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Sample records for reticular calcium release

  1. Oxidative calcium release from catechol.

    PubMed

    Riley, Patrick A; Stratford, Michael R L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of 4-methylcatechol previously exposed to aqueous calcium chloride was shown by ion chromatography to be associated with release of calcium ions. The catechol was oxidised to the corresponding orthoquinone by the use of tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus. The oxidative release of calcium from the catechol is ascribed to the diminution of the available hydroxyl functions able to act as chelating groups. Our results suggest that the redox status of melanin may regulate calcium binding and influence calcium levels in pigmented cells.

  2. Contrary roles of kainate receptors in transmitter release at corticothalamic synapses onto thalamic relay and reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Mariko; Imoto, Keiji

    2009-03-01

    Corticothalamic fibres, which originate from layer VI pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex, provide excitatory synaptic inputs to both thalamic relay neurons and reticular neurons; reticular neurons in turn supply inhibitory inputs to thalamic relay neurons. Pyramidal cells in layer VI in the mouse somatosensory cortex highly express mRNA encoding kainate receptors, which facilitate or depress transmitter release at several synapses in the central nervous system. We report here that contrary modulation of transmitter release from corticothalamic fibres onto thalamic relay and reticular neurons is mediated by activation of kainate receptors in mouse thalamic ventrobasal complex and thalamic reticular nucleus. Exogenous kainate presynaptically depresses the synaptic transmission at corticothalamic synapses onto thalamic relay neurons, but facilitates it at corticothalamic synapses onto reticular neurons. Meanwhile, the lemniscal synaptic transmission, which sends primary somatosensory inputs to relay neurons, is not affected by kainate. In addition, GluR5-containing kainate receptors are involved in the depression of corticothalamic synaptic transmission onto relay neurons, but not onto reticular neurons. Furthermore, synaptically activated kainate receptors mimic these effects; high-frequency stimulation of corticothalamic fibres depresses synaptic transmission onto relay neurons, but facilitates it onto reticular neurons. Our results suggest that the opposite sensitivity of kainate receptors at the two corticothalamic synapses is governed by cortical activity and regulates the balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to thalamic relay neurons and therefore their excitability.

  3. Hypocretin (orexin) receptor subtypes differentially enhance acetylcholine release and activate g protein subtypes in rat pontine reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, René; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2006-04-01

    The hypothalamic peptides hypocretin-1 (orexin A) and -2 (orexin B) promote wakefulness by mechanisms that are not well understood. Defects in hypocretinergic neurotransmission underlie the human sleep disorder narcolepsy. Hypocretins alter cell excitability via two receptor subtypes, hypocretin receptor subtype 1 (hcrt-r1) and hypocretin receptor subtype 2 (hcrt-r2). This study aimed to identify G protein subtypes activated by hypocretin in rat pontine reticular nucleus oral part (PnO) and the hypocretin receptor subtype modulating acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO. G protein activation was quantified using in vitro [(35)S]guanylyl-5'-O-(gamma-thio)triphosphate autoradiography. ACh release was measured using in vivo microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography. Hypocretin-1-stimulated G protein activation was significantly decreased by pertussis toxin, demonstrating that some hypocretin receptors in rat PnO activate inhibitory G proteins. Hypocretin-1-stimulated ACh release was not blocked by pertussis toxin, supporting the conclusion that the hypocretin receptors modulating ACh release in rat PnO activate stimulatory G proteins. Hypocretin-1 and -2 each caused a concentration-dependent increase in ACh release with similar potencies, indicating that hcrt-r2 modulates ACh release in PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significantly greater increase in ACh release than hypocretin-2, suggesting a role for hcrt-r1 in the modulation of PnO ACh release. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that hypocretin receptors in rat PnO signal via inhibitory and stimulatory G proteins and that ACh release in rat PnO is modulated by hcrt-r2 and hcrt-r1. One mechanism by which hypocretin promotes arousal may be to increase ACh release in the pontine reticular formation.

  4. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions.

  5. Bypassing the rumen in dairy ewes: the reticular groove reflex vs. calcium soap of olive fatty acids.

    PubMed

    García, C Dobarganes; Hernández, M Pérez; Cantalapiedra, G; Salas, J M; Merino, J A

    2005-02-01

    A 3 x 3 Latin Square experiment was designed to compare 2 ways of bypassing the effects of the rumen with olive oil fatty acids in 'Manchega' dairy ewes. Treatments were a control diet, CaOFA (control diet plus 45 g of olive fatty acids as calcium soap), and OO (control plus 45 g/d of olive fatty acids as olive oil emulsified in skim milk) and bottle-fed to animals trained to maintain the reticular groove reflex). No differences were found in milk, protein, and lactose yields, but fat yield and milk fat content were greater in treatments with added fat (CaOFA and OO). Content of short- and medium-chain fatty acids in milk fat was greater for control treatment than for the other 2 groups, the yield of these fatty acids being similar for all 3 diets, except that of C12:0, which was greater for the control treatment. Content and yield of C18:0 and isomers of C18:1 others than oleic acid were greater in milk from the CaOFA diet than from the other 2 diets. Oleic acid content and yield were greater in milk after OO treatment (23.9% and 16.8 g/d, respectively), intermediate after CaOFA treatment (19.2% and 13.8 g/d, respectively), and lower after control diet (10.7% and 6.52 g/d, respectively). Linoleic acid yield and content were greater in ewes fed the OO diet than in those on the other 2 diets, both of which showed similar data. All these changes indicated that the "protected" olive fatty acids (as calcium soap) were severely affected by the rumen environment and that the use of the reticular groove reflex seems to be a more effective way of bypassing the rumen in adult lactating dairy ewes.

  6. [Changes induced by hypertonic solutions in the transportation of calcium by the cardiac reticular sarcoplasma].

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Holguín, J A

    1979-01-01

    In the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocardium, celular organell which function is to regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium in contraction and relaxation, we have studied the effect of hypertonic solutions of sucrose between 1 and 6.96 times the normal tonicity in order to observe the behavior of the internal linked or free calcium of this structure, as well as to prove the hypothesis that hypertonic solutions encourage the calcium exit of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum with the resulting signs of contractures. The following results were obtained: 1. The ATP hydrolisis and calcium transport rate are 14% and 90% respectively of the maximum speeds of 10(-5) M in calcium, while for concentrations of 10(-7) M or ess of the said cation, the transport rates and the ATPase do not reach 5% of the maximum values. 2. Between 1 and 2.54 times of the normal tonicity the calcium uptake remains between 400 and 500 nmoles of calcium/mg protein/min, the transported amount of calcium varies between 14 and 16 nmoles/mg protein and the rate of the ATP hydrolysis increases a 37% to 0.4 M in sucrose. 3. Between 0.4 and 1.2 M in sucrose of 2.54 to 6.96 times the isotonicity, the calcium transport rate velocity as well as the ATP hydrolisis are strongly inhibited. The vesicles volume minimizes and the amount of linked calcium remains within the control values, proving that the capacity of linking this cathion is independent from sarcoplasmic reticulum volume. These results show that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is involved in the contractures induced by hypertonic solutions in intact cells, since the osmolarity increase produces changes of volume which results in a decrease of the calcium transportation velocity or in an increase of the exit of said cathion.

  7. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  8. Dynamics of Intrinsic Dendritic Calcium Signaling during Tonic Firing of Thalamic Reticular Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chausson, Patrick; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C.

    2013-01-01

    The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca2+ channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca2+ responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca2+ accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca2+ influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca2+ channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca2+ influx suggesting that this Ca2+ influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels’ availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca2+ dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications. PMID:23991078

  9. Modulation of GABA release from the thalamic reticular nucleus by cocaine and caffeine: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Gingrich, Jay A; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin receptors are targets of drug therapies for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Cocaine inhibits the re-uptake of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and noradrenaline, whereas caffeine blocks adenosine receptors and opens ryanodine receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum. We studied how 5-HT and adenosine affected spontaneous GABAergic transmission from thalamic reticular nucleus. We combined whole-cell patch clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in ventrobasal thalamic neurons during local (puff) application of 5-HT in wild type (WT) or knockout mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A -/-). Inhibition of mIPSCs frequency by low (10 μM) and high (100 μM) 5-HT concentrations was observed in ventrobasal neurons from 5-HT2A -/- mice. In WT mice, only 100 μM 5-HT significantly reduced mIPSCs frequency. In 5-HT2A -/- mice, NAN-190, a specific 5-HT1A antagonist, prevented the 100 μM 5-HT inhibition while blocking H-currents that prolonged inhibition during post-puff periods. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM 5-HT were enhanced in cocaine binge-treated 5-HT2A -/- mice. Caffeine binge treatment did not affect 5-HT-mediated inhibition. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are present in pre-synaptic thalamic reticular nucleus terminals. Serotonergic-mediated inhibition of GABA release could underlie aberrant thalamocortical physiology described after repetitive consumption of cocaine. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A , 5-HT2A and A1 receptors are present in pre-synaptic TRN terminals. 5-HT1A and A1 receptors would down-regulate adenylate cyclase, whereas 5-HT1A would also increase the probability of the opening of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK). Sustained opening of GIRK channels would hyperpolarize pre-synaptic terminals activating H-currents, resulting in less GABA release. 5-HT2A -would activate PLC and IP3 , increasing intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and

  10. Calcium-induced calcium release in crayfish skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Györke, S; Palade, P

    1992-01-01

    1. Cut crayfish skeletal muscle fibres were mounted in a triple Vaseline-gap voltage clamp with the Ca(2+)-sensing dye Rhod-2 allowed to diffuse in via the cut ends. Ca2+ currents across the surface/T-tubule membranes (ICa) were recorded simultaneously with changes in myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ transients). 2. Excitation-contraction coupling in crayfish skeletal muscle fibres is abolished when calcium in the extracellular solution is replaced by Mg2+. 3. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transients elicited by voltage clamp pulses closely followed the amplitude of the peak calcium currents recorded simultaneously across the surface/T-tubule membranes. This included decreases in both parameters as the pulse potential approached ECa (reversal potential for Ca2+), as well as secondary Ca2+ transients accompanying large tail calcium currents occurring upon repolarization from very large depolarizations. 4. A large contribution of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release to the Ca2+ transients was revealed by a large decrease in the transient caused by the calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) blockers procaine and tetracaine. 5. Short pulses which interrupted the calcium current while SR Ca2+ release was in progress at high rates caused the Ca2+ transient to stop rising nearly immediately after the end of the pulse in most fibres. In about 15% of the fibres the Ca2+ transients continued to rise, albeit at a slower rate, for 10-20 ms after the end of the pulse, as if released Ca2+ was able to elicit some further Ca2+ release from the SR for a while. 6. Even with fibres displaying little sign of continued release after termination of short pulses under control conditions, procaine accelerated the decay of Ca2+ transients elicited by short pulses, indicating that continued release was taking place even as the transient was declining. 7. These results suggest that CICR in crayfish fibres is more closely controlled by a small entry of Ca2+ via surface/T-tubule membrane Ca

  11. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium transients and the range of propagation velocities observed experimentally (0.05-15 mm s(-1)) could be predicted. Calcium fluctuations propagate by virtue of focal calcium release from the SR, diffusion through the cytosol (which is modulated by binding to troponin and calmodulin and sequestration by the SR), and subsequently induce calcium release from adjacent release sites of the SR. The minimal and maximal velocities derived from the simulation were 0.09 and 15 mm s(-1) respectively. The method of solution involved writing the diffusion equation as a difference equation in the spatial coordinates. Thus, coupled ordinary differential equations in time with banded coefficients were generated. The coupled equations were solved using Gear's sixth order predictor-corrector algorithm for stiff equations with reflective boundaries. The most important determinants of the velocity of propagation of the calcium waves were the diastolic [Ca++]i, the rate of rise of the release, and the amount of calcium released from the SR. The results are consistent with the assumptions that calcium loading causes an increase in intracellular calcium and calcium in the SR, and an increase in the amount and rate of calcium released. These two effects combine to increase the propagation velocity at higher levels of calcium loading. PMID:2738577

  12. Acetylcholine release in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse is modulated by non-M1 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C G; Lydic, R; Baghdoyan, H A

    2004-01-01

    Pontine acetylcholine (ACh) contributes to the regulation of electroencephalographic and behavioral arousal in all mammals so far investigated. The mouse is recognized as a powerful model for pharmacogenomics but the synaptic mechanisms regulating ACh release in mouse pontine reticular formation have not been characterized. Drug delivery by microdialysis was used in isoflurane-anesthetized C57BL/6J (B6) mice (n=33) to test the hypothesis that muscarinic autoreceptors modulate ACh release in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO). Dialysis delivery of tetrodotoxin to the PnO significantly decreased ACh by 58% below control levels, confirming that measured ACh reflected neurotransmitter release. The muscarinic antagonist scopolamine increased ACh release in the PnO by 21% (3 nM), 48% (10 nM), 56% (30 nM), and 104% (100 nM). The muscarinic agonist bethanechol dialyzed into the PnO significantly decreased ACh release by 60% compared with control. Dialysis delivery of relatively subtype selective muscarinic antagonists to the PnO revealed the following order of potency for increasing ACh release: scopolamine (3 nM)>AF-DX 116 (100 nM)=pirenzepine (100 nM). These data support the conclusion that ACh release in PnO of B6 mouse is modulated by non-M1 muscarinic receptors.

  13. Calcium Control of Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Upon entering a presynaptic terminal, an action potential opens Ca2+ channels, and transiently increases the local Ca2+ concentration at the presynaptic active zone. Ca2+ then triggers neurotransmitter release within a few hundred microseconds by activating synaptotagmins Ca2+. Synaptotagmins bind Ca2+ via two C2-domains, and transduce the Ca2+ signal into a nanomechanical activation of the membrane fusion machinery; this activation is mediated by the Ca2+-dependent interaction of the synaptotagmin C2-domains with phospholipids and SNARE proteins. In triggering exocytosis, synaptotagmins do not act alone, but require an obligatory cofactor called complexin, a small protein that binds to SNARE complexes and simultaneously activates and clamps the SNARE complexes, thereby positioning the SNARE complexes for subsequent synaptotagmin action. The conserved function of synaptotagmins and complexins operates generally in most, if not all, Ca2+-regulated forms of exocytosis throughout the body in addition to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, including in the degranulation of mast cells, acrosome exocytosis in sperm cells, hormone secretion from endocrine cells, and neuropeptide release. PMID:22068972

  14. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  15. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  16. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  17. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  18. Suppression of calcium release by calcium or procaine in voltage clamped rat skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    García, J; Schneider, M F

    1995-01-01

    1. Calcium transients were measured in fast-twitch rat skeletal muscle fibres stretched to 3.7-4.0 microns per sarcomere, and voltage clamped at a holding potential of -80 mV using the double-seal Vaseline gap technique. Resting calcium was monitored with fura-2 and the calcium transients were measured with antipyrylazo III. The rate of release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transient records. The temperature was 14-17 degrees C. 2. The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of release was studied with a two-pulse protocol in which 200 ms prepulses of different amplitudes elevated the internal calcium concentration to various levels. The inactivation of release was then measured in the test pulse that followed the prepulses. The calcium concentration at which the inactivation of release are half-maximal was approximately 0.22 microM, the average number of bound calcium ions needed to cause inactivation was about three per release channel and the amount of release that could be inactivated was, on average, 2.48 times the steady level of release during the test pulses. 3. Procaine (0.3mM) reversibly decreased the amplitude and the rate of rise of the calcium transient. Both the peak and the steady level of release were decreased by about 50%. The shape of the release waveform was not modified. PMID:7666366

  19. Ion release from calcium and fluoride containing dental varnishes.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, N J; Shen, P; Yuan, Y; Reynolds, E C

    2014-03-01

    A range of dental varnishes have been commercialized recently that contain calcium and inorganic phosphate in addition to fluoride. The aim of this study was to analyse the fluoride, calcium and inorganic phosphate ion release from: (1) MI Varnish containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP); (2) Clinpro White containing functionalized tricalcium phosphate (fTCP); (3) Enamel Pro containing amorphous calcium phosphate; (4) Bifluorid 5 containing calcium fluoride; and (5) Duraphat (no added calcium control). The varnishes were applied to a standardized surface area of polyvinyl chloride (n = 7 per group) and immersed in 25 g of distilled deionized water which was changed at 1, 4, 24, 72 and 168 hours. The ion release was determined by ion chromatography and expressed as μmol (cumulative) per gram of varnish. All varnishes released measurable fluoride and calcium, however only MI Varnish and Enamel Pro released significant levels of inorganic phosphate. At 24 hours the order of cumulative fluoride release was: 1>3>4>2=5 with 1 significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the rest. At 72 and 168 hours, the cumulative calcium release was: 1>4>3>2=5 with 1 significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the rest. MI Varnish containing CPP-ACP had the highest release of calcium and fluoride ions. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Intracellular Calcium Release at Fertilization in the Sea Urchin Egg

    PubMed Central

    Steinhardt, R.; Zucker, R.; Schattenand, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization or ionophore activation of Lytechinus pictus eggs can be monitored after injection with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein aequorin to estimate calcium release during activation. We estimate the peak calcium transient to reach concentrations of 2.5–4.5 μM free calcium 45–60 sec after activation and to last 2–3 min, assuming equal Ca2+ release throughout the cytoplasm. Calcium is released from an intracellular store, since similar responses are obtained during fertilization at a wide range of external calcium concentrations or in zero-calcium seawater in ionophore activations. In another effort to estimate free calcium at fertilization, we isolated egg cortices, added back calcium quantitatively, and fixed for observation with a scanning electron microscope. In this way, we determined that the threshold for discharge of the cortical granules is between 9 and 18 μM Ca2+. Therefore, the threshold for the in vitro cortical reaction is about five times the amount of free calcium, assuming equal distribution in the egg. This result suggests that transient calcium release is confined to the inner subsurface of the egg. PMID:326602

  1. Hydrolytic conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate into apatite accompanied by sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Chen, Siqian; Tian, Feng; Wang, Lizhen; Feng, Qingling; Fan, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the calcium and orthophosphate ions release during the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to hydroxyapatite (HA) in aqueous solution. The ACP is prepared by a wet chemical method and further immersed in the distilled water for various time points till 14d. The release of calcium and orthophosphate ions is measured with calcium and phosphate colorimetric assay kits, respectively. The transition of ACP towards HA is detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results indicate that the morphological conversion of ACP to HA occurs within the first 9h, whereas the calcium and orthophosphate ions releases last for over 7d. Such sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release is very useful for ACP as a candidate material for hard tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimal model for calcium alternans due to SR release refractoriness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantalapiedra, Inma R.; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Peñaranda, Angelina; Echebarria, Blas

    2017-09-01

    In the heart, rapid pacing rates may induce alternations in the strength of cardiac contraction, termed pulsus alternans. Often, this is due to an instability in the dynamics of the intracellular calcium concentration, whose transients become larger and smaller at consecutive beats. This alternation has been linked experimentally and theoretically to two different mechanisms: an instability due to (1) a strong dependence of calcium release on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) load, together with a slow calcium reuptake into the SR or (2) to SR release refractoriness, due to a slow recovery of the ryanodine receptors (RyR2) from inactivation. The relationship between calcium alternans and refractoriness of the RyR2 has been more elusive than the corresponding SR Ca load mechanism. To study the former, we reduce a general calcium model, which mimics the deterministic evolution of a calcium release unit, to its most basic elements. We show that calcium alternans can be understood using a simple nonlinear equation for calcium concentration at the dyadic space, coupled to a relaxation equation for the number of recovered RyR2s. Depending on the number of RyR2s that are recovered at the beginning of a stimulation, the increase in calcium concentration may pass, or not, over an excitability threshold that limits the occurrence of a large calcium transient. When the recovery of the RyR2 is slow, this produces naturally a period doubling bifurcation, resulting in calcium alternans. We then study the effects of inactivation, calcium diffusion, and release conductance for the onset of alternans. We find that the development of alternans requires a well-defined value of diffusion while it is less sensitive to the values of inactivation or release conductance.

  3. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Michael E.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. PMID:26510758

  4. Ion release and mechanical properties of calcium silicate and calcium hydroxide materials used for pulp capping.

    PubMed

    Natale, L C; Rodrigues, M C; Xavier, T A; Simões, A; de Souza, D N; Braga, R R

    2015-01-01

    To compare the ion release and mechanical properties of a calcium hydroxide (Dycal) and two calcium silicate (MTA Angelus and Biodentine) cements. Calcium and hydroxyl ion release in water from 24-h set cements were calculated from titration with HCl (n = 3). Calcium release after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days at pH 5.5 and 7.0 was measured using ICP-OES (n = 6). Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (E) were tested after 48-h storage, and compressive strength (CS) was tested after 48 h and 7 days (n = 10). Ion release and mechanical data were subjected to anova/Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α = 0.05). Titration curves revealed that Dycal released significantly fewer ions in solution than calcium silicates (P < 0.001). Calcium release remained constant at pH 7.0, whilst at pH 5.5, it dropped significantly by 24% after 21 days (P < 0.05). At pH 5.5, MTA Angelus released significantly more calcium than Dycal (P < 0.01), whilst Biodentine had superior ion release than Dycal at pH 7.0 (P < 0.01). Biodentine had superior flexural strength, flexural modulus and compressive strength than the other cements, whilst MTA Angelus had higher modulus than Dycal (P < 0.001). Immediate calcium and hydroxyl ion release in solution was significantly lower for Dycal. In general, all materials released constant calcium levels over 28 days, but release from Dycal was significantly lower than Biodentine and MTA Angelus depending on pH conditions. Biodentine had substantially higher strength and modulus than MTA Angelus and Dycal, both of which demonstrated low stress-bearing capabilities. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Numerical methods to determine calcium release flux from calcium transients in muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Timmer, J; Müller, T; Melzer, W

    1998-01-01

    Several methods are currently in use to estimate the rate of depolarization-induced calcium release in muscle cells from measured calcium transients. One approach first characterizes calcium removal of the cell. This is done by determining parameters of a reaction scheme from a fit to the decay of elevated calcium after the depolarizing stimulus. In a second step, the release rate during depolarization is estimated based on the fitted model. Using simulated calcium transients with known underlying release rates, we tested the fidelity of this analysis in determining the time course of calcium release under different conditions. The analysis reproduced in a satisfactory way the characteristics of the input release rate, even when the assumption that release had ended before the start of the fitting interval was severely violated. Equally good reconstructions of the release rate time course could be obtained when the model used for the analysis differed in structure from the one used for simulating the data. We tested the application of a new strategy (multiple shooting) for fitting parameters in nonlinear differential equation systems. This procedure rendered the analysis less sensitive to ill-chosen initial guesses of the parameters and to noise. A locally adaptive kernel estimator for calculating numerical derivatives allowed good reconstructions of the original release rate time course from noisy calcium transients when other methods failed. PMID:9545033

  6. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  7. Calcium-induced calcium release and gap junctions mediate large-scale calcium waves in olfactory ensheathing cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Stavermann, Maren; Meuth, Patrick; Doengi, Michael; Thyssen, Anne; Deitmer, Joachim W; Lohr, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a specialised type of glial cells, supporting axon growth and guidance during development and regeneration of the olfactory nerve and the nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. We measured calcium signalling in OECs in olfactory bulb in-toto preparations using confocal and epifluorescence microscopy and the calcium indicator Fluo-4. We identified two subpopulations of olfactory bulb OECs: OECs in the outer sublamina of the nerve layer responded to purinergic neurotransmitters such as adenosine triphosphate with calcium transients, while OECs in the inner sublamina of the nerve layer did not respond to neurotransmitters. However, the latter generated spontaneous calcium waves that covered hundreds of cells. These calcium waves persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin and in calcium-free saline, but were abolished after calcium store depletion with cyclopiazonic acid or inositol trisphosphate receptor blockage with 2-APB. Calcium waves could be triggered by laser photolysis of caged inositol trisphosphate. Blocking purinoceptors with PPADS had no effect on calcium wave propagation, whereas blocking gap junctions with carbenoxolone or meclofenamic acid entirely suppressed calcium waves. Increasing calcium buffer capacity in OECs with NP-EGTA ("caged" Ca(2+)) prevented calcium wave generation, and laser photolysis of NP-EGTA in a small group of OECs resulted in a calcium increase in the irradiated cells followed by a calcium wave. We conclude that calcium waves in OECs can be initiated by calcium-induced calcium release via InsP3 receptors and propagate through gap junctions, while purinergic signalling is not involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium and phosphate release from resin-based materials containing different calcium orthophosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcela C; Natale, Livia C; Arana-Chaves, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2015-11-01

    The study compared ion release from resin-based materials containing calcium orthophosphates. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and surface area (nitrogen adsorption isotherms, BET method). Nanoparticles were added to a dimethacrylate-based resin and materials were tested for degree of conversion (DC) and calcium/phosphate release up to 28 days under pH 5.5 and 7.0. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 0.05).The crystallinity of DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP were confirmed, as well as the ACP amorphous nature. DCPD and β-TCP presented larger agglomerates than DCPA and ACP. The surface area of ACP was 5-11 times higher than those of the other nanoparticles. Materials showed similar DC. The material containing ACP released significantly more ions than the others, which released similar amounts of calcium and, in most cases, phosphate. Ion release was not affected by pH. Calcium release decreased between 7 and 21 days, while phosphate levels remained constant after 14 days. In conclusion, ACP higher ion release can be ascribed to its high surface area. DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP had similar performances as ion-releasing fillers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  10. Calcium-Induced Calcium Release during Action Potential Firing in Developing Inner Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  11. Detection of calcium release via ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Eu, Jerry P; Meissner, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor ion channels (RyRs) release Ca(2+) from the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum in a variety of nonvertebrate and vertebrate species including flies, crustaceans, birds, fish, and amphibians. They are most abundant in skeletal and cardiac muscle, where in response to an action potential, the release of Ca(2+) ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the RyRs into the cytoplasm leads to muscle contraction (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling). Here, we describe how to determine their cellular location using isoform-specific antibodies, their protein levels using an in vitro ((3)H)ryanodine-binding assay, and their cellular release of Ca(2+) using RyR-specific channel agonists and inhibitors.

  12. Release of calcium from endolysosomes increases calcium influx through N-type calcium channels: Evidence for acidic store-operated calcium entry in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Geiger, Nicholas H; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Churchill, Grant C; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    Neurons possess an elaborate system of endolysosomes. Recently, endolysosomes were found to have readily releasable stores of intracellular calcium; however, relatively little is known about how such 'acidic calcium stores' affect calcium signaling in neurons. Here we demonstrated in primary cultured neurons that calcium released from acidic calcium stores triggered calcium influx across the plasma membrane, a phenomenon we have termed "acidic store-operated calcium entry (aSOCE)". aSOCE was functionally distinct from store-operated calcium release and calcium entry involving endoplasmic reticulum. aSOCE appeared to be governed by N-type calcium channels (NTCCs) because aSOCE was attenuated significantly by selectively blocking NTCCs or by siRNA knockdown of NTCCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NTCCs co-immunoprecipitated with the lysosome associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and that aSOCE is accompanied by increased cell-surface expression levels of NTCC and LAMP1 proteins. Moreover, we demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of LAMP1 or Rab27a, both of which are key proteins involved in lysosome exocytosis, attenuated significantly aSOCE. Taken together our data suggest that aSOCE occurs in neurons, that aSOCE plays an important role in regulating the levels and actions of intraneuronal calcium, and that aSOCE is regulated at least in part by exocytotic insertion of N-type calcium channels into plasma membranes through LAMP1-dependent lysosome exocytosis.

  13. Decreased expression of ryanodine receptors alters calcium-induced calcium release mechanism in mdx duodenal myocytes.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Rakotoarisoa, Lala; Jeyakumar, Loice H; Fleischer, Sidney; Mironneau, Chantal; Mironneau, Jean

    2004-05-14

    It is generally believed that alterations of calcium homeostasis play a key role in skeletal muscle atrophy and degeneration observed in Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and mdx mice. Mechanical activity is also impaired in gastrointestinal muscles, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of this pathological state have not yet been investigated. We showed, in mdx duodenal myocytes, that both caffeine- and depolarization-induced calcium responses were inhibited, whereas acetylcholine- and thapsigargin-induced calcium responses were not significantly affected compared with control mice. Calcium-induced calcium release efficiency was impaired in mdx duodenal myocytes depending only on inhibition of ryanodine receptor expression. Duodenal myocytes expressed both type 2 and type 3 ryanodine receptors and were unable to produce calcium sparks. In control and mdx duodenal myocytes, both caffeine- and depolarization-induced calcium responses were dose-dependently and specifically inhibited with the anti-type 2 ryanodine receptor antibody. A strong inhibition of type 2 ryanodine receptor in mdx duodenal myocytes was observed on the mRNA as well as on the protein level. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of type 2 ryanodine receptor expression in mdx duodenal myocytes may account for the decreased calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and reduced mechanical activity.

  14. Ricardo Miledi and the calcium hypothesis of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jade-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Ricardo Miledi has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of how synapses work. Here I discuss aspects of Miledi's research that helped to establish the requirement of presynaptic calcium for neurotransmitter release, from his earliest scientific studies to his classic experiments in the squid giant synapse.

  15. Sulfhydryl oxidation overrides Mg(2+) inhibition of calcium-induced calcium release in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, P; Aracena, P; Hidalgo, C

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of oxidation of sulfhydryl (SH) residues on the inhibition by Mg(2+) of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in triad-enriched sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle. Vesicles were either passively or actively loaded with calcium before eliciting CICR by dilution at pCa 4.6-4.4 in the presence of 1.2 mM free [ATP] and variable free [Mg(2+)]. Native triads exhibited a significant inhibition of CICR by Mg(2+), with a K(0.5) approximately 50 microM. Partial oxidation of vesicles with thimerosal produced a significant increase of release rate constants and initial release rates at all [Mg(2+)] tested (up to 1 mM), and shifted the K(0.5) value for Mg(2+) inhibition to 101 or 137 microM in triads actively or passively loaded with calcium, respectively. Further oxidation of vesicles with thimerosal completely suppressed the inhibitory effect of [Mg(2+)] on CICR, yielding initial rates of CICR of 2 micromol/(mg x s) in the presence of 1 mM free [Mg(2+)]. These effects of oxidation on CICR were fully reversed by SH reducing agents. We propose that oxidation of calcium release channels, by decreasing markedly the affinity of the channel inhibitory site for Mg(2+), makes CICR possible in skeletal muscle. PMID:10866954

  16. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  17. Inositol trisphosphate stimulates calcium release from peeled skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, S K; Goldberg, N D; Walseth, T F; Huetteman, D A

    1987-01-19

    The effects of inositol phosphates (tris (InsP3), bis (InsP2), mono (InsP)) on rabbit adductor magnus and soleus muscles were determined using mechanically peeled fibers (sarcolemma removed). Isometric force generation of each fiber was continuously monitored and was used along with 45Ca to detect calcium release from internal fiber stores. All experiments were conducted at a physiological Mg2+ concentration (10(-3) M) of the bathing solutions. The inositol phosphates did not directly activate the contractile apparatus. At bath concentrations of 100-300 microM, only InsP3 was capable of stimulating Ca2+ release. In contrast, 1 microM InsP3 maximally and selectively stimulated Ca2+ release when microinjected into the myofilament lattice. Calcium releasing effects of InsP2 and InsP were manifested at 10 microM when they were microinjected. The end-to-end internal Ca2+ release and subsequent fiber force generation stimulated by the locally applied microinjected InsP3 suggests that the InsP3-induced Ca2+ release mechanism may involve propagation, but not via the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, since procaine did not inhibit this response. These findings support the possibility that InsP3 plays a role in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling.

  18. Calcium transients and calcium release in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J; Schneider, M F

    1993-01-01

    occupancy of slowly equilibrating myoplasmic calcium binding sites by released calcium. 5. The fast phase of decay of the signals obtained with AP III was well fitted with a model of the system for removing calcium from the myofilament space. 6. The rate of calcium release (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated once the removal system was characterized in the same fibre.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8246202

  19. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  20. Rechargeable calcium phosphate orthodontic cement with sustained ion release and re-release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-11-01

    White spot lesions (WSL) due to enamel demineralization are major complications for orthodontic treatments. Calcium phosphate (CaP) dental resins with Ca and P ion releases are promising for remineralization. However, previous Ca and P releases lasted for only weeks. Experimental orthodontic cements were developed using pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) at mass ratio of 1:1 (PE); and PE plus 10% of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 5% of bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) (PEHB). Particles of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were incorporated into PE and PEHB at 40% filler level. Specimens were tested for bracket-enamel shear bond strength, water sorption, CaP release, and ion recharge and re-release. PEHB+40ACP had higher bracket-enamel bond strength and ion release and rechargeability than PE+40ACP. ACP incorporation into the novel orthodontic cement did not adversely affect the bracket-enamel bond strength. Ion release and re-release from the novel ACP orthodontic cement indicated favorable release and re-release patterns. The recharged orthodontic cement could release CaP ions continuously for four weeks without further recharge. Novel rechargeable orthodontic cement containing ACP was developed with a high bracket-enamel bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly recharged to maintain long-term high levels of CaP ion releases.

  1. Rechargeable calcium phosphate orthodontic cement with sustained ion release and re-release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-01-01

    White spot lesions (WSL) due to enamel demineralization are major complications for orthodontic treatments. Calcium phosphate (CaP) dental resins with Ca and P ion releases are promising for remineralization. However, previous Ca and P releases lasted for only weeks. Experimental orthodontic cements were developed using pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) at mass ratio of 1:1 (PE); and PE plus 10% of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 5% of bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) (PEHB). Particles of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were incorporated into PE and PEHB at 40% filler level. Specimens were tested for bracket-enamel shear bond strength, water sorption, CaP release, and ion recharge and re-release. PEHB+40ACP had higher bracket-enamel bond strength and ion release and rechargeability than PE+40ACP. ACP incorporation into the novel orthodontic cement did not adversely affect the bracket-enamel bond strength. Ion release and re-release from the novel ACP orthodontic cement indicated favorable release and re-release patterns. The recharged orthodontic cement could release CaP ions continuously for four weeks without further recharge. Novel rechargeable orthodontic cement containing ACP was developed with a high bracket-enamel bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly recharged to maintain long-term high levels of CaP ion releases. PMID:27808251

  2. Roscovitine increases intracellular calcium release and capacitative calcium entry in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ho Sook; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2010-01-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), which is activated by the non-cyclin regulator p35 or p39, is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that is implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we studied calcium signaling using the fluorescent cytosolic calcium indicator, Fura-4, in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells treated with roscovitine, a Cdk5 inhibitor. As compared to the control cells, the roscovitine-treated cells significantly potentiated intracellular calcium release by membrane depolarization (high K(+)) or through thapsigargin. In addition, roscovitine increased the magnitude of capacitative calcium entry (CCE), i.e., a calcium influx mechanism triggered by the depletion of intracellular calcium stores. Notably, roscovitine markedly slowed the rate of Ca(2+) removal from the plasma membrane. These results suggest that Cdk5 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and that the dysregulation of Cdk5 may contribute to disease pathogenesis by perturbing cellular Ca(2+) signaling. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, S; Lai, F A

    2006-11-01

    The RyR (ryanodine receptor)/calcium release channel contains a number of highly reactive thiol groups that endow it with redox sensitivity. In general, oxidizing conditions favour channel opening, while reducing conditions have the opposite effect. Thiol modification affects the channel sensitivity to its principal effectors, Ca2+, Mg2+ and ATP, and alters RyR protein interactions. Here, we give a brief account of the major findings and prevailing views in the field.

  4. Drug Release from Calcium Sulfate-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Hilt, J. Zach; Puleo, David A.

    2015-01-01

    To help reduce the need for autografts, calcium sulfate-based bone graft substitutes are being developed to provide a stable platform to aid augmentation while having the ability to release a broad range of bioactive agents. Calcium sulfate (CS) has an excellent reputation as a biocompatible and osteoconductive substance, but addition of bioactive agents may further enhance these properties. Samples were produced with either directly loaded small, hydrophobic molecule (i.e., simvastatin), directly loaded hydrophilic protein (i.e., lysozyme), or 1 and 10 wt% of H6 poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) particles containing protein. Whereas sustained release of directly loaded simvastatin was achieved, direct loading of small amounts of lysozyme resulted in highly variable release. Direct loading of a larger amount of protein generated a large burst, 65% of total loading, followed by sustained release of protein. Release of lysozyme from 1 wt% PBAE particles embedded into CS was more controllable than when directly loaded, and for 10 wt% of protein-loaded PBAE particles, a higher burst was followed by sustained release, comparable to the results for the high direct loading. Compression testing determined that incorporation of directly loaded drug or drug-loaded PBAE particles weakened CS. In particular, PBAE particles had a significant effect on the strength of the composites, with a 25% and 80% decrease in strength for 1 wt% and 10 wt% particle loadings, respectively. CS-based composites demonstrated the ability to sustainably release both macromolecules and small molecules, supporting the potential for these materials to release a range of therapeutic agents. PMID:24788686

  5. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies.

  6. Drug release from calcium sulfate-based composites.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Bryan R; Hilt, J Zach; Puleo, David A

    2015-01-01

    To help reduce the need for autografts, calcium sulfate (CS)-based bone graft substitutes are being developed to provide a stable platform to aid augmentation while having the ability to release a broad range of bioactive agents. CS has an excellent reputation as a biocompatible and osteoconductive substance, but addition of bioactive agents may further enhance these properties. Samples were produced with either directly loaded small, hydrophobic molecule (i.e., simvastatin), directly loaded hydrophilic protein (i.e., lysozyme), or 1 and 10 wt % of fast-degrading poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) particles containing protein. Although sustained release of directly loaded simvastatin was achieved, direct loading of small amounts of lysozyme resulted in highly variable release. Direct loading of a larger amount of protein generated a large burst, 65% of total loading, followed by sustained release of protein. Release of lysozyme from 1 wt % of PBAE particles embedded into CS was more controllable than when directly loaded, and for 10 wt % of protein-loaded PBAE particles, a higher burst was followed by sustained release, comparable to the results for the high direct loading. Compression testing determined that incorporation of directly loaded drug or drug-loaded PBAE particles weakened CS. In particular, PBAE particles had a significant effect on the strength of the composites, with a 25 and 80% decrease in strength for 1 and 10 wt % particle loadings, respectively. CS-based composites demonstrated the ability to sustainably release both macromolecules and small molecules, supporting the potential for these materials to release a range of therapeutic agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sodium-Calcium Exchange Is Essential for Effective Triggering of Calcium Release in Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Neco, Patricia; Rose, Beth; Huynh, Nhi; Zhang, Rui; Bridge, John H.B.; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2010-01-01

    In cardiac myocytes, excitation-contraction coupling depends upon sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ release triggered by Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels. Although Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX) is essential for Ca2+ extrusion, its participation in the trigger process of excitation-contraction coupling is controversial. To investigate the role of NCX in triggering, we examined Ca2+ sparks in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific NCX knockout (KO) mice. Myocytes from young NCX KO mice are known to exhibit normal resting cytosolic Ca2+ and normal Ca2+ transients despite reduced L-type Ca2+ current. We loaded myocytes with fluo-3 to image Ca2+ sparks using confocal microscopy in line-scan mode. The frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks was reduced in KO myocytes compared with WT. However, spark amplitude and width were increased in KO mice. Permeabilizing the myocytes with saponin eliminated differences between spontaneous sparks in WT and KO mice. These results suggest that sarcolemmal processes are responsible for the reduced spark frequency and increased spark width and amplitude in KO mice. When myocytes were loaded with 1 mM fluo-3 and 3 mM EGTA via the patch pipette to buffer diadic cleft Ca2+, the number of sparks triggered by action potentials was reduced by 60% in KO cells compared to WT cells, despite similar SR Ca2+ content in both cell types. When EGTA was omitted from the pipette solution, the number of sparks triggered in KO and WT myocytes was similar. Although the number of sparks was restored in KO cells, Ca2+ release was asynchronous. These results suggest that high subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is required to ensure synchronous triggering with short spark latency in the absence of NCX. In WT mice, high subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is not required for synchronous triggering, because NCX is capable of priming the diadic cleft with sufficient Ca2+ for normal triggering, even when subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is lowered by EGTA. Thus, reducing

  8. Tailored Sequential Drug Release from Bilayered Calcium Sulfate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt%) of metronidazole-loaded poly poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) images showed the overall layered geometry as well as homogenous distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4% per day). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. PMID:25175211

  9. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Bryan R; Puleo, David A

    2014-10-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Superresolution Modeling of Calcium Release in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark A.; Williams, George S.B.; Kohl, Tobias; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Jafri, M. Saleet; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Lederer, W.J.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is critical for maintaining normal cellular contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The fundamental element of CICR in the heart is the calcium (Ca2+) spark, which arises from a cluster of ryanodine receptors (RyR). Opening of these RyR clusters is triggered to produce a local, regenerative release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The Ca2+ leak out of the SR is an important process for cellular Ca2+ management, and it is critically influenced by spark fidelity, i.e., the probability that a spontaneous RyR opening triggers a Ca2+ spark. Here, we present a detailed, three-dimensional model of a cardiac Ca2+ release unit that incorporates diffusion, intracellular buffering systems, and stochastically gated ion channels. The model exhibits realistic Ca2+ sparks and robust Ca2+ spark termination across a wide range of geometries and conditions. Furthermore, the model captures the details of Ca2+ spark and nonspark-based SR Ca2+ leak, and it produces normal excitation-contraction coupling gain. We show that SR luminal Ca2+-dependent regulation of the RyR is not critical for spark termination, but it can explain the exponential rise in the SR Ca2+ leak-load relationship demonstrated in previous experimental work. Perturbations to subspace dimensions, which have been observed in experimental models of disease, strongly alter Ca2+ spark dynamics. In addition, we find that the structure of RyR clusters also influences Ca2+ release properties due to variations in inter-RyR coupling via local subspace Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]ss). These results are illustrated for RyR clusters based on super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. Finally, we present a believed-novel approach by which the spark fidelity of a RyR cluster can be predicted from structural information of the cluster using the maximum eigenvalue of its adjacency matrix. These results provide critical insights into CICR

  11. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  12. Prolonged calcium influx after termination of light-induced calcium release in invertebrate photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In microvillar photoreceptors, light stimulates the phospholipase C cascade and triggers an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ that is essential for the regulation of both visual excitation and sensory adaptation. In some organisms, influx through light-activated ion channels contributes to the Ca2+ increase. In contrast, in other species, such as Lima, Ca2+ is initially only released from an intracellular pool, as the light-sensitive conductance is negligibly permeable to calcium ions. As a consequence, coping with sustained stimulation poses a challenge, requiring an alternative pathway for further calcium mobilization. We observed that after bright or prolonged illumination, the receptor potential of Lima photoreceptors is followed by the gradual development of an after-depolarization that decays in 1–4 minutes. Under voltage clamp, a graded, slow inward current (Islow) can be reproducibly elicited by flashes that saturate the photocurrent, and can reach a peak amplitude in excess of 200 pA. Islow obtains after replacing extracellular Na+ with Li+, guanidinium, or N-methyl-d-glucamine, indicating that it does not reflect the activation of an electrogenic Na/Ca exchange mechanism. An increase in membrane conductance accompanies the slow current. Islow is impervious to anion replacements and can be measured with extracellular Ca2+ as the sole permeant species; Ba can substitute for Ca2+ but Mg2+ cannot. A persistent Ca2+ elevation parallels Islow, when no further internal release takes place. Thus, this slow current could contribute to sustained Ca2+ mobilization and the concomitant regulation of the phototransduction machinery. Although reminiscent of the classical store depletion–operated calcium influx described in other cells, Islow appears to diverge in some significant aspects, such as its large size and insensitivity to SKF96365 and lanthanum; therefore, it may reflect an alternative mechanism for prolonged increase of cytosolic calcium in photoreceptors. PMID

  13. A mathematical model of spontaneous calcium release in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Aistrup, Gary; Wasserstrom, J. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In cardiac myocytes, calcium (Ca) can be released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum independently of Ca influx from voltage-dependent membrane channels. This efflux of Ca, referred to as spontaneous Ca release (SCR), is due to Ryanodine receptor fluctuations, which can induce spontaneous Ca sparks, which propagate to form Ca waves. This release of Ca can then induce delayed after-depolarizations (DADs), which can lead to arrhythmogenic-triggered activity in the heart. However, despite its importance, to date there is no mathematical model of SCR that accounts for experimentally observed features of subcellular Ca. In this article, we present an experimentally based model of SCR that reproduces the timing distribution of spontaneous Ca sparks and key features of the propagation of Ca waves emanating from these spontaneous sparks. We have coupled this model to an ionic model for the rabbit ventricular action potential to simulate SCR within several thousand cells in cardiac tissue. We implement this model to study the formation of an ectopic beat on a cable of cells that exhibit SCR-induced DADs. PMID:21357507

  14. Computational modelling of local calcium ions release from calcium phosphate-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Varun; Guyot, Yann; Kerckhofs, Greet; Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet

    2017-04-01

    A variety of natural or synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP)-based scaffolds are currently produced for dental and orthopaedic applications. These scaffolds have been shown to stimulate bone formation due to their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. The release of the [Formula: see text] ions from these scaffolds is of great interest in light of the aforementioned properties. It can depend on a number of biophysicochemical phenomena such as dissolution, diffusion and degradation, which in turn depend on specific scaffold characteristics such as composition and morphology. Achieving an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying on traditional experimental work alone. Mathematical modelling can complement experimentation. In this study, the in vitro dissolution behaviour of four CaP-based scaffold types was investigated experimentally. Subsequently, a mechanistic finite element method model based on biophysicochemical phenomena and specific scaffold characteristics was developed to predict the experimentally observed behaviour. Before the model could be used for local [Formula: see text] ions release predictions, certain parameters such as dissolution constant ([Formula: see text]) and degradation constant ([Formula: see text]) for each type of scaffold were determined by calibrating the model to the in vitro dissolution data. The resulting model showed to yield release characteristics in satisfactory agreement with those observed experimentally. This suggests that the mathematical model can be used to investigate the local [Formula: see text] ions release from CaP-based scaffolds.

  15. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50–150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway. PMID:21633077

  17. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L; Eckmann, David M

    2011-09-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50-150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway.

  18. The Influence of Hydrogen Ion Concentration on Calcium Binding and Release by Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakamaru, Yoshiaki; Schwartz, Arnold

    1972-01-01

    Calcium release and binding produced by alterations in pH were investigated in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from skeletal muscle. When the pH was abruptly increased from 6.46 to 7.82, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 80–90 nanomoles (nmole) of calcium/mg protein were released. When the pH was abruptly decreased from 7.56 to 6.46, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 25–30 nmole of calcium/mg protein were rebound. The calcium release process was shown to be a function of pH change: 57 nmole of calcium were released per 1 pH unit change per mg protein. The amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bound to the SR was not altered by the pH changes. The release phenomenon was not due to alteration of ATP concentration by the increased pH. Native actomyosin was combined with SR in order to study the effectiveness of calcium release from the SR by pH change in inducing super-precipitation of actomyosin. It was found that SR, in an amount high enough to inhibit superprecipitation at pH 6.5, did not prevent the process when the pH was suddenly increased to 7.3, indicating that the affinity of SR for calcium depends specifically on pH. These data suggest the possible participation of hydrogen ion concentration in excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:5007263

  19. Reticular schwannoma mimicking myxoid sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Afroz, Nishat; Sahoo, Biswajit; Naim, Mohammed

    2014-02-20

    Reticular/microcystic schwannoma is a recently described rare distinctive variant of schwannoma with a predilection for gastrointestinal tract. Its occurrence in soft tissue is extremely rare. We report a case of reticular/microcystic variant of schwannoma in a 55-year-old Indian woman who presented with a painless slow-growing swelling in the right forearm for the past 6 months. MRI findings suggested myxoid sarcoma. However, histological and immunohistochemical findings in the excised specimen were consistent with reticular/microcystic variant of schwannoma. This case report emphasises that the diagnosis of reticular/microcystic schwannoma should always be considered in cases where myxoid sarcomas are suspected as it can mimic malignant myxoid sarcomas, clinically and radiologically, thereby avoiding aggressive intervention and overtreatment.

  20. Low myoplasmic Mg2+ potentiates calcium release during depolarization of frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of intracellular free magnesium concentration ([Mg2+]) in modulating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in voltage-clamped frog cut skeletal muscle fibers equilibrated with cut end solutions containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and antipyrylazo III (AP III), and various concentrations of free Mg2+ (25 microM-1 mM) obtained by adding appropriate total amounts of ATP and magnesium to the solutions. Changes in AP III absorbance were used to monitor calcium transients, whereas fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the SR was calculated from the calcium transient and found to be increased in low internal [Mg2+]. After correcting for effects of calcium depletion from the SR and normalization to SR content, the mean values of the inactivatable and noninactivatable components of Rrel were increased by 163 and 46%, respectively, in low Mg2+. Independent of normalization to SR content, the ratio of inactivatable to noninactivatable components of Rrel was increased in low internal [Mg2+]. Both observations suggest that internal [Mg2+] preferentially modulates the inactivatable component of Rrel, which is thought to be due to calcium-induced calcium release from the SR. This could also explain the observation that, in low internal [Mg2+], the time to the peak of the calcium transient for a 5-ms depolarizing pulse was not very different from the time to the peak of the delta [Ca2+] for a 10- ms pulse of the same amplitude. Finally, in low internal [Mg2+], the calcium transient elicited by a short depolarizing pulse was in some cases clearly followed by a very slow rise of calcium after the end of the pulse. The observed effects of reduced [Mg2+] on calcium release are consistent with a removal of the inhibition that the normal 1 mM myoplasmic [Mg2+] exerts on calcium release in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:1512555

  1. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  2. [Calcium modulation of the release kinetics of the acetylcholine quanta generating multiquantal postsynaptic response].

    PubMed

    Khuzakhmetova, V F; Fatikhov, N F; Bukharaeva, E A; Nikol'skiĭ, E E

    2011-10-01

    The effects of calcium on the quantal content of nerve-evoked endplate currents (EPC) and on the temporal parameters of quantal release were studied in the frog neuromuscular synapse using the method of "subtractions". It was shown that under physiological conditions quanta generating multiquantal postsynaptic responses were released nonsynchronously because of a considerable variability of latencies of the uniquantal responses forming multiquantal EPC. Different calcium dependences for EPCs quantal content and time course of the quantal release were revealed. The average quantal content grew exponentially with the increase in calcium concentration from 0.4 to 1.8 mmol/L, whereas the release synchronicity reached the maximum at 1 mmol/L calcium. It was suggested that the changes in the synchronicity of the evoked release were one of the mechanisms of the synaptic plasticity.

  3. Sphingosylphosphocholine modulates the ryanodine receptor/calcium-release channel of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Betto, R; Teresi, A; Turcato, F; Salviati, G; Sabbadini, R A; Krown, K; Glembotski, C C; Kindman, L A; Dettbarn, C; Pereon, Y; Yasui, K; Palade, P T

    1997-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphocholine (SPC) modulates Ca2+ release from isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes; 50 microM SPC induces the release of 70 80% of the accumulated calcium. SPC release calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor, since the release is inhibited by the ryanodine receptor channel antagonists ryanodine. Ruthenium Red and sphingosine. In intact cardiac myocytes, even in the absence of extracellular calcium. SPC causes a rise in diastolic Ca2+, which is greatly reduced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum is depleted of Ca2+ by prior thapsigargin treatment. SPC action on the ryanodine receptor is Ca(2+)-dependent. SPC shifts to the left the Ca(2+)-dependence of [3H]ryanodine binding, but only at high pCa values, suggesting that SPC might increase the sensitivity to calcium of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism. At high calcium concentrations (pCa 4.0 or lower), where [3H]ryanodine binding is maximally stimulated, no effect of SPC is observed. We conclude that SPC releases calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by activating the ryanodine receptor and possibly another intracellular Ca(2+)-release channel, the sphingolipid Ca(2+)-release-mediating protein of endoplasmic reticulum (SCaMPER) [Mao, Kim, Almenoff, Rudner, Kearney and Kindman (1996) Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. U.S.A 93, 1993-1996], which we have identified for the first time in cardiac tissue. PMID:9078280

  4. Calcium and phosphate ion releasing composite: Effect of pH on release and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Sun, Limin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries and restoration fracture are the two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. The objective of this study was to develop a composite using tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) fillers and whiskers to be stress-bearing, and to be “smart” to increase the calcium (Ca) and phosphate (PO4) ion release at cariogenic pH. Methods TTCP was ball-milled to obtain four different particle sizes: 16.2 μm, 2.4 μm, 1.3 μm, and 0.97 μm. Whiskers fused with nano-sized silica were combined with TTCP as fillers in a resin. Filler level mass fractions varied from 0% to 75%. Ca and PO4 ion release were measured vs. time at pH of 7.4, 6, and 4. Composite mechanical properties were measured via three-point flexure before and after immersion in solutions at the three pH. Results TTCP composite without whiskers had flexural strength similar to a resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and previous Ca-PO4 composites. With whiskers, the TTCP composite had a flexural strength (mean ± sd; n = 5) of (116 ± 9) MPa, similar to (112 ± 14) MPa of a stress-bearing, non-releasing hybrid composite (TPH) (p > 0.1). The Ca release was (1.22 ± 0.16) mmol/L at pH of 4, higher than (0.54 ± 0.09) at pH of 6, and (0.22 ± 0.06) at pH of 7.4 (p < 0.05). PO4 release was also dramatically increased at acidic pH. After immersion, the TTCP-whisker composite matched the strength of TPH at all three pH (p > 0.1); both TTCP-whisker composite and TPH had strengths about 3-fold that of a releasing control. Significance The new TTCP-whisker composite was “smart” and increased the Ca and PO4 release dramatically when the pH was reduced from neutral to a cariogenic pH of 4, when these ions are most needed to inhibit caries. Its strength was 2–3 fold higher than previously-known Ca-PO4 composites and resin-modified glass ionomer. This composite may have the potential to provide the necessary combination of load-bearing and caries-inhibiting capabilities. PMID:19101026

  5. Permeation through the calcium release channel of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    Current voltage (I-V) relations were measured from the calcium release channel (CRC) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle in 12 KCl solutions, symmetrical and asymmetrical, from 25 mM to 2 M. I-V curves are nearly linear, in the voltage range +/- 150 mV approximately 12kT/e, even in asymmetrical solutions, e.g., 2 M // 100 mM. It is awkward to describe straight lines as sums of exponentials in a wide range of solutions and potentials, and so traditional barrier models have difficulty fitting this data. Diffusion theories with constant fields predict curvilinear I-V relations, and so they are also unsatisfactory. The Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) form a diffusion theory with variable fields. They fit the data by using adjustable parameters for the diffusion constant of each ion and for the effective density of fixed (i.e., permanent) charge P(x) along the channel's "filter" (7-A diameter, 10 A long). If P(x) is described by just one parameter, independent of x (i.e., P(x) = P0 = -4.2 M), the fits are satisfactory (RMS error/RMS current = 6.4/67), and the estimates of diffusion coefficients are reasonable D(K) = 1.3 x 10(-6) cm2/s, D(Cl) = 3.9 x 10(-6) cm2/s. The CRC seems to have a small selectivity filter with a very high density of permanent charge. This may be a design principle of channels specialized for large flux. The Appendix derives barrier models, and their prefactor, from diffusion theories (with variable fields) and argues that barrier models are poor descriptions of CRCs in particular and open channels in general. PMID:9284302

  6. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  7. Calcium occupancy of N-terminal sites within calmodulin induces inhibition of the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-09-18

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614-N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is presently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence in association with CaM (a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or alternatively, (b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene)maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association of both apo-CaM and calcium-activated CaM with RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-dependent activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM at resting calcium levels; at calcium levels associated with muscle contraction, activation of the N-terminal domain occurs with concomitant increases in the fluorescence intensity of PyC-CaM that is associated with structural changes within the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1. Occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N

  8. Multiple Modes of Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Sympathetic Neurons II

    PubMed Central

    Hongpaisan, Jarin; Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Colegrove, Stephen L.; Leapman, Richard D.; Friel, David D.; Andrews, S. Brian

    2001-01-01

    CICR from an intracellular store, here directly characterized as the ER, usually refers to net Ca2+ release that amplifies evoked elevations in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i). However, the companion paper (Albrecht, M.A., S.L. Colegrove, J. Hongpaisan, N.B. Pivovarova, S.B. Andrews, and D.D. Friel. 2001. J. Gen. Physiol. 118:83–100) shows that in sympathetic neurons, small [Ca2+]i elevations evoked by weak depolarization stimulate ER Ca accumulation, but at a rate attenuated by activation of a ryanodine-sensitive CICR pathway. Here, we have measured depolarization-evoked changes in total ER Ca concentration ([Ca]ER) as a function of [Ca2+]i, and found that progressively larger [Ca2+]i elevations cause a graded transition from ER Ca accumulation to net release, consistent with the expression of multiple modes of CICR. [Ca]ER is relatively high at rest (12.8 ± 0.9 mmol/kg dry weight, mean ± SEM) and is reduced by thapsigargin or ryanodine (5.5 ± 0.7 and 4.7 ± 1.1 mmol/kg, respectively). [Ca]ER rises during weak depolarization (to 17.0 ± 1.6 mmol/kg over 120s, [Ca2+]i less than ∼350 nM), changes little in response to stronger depolarization (12.1 ± 1.1 mmol/kg, [Ca2+]i ∼700 nM), and declines (to 6.5 ± 1.0 mmol/kg) with larger [Ca2+]i elevations (>1 μM) evoked by the same depolarization when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is inhibited (FCCP). Thus, net ER Ca2+ transport exhibits a biphasic dependence on [Ca2+]i. With mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake enabled, [Ca]ER rises after repolarization (to 16.6 ± 1.8 mmol/kg at 15 min) as [Ca2+]i falls within the permissive range for ER Ca accumulation over a period lengthened by mitochondrial Ca2+ release. Finally, although spatially averaged [Ca]ER is unchanged during strong depolarization, net ER Ca2+ release still occurs, but only in the outermost ∼5-μm cytoplasmic shell where [Ca2+]i should reach its highest levels. Since mitochondrial Ca accumulation occurs preferentially in peripheral cytoplasm, as demonstrated

  9. Distinct Calcium Sources Support Multiple Modes of Synaptic Release from Cranial Sensory Afferents.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Jessica A; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2016-08-24

    Most craniosensory afferents have unmyelinated axons expressing TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in synaptic terminals at the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). Neurotransmission from these synapses is characterized by substantial asynchronous EPSCs following action potential-synched EPSCs and high spontaneous rates that are thermally sensitive. The present studies blocked voltage-activated calcium channels (CaV) using the nonselective CaV blocker Cd(2+) or the specific N-type blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA to examine the calcium dependence of the synchronous, asynchronous, spontaneous, and thermally gated modes of release. In rat brainstem slices containing caudal NTS, shocks to the solitary tract (ST) triggered synchronous ST-EPSCs and trailing asynchronous EPSCs. Cd(2+) or GVIA efficiently reduced both synchronous and asynchronous EPSCs without altering spontaneous or thermal-evoked transmission. Activation of TRPV1 with either the selective agonist resiniferatoxin (150 pm) or temperature augmented basal sEPSC rates but failed to alter the synchronous or asynchronous modes of release. These data indicate that calcium sourced through TRPV1 has no access to the synchronous or asynchronous release mechanism(s) and conversely that CaV-sourced calcium does not interact with the thermally evoked mode of release. Buffering intracellular calcium with EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM reduced asynchronous EPSC rates earlier and to a greater extent than synchronous ST-EPSC amplitudes without altering sEPSCs or thermal sensitivity. Buffering therefore distinguishes asynchronous vesicles as possessing a highly sensitive calcium sensor located perhaps more distant from CaV than synchronous vesicles or thermally evoked vesicles from TRPV1. Together, our findings suggest separate mechanisms of release for spontaneous, asynchronous and synchronous vesicles that likely reside in unique, spatially separated vesicle domains. Most craniosensory fibers release glutamate using calcium entry from two

  10. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method.

  11. Capacitative calcium entry is colocalised with calcium release in Xenopus oocytes: evidence against a highly diffusible calcium influx factor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, C C; Berridge, M J

    1996-06-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium stores activates the plasma membrane capacitative calcium entry pathway in many cell types. The nature of the signal that couples the depletion of the intracellular calcium stores to the activation of the plasma membrane calcium influx pathway is as yet unknown. It has recently been suggested that a highly diffusible calcium influx factor is involved in the activation of capacitative calcium entry, and that its action is potentiated by the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores in a localised region of a Xenopus oocyte was found to evoke capacitative calcium entry exclusively colocalised across the stimulated area of the plasma membrane, arguing against the involvement of a highly diffusible calcium influx factor. Equally, no evidence could be found for the presence of a soluble calcium influx factor in the bulk cytosol of Xenopus oocytes. The potentiation of capacitative calcium entry by okadaic acid resembled that mediated by the activation of protein kinase C, thus suggesting that okadaic acid activity may not necessarily be related to the action of a putative calcium influx factor.

  12. Evaluation of calcium ion, hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Fulzele, Punit; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima; Pradhan, Debaprya

    2011-10-01

    Evaluation of calcium ion and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate calcium and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels of calcium hydroxide based products, namely, RC Cal, Metapex, calcium hydroxide with distilled water, along with the new gutta-percha points with calcium hydroxide. The materials were inserted in polyethylene tubes and immersed in deionized water. The pH variation, Ca(++) and OH(-) release were monitored periodically for 1 week. Statistical analysis was carried out using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests with PASW Statistics version 18 software to compare the statistical difference. After 1 week, calcium hydroxide with distilled water and RC Cal raised the pH to 12.7 and 11.8, respectively, while a small change was observed for Metapex, calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points. The calcium released after 1 week was 15.36 mg/dL from RC Cal, followed by 13.04, 1.296, 3.064 mg/dL from calcium hydroxide with sterile water, Metapex and calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points, respectively. Calcium hydroxide with sterile water and RC Cal pastes liberate significantly more calcium and hydroxyl ions and raise the pH higher than Metapex and calcium hydroxidegutta-percha points.

  13. Evaluation of calcium ion, hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Fulzele, Punit; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima; Pradhan, Debaprya

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Evaluation of calcium ion and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate calcium and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels of calcium hydroxide based products, namely, RC Cal, Metapex, calcium hydroxide with distilled water, along with the new gutta-percha points with calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: The materials were inserted in polyethylene tubes and immersed in deionized water. The pH variation, Ca++ and OH- release were monitored periodically for 1 week. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests with PASW Statistics version 18 software to compare the statistical difference. Results: After 1 week, calcium hydroxide with distilled water and RC Cal raised the pH to 12.7 and 11.8, respectively, while a small change was observed for Metapex, calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points. The calcium released after 1 week was 15.36 mg/dL from RC Cal, followed by 13.04, 1.296, 3.064 mg/dL from calcium hydroxide with sterile water, Metapex and calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points, respectively. Conclusions: Calcium hydroxide with sterile water and RC Cal pastes liberate significantly more calcium and hydroxyl ions and raise the pH higher than Metapex and calcium hydroxidegutta-percha points. PMID:22346155

  14. Understanding calcium homeostasis in postnatal gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons using cell-specific Pericam transgenics.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Stéphanie; Jasoni, Christine; Romanò, Nicola; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are the key output cells of a complex neuronal network controlling fertility in mammals. To examine calcium homeostasis in postnatal GnRH neurons, we generated a transgenic mouse line in which the genetically encodable calcium indicator ratiometric Pericam (rPericam) was targeted to the GnRH neurons. This mouse model enabled real-time imaging of calcium concentrations in GnRH neurons in the acute brain slice preparation. Investigations in GnRH-rPericam mice revealed that GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous, long-duration (~8s) calcium transients. Dual electrical-calcium recordings revealed that the calcium transients were correlated perfectly with burst firing in GnRH neurons and that calcium transients in GnRH neurons regulated two calcium-activated potassium channels that, in turn, determined burst firing dynamics in these cells. Curiously, the occurrence of calcium transients in GnRH neurons across puberty or through the estrous cycle did not correlate well with the assumption that GnRH neuron burst firing was contributory to changing patterns of pulsatile GnRH release at these times. The GnRH-rPericam mouse was also valuable in determining differential mechanisms of GABA and glutamate control of calcium levels in GnRH neurons as well as effects of G-protein-coupled receptors for GnRH and kisspeptin. The simultaneous measurement of calcium levels in multiple GnRH neurons was hampered by variable rPericam fluorescence in different GnRH neurons. Nevertheless, in the multiple recordings that were achieved no evidence was found for synchronous calcium transients. Together, these observations show the great utility of transgenic targeting strategies for investigating the roles of calcium with specified neuronal cell types. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Presynaptic calcium diffusion from various arrays of single channels. Implications for transmitter release and synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelson, A L; Zucker, R S

    1985-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of presynaptic calcium diffusion away from the membrane, with cytoplasmic binding, extrusion by a surface pump, and influx during action potentials, can account for the rapid decay of phasic transmitter release and the slower decay of synaptic facilitation following one spike, as well as the very slow decline in total free calcium observed experimentally. However, simulations using this model, and alternative versions in which calcium uptake into organelles and saturable binding are included, fail to preserve phasic transmitter release to spikes in a long tetanus. A three-dimensional diffusion model was developed, in which calcium enters through discrete membrane channels and acts to release transmitter within 50 nm of entry points. Analytic solutions of the equations of this model, in which calcium channels were distributed in active zone patches based on ultrastructural observations, were successful in predicting synaptic facilitation, phasic release to tetanic spikes, and the accumulation of total free calcium. The effects of varying calcium buffering, pump rate, and channel number and distribution were explored. Versions appropriate to squid giant synapses and frog neuromuscular junctions were simulated. Limitations of key assumptions, particularly rapid nonsaturable binding, are discussed. PMID:2418887

  16. Release of Intracellular Calcium Stores Facilitates Coxsackievirus Entry into Polarized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozym, Rebecca A.; Morosky, Stefanie A.; Kim, Kwang S.; Cherry, Sara; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2010-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) are associated with viral-induced heart disease and are among the leading causes of aseptic meningitis worldwide. Here we show that CVB entry into polarized brain microvasculature and aortic endothelial cells triggers a depletion of intracellular calcium stores initiated through viral attachment to the apical attachment factor decay-accelerating factor. Calcium release was dependent upon a signaling cascade that required the activity of the Src family of tyrosine kinases, phospholipase C, and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoform 3. CVB-mediated calcium release was required for the activation of calpain-2, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, which controlled the vesicular trafficking of internalized CVB particles. These data point to a specific role for calcium signaling in CVB entry into polarized endothelial monolayers and highlight the unique signaling mechanisms used by these viruses to cross endothelial barriers. PMID:20949071

  17. Stimulation of renin release by intrarenal calcium infusion.

    PubMed

    Lahera, V; Fiksen-Olsen, M J; Romero, J C

    1990-02-01

    The effects of intrarenal infusions of calcium gluconate (10 and 100 micrograms Ca/kg/min) on renin secretion were studied in anesthetized mongrel dogs. In one group, the two doses of calcium were infused for 30 minutes each (1 ml/min). In a second group, the same doses were administered 30 minutes after the start of infusion of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin 10 micrograms/kg/min intrarenal or injection of meclofenamate 5 mg/kg i.v. bolus). Mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged during the infusion of calcium in both groups. The infusion of 10 micrograms Ca/kg/min increased renin secretion 77% and sodium excretion 123%. During the infusion of 100 micrograms Ca/kg/min, renin secretion was not different from precalcium values, whereas urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, urine flow, sodium, potassium, and calcium excretion rates were increased (p less than 0.05). During the administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, the urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha levels were reduced, and the infusion of 10 micrograms Ca/kg/min failed to increase renin secretion, sodium excretion, or 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion rates. The infusion of 100 micrograms Ca/kg/min during prostaglandin synthesis inhibition did not modify urine flow or sodium excretion; however, potassium and calcium excretions increased. It is concluded that 1) the intrarenal infusion of small doses of calcium gluconate is capable of stimulating renin secretion through a prostaglandin-mediated mechanism, and 2) the stimulation of renin secretion as well as the increase in sodium excretion induced by calcium are independent of hemodynamic alterations.

  18. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  20. Calcium and titanium release in simulated body fluid from plasma electrolytically oxidized titanium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Matykina, E; Skeldon, P; Thompson, G E

    2010-01-01

    The release of titanium and calcium species to a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 degrees C has been investigated for titanium treated by dc plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in three different electrolytes, namely phosphate, silicate and calcium- and phosphorus-containing. The average rate of release of titanium over a 30 day period in immersion tests, determined by solution analysis, was in the range approximately 1.5-2.0 pg cm(-2) s(-1). Calcium was released at an average rate of approximately 11 pg cm(-2) s(-1). The passive current densities, determined from potentiodynamic polarization measurements, suggested titanium losses of a similar order to those determined from immersion tests. However, the possibility of film formation does not allow for discrimination between the metal releases due to electrochemical oxidation of titanium and chemical dissolution of the coating.

  1. Microinjection of strong calcium buffers suppresses the peak of calcium release during depolarization in frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of high intracellular concentrations of various calcium buffers on the myoplasmic calcium transient and on the rate of release of calcium (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were studied in voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers. The changes in intracellular calcium concentration (delta[Ca2+]) for 200-ms pulses to 0-20 mV were recorded before and after the injection of the calcium buffer and the underlying Rrel was calculated. If the buffer concentration after the injection was high, the initial rate of rise of the calcium transient was slower after injection than before and was followed by a slow increase of [Ca2+] that resembled a ramp. The increase in myoplasmic [Mg2+] that accompanies the calcium transient in control was suppressed after the injection and a slight decrease was observed instead. After the injection the buffer concentration in the voltage-clamped segment of the fiber decreased as the buffer diffused away toward the open ends. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficient for fura-2 (Dapp = 0.40 +/- 0.03 x 10(-6) cm2/s, mean +/- SEM, n = 6) suggests that approximately 65-70% of the indicator was bound to relatively immobile intracellular constituents. As the concentration of the injected buffer decreased, the above effects were reversed. The changes in delta[Ca2+] were underlined by characteristic modification of Rrel. The early peak component was suppressed or completely eliminated; thus, Rrel rose monotonically to a maintained steady level if corrected for depletion. If Rrel was expressed as percentage of SR calcium content, the steady level after injection did not differ significantly from that before. Control injections of anisidine, to the concentration that eliminated the peak of Rrel when high affinity buffers were used, had only a minor effect on Rrel, the peak was suppressed by 26 +/- 5% (mean +/- SE, n = 6), and the steady level remained unchanged. Thus, the peak component of Rrel is dependent on a rise in

  2. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Weiss, James N.; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR) open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs). We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR). In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers’ escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is modulated

  3. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR) open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs). We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR). In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers' escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is modulated

  4. Calcium Release-Dependent Actin Flow in the Leading Process Mediates Axophilic Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, B. Ian; Klenke, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Proper assembly of neural circuits requires newly born neurons to migrate from their place of origin to their final location. Little is known about the mechanisms of axophilic neuronal migration, whereby neurons travel along axon pathways to navigate to their destinations. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-expressing neurons migrate along olfactory axons from the nose into the forebrain during development, and were used as a model of axophilic migration. After migrating, GnRH neurons are located in the hypothalamus and are essential for puberty and maintenance of reproductive function. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying axophilic migration, we investigated in mice the regulation of movement from calcium signals to cytoskeletal dynamics. Live imaging revealed robust calcium activity during axophilic migration, and calcium release through IP3 receptors was found to stimulate migration. This occurred through a signaling pathway involving the calcium sensor calcium/calmodulin protein kinase kinase, AMP-activated kinase, and RhoA/ROCK. By imaging GnRH neurons expressing actin-GFP or Lifeact-RFP, calcium release was found to stimulate leading process actin flow away from the cell body. In contrast, actin contractions at the cell rear were unaffected by this calcium signaling pathway. These findings are the first to test the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics in axophilic migration, and reveal mechanisms of movement that have broad implications for the migration of other CNS populations. PMID:23843509

  5. Preparation and characterization of calcium sulfate-biomimetic apatite nanocomposites for controlled release of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Moztarzadeh, Fatollah; Nemati, Roghayeh; Nezafati, Nader

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, release properties of antibiotic-loaded cement-type nanocomposites of biomimetic apatite and calcium sulfate were studied. Nanocrystalline component of the nanocomposite was synthesized by soaking a mixture of calcium phosphate reactants in tris-buffered simulated body fluid (SBF). The release patterns of cephalexin and gentamicin from both pure calcium sulfate and nanocomposite cements into SBF were collected up to 144 h and fitted by Higuchi and Weibull equations. The effect of loaded antibiotics on physical properties of the cements was also evaluated. Fast release behavior of both antibiotics was obtained from calcium sulfate matrix, in which 80-85% of the loaded antibiotics were liberated during the first 10 h of elution. In contrast, an administered elution was acquired from nanonocomposite materials so that the release was controlled, in all cases, by a combined mechanism; major mechanism was drug diffusion through the matrix and the minor was matrix dissolution. The results showed that the initial setting time and injectability of cements were increased from 7 min and 71% for pure calcium sulfate cement (powder-to-liquid ratio = 2.5 g/mL) to 33 min and 95% for the nanocomposite cement containing 60 wt % apatite, respectively. The compressive strength of nanocomposite was about 0.9 MPa, nearly four times lower than that of pure calcium sulfate. In addition, the use of cephalexin monohydrate did not influence the setting time and compressive strength of the cements, whereas (adding) gentamicin sulfate significantly improved these properties.

  6. Dynamic Calcium Movement inside Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum during Release

    PubMed Central

    Picht, Eckard; Zima, Aleksey V.; Shannon, Thomas R.; Duncan, Alexis M.; Blatter, Lothar A.; Bers, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) free [Ca] ([Ca]SR) provides the driving force for SR Ca release and is a key regulator of SR Ca release channel gating during normal SR Ca release or arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca release events. However, little is known about [Ca]SR spatiotemporal dynamics. Objective To directly measure local [Ca]SR with subsarcomeric spatiotemporal resolution during both normal global SR Ca release and spontaneous Ca sparks, and to evaluate the quantitative implications of spatial [Ca]SR gradients. Methods & Results Intact and permeabilized rabbit ventricular myocytes were subjected to direct simultaneous measurement of cytosolic [Ca] and [Ca]SR and fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP). We found no detectable [Ca]SR gradients between SR release sites (junctional SR) and Ca uptake sites (free SR) during normal global Ca release, clear spatio-temporal [Ca]SR gradients during isolated Ca blinks, faster intra-SR diffusion in the longitudinal vs. transverse direction, 3-4 fold slower diffusion of fluorophores in the SR than in cytosol, and that intra-SR Ca diffusion varies locally, dependent on local SR connectivity. A computational model clarified why spatiotemporal gradients are more detectable in isolated local releases vs. global releases and provides a quantitative framework for understanding intra-SR Ca diffusion. Conclusions Intra-SR Ca diffusion is rapid, limiting spatial [Ca]SR gradients during excitation-contraction coupling. Spatiotemporal [Ca]SR gradients are apparent during Ca sparks, and these observations constrain models of dynamic Ca movement inside the SR. This has important implications for myocyte SR Ca handling, synchrony and potentially arrhythmogenic spontaneous contraction. PMID:21311044

  7. Differential calcium dependence in basal and forskolin-potentiated spontaneous transmitter release in basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuki; Naka, Masamitsu; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2012-10-31

    Action potential-independent transmitter release, or spontaneous release, is postulated to produce multiple postsynaptic effects (e.g., maintenance of dendritic spines and suppression of local dendritic protein synthesis). Potentiation of spontaneous release may contribute to the precise modulation of synaptic function. However, the expression mechanism underlying potentiated spontaneous release remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the involvement of extracellular and intracellular calcium in basal and potentiated spontaneous release. Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) of the basolateral amygdala neurons in acute brain slices were recorded. Forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, increased mEPSC frequency, and the increase lasted at least 25 min after washout. Removal of the extracellular calcium decreased mEPSC frequency in both naïve and forskolin-treated slices. On the other hand, chelation of intracellular calcium by BAPTA-AM decreased mEPSC frequency in naïve, but not in forskolin-treated slices. A blockade of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) resulted in an increase in mEPSC frequency in forskolin-treated, but not in naïve slices. These findings indicate that forskolin-induced potentiation is accompanied by changes in the mechanisms underlying Ca(2+)-dependent spontaneous release.

  8. Calcium modified edible Canna (Canna edulis L) starch for controlled released matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, A. P.; Ridwan, M.; Darmawan, T. A.; Darusman, F.; Gadri, A.

    2017-07-01

    Canna edulis L starch was modified with calcium chloride in order to form controlled released matrix. Present study aim to analyze modified starch characteristic. Four different formulation of ondansetron granules was used to provide dissolution profile of controlled released, two formula consisted of 15% and 30% modified starch, one formula utilized matrix reference standards and the last granules was negative control. Methocel-hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose was used as controlled released matrix reference standards in the third formula. Calcium starch was synthesized in the presence of sodium hydroxide to form gelatinized mass and calcium chloride as the cross linking agent. Physicochemical and dissolution properties of modified starch for controlled released application were investigated. Modified starch has higher swelling index, water solubility and compressibility index. Three of four different formulation of granules provide dissolution profile of controlled released. The profiles indicate granules which employed calcium Canna edulis L starch as matrix are able to resemble controlled drug released profile of matrix reference, however their bigger detain ability lead to lower bioavailability.

  9. Multiple roles of calcium ions in the regulation of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Neher, Erwin; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2008-09-25

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]) has important roles in the triggering of neurotransmitter release and the regulation of short-term plasticity (STP). Transmitter release is initiated by quite high concentrations within microdomains, while short-term facilitation is strongly influenced by the global buildup of "residual calcium." A global rise in [Ca(2+)] also accelerates the recruitment of release-ready vesicles, thereby controlling the degree of short-term depression (STD) during sustained activity, as well as the recovery of the vesicle pool in periods of rest. We survey data that lead us to propose two distinct roles of [Ca(2+)] in vesicle recruitment: one accelerating "molecular priming" (vesicle docking and the buildup of a release machinery), the other promoting the tight coupling between releasable vesicles and Ca(2+) channels. Such coupling is essential for rendering vesicles sensitive to short [Ca(2+)] transients, generated during action potentials.

  10. The release rate of curcumin from calcium alginate beads regulated by food emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Song, Shili; Wang, Zhen; Qian, Yuhua; Zhang, Lijie; Luo, Erfeng

    2012-05-02

    Curcumin-loaded alginate beads, which contain different food emulsifiers, have been prepared using CaCl₂ as the cross-linking agent. The controlled release of the curcumin from the beads was investigated at room temperature. For calcium alginate/Span-80/Tween-80 (A/S/T) formulations, almost all of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released into the medium within about 20 h, and the release rates could be regulated by changing the concentration of both Tween-80 and Span-80. However, for the systems of calcium alginate/Q-12A/F-18A (A/Q/F), about 60% of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released at the end of experiments. The studies of scanning electron microscopy indicated that the microstructure of the walls of beads could significantly vary with the concentration or type of emulsifiers. The Fourier transform infrared spectral measurements confirmed that the interactions between calcium alginate and polyglycerol fatty acid esters were stronger than that between calcium alginate and Tween-80/Span-80. The results of swelling studies demonstrated that the initial rates of water uptake for A/Q/F beads were higher than that for A/S/T beads. Moreover, the data of release rates were fitted by an empirical equation, which showed that the release mechanism of curcumin from the alginate gels varied with the composition of emulsifiers for the A/S/T systems. This work provides an important insight into the effect of food emulsifiers on the release rates of the curcumin from calcium alginate beads and will be helpful for the application of the systems in controlled release of other hydrophobic drug.

  11. High calcium content in Streptomyces spores and its release as an early event during spore germination.

    PubMed Central

    Salas, J A; Guijarro, J A; Hardisson, C

    1983-01-01

    The metal ion content of spores of five Streptomyces species was studied. A general feature of this study was the finding of a very high calcium content (1.1 to 2.1% of the dry weight). Accumulation of calcium occurred preferentially during the sporulation process. Spore calcium was located in the integument fraction, and more than 95% of the calcium was removed from intact spores by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid. Several divalent cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, and Fe2+) which induced darkening of spores and loss of heat resistance also caused the release of calcium from spores. In addition, darkening of spores was blocked by metabolic inhibitors, whereas calcium excretion was not affected. Two different categories of events in the initiation of germination may be differentiated; first, calcium release from spores which is not energy dependent and is a consequence of triggering of germination by some divalent cations, and second, some other events including loss of heat resistance, loss of spore refractility, and a decrease in absorbance, with at least one energy-dependent step. PMID:6411686

  12. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  14. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  15. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Rüdiger, Sten; Erban, Radek

    2013-04-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)], 10.1098/rsif.2011.0574 in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with

  16. Developmental expression of the calcium release channels during early neurogenesis of the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Faure, A V; Grunwald, D; Moutin, M J; Hilly, M; Mauger, J P; Marty, I; De Waard, M; Villaz, M; Albrieux, M

    2001-11-01

    The developmental changes of intracellular calcium release channels of mouse neocortex were studied at the onset of neurogenesis, which occurs between embryonic days E11 and E17. The three main isoforms of the two families of intracellular calcium release channels, namely the inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and the ryanodine receptors (RyR), were detected by their transcripts in the cerebral hemispheres, as early as stage E11. The major isoforms of each family, IP3R-1 and RyR-2, were found at the protein level by Western blot analysis. Expression of these proteins increases progressively throughout brain development. Their localization in coronal sections of cortex has been observed by immunodetection from E12, and compared to the TuJ1 (anti-class III beta-tubulin antibody) neuronal specific labelling. The expression of both channels is greatly enhanced after E12, and both were seen to be present in most of the proliferative and neuronal cells of the slice. Between E12 and E13, there is a striking transition in the pattern of calcium release elicited by specific agonists of these channels, thimerosal for IP3R and caffeine for RyR. The signals induced by thimerosal were not zone-specific, while the observed calcium release signals induced by caffeine were predominantly restricted out of the ventricular zone. This zone-specific caffeine sensitivity is consistent with the main RyR localization immunodetected at E13. Our results indicate that there is a time lag of several days between the molecular detection of calcium release channels and their functional expression, around the time of neuronal differentiation. Altogether, they provide a molecular basis for analyzing the developmental modulation of calcium signals useful for neurogenesis progression.

  17. Evaluation of calcium-releasing and apatite-forming abilities of fast-setting calcium silicate-based endodontic materials.

    PubMed

    Han, L; Kodama, S; Okiji, T

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate two fast-setting calcium silicate-based endodontic materials (Endocem mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Endocem Zr) with regard to their ability to release calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and produce apatite-like precipitates after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Endocem MTA, Endocem Zr and white ProRoot MTA (WMTA) were used. Chemical composition of the powder of each material was analysed with a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyser with image observation function (SEM-EPMA). The amount of Ca(2+) released from water-immersed set cements was measured with an EDTA titration method. Morphology and chemical composition of surface precipitates formed on the surface of PBS-immersed cements were analysed with the SEM-EPMA. Data obtained were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test with a significance level of 5%. Endocem MTA and WMTA contained calcium (Ca), silicon (Si) and bismuth as the major elemental constituents, whereas Endocem Zr contained zirconium as the most abundant element, followed by Ca and Si. The amount of Ca(2+) release was WMTA >Endocem MTA ≥Endocem Zr. After immersion in PBS for 14 days, the three materials produced Ca- and phosphorus (P)-containing apatite-like surface precipitates. WMTA showed higher Ca/P ratio of the precipitates compared with the other cements, with statistical significance between WMTA and Endocem Zr (P < 0.05). Compared with WMTA, Endocem MTA and Endocem Zr were associated with significantly less Ca ions release and, when immersed in PBS, produced apatite-like crystalline precipitates of significantly lower Ca/P ratios. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Visible light initiated release of calcium ions through photochemical electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Romina R; Thum, Matthew D; Hardee, Apryl L; Falvey, Daniel E

    2017-06-14

    Photolysis of anthraquinone or flavin photosensitizers in the presence of calcium EDTA complexes results in decomposition of the EDTA complex, releasing free Ca(2+). In the case of the flavin sensitizers, it is shown that millimolar concentrations of Ca(2+) can be released using visible light (>440 nm) and with quantum yields as high as 0.31. The utility of this system is further demonstrated by in situ photogelation of an alginate solution.

  19. Reversible block of the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor by protamine, a heparin antidote.

    PubMed

    Koulen, P; Ehrlich, B E

    2000-07-01

    Channel activity of the calcium release channel from skeletal muscle, ryanodine receptor type 1, was measured in the presence and absence of protamine sulfate on the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Single-channel activity was measured after incorporating channels into planar lipid bilayers. Optimally and suboptimally calcium-activated calcium release channels were inactivated by the application of protamine to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Recovery of channel activity was not observed while protamine was present. The addition of protamine bound to agarose beads did not change channel activity, implying that the mechanism of action involves an interaction with the ryanodine receptor rather than changes in the bulk calcium concentration of the medium. The block of channel activity by protamine could be reversed either by removal by perfusion with buffer or by the addition of heparin to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Microinjection of protamine into differentiated C(2)C(12) mouse muscle cells prevented caffeine-induced intracellular calcium release. The results suggest that protamine acts on the ryanodine receptor in a similar but opposite manner from heparin and that protamine can be used as a potent, reversible inhibitor of ryanodine receptor activity.

  20. Dimensions of calcium release domains in frog skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Julio L.; DiFranco, Marino; Novo, David

    2001-07-01

    The spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ release process in skeletal muscle fibers were determined using an improved confocal spot detection system. Muscle fibers were loaded with the low affinity fluorescent Ca2+ indicator OGB-5N and localized action potential-induced fluorescence signals were recorded from consecutive locations separated by 200 nm within a single sarcomere. Three-dimensional reconstructions on the Ca2+ transients illustrate the existence of domains of increased fluorescence around Ca2+ release sites in the neighborhood of the T-tubules. We estimated the dimensions of these domains by drawing isochronal curves ((delta) F/F vs. spot position) and fitting Gaussian profiles to them. It was found that the earliest detectable full-width-at-half- maximum of these profiles was 0.77 +/- 0.25 micrometers and increased rapidly with time to 1.4 +/- 0.2 micrometers at their peak (18 degree(s)C). A brief, but statistically significant delay of 0.8 +/- 0.42ms was observed between the onset of the fluorescent transients at the Z- and M-lines. Our results are compatible with the possibility that, in response to AP stimulation, Ca2+ is not released exclusively from the junctional region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but from a broader expanse of the triadic region.

  1. The effect of porosity on drug release kinetics from vancomycin microsphere/calcium phosphate cement composites.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Julia; Gbureck, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Schossig, Michael; Kissel, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The influence of porosity on release profiles of antibiotics from calcium phosphate composites was investigated to optimize the duration of treatment. We hypothesized, that by the encapsulation of vancomycin-HCl into biodegradable microspheres prior admixing to calcium phosphate bone cement, the influence of porosity of the cement matrix on vancomycin release could be reduced. Encapsulation of vancomycin into a biodegradable poly(lactic co-glycolic acid) copolymer (PLGA) was performed by spray drying; drug-loaded microparticles were added to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) at different powder to liquid ratios (P/L), resulting in different porosities of the cement composites. The effect of differences in P/L ratio on drug release kinetics was compared for both the direct addition of vancomycin-HCl to the cement liquid and for cement composites modified with vancomycin-HCl-loaded microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize surface and cross section morphology of the different composites. Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller-plots (BET) was used to determine the specific surface area and pore size distribution of these matrices. It could be clearly shown, that variations in P/L ratio influenced both the porosity of cement and vancomycin release profiles. Antibiotic activity during release study was successfully measured using an agar diffusion assay. However, vancomycin-HCl encapsulation into PLGA polymer microspheres decreased porosity influence of cement on drug release while maintaining antibiotic activity of the embedded substance.

  2. Effects on inorganic nitrogen compounds release of contaminated sediment treatment with in situ calcium nitrate injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Wu, Huacai; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Notable releases of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia are often observed in contaminated sediment treatment works implementing in situ calcium nitrate injection. In order to provide extended information for making best decision of employing this in situ sediment remediation technology, in this study the releases of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia from the sediment after the calcium nitrate addition operation was investigated in column setups designed to simulate the scenarios of a stagnant water (e.g., a pound or small lake) and a tidal-influenced water (e.g., a river mouth), respectively. Comparison with published aquatic toxicity data or authorized criteria was conducted to assess if there is any toxic effect that might be induced. Along with the vigorous N2 emission due to the denitrification reactions which occurred in the treated sediment, external loaded nitrate, intermediately produced nitrite, and indigenous ammonia in the sediment showed being mobilized and released out. Their promoted release and fast buildup in the overlying water to an excessive level probably cause toxic effects to sensitive freshwater living species. Among them, the potential ecological risk induced by the promoted sediment ammonia release is the greatest, and cautions shall be raised for applying the calcium nitrate injection in ammonia-rich sediments. The caused impacts shall be less violent in a tidal-influenced water body, and comparatively, the continuous and fast accumulation of the released inorganic nitrogen compounds in a stagnant water body might impose severer influences to the ecosystem until being further transferred to less harmful forms.

  3. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  4. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  5. Localization of intracellular calcium release in cells injured by venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) and dependence of calcium mobilization on G-protein activation.

    PubMed

    Rivers, David B; Crawley, Timothy; Bauser, Holly

    2005-02-01

    Venom from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis induces cellular injury that appears to involve the release of intracellular calcium stores via the activation of phospholipase C, and culminates in oncotic death. A linkage between release of intracellular Ca2+ and oncosis has not been clearly established and was the focus of this study. When BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells were treated with suramin, an uncoupler of G-proteins, venom-induced swelling and oncotic death were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner for at least 24 h. Suramin also blocked increases in free cytosolic [Ca2+], arguing that venom induces calcium mobilization through G-protein signaling pathways. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was predicted to be the source of intracellular calcium release, but labeling with the fluorescent probe ER-tracker revealed no indication of organelle swelling or loss of membrane integrity as would be expected if the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump was disabled by crude venom. Incubation of cell monolayers with calmodulin or nitrendipine, modulators of ER calcium release channels, neither attenuated nor augmented the effects of wasp venom. These results suggest that wasp venom stimulates calcium release from ER compartments distinct from RyRs, L-type Ca2+ channels, and the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump, or calcium is released from some other intracellular store. A reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential delta psi(m) appeared to precede a rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ as evidenced by fluorescent microscopy using the calcium-sensitive probe fluo-4 AM. This argues that the initial insult to the cell resulting from venom elicits a rapid loss of (delta psi(m)), followed by unregulated calcium efflux from mitochondria into the cytosol. Mobilization of calcium in this fashion could stimulate cAMP formation, and subsequently promote calcium release from NAADP-sensitive stores.

  6. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  7. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  8. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  9. Calcium-induced Cytochrome c release from rat brain mitochondria is altered by digitonin.

    PubMed

    Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Jemmerson, Ronald; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2002-10-31

    To determine if calcium could release Cytochrome c (Cyt c) from brain mitochondria without activating the permeability transition (mPT), brain mitochondria were prepared in two different ways. Digitonin was used to lyse synaptosomes and release synaptosomal mitochondria or a Percoll gradient was used to separate non-synaptosomal mitochondria from the synaptosomes. In gradient-purified mitochondria, low levels of added digitonin produced swelling and Cyt c release. Digitonin augmented Ca(2+)-induced Cyt c release that was insensitive to the mPT inhibitors, cyclosporin A CsA and ADP. Similarly, in mitochondria prepared with digitonin, these inhibitors also failed to prevent Ca(2+)-induced Cyt c release. Thus the mPT-independent, Ca(2+)-induced Cyt c release pathway was attributable to alteration of the permeability properties of the outer mitochondrial membrane by digitonin. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  10. Calcium release and intramembranous charge movement in frog skeletal muscle fibres with reduced (<250 μM) calcium content

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Paul C; Carrier, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that activation of voltage sensors in the T-tubular membranes is a critical step of excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate further whether the Qγ component (delayed [hump] component) of the intramembranous charge movement current (Icm) results from movement of these voltage sensors. Ca2+ release and Icm were measured in voltage-clamped frog cut fibres mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber. In order to reduce effects of Ca2+ feedback mechanisms, the calcium content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during rest was reduced to < 250 μm (referred to volume of myoplasm) and maintained approximately constant. The early (Qβ) and Qγ components of charge movement were estimated by fitting the sum of two Boltzmann functions to the total steady-state intramembranous charge vs. voltage data. The average voltage steepness factor (k) and half-maximal voltage (V-) for Qγ were 4.3 and −57.4 mV (n = 6), respectively. The SR membrane permeability for Ca2+ release was assessed when a constant amount of calcium remained in the SR (usually about 60 μm). A single Boltzmann function fitted to these data gave values on average for k and V- of 4.7 and −45.3 mV, respectively. The similarity of the values of k for Qγ and Ca2+ release supports the idea that Qγ reflects movement of voltage sensors for Ca2+ release. The greater value of V- for Ca2+ release compared to Qγ is consistent with multi-state models of the voltage sensor involving movement of Qγ charge during non-activating transitions. PMID:11850517

  11. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  12. Involvement of calcium in macrophage leukotriene release during experimental cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Alric, L; Pinelli, E; Carrera, G; Vinel, J P; Beraud, M; Duffaut, M; Pascal, J P; Pipy, B

    1996-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the mechanism of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites (LT) secretion by peritoneal macrophages in rats wih CC14 induced cirrhosis. After stimulation with calcium ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan, [3H] arachidonic acid labeled macrophages from cirrhotic rats presented a significantly greater secretion of LT than macrophages from healthy controls. In addition, the phorbol ester TPA (protein kinase C activator) increased LT production only in macrophages from cirrhotic animals and not in controls. Although Ca2+ is thought to be involved in 5 lipoxygenase activation, the role of Ca2+ in LT production was studied. The use of a Ca2+-free medium as well as the addition of TMB-8 (an inhibitor of intra-cellular Ca2+ movements and of plasma membrane Ca2+ fluxes) resulted in a fall in LT production greater for macrophages from cirrhotic animals than for controls. The measurement of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by cytofluorimetry showed that Fluo-3 loaded macrophages from cirrhotic rats had a greater cytosolic CA2+ concentration than macrophages from control animals both in basal conditions and after A23187 stimulation. Study of 45Ca2+ uptake suggest, that extra-cellular Ca2+ is implicated in the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ observed in macrophages from cirrhotic animals as compared to healthy controls. The greater Ca2+ concentration observed in macrophages from cirrhotic rats was not related to a difference in phospholipase C activation because inositol phosphate production did not differ between macrophages from healthy and cirrhotic animals. Taken together these results suggest that as compared to healthy animals, the greater LT production during cirrhosis could be dependent upon a difference in 5-lipoxygenase activation related to a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration independently of inositol phosphates generation.

  13. Calcium release rates from tooth enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents and abrasives.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Danilo Barral; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; de Araujo, Roberto Paulo Correia

    2010-01-01

    Tooth whitening agents containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide are used frequently in esthetic dental procedures. However, lesions on the enamel surface have been attributed to the action of these products. Using conventional procedures for separating and isolating biological structures, powdered enamel was obtained and treated with hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, and sodium bicarbonate, ingredients typically found in dentifrices. The enamel was exposed to different pH levels, and atomic emission spectrometry was used to determine calcium release rates. As the pH level increased, the rate of calcium release from enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents decreased. Carbamide peroxide produced the lowest amount of decalcification, while sodium bicarbonate produced the highest release rates at all pH levels.

  14. Demonstration of calcium uptake and release by sea urchin egg cortical endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The calcium indicator dye fluo-3/AM was loaded into the ER of isolated cortices of unfertilized eggs of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. Development of the fluorescent signal took from 8 to 40 min and usually required 1 mM ATP. The signal decreased to a minimum level within 30 s after perfusion with 1 microM InsP3 and increased within 5 min when InsP3 was replaced with 1 mM ATP. Also, the fluorescence signal was lowered rapidly by perfusion with 10 microM A23187 or 10 microM ionomycin. These findings demonstrate that the cortical ER is a site of ATP-dependent calcium sequestration and InsP3-induced calcium release. A light-induced wave of calcium release, traveling between 0.7 and 2.8 microns/s (average speed 1.4 microns/s, N = 8), was sometimes observed during time lapse recordings; it may therefore be possible to use the isolated cortex preparation to investigate the postfertilization calcium wave. PMID:1955454

  15. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  16. Simulations of inositol phosphate metabolism and its interaction with InsP(3)-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyoti; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2002-01-01

    Inositol phosphates function as second messengers for a variety of extracellular signals. Ins(1,4,5)P(3) generated by phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, triggers numerous cellular processes by regulating calcium release from internal stores. The Ins(1,4,5)P(3) signal is coupled to a complex metabolic cascade involving a series of phosphatases and kinases. These enzymes generate a range of inositol phosphate derivatives, many of which have signaling roles of their own. We have integrated published biochemical data to build a mass action model for InsP(3) metabolism. The model includes most inositol phosphates that are currently known to interact with each other. We have used this model to study the effects of a G-protein coupled receptor stimulus that activates phospholipase C on the inositol phosphates. We have also monitored how the metabolic cascade interacts with Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated calcium release. We find temporal dynamics of most inositol phosphates to be strongly influenced by the elaborate networking. We also show that Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) plays a key role in InsP(3) dynamics and allows for paired pulse facilitation of calcium release. Calcium oscillations produce oscillatory responses in parts of the metabolic network and are in turn temporally modulated by the metabolism of InsP(3). PMID:12202356

  17. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  18. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating.

  19. Calcium and osmotic stimulation in renin release from isolated rat glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Skøtt, O

    1986-05-01

    The effects of changes in osmolality and calcium concentration on renin release (RR) from isolated superfused rat glomeruli were studied. The undisturbed RR followed a first order fall with a half-time of about 100 min (n = 45). Changes in the osmolality between 270 and 350 mOsm/kg resulted in dose-dependent changes in the RR rates. Hypoosmotic treatment stimulated the RR transiently, whereas hyperosmotic treatment produced a sustained inhibition. The dose-response relationship was log-linear between 270 and 320 mOsm/kg. A decrease in osmolality of 20 mOsm/kg gave proportional increases in RR irrespectively of the RR rate preceding the stimulus. Removal of calcium stimulated the RR by 10 times (n = 5, p less than 0.001) and a subsequent decrease in osmolality of 20 mOsm/kg stimulated the RR proportionally to that observed in the series containing 2 mM calcium. A decrease in osmolality was able to stimulate RR (n = 5.5, p less than 0.05) even when the calcium concentration in the medium was simultaneously raised from 0 to 2 mM. A hyperosmotic Ringer (+ 300 mOsm/kg), inhibited RR to very low levels. A subsequent removal of external calcium was now unable to stimulate the release (n = 5.5). In a less hyperosmotic Ringer (+ 50 mOsm), the RR was inhibited, but a removal of external calcium now stimulated RR. It is suggested that the osmosensitivity of the RR process reflects a waterflux-driven fusion of secretory granules with the cell membrane, and that calcium affects an intragranular equilibrium between aggregated, osmotically inert granule content and dissolved, osmotically active granule content.

  20. Calcium channels and intracellular calcium release are pharmacologically different in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCleskey, E W

    1985-04-01

    The pharmacology of Ca2+ channels and intracellular Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) were compared by injecting Ca2+ channel blockers into the cytoplasm and observing contraction under voltage clamp of frog skeletal muscle fibres, a preparation that contracts only in response to Ca2+ release from the s.r. A method for quantifying intracellular injections by co-injecting a fluorescent dye is described. Nifedipine injected into cells blocks Ca2+ current through the cell membrane showing that nifedipine is active when applied to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane in which Ca2+ channels are located. Neither the presence of Ca2+ channel blockers in the extracellular medium nor 24 h incubation in nifedipine and D-600 affect contraction. Nifedipine and D-600 injected to intracellular concentrations much greater than necessary to block Ca2+ channels do not affect contraction. The presence of 30 microM-D-600 during K+ contractures caused paralysis but 20 microM-nifedipine did not. Thus, contracture-dependent D-600 paralysis is not due to blockade of the transverse tubule Ca2+ channel. It is concluded that: (a) a functioning Ca2+ channel on the cell membrane is not necessary to trigger Ca2+ release from the s.r.; (b) s.r. Ca2+ release and Ca2+ channels are pharmacologically different.

  1. Multiple Modes of Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Sympathetic Neurons I

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Meredith A.; Colegrove, Stephen L.; Hongpaisan, Jarin; Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Andrews, S. Brian; Friel, David D.

    2001-01-01

    Many cells express ryanodine receptors (RyRs) whose activation is thought to amplify depolarization-evoked elevations in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) through a process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). In neurons, it is usually assumed that CICR triggers net Ca2+ release from an ER Ca2+ store. However, since net ER Ca2+ transport depends on the relative rates of Ca2+ uptake and release via distinct pathways, weak activation of a CICR pathway during periods of ER Ca accumulation would have a totally different effect: attenuation of Ca2+ accumulation. Stronger CICR activation at higher [Ca2+]i could further attenuate Ca2+ accumulation or trigger net Ca2+ release, depending on the quantitative properties of the underlying Ca2+ transporters. This and the companion study (Hongpaisan, J., N.B. Pivovarova, S.L. Colgrove, R.D. Leapman, and D.D. Friel, and S.B. Andrews. 2001. J. Gen. Physiol. 118:101–112) investigate which of these CICR “modes” operate during depolarization-induced Ca2+ entry in sympathetic neurons. The present study focuses on small [Ca2+]i elevations (less than ∼350 nM) evoked by weak depolarization. The following two approaches were used: (1) Ca2+ fluxes were estimated from simultaneous measurements of [Ca2+]i and ICa in fura-2–loaded cells (perforated patch conditions), and (2) total ER Ca concentrations ([Ca]ER) were measured using X-ray microanalysis. Flux analysis revealed triggered net Ca2+ release during depolarization in the presence but not the absence of caffeine, and [Ca2+]i responses were accelerated by SERCA inhibitors, implicating ER Ca2+ accumulation, which was confirmed by direct [Ca]ER measurements. Ryanodine abolished caffeine-induced CICR and enhanced depolarization-induced ER Ca2+ accumulation, indicating that activation of the CICR pathway normally attenuates ER Ca2+ accumulation, which is a novel mechanism for accelerating evoked [Ca2+]i responses. Theory shows how such a low gain mode of CICR can operate

  2. Calcium release in frog cut twitch fibers exposed to different ionic environments under voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Hui, C S

    1999-10-01

    Calcium release was measured in highly stretched frog cut twitch fibers mounted in a double Vaseline-gap voltage clamp chamber, with the internal solution containing 20 mM EGTA plus 0.4 or 1.8 mM added calcium. Rise in myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] was monitored with antipyrylazo III as the indicator at a temperature of 13 to 14 degrees C. The waveform of calcium release rate (Rel) computed from the absorbance change showed an early peak (Rel(p)) followed by a maintained phase (Rel(m)). Each Rel(p)-versus-V plot was fitted with a Boltzmann distribution function. The maximum value of Rel(p) (Rel(p,max)) was compared in various calcium-containing external solutions. The average value in a Cl(-) solution was about one-third larger than those in a CH(3)SO(3)(-) or gluconate solution, whereas the values in the CH(3)SO(3)(-) and gluconate solutions had no statistically significant difference. In external solutions containing CH(3)SO(3)(-) or gluconate, a replacement of the Ca(2+) with Mg(2+) reduced Rel(p,max) by 30 to 50%, on average. The values of Rel(p, max) also had no statistically significant difference among calcium-free external solutions containing different impermeant anions. An increase of the nominal free [Ca(2+)] in the end-pool solution from a reduced to the normal physiological level increased the value of Rel(p,max), and also slowed the decay of the maintained phase of the Rel waveform. The Rel waveforms in the Cl(-) and CH(3)SO(3)(-) solutions were compared in the same fiber at a fixed potential. CH(3)SO(3)(-) increased the time to peak, reduced Rel(p), and increased Rel(m), and the effects were partially reversible. Under the hypothesis that the decay of the peak was due to calcium inactivation of calcium release, the inactivation was larger in Cl(-) than in CH(3)SO(3)(-), in qualitative agreement with the ratio of Rel(p) in the two solutions. Under the alternative hypothesis that the peak and the maintained phase were separately gated by calcium and

  3. Modelling cardiac calcium sparks in a three-dimensional reconstruction of a calcium release unit.

    PubMed

    Hake, Johan; Edwards, Andrew G; Yu, Zeyun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Michailova, Anushka P; McCammon, J Andrew; Holst, Michael J; Hoshijima, Masahiko; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2012-09-15

    Triggered release of Ca2+ from an individual sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release unit (CRU) is the fundamental event of cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, and spontaneous release events (sparks) are the major contributor to diastolic Ca(2+) leak in cardiomyocytes. Previous model studies have predicted that the duration and magnitude of the spark is determined by the local CRU geometry, as well as the localization and density of Ca(2+) handling proteins. We have created a detailed computational model of a CRU, and developed novel tools to generate the computational geometry from electron tomographic images. Ca(2+) diffusion was modelled within the SR and the cytosol to examine the effects of localization and density of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA), and calsequestrin on spark dynamics. We reconcile previous model predictions of approximately 90% local Ca(2+) depletion in junctional SR, with experimental reports of about 40%. This analysis supports the hypothesis that dye kinetics and optical averaging effects can have a significant impact on measures of spark dynamics. Our model also predicts that distributing calsequestrin within non-junctional Z-disc SR compartments, in addition to the junctional compartment, prolongs spark release time as reported by Fluo5. By pumping Ca(2+) back into the SR during a release, SERCA is able to prolong a Ca(2+) spark, and this may contribute to SERCA-dependent changes in Ca(2+) wave speed. Finally, we show that including the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inside the dyadic cleft does not alter local [Ca(2+)] during a spark.

  4. Rechargeable dental adhesive with calcium phosphate nanoparticles for long-term ion release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Hack, Gary; Fouad, Ashraf F.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The tooth-resin bond is the weak link of restoration, with secondary caries as a main reason for failure. Calcium phosphate-containing resins are promising for remineralization; however, calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases last only a couple of months. The objectives of this study were to develop the first rechargeable CaP bonding agent and investigate the key factors that determine CaP ion recharge and re-release. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were synthesized. Pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM), ethoxylated bisphenol-A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) were used to synthesize three adhesives (denoted PE, PEH and PEHB). NACP were mixed into adhesive at 0–30% by mass. Dentin shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive specimens were tested for Ca and P initial ion release. Then the ion-exhausted specimens were immersed in Ca and P solution to recharge the specimens, and the recharged specimens were then used to measure ion re-release for 7 days as one cycle. Then these specimens were again recharged and the re-release was measured for 7 days as the second cycle. Three recharge/re-release cycles were tested. Results PEHB had the highest dentin bond strength (p<0.05). Increasing NACP content from 0 to 30% did not affect dentin bond strength (p>0.1), but increased CaP release and re-release (p<0.05). PEHB-NACP had the greatest recharge/re-release, and PE-NACP had the least (p<0.05). Ion release remained high and did not decrease with increasing the number of recharge/re-release cycles (p>0.1). After the third cycle, specimens without further recharge had continuous CaP ion release for 2–3 weeks. Significance Rechargeable CaP bonding agents were developed for the first time to provide long-term Ca and P ions to promote remineralization and reduce caries. Incorporation of NACP into adhesive had no negative effect on dentin bond

  5. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  6. The proangiogenic potential of a novel calcium releasing composite biomaterial: orthotopic in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Hugo; Catros, Sylvain; Castano, Oscar; Rey, Sylvie; Siadous, Robin; Clift, Douglas; Marti-Munoz, Joan; Batista, Marc; Bareille, Reine; Planell, Josep; Engel, Elisabeth; Amédée, Joëlle

    2017-02-24

    Insufficient angiogenesis remains a major hurdle in current bone tissue engineering strategies. An extensive body of work has focused on the use of angiogenic factors or endothelial progenitor cells. However, these approaches are inherently complex, in terms of regulatory and methodologic implementation, and present a high cost. We have recently demonstrate the potential of electrospun poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fiber-based membranes, containing calcium phosphate (CaP) ormoglass particles, to elicit angiogenesis in vivo, in a subcutaneous model in mice. Here we have devised an injectable composite, containing CaP glass-ceramic particles, dispersed within a (Hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (HPMC) matrix, with the capacity to release calcium in a more sustained fashion. We show that by tuning the release of calcium in vivo, in a rat bone defect model, we could improve both bone formation and increase angiogenesis. The bone regeneration kinetics was dependent on the Ca(2+) release rate, with the faster Ca(2+) release composite gel showing improved bone repair at 3 weeks, in relation to control. In the same line, improved angiogenesis could be observed for the same gel formulation at 6 weeks post implantation. This methodology allows to integrate two fundamental processes for bone tissue regeneration while using a simple, cost effective, and safe approach.

  7. 4-aminopyridine-induced contracture in frog ventricle is due to calcium released from intracellular stores.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, A; Subbanna, P K; Arasan, S; Rajapathy, J; Rao, J P; Subramani, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the presence of intracellular calcium store in frog ventricle based on contractures induced by 4-aminopyridine in calcium-free media. Frog-ventricular strips were subjected to field stimulation at 0.2 Hz and the force of contraction was recorded after stabilization. The preparation was then kept quiescent for some time in solutions with different sodium concentrations, containing 0 or 1 mmol/L calcium. Caffeine, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), or tetraethylammonium chloride was then added. Frog skeletal muscle preparations were used as positive controls for the caffeine experiments. Frog ventricular preparations did not develop contractures (sustained contractions) in the presence of caffeine (25 mmol/L), while frog skeletal muscle preparations developed caffeine-induced contractures. However, 4-AP (16 mmol/L) was able to induce contractures in quiescent frog ventricular preparations, even when they were superfused with calcium-free solution. 4-AP contractures in frog ventricle were seen in the presence of nifedipine also. Amplitude of 4-AP evoked contractures in frog ventricle were much larger in low sodium (30 mmol/L) and sodium-free (sodium substituted by lithium) solutions than in normal sodium solution, suggesting that the route of extrusion of the cytosolic calcium (released from intracellular stores by 4-AP) is the sodium calcium exchanger, which gets reversed in low sodium solutions. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was not able to induce contractures in frog ventricle suggesting that the contracture evoked by 4-AP is not due to its potassium channel blocking effect. In quiescent frog skeletal muscle preparations, caffeine as well as 4-AP induced contractures in calcium-free solutions. We therefore conclude that there is a caffeine-insensitive, 4-AP sensitive intracellular calcium store in the frog ventricle.

  8. Localized superoxide release by neutrophils can be provoked by a cytosolic calcium 'cloud'.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E V; Hallett, M B; Campbell, A K

    1991-01-01

    We have used single-cell ratio imaging of Fura-2 loaded neutrophils to visualize release of cytosolic Ca2+ from an intracellular store in order to determine the location of this store and the relationship of release from it to oxidase activation. In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP) produced an increase in free Ca2+ throughout the cytosol. In its absence, however, stimulation induced in 38% of neutrophils a highly localized increase in cytosolic free Ca2+, located between the nuclear lobes and the plasma membrane, at a region of cytosol which stained positively with 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide [DiOC6(3)]. Calcium release from the store was transient, without oscillation and occurred after delays of up to 120 seconds. Addition of Ca2+ ionophore also released Ca2+ from this, and other stores, within the cell, up to three foci being detected in some cells. Localized oxidase activation occurred at the plasma membrane when the calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) of the 'cloud' exceeded 250 nM. Surprisingly, localized activation occurred at the plasma membrane at a site separate from but near to a region of high Ca2+. It was concluded that release of Ca2+ from a single receptor-releasable, Ca2+ store in neutrophils was insufficient to trigger oxidase activation throughout the cell, but could provide a localized activation of the oxidase. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1649127

  9. Calcium buffering properties of sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium-induced Ca2+ release during the quasi-steady level of release in twitch fibers from frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Lamboley, Cédric R.H.; Carrier, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the properties of the intrinsic Ca2+ buffers in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of cut fibers from frog twitch muscle. The concentrations of total and free calcium ions within the SR ([CaT]SR and [Ca2+]SR) were measured, respectively, with the EGTA/phenol red method and tetramethylmurexide (a low affinity Ca2+ indicator). Results indicate SR Ca2+ buffering was consistent with a single cooperative-binding component or a combination of a cooperative-binding component and a linear binding component accounting for 20% or less of the bound Ca2+. Under the assumption of a single cooperative-binding component, the most likely resting values of [Ca2+]SR and [CaT]SR are 0.67 and 17.1 mM, respectively, and the dissociation constant, Hill coefficient, and concentration of the Ca-binding sites are 0.78 mM, 3.0, and 44 mM, respectively. This information can be used to calculate a variable proportional to the Ca2+ permeability of the SR, namely d[CaT]SR/dt ÷ [Ca2+]SR (denoted release permeability), in experiments in which only [CaT]SR or [Ca2+]SR is measured. In response to a voltage-clamp step to −20 mV at 15°C, the release permeability reaches an early peak followed by a rapid decline to a quasi-steady level that lasts ∼50 ms, followed by a slower decline during which the release permeability decreases by at least threefold. During the quasi-steady level of release, the release amplitude is 3.3-fold greater than expected from voltage activation alone, a result consistent with the recruitment by Ca-induced Ca2+ release of 2.3 SR Ca2+ release channels neighboring each channel activated by its associated voltage sensor. Release permeability at −60 mV increases as [CaT]SR decreases from its resting physiological level to ∼0.1 of this level. This result argues against a release termination mechanism proposed in mammalian muscle fibers in which a luminal sensor of [Ca2+]SR inhibits release when [CaT]SR declines to a low level

  10. Calcium buffering properties of sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium-induced Ca(2+) release during the quasi-steady level of release in twitch fibers from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Karine; Lamboley, Cédric R H; Carrier, Nicole; Pape, Paul C

    2012-10-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the properties of the intrinsic Ca(2+) buffers in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of cut fibers from frog twitch muscle. The concentrations of total and free calcium ions within the SR ([Ca(T)](SR) and [Ca(2+)](SR)) were measured, respectively, with the EGTA/phenol red method and tetramethylmurexide (a low affinity Ca(2+) indicator). Results indicate SR Ca(2+) buffering was consistent with a single cooperative-binding component or a combination of a cooperative-binding component and a linear binding component accounting for 20% or less of the bound Ca(2+). Under the assumption of a single cooperative-binding component, the most likely resting values of [Ca(2+)](SR) and [Ca(T)](SR) are 0.67 and 17.1 mM, respectively, and the dissociation constant, Hill coefficient, and concentration of the Ca-binding sites are 0.78 mM, 3.0, and 44 mM, respectively. This information can be used to calculate a variable proportional to the Ca(2+) permeability of the SR, namely d[Ca(T)](SR)/dt ÷ [Ca(2+)](SR) (denoted release permeability), in experiments in which only [Ca(T)](SR) or [Ca(2+)](SR) is measured. In response to a voltage-clamp step to -20 mV at 15°C, the release permeability reaches an early peak followed by a rapid decline to a quasi-steady level that lasts ~50 ms, followed by a slower decline during which the release permeability decreases by at least threefold. During the quasi-steady level of release, the release amplitude is 3.3-fold greater than expected from voltage activation alone, a result consistent with the recruitment by Ca-induced Ca(2+) release of 2.3 SR Ca(2+) release channels neighboring each channel activated by its associated voltage sensor. Release permeability at -60 mV increases as [Ca(T)](SR) decreases from its resting physiological level to ~0.1 of this level. This result argues against a release termination mechanism proposed in mammalian muscle fibers in which a luminal sensor of [Ca(2+)](SR) inhibits

  11. Dissolution of the inorganic phase of bone leading to release of calcium regulates osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rasmus H; Karsdal, Morten A; Sørensen, Mette G; Dziegiel, Morten H; Henriksen, Kim

    2007-09-07

    Osteoclasts are the sole cells possessing the ability to resorb calcified bone matrix. This occurs via secretion of hydrochloric acid mediated by the V-ATPase and the chloride channel ClC-7. Loss of acidification leads to osteopetrosis characterized by ablation of bone resorption and increased osteoclast numbers, indicating increased life span of the osteoclasts. To investigate the role of the inorganic phase of bone with respect to osteoclast life span, we used the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium uptake antagonist ryanodine on human osteoclasts cultured on calcified and decalcified bone slices. Bafilomycin inhibited bone resorption and increased osteoclast survival on calcified but not decalcified bones. Ryanodine attenuated calcium uptake and thereby augmented osteoclast survival on calcified bones. In summary, we found that acidification leading to calcium release from bone during resorption controls osteoclast survival, potentially explaining the increased numbers of osteoclasts in patients with osteopetrosis.

  12. Calcium efflux and neurotransmitter release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Minnema, D J; Michaelson, I A; Cooper, G P

    1988-03-15

    The results of several studies, employing various tissue preparations, have demonstrated that in vitro Pb exposure has similar effects on the release of several different transmitter substances. Pb has been observed to attenuate depolarization-evoked release and increase spontaneous (depolarization-independent) release. The current study confirms that Pb in vitro increases the spontaneous release of [3H]acetylcholine (ACh) from superfused synaptosomes prepared from rat hippocampus. Additionally, hippocampal synaptosomes, preloaded with 45Ca, were superfused under conditions similar to those used in the [3H]ACh-release studies. Exposure to 1-30 microM Pb produced a concentration-dependent increase in the efflux of 45Ca that was quantitatively and temporally related to the Pb-induced release of [3H]ACh from the hippocampal synaptosomes. Depolarization-evoked [3H]ACh release with high potassium did not produce a corresponding increase in 45Ca efflux. It is concluded that the Pb-induced increase in spontaneous transmitter release is apparently due to either an increase in intraneuronal ionized calcium or the stimulation by Pb of Ca-activated molecules mediating transmitter release.

  13. Effects of procaine and caffeine on calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1992-01-01

    1. Resting myoplasmic free [Ca2+] and [Ca2+] transients (delta [Ca2+]) were measured in single voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fibres in the presence and absence of procaine, caffeine or procaine plus caffeine using Fura-2 fluorescence and antipyrylazo III (Ap III) absorbance signals. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated from the calcium transients and corrected for the relatively small decline due to depletion of calcium from the SR. 2. Procaine (1 mM) reversibly suppressed delta [Ca2+] and the corresponding Rrel by about 40% for 60-100 ms depolarizing steps to -40 to +20 mV. Procaine had little effect on either the waveform or voltage dependence of the Rrel records. 3. [Ca2+] transients calculated from Fura-2 fluorescence changes in the presence or absence of procaine had similar time courses and amplitudes as those calculated from the Ap III absorbance changes suggesting that 1 mM-procaine did not interfere with the ability of Ap III or Fura-2 to monitor delta [Ca2+]. 4. Although 1 mM-procaine depressed Rrel it had no effect on intramembrane charge movements (IQ) calculated from membrane currents recorded simultaneously with delta [Ca2+]. 5. Procaine (1 mM) reversibly inhibited the potentiating effect of 0.5 mM-caffeine on delta [Ca2+]. The amplitude and waveform of the Rrel records were similar in control fibres and in the presence of 1 mM-procaine plus 0.5 mM-caffeine. 6. In the presence of 0.5 mM-caffeine delta [Ca2+] after 10-20 ms voltage steps exhibited an increase in the time to peak and a slower decay time course compared with caffeine-free controls, suggestive of significant calcium-induced calcium release in the presence of caffeine. These effects of caffeine were completely and reversibly blocked by 1 mM-procaine. 7. In the absence of caffeine, 1 mM-procaine caused a small decrease in time to peak of delta [Ca2+] after 10-30 ms duration voltage steps compared to the bracketing control and wash

  14. NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform persistent activity requires calcium release from intracellular stores in prefrontal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S

    2006-02-01

    Various normal and pathological forms of synchronized population activity are generated by recurrent excitation among pyramidal neurons in the neocortex. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying this activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the cellular properties of synchronized epileptiform activity in the prefrontal cortex with particular emphasis on a potential role of intracellular calcium stores. We find that the zero-magnesium-induced synchronized activity is blocked by inhibition of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, and the ryanodine receptor. This same activity is, however, not affected by application of metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR) agonists, nor by introduction of an mGluR antagonist. These results suggest that persistent synchronized activity in vitro is dependent upon calcium release from internal calcium stores through the activation of PLC-IP3 receptor pathway. Our findings also raise the possibility that intracellular calcium release may be involved in the generation of pathologic synchronized activity in epilepsy in vivo and in physiological forms of synchronized cortical activity.

  15. Calcium release induced by 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone and its copper complex contributes to tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Wang, Jiangang; Li, Cuiping; Zhou, Sufeng; Yang, Yun; Zhou, Pingxin; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Changzheng

    2017-03-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display significant antitumor activity and their copper complexes also exhibit enhanced biological activities in most situations, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Therefore, investigation of the mechanism involved in the change upon chelation is required to extend our understanding of the effects of thiosemicarbazones. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (PCT) and its copper complex (PCT-Cu) on cell proliferation was investigated. The copper chelate exhibited a 3- to 10-fold increase in antitumor activity (with an IC50 <5 µM). The results showed that both PCT and PCT-Cu induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in vitro and in vivo, caused cellular DNA fragmentation, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and cell cycle arrest. Western blotting showed that both PCT and PCT-Cu induced apoptosis. Upregulation of GRP78 in HepG2 cells following treatment with the agents indicated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurred. Furthermore calcium release was revealed in this study, suggesting that PCT and PCT-Cu disturbed calcium homeostasis. It was noted that PCT-Cu sensitized thapsigargin‑stimulated calcium release from the ER, which was correlated with the ROS level they induced, implying that the antitumor activity of PCT and PCT-Cu partly stemmed from calcium mobilization, a situation that was reported in few studies. Our findings may significantly contribute to the understanding of the anti‑proliferative effect of the derivatives of thiosemicarbazones along with their antitumor mechanism.

  16. Release of calcium into the myofibrillar space in response to active shortening of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Edman, K A P; Caputo, C

    2017-10-01

    The study was undertaken to explore whether shortening of striated muscle during activity is associated with release of bound Ca(2+) into the myofibrillar space as has previously been proposed in order to explain the depressant effect of active shortening. The experiments were carried out on single muscle fibres isolated from the anterior tibialis muscle of Rana temporaria. The fibres were loaded with the calcium sensitive indicator Fluo-3. The fibres, stimulated to produce a partially fused isometric tetanus, were subjected to a shortening ramp or, alternatively, to a stretch ramp during activity while force, fibre length, sarcomere length and the Fluo-3 signal were recorded. A shortening ramp performed during a partially fused tetanus caused an increase in the myofibrillar free calcium concentration and produced, simultaneously, a decrease in active force. The isometric force recovered gradually after the shortening ramp, while the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration stayed above the control level during the remainder of the stimulation period. A stretch ramp applied during a partially fused tetanus caused a considerably smaller change in the myofibrillar Ca(2+) concentration. The results provide evidence that the myosin cross-bridges interact with the calcium binding sites on the thin filaments during active shortening, causing sustained release of calcium and reduced contractile strength. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres estimated from Arsenazo III calcium transients.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1983-01-01

    Single twitch fibres, dissected from frog muscle, were injected with the metallochromic dye Arsenazo III. Changes in dye-related absorbance measured at 650 or 660 nm were used to estimate the time course of myoplasmic free [Ca2+] following either action potential stimulation or voltage-clamp depolarization (temperature, 15-17 degrees C). The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased when fibres were stretched to sarcomere spacings approaching 4 microns. The effect appeared to be less marked in H2O Ringer than in D2O Ringer, where a reduction of about 40% was observed in going from 3.0 microns to 3.7-3.9 microns. In fibres heavily injected with dye (1.5-2.2 mM-dye) at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was complexed with Arsenazo III following a single action potential, implying that at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) into the myoplasm. Computer simulations were carried out to estimate the flux of Ca2+ between the s.r. and myoplasm (in fibres containing no more that 0.8 mM-dye). The amounts and time courses of Ca2+ bound to the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin and to the Ca2+, Mg2+ sites on parvalbumin were estimated from the free [Ca2+] wave form and the law of mass action. In the computations the total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was taken as the total amount of Ca2+ existing either as free ion or as ion complexed with dye, troponin or parvalbumin. The time derivative of total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was used as an estimate of net Ca2+ flux (release minus uptake) from the s.r. into myoplasm. Rate constants for formation of cation: receptor complex were taken from published values. For the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin, three sets of rate constants, corresponding to two values of dissociation constant (0.2 and 2 microM) were used. Each set of three simulations was carried out both with and without parvalbumin. The simulations show that following action potential stimulation, 0.2-0.3 mM-Ca2+ enters the myoplasm from the s.r. The wave form of s.r. Ca2

  18. Release of noradrenaline from slices of cat spleen by pre-treatment with calcium, strontium and barium

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A. G.; Kirpekar, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. Spleen slices pre-incubated for different periods at 4° C in Krebs solution containing varying concentrations of calcium, up to 96 mM, lost their endogenous noradrenaline stores when reincubated in normal Krebs solution at 37° C for 2 hr. Rate of loss of noradrenaline was roughly related to the calcium concentration of the pre-incubation medium and the pre-exposure time. 2. Pre-treatment with isotonic barium or strontium (96 mM) Krebs solution also induced release of noradrenaline from spleen slices when re-exposed to normal Krebs solution. Barium was more effective than either calcium or strontium. 3. The enhanced release induced by calcium pre-treatment occurred in the absence of calcium, with or without EGTA. 4. Tissue calcium concentration of spleen slices was 0·68 m-mole/kg. Pre-treatment of slices with normal or 96 mM calcium-Krebs solution for 4 hr at 4° C increased the calcium concentration to 2·57 and 9·9 m-mole/kg, respectively. 5. Ouabain, which caused a dose-dependent release of noradrenaline, did not modify the release induced by calcium pre-treatment. 6. Spleen slices prepared from cats anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone instead of ether were resistant to noradrenaline depletion by calcium pre-treatment. 7. Evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline by high potassium from calcium-pre-treated slices did not occur in the absence of external calcium, even though the calcium pre-treatment enhanced the tissue concentration of this ion by nearly tenfold. 8. Net uptake of noradrenaline in normal and in treated slices whose noradrenaline content was severely reduced by barium pre-treatment or sodium withdrawal was comparable. 9. Specific activity of released and endogenous [3H]noradrenaline increased as the tissue stores of noradrenaline were reduced. 10. It is suggested that the spontaneous loss of tissue noradrenaline after pre-treatment with high-calcium solution was due to inhibition of sodium-potassium-activated ATPase by intracellular

  19. Increased asynchronous release and aberrant calcium channel activation in amyloid precursor protein deficient neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wang, B; Long, C; Wu, G; Zheng, H

    2007-11-23

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca(2+) channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca(2+) channel function.

  20. Controlled release based on the dissolution of a calcium carbonate layer deposited on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ogomi, Daisuke; Serizawa, Takeshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-03-21

    It is possible that inorganic materials conjugated to suitable organic materials may induce unique mechanical, optical and other functional properties. Therefore, artificial conjugation of organic and inorganic components is attractive for preparing novel functional materials. Recently, we developed an alternate soaking process for calcium salt formation on/in polymer materials. In this study, a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel-calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) composite was prepared by the aforementioned process as a controlled release support. Brilliant blue FCF (Mw = 794), FITC labeled BSA (Mw = 6.6 x 10(4)), FITC labeled dextran-10 k (Mw = 9.5 x 10(3)) and FITC labeled dextran-40 k (Mw = 4.3 x 10(4)) were loaded into the composite as model drugs. CaCO(3) dissolution and model drug release rates increased with a decrease in buffer pH. In addition, model drug release rates increased with a decrease in model drug molecular weight. These results show that CaCO(3) layers on hydrogels behave as capping layers for model drug release; the release rate of model drugs can be controlled by the dissolution rate of CaCO(3) and the molecular weight of the drug.

  1. Microstructural control of modular peptide release from microporous biphasic calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Polak, Samantha J; Lee, Jae Sung; Murphy, William L; Tadier, Solène; Grémillard, Laurent; Lightcap, Ian V; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J

    2017-03-01

    Drug release from tissue scaffolds is commonly controlled by using coatings and carriers, as well as by varying the binding affinity of molecules being released. This paper considers modulating synthetic peptide incorporation and release through the use of interconnected microporosity in biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and identifies the microstructural characteristics important to the release using experiments and a model of relative diffusivity. First, the release of three modular peptides designed to include an osteocalcin-inspired binding sequence based on bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) was compared and one was selected for further study. Next, the incorporation and release of the peptide from four types of substrates were compared: non-microporous (NMP) substrates had no microporosity; microporous (MP) substrates were either 50% microporous with 5μm pores (50/5), 60% microporous with 5μm pores (60/5), or 50% microporous with 50μm pores (50/50). Results showed that MP substrates incorporated significantly more peptide than NMP ones, but that the three different microporous substrates all incorporated the same total amount of peptide. NMP had a markedly lower release rate compared to each of three of the MP samples, though the initial burst release was the highest. The initial release and the release rate for the 60/5 samples were different from the 50/50, though they were not statistically different from the 50/5. The model indicated that the pore interconnection to pore size ratio, affecting the constriction between pores, had the greatest influence on the calculated relative diffusivity. While the model was consistent with the trends observed experimentally, the quantitative experimental results suggested that to attain an appreciable difference in release characteristics, both pore size and pore fraction should be changed for this system. These results contribute to rational scaffold design by showing that microstructure, specifically microporosity

  2. Releasing phosphorus from calcium for struvite fertilizer production from anaerobically digested dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Bowers, Keith E; Harrison, Joseph H; Chen, Shulin

    2010-01-01

    Being a non-renewable resource and a source of potential water pollution, phosphorus could be recovered from animal manure in the form of struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) to be used as a slow-release fertilizer. It was found recently that the majority of phosphorus in anaerobically digested dairy effluent is tied up in a fine suspended calcium-phosphate solid, thus becoming unavailable for struvite formation. Acidification and use of a chelating agent were investigated for converting the calcium-associated phosphorus in the digested effluent to dissolved phosphate ions, so that struvite can be produced. The results demonstrated that the phosphorus in the effluent was released into the solution by lowering the pH. In addition, the phosphorus concentration in the solution increased significantly with increased ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) concentration, as EDTA has a high stability constant with calcium. Most of the phosphorus (91%) was released into the solution after adding EDTA. Further, the freed phosphorus ion precipitated out as struvite provided that sufficient magnesium ions (Mg2+) were present in the solution. Furthermore, the phase structure of the solid precipitate obtained from the EDTA treatment matched well with standard struvite, based on the data from X-ray diffraction analysis. These results provide methods for altering the forms of phosphorus for the design and application of phosphorus-removal technologies for dairy wastewater management.

  3. Effect of soft drinks on the release of calcium from enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Surarit, Rudee

    2013-09-01

    Continuous consumption of soft drinks is the main cause of potential oral health problems, including dental caries and erosion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different types of soft drinks on the release of calcium from the enamel surface of teeth. Forty bovine teeth were selected for the experiment. They were divided into four groups (n=10/group): Group 1 (Coke), Group 2 (Pepsi), Group 3 (Sprite), and Group 4 (distilled water, the control). The pH of each beverage was measured using a pH meter. The release of calcium ions was measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer at baseline, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results were assessed by analysis of variance and then by the Tukey test (p< 0.05). Coke, with a pH of 2.39, was the most acidic among the soft drinks. Coke, Pepsi, and Sprite showed no significant mean differences in the calcium released, but there was a significant mean difference of these soft drinks with distilled water at 60 minutes. We concluded that prolonged exposure to soft drinks could lead to significant enamel loss.

  4. Levetiracetam Inhibits Both Ryanodine and IP3 Receptor Activated Calcium Induced Calcium Release in Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Nisha; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and there is a pressing need to develop new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and understand their mechanisms of action. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel AED and despite its increasingly widespread clinical use, its mechanism of action is as yet undetermined. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) regulation by both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) has been implicated in epileptogenesis and the maintenance of epilepsy. To this end, we investigated the effect of LEV on RyR and IP3R activated calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in hippocampal neuronal cultures. RyR-mediated CICR was stimulated using the well-characterized RyR activator, caffeine. Caffeine (10mM) caused a significant increase in [Ca2+]i in hippocampal neurons. Treatment with LEV (33μM) prior to stimulation of RyR-mediated CICR by caffeine led to a 61% decrease in the caffeine induced peak height of [Ca2+]i when compared to the control. Bradykinin stimulates IP3R-activated CICR—to test the effect of LEV on IP3R-mediated CICR, bradykinin (1μM) was used to stimulate cells pre-treated with LEV (100μM). The data showed that LEV caused a 74% decrease in IP3R-mediated CICR compared to the control. In previous studies we have shown that altered Ca2+ homeostatic mechanisms play a role in seizure activity and the development of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs). Elevations in [Ca2+]i mediated by CICR systems have been associated with neurotoxicity, changes in neuronal plasticity, and the development of AE. Thus, the ability of LEV to modulate the two major CICR systems demonstrates an important molecular effect of this agent on a major second messenger system in neurons. PMID:18406528

  5. A highly calcium-selective cation current activated by intracellular calcium release in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Delles, C; Haller, T; Dietl, P

    1995-08-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence microscopy with the Ca2+ indicators fura-2 and fluo-3 were used to measure the whole-cell current and the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. 2. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, thapsigargin (TG) caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ caused a long lasting elevation of [Ca2+]i. 3. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, extracellular application of TG, ATP or ionomycin, or intracellular application of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), caused a small but significant inward current (Iin) and a transient outward Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), consistent with intracellular Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ induced a prominent Iin with a current density of -4.2 +/- 0.7 pA pF-1. This Iin was unaffected by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4). 4. Na+ replacement by mannitol, N-methyl-D-glucamine+ (NMG+), aminomethylidin-trimethanol+ (Tris+) or choline+ reduced Iin by 54, 65, 52 and 56%, respectively. This indicates an apparent Ca2+ selectivity over Na+ of 26:1. Iin was, however, unaffected by replacing Cl- with gluconate- or by the K+ channel blocker charybdotoxin (CTX). 5. Iin was completely blocked by La3+ (IC50 = 0.77 microM). Consistently, La3+ completely reversed the TG-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. SK&F 96365 (1-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propoxyl]-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethyl-1H-im idazole) HCl did not inhibit the TG-induced Iin. It did, however, exhibit a biphasic effect on [Ca2+]i, consisting of an initial Ca2+ decay and a subsequent Ca2+ elevation. La3+ completely reversed the SK&F 96365-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. In the absence of Na+, Iin was dependent on the bath Ca2+ concentration (EC50 = 1.02 mM). Ca2+ replacement by Ba2+ or Mn2+ resulted in a reduction of Iin by 95 and 94%, respectively. 7. From these experiments we conclude that Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, induced by different independent

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  7. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30(-/-) mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca(2+)]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30(-/-) CCDs ([Ca(2+)]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca(2+)]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30(-/-) mice. The [Ca(2+)]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption.

  8. ATP Releasing Connexin 30 Hemichannels Mediate Flow-Induced Calcium Signaling in the Collecting Duct

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30−/− mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30−/− mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca2+]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30−/− CCDs ([Ca2+]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca2+]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30−/− mice. The [Ca2+]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption. PMID:24137132

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane-Bound STIM1 to Investigate Conformational Changes during STIM1 Activation upon Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sreya; Karolak, Aleksandra; Debant, Marjolaine; Buscaglia, Paul; Renaudineau, Yves; Mignen, Olivier; Guida, Wayne C; Brooks, Wesley H

    2017-02-27

    Calcium is involved in important intracellular processes, such as intracellular signaling from cell membrane receptors to the nucleus. Typically, calcium levels are kept at less than 100 nM in the nucleus and cytosol, but some calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for rapid release to activate intracellular calcium-dependent functions. Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1) plays a critical role in early sensing of changes in the ER's calcium level, especially when there is a sudden release of stored calcium from the ER. Inactive STIM1, which has a bound calcium ion, is activated upon ion release. Following activation of STIM1, there is STIM1-assisted initiation of extracellular calcium entry through channels in the cell membrane. This extracellular calcium entering the cell then amplifies intracellular calcium-dependent actions. At the end of the process, ER levels of stored calcium are reestablished. The main focus of this work was to study the conformational changes accompanying homo- or heterodimerization of STIM1. For this purpose, the ER luminal portion of STIM1 (residues 58-236), which includes the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain plus the calcium-binding EF-hand domains 1 and 2 attached to the STIM1 transmembrane region (TM), was modeled and embedded in a virtual membrane. Next, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the conformational changes that take place during STIM1 activation and subsequent protein-protein interactions. Indeed, the simulations revealed exposure of residues in the EF-hand domains, which may be important for dimerization steps. Altogether, understanding conformational changes in STIM1 can help in drug discovery when targeting this key protein in intracellular calcium functions.

  10. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J Carlos; Wacha, András; Gomes, Pedro S; Alves, Luís C; Fernandes, M Helena Vaz; Salvado, Isabel M Miranda; Fernandes, M Helena R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS-SiO2 have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS-SiO2-CaO-SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO2. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol-gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity.

  11. Co-operative action of calcium ions in transmitter release at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, F. A.; Rahamimoff, R.

    1967-01-01

    1. The quantitative dependence of transmitter release on external calcium concentration has been studied at the frog neuromuscular junction, using intracellular recording and taking the amplitude of the end-plate potential (e.p.p.) as an index of the number of packets released. 2. The relation between [Ca] and the e.p.p. is highly non-linear. The initial part of this relation on double logarithmic co-ordinates gives a straight line with a slope of nearly four (mean 3·78 ± 0·2 S.D. in 28 experiments). Addition of a constant amount of Mg reduces the e.p.p. without altering the slope of the log e.p.p./log Ca relation. 3. The slope of this logarithmic relation diminishes as [Ca] is raised towards the normal level. 4. The results are explained quantitatively on the hypothesis that Ca ions combine with a specific site X on the nerve terminal forming CaX, and that the number of packets of acetylcholine released is proportional to the fourth power of [CaX]. 5. The analysis suggests that a co-operative action of about four calcium ions is necessary for the release of each quantal packet of transmitter by the nerve impulse. PMID:6065887

  12. Effect of thymol on calcium handling in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Szentandrássy, Norbert; Szigeti, Gyula; Szegedi, Csaba; Sárközi, Sándor; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Csernoch, László; Kovács, László; Nánási, Péter P; Jóna, István

    2004-01-02

    Concentration-dependent effects of thymol on calcium handling were studied in canine and guinea pig cardiac preparations (Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts, canine ventricular trabeculae, canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles and single ryanodine receptors). Thymol induced a concentration-dependent negative inotropic action in both canine and guinea pig preparations (EC(50) = 297 +/- 12 microM in dog). However, low concentrations of thymol reduced intracellular calcium transients in guinea pig hearts without decreasing contractility. At higher concentrations both calcium transients and contractions were suppressed. In canine sarcoplasmic reticular vesicles thymol induced rapid release of calcium (V(max) = 0.47 +/- 0.04 nmol s(-1), EC(50) = 258 +/- 21 microM, Hill coefficient = 3.0 +/- 0.54), and decreased the activity of the calcium pump (EC(50) = 253 +/- 4.7 microM, Hill coefficient = 1.62 +/- 0.05). Due to the less sharp concentration-dependence of the ATPase inhibition, this effect was significant from 50 microM, whereas the thymol-induced calcium release only from 100 microM. In single ryanodine receptors incorporated into artificial lipid bilayer thymol induced long lasting openings, having mean open times increased with 3 orders of magnitude, however, the specific conductance of the channel remained unaltered. This effect of thymol was not voltage-dependent and failed to prevent the binding of ryanodine. In conclusion, the negative inotropic action of thymol can be explained by reduction in calcium content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum due to the combination of the thymol-induced calcium release and inhibition of the calcium pump. The calcium-sensitizer effect, observed at lower thymol concentrations, indicates that thymol is likely to interact with the contractile machinery also.

  13. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D'Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-05-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a "leaky" RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

  14. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a “leaky” RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25844899

  15. Degradation and drug release in calcium polyphosphate bioceramics: an MRI-based characterization.

    PubMed

    Bray, J M; Filiaggi, M J; Bowen, C V; Beyea, S D

    2012-10-01

    Degradable, bioceramic bone implants made of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) hold potential for controlled release of therapeutic agents in the treatment of localized bone disease. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques for non-invasively mapping fluid distribution, T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient were performed in conjunction with a drug elution protocol to resolve free and bound water components within the material microstructure in two CPP formulations (G1 and G2). The T(2) maps provided the most accurate estimates of free and bound water, and showed that G1 disks contained a detectable free water component at all times, with drug release dominated by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. Drug release from G2 disks was characterized by a combined diffusional/structural relaxation mechanism, which may be related to the gradual infiltration of a free water component associated with swelling and/or chemical degradation.

  16. Protein encapsulation and release from PEO-b-polyphosphoester templated calcium carbonate particles.

    PubMed

    Ergul Yilmaz, Zeynep; Cordonnier, Thomas; Debuigne, Antoine; Calvignac, Brice; Jerome, Christine; Boury, Frank

    2016-11-20

    Calcium carbonate particles are promising candidates as proteins carriers for their controlled delivery in the body. The present paper aims at investigating the protein encapsulation by in situ precipitation of calcium carbonate particles prepared by a process based on supercritical CO2 and using a new type of degradable well-defined double hydrophilic block copolymers composed of poly(ethylene oxide) and polyphosphoester blocks acting as templating agent for the calcium carbonate. For this study, lysozyme was chosen as a model for therapeutic protein for its availability and ease of detection. It was found that by this green process, loading into the CaCO3 microparticles with a diameter about 2μm can be obtained as determined by scanning electron microscopy. A protein loading up to 6.5% active lysozyme was measured by a specific bioassay (Micrococcus lysodeikticus). By encapsulating fluorescent-labelled lysozyme (lysozyme-FITC), the confocal microscopy images confirmed its encapsulation and suggested a core-shell distribution of lysozyme into CaCO3, leading to a release profile reaching a steady state at 59% of release after 90min. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The inhibition of neuronal calcium ion channels by trace levels of yttrium released from carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jakubek, Lorin; Marangoudakis, Spiro; Raingo, Jessica; Liu, Xinyuan; Lipscombe, Diane; Hurt, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used with increasing frequency in neuroengineering applications. CNT scaffolds are used to transmit electrical stimulation to cultured neurons and to control outgrowth and branching patterns of neurites. CNTs have been reported to disrupt normal neuronal function including alterations in endocytotic capability and inhibition of ion channels. Calcium ion channels regulate numerous neuronal and cellular functions including endo and exocytosis, neurite outgrowth, and gene expression. Strong CNT interactions with neuronal calcium ion channels would have profound biological implications. Here we show that physiological solutions containing CNTs inhibit neuronal voltage-gated calcium-ion channels in a dose dependent and CNT-sample-dependent manner with IC50 as low as 1.2 ug/ml. Importantly, we demonstrate that the inhibitory activity does not involve tubular graphene as previously reported, but rather very low concentrations of soluble yttrium released from the nanotube growth catalyst. Cationic yttrium potently inhibits calcium ion channel function with an inhibitory efficacy, IC50, of 0.07 ppm w/w. Because of this potency, unpurified and even some reportedly “purified” CNT samples contain sufficient bioavailable yttrium to inhibit channel function. Our results have important implications for emerging nano-neurotechnology and highlight the critical role that trace components can play in the biological response to complex nanomaterials. PMID:19698989

  18. Diffusion characteristics and controlled release of bacterial fertilizers from modified calcium alginate capsules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Jane-Yii; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2008-04-01

    An indigenous Cellulosimicrobium cellulans GS6 isolate able to solubilize insoluble phosphate complexes in soil is a potential bacterial fertilizer. Enclosure of the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) in biodegradable capsules may protect the PSB cells inoculated into soil and, in the meantime, enable the control of cell release that confers long-term fertilizing effects. In this study, calcium alginate (CA) was used as the core matrix to encapsulate cells of C. cellulans GS6. The cell-liberating properties of the CA-based capsules were modified by blending with a variety of supplemental materials (SM), including chitin, cellulose, olive oil, and gelatin. The experimental results showed that the maximum cell-release percentage (MCR%) of the capsules decreased in the order of CA-cellulose>CA-olive oil>CA-chitin>CA-gelatin>CA. Furthermore, a mass transport model was developed to accurately describe the kinetics of cell release results for each capsule. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of each capsule was also determined from the model simulation. We found that the estimated D(e) values are positively correlated to the release rate with rare exceptions. Lastly, as our results underscored the crucial roles that the type of capsules plays in the rate and amount of cell release, controlled release of the bacterial fertilizer (C. cellulans GS6 cells) may be achieved via the design of capsule materials.

  19. Calcium Binding-Mediated Sustained Release of Minocycline from Hydrophilic Multilayer Coatings Targeting Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiling; Nix, Camilla A.; Ercan, Utku K.; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Joshi, Suresh G.; Zhong, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    Infection and inflammation are common complications that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of implanted medical implants. Systemic administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs often cannot achieve sufficient local concentration to be effective, and elicits serious side effects. Local delivery of therapeutics from drug-eluting coatings presents a promising solution. However, hydrophobic and thick coatings are commonly used to ensure sufficient drug loading and sustained release, which may limit tissue integration and tissue device communications. A calcium-mediated drug delivery mechanism was developed and characterized in this study. This novel mechanism allows controlled, sustained release of minocycline, an effective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, from nanoscale thin hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers for over 35 days at physiologically relevant concentrations. pH-responsive minocycline release was observed as the chelation between minocycline and Ca2+ is less stable at acidic pH, enabling ‘smart’ drug delivery in response to infection and/or inflammation-induced tissue acidosis. The release kinetics of minocycline can be controlled by varying initial loading, Ca2+ concentration, and Ca2+ incorporation into different layers, enabling facile development of implant coatings with versatile release kinetics. This drug delivery platform can potentially be used for releasing any drug that has high Ca2+ binding affinity, enabling its use in a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:24409292

  20. Selenoprotein N is required for ryanodine receptor calcium release channel activity in human and zebrafish muscle.

    PubMed

    Jurynec, Michael J; Xia, Ruohong; Mackrill, John J; Gunther, Derrick; Crawford, Thomas; Flanigan, Kevin M; Abramson, Jonathan J; Howard, Michael T; Grunwald, David Jonah

    2008-08-26

    Mutations affecting the seemingly unrelated gene products, SepN1, a selenoprotein of unknown function, and RyR1, the major component of the ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel, result in an overlapping spectrum of congenital myopathies. To identify the immediate developmental and molecular roles of SepN and RyR in vivo, loss-of-function effects were analyzed in the zebrafish embryo. These studies demonstrate the two proteins are required for the same cellular differentiation events and are needed for normal calcium fluxes in the embryo. SepN is physically associated with RyRs and functions as a modifier of the RyR channel. In the absence of SepN, ryanodine receptors from zebrafish embryos or human diseased muscle have altered biochemical properties and have lost their normal sensitivity to redox conditions, which likely accounts for why mutations affecting either factor lead to similar diseases.

  1. Regulation of renin release by calcium and ammonium ions in normal man.

    PubMed

    Kisch, E S; Dluhy, R G; Williams, G H

    1976-12-01

    The effect of infusing calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, sodium lactate, and ammonium chloride on renin secretion was compared to equimolar infusions of hypotonic and normal saline in sodium-deplete normal subjects. The infusion of 75 mEq of ammonium chloride for 60 min in 6 normal, sodium-deplete subjects suppressed plasma renin activity significantly (P less than 0.01) from 4.4 +/- 0.8 to 2.1 +/- 0.2 ng/ml/h, an effect comparable to that produced by normal saline. Sodium lactate (75 mEq sodium/hr) also significantly reduced renin levels at 20-30 min (P less than 0.01). The infusion of 1/3 normal saline (25 mEq sodium/h for 2 h) produced a significant reduction (P less than 0.01) in plasma renin activity (from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.8 to 3.1 +/- 0.6 ng/ml/h at 90 min). On the other hand, comparable infusions of 50 mEq of magnesium sulfate over 2 h had no effect on renin release (4.6 +/- 0.8 to 4.6 +/- 0.9 ng/ml/h at 2 h), while the infusion of calcium chloride produced an intermediate reduction (5.2 +/- 1.2 to 3.7 +/- 0.8 ng/ml/h at 2 h (P less than 0.05). The observed effects of the hydrogen and calcium ions on suppressing renin release may be secondary to their known actions on renal sodium excretion. Since the infusions of calcium and hydrogen ions both result in an increased delivery of sodium to the distal segment of the nephron, the results may reflect the regulation of renin by the macula densa, a sensitive intrarenal sensor of renal tubular sodium.

  2. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  3. Intramembrane charge movement and sarcoplasmic calcium release in enzymatically isolated mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Szentesi, P; Jacquemond, V; Kovács, L; Csernoch, L

    1997-01-01

    1. Single muscle fibres were dissociated enzymatically from the extensor digitorum longus and communis muscles of rats and guinea-pigs. The fibres were mounted into a double Vaseline gap experimental chamber and the events in excitation-contraction coupling were studied under voltage clamp conditions. 2. The voltage dependence of intramembrane charge movement followed a two-state Boltzmann distribution with maximal available charge of 26.1 +/- 1.5 and 26.1 +/- 1.3 nC microF-1, mid-point voltage of -35.1 +/- 5.0 and -42.2 +/- 1.2 mV and steepness of 16.7 +/- 2.2 and 17.0 +/- 1.9 mV (means +/- S.E.M., n = 7 and 4) in rats and guinea-pigs, respectively. 3. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored using the calcium-sensitive dyes antipyrylazo III, fura-2 and mag-fura-5. Resting [Ca2+]i was similar in rats and guinea-pigs with 125 +/- 18 and 115 +/- 8 nM (n = 10 and 9), respectively, while the maximal increase for a 100 ms depolarization to 0 mV was larger in rats (6.3 +/- 1.0 microM; n = 7), than in guinea-pigs (2.8 +/- 0.3; n = 4). 4. The rate of calcium release (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) displayed an early peak followed by a fast and a slow decline to a quasi maintained steady level. After normalizing Rrel to the estimated SR calcium content (1.2 +/- 0.1 and 0.9 +/- 0.1 mM in rats and guinea-pigs, respectively) and correcting for depletion of calcium in the SR the peak and steady levels at 0 mV, respectively, were found to be 2.50 +/- 0.08 and 0.81 +/- 0.06% ms-1 in rats and 2.43 +/- 0.25 and 0.88 +/- 0.01% ms-1 in guinea-pigs. The voltage dependence was essentially the same in both species, but different from that in amphibians. 5. These experiments show that enzymatic isolation yields functionally intact mammalian skeletal muscle fibres for Vaseline gap experiments. The data also suggest a close connection in the regulation of the different kinetic components of SR calcium release in mammalian skeletal muscle. PMID:9423180

  4. Role of nucleotide P2 receptors in calcium signaling and prolactin release in pituitary lactotrophs.

    PubMed

    He, Mu-Lan; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2003-11-21

    Anterior pituitary cells express nucleotide-gated G protein-coupled P2 receptors (P2YRs) and cation-conducting channels (P2XRs). However, the identification of P2 receptors subtypes and their native ligands, and the distribution and function of these receptors within the secretory and non-secretory pituitary cells has been incompletely characterized. The focus in this study was on lactotroph subpopulation of cells. ATP and ADP, but not UTP and UDP, triggered calcium signaling in a majority (85%) of lactotrophs and prolactin release in mixed pituitary cells. Consistent with the role of P2 receptors in signaling and secretion, the actions of ATP and ADP were abolished in the presence of apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. Transcripts for Gq-coupled calcium-mobilizing P2Y1R, P2Y2R, P2Y4R, and P2Y6R, as well as Gi-coupled P2Y12R, were identified in mixed anterior pituitary cells. The ligand-selectivity profile of calcium mobilization-dependent signaling and prolactin secretion and the blockade of these responses by pyridoxal 5-phosphate 6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid indicated that P2Y1R mediates the stimulatory action of ATP and ADP. Within the channels expressed in anterior pituitary (P2X2R, P2X3R, P2X4R, and P2X7R), the P2X4R subtype provides a major pathway for calcium influx-dependent signaling and prolactin secretion. This conclusion was based on comparison of native to recombinant channels with respect to their ligand preference, sensitivity to pyridoxal 5-phosphate 6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid, and the rates of calcium signal desensitization.

  5. Inhibitors of calcium buffering depress evoked transmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D J; Takeda, K; Umbach, J A

    1985-01-01

    Evoked release of transmitter at the squid giant synapse was examined under conditions where the calcium ion concentration in the presynaptic terminal was manipulated by inhibitors of calcium sequestration. Simultaneous intracellular recordings of presynaptic and post-synaptic resting and action potentials were made during bath application of one of the following metabolic inhibitors: sodium cyanide (NaCN), carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP); ruthenium red (RuR) and sodium-free (lithium) sea water. Cyanide and lithium sea water reversibly depressed the post-synaptic potential (p.s.p.) whilst RuR and FCCP blocked the evoked post-synaptic response irreversibly. The progressive reduction of p.s.p. amplitude was accompanied by a reversible increase in synaptic delay. The time course of block of the p.s.p. was similar for different agents and dependent on the rate of presynaptic activity (30-40 min at 0.01 Hz). Recovery of the post-synaptic action potential following block by cyanide and lithium sea water was obtained within 40 min and 5 min respectively. Synaptic depression by the metabolic inhibitors does not result from changes in presynaptic resting or action potentials, nor from a change in post-synaptic receptor sensitivity. The post-synaptic response to the local ionophoresis of L-glutamate was unchanged following inhibition of evoked release of transmitter by cyanide. Injections of EGTA into presynaptic terminals poisoned by cyanide produced transient increases in p.s.p. amplitude, suggesting that cyanide is having its effect through raising intracellular calcium rather than lowering ATP. Control experiments injecting EGTA into unpoisoned nerve terminals showed no apparent effect on evoked transmitter release. PMID:2419546

  6. Erosive effects of different acids on bovine enamel: release of calcium and phosphate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Hamkens, Arne; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Rengin; Attin, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The present study intended to investigate minimal erosive effects of different acids on enamel during short time incubation via determination of calcium and phosphate dissolution. Bovine enamel specimens were eroded for 1-5 min with eight different acids of pH 2, 2.3 and 3 (citric (CA), maleic (MA), lactic (LA), tartaric (TA), phosphoric (PA), oxalic (OA), acetic (AA) and hydrochloric acid (HCl)). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) release were determined photometrically using arsenazo III (calcium) and malachite green (phosphate) as substrates. Each subgroup contained eight enamel specimens. Amount of titratable acid was determined for all acidic solutions. MA, LA, TA, AA and HCl caused linear release of Ca and P, PA of Ca, CA of P. For CA, MA, LA, TA, AA, PA and HCl mineral loss was shown to be pH-dependent. Ca dissolution varied between 28.6+/-4.4 (LA, pH 2) and 2.4+/-0.7 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3), P dissolution ranged between 17.2+/-2.6 (LA, pH 2) and 1.4+/-0.4 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3). LA was one of the most erosive acids. AA was very erosive at pH 3. HCl and MA were shown to have the lowest erosive effects. There was only a weak correlation (r=0.28) between P and Ca release and the amount of titratable acid. The method of the present study allows investigation of minimal erosive effects via direct determination of P and Ca dissolution. During short time exposition at constant pH level, erosive effects mainly depend on pH and type of acid but not on amount of titratable acid.

  7. Development of sustained-release lipophilic calcium stearate pellets via hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Roblegg, Eva; Jäger, Evelyn; Hodzic, Aden; Koscher, Gerold; Mohr, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas; Khinast, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was the development of retarded release pellets using vegetable calcium stearate (CaSt) as a thermoplastic excipient. The matrix carrier was hot melt extruded and pelletized with a hot-strand cutter in a one step continuous process. Vegetable CaSt was extruded at temperatures between 100 and 130°C, since at these temperatures cutable extrudates with a suitable melt viscosity may be obtained. Pellets with a drug loading of 20% paracetamol released 11.54% of the drug after 8h due to the great densification of the pellets. As expected, the drug release was influenced by the pellet size and the drug loading. To increase the release rate, functional additives were necessary. Therefore, two plasticizers including glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and tributyl citrate (TBC) were investigated for plasticization efficiency and impact on the in vitro drug release. GMS increased the release rate due to the formation of pores at the surface (after dissolution) and showed no influence on the process parameters. The addition of TBC increased the drug release to a higher extent. After dissolving, the pellets exhibited pores at the surface and in the inner layer. Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) revealed no major change in crystalline peaks. The results demonstrated that (nearly) spherical CaSt pellets could be successfully prepared by hot melt extrusion using a hot-strand cutter as downstreaming system. Paracetamol did not melt during the process indicating a solid suspension. Due to the addition of plasticizers, the in vitro release rate could be tailored as desired.

  8. Calmodulin modulates the delay period between release of calcium from internal stores and activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Luis; Sampieri, Alicia

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we have explored the role of calmodulin (CaM) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) in the communication process activated after the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels from Chinese hamster ovary cells. Experiments using combined rapid confocal calcium and electrophysiology measurements uncovered a consistent delay of around 900 ms between the first detectable calcium released from the ER and the activation of the calcium current. This delay was evident with two different methods used to release calcium from the ER: either the blockade of the microsomal calcium ATPase with thapsigargin or activation of bradykinin receptors linked to the IP(3) cascade. Direct application of IP(3) or a peptide from the NH(2)-terminal region of the IP(3)R activated store operated calcium, reducing the delay period. Introduction of CaM into the cell via the patch pipette increased the delay period from 900 +/- 100 ms to 10 +/- 2.1 s (n = 18). Furthermore, the use of selective CaM antagonists W7 and trifluoperazine maleate resulted in a substantial reduction of the delay period to 200 +/- 100 ms with 5 microm trifluoperazine maleate (n = 16) and 150 +/- 50 ms with 500 nm W7 (n = 22). CaM reduced also the current density activated by thapsigargin or brandykinin to about 60% from control. The CaM antagonists did not affect significantly the current density. The results presented here are consistent with an antagonistic effect of IP(3)R and CaM for the activation of store operated calcium after depletion of the ER. The functional competition between the activating effect of IP(3)R and the inhibiting effect of CaM may modulate the delay period between the release of calcium from the ER and the activation of calcium influx observed in different cells, as well as the amount of current activated after depletion of the ER.

  9. Influence of strontium for calcium substitution in bioactive glasses on degradation, ion release and apatite formation

    PubMed Central

    Fredholm, Yann C.; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S.; Jones, Julian R.; Law, Robert V.; Hill, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone through the formation of hydroxy-carbonate apatite in body fluids while strontium (Sr)-releasing bioactive glasses are of interest for patients suffering from osteoporosis, as Sr was shown to increase bone formation both in vitro and in vivo. A melt-derived glass series (SiO2–P2O5–CaO–Na2O) with 0–100% of calcium (Ca) replaced by Sr on a molar base was prepared. pH change, ion release and apatite formation during immersion of glass powder in simulated body fluid and Tris buffer at 37°C over up to 8 h were investigated and showed that substituting Sr for Ca increased glass dissolution and ion release, an effect owing to an expansion of the glass network caused by the larger ionic radius of Sr ions compared with Ca. Sr release increased linearly with Sr substitution, and apatite formation was enhanced significantly in the fully Sr-substituted glass, which allowed for enhanced osteoblast attachment as well as proliferation and control of osteoblast and osteoclast activity as shown previously. Studying the composition–structure–property relationship in bioactive glasses enables us to successfully design next-generation biomaterials that combine the bone regenerative properties of bioactive glasses with the release of therapeutically active Sr ions. PMID:21993007

  10. Reduction of calcium release site models via moment fitting of phase-type distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMar, M. Drew; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D.

    2011-04-01

    Models of calcium (Ca2 +) release sites derived from continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) models of intracellular Ca2 + channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of Ca2 + puffs and sparks. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in compositionally defined Ca2 + release site models, we have implemented an automated procedure for model reduction that replaces aggregated states of the full release site model with much simpler CTMCs that have similar within-group phase-type sojourn times and inter-group transitions. Error analysis based on comparison of full and reduced models validates the method when applied to release site models composed of 20 three-state channels that are both activated and inactivated by Ca2 +. Although inspired by existing techniques for fitting moments of phase-type distributions, the automated reduction method for compositional Ca2 + release site models is unique in several respects and novel in this biophysical context.

  11. Sustained release of small molecules from carbon nanotube-reinforced monetite calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Boren; Zhou, Huan; Leaman, Douglas W; Goel, Vijay K; Agarwal, Anand K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-10-01

    The interest in developing calcium phosphate cement (CPC) as a drug delivery system has risen because of its capability to achieve local and controlled treatment to the site of the bone disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the release pattern of drug-carrying carboxylic acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced monetite (DCPA, CaHPO4)-based CPC. Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al (MG132), a small peptide molecule inhibiting NF-κB-mediated osteoclastic resorption, was used as a model drug. MG132 was added into the cement during setting and released into the medium used to culture indicator cells. Significant cell death was observed in osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in the medium incubated with MG132-loaded CPC; however, with the presence of MWCNTs in the cement, the toxic effect was not detectable. NF-κB activation was quantified using a NF-κB promoter-driving luciferase reporter in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The medium collected after incubation with drug-incorporated CPC with or without MWCNT inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activation indicating that the effective amount of MG132 was released. CPC/drug complex showed a rapid release within 24h whereas incorporation of MWCNTs attenuated this burst release effect. In addition, suppression of TNFα-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cell culture also confirmed the sustained release of MWCNT/CPC/drug. Our data demonstrated the drug delivery capability of this cement composite, which can potentially be used to carry therapeutic molecules to improve bone regeneration in conjunction with its fracture stabilizing function. Furthermore, it suggested a novel approach to lessen the burst release effect of the CPC-based drug delivery system by incorporating functionalized MWCNTs.

  12. Effects of experimental conditions on the release of 45calcium from prelabeled fetal mouse long bones.

    PubMed

    van Beek, E; Oostendorp-van de Ruit, M; van der Wee-Pals, L; Bloys, H; van de Bent, C; Papapoulos, S; Löwik, C

    1995-07-01

    Embryonic/neonatal bones in culture are commonly used for the study of osteoclastic resorption in vitro. For this purpose, the release of 45calcium (45Ca) from prelabeled bones is measured as an index of resorption. We studied 45Ca release from two types of long bone explants after different preparation methods: 17-day-old fetal mouse radii/ulnae with and without cartilage ends (intact radii/ulnae and shafts, respectively), and intact 18-day old metacarpals/metatarsals. In addition, we examined the effect of different culture conditions, such as cultures performed under the surface of the medium or at the interphase of medium and air, on 45Ca release and histology. When intact radii/ulnae were cultured under the surface of the medium, there was always a significant amount (10%) of net basal 45Ca release (corrected for physicochemical exchange) that was not due to osteoclastic resorption, as it could not be suppressed by inhibitors of resorption even at high concentrations. Moreover, histologically TRAcP-positive cells were almost absent after culture and the bone marrow/stromal cells in the center of the bone appeared necrotic, possibly due to a lack of oxygen. Under these culture conditions, osteoclasts could survive in shafts as well as in PTH-stimulated intact radii/ulnae, but a constant amount of 10% 45Ca, not due to resorption, was still released in the medium. When these explants were cultured at the interphase of medium and air, basal and stimulated 45Ca release originated from osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, in 18-day-old fetal mouse metacarpals/metatarsals, the experimental conditions applied did not affect 45Ca release, which was always due to resorption of the explants by osteoclasts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Acid-induced release of curcumin from calcium containing nanotheranostic excipient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aifei; Muhammad, Faheem; Qi, Wenxiu; Wang, Nan; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Guangshan

    2014-08-27

    Poor water solubility is believed one of the most critical problems of numerous promising pharmaceutical ingredients in their successful clinical utilization. Nanomedicine holds considerable promise to address this challenge, because it extends the therapeutic window of hydrophobic drugs through nanonization approach. Recently, the integration of diagnostic agents with smart therapeutic nanocarriers is also an emerging research arena to simultaneously visualize diseased tissues, achieve site specific drug release and track the impact of therapy. In this study, we have developed a biocompatible smart theranostic nanosystem which transports a highly promising hydrophobic drug (curcumin) in response to mildly acidic environment. As calcium is a main constituent of human body, hence we exploited the reversible calcium chelate formation tendency of divalent calcium to load and unload curcumin molecules. Moreover, an emerging T1 contrast agent is also tethered onto the surface of nanocarrier to realize MRI diagnosis application. In-vitro cell experiments revealed a significantly high chemotherapeutic efficiency of curcumin nanoformulation (IC50; 1.67 μg/mL), whereas free curcumin was found ineffective at the corresponding concentration (IC50; 29.72 μg/mL). MR imaging test also validated the performance of resulting system. Our strategy can be extended for the targeted delivery of other hydrophobic pharmaceutical ingredients.

  14. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  15. Roscovitine: a novel regulator of P/Q-type calcium channels and transmitter release in central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhen; Chi, Ping; Bibb, James A; Ryan, Timothy A; Greengard, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Roscovitine is widely used for inhibition of cdk5, a cyclin-dependent kinase expressed predominantly in the brain. A novel function of roscovitine, i.e. an effect on Ca2+ channels and transmitter release in central neurons, was studied by whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings and time-lapse fluorescence imaging techniques. Extracellular application of roscovitine markedly enhanced the tail calcium current following repolarization from depolarized voltages. This effect was rapid, reversible and dose dependent. Roscovitine dramatically slowed the deactivation kinetics of calcium channels. The deactivation time constant was increased 3- to 6-fold, suggesting that roscovitine could prolong the channel open state and increase the calcium influx. The potentiation of tail calcium currents caused by roscovitine and by the L-channel activator Bay K 8644 was not occluded but additive. Roscovitine-induced potentiation of tail calcium currents was significantly blocked by the P/Q-channel blocker CgTx-MVIIC, indicating that the major target of roscovitine is the P/Q-type calcium channel. In mutant mice with targeted deletion of p35, a neuronal specific activator of cdk5, roscovitine regulated calcium currents in a manner similar to that observed in wild-type mice. Moreover, intracellular perfusion of roscovitine failed to modulate calcium currents. These results suggest that roscovitine acts on extracellular site(s) of calcium channels via a cdk5-independent mechanism. Roscovitine potentiated glutamate release at presynaptic terminals of cultured hippocampal neurons detected with the vesicle trafficking dye FM1–43, consistent with the positive effect of roscovitine on the P/Q-type calcium channel, the major mediator of action potential-evoked transmitter release in the mammalian CNS. PMID:11986366

  16. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as canned sardines and salmon Calcium-enriched foods such as breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice drinks, and tofu. Check the product labels. The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than ...

  17. Improvement of bone regeneration capability of ceramic scaffolds by accelerated release of their calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Girdhari, Rijal; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-11-01

    To regenerate the bone tissue, the fabrication of scaffolds for better tissue regeneration has attracted a great deal of attention. In fact, growth factors are already used in clinical practice and are being investigated for enhancing the capacity for bone tissue regeneration. However, despite their strong osteoinductive activity, these growth factors have several limitations: safety issues, high treatment costs, and the potential for ectopic bone formation. The aim of this study was therefore to develop ceramic scaffolds that could promote the capacity for bone regeneration without growth factors. Three-dimensional ceramic scaffolds were successfully fabricated from hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) using projection-based microstereolithography, which is an additive manufacturing technology. The effects of calcium ions released from ceramic scaffolds on osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The osteogenesis-related gene expression and area of new bone formation in the HA/TCP scaffolds was higher than those in the HA scaffolds. Moreover, regenerated bone tissue in HA/TCP scaffolds were more matured than that in HA scaffolds. Through this study, we were able to enhance the bone regeneration capacity of scaffolds not by growth factors but by calcium ions released from the scaffolds. Ceramic scaffolds developed in this study might be useful for enhancing the capacity for regeneration in complex bone defects.

  18. Rapid intracellular release of calcium in human platelets by stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Erne, P.; Pletscher, A.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ( [Ca2+]i) in human blood platelets was measured by use of the fluorescent probe quin-2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of Ca2+ in the medium. The [Ca2+]i-rise was less marked in the absence of Ca2+ and could be antagonized by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate-hydrochloride (TMB-8), an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores. 5-HT induced a shape change reaction in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the pEC50 of 5-HT was slightly higher in the presence of the cation. Shape change reaction and [Ca2+]i-rise showed similar time courses. Various 5-HT-agonists caused a rise of [Ca2+]i, whereas 5-HT-antagonists, but not the 5-HT-uptake inhibitor desmethylimipramine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, counteracted the 5-HT-induced rise of the cation in a stereospecific manner. The antagonists were more potent than the agonists. The orders of potencies of the drugs affecting [Ca2+]i and platelet shape were similar. It is concluded that stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors of platelets causes a rapid release of intracellular calcium which, by activation of the contractile system, mediates the shape change reaction. PMID:3156650

  19. Improvement of Bone Regeneration Capability of Ceramic Scaffolds by Accelerated Release of Their Calcium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Girdhari, Rijal; Kim, Sung Won

    2014-01-01

    To regenerate the bone tissue, the fabrication of scaffolds for better tissue regeneration has attracted a great deal of attention. In fact, growth factors are already used in clinical practice and are being investigated for enhancing the capacity for bone tissue regeneration. However, despite their strong osteoinductive activity, these growth factors have several limitations: safety issues, high treatment costs, and the potential for ectopic bone formation. The aim of this study was therefore to develop ceramic scaffolds that could promote the capacity for bone regeneration without growth factors. Three-dimensional ceramic scaffolds were successfully fabricated from hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) using projection-based microstereolithography, which is an additive manufacturing technology. The effects of calcium ions released from ceramic scaffolds on osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The osteogenesis-related gene expression and area of new bone formation in the HA/TCP scaffolds was higher than those in the HA scaffolds. Moreover, regenerated bone tissue in HA/TCP scaffolds were more matured than that in HA scaffolds. Through this study, we were able to enhance the bone regeneration capacity of scaffolds not by growth factors but by calcium ions released from the scaffolds. Ceramic scaffolds developed in this study might be useful for enhancing the capacity for regeneration in complex bone defects. PMID:24784792

  20. The role of calcium in the effects of noradrenaline and phenoxybenzamine on adrenergic transmitter release from atria: no support for negative feedback of release

    PubMed Central

    Kalsner, Stanley

    1981-01-01

    1 The relation of calcium ion influx into nerve terminals to presynaptic adrenoceptor function and the possible masking, by desensitization due to intraneuronal calcium accumulation, of the effects of adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on presynaptic α-adrenoceptors was investigated in guinea-pig atria previously incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. 2 Atria were stimulated with 100 pulses at various frequencies (1 to 15 Hz) in standard (2.3 mm), low (0.26 mm) and high (6.9 mm) calcium-Krebs solution in the absence and then the presence first of noradrenaline and subsequently phenoxybenzamine. 3 The per pulse overflow of tritium was directly related to the calcium concentration of the Krebs solution, being much reduced and substantially increased in 0.26 and 6.9 mm calcium-Krebs solutions respectively. 4 Noradrenaline inhibited the overflow of tritium in low calcium-Krebs solution, to a relatively constant extent, independently of frequency. In addition, the agonist had a greater maximal inhibitory effect in standard than in reduced calcium-Krebs. The catecholamine was as effective an inhibitor of overflow at the lowest and highest frequencies in high as it was in standard calcium-Krebs solution. Phenoxybenzamine invariably increased the tritium overflow but was generally less effective both in low and in high calcium-Krebs solution. The patterns of inhibition and enhancement of stimulation-induced tritium overflow by these two agents do not indicate an intimate relationship between calcium influx and adrenoceptor activation; nor does desensitization appear to be an adequate explanation of the relationship between frequency of stimulation and the intensity of agonist and antagonist effect in the three different calcium concentrations. 5 It is concluded that the perineuronal levels of adrenergic transmitter do not establish the magnitudes of effect of exogenous adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on tritium overflow and that a negative feedback regulation of

  1. Modulation of elementary calcium release mediates a transition from puffs to waves in an IP3R cluster model.

    PubMed

    Rückl, Martin; Parker, Ian; Marchant, Jonathan S; Nagaiah, Chamakuri; Johenning, Friedrich W; Rüdiger, Sten

    2015-01-01

    The oscillating concentration of intracellular calcium is one of the most important examples for collective dynamics in cell biology. Localized releases of calcium through clusters of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels constitute elementary signals called calcium puffs. Coupling by diffusing calcium leads to global releases and waves, but the exact mechanism of inter-cluster coupling and triggering of waves is unknown. To elucidate the relation of puffs and waves, we here model a cluster of IP3R channels using a gating scheme with variable non-equilibrium IP3 binding. Hybrid stochastic and deterministic simulations show that puffs are not stereotyped events of constant duration but are sensitive to stimulation strength and residual calcium. For increasing IP3 concentration, the release events become modulated at a timescale of minutes, with repetitive wave-like releases interspersed with several puffs. This modulation is consistent with experimental observations we present, including refractoriness and increase of puff frequency during the inter-wave interval. Our results suggest that waves are established by a random but time-modulated appearance of sustained release events, which have a high potential to trigger and synchronize activity throughout the cell.

  2. Modulation of Elementary Calcium Release Mediates a Transition from Puffs to Waves in an IP3R Cluster Model

    PubMed Central

    Rückl, Martin; Parker, Ian; Marchant, Jonathan S.; Nagaiah, Chamakuri; Johenning, Friedrich W.; Rüdiger, Sten

    2015-01-01

    The oscillating concentration of intracellular calcium is one of the most important examples for collective dynamics in cell biology. Localized releases of calcium through clusters of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels constitute elementary signals called calcium puffs. Coupling by diffusing calcium leads to global releases and waves, but the exact mechanism of inter-cluster coupling and triggering of waves is unknown. To elucidate the relation of puffs and waves, we here model a cluster of IP3R channels using a gating scheme with variable non-equilibrium IP3 binding. Hybrid stochastic and deterministic simulations show that puffs are not stereotyped events of constant duration but are sensitive to stimulation strength and residual calcium. For increasing IP3 concentration, the release events become modulated at a timescale of minutes, with repetitive wave-like releases interspersed with several puffs. This modulation is consistent with experimental observations we present, including refractoriness and increase of puff frequency during the inter-wave interval. Our results suggest that waves are established by a random but time-modulated appearance of sustained release events, which have a high potential to trigger and synchronize activity throughout the cell. PMID:25569772

  3. Dental glass-reinforced composite for caries inhibition: calcium phosphate ion release and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hockin H K; Moreau, Jennifer L

    2010-02-01

    The two main challenges facing dental composite restorations are secondary caries and bulk fracture. Previous studies developed whisker-reinforced Ca-PO(4) composites that were relatively opaque. The objective of this study was to develop an esthetic glass particle-reinforced, photo-cured calcium phosphate composite. Tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles were incorporated into a resin for Ca and PO(4) release, while glass particles provided reinforcement. Ion release and mechanical properties were measured after immersion in solutions with pH of 7, 5.5, and 4. For the composite containing 40% mass fraction of TTCP, incorporating glass fillers increased the strength (p < 0.05). Flexural strength (Mean +/- SD; n = 6) at 30% glass was 99 +/- 18 MPa, higher than 54 +/- 20 MPa at 0% glass (p < 0.05). Elastic modulus was 11 GPa at 30% glass, compared to 2 GPa without glass. At 28 days, the released Ca ion concentration was 4.61 +/- 0.18 mmol/L at pH of 4, much higher than 1.14 +/- 0.07 at pH of 5.5, and 0.27 +/- 0.01 at pH of 7 (p < 0.05). PO(4) release was also dramatically increased at cariogenic, acidic pH. The TTCP-glass composite had strength 2-3 fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer control. In conclusion, the photo-cured TTCP-glass composite was "smart" and substantially increased the Ca and PO(4) release when the pH was reduced from neutral to a cariogenic pH of 4, when these ions are most needed to inhibit tooth caries. Its mechanical properties were significantly higher than previous Ca, PO(4), and fluoride releasing restoratives. Hence, the photo-cured TTCP-glass composite may have potential to provide the necessary combination of load-bearing and caries-inhibiting capabilities.

  4. [Study on the in vitro release behavior of bovine serum albumin from calcium phosphate coating on pure titanium surface].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Teng, Wei; Ning, Chengyun; Zheng, Huade

    2014-09-01

    To study the incorporation rate and release behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA) incorporated into the calcium phosphate coating by biomimetic deposition, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the hybrid coating, and to provide experimental basis for the fabrication of growth factor/biomimetic calcium phosphate coating and exploration for the loading/release behavior of growth factors. Pure titanium specimens were immersed into saturated calcium phosphate solutions(SCP) containing no BSA (controlled group) and 3 different concentrations of BSA (experimental groups) : 1, 10 and 100 mg/L. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating was formed on titanium surface and BSA was incorporated into the coating through co-deposition. The topography of the specimen was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure and phase composition of coatings were detected by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. BSA incorporation rate and release profile were determined by bicinchoninic acid protein assay kit. The biomimetic calcium phosphate coating was mainly composed of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate. BSA was successfully incorporated into the calcium phosphate coatings in all the 3 experimental groups. With the increase of BSA concentration, plate-like units of the coatings were turned into small grid structure. BSA incorporation rates of the three experimental groups were (72.4 ± 2.4)%, (62.3 ± 0.9)% and (42.2 ± 1.7)% respectively. The in vitro release test showed that all three BSA release profiles could be divided into two significant different stages: early burst release stage and later sustained release stage. The amount of BSA release of the 3 experimental groups in 24 h and 30 d were (1.57 ± 0.09), (8.82 ± 0.93), (140.24 ± 3.12) µg, and (2.39 ± 0.29), (14.39 ± 0.70), (151.06 ± 2.00) µg respectively. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating can be used as an effective carrier for

  5. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  6. Dissolved Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates Promote Arsenate Release From Ferrihydrite in Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, S. L.; Bostick, B. C.

    2007-12-01

    Field data from water systems around the world have shown that arsenic can reach toxic concentrations in dynamic groundwater systems. This is generally in contrast to analogous static systems at circumneutral pH, where arsenic is strongly retained by sorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Our research examines the effect of calcium and magnesium carbonates on As(V) mobility. In both dynamic flow and static experiments, arsenate was pre- sorbed to poorly crystalline iron hydroxides (1-10% sorption capacity), with varying aqueous compositions including calcium, magnesium, carbonate, sulfate, lactate, and other common groundwater species (pH 7.5-8). Thus we investigated how the dissolution of common carbonate minerals, specifically CaCO3 and MgCO3, affect arsenic behavior in the context of groundwater solutions. Under static (batch) conditions, no measurable arsenic (<10 μg/L) is released into solutions containing alkaline earth metals (AEMs) and carbonates. When elevated concentrations of AEMs and carbonate are introduced by dynamic flow, however, arsenic is mobilized at up to 500 μg/L, releasing significant proportions the total arsenic present. This is only the case when both of these species are present; with other common ion pairs, little to no arsenic is released. These results indicate that arsenate adsorption is kinetically controlled under flow conditions, resulting in very different mobility relative to otherwise equivalent static systems. Furthermore, the combination of alkaline earth metals and carbonates promotes As(V) mobility in column-based systems. We propose that these phenomena indicate a combination of physical and chemical effects by which diffusion limitation becomes dominant in limiting arsenic sorption in flow systems. Many carbonate-buffered aquifers, as well as those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, could be affected by these processes of AEM-carbonate-limited sorption and increased arsenic mobility.

  7. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  8. Contribution of presynaptic calcium-activated potassium currents to transmitter release regulation in cultured Xenopus nerve-muscle synapses.

    PubMed

    Pattillo, J M; Yazejian, B; DiGregorio, D A; Vergara, J L; Grinnell, A D; Meriney, S D

    2001-01-01

    Using Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures, we have examined the contribution of calcium-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channels to the regulation of transmitter release evoked by single action potentials. The presynaptic varicosities that form on muscle cells in these cultures were studied directly using patch-clamp recording techniques. In these developing synapses, blockade of K(Ca) channels with iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin decreased transmitter release by an average of 35%. This effect would be expected to be caused by changes in the late phases of action potential repolarization. We hypothesize that these changes are due to a reduction in the driving force for calcium that is normally enhanced by the local hyperpolarization at the active zone caused by potassium current through the K(Ca) channels that co-localize with calcium channels. In support of this hypothesis, we have shown that when action potential waveforms were used as voltage-clamp commands to elicit calcium current in varicosities, peak calcium current was reduced only when these waveforms were broadened beginning when action potential repolarization was 20% complete. In contrast to peak calcium current, total calcium influx was consistently increased following action potential broadening. A model, based on previously reported properties of ion channels, faithfully reproduced predicted effects on action potential repolarization and calcium currents. From these data, we suggest that the large-conductance K(Ca) channels expressed at presynaptic varicosities regulate transmitter release magnitude during single action potentials by altering the rate of action potential repolarization, and thus the magnitude of peak calcium current.

  9. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days.

  10. Calcium uptake and release by isolated cortices and microsomes from the unfertilized egg of the sea urchin strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdorf, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two subcellular fractions of the sea urchin egg were studied for their potential role in regulating the transient rise in cytosolic calcium that accompanies fertilization. Isolated cortices from unfertilized sea urchin eggs sequester calcium in an ATP dependent manner when incubated in a medium containing free calcium levels characteristic of the resting cell. This ATP dependent calcium uptake activity, measured in the presence of 5mM Na Azide to prevent mitochondrial accumulation, was increased by oxalate, and was blocked by 150 ..mu..M quercetin and 50 ..mu..M vanadate. Cortices preloaded with /sup 45/Ca in the presence of ATP dramatically increased their rate of calcium efflux upon the addition of (1) the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M), (2) trifluoperazine (200 ..mu..M), (3) concentrations of free calcium that activated cortical granule exocytosis, and (4) the calcium mobilizing agent inositol trisphosphate (IP3). This pool of calcium is most likely sequestered in the portion of the egg's endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that remains associated with the cortical region during its isolation. They have developed a method for obtaining a high yield of purified microsomal vesicles from whole eggs. This preparation also demonstrates ATP dependent calcium sequestering activity which increases in the presence of oxalate and has similar sensitivities to calcium transport inhibitors, however the isolated microsomal vesicles did not show any detectable release of calcium when exposed to IP3. Procedures originally developed for purifying calsequestrin were used to partially purify a 58,000 MW protein from the egg's microsomal vesicles.

  11. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  12. Sustained release of calcium hydroxide from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid microspheres for apexification.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino Isaac; Breceda-Leija, Alejandro; Méndez-González, Verónica; Chavarría-Bolaños, Daniel; Flores-Reyes, Héctor; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Komabayashi, Takashi; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury J

    2016-09-01

    Calcium hydroxide (CH) loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) might be used for apexification requiring a sustained release of Ca(2+). The aim of this study was to formulate and characterize CH-PLGA-MS. The CH-loaded MS were prepared by either oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil/in-water (W/O/W) emulsion solvent evaporation technique. MS produced by the O/W technique exhibited a larger diameter (18.63 ± 7.23 μm) than the MS produced by the W/O/W technique (15.25 ± 7.37 μm) (Mann-Whitney U test P < 0.001). The CH encapsulation efficiency (E e) and Ca(2+) release were calculated from data obtained by absorption techniques. Ca(2+) release profile was evaluated for 30 days. To know the E e, the CH-loaded MS were dissolved in 1 M NaOH to release all its content and a Ca(2+) colorimetric marker was added to this solution. The reagent marked the Ca(2+) in blue color, which was then measured by a UV-Vis system (650 nm). The percentage of E e was calculated on the basis of the theoretical loading. The E e of the O/W-produced MS was higher (24 %) than the corresponding percentage of the W/O/W-produced MS (11 %). O/W- and W/O/W-produced MS released slower and lower Ca(2+) than a control CH paste with polyethylene glycol 400 (Kruskal-Wallis test). O/W-produced MS released higher Ca(2+) than W/O/W-produced MS (statistically significant differences; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the CH-PLGA-MS were successfully formulated; the technique of formulation influenced the size, encapsulation efficiency and release profile. The MS were better sustained release system than the CH paste.

  13. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell-cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level.

  14. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell–cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level. PMID:27385917

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro release of diclofenac sodium from hybrid nanostructured magnetite-calcium pectinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Raj Kumar; Sahu, Saurabh; Reddy, V. R.

    2012-08-01

    A stable spherical nanostructured calcium pectinate loaded with diclofenac sodium (DS) and functionalized by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, referred as MCPDS, was developed as a potential magnetically targeted drug delivery system. The sizes of the MCPDS were in the range of 100-200 nm in dried condition, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In the aqueous medium, the sizes of MCPDS were in the range 300 ± 50 nm, measured by dynamic light scattering technique. The X-ray diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed magnetite phase in MCPDS. The magnetic property of the MCPDS nanostructures was confirmed from high saturation magnetization (44.05 emu/g), measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The superparamagnetic property of MCPDS was characterized by superconducting quantum unit interference device magnetometry and corroborated by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The loading efficiency of DS in MCPDS was measured by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and corroborated by thermal analysis. The in vitro release of the drug from MCPDS in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and in phosphate buffer solution was found to be pH sensitive and exhibited sustained release property. The cumulative drug release agreed well with that of swelling controlled diffusion mechanism, given by the Korsemeyer Peppas model.

  16. Synaptic mechanisms underlying cholinergic control of thalamic reticular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks of the thalamus are the target of extensive cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and the brainstem. Activation of these afferents can regulate neuronal excitability, transmitter release, and firing patterns in thalamic networks, thereby altering the flow of sensory information during distinct behavioural states. However, cholinergic regulation in the thalamus has been primarily examined by using receptor agonist and antagonist, which has precluded a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics that govern cholinergic signalling under physiological conditions. This review summarizes recent studies on cholinergic synaptic transmission in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a brain structure intimately involved in the control of sensory processing and the generation of rhythmic activity in the thalamocortical system. This work has shown that acetylcholine (ACh) released from individual axons can rapidly and reliably activate both pre- and postsynaptic cholinergic receptors, thereby controlling TRN neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal precision. PMID:24973413

  17. The comparison of calcium ion release and pH changes from modified MTA and bioceramics in regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irawan, R. M.; Margono, A.; Djauhari, N.

    2017-08-01

    The surface reactions of bioactive materials release and change dissolutions triggering intracellular and extracellular responses. Calcium ion release can promote alkalinizing activity, which is needed in tissue regeneration. To analyze calcium ion release and pH changes in modified MTA and bioceramics as bioactive materials. Thirty samples, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, were prepared, with 15 consisting of modified MTA and 15 consisting of bioceramics. Both materials were immersed in deionized water for an hour, then measured and transferred into fresh solutions and soaked for 48 hours or 168 hours. The measurements were conducted using an atom absorption spectrophotometer and pHmeter. Mann Whitney’s post hoc statistic test showed a significant difference among all the 1-hour, 48-hour, and 168-hour measurement groups, with a value of p ≤ 0.05. Bioceramics released more calcium ions and raised pH levels higher than modified MTA for each of the three soak-time groups. Bioceramics released more calcium ion and had higher pH level compared to modified MTA which contributed to the tissue regeneration.

  18. Calcium release from intra-axonal endoplasmic reticulum leads to axon degeneration through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L; Court, Felipe A

    2014-05-21

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions.

  19. Calcium Release from Intra-Axonal Endoplasmic Reticulum Leads to Axon Degeneration through Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W.; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:24849352

  20. Calcium waves in a model with a random spatially discrete distribution of Ca2+ release sites.

    PubMed Central

    Bugrim, A E; Zhabotinsky, A M; Epstein, I R

    1997-01-01

    We study the propagation of intracellular calcium waves in a model that features Ca2+ release from discrete sites in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and random spatial distribution of these sites. The results of our simulations qualitatively reproduce the experimentally observed behavior of the waves. When the level of the channel activator inositol trisphosphate is low, the wave undergoes fragmentation and eventually vanishes at a finite distance from the region of initiation, a phenomenon we refer to as an abortive wave. With increasing activator concentration, the mean distance of propagation increases. Above a critical level of activator, the wave becomes stable. We show that the heterogeneous distribution of Ca2+ channels is the cause of this phenomenon. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 9 PMID:9414204

  1. Selection of intracellular calcium patterns in a model with clustered Ca2+ release channels.

    PubMed

    Shuai, J W; Jung, P

    2003-03-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed for intracellular Ca2+ waves, which incorporates both the discrete nature of Ca2+ release sites in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and the stochastic dynamics of the clustered inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptors. Depending on the Ca2+ diffusion coefficient and concentration of IP3, various spontaneous Ca2+ patterns, such as calcium puffs, local waves, abortive waves, global oscillation, and tide waves, can be observed. We further investigate the speed of the global waves as a function of the IP3 concentration and the Ca2+ diffusion coefficient and under what conditions the spatially averaged Ca2+ response can be described by a simple set of ordinary differential equations.

  2. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor/calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bellinger, Andrew M.; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) leading to pathologic calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells 1–5. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that may contribute to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle exhibited an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (or “calstabin1” for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein) resulting in “leaky” channels. Preventing calstabin1 depletion from RyR1 using S107, a compound that binds to the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited SR Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histologic evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. Thus, SR Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin1 depletion likely contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy and preventing the RyR1-mediated SR Ca2+ leak may provide a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:19198614

  3. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: a critical mediator of heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Xander H T; Lehnart, Stephan E; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R

    2006-01-17

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium "leak" via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the "fight or flight" stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

  4. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  5. LOX-1 regulates estrogenesis via intracellular calcium release from bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, J M; Vernunft, A; Krüger, B; Plinski, C; Viergutz, T

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol produced by ovarian granulosa cells triggers the luteinizing hormone surge which in turn initiates ovulation in female mammals. Disturbances in estradiol production from granulosa cells are a major reason for reproductive dysfunctions in dairy cows. Endogenous estradiol production might be altered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), a receptor of ox-LDL, leads to increased estrogenesis in granulosa cells. This activity is mediated by calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-dependent and ER-independent calcium pools. Inhibition of the LOX-1 signal transduction pathway is followed by mitochondrial alterations. The membrane potential ΔΨ increases and the ROS production decreases in mitochondria after blocking LOX-1. Our data indicate that blocking the LOX-1 receptor signal pathway might be a promising way to improve steroid hormone concentrations in metabolically highly active female mammals and, therefore, to defend against reproductive dysfunctions in humans and animals.

  6. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Modifies NMDA Receptor Mediated Release of Intracellular Calcium: Implications for Endocannabinoid Control of Hippocampal Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Miller, Frances; Palchik, Guillermo; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) leads to continuous suppression of neuronal plasticity in hippocampus and other brain regions, suggesting that endocannabinoids may have a functional role in synaptic processes that produce state-dependent transient modulation of hippocampal cell activity. In support of this, it has previously been shown in vitro that cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulate second messenger systems in hippocampal neurons that can modulate intracellular ion channels, including channels which release calcium from intracellular stores. Here we demonstrate in hippocampal slices a similar endocannabinoid action on excitatory glutamatergic synapses via modulation of NMDA-receptor mediated intracellular calcium levels in confocal imaged neurons. Calcium entry through glutamatergic NMDA-mediated ion channels increases intracellular calcium concentrations via modulation of release from ryanodine-sensitive channels in endoplasmic reticulum. The studies reported here show that NMDA-elicited increases in Calcium Green fluorescence are enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists (i.e. rimonabant), and inhibited by CB1 agonists (i.e. WIN 55,212-2). Suppression of endocannabinoid breakdown by either reuptake inhibition (AM404) or fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibition (URB597) produced suppression of NMDA elicited calcium increases comparable to WIN 55,212-2, while enhancement of calcium release provoked by endocannabinoid receptor antagonists (Rimonabant) was shown to depend on the blockade of CB1 receptor mediated de-phosphorylation of Ryanodine receptors. Such CB1 receptor modulation of NMDA elicited increases in intracellular calcium may account for the respective disruption and enhancement by CB1 agents of trial-specific hippocampal neuron ensemble firing patterns during performance of a short-term memory task, reported previously from this laboratory. PMID:21288475

  7. Evolution and modulation of intracellular calcium release during long-lasting, depleting depolarization in mouse muscle

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Leandro; Pouvreau, Sandrine; Ríos, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signals regulate multiple cellular functions. They depend on release of Ca2+ from cellular stores into the cytosol, a process that in many types of cells appears to be tightly controlled by changes in [Ca2+] within the store. In contrast with cardiac muscle, where depletion of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a crucial determinant of termination of Ca2+ release, in skeletal muscle there is no agreement regarding the sign, or even the existence of an effect of SR Ca2+ level on Ca2+ release. To address this issue we measured Ca2+ transients in mouse flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) skeletal muscle fibres under voltage clamp, using confocal microscopy and the Ca2+ monitor rhod-2. The evolution of Ca2+ release flux was quantified during long-lasting depolarizations that reduced severely the Ca2+ content of the SR. As in all previous determinations in mammals and non-mammals, release flux consisted of an early peak, relaxing to a lower level from which it continued to decay more slowly. Decay of flux in this second stage, which has been attributed largely to depletion of SR Ca2+, was studied in detail. A simple depletion mechanism without change in release permeability predicts an exponential decay with time. In contrast, flux decreased non-exponentially, to a finite, measurable level that could be maintained for the longest pulses applied (1.8 s). An algorithm on the flux record allowed us to define a quantitative index, the normalized flux rate of change (NFRC), which was shown to be proportional to the ratio of release permeability P and inversely proportional to Ca2+ buffering power B of the SR, thus quantifying the ‘evacuability’ or ability of the SR to empty its content. When P and B were constant, flux then decayed exponentially, and NFRC was equal to the exponential rate constant. Instead, in most cases NFRC increased during the pulse, from a minimum reached immediately after the early peak in flux, to a time between 200 and 250 ms

  8. Effect of Calcium Chloride on Release Behavior of Babul (Acacia nilotica) gum Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Malviya, Rishabha

    2015-01-01

    Oral delivery of drugs is the most common method, but due to the inability of drugs to restrain and localize in the gastro-intestinal tract, oral administration of drugs in conventional dosage forms have short-term limitations. Carrier technology may provide many approaches for the delivery of drugs by coupling the drug to a carrier particle, such as Microspheres, nanoparticles and liposomes, which modulate the release and absorption characteristics of the drug. The aim of this study was to prepare Diclofenac sodium microspheres using a natural polymer and show the effect of calcium chloride on the release behavior of microspheres. The microspheres of Diclofenac sodium were successfully developed by ionic gelation technique using natural polymer babul gum with sodium alginate. Diclofenac Sodium was received as a gift sample from Aegis Pharmaceuticals Pvt. Ltd., Roorkee. Acacia nilotica gum was purchased from Ghaziabad and purification was done in the laboratory. All other excipients used analytical grade method. The microspheres of diclofenac sodium were prepared by Ionic gelation method using a natural polimer, i.e. Acacia nilotica. Calcium chloride (5% solution) was used as a cross-linking agent. In this research article all the data was presented as averages and standard deviations. Five formulations were successfully prepared, i.e. F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5. All the formulations were evaluated for micromeritic properties, particle size analysis, percentage yield, drug content, drug entrapment efficacy, percent moisture loss, swelling index and in vitro dissolution studies. The size of the microspheres varied between 14.55 ± 0.29 to 20.18 ± 0.15 μm and as high as 81.51 ± 0.14% entrapment efficiency for babul gum was obtained. Batch F1 and F5 was found to release the drug 91.35% and 75.48% respectively for 6 hrs. The formulations were found to be effective in providing controlled release of drug for a prolonged period of time.

  9. A mathematical model of cardiocyte Ca(2+) dynamics with a novel representation of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) control.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, S M; Palmer, B M; Moore, R L

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac contraction and relaxation dynamics result from a set of simultaneously interacting Ca(2+) regulatory mechanisms. In this study, cardiocyte Ca(2+) dynamics were modeled using a set of six differential equations that were based on theories, equations, and parameters described in previous studies. Among the unique features of the model was the inclusion of bidirectional modulatory interplay between the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) release channel (SRRC) and calsequestrin (CSQ) in the SR lumen, where CSQ acted as a dynamic rather than simple Ca(2+) buffer, and acted as a Ca(2+) sensor in the SR lumen as well. The inclusion of this control mechanism was central in overcoming a number of assumptions that would otherwise have to be made about SRRC kinetics, SR Ca(2+) release rates, and SR Ca(2+) release termination when the SR lumen is assumed to act as a simple, buffered Ca(2+) sink. The model was sufficient to reproduce a graded Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) response, CICR with high gain, and a system with reasonable stability. As constructed, the model successfully replicated the results of several previously published experiments that dealt with the Ca(2+) dependence of the SRRC (, J. Gen. Physiol. 85:247-289), the refractoriness of the SRRC (, Am. J. Physiol. 270:C148-C159), the SR Ca(2+) load dependence of SR Ca(2+) release (, Am. J. Physiol. 268:C1313-C1329;, J. Biol. Chem. 267:20850-20856), SR Ca(2+) leak (, J. Physiol. (Lond.). 474:463-471;, Biophys. J. 68:2015-2022), SR Ca(2+) load regulation by leak and uptake (, J. Gen. Physiol. 111:491-504), the effect of Ca(2+) trigger duration on SR Ca(2+) release (, Am. J. Physiol. 258:C944-C954), the apparent relationship that exists between sarcoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticular calcium concentrations (, Biophys. J. 73:1524-1531), and a variety of contraction frequency-dependent alterations in sarcoplasmic [Ca(2+)] dynamics that are normally observed in the laboratory, including rest potentiation, a

  10. Effect of gadolinium on the ryanodine receptor/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sárközi, Sándor; Szegedi, Csaba; Lukács, Balázs; Ronjat, Michel; Jóna, István

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gadolinium ions on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) was studied using heavy SR (HSR) vesicles and RyR1 isolated from rabbit fast twitch muscle. In the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay, 5 microM Gd(3+) increased the K(d) of the [(3)H]ryanodine binding of the vesicles from 33.8 nM to 45.6 nM while B(max), referring to the binding capacity, was not affected significantly. In the presence of 18 nM[(3)H]ryanodine and 100 microM free Ca(2+), Gd(3+) inhibited the binding of the radiolabeled ryanodine with an apparent K(d) value of 14.7 microM and a Hill coefficient of 3.17. In (45)Ca(2+) experiments the time constant of (45)Ca(2+) efflux from HSR vesicles increased from 90.9 (+/- 11.1) ms to 187.7 (+/- 24.9) ms in the presence of 20 microM gadolinium. In single channel experiments gadolinium inhibited the channel activity from both the cytoplasmic (cis) (IC(50) = 5.65 +/- 0.33 microM, n(Hill) = 4.71) and the luminal (trans) side (IC(50) = 5.47 +/- 0.24 microM, n(Hill) = 4.31). The degree of inhibition on the cis side didn't show calcium dependency in the 100 microM to 1 mM Ca(2+) concentration range which indicates no competition with calcium on its regulatory binding sites. When Gd(3+) was applied at the trans side, EGTA was present at the cis side to prevent the binding of Gd(+3) to the cytoplasmic calcium binding regulatory sites of the RyR1 if Gd(3+) accidentally passed through the channel. The inhibition of the channel did not show any voltage dependence, which would be the case if Gd(3+) exerted its effect after getting to the cis side. Our results suggest the presence of inhibitory binding sites for Gd(3+) on both sides of the RyR1 with similar Hill coefficients and IC(50) values.

  11. Bone substitute material composition and morphology differentially modulate calcium and phosphate release through osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Konermann, A; Staubwasser, M; Dirk, C; Keilig, L; Bourauel, C; Götz, W; Jäger, A; Reichert, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the material composition and cell-mediated remodelling of different calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes. Osteoclasts were cultivated on bone substitutes (Cerabone, Maxresorb, and NanoBone) for up to 5 days. Bafilomycin A1 addition served as the control. To determine cellular activity, the supernatant content of calcium and phosphate was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cells were visualized on the materials by scanning electron microscopy. Material composition and surface characteristics were assessed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Osteoclast-induced calcium and phosphate release was material-specific. Maxresorb exhibited the highest ion release to the medium (P = 0.034; calcium 40.25mg/l day 5, phosphate 102.08 mg/l day 5) and NanoBone the lowest (P = 0.021; calcium 8.43 mg/l day 5, phosphate 15.15 mg/l day 5); Cerabone was intermediate (P = 0.034; calcium 16.34 mg/l day 5, phosphate 30.6 mg/l day 5). All investigated materials showed unique resorption behaviours. The presented methodology provides a new perspective on the investigation of bone substitute biodegradation, maintaining the material-specific micro- and macrostructure. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of the Amount of Calcium Ions Released after the use of Different Chelating Agents and Agitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Costa, Laura Maria Amorim Santana; Filho, Gilberto Siebert; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Pereira, Thiago Machado; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Background: The main goal of endodontic treatment is to achieve cleaning and shaping prior to the filling process. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate, using atomic absorption spectrometry, the release of Calcium ions after the use of different chelating agents and protocols of agitation. Method: Ninety human canine teeth were randomly assigned to one of nine groups (n=10), as follows: 1) 0.2% Chitosan and manual agitation; 2) 0.2% Chitosan and sonic agitation; 3) 0.2% Chitosan and ultrasonic agitation; 4) 17% EDTA and manual agitation; 5) 17% EDTA and sonic agitation; 6) 17% EDTA and ultrasonic agitation; 7) distilled water and manual agitation; 8) distilled water and sonic agitation; 9) distilled water and ultrasonic agitation. Following instrumentation, all chelating substances remained inside the root canal for 3 min. Then the fluid was collected for the identification and quantification of Calcium ions. The amount of Calcium ions released in each group was compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene tests followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test. Significance was set at 5%. Results: The groups in which 0.2% Chitosan was used showed the highest concentration of Calcium ions (p<0.05). Concerning the agitation method, ultrasonic agitation showed the greatest values, followed by sonic and manual agitation (all comparisons, p<0.05). Conclusion: The present findings suggest that, among the combinations here tested, Chitosan associated with ultrasonic agitation yielded the greatest release of Calcium ions. PMID:28458729

  13. Development of polysaccharide gel-coated pellets for oral administration: swelling and release behavior of calcium pectinate gel.

    PubMed

    Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Kennedy, Ross A

    2007-09-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pellet size, pectin type, pectin concentration, and dissolution medium on the swelling and drug release behavior of spherical pellets containing theophylline and coated with 2 different calcium pectinates, using a multi-level factorial design approach. The spherical pellets were prepared by an extrusion-spheronization method and then coated with calcium pectinate using the diffusion-controlled interfacial complexation technique, which provides a defect-free and uniform coating on solid cores. Theophylline release from the pellets was slowed by the application of the coatings. The time to release 50% of the payload (ie, T50) in an acidic medium was approximately 7 minutes from uncoated small pellets and was 55 minutes after an amidated calcium pectinate coat was applied; a comparable coat on large pellets showed a T50 of 93 minutes. Drug release profiles of dry coated pellets showed a lag time (all less than 20 minutes) when the gel coat hydrated and swelled, followed by a zero-order release. It was found that the release rate was controlled by the pellet size, pectin type, pectin concentration, and dissolution medium.

  14. Physically Targeted Intravenous Polyurethane Nanoparticles for Controlled Release of Atorvastatin Calcium

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Behnaz Sadat; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Alizadeh, Ali

    2017-05-23

    Intravenous drug delivery is an advantageous choice for rapid administration, immediate drug effect, and avoidance of first-pass metabolism in oral drug delivery. In this study, the synthesis, formulation, and characterization of atorvastatin-loaded polyurethane (PU) nanoparticles were investigated for intravenous route of administration. First, PU was synthesized and characterized. Second, nanoparticles were prepared in four different ratios of drug to polymer through two different techniques, including emulsion-diffusion and single-emulsion. Finally, particle size and polydispersity index, shape and surface morphology, drug entrapment efficiency (EE), drug loading, and in vitro release were evaluated by dynamics light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and UV visible spectroscopy, respectively. Within two methods, the prepared nanoparticles had a spherical shape and a smooth surface with a diversity of size ranged from 174.04 nm to 277.24 nm in emulsion-diffusion and from 306.5 nm to 393.12 in the single-emulsion method. The highest EE was 84.76%, for (1:4) sample in the emulsion-diffusion method. It has also been shown that in vitro release of nanoparticles, using the emulsion-diffusion method, was sustained up to eight days by two mechanisms: drug diffusion and polymer relaxation. PU nanoparticles, that were prepared by the emulsion-diffusion method, could be used as effective carriers for the controlled drug delivery of poorly water soluble drugs such as atorvastatin calcium.

  15. Calcium ionophore A23187 induces release of chemokinetic and aggregating factors from polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, M. A.; Ford-Hutchinson, A. W.; Shipley, M. E.; Smith, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    1. Rat and human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) when exposed to calcium ionophore A23187 10 microM release products which cause aggregation of rat PMNs and chemokinesis of human PMNs. 2. Aggregating and chemokinetic activities are rapidly generated; maximal release occurs after 4 min, and can be detected in dilutions of the supernatant of up to 1:1000. 3. Generation of aggregating and chemokinetic activities is inhibited by nordihydroguaiaretic acid 10(-4) to 10(0-7) M, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid 10(-4) and 10(-5) M, BW 755C 10(-4) M and benoxaprofen 10(-4) M, all compounds known to inhibit lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. 4. Conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin and indomethacin, inhibited little or not at all the generation of these activities. 5. We conclude that the aggregating and chemokinetic activities induced by A23187 represent generation of biologically active products of lipoxygenase pathways of AA metabolism. PMID:6781577

  16. Calcium-deficient apatite: influence of granule size and consolidation mode on release and in vitro activity of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Obadia, L; Amador, G; Daculsi, G; Bouler, J-M

    2003-03-01

    The use of dynamic compaction and isostatic compression to consolidate calcium phosphate powder loaded with a therapeutic agent avoids a sintering step that could destroy the drug. The present study applied these consolidation methods to vancomycin-loaded calcium-deficient apatite powder, using three granulometric fractions (40-80, 80-200 and 200-500 micrometer). In vitro release profiles were determined via an original system derived from low-pressure liquid chromatography. The biological activity of vancomycin was measured by an in vitro standardized bacteriologic assay, which showed that the drug is completely active after association with calcium phosphate. Regardless of the consolidation method and granulometric fraction used, release profiles were not significantly different and therefore adaptable to injectable suspensions.

  17. Involvement of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in high asynchrony of transmitter release in neuromuscular synapses of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Khuzakhmetova, V F; Nurullin, L F; Bukharaeva, E A; Nikolsky, E E

    2016-09-01

    Experiments on neuromuscular synapses of rats at different stages of ontogenesis have been performed. It has been found that one of the reasons of higher asynchrony of the release of single quanta of acetylcholine in the synapses of newborn animals is the activity of the presynaptic dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels of the L-type.

  18. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  19. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  20. Neuronal regeneration in C. elegans requires subcellular calcium release by ryanodine receptor channels and can be enhanced by optogenetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa; Roodhouse, Kevin; Chung, Samuel H; Clark, Christopher M; Pirri, Jennifer K; Alkema, Mark J; Gabel, Christopher V

    2014-11-26

    Regulated calcium signals play conserved instructive roles in neuronal repair, but how localized calcium stores are differentially mobilized, or might be directly manipulated, to stimulate regeneration within native contexts is poorly understood. We find here that localized calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels is critical in stimulating initial regeneration following traumatic cellular damage in vivo. Using laser axotomy of single neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that mutation of unc-68/RyR greatly impedes both outgrowth and guidance of the regenerating neuron. Performing extended in vivo calcium imaging, we measure subcellular calcium signals within the immediate vicinity of the regenerating axon end that are sustained for hours following axotomy and completely eliminated within unc-68/RyR mutants. Finally, using a novel optogenetic approach to periodically photo-stimulate the axotomized neuron, we can enhance its regeneration. The enhanced outgrowth depends on both amplitude and temporal pattern of excitation and can be blocked by disruption of UNC-68/RyR. This demonstrates the exciting potential of emerging optogenetic technology to beneficially manipulate cell physiology in the context of neuronal regeneration and indicates a link to the underlying cellular calcium signal. Taken as a whole, our findings define a specific localized calcium signal mediated by RyR channel activity that stimulates regenerative outgrowth, which may be dynamically manipulated for beneficial neurotherapeutic effects.

  1. Fluoride varnishes with calcium glycerophosphate: fluoride release and effect on in vitro enamel demineralization.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Peters, Bianca Glerean; Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bönecker, Marcelo José Strazzeri

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the amount of fluoride (F) released from varnishes containing calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) and (2) to assess the effect of the experimental varnishes on in vitro demineralization. Six test groups using 5 varnishes: base varnish (no active ingredients); Duraphat® (2.26% NaF); Duofluorid® (5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 1 (1% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 2 (5% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); and no varnish were set up. In stage 1, 60 acrylic blocks were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n = 10). Then 300 µg of each varnish was applied to each block. The blocks were immersed in deionized water, which was changed after 1, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Fluoride concentration in the water was analyzed using a fluoride electrode. In stage 2, 60 bovine enamel samples were distributed into 6 groups (n = 10), and treated with 300 µg of the respective varnish. After 6 h the varnish was removed and the samples were subjected to a 7-day in vitro pH cycle (6 h demineralization/18 h remineralization per day). The demineralization was measured using surface hardness. The results showed that both experimental varnishes released more fluoride than Duofluorid® and Duraphat® (p < 0.05), but Duraphat® showed the best preventive effect by decreasing enamel hardness loss (p < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that even though (1) the experimental varnishes containing CaGP released greater amounts of F, (2) they did not increase in the preventive effect against enamel demineralization.

  2. In vitro/in vivo comparison of cefuroxime release from poly(ε-caprolactone)-calcium sulfate implants for osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Yaprakci, Volkan; Erdemli, Ozge; Kayabolen, Alisan; Tezcaner, Aysen; Bozkurt, Fatih; Keskin, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the release of cefuroxime axetil (CF) and calcium from poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-calcium sulfate (CaS) implants (PCL:CaS 2:1-10% CF; PCL:CaS 2:1-20% CF; PCL:CaS 1:1-10% CF) for treating infectious bone diseases. Bioactivity, crystallinity and strength, and release profiles under standard and pressurized release conditions were studied. PCL:CaS 2:1-20% CF had slower release than 10% loading. These groups had no significant change in CF and Ca release in response to pressure. The PCL:CaS 1:1 group had the slowest release despite having higher CaS, probably due to more compaction of discs. In contrast, pressure caused significant differentiation of CF and Ca(2+) release. The presence of CaS enhanced mechanical properties and bioactivity of discs. SEM and XPS results showed calcium-phosphate containing accumulations on surfaces upon SBF incubation. CF-loaded implants were applied in a rabbit osteomyelitis model. In vivo CF release was enhanced with increased CaS proportions, suggesting that in vivo release conditions are closer to pressurized in vitro conditions. In the control group, there was still some inflammation in the bone and no complete coverage with bone was achieved in the defect site. Discs provided a suitable surface for regeneration of bone. However, bone formation in the PCL:CaS 1:1 disc implanted group was more complete and regular than in the 2:1 group. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Neurotransmitter Release Can Be Stabilized by a Mechanism That Prevents Voltage Changes Near the End of Action Potentials from Affecting Calcium Currents.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephen G; Scarnati, Matthew S; Paradiso, Kenneth G

    2016-11-09

    At chemical synapses, presynaptic action potentials (APs) activate voltage-gated calcium channels, allowing calcium to enter and trigger neurotransmitter release. The duration, peak amplitude, and shape of the AP falling phase alter calcium entry, which can affect neurotransmitter release significantly. In many neurons, APs do not immediately return to the resting potential, but instead exhibit a period of depolarization or hyperpolarization referred to as an afterpotential. We hypothesized that presynaptic afterpotentials should alter neurotransmitter release by affecting the electrical driving force for calcium entry and calcium channel gating. In support of this, presynaptic calcium entry is affected by afterpotentials after standard instant voltage jumps. Here, we used the mouse calyx of Held synapse, which allows simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic patch-clamp recording, to show that the postsynaptic response is affected significantly by presynaptic afterpotentials after voltage jumps. We therefore tested the effects of presynaptic afterpotentials using simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings and AP waveforms or real APs. Surprisingly, presynaptic afterpotentials after AP stimuli did not alter calcium channel responses or neurotransmitter release appreciably. We show that the AP repolarization time course causes afterpotential-induced changes in calcium driving force and changes in calcium channel gating to effectively cancel each other out. This mechanism, in which electrical driving force is balanced by channel gating, prevents changes in calcium influx from occurring at the end of the AP and therefore acts to stabilize synaptic transmission. In addition, this mechanism can act to stabilize neurotransmitter release when the presynaptic resting potential changes.

  4. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  5. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is associated with a decrease in calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a chronic rabbit model.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, D A; Atkinson, J B; Olson, R D; Buck, S; Cusack, B J; Fleischer, S; Boucek, R J

    1993-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent that produces a dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that limits its clinical usefulness. Clinical and animal studies of morphological changes during the early stages of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy have suggested that the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the intracellular membrane system responsible for myoplasmic calcium regulation in adult mammalian heart, may be the early target of doxorubicin. To detect changes in the calcium pump protein or the calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum during chronic doxorubicin treatment, rabbits were treated with intravenous doxorubicin (1 mg/kg) twice weekly for 12 to 18 doses. Pair-fed controls received intravenous normal saline. The severity of cardiomyopathy was scored by light and electron microscopy of left ventricular papillary muscles. Developed tension was measured in isolated atrial strips. In subcellular fractions from heart, [3H]ryanodine binding was decreased in doxorubicin-treated rabbits (0.33 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg) compared with control rabbits (0.66 +/- 0.02 pmol/mg; P < 0.0001). The magnitude of the decrease in [3H]ryanodine binding correlated with both the severity of the cardiomyopathy graded by pathology score (light and electron microscopy) and the decrease in developed tension in isolated atrial strips. Bmax for [3H]ryanodine binding and the amount of immunoreactive ryanodine receptor by Western blot analysis using sequence-specific antibody were both decreased, consistent with a decrease in the amount of calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. In contrast, there was no decrease in the amount or the activity of the calcium pump protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in doxorubicin-treated rabbits. Doxorubicin treatment did not decrease [3H]ryanodine binding or the amount of immunoreactive calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle. Since the sarcoplasmic

  6. Membrane properties involved in calcium-stimulated microparticle release from the plasma membranes of S49 lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lauryl E; Nelson, Jennifer; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2014-01-01

    This study answered the question of whether biophysical mechanisms for microparticle shedding discovered in platelets and erythrocytes also apply to nucleated cells: cytoskeletal disruption, potassium efflux, transbilayer phospholipid migration, and membrane disordering. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, disrupted the actin cytoskeleton of S49 lymphoma cells and produced rapid release of microparticles. This release was significantly inhibited by interventions that impaired calcium-activated potassium current. Microparticle release was also greatly reduced in a lymphocyte cell line deficient in the expression of scramblase, the enzyme responsible for calcium-stimulated dismantling of the normal phospholipid transbilayer asymmetry. Rescue of the scrambling function at high ionophore concentration also resulted in enhanced particle shedding. The effect of membrane physical properties was addressed by varying the experimental temperature (32-42°C). A significant positive trend in the rate of microparticle release as a function of temperature was observed. Fluorescence experiments with trimethylammonium diphenylhexatriene and Patman revealed significant decrease in the level of apparent membrane order along that temperature range. These results demonstrated that biophysical mechanisms involved in microparticle release from platelets and erythrocytes apply also to lymphocytes.

  7. Inhibition of neurally-evoked transmitter release by calcium channel antagonists in rat parasympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Seabrook, G. R.; Adams, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    ',4'-dichlorobenzamil was ineffective in reducing the amplitude of e.p.s.ps (30-100 microM). 7. omega-Conotoxin GVIA, a marine neurotoxin, which depressed whole cell calcium currents recorded from cultured rat parasympathetic cardiac neurones (up to 90% block at 10 nM), was ineffective at blocking synaptic transmission in submandibular ganglia (0.1-1 microM). 8. The differential effects of these calcium channel antagonists upon synaptic transmission in rat parasympathetic ganglia, suggest that either more than one type of calcium channel may be involved in transmitter release, or that the presynaptic calcium channels possess pharmacological sensitivities different from those of channel types described in ne PMID:2571381

  8. Self-Setting Calcium Phosphate Cements with Tunable Antibiotic Release Rates for Advanced Antimicrobial Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shreya; Wu, Victoria; Pernal, Sebastian; Uskoković, Vuk

    2016-03-01

    Osteomyelitis, an infectious disease predominantly tied to poor sanitary conditions in underdeveloped regions of the world, is in need of inexpensive, easily in situ synthesizable and administrable materials for its treatment. The results of this study stem from the attempt to create one such affordable and minimally invasive therapeutic platform in the form of a self-setting, injectable cement with a tunable drug release profile, composed of only nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite, the synthetic version of the bone mineral. Cements comprised two separately synthesized hydroxyapatite powders, one of which, HAP2, was precipitated abruptly, retaining the amorphous nature longer, and the other one of which, HAP1, was precipitated at a slower rate, more rapidly transitioning to the crystalline structure. Cements were made with four different weight ratios of the two hydroxyapatite components: 100/0, 85/15, 50/50, and 0/100 with respect to HAP1 and HAP2. Both the setting and the release rates measured on two different antibiotics, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin, were controlled using the weight ratio of the two hydroxyapatite components. Various inorganic powder properties were formerly used to control drug release, but here we demonstrate for the first time that the kinetics of the mechanism of formation of a solid compound can be controlled to produce tunable drug release profiles. Specifically, it was found that the longer the precursor calcium phosphate component of the cement retains the amorphous nature of the primary precipitate, the more active it was in terms of speeding up the diffusional release of the adsorbed drug. The setting rate was, in contrast, inversely proportional to the release rate and to the content of this active hydroxyapatite component, HAP2. The empirical release profiles were fitted to a set of equations that could be used to tune the release rate to the therapeutic occasion. All of the cements loaded with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin inhibited the

  9. A new hand-held optical reflectometer to measure enamel erosion: correlation with surface hardness and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the surface reflection intensity (SRI) was measured from enamel with different induced erosion degrees using a hand-held pen-size reflectometer (Hand-Held) and a Table-Top reflectometer. To validate the Hand-Held reflectometer, we correlated its optical signals with the change of surface microhardness (SMH), and amount of calcium released from the enamel samples during erosion. We used 124 tooth enamel specimens that were exposed to an erosive challenge of either 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes. SRI and SMH were measured before and after the erosive challenge and we also measured the amount of calcium released to the citric acid. Relative SRI loss (rSRIloss) and relative SMH loss (rSMHloss) were calculated. rSRIloss from the Hand-Held and the Table-Top reflectometers were similar and significantly correlated to rSMHloss and calcium release. The regression analyses showed a significant association between rSRIloss from both reflectometers and rSMHloss and calcium, showing that both reflectometers can be used to measure erosive demineralization of enamel. The Hand-Held reflectometer is capable of assessing in vitro erosion, correlating to other commonly used methods. It is small, easy to handle and provides fast measurement, being a possible candidate to measure erosion in clinical studies. PMID:27121129

  10. A new hand-held optical reflectometer to measure enamel erosion: correlation with surface hardness and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-04-28

    In the present study, the surface reflection intensity (SRI) was measured from enamel with different induced erosion degrees using a hand-held pen-size reflectometer (Hand-Held) and a Table-Top reflectometer. To validate the Hand-Held reflectometer, we correlated its optical signals with the change of surface microhardness (SMH), and amount of calcium released from the enamel samples during erosion. We used 124 tooth enamel specimens that were exposed to an erosive challenge of either 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes. SRI and SMH were measured before and after the erosive challenge and we also measured the amount of calcium released to the citric acid. Relative SRI loss (rSRIloss) and relative SMH loss (rSMHloss) were calculated. rSRIloss from the Hand-Held and the Table-Top reflectometers were similar and significantly correlated to rSMHloss and calcium release. The regression analyses showed a significant association between rSRIloss from both reflectometers and rSMHloss and calcium, showing that both reflectometers can be used to measure erosive demineralization of enamel. The Hand-Held reflectometer is capable of assessing in vitro erosion, correlating to other commonly used methods. It is small, easy to handle and provides fast measurement, being a possible candidate to measure erosion in clinical studies.

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of phosphorylase by anoxia and dinitrophenol in rabbit colon smooth muscle: relation to release of calcium from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, G

    1983-05-01

    The effect of anoxia or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) on the phosphorylase a activity and the calcium content in subcellular fractions from rabbit colon smooth muscle was studied. Anoxia for 15 min. as well as DNP (6.6 X 10(-5) M) for 5 min. increased the phosphorylase a activity. The calcium content in the mitochondrial subfraction, prepared from the anoxic- or DNP-treated intact muscle and determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was reduced. The calcium content in the nuclear and the microsomal fractions was not changed in preparations with a normal Ca-content. When the muscle was incubated for 60 min. in a Ca2+-free medium containing 2.0 mM EGTA, the calcium content in the mitochondrial fraction was reduced to 38% of the control. This calcium level was still further reduced and the phosphorylase a activity was increased by DNP in this "Ca-poor" muscle. In these preparations the Ca-content of the microsomal + supernatant fraction increased. Only when the muscle was incubated, initially, in an anoxic medium containing 0.1 mM Ca2+ for 120 min. and, subsequently, in an oxygenated medium containing 0.1 mM Ca2+ for 20 min., DNP failed to activate phosphorylase and to decrease the calcium content in the mitochondrial fraction. These results indicate that mitochondrial Ca2+ release is one of the regulatory factors of the anoxic-induced glycogenolysis.

  13. Arachidonic acid activates release of calcium ions from reticulum via ryanodine receptor channels in C2C12 skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Muslikhov, E R; Sukhanova, I F; Avdonin, P V

    2014-05-01

    Arachidonic acid causes an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in differentiated skeletal multinucleated myotubes C2C12 and does not induce calcium response in C2C12 myoblasts. The same reaction of myotubes to arachidonic acid is observed in Ca2+-free medium. This indicates that arachidonic acid induces release of calcium ions from intracellular stores. The blocker of ryanodine receptor channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum dantrolene (20 µM) inhibits this effect by 68.7 ± 6.3% (p < 0.001). The inhibitor of two-pore calcium channels of endolysosomal vesicles trans-NED19 (10 µM) decreases the response to arachidonic acid by 35.8 ± 5.4% (p < 0.05). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (10 µM) has no effect. These data indicate the involvement of ryanodine receptor calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum in [Ca2+]i elevation in skeletal myotubes caused by arachidonic acid and possible participation of two-pore calcium channels from endolysosomal vesicles in this process.

  14. Internal calcium release and activation of sea urchin eggs by cGMP are independent of the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, T; McDougall, A; Crossley, I; Swann, K; Whitaker, M

    1992-01-01

    We show that microinjecting cyclic GMP (cGMP) into unfertilized sea urchin eggs activates them by stimulating a rise in the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). The increase in [Ca2+]i is similar in both magnitude and duration to the transient that activates the egg at fertilization. It is due to mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but is not prevented by the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) antagonist heparin. Furthermore, cGMP does not stimulate the eggs Na+/H+ antiport when the [Ca2+]i transient is blocked by the calcium chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting that cGMP does not activate eggs by interacting with the their phosphoinositide signaling pathway. However, the [Ca2+]i increase and activation are prevented in eggs in which the InsP3-sensitive calcium stores have been emptied by the prior microinjection of the InsP3 analogue inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphorothioate. These data indicate that cGMP activates eggs by stimulating the release of calcium from an InsP3-sensitive calcium store via a novel, though unidentified, route independent of the InsP3 receptor. PMID:1320962

  15. Calcium release and ionic changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of tetanized muscle: an electron-probe study

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 60-70% of the total fiber calcium was localized in the terminal cisternae (TC) in resting frog muscle as determined by electron-probe analysis of ultrathin cryosections. During a 1.2 s tetanus, 59% (69 mmol/kg dry TC) of the calcium content of the TC was released, enough to raise total cytoplasmic calcium concentration by approximately 1 mM. This is equivalent to the concentration of binding sites on the calcium-binding proteins (troponin and parvalbumin) in frog muscle. Calcium release was associated with a significant uptake of magnesium and potassium into the TC, but the amount of calcium released exceeded the total measured cation accumulation by 62 mEq/kg dry weight. It is suggested that most of the charge deficit is apparent, and charge compensation is achieved by movement of protons into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or by the movement of organic co- or counterions not measured by energy dispersive electron-probe analysis. There was no significant change in the sodium or chlorine content of the TC during tetanus. The unchanged distribution of a permeant anion, chloride, argues against the existence of a large and sustained transSR potential during tetanus, if the chloride permeability of the in situ SR is as high as suggested by measurements on fractionated SR. The calcium content of the longitudinal SR (LSR) during tetanus did not show the LSR to be a major site of calcium storage and delayed return to the TC. The potassium concentration in the LSR was not significantly different from the adjacent cytoplasmic concentration. Analysis of small areas of I-band and large areas, including several sarcomeres, suggested that chloride is anisotropically distributed, with some of it probably bound to myosin. In contrast, the distribution of potassium in the fiber cytoplasm followed the water distribution. The mitochondrial concentration of calcium was low and did not change significantly during a tetanus. The TC of both tetanized and resting

  16. Regulated Drug Release Abilities of Calcium Carbonate-Gelatin Hybrid Nanocarriers Fabricated via a Self-Organizational Process.

    PubMed

    Murai, Kazuki; Kurumisawa, Kazuya; Nomura, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi

    2017-07-25

    In this study, we investigated the drug-releasing behavior of a calcium carbonate (CaCO3 )-gelatin hybrid nanocarrier, fabricated through a single process using biomimetic mineralization. The organic scaffold (gelatin) of the fabricated nanocarrier is responsible for its capacity to load anionic drugs and for controlling the morphology of the inorganic matrix (CaCO3 ). We studied the drug-releasing properties of the nanocarrier by investigating the response of the CaCO3 matrix to acidic conditions. We found that under neutral conditions, drug release from the nanocarrier was inhibited, whereas under acidic conditions, the drug was efficiently released. Therefore, drug release from the nanocarrier is largely dependent on the surrounding pH. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  18. Calcium inactivation of calcium release in frog cut muscle fibers that contain millimolar EGTA or Fura-2

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cut muscle fibers from Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 3.4-4.2 microns) were mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber (14-15 degrees C) and equilibrated with end-pool solutions that contained 20 mM EGTA and 1.76 mM Ca. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release was estimated from changes in pH (Pape, P. C., D.-S. Jong, and W.K. Chandler. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:000-000). Although the amplitude and duration of the [Ca] transient, as well as its spatial spread from the release sites, are reduced by EGTA, SR Ca release elicited by either depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses or action potentials behaved in a manner consistent with Ca inactivation of Ca release. After a step depolarization to -20 or 10 mV, the rate of SR Ca release, corrected for SR Ca depletion, reached a peak value within 5-15 ms and then rapidly decreased to a quasi-steady level that was about half the peak value; the time constant of the last half of the decrease was usually 2- 4 ms. Immediately after an action potential or a 10-15 ms prepulse to - 20 mV, the peak rate of SR Ca release elicited by a second stimulation, as well as the fractional amount of release, were substantially decreased. The rising phase of the rate of release was also reduced, suggesting that at least 0.9 of the ability of the SR to release Ca had been inactivated by the first stimulation. There was little change in intramembranous charge movement, suggesting that the changes in SR Ca release were not caused by changes in its voltage activation. These effects of a first stimulation on the rate of SR Ca release elicited by a second stimulation recovered during repolarization to -90 mV; the time constant of recovery was approximately 25 ms in the action- potential experiments and approximately 50 ms in the voltage-clamp experiments. Fura-2, which is able to bind Ca more rapidly than EGTA and hence reduce the amplitude of the [Ca] transient and its spatial spread from release sites by a greater amount, did not

  19. Dominance of P/Q-type calcium channels in depolarization-induced presynaptic FM dye release in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, B; Flucher, B E; Obermair, G J

    2013-12-03

    Neurotransmitter release probability is related by high power to the local concentration of calcium in presynaptic terminals, which in turn is controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels. P/Q- and N-type channels trigger synaptic transmission in the majority of neurons of the central nervous system. However, whether and under which conditions both channel types act cooperatively or independently is still insufficiently understood. Previous studies suggested either a dominance of N- or P/Q-type channels, or a synergistic action of both channels, depending on the experimental paradigms. Thus, to provide insight into the properties of neurotransmitter release in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, we used quantitative analysis of FM dye release from presynaptic boutons induced by high potassium membrane depolarization. Increasing extracellular potassium concentrations revealed a sigmoid dependence of FM dye release to the stimulation strength. Individual and combined application of the P/Q- and N-type channel-specific blockers ω-agatoxin-IVA and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, respectively, allowed us to specifically isolate the contribution of both channel types to release triggered with 40 mM KCl. Analysis of the release kinetics and the fractional release amplitude demonstrate that, whereas in only 15% of the synapses release depended exclusively on P/Q-type channels, the majority of synapses (85%) contained both N- and P/Q-type channels. Nevertheless, the kinetics of FM dye release in synapses containing both channel types was determined by the P/Q-type channels. Together, our data suggest a more direct coupling of P/Q-type channels to synaptic release compared to N-type channels, which may explain the high prevalence of neurological P/Q-type channelopathies.

  20. Stochastic spontaneous calcium release events and sodium channelopathies promote ventricular arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Fernando O.; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Vigmond, Edward J.; Plank, Gernot

    2017-09-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), the first initiating beats of a variety of cardiac arrhythmias, have been associated with spontaneous calcium release (SCR) events at the cell level. However, the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of such PVCs into arrhythmias are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the conditions under which SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to ventricular arrhythmias. In particular, we sought to determine whether sodium (Na+) current loss-of-function in the structurally normal ventricles provides a substrate for unidirectional conduction block and reentry initiated by SCR-mediated PVCs. To achieve this goal, a stochastic model of SCR was incorporated into an anatomically accurate compute model of the rabbit ventricles with the His-Purkinje system (HPS). Simulations with reduced Na+ current due to a negative-shift in the steady-state channel inactivation showed that SCR-mediated delayed afterdepolarizations led to PVC formation in the HPS, where the electrotonic load was lower, conduction block, and reentry in the 3D myocardium. Moreover, arrhythmia initiation was only possible when intrinsic electrophysiological heterogeneity in action potential within the ventricles was present. In conclusion, while benign in healthy individuals SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias when combined with Na+ channelopathies.

  1. Stochastic spontaneous calcium release events and sodium channelopathies promote ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fernando O.; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2017-01-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), the first initiating beats of a variety of cardiac arrhythmias, have been associated with spontaneous calcium release (SCR) events at the cell level. However, the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of such PVCs into arrhythmias are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the conditions under which SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to ventricular arrhythmias. In particular, we sought to determine whether sodium (Na+) current loss-of-function in the structurally normal ventricles provides a substrate for unidirectional conduction block and reentry initiated by SCR-mediated PVCs. To achieve this goal, a stochastic model of SCR was incorporated into an anatomically accurate compute model of the rabbit ventricles with the His-Purkinje system (HPS). Simulations with reduced Na+ current due to a negative-shift in the steady-state channel inactivation showed that SCR-mediated delayed afterdepolarizations led to PVC formation in the HPS, where the electrotonic load was lower, conduction block, and reentry in the 3D myocardium. Moreover, arrhythmia initiation was only possible when intrinsic electrophysiological heterogeneity in action potential within the ventricles was present. In conclusion, while benign in healthy individuals SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias when combined with Na+ channelopathies. PMID:28964108

  2. Stochastic spontaneous calcium release events and sodium channelopathies promote ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fernando O; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Vigmond, Edward J; Plank, Gernot

    2017-09-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), the first initiating beats of a variety of cardiac arrhythmias, have been associated with spontaneous calcium release (SCR) events at the cell level. However, the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of such PVCs into arrhythmias are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the conditions under which SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to ventricular arrhythmias. In particular, we sought to determine whether sodium (Na(+)) current loss-of-function in the structurally normal ventricles provides a substrate for unidirectional conduction block and reentry initiated by SCR-mediated PVCs. To achieve this goal, a stochastic model of SCR was incorporated into an anatomically accurate compute model of the rabbit ventricles with the His-Purkinje system (HPS). Simulations with reduced Na(+) current due to a negative-shift in the steady-state channel inactivation showed that SCR-mediated delayed afterdepolarizations led to PVC formation in the HPS, where the electrotonic load was lower, conduction block, and reentry in the 3D myocardium. Moreover, arrhythmia initiation was only possible when intrinsic electrophysiological heterogeneity in action potential within the ventricles was present. In conclusion, while benign in healthy individuals SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias when combined with Na(+) channelopathies.

  3. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  4. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  5. Interactions between fibroblastic reticular cells and B cells promote mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Karempudi, Praneeth; Luther, Sanjiv A; Ludewig, Burkhard; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-08-28

    Lymphatic growth (lymphangiogenesis) within lymph nodes functions to promote dendritic cell entry and effector lymphocyte egress in response to infection or inflammation. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR) signaling to fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) by lymphotoxin-expressing B cells in driving mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis following helminth infection. LTβR ligation on fibroblastic reticular cells leads to the production of B-cell-activating factor (BAFF), which synergized with interleukin-4 (IL-4) to promote the production of the lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C, by B cells. In addition, the BAFF-IL-4 synergy augments expression of lymphotoxin by antigen-activated B cells, promoting further B cell-fibroblastic reticular cell interactions. These results underlie the importance of lymphotoxin-dependent B cell-FRC cross talk in driving the expansion of lymphatic networks that function to promote and maintain immune responsiveness.The growth of lymph nodes in response to infection requires lymphangiogenesis. Dubey et al. show that the mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis upon helminth infection depends on the signaling loop between the B and fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), whereby the FRCs respond to lymphotoxin secreted by B cells by releasing B cell activating factor.

  6. Homosynaptic facilitation of transmitter release in crayfish is not affected by mobile calcium chelators: implications for the residual ionized calcium hypothesis from electrophysiological and computational analyses.

    PubMed

    Winslow, J L; Duffy, S N; Charlton, M P

    1994-10-01

    1. Evoked neurotransmitter release at the crayfish neuromuscular junction was measured in the presence of the cell-permeant calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetotoxymethyl (BAPTA-AM). Excitatory post-synaptic potentials were greatly diminished after application of the intracellular chelator, an effect resulting from attenuation of the rise in the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca]i) that is necessary for neurotransmission. However, short-term homosynaptic facilitation of release, the magnitude and time course of which is thought to depend on the accumulation and removal of residual Ca ions (Ca2+), was not affected. Application of the cell-permeant form of ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) gave similar results. 2. To interpret these results we developed a reaction-diffusion model in 3D rectangular coordinates for Ca2+ diffusion in the presence of mobile and immobile buffers. Solutions of the model in response to influx of Ca2+ through one or six channels for different diffusion coefficients and no nondiffusable buffer, predict that 1) the time course of residual Ca2+ is very brief, 2) an unrealistically low Ca2+ diffusion coefficient is required for residual calcium, 3) the spatially distributed Ca2+ signal is attenuated by intracellular BAPTA, 4) the rate at which free Ca2+ returns to resting levels, after entry (residual Ca2+) is faster with more mobile buffer, and 5) when pulse trains of Ca2+ channel current are used as input, computed facilitation is comparable to experimental measurements without buffer, but is abolished in the presence of exogenous buffer. 3. When the diffusion coefficient of Ca2+ in water is used, there is no residual Ca2+; however, when 0.1-1.6 mM nondiffusable buffer is present with a fast binding coefficient comparable to BAPTA, there is a very small residual Ca2+ due to the unbinding from the fixed binding sites. The nondiffusable buffer is

  7. Influence of calcium salts and bovine thrombin on growth factor release from equine platelet-rich gel supernatants.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Carlos E; Álvarez, María E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2017-01-16

    To compare five activation methods in equine platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by determination of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentrations in platelet-rich gel (PRG) supernatants. Platelet-rich plasma from 20 horses was activated by calcium chloride (CC), calcium gluconate (CG), bovine thrombin (BT), and their combinations, BTCC and BTCG. Both growth factor concentrations in PRG supernatants were measured by ELISA and compared with plasma and platelet lysates (PL) over time. Growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in plasma and higher for all PRG supernatants. Platelet lysates contained a significantly lower concentration of PDGF-BB than PRG supernatants and a significantly higher concentration of TGF-β1 than PRG supernatants. Clots from PRP activated with sodium salts were more stable over time and had significant growth factor release, whereas CC produced gross salt deposition. Significant correlations were noticed for platelet with leukocyte concentrations in PRP (rs: 0.76), platelet counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.86), platelet counts in PRP with PDGF-BB concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.78), leukocyte counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.76), and PDGF-BB concentrations with activating substances (rs: 0.72). Calcium gluconate was the better substance to induce PRP activation. It induced growth factor release free from calcium precipitates in the clots. Use of BT alone or combined with calcium salts was not advantageous for growth factor release.

  8. Linoleic acid induces calcium signaling, Src kinase phosphorylation, and neurotransmitter release in mouse CD36-positive gustatory cells.

    PubMed

    El-Yassimi, Abdelghani; Hichami, Aziz; Besnard, Philippe; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2008-05-09

    We have recently demonstrated that the cells expressing CD36, localized apically on the taste buds of mouse lingual circumvallate papillae, act as gustatory cells. In the present study we isolated these CD36-positive cells from mouse circumvallate papillae and investigated intracellular signaling events, triggered by a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, i.e. linoleic acid (LA). LA induced increases in free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca(2+)](i), by recruiting calcium from endoplasmic reticulum pool via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate production followed by calcium influx via opening of store-operated calcium (SOC) channels. LA also induced phosphorylation of Src-protein-tyrosine kinases (Src-PTKs), particularly of Fyn(59) and Yes(62). LA-evoked phosphorylation of Fyn(59) and Yes(62) was implicated in the activation of SOC channels. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that the CD36-positive gustatory cells possessed mRNA of enzymes like tryptophan hydroxylase-1, l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase, involved in the synthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters. Interestingly, the addition of LA to these cells induced the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenalin to the extracellular environment. The LA-induced release of these neurotransmitters was curtailed by SOC channel blockers and Src-PTK inhibitors. These results altogether demonstrate that LA binds to mouse CD36-positive gustatory cells, induces Src-PTKs phosphorylation, triggers calcium signaling, and evokes the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenalin, which in turn may be implicated in the downstream signaling to the afferent nerve fibers, thus transmitting the output signal from taste buds to the central nervous system.

  9. Ceramide induces serotonin release from RBL-2H3 mast cells through calcium mediated activation of phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jung Eun; Kim, Seok Kyun; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Choi, Jong Min; Jung, Sung Yun; Jung, Kwang Mook; Jeon, Hyung Jun; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2011-04-01

    Ceramide has been suggested to function as a mediator of exocytosis in response to the addition of a calcium ionophore from PC12 cells. Here, we show that although cell-permeable C(6)-ceramide or a calcium ionophore alone did not increase either the degranulation of serotonin or the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from RBL-2H3 cells, their combined effect significantly stimulated these processes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This effect was inhibited by the presence of an exogenous calcium chelator and significantly suppressed by the CERK inhibitor (K1) and phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) inhibitors. Moreover, cytosolic PLA(2) GIVA (cPLA(2) GIVA) siRNA-transfected RBL-2H3 cells showed a lower level of serotonin release than scramble siRNA-transfected cells. Little is known about the regulation of degranulation proximal to the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) GIVA, the initial rate-limiting step in RBL-2H3 cells. In this study, we suggest that CERK, ceramide-1-phosphate, and PLA(2) are involved in degranulation in a calcium-dependent manner. Inhibition of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase partially decreased the AA release, but did not affect degranulation. Furthermore, treatment of the cells with AA (ω-6, C20:4), not linoleic acid (ω-6, C18:2) or α-linolenic acid (ω-6, C18:3), induced degranulation. Taken together, these results suggest that ceramide is involved in mast cell degranulation via the calcium-mediated activation of PLA(2). Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequelae of potassium removal. In the presence of 4.7 mM potassium and at a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, ryanodine had only a small variable effect on papillary muscle force development and action potential characteristics. In calf Purkinje fibers, ryanodine (1 nM-1 microM) completely blocked the aftercontractions and transient inward currents without altering the steady state current-voltage relationship. Ryanodine also abolished the twitch in potassium-free solutions, but it enhanced the tonic force during depolarizing voltage- clamp steps. This latter effect was dependent on the combination of ryanodine and potassium-free solutions. The slow inward current was not blocked by 1 microM ryanodine, but ryanodine did appear to abolish an outward current that remained in the presence of 0.5 mM 4- aminopyridine. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ryanodine, by inhibiting the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, prevents the oscillations in intracellular calcium that activate the transient inward currents and aftercontractions associated with calcium overload states. PMID:6631403

  11. Parallel temperature dependence of contracture-associated enzyme release due to anoxia, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), or caffeine and the calcium paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Ganote, C. E.; Sims, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hypothermia during calcium-free perfusion of hearts protects them from injury caused by subsequent calcium repletion at 37 C (calcium paradox). Injury to calcium-free hearts is also associated with contracture caused by anoxia, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), or caffeine. This study was done for the purpose of determining whether hypothermia during calcium-free perfusions protects hearts from contracture-associated injury. Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were studied in four experimental groups: I) Anoxia: Thirty minutes of anoxic perfusion at 37 C was followed by thirty minutes of anoxic calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C. II) Calcium paradox: Five minutes of calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C was followed by calcium repletion at 37 C. III, IVa) Caffeine or DNP: Five minutes of calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C was followed by addition of 10 mM caffeine or 1 mM DNP in calcium-free medium at 37 C or, IVb) 1 mM DNP in calcium-free medium at 22 C. Injury was assessed by measurement of serial releases of creatine kinase (CK) in effluents and by cellular morphology. The results show that progressive hypothermia to 22 C during calcium-free perfusion periods produced a progressive reduction of CK release and morphologic evidence of injury due to anoxia, caffeine, or DNP, which closely paralleled protection of hearts from the calcium paradox. Protection from injury in all experimental groups was associated with preservation of sarcolemmal membrane integrity and prevention of cell separations at intercalated disk junctions. It is proposed that weakening of intercalated disks occurs during calcium-free perfusions and may be a cause of mechanical fragility of the sarcolemma. Hypothermia may protect hearts from contracture-associated injury by preserving the integrity of intercalated disk junctions during periods of extracellular calcium depletion. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6742111

  12. Preparation, characterization, release kinetics, and in vitro cytotoxicity of calcium silicate cement as a risedronate delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxing; Wang, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yubiao; Sun, Changshan; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom; Häfeli, Urs O

    2014-07-01

    Injectable bone cements have been well characterized and studied in non-load bearing bone fixation and bone screw augmentation applications. Current calcium phosphate cement or poly(methyl methacrylate) cement have drawbacks like low mechanical strength and in situ exothermic properties. This leads especially in patients with osteoporosis to worsening contact between implant and bone and can finally lead to implant failure. To improve these properties, a calcium silicate cement (CSC) was prepared, which additionally contained the bisphosphonate risedronate (RA) to promote osteoblast function. Cement setting rate and compressive strength were measured and found to be reduced by RA above 0.5 wt%. X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and porosity measurements by gas sorption revealed that RA reduces calcium silicate hydrate gel formation and changes the cement's microstructure. Cumulative release profiles of RA from CSC up to 6 months into phosphate buffer solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the results were compared with theoretical release curves obtained from the Higuchi equation. Fourier transform infrared spectra measurements and drug release studies indicate that calcium-RA formed within the cement, from which the drug can be slowly released over time. An investigation of the cytotoxicity of the RA-CSC systems upon osteoblast-like cells showed no toxic effects of concentrations up to 2%. The delivery of RA from within a CSC might thus be a valuable and biocompatible new approach to locally deliver RA and to reconstruct and/or repair osteoporosis-related bone fractures.

  13. An experimental study of the effect of strontium pre-treatment on calcium release from carious and non-carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Riyat, Manminder; Sharma, Dinesh Chandra

    2010-03-01

    The administration of strontium salt is known to be beneficial for bones in preventing calcium loss and osteoporosis. Therefore, we decided to study if strontium treatment affects calcium release from teeth in vitro. Extracted carious as well as non-carious teeth were washed, cleaned, and dried. These were individually immersed in 25 ml of 1% lactic acid at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the amount of calcium released was measured. The rate of calcium release from these teeth was again determined after their exposure to M/4 strontium chloride for 1 month at 37 degrees C. It was found that: (1) the rate of calcium release from non-carious teeth was significantly higher than carious teeth, possibly because there was more calcium present, (2) the rate of calcium release was almost halved after strontium treatment in both groups of teeth, (3) the Vicker's microhardness of non-carious teeth was higher than those of carious teeth, and (4) strontium treatment did not affect hardness. Strontium treatment may be beneficial in reducing loss of calcium from intact teeth-non-carious as well as carious-and this beneficial effect of strontium is unrelated to change in teeth hardness.

  14. TAT-mediated photochemical internalization results in cell killing by causing the release of calcium into the cytosol of cells

    PubMed Central

    Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Lim, Jongdoo; Simanek, Eric E.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Lysis of endocytic organelles is a necessary step in many cellular delivery methodologies. This is achieved efficiently in the photochemical internalization approach but the cell death that accompanies this process remains a problem. Methods We investigate the mechanisms of cell death that accompanies photochemical internalization of the fluorescent peptide TMR-TAT. Results TMR-TAT kills cells after endocytosis and light irradiation. The lysis of endocytic organelles by TMR-TAT causes a rapid increase in the concentration of calcium in the cytosol. TMR-TAT co-localizes with endocytic organelles containing calcium prior to irradiation and photochemical internalization leads to the release of the lumenal content of these organelles. Ruthenium red and cyclosporin A, inhibitors of calcium import in mitochondria and of the mitochondria permeability transition pore, inhibit cell death. Conclusions TMR-TAT mediated photochemical internalization leads to a disruption of calcium homeostasis. The subsequent import of calcium in mitochondria is a causative factor of the cell death that accompanies photochemical internalization. General Significance Understanding how the lysis of endocytic organelles affects cellular physiology and causes cell death is crucial to the development of optimal delivery methodologies. PMID:22771830

  15. Local release of antibiotics for surgical site infection management using high-purity calcium sulfate: an in vitro elution study.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Sean S; Cooper, John J; Florance, Hannah; Robinson, Matthew T; Michell, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the elution of four antibiotics from pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate beads and show that the eluted antibiotics retained efficacy. Calcium sulfate was combined with gentamicin, tobramycin, vancomycin, or rifampicin (ratio: 20 g of calcium sulfate, to 240 mg, 500 mg, 900 mg, and 600 mg of antibiotic, respectively). Three grams of beads were immersed in 4 mL of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. At each time point (4, 8, 24 h; 2, 7, 14, 28, 42 d), eluates were removed for analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficacy of antibiotics combined with calcium sulfate beads after 42 d was tested by a modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. All samples showed a generally exponential decay in the eluted antibiotic concentration. At the first time point, both gentamicin and tobramycin had eluted to a peak concentration of approximately 10,000 mcg/mL. For rifampicin, the peak concentration occurred at 24 h, whereas for vancomycin, it occurred at 48 h. The eluted concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration for common periprosthetic joint infection pathogens for the entire span of the 42 study days. Mass spectrometry confirmed all antibiotics were unchanged when eluted from the calcium sulfate carrier. Antimicrobial efficacy was unaltered after 42 d in combination with calcium sulfate at 37°C. Pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate has the potential for targeted local release of tobramycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, and rifampicin over a clinically meaningful time period.

  16. Local Release of Antibiotics for Surgical Site Infection Management Using High-Purity Calcium Sulfate: An In Vitro Elution Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, John J.; Florance, Hannah; Robinson, Matthew T.; Michell, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to characterize the elution of four antibiotics from pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate beads and show that the eluted antibiotics retained efficacy. Methods: Calcium sulfate was combined with gentamicin, tobramycin, vancomycin, or rifampicin (ratio: 20 g of calcium sulfate, to 240 mg, 500 mg, 900 mg, and 600 mg of antibiotic, respectively). Three grams of beads were immersed in 4 mL of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. At each time point (4, 8, 24 h; 2, 7, 14, 28, 42 d), eluates were removed for analysis by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficacy of antibiotics combined with calcium sulfate beads after 42 d was tested by a modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. Results: All samples showed a generally exponential decay in the eluted antibiotic concentration. At the first time point, both gentamicin and tobramycin had eluted to a peak concentration of approximately 10,000 mcg/mL. For rifampicin, the peak concentration occurred at 24 h, whereas for vancomycin, it occurred at 48 h. The eluted concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration for common periprosthetic joint infection pathogens for the entire span of the 42 study days. Mass spectrometry confirmed all antibiotics were unchanged when eluted from the calcium sulfate carrier. Antimicrobial efficacy was unaltered after 42 d in combination with calcium sulfate at 37°C. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate has the potential for targeted local release of tobramycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, and rifampicin over a clinically meaningful time period. PMID:25148101

  17. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Selectivity and permeation in calcium release channel of cardiac muscle: alkali metal ions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1999-01-01

    Current was measured from single open channels of the calcium release channel (CRC) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (over the range +/-180 mV) in pure and mixed solutions (e.g., biionic conditions) of the alkali metal ions Li+, K+, Na+, Rb+, Cs+, ranging in concentration from 25 mM to 2 M. The current-voltage (I-V) relations were analyzed by an extension of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) formulation of electrodiffusion, which includes local chemical interaction described by an offset in chemical potential, which likely reflects the difference in dehydration/solvation/rehydration energies in the entry/exit steps of permeation. The theory fits all of the data with few adjustable parameters: the diffusion coefficient of each ion species, the average effective charge distribution on the wall of the pore, and an offset in chemical potential for lithium and sodium ions. In particular, the theory explains the discrepancy between "selectivities" defined by conductance sequence and "selectivities" determined by the permeability ratios (i.e., reversal potentials) in biionic conditions. The extended PNP formulation seems to offer a successful combined treatment of selectivity and permeation. Conductance selectivity in this channel arises mostly from friction: different species of ions have different diffusion coefficients in the channel. Permeability selectivity of an ion is determined by its electrochemical potential gradient and local chemical interaction with the channel. Neither selectivity (in CRC) seems to involve different electrostatic interaction of different ions with the channel protein, even though the ions have widely varying diameters. PMID:10049318

  20. Effects of copyrolysis of sludge with calcium carbonate and calcium hydrogen phosphate on chemical stability of carbon and release of toxic elements in the resultant biochars.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuebin; Hu, Xin; Ding, Zhuhong; Chen, Yijun

    2017-09-08

    The potential release of toxic elements and the stability of carbon in sludge-based biochars are important on their application in soil remediation and wastewater treatment. In this study, municipal sludge was co-pyrolyzed with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium dihydrogen phosphate [Ca(H2PO4)2] under 300 and 600 °C, respectively. The basic physicochemical properties of the resultant biochars were characterized and laboratory chemical oxidation and leaching experiments of toxic elements were conducted to evaluate the chemical stability of carbon in biochars and the potential release of toxic elements from biochars. Results show that the exogenous minerals changed the physico-chemical properties of the resultant biochars greatly. Biochars with exogenous minerals, especially Ca(H2PO4)2, decreased the release of Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, and As and the release ratios were less than 1%. Tessier's sequential extraction analysis revealed that labile toxic elements were transferred to residual fraction in the biochars with high pyrolysis temperature (600 °C) and exogenous minerals. Low risks for biochar-bound Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, and Cu were confirmed according to risk assessment code (RAC) while the potential ecological risk index (PERI) revealed that the exogenous Ca(H2PO4)2 significantly decreased the risks from considerable to moderate level. Moreover, the exogenous minerals significantly increased the chemical stability of carbon in 600 °C-pyrolyzed biochars by 10-20%. These results indicated that the copyrolysis of sludge with phosphate and carbonate, especially phosphate, were effective methods to prepare the sludge-based biochars with immobilized toxic elements and enhanced chemical stability of carbon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relevance of microstructure for the early antibiotic release of fresh and pre-set calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Canal, Cristina; Pastorino, David; Mestres, Gemma; Schuler, Philipp; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2013-09-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have great potential as carriers for controlled release and vectoring of drugs in the skeletal system. However, a lot of work still has to be done in order to obtain reproducible and predictable release kinetics. A particular aspect that adds complexity to these materials is that they cannot be considered as stable matrices, since their microstructure evolves during the setting reaction. The aims of the present work were to analyze the effect of the microstructural evolution of the CPC during the setting reaction on the release kinetics of the antibiotic doxycycline hyclate and to assess the effect of the antibiotic on the microstructural development of the CPC. The incorporation of the drug in the CPC modified the textural and microstructural properties of the cements by acting as a nucleating agent for the heterogeneous precipitation of hydroxyapatite crystals, but did not affect its antibacterial activity. In vitro release experiments were carried out on readily prepared cements (fresh CPCs), and compared to those of pre-set CPCs. No burst release was found in any formulation. A marked difference in release kinetics was found at the initial stages; the evolving microstructure of fresh CPCs led to a two-step release. Initially, when the carrier was merely a suspension of α-TCP particles in water, a faster release was recorded, which rapidly evolved to a zero-order release. In contrast, pre-set CPCs released doxycycline following non-Fickian diffusion. The final release percentage was related to the total porosity and entrance pore size of each biomaterial.

  2. Protein Geometry and Placement in the Cardiac Dyad Influence Macroscopic Properties of Calcium-Induced Calcium Release

    PubMed Central

    Tanskanen, Antti J.; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Chen, Alex; Sun, Sean X.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2007-01-01

    In cardiac ventricular myocytes, events crucial to excitation-contraction coupling take place in spatially restricted microdomains known as dyads. The movement and dynamics of calcium (Ca2+) ions in the dyad have often been described by assigning continuously valued Ca2+ concentrations to one or more dyadic compartments. However, even at its peak, the estimated number of free Ca2+ ions present in a single dyad is small (∼10–100 ions). This in turn suggests that modeling dyadic calcium dynamics using laws of mass action may be inappropriate. In this study, we develop a model of stochastic molecular signaling between L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) that describes: a), known features of dyad geometry, including the space-filling properties of key dyadic proteins; and b), movement of individual Ca2+ ions within the dyad, as driven by electrodiffusion. The model enables investigation of how local Ca2+ signaling is influenced by dyad structure, including the configuration of key proteins within the dyad, the location of Ca2+ binding sites, and membrane surface charges. Using this model, we demonstrate that LCC-RyR2 signaling is influenced by both the stochastic dynamics of Ca2+ ions in the dyad as well as the shape and relative positioning of dyad proteins. Results suggest the hypothesis that the relative placement and shape of the RyR2 proteins helps to “funnel” Ca2+ ions to RyR2 binding sites, thus increasing excitation-contraction coupling gain. PMID:17325016

  3. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  4. Fundamental calcium release events revealed by two-photon excitation photolysis of caged calcium in guinea-pig cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, Peter; Niggli, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, ‘Ca2+ sparks’ have been proposed to underlie Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR), and to result from openings of clusters of Ca2+ channels (ryanodine receptors; RyRs) located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. To investigate the elementary nature of these Ca2+ signals directly, a diffraction-limited point source of Ca2+ was created in single cardiac myocytes by two-photon excitation photolysis of caged Ca2+. Simultaneously, concentration profiles of released Ca2+ were imaged at high temporal and spatial resolution with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. This approach enabled us to generate and detect photolytic Ca2+ signals that closely resembled the Ca2+ sparks occurring naturally, not only in amplitude and size, but also in their ability to trigger additional Ca2+ sparks or Ca2+ waves. Surprisingly, at low photolytic power minuscule events with estimated Ca2+ release fluxes 20–40 times smaller than those calculated for a typical Ca2+ spark were directly resolved. These events appeared to arise from the opening of a more limited number of RyRs (possibly one) or from RyRs exhibiting a different gating mode and may correspond to the elusive ‘Ca2+ quark’. The Ca2+ quark represents the fundamental Ca2+ release event of excitable cells implementing hierarchical Ca2+ signalling systems with Ca2+ release events of various but distinct amplitude levels (i.e. Ca2+ quarks, Ca2+ sparks and full cellular Ca2+ transients). A graded recruitment of nanoscopic Ca2+ release domains (i.e. Ca2+ quarks) exhibiting variable degrees of spatial coherence and coupling may then build up intermediate Ca2+ signalling events (i.e. Ca2+ sparks). This mechanism suggests the existence of Ca2+ sparks caused by gating of a variable fraction of RyRs from within an individual cluster. Additional mobilization of a variable number of these Ca2+ sparks enables cardiac cells to show graded cellular Ca2+ transients. Similar recruitment processes may underlie regulation

  5. Fundamental calcium release events revealed by two-photon excitation photolysis of caged calcium in Guinea-pig cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lipp, P; Niggli, E

    1998-05-01

    1. In cardiac muscle, 'Ca2+ sparks' have been proposed to underlie Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR), and to result from openings of clusters of Ca2+ channels (ryanodine receptors; RyRs) located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. 2. To investigate the elementary nature of these Ca2+ signals directly, a diffraction-limited point source of Ca2+ was created in single cardiac myocytes by two-photon excitation photolysis of caged Ca2+. Simultaneously, concentration profiles of released Ca2+ were imaged at high temporal and spatial resolution with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 3. This approach enabled us to generate and detect photolytic Ca2+ signals that closely resembled the Ca2+ sparks occurring naturally, not only in amplitude and size, but also in their ability to trigger additional Ca2+ sparks or Ca2+ waves. 4. Surprisingly, at low photolytic power minuscule events with estimated Ca2+ release fluxes 20-40 times smaller than those calculated for a typical Ca2+ spark were directly resolved. These events appeared to arise from the opening of a more limited number of RyRs (possibly one) or from RyRs exhibiting a different gating mode and may correspond to the elusive 'Ca2+ quark'. 5. The Ca2+ quark represents the fundamental Ca2+ release event of excitable cells implementing hierarchical Ca2+ signalling systems with Ca2+ release events of various but distinct amplitude levels (i.e. Ca2+ quarks, Ca2+ sparks and full cellular Ca2+ transients). 6. A graded recruitment of nanoscopic Ca2+ release domains (i.e. Ca2+ quarks) exhibiting variable degrees of spatial coherence and coupling may then build up intermediate Ca2+ signalling events (i.e. Ca2+ sparks). This mechanism suggests the existence of Ca2+ sparks caused by gating of a variable fraction of RyRs from within an individual cluster. Additional mobilization of a variable number of these Ca2+ sparks enables cardiac cells to show graded cellular Ca2+ transients. Similar recruitment processes may underlie

  6. Identification of calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand as a human host restriction to HIV-1 release overcome by Vpu

    PubMed Central

    Varthakavi, Vasundhara; Heimann-Nichols, Ellen; Smith, Rita M; Sun, Yuehui; Bram, Richard J; Ali, Showkat; Rose, Jeremy; Ding, Lingmei; Spearman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The HIV-1 Vpu protein is required for efficient viral release from human cells. For HIV-2, the envelope (Env) protein replaces the role of Vpu. Both Vpu and HIV-2 Env enhance virus release by counteracting an innate host-cell block within human cells that is absent in African green monkey (AGM) cells. Here we identify calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) as a Vpu-interacting host factor that restricts HIV-1 release. Expression of human CAML (encoded by CAMLG) in AGM cells conferred a strong restriction of virus release that was reversed by Vpu and HIV-2 Env, suggesting that CAML is the mechanistic link between these two viral regulators. Depletion of CAML in human cells eliminated the need for Vpu in enhancing HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus release. These results point to CAML as a Vpu-sensitive host restriction factor that inhibits HIV release from human cells. The ability of CAML to inhibit virus release should illuminate new therapeutic strategies against HIV. PMID:18500349

  7. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  8. Role of zinc influx via AMPA/kainate receptor activation in metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Fuke, Sayuri; Minami, Akira; Oku, Naoto

    2007-05-01

    The uptake of free zinc into CA3 pyramidal cells and its significance was examined in rat hippocampal slices with ZnAF-2DA, a membrane-permeable zinc indicator. Intracellular ZnAF-2 signal in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer was increased during delivery of tetanic stimuli to the dentate granule cell layer. This increase was completely blocked in the presence of CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. These results suggest that free zinc is taken up into CA3 pyramidal cells via activation of AMPA/kainate receptors. The effect of free zinc levels in the CA3 pyramidal cells on the increase in intracellular calcium via Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors was examined by regional delivery of tADA, a Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, to the stratum lucidum after blockade of AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated calcium and zinc influx. Intracellular calcium orange signal in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer was increased by tADA, whereas intracellular ZnAF-2 signal was not increased even in the presence of 100 muM zinc, suggesting that tADA induces calcium release from internal stores in CA3 pyramidal cells and is not involved in zinc uptake. The increase in calcium orange signal by tADA was enhanced by perfusion with pyrithione, a zinc ionophore that decreased basal ZnAF-2 signal in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. It was blocked by perfusion with pyrithione and zinc that increased basal ZnAF-2 signal. The present study indicates that the increase in free calcium levels via the metabotropic glutamate receptor pathway is inversely related to free zinc levels in CA3 pyramidal cells.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the calcium release from mineral trioxide aggregate and its mixture with glass ionomer cement in different proportions and time intervals – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Surbhi; Vivekananda Pai, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Addition of glass ionomer cement (GIC) has been suggested to improve the setting time and handling characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). This study evaluated the effect of adding GIC to MTA in terms of calcium release, an issue that has not been previously studied. Materials and methods The study comprised four groups with five samples each: a control group of MTA alone and experimental groups I (1MTA:1GIC), II (2MTA:1GIC), and III (1MTA:2GIC) based on the mixture of MTA and GIC powders in the respective proportions by volume. Calcium release from the samples was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 15 min, 6 h, 24 h, and 1 week after setting. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Groups I (1MTA:1GIC) and III (1MTA:2GIC) released significantly less calcium than the control group at all time periods, except at 15 min for group I. Group II (2MTA:1GIC) showed no significant difference in calcium release compared to the control at any time period. Group II exhibited greater calcium release than group I or III at all time periods, with significant differences between groups I and II at 1 week and between groups I and III at 24 h and 1 week. There were no statistical differences in calcium release between groups I and III. Conclusions Adding GIC to improve the setting time and handling properties of the MTA powder can be detrimental to the calcium-releasing ability of the resultant mixture, depending on the proportion of GIC added. Adding MTA and GIC at a proportion of 2:1 by volume did not impact calcium release from the mixture. These findings should be verified through further clinical studies. PMID:26644757

  10. Calcium release by noradrenaline from central sarcoplasmic reticulum in rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kowarski, D; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1985-01-01

    The subcellular composition of relaxed and noradrenaline-contracted rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of rapidly frozen tissue. Some of the preparations were made permeable with saponin and exposed to a known free Ca ion concentration, rapidly frozen, freeze-substituted, and also analysed by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. 98% of intracellular K could be replaced by Rb. This was done to remove the K peak that partially overlaps the Ca peak in the X-ray spectra. The final [Rb]i plus residual [K]i was not significantly different from the [K]i of normal tissue. The [Ca]i in Rb-containing tissue was not significantly different from the [Ca]i in normal, K-containing tissue. Non-mitochondrial micro-regions containing high [Ca] (up to 33 mmol/kg dry wt.) were found at sites 200 nm or more away from the plasma membrane. These micro-regions also contained high [P]. We consider the identification of these regions containing high [Ca] as sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), validated by: (a) conventional electron micrographs that show no other structures in main pulmonary artery smooth muscle in sufficient quantity and location to account for the frequency of these regions, (b) the previous localization of strontium, a functional calcium analogue, in the central s.r. in these smooth muscles (Somlyo & Somlyo, 1971 a), (c) the present demonstration that the central s.r. in this tissue can accumulate large amounts of calcium oxalate. The proportion of regions containing high [Ca] (greater than 12.0 mmol/kg dry wt.) was significantly higher in relaxed (35 of 330 measurements) than in the contracted (14 of 337) tissues (P less than 0.005), or 26 of 34 vs. 6 of 31 high [Ca] measurements in regions identified as s.r. through their high phosphorus content (P less than 0.006). This difference is thought to represent Ca release from the central s.r. There was no significant difference (P greater than 0

  11. Reticular telangiectatic erythema: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, Bryce D.; Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reticular telangiectatic erythema is a benign cutaneous reaction that may occur in patients who have received a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Reticular telangiectatic erythema is characterized by asymptomatic telangiectasias, blanchable erythematous patches, or both overlying and/or adjacent to the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Purpose: We describe a man who developed reticular telangiectatic erythema after receiving a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and review the salient features of this condition. We also summarize the conditions that can mimic reticular telangiectatic erythema. Materials and methods: The features of a man with reticular telangiectatic erythema are presented and the literature on reticular telangiectatic erythema is reviewed. Results: Our patient developed reticular telangiectatic erythema within one month of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator insertion. The subcutaneous manifestations were asymptomatic. The patient concurred to have periodic clinical follow up and his condition will be monitored for any changes. Conclusion: Reticular telangiectatic erythema is a benign condition characterized by the development of erythema, telangiectasia, or both following insertion of a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Other subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator-related side effects, such as pressure dermatitis and contact dermatitis, can mimic the condition. Reticular telangiectatic erythema can also be observed following insertion of other devices or, rarely, in the absence of inserted devices. Local microcirculatory changes and subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator-related obstruction of blood flow have been suggested as possible mechanisms of pathogenesis. The diagnosis can usually be established by clinical presentation. Therefore, patch testing can usually be omitted. Reticular telangiectatic erythema is

  12. D1/D5 dopamine receptors stimulate intracellular calcium release in primary cultures of neocortical and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Nelson; Bergson, Clare

    2002-04-01

    D1/D5 dopamine receptors in basal ganglia, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex modulate motor, reward, and cognitive behavior. Previous work with recombinant proteins revealed that in cells primed with heterologous G(q/11)-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, the typically G(s)-linked D1/D5 receptors can stimulate robust release of calcium from internal stores when coexpressed with calcyon. To learn more about the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying these D1/D5 receptor regulated behaviors, we explored the possibility that endogenous receptors stimulate internal release of calcium in neurons. We have identified a population of neurons in primary cultures of hippocampus and neocortex that respond to D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonists with a marked increase in intracellular calcium (Ca) levels. The D1/D5 receptor stimulated responses occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) indicating the rises in Ca involve release from internal stores. In addition, the responses were blocked by D1/D5 receptor antagonists. Further, the D1/D5 agonist-evoked responses were state dependent, requiring priming with agonists of G(q/11)-coupled glutamate, serotonin, muscarinic, and adrenergic receptors or with high external K(+) solution. In contrast, D1/D5 receptor agonist-evoked Ca(2+) responses were not detected in neurons derived from striatum. However, D1/D5 agonists elevated cAMP levels in striatal cultures as effectively as in neocortical and hippocampal cultures. Further, neither forskolin nor 8-Br-cAMP stimulation following priming was able to mimic the D1/D5 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) response in neocortical neurons indicating that increased cAMP levels are not sufficient to stimulate Ca release. Our data suggest that D1-like dopamine receptors likely modulate neocortical and hippocampal neuronal excitability and synaptic function via Ca(2+) as well as cAMP-dependent signaling.

  13. Simulated GABA synaptic input and L-type calcium channels form functional microdomains in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Peter J; O'Boyle, Michael P; Roberts, Carson B; Delgado-Reyes, Alfonso; Hemond, Zoe; Suter, Kelly J

    2012-06-27

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate the multiple internal and external cues that regulate sexual reproduction. In contrast to other neurons that exhibit extensive dendritic arbors, GnRH neurons usually have a single dendrite with relatively little branching. This largely precludes the integration strategy in which a single dendritic branch serves as a unit of integration. In the present study, we identify a gradient in L-type calcium channels in dendrites of mouse GnRH neurons and its interaction with GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Higher levels of L-type calcium channels are in somata/proximal dendrites (i.e., 0-26 μm) and distal dendrites (∼130 μm dendrite length), but intervening midlengths of dendrite (∼27-130 μm) have reduced L-type calcium channels. Using uncaging of GABA, there is a decreasing GABAergic influence along the dendrite and the impact of GABA(A) receptors is dependent on activation of L-type calcium channels. This results in amplification of proximal GABAergic signals and attenuation of distal dendritic signals. Most interestingly, the intervening dendritic regions create a filter through which only relatively high-amplitude, low-frequency GABAergic signaling to dendrites elicits action potentials. The findings of the present study suggest that GnRH dendrites adopt an integration strategy whereby segments of single nonbranching GnRH dendrites create functional microdomains and thus serve as units of integration.

  14. Specific Association of Growth-associated Protein 43 with Calcium Release Units in Skeletal Muscles of Lower Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, G.A.; Perni, S.; Morabito, C.; Mariggiò, M.A.; Guarnieri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes), and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species. PMID:25578978

  15. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  16. Cations and anions as modifiers of ryanodine binding to the skeletal muscle calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Hasselbach, W; Migala, A

    1998-08-01

    Rate and equilibrium measurements of ryanodine binding to terminal cysternae fractions of heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles demonstrate that its activation by high concentrations of monovalent salts is based on neither elevated osmolarity nor ionic strength. The effect of the ions specifically depends on their chemical nature following the Hofmeister ion series for cations (Li+ < NH+4 < K- approximately Cs+ calcium release from actively

  17. Aqueous Black Colloids of Reticular Nanostructured Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, S. E.; Fritzsche, W.; Dellith, J.; Froehlich, F.; Undisz, A.; Deckert, V.; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, noble gold has continuously contributed to several aspects of life from medicine to electronics. It perpetually reveals its new features. We report the finding of a unique form of gold, reticular nanostructured gold (RNG), as an aqueous black colloid, for which we present a one-step synthesis. The reticules consist of gold crystals that interconnect to form compact strands. RNG exhibits high conductivity and low reflection, and these features, coupled with the high specific surface area of the material, could prove valuable for applications in electronics and catalysis. Due to high absorption throughout the visible and infrared domain, RNG has the potential to be applied in the construction of sensitive solar cells or as a substrate for Raman spectroscopy.

  18. THE RETICULAR MATERIAL OF DEVELOPING BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cowdry, Edmund V.

    1921-01-01

    Erythroblasts, leucocytes, and lymphocytes resemble other cells of the body in containing a restricted area of fluidity in their cytoplasm. In special preparations this fluid appears in the form of a more or less complicated reticulum which seems to be continually but slowly changing in shape. For convenience the fluid may provisionally be referred to as reticular material, emphasis being laid on its composition rather than its form. As a working hypothesis it is safe to assume that the chemical and physical properties of this material vary in cells of different kinds as well as in different stages in the activity of the same cell. The conclusion that it is "identical" in different cells, because the present crude methods of technique reveal no fundamental differences, would be as incorrect as the statement that the serum of different animals is identical, because no difference is observed on microscopic examination. PMID:19868474

  19. Aqueous black colloids of reticular nanostructured gold.

    PubMed

    Stanca, S E; Fritzsche, W; Dellith, J; Froehlich, F; Undisz, A; Deckert, V; Krafft, C; Popp, J

    2015-01-20

    Since ancient times, noble gold has continuously contributed to several aspects of life from medicine to electronics. It perpetually reveals its new features. We report the finding of a unique form of gold, reticular nanostructured gold (RNG), as an aqueous black colloid, for which we present a one-step synthesis. The reticules consist of gold crystals that interconnect to form compact strands. RNG exhibits high conductivity and low reflection, and these features, coupled with the high specific surface area of the material, could prove valuable for applications in electronics and catalysis. Due to high absorption throughout the visible and infrared domain, RNG has the potential to be applied in the construction of sensitive solar cells or as a substrate for Raman spectroscopy.

  20. GABAB receptors suppress burst-firing in reticular thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cain, Stuart M; Garcia, Esperanza; Waheed, Zeina; Jones, Karen L; Bushell, Trevor J; Snutch, Terrance P

    2017-07-25

    Burst-firing in thalamic neurons is known to play a key role in mediating thalamocortical (TC) oscillations that are associated with non-REM sleep and some types of epileptic seizure. Within the TC system the primary output of GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) is thought to induce the de-inactivation of T-type calcium channels in thalamic relay (TR) neurons, promoting burst-firing drive to the cortex and the propagation of TC network activity. However, RTN neurons also project back onto other neurons within the RTN. The role of this putative negative feedback upon the RTN itself is less well understood, although is hypothesized to induce de-synchronization of RTN neuron firing leading to the suppression of TC oscillations. Here we tested two hypotheses concerning possible mechanisms underlying TC oscillation modulation. Firstly, we assessed the burst-firing behavior of RTN neurons in response to GABAB receptor activation using acute brain slices. The selective GABAB receptor agonist baclofen was found to induce suppression of burst-firing concurrent with effects on membrane input resistance. Secondly, RTN neurons express CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 T-type calcium channel isoforms known to contribute toward TC burst-firing and we examined the modulation of these channels by GABAB receptor activation. Utilizing exogenously expressed T-type channels we assessed whether GABAB receptor activation could directly alter T-type calcium channel properties. Overall, GABAB receptor activation had only modest effects on CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 isoforms. The only effect that could be predicted to suppress burst-firing was a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of inactivation, potentially causing lower channel availability at membrane potentials critical for burst-firing. Conversely, other effects observed such as a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of activation of both CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 as well as increased time constant of activation of the CaV3

  1. Effects of crystallinity and surface modification of calcium phosphate nanoparticles on the loading and release of tetracycline hydro-chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhi; Yan, Dong; Menike Korale Gedara, Sriyani; Dingiri Marakkalage, Sajith Sudeepa Fernando; Gamage Kasun Methlal, Jothirathna; Han, YingChao; Dai, HongLian

    2017-03-01

    The influences of crystallinity and surface modification of calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nCaP) on their drug loading capacity and drug release profile were studied in the present investigation. The CaP nanoparticles with different crystallinity were prepared by precipitation method under different temperatures. CaP nanoparticles with lower crystallinity exhibited higher drug loading capacity. The samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, TEM and BET surface area analyzer respectively. The drug loading capacity of nCaP was evaluated to tetracycline hydro-chloride (TCH). The internalization of TCH loaded nCaP in cancer cell was observed by florescence microscope. nCaP could be stabilized and dispersed in aqueous solution by poly(acrylic acid) surface modification agent, leading to enhanced drug loading capacity. The drug release was conducted in different pH environment and the experimental data proved that nCaP were pH sensitive drug carrier, suggesting that nCaP could achieve the controlled drug release in intracellular acidic environment. Furthermore, nCaP with higher crystallinity showed lower drug release rate than that of lower crystallinity, indicating that the drug release profile could be adjusted by crystallinity of nCaP. nCaP with adjustable drug loading and release properties are promising candidate as drug carrier for disease treatment.

  2. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  3. Ryanodine receptor sensitivity governs the stability and synchrony of local calcium release during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Andrew P; Jafri, M Saleet; Lederer, W J; Williams, George S B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-induced calcium release is the principal mechanism that triggers the cell-wide [Ca(2+)]i transient that activates muscle contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). Here, we characterize this process in mouse cardiac myocytes with a novel mathematical action potential (AP) model that incorporates realistic stochastic gating of voltage-dependent L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels (LCCs) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels (the ryanodine receptors, RyR2s). Depolarization of the sarcolemma during an AP stochastically activates the LCCs elevating subspace [Ca(2+)] within each of the cell's 20,000 independent calcium release units (CRUs) to trigger local RyR2 opening and initiate Ca(2+) sparks, the fundamental unit of triggered Ca(2+) release. Synchronization of Ca(2+) sparks during systole depends on the nearly uniform cellular activation of LCCs and the likelihood of local LCC openings triggering local Ca(2+) sparks (ECC fidelity). The detailed design and true SR Ca(2+) pump/leak balance displayed by our model permits investigation of ECC fidelity and Ca(2+) spark fidelity, the balance between visible (Ca(2+) spark) and invisible (Ca(2+) quark/sub-spark) SR Ca(2+) release events. Excess SR Ca(2+) leak is examined as a disease mechanism in the context of "catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)", a Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmia. We find that that RyR2s (and therefore Ca(2+) sparks) are relatively insensitive to LCC openings across a wide range of membrane potentials; and that key differences exist between Ca(2+) sparks evoked during quiescence, diastole, and systole. The enhanced RyR2 [Ca(2+)]i sensitivity during CPVT leads to increased Ca(2+) spark fidelity resulting in asynchronous systolic Ca(2+) spark activity. It also produces increased diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak with some prolonged Ca(2+) sparks that at times become "metastable" and fail to efficiently terminate. There is a huge margin of safety for

  4. Intracellular calcium stores drive slow non-ribbon vesicle release from rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Križaj, David; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Rods are capable of greater slow release than cones contributing to overall slower release kinetics. Slow release in rods involves Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). By impairing release from ribbons, we found that unlike cones where release occurs entirely at ribbon-style active zones, slow release from rods occurs mostly at ectopic, non-ribbon sites. To investigate the role of CICR in ribbon and non-ribbon release from rods, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as a tool for visualizing terminals of isolated rods loaded with fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dyes and synaptic vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pH-sensitive rhodamine. We found that rather than simply facilitating release, activation of CICR by ryanodine triggered release directly in rods, independent of plasma membrane Ca2+ channel activation. Ryanodine-evoked release occurred mostly at non-ribbon sites and release evoked by sustained depolarization at non-ribbon sites was mostly due to CICR. Unlike release at ribbon-style active zones, non-ribbon release did not occur at fixed locations. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-tracker dye in rod terminals showed that ER extends continuously from synapse to soma. Release of Ca2+ from terminal ER by lengthy depolarization did not significantly deplete Ca2+ from ER in the perikaryon. Collectively, these results indicate that CICR-triggered release at non-ribbon sites is a major mechanism for maintaining vesicle release from rods and that CICR in terminals may be sustained by diffusion of Ca2+ through ER from other parts of the cell. PMID:24550779

  5. Nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium applied individually or as a slow release or controlled release fertilizer increase growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has restricted concentrated animal feeding operation(CAFO) release of waste products into U.S. waters. These waste products must be disposed of using best management practices. Most of the waste is spread on cropland, but some operations have found ot...

  6. Contribution of sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchange and intracellular calcium release to force development in isolated canine ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the relationship between peak twitch amplitude and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content during changes of stimulation frequency in isolated canine ventricle, and to estimate the extent to which these changes were dependent upon sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange. In physiological [Na+]o, increased stimulation frequency in the 0.2-2-Hz range resulted in a positive inotropic effect characterized by an increase in peak twitch amplitude and a decrease in the duration of contraction, measured as changes in isometric force development or unloaded cell shortening in intact muscle and isolated single cells, respectively. Action potentials recorded from single cells indicated that the inotropic effect was associated with a progressive decrease of action potential duration and a marked reduction in average time spent by the cell near the resting potential during the stimulus train. The frequency-dependent increase of peak twitch force was correlated with an increase of Ca2+ uptake into and release from the SR. This was estimated indirectly using the phasic contractile response to rapid (less than 1 s) lowering of perfusate temperature from 37 degrees C to 0-2 degrees C and changes of twitch amplitude resulting from perturbations in the pattern of electrical stimulation. Lowering [Na+]o from 140 to 70 mM resulted in an increase of contractile strength, which was accompanied by a similar increase of apparent SR Ca2+ content, both of which could be abolished by exposure to ryanodine (1 x 10(-8) M), caffeine (3 x 10(-3) M), or nifedipine (2 x 10(-6) M). Increased stimulation frequency in 70 mM [Na+]o resulted in a negative contractile staircase, characterized by a graded decrease of peak isometric force development or unloaded cell shortening. SR Ca2+ content estimated under identical conditions remained unaltered. Rate constants derived from mechanical restitution studies implied that the depressant effect of increased stimulation

  7. Omega-conotoxin CVID inhibits a pharmacologically distinct voltage-sensitive calcium channel associated with transmitter release from preganglionic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Adams, David J; Smith, Amanda B; Schroeder, Christina I; Yasuda, Takahiro; Lewis, Richard J

    2003-02-07

    Neurotransmitter release from preganglionic parasympathetic neurons is resistant to inhibition by selective antagonists of L-, N-, P/Q-, R-, and T-type calcium channels. In this study, the effects of different omega-conotoxins from genus Conus were investigated on current flow-through cloned voltage-sensitive calcium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and nerve-evoked transmitter release from the intact preganglionic cholinergic nerves innervating the rat submandibular ganglia. Our results indicate that omega-conotoxin CVID from Conus catus inhibits a pharmacologically distinct voltage-sensitive calcium channel involved in neurotransmitter release, whereas omega-conotoxin MVIIA had no effect. omega-Conotoxin CVID and MVIIA inhibited depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents recorded from oocytes expressing N-type but not L- or R-type calcium channels. High affinity inhibition of the CVID-sensitive calcium channel was enhanced when position 10 of the omega-conotoxin was occupied by the smaller residue lysine as found in CVID instead of an arginine as found in MVIIA. Given that relatively small differences in the sequence of the N-type calcium channel alpha(1B) subunit can influence omega-conotoxin access (Feng, Z. P., Hamid, J., Doering, C., Bosey, G. M., Snutch, T. P., and Zamponi, G. W. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 15728-15735), it is likely that the calcium channel in preganglionic nerve terminals targeted by CVID is a N-type (Ca(v)2.2) calcium channel variant.

  8. Drug Release as a function of bioactivity, incubation regime, liquid, and initial load: Release of bortezomib from calcium phosphate-containing silica/collagen xerogels.

    PubMed

    Kruppke, Benjamin; Hose, Dirk; Schnettler, Reinhard; Seckinger, Anja; Rößler, Sina; Hanke, Thomas; Heinemann, Sascha

    2017-05-29

    The ability of silica-/collagen-based composite xerogels to act as drug delivery systems was evaluated by taking into account the initial drug concentration, bioactivity of the xerogels, liquid, and incubation regime. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was chosen as a model drug, used for the systemic treatment of multiple myeloma. Incubation during 14 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or simulated body fluid (SBF) showed a weak initial burst and was identified to be of first order with subsequent release being independent from the initial load of 0.1 or 0.2 mg bortezomib per 60 mg monolithic sample. Faster drug release occurred during incubation in SBF compared to PBS, and during static incubation without changing the liquid, compared to dynamic incubation with daily liquid changes. Drug-loaded xerogels with hydroxyapatite as a third component exhibited enhanced bioactivity retarding drug release, explained by formation of a surface calcium phosphate layer. The fastest release of 50% of the total drug load was observed for biphasic xerogels after 7 days during dynamic incubation in SBF. As a result, the presented concept is suitable for the intended combination of the advantageous bone substitution properties of xerogels and local application of drugs exemplified by bortezomib. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Determination of time-dependent inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate concentrations during calcium release in a smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, C C; Slepchenko, B; Loew, L M

    1999-01-01

    The level of [InsP3]cyt required for calcium release in A7r5 cells, a smooth muscle cell line, was determined by a new set of procedures using quantitative confocal microscopy to measure release of InsP3 from cells microinjected with caged InsP3. From these experiments, the [InsP3]cyt required to evoke a half-maximal calcium response is 100 nM. Experiments with caged glycerophosphoryl-myo-inositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (GPIP2), a slowly metabolized analogue of InsP3, gave a much slower recovery and a half-maximal response of an order of magnitude greater than InsP3. Experimental data and highly constrained variables were used to construct a mathematical model of the InsP3-dependent [Ca2+]cyt changes; the resulting simulations show high fidelity to experiment. Among the elements considered in constructing this model were the mechanism of the InsP3-receptor, InsP3 degradation, calcium buffering in the cytosol, and refilling of the ER stores via sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) pumps. The model predicts a time constant of 0.8 s for InsP3 degradation and 13 s for GPIP2. InsP3 degradation was found to be a prerequisite for [Ca2+]cyt recovery to baseline levels and is therefore critical to the pattern of the overall [Ca2+]cyt signal. Analysis of the features of this model provides insights into the individual factors controlling the amplitude and shape of the InsP3-mediated calcium signal. PMID:10388786

  10. Discrepancy in calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular acidic stores for the protection of the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Aseel; Babiker, Fawzi

    2016-09-01

    We and others have demonstrated a protective effect of pacing postconditioning (PPC) against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanisms underlying this protection are not completely clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the novel intracellular acidic stores (AS). Isolated rat hearts (n = 6 per group) were subjected to coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion using a modified Langendorff system. Cardiac hemodynamics and contractility were assessed using a data acquisition program, and cardiac injury was evaluated by creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Hearts were subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia, produced by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The hearts were also subjected to PPC (3 cycles of 30 s of left ventricle (LV) pacing alternated with 30 s of right atrium (RA) pacing) and/or were treated during reperfusion with agonists or antagonists of release of calcium from SR or AS. PPC significantly (P < 0.05) normalized LV, contractility, and coronary vascular dynamics and significantly (P < 0.001) decreased heart enzyme levels compared to the control treatments. The blockade of SR calcium release resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) recovery in LV function and contractility and a significant reduction in CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) when applied alone or in combination with PPC. Interestingly, the release of calcium from AS alone or in combination with PPC significantly improved LV function and contractility (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased the CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) compared to the control treatments. An additive effect was produced when agonism of calcium release from AS or blockade of calcium release from the SR was combined with PPC. Calcium release from AS and blockade of calcium release from the SR protect the heart against I

  11. Cyclic AMP regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) release and phospholipid metabolism in human monocytes: modulation by intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffstein, S.T.; Manzi, R.M.; Godfrey, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Stimulation of inflammatory cells by specific ligands results in activation of phospholipase(s) and production of oxygenation products of AA. The authors have employed (/sup 3/H)AA labeled monocytes to examine the involvement of cAMP in regulating phospholipase activity as measured by percent of incorporated (/sup 3/H)AA released and TLC analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA cellular lipids. Maximum release of radiolabel (31 +/- 5%) occurred upon challenge with the calcium ionophore A23187/sup -/ (10..mu..M), while FMLP (1..mu..M) yielded 15 +/- 1% and untreated cells 8 +/- 1%. Pretreatment of monocytes with isobutyl methyl xanthine/sup -/(IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) inhibited FMLP stimulated release with IC/sub 50/'s of 2.5 x 10/sup -5/M and 8 x 10/sup -5/M respectively. Exposure of monocytes to maximal levels of IBMX (5 x 10/sup -4/M) or d-cAMP (10/sup -3/M) also reduced release from controls by 40%, while A23187 induced release was uneffected by either. Examination of (/sup 3/H) AA labeled phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol were the major pools labeled and that stimulation by FMLP or A23187 appeared to deplete the PC pool exclusively. Prior exposure to IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited the loss from the PC pool only in untreated or FMLP stimulated cells. The data suggests that a phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity, directly primarily towards PC, is regulated by cAMP possibly by inhibiting receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium levels.

  12. Calcium transients and the effect of a photolytically released calcium chelator during electrically induced contractions in rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Arner, A; Malmqvist, U; Rigler, R

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ was determined with the fura-2 technique during electrically induced contractions in the rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle at 22 degreesC. The muscles were electrically activated to give short, reproducible contractions. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased during activation; the increase in [Ca2+] preceded force development by approximately 2 s. After cessation of stimulation Ca2+ fell, preceding the fall in force by approximately 4 s. The fluorescence properties of fura-2 were determined with time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron light at the MAX-storage ring, Lund, Sweden. The fluorescence decay of free fura-2 was best described by two exponential decays (time constants approximately 0.5 and 1.5 ns) at low Ca2+ (pCa 9). At high Ca2+ (pCa 4.5), fluorescence decay became slower and could be fitted by one exponential decay (1.9 ns). Time-resolved anisotropy of free fura-2 was characteristic of free rotational motion (correlation time 0.3 ns). Motion of fura-2 could be markedly inhibited by high concentrations of creatine kinase. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of muscle fibers loaded with fura-2 showed that the fluorescence lifetime of the probe was longer, suggesting an influence of the chemical environment. Anisotropy measurements revealed, however, that the probe was mobile in the cells. The Ca2+-dependence of contraction and relaxation was studied using a photolabile calcium chelator, diazo-2, which could be loaded into the muscle cells in a similar manner as fura-2. Photolysis of diazo-2 leads to an increase in its Ca2+-affinity and a fall in free Ca2+. When muscles that had been loaded with diazo-2 were illuminated with UV light flashes during the rising phase of contraction, the rate of contraction became slower, suggesting a close relation between intracellular Ca2+ and the cross-bridge interaction. In contrast, photolysis during relaxation did not influence the rate of force decay, suggesting that relaxation of these

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium release potentiates the ER stress and cell death caused by an oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Beck, Raphaël; Verrax, Julien; Taper, Henryk; Gailly, Philippe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2010-05-01

    Increase in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+](c)), release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ([Ca2+](er)) and ER stress have been proposed to be involved in oxidative toxicity. Nevertheless, their relative involvements in the processes leading to cell death are not well defined. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress generated during ascorbate-driven menadione redox cycling (Asc/Men) could trigger these three events, and, if so, whether they contributed to Asc/Men cytoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Using microspectrofluorimetry, we demonstrated that Asc/Men-generated oxidative stress was associated with a slow and moderate increase in [Ca2+](c), largely preceding permeation of propidium iodide, and thus cell death. Asc/Men treatment was shown to partially deplete ER calcium stores after 90 min (decrease by 45% compared to control). This event was associated with ER stress activation, as shown by analysis of eIF2 phosphorylation and expression of the molecular chaperone GRP94. Thapsigargin (TG) was then used to study the effect of complete [Ca2+](er) emptying during the oxidative stress generated by Asc/Men. Surprisingly, the combination of TG and Asc/Men increased ER stress to a level considerably higher than that observed for either treatment alone, suggesting that [Ca2+](er) release alone is not sufficient to explain ER stress activation during oxidative stress. Finally, TG-mediated [Ca2+](er) release largely potentiated ER stress, DNA fragmentation and cell death caused by Asc/Men, supporting a role of ER stress in the process of Asc/Men cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ER stress and [Ca2+](er) decrease in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells.

  14. The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the 5-ASA release from calcium alginate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Cristián; Molina, Sergio; Diaz, Alvaro; Abugoch, Lilian; Diaz-Dosque, Mario; Valenzuela, Fernando; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2010-09-01

    The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the mesalamine (5-ASA) release from calcium alginate microparticles (CaAl) was studied, and a delayed release of 5-ASA system intended for colonic drug delivery was developed. The external chitosan coating was developed by immersion of wetted CaAl in chitosan solution and the internal coating by mixing 5-ASA with chitosan solution and drying before the preparation of CaAl. Both systems were coated with Acryl-EZE® using combined fluid bed coating and immersion procedure. The results showed that in phosphate medium (pH 7.5), chitosan as 5-ASA coating promotes a quick erosion process accelerating drug release, but chitosan as external coating (CaAlCS) does not increase the T (50) value compared with the microparticles without chitosan (CaAl). Chitosan as internal or external coating was not effective to avoid the quick 5-ASA release in acidic medium (pH 1.2). The presence of β-glucosidase enzymes increases significantly the 5-ASA release for CaAl, while no effect was observed with chitosan as internal or external coating. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray data revealed that 5-ASA did not form a solid solution but was dispersed in the microparticles. The Acryl-EZE® coating of microparticles was effective because all the formulations showed a low release, less than 15%, of 5-ASA in acid medium at pH 1.2. Significant differences in the percentage of 5-ASA released between formulations were observed in phosphate buffer at pH 6.0. In phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, all the formulations released 100% of 5-ASA.

  15. Somato-axodendritic release of oxytocin into the brain due to calcium amplification is essential for social memory.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain from the cell soma, axons, and dendrites of neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus. Locally released OT can activate OT receptors, form inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and elevate intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations [(Ca(2+)) i ] in self and neighboring neurons in the hypothalamus, resulting in further OT release: i.e., autocrine or paracrine systems of OT-induced OT release. CD38-dependent cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is also involved in this autoregulation by elevating [Ca(2+)] i via Ca(2+) mobilization through ryanodine receptors on intracellular Ca(2+) pools that are sensitive to both Ca(2+) and cADPR. In addition, it has recently been reported that heat stimulation and hyperthermia enhance [Ca(2+)] i increases by Ca(2+) influx, probably through TRPM2 cation channels, suggesting that cADPR and TRPM2 molecules act as Ca(2+) signal amplifiers. Thus, OT release is not simply due to depolarization-secretion coupling. Both of these molecules play critical roles not only during labor and milk ejection in reproductive females, but also during social behavior in daily life in both genders. This was clearly demonstrated in CD38 knockout mice in that social behavior was impaired by reduction of [Ca(2+)] i elevation and subsequent OT secretion. Evidence for the associations of CD38 with social behavior and psychiatric disorder is discussed, especially in subjects with autism spectrum disorder.

  16. The role of calcium and nitric oxide during liver enzyme release induced by increased physical forces as evidenced in partially hepatectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Juárez, Julieta; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2011-03-01

    Although increased plasma enzyme activities could be diagnostic for tissue damage, the mechanisms controlling cellular enzyme release remain poorly understood. We found a selective and drastic elevation of serum enzyme activities accompanying rat liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH), apparently controlled by a mechanism dependent on flow-bearing physical forces. In fact, this study assesses a putative role of calcium mobilization and nitric oxide (NO) production underlying rat liver enzyme release. The role of increased shear stress (by enhancing viscosity during perfusion) and the participation of cell calcium and NO were tested in isolated livers subjected to increasing flow rate. After PH, there was a drastic elevation of serum activities for liver enzyme markers, clearly predominating those of mitochondrial localization. Liver enzyme release largely depended on extracellular calcium entry, probably mediated by stretch-sensitive calcium channels, as well as by increasing NO production. However, these effects were differentially observed when comparing liver enzymes from cytoplasmic or mitochondrial compartments. Moreover, a possible role for cell-mediated mechanotransduction in liver enzyme release was suggested by increasing shear stress (high viscosity), which also selectively affected the release of the enzymes tested. Therefore, we show, for the first time, that flow-induced shear stress can control the amount of hepatic enzymes released into the bloodstream, which is largely regulated through modifications in cell calcium mobilization and production of liver NO, events markedly elevated in the proliferating rat liver. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Involvement of multiple calcium channels in neurotransmitter release from cultured sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Hirning, L.D.; Perney, T.M.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The release of neurotransmitters has been defined to be a Ca/sup + +/ dependent process, however, the role of Ca/sup + +/ channels in the release process is unclear. Primary cultures of sympathetic nerves from superior cervical ganglia were used to examine the specific actions of dihydropyridine (DHP) drugs. In nerve cultures, /sup 3/H-norepinepharine (NE) was taken up in a desipramine blockable fashion and released on exposure to high external K/sup +/ concentrations. NE release was virtually abolished by Co/sup + +/ (3 mM) or in Ca/sup + +/ free media, demonstrating the Ca/sup + +/ dependence of the release. However, the antagonist DHP, nimodipine, was ineffective in blocking transmitter release in concentrations up to 10/sup -5/M. In contrast, the agonist DHP, Bay K8644 (10/sup -6/M), significantly enhanced transmitter release by 35-40% of control. This enhancement was blocked down to control levels by nimodipine (10/sup -6/M). The authors have also demonstrated high affinity /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites (B/sub max/ = 179 fmoles/mg, Kd = 0.25 nM) on these sympathetic neuronal membranes. These data suggest that DHP sensitive Ca/sup + +/ channels, which have been shown to modulate SP release from DRG neurons in culture are not usually involved in NE release from sympathetic neurons. However, prolonged opening of these channels by the DHP agonist, Bay K8644, increases the overall Ca/sup + +/ influx into sympathetic nerves to enhance transmitter release.

  18. The initiation of calcium release following muscarinic stimulation in rat lacrimal glands.

    PubMed

    Marty, A; Tan, Y P

    1989-12-01

    1. Acinar cells were isolated from rat lacrimal glands, and the Ca2+ release response of these cells was studied using two experimental approaches. In one approach, changes in Ca2+ concentration, Cai2+, were monitored by measuring Ca2(+)-dependent Cl- currents using tight-seal whole-cell recording. Alternatively, such changes were measured as a fluorescence signal in cells loaded with Fura-2. 2. Following bath application of ACh (0.5 microM), the cell current recorded at -60 mV was unchanged for ca 0.8 s, then rose in a biphasic manner. The initial phase of the current rise ('hump') took different appearances depending on the cell studied, and it sometimes stood out from the main part of the response as a partially isolated transient. 3. In cells which had been loaded with Fura-2, Cai2+ was found to rise abruptly following a silent period. The delay was larger if ACh (0.2-0.5 microM) was applied in a depolarizing isotonic K+ saline than if it was applied in the normal saline. In addition, the maximum of the Cai2+ response was reduced with depolarizing stimulating solutions. This indicates that membrane potential modulates the Cai2+ response. 4. Responses to 5 microM-ACh, a saturating agonist concentration, were almost identical in K+ saline and in normal saline. 5. If the cell potential was hyperpolarized, the delay of the ACh-induced current became shorter. 6. Breaking into an acinar cell with a pipette containing an elevated Ca2+ concentration (0.1-1 mM) led to a transient activation of Ca2(+)-induced currents during the first seconds of whole-cell recording. These transients were obtained more reliably if the transition to the whole-cell mode was achieved by applying a sharp pulse of potential ('zapping') rather than by applying suction to the pipette compartment. At -60 mV, the transients elicited with the former method by 0.5 mM-Ca2+ had a time-to-peak near 0.6s and an amplitude varying between 10 and 600 pA. With 0.1 mM-Ca2+, similar transients were also

  19. The initiation of calcium release following muscarinic stimulation in rat lacrimal glands.

    PubMed Central

    Marty, A; Tan, Y P

    1989-01-01

    1. Acinar cells were isolated from rat lacrimal glands, and the Ca2+ release response of these cells was studied using two experimental approaches. In one approach, changes in Ca2+ concentration, Cai2+, were monitored by measuring Ca2(+)-dependent Cl- currents using tight-seal whole-cell recording. Alternatively, such changes were measured as a fluorescence signal in cells loaded with Fura-2. 2. Following bath application of ACh (0.5 microM), the cell current recorded at -60 mV was unchanged for ca 0.8 s, then rose in a biphasic manner. The initial phase of the current rise ('hump') took different appearances depending on the cell studied, and it sometimes stood out from the main part of the response as a partially isolated transient. 3. In cells which had been loaded with Fura-2, Cai2+ was found to rise abruptly following a silent period. The delay was larger if ACh (0.2-0.5 microM) was applied in a depolarizing isotonic K+ saline than if it was applied in the normal saline. In addition, the maximum of the Cai2+ response was reduced with depolarizing stimulating solutions. This indicates that membrane potential modulates the Cai2+ response. 4. Responses to 5 microM-ACh, a saturating agonist concentration, were almost identical in K+ saline and in normal saline. 5. If the cell potential was hyperpolarized, the delay of the ACh-induced current became shorter. 6. Breaking into an acinar cell with a pipette containing an elevated Ca2+ concentration (0.1-1 mM) led to a transient activation of Ca2(+)-induced currents during the first seconds of whole-cell recording. These transients were obtained more reliably if the transition to the whole-cell mode was achieved by applying a sharp pulse of potential ('zapping') rather than by applying suction to the pipette compartment. At -60 mV, the transients elicited with the former method by 0.5 mM-Ca2+ had a time-to-peak near 0.6s and an amplitude varying between 10 and 600 pA. With 0.1 mM-Ca2+, similar transients were also

  20. Genistein prevents calcium mobilization evoked by platelet-derived growth factor without affecting calcium release by cadmium or bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Ming Lyu; Barnes, S.; Smith, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Cadmium (Cd) strikingly increases ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate and evokes a spike in cytosolic free Ca (Ca{sub i}) in human dermal fibroblasts as described previously. Cd apparently activates a membrane receptor by binding to a zinc site in its external domain. Two classes of receptors are known to induce inositol phosphate formation and release stored Ca: those that are coupled to phospholipase C via GTP-binding proteins, e.g., the bradykinin (BK) receptor; and those that are tyrosine kinases, e.g. the receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Cd, 100 nM BK, and 10 ng/ml PDGF increased Ca{sub i} from 142 {plus minus} 24 nM to 809 {plus minus} 36, 964 {plus minus} 74, and 401 {plus minus} 52 nM (n = 5), respectively. Cd and BK immediately increased Ca{sub i}, however, there was a lag between the addition of PDGF compared to 15 {plus minus} 1 sec for Cd and 9 {plus minus} 1 sec for BK (all n = 10). Genistein (40 {mu}M, 40 min), which selectively inhibits tyrosine kinases, had no significant effect on the Ca{sub i} spike evoked by Cd or BK. In the presence of genistein Cd and BK increased Ca{sub i} from 165 {plus minus} 14 nM to 726 {plus minus} 23 and 876 {plus minus} 31 nM (n = 4), respectively. In contrast to Cd and BK, PDGF only slightly increased Ca{sub i} in the presence of 40 {mu}M genistein. The concentration of genistein that inhibited the Ca{sub i} response to PDGF by 50% was 8 {mu}M. These findings suggest that the Cd triggers a G protein-coupled receptor rather than a tyrosine kinase.

  1. Recruitment of Ca2+ release channels by calcium-induced Ca2+ release does not appear to occur in isolated Ca2+ release sites in frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Pape, Paul C

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in skeletal muscle in response to small depolarisations (e.g. to -60 mV) should be the sum of release from many isolated Ca2+ release sites. Each site has one SR Ca2+ release channel activated by its associated T-tubular voltage sensor. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether it also includes neighbouring Ca2+ release channels activated by Ca-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). Ca2+ release in frog cut muscle fibres was estimated with the EGTA/phenol red method. The fraction of SR Ca content ([CaSR]) released by a 400 ms pulse to -60 mV (denoted fCa) provided a measure of the average Ca2+ permeability of the SR associated with the pulse. In control experiments, fCa was approximately constant when [CaSR] was 1500-3000 μm (plateau region) and then increased as [CaSR] decreased, reaching a peak when [CaSR] was 300-500 μm that was 4.8 times larger on average than the plateau value. With 8 mm of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA in the internal solution, fCa was 5.0-5.3 times larger on average than the plateau value obtained before adding BAPTA when [CaSR] was 300-500 μm. In support of earlier results, 8 mm BAPTA did not affect Ca2+ release in the plateau region. At intermediate values of [CaSR], BAPTA resulted in a small, if any, increase in fCa, presumably by decreasing Ca inactivation of Ca2+ release. Since BAPTA never decreased fCa, the results indicate that neighbouring channels are not activated by CICR with small depolarisations when [CaSR] is 300-3000 μm. PMID:12411523

  2. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  3. Gamma band activity in the reticular activating system.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep-wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem-thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep-wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of pre

  4. By Releasing ADP, Acanthamoeba castellanii Causes an Increase in the Cytosolic Free Calcium Concentration and Apoptosis in Wish Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Tozzi, M. G.; Costa, M.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by soluble molecules that may participate in acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be fully characterized. We demonstrate here that Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites constitutively release ADP in the medium. Cell-free supernatants prepared from A. castellanii, by interaction with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the Wish cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, extensive cell membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal disorganization, and the breakdown of nuclei. Cell damage induced by amoebic supernatants was blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor Suramin. The same results were found in Wish cells exposed to purified ADP. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii may have a cytopathic effect on human epithelial cells through ADP release, by a process that begins with a rise of cytosolic free-calcium concentration, and culminates in apoptosis. PMID:11349088

  5. Calcium permeability changes and neurotransmitter release in cultured rat brain neurons. I. Effects of stimulation on calcium fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarom, M.; Zurgil, N.; Zisapel, N.

    1985-12-25

    The permeability of neuronal membranes to Ca2+ is of great importance for neurotransmitter release. The temporal characteristics of Ca2+ fluxes in intact brain neurons have not been completely defined. In the present study 45Ca2+ was used to examine the kinetics of Ca2+ influx and efflux from unstimulated and depolarized rat brain neurons in culture. Under steady-state conditions three cellular exchangeable Ca2+ pools were identified in unstimulated cells: 1) a rapidly exchanging pool (t1/2 = 7 s) which represented about 10% of the total cellular Ca2+ and was unaffected by the presence of Co2+, verapamil, or tetrodotoxin; 2) a slowly exchanging pool (t1/2 = 360 s) which represented 42% of the total cellular Ca2+ and was inhibited by Co2+, but not by verapamil or tetrodotoxin; 3) a very slowly exchanging pool (t1/2 = 96 min) which represented 48% of the total cell Ca2+ was observed only in the prolonged efflux experiments. The rate of exchange of 45Ca2+ in the unstimulated cells was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration (half-saturation at 70 microM). Depolarization of the neurons with elevated K+ causes a rapid and sustained 45Ca2+ uptake. The cellular Ca2+ content increased from 56 nmol/mg protein in unstimulated cells to 81 nmol/mg protein during 5 min of depolarization. The kinetics of the net 45Ca2+ uptake by the stimulated neurons was consistent with movement of the ion with a first order rate constant of 0.0096 s-1 (t1/2 = 72 s) into a single additional compartment. The other cellular Ca2+ pools were apparently unaffected by stimulation. The stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake was inhibited by Co2+ and by the Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil but not by the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin. Ca2+ uptake into this compartment was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration (half-saturation at 0.80 mM Ca2+).

  6. Renal electrolyte excretion and renin release during calcium and parathormone infusions in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, W S; Roddis, S A; Unwin, R J

    1986-01-01

    Following a random block experimental design in each case, three repeated measurement studies were carried out in three different groups of conscious rabbits, to investigate the renal effects of increasing doses of intravenous calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH). In the first study, each rabbit received either CaCl2 (0.15, 0.3, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1) or vehicle alone (control) for 160 min. In the second study, rabbits were given either PTH (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1), CaCl2 (1.0 mg kg-1 min-1), PTH plus CaCl2 (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1, respectively) or vehicle alone; PTH was infused for just over 60 min. In the third study, a much smaller dose (0.05 mg kg-1 min-1) of CaCl2 was infused for 100 min. CaCl2 infusion produced a striking fall in fractional excretion of sodium of at least 50% (P less than 0.01), but this was not dose related, being almost maximal at the smaller doses infused. Although this effect was evident in the absence of any changes in total plasma calcium concentration at the lower doses of CaCl2, renal calcium excretion was increased between 2- and 20-fold (P less than 0.01) at all doses infused. Fractional excretion of chloride doubled at the two higher doses of CaCl2 (P less than 0.01), but potassium excretion was unchanged. There were no consistent alterations in mean arterial blood pressure, effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate or plasma renin activity (PRA); total plasma calcium concentration was consistently elevated only during infusion of the high dose by just under 1 mmol l-1. PTH infusion had no measured effect on fractional excretion of sodium or renal calcium excretion, but doubled fractional potassium excretion (P less than 0.05). Heart rate and PRA increased (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.05, respectively), the latter by 50%, but systemic pressure and renal haemodynamics were not significantly affected. By contrast, PTH infused with CaCl2 produced a 4-fold rise

  7. Ca2+ released from calcium alginate gels can promote inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gail; Mooney, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In general, alginate hydrogels are considered to be biologically inert and are commonly used for biomedical purposes that require minimum inflammation. However, Ca2+, which is commonly used to crosslink alginate, is a critical second messenger in immune cell signaling, and little has been done to understand its effect on immune cell fate when delivered as a component of alginate gels. We found that dendritic cells (DCs) encapsulated in Ca2+-crosslinked alginate (calcium alginate) secreted at least fivefold more of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β when compared to DCs encapsulated in agarose and collagen gels, as well as DCs plated on tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). Plating cells on TCPS with the alginate polymer could not reproduce these results, whereas culturing DCs on TCPS with increasing concentrations of Ca2+ increased IL-1β, MHC class II and CD86 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with these findings, calcium alginate gels induced greater maturation of encapsulated DCs compared to barium alginate gels. When injected subcutaneously in mice, calcium alginate gels significantly upregulated IL-1β secretion from surrounding tissue relative to barium alginate gels, and similarly, the inflammatory effects of LPS were enhanced when it was delivered from calcium alginate gels rather than barium alginate gels. These results confirm that the Ca2+ used to crosslink alginate gels can be immunostimulatory and suggest that it is important to take into account Ca2+’s bioactive effects on all exposed cells (both immune and non-immune) when using calcium alginate gels for biomedical purposes. This work may strongly impact the way people use alginate gels in the future as well as provide insights into past work utilizing alginate gels. PMID:23938198

  8. Effects of disodium EDTA and calcium infusion on prolactin and thyrotropin responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Dudczak, R; Waldhäusl, W K; Bratusch-Marrain, P

    1983-03-01

    To determine the impact of induced hypo- and hypercalcemia on TRH (400 micrograms)-stimulated TSH and PRL release, healthy subjects (n = 11) were infused with 5% glucose in water (n = 11), disodium EDTA (n = 11), or calcium gluconate (n = 7). TRH was given as an iv bolus 60 min (5% glucose and EDTA) and 120 min (calcium) after initiation of the respective infusion. Basal plasma concentrations of TSH remained unchanged during induced hypo- and hypercalcemia, whereas those of PRL fell during the latter (P less than 0.05). The mean sum of increments (0-90 min) in PRL and TSH was considerably greater during hypocalcemia than during hypercalcemia (PRL, P less than 0.002; TSH, P less than 0.005). The increments in the plasma hormone concentration above basal after iv TRH were increased compared to those in normocalcemia (PRL, 98.4 +/- 37.9 ng/ml; TSH, 38.9 +/- 11.8 microU/ml) during hypocalcemia [PRL, 128 +/- 47.8 ng/ml (P less than 0.002); TSH, 46.7 +/- 12.8 microU/ml; (P less than 0.005)], but were impaired during hypercalcemia [PRL, 70.1 +/- 27 ng/ml (P less than 0.002); TSH, 28.9 +/- 8.5 microU/ml (P less than 0.025)]. The mean sum of increments in PRL was related to concentrations of both serum calcium (r = -0.59; P less than 0.01) and PTH (r = 0.51; P less than 0.05). A relation was also seen between the incremental responses of TSH and serum calcium (r = -0.52; P less than 0.05), PTH (r = 0.55; P less than 0.01), and phosphorus (r = -0.55; P less than 0.01). We conclude that in healthy man, TRH-mediated release of both PRL and TSH are inversely related to serum calcium concentrations in such a manner that hormone secretion is enhanced by acute hypocalcemia, but blunted by hypercalcemia.

  9. Bcl-2 functionally interacts with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors to regulate calcium release from the ER in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Valencia, Ignacio; Zhong, Fei; McColl, Karen S.; Roderick, H. Llewelyn; Bootman, Martin D.; Berridge, Michael J.; Conway, Stuart J.; Holmes, Andrew B.; Mignery, Gregory A.; Velez, Patricio; Distelhorst, Clark W.

    2004-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3Rs) are channels responsible for calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (either wild type or selectively localized to the ER) significantly inhibited InsP3-mediated calcium release and elevation of cytosolic calcium in WEHI7.2 T cells. This inhibition was due to an effect of Bcl-2 at the level of InsP3Rs because responses to both anti-CD3 antibody and a cell-permeant InsP3 ester were decreased. Bcl-2 inhibited the extent of calcium release from the ER of permeabilized WEHI7.2 cells, even at saturating concentrations of InsP3, without decreasing luminal calcium concentration. Furthermore, Bcl-2 reduced the open probability of purified InsP3Rs reconstituted into lipid bilayers. Bcl-2 and InsP3Rs were detected together in macromolecular complexes by coimmunoprecipitation and blue native gel electrophoresis. We suggest that this functional interaction of Bcl-2 with InsP3Rs inhibits InsP3R activation and thereby regulates InsP3-induced calcium release from the ER. PMID:15263017

  10. Pergolide inhibition of calcium-induced /sup 3/H-dopamine release from striatal synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-05

    Several investigators have reported that dopamine agonists or antagonists are unable to modulate the K/sup +/-evoked release of /sup 3/H-dopamine (/sup 3/H-DA) from striatal synaptosomes. To further assess the role of DA in regulating its release, they have examined the effects of pergolide on Ca/sup + +/ (1.25 mM)-evoked release of /sup 3/H-DA from partially K/sup +/-depolarized striatal synaptosomes. Synaptosomes (P2 pellet) were isolated from rat striatum and incubated for 5 min at 37/sup 0/C in a Ca/sup + +/-free Krebs-Ringer buffer containing 25 nM /sup 3/H-DA. After radiolabeling, the synaptosomes were superfused for 12 min with Ca/sup + +/-free 6 mM Krebs-Ringer buffer to determine basal release of /sup 3/H-DA. Synaptosomes were then exposed to test drugs for 8 min prior to Ca/sup + +/ challenge. Ca/sup + +/ addition resulted in a 3-fold increase in /sup 3/H-DA release within 2-4 min. Pergolide inhibited the release of /sup 3/H-DA in a concentration-dependent manner. Release was inhibited to 56% of control by 10 nM pergolide. This was largely reversed by 0.1 ..mu..M S-sulpiride. Ca/sup + +/-evoked release was inhibited over 70% by 1 ..mu..M tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that voltage-dependent Na/sup +/ channels may play a role in the release process. The combination of pergolide and TTX inhibited release to a degree similar to TTX alone. These results suggest that pergolide may inhibit /sup 3/H-DA release by a TTX-sensitive mechanism and that the dopaminergic autoreceptors may be linked to voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels.

  11. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  12. Dual pathways of calcium entry in spike and plateau phases of luteinizing hormone release from chicken pituitary cells: sequential activation of receptor-operated and voltage-sensitive calcium channels by gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.S.; Wakefield, I.K.; King, J.A.; Mulligan, G.P.; Millar, R.P.

    1988-04-01

    It has previously been shown that, in pituitary gonadotrope cells, the initial rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induced by GnRH is due to a Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores. This raises the possibility that the initial transient spike phase of LH release might be fully or partially independent of extracellular Ca2+. We have therefore characterized the extracellular Ca2+ requirements, and the sensitivity to Ca2+ channel blockers, of the spike and plateau phases of secretion separately. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ the spike and plateau phases were inhibited by 65 +/- 4% and 106 +/- 3%, respectively. Both phases exhibited a similar dependence on concentration of extracellular Ca2+. However, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel blockers D600 and nifedipine had a negligible effect on the spike phase, while inhibiting the plateau phase by approximately 50%. In contrast, ruthenium red, Gd3+ ions, and Co2+ ions inhibited both spike and plateau phases to a similar extent as removal of extracellular Ca2+. A fraction (35 +/- 4%) of spike phase release was resistant to removal of extracellular Ca2+. This fraction was abolished after calcium depletion of the cells by preincubation with EGTA in the presence of calcium ionophore A23187, indicating that it depends on intracellular Ca2+ stores. Neither absence of extracellular Ca2+, nor the presence of ruthenium red or Gd3+ prevented mobilization of 45Ca2+ from intracellular stores by GnRH. We conclude that mobilization of intracellular stored Ca2+ is insufficient by itself to account for full spike phase LH release.

  13. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M O; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X

    2016-01-15

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG.

  14. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M. O.; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S.; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X.

    2016-01-01

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG. PMID:26582200

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  16. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx.

  17. Heterogeneity of firing properties among rat thalamic reticular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Govindaiah, G; Cox, Charles L

    2007-01-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) provides inhibitory innervation to most thalamic relay nuclei and receives excitatory innervation from both cortical and thalamic neurons. Ultimately, information transfer through the thalamus to the neocortex is strongly influenced by TRN. In addition, the reciprocal synaptic connectivity between TRN with associated thalamic relay nuclei is critical in generating intrathalamic rhythmic activities that occur during certain arousal states and pathophysiological conditions. Despite evidence suggesting morphological heterogeneity amongst TRN neurons, the heterogeneity of intrinsic properties of TRN neurons has not been systematically examined. One key characteristic of virtually all thalamic neurons is the ability to produce action potentials in two distinct modes: burst and tonic. In this study, we have examined the prevalence of burst discharge within TRN neurons. Our intracellular recordings revealed that TRN neurons can be differentiated by their action potential discharge modes. The majority of neurons in the dorsal TRN (56%) lack burst discharge, and the remaining neurons (35%) show an atypical burst that consists of an initial action potential followed by small amplitude, long duration depolarizations. In contrast, most neurons in ventral TRN (82%) display a stereotypical burst discharge consisting of a transient, high frequency discharge of multiple action potentials. TRN neurons that lack burst discharge typically did not produce low threshold calcium spikes or produced a significantly reduced transient depolarization. Our findings clearly indicate that TRN neurons can be differentiated by differences in their spike discharge properties and these subtypes are not uniformly distributed within TRN. The functional consequences of such intrinsic differences may play an important role in modality-specific thalamocortical information transfer as well as overall circuit level activities. PMID:17463035

  18. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  19. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity.

  20. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  1. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  2. Effects of tetracaine on insulin release and calcium handling by rat pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel El Motal, S.M.A.; Pian-Smith, M.C.M.; Sharp, G.W.G.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of tetracaine on insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ handling by rat pancreatic islets have been studied under basal, glucose-stimulated, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated conditions. Islets were isolated by the use of collagenase and used either directly (freshly isolated islets) or after a period under tissue culture conditions. Tetracaine was found to stimulate insulin release under basal conditions, to inhibit glucose-stimulated insulin release, and to potentiate insulin release stimulated by IBMX. In studies on the mechanisms underlying these effects, tetracaine was found to decrease glucose-stimulated net retention of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ (by an action to block the voltage-dependent Ca channels) and to mobilize Ca/sup 2 +/ from intracellular stores. These two actions form the basis for the inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release, which depends heavily on Ca/sup 2 +/ entry via the voltage-dependent channels and the synergism with IBMX to potentiate release. No inhibition of IBMX-stimulated release occurs because IBMX does not use the voltage-dependent channels to raise intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/.

  3. Ectopic vesicular neurotransmitter release along sensory axons mediates neurovascular coupling via glial calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Anne; Hirnet, Daniela; Wolburg, Hartwig; Schmalzing, Günther; Deitmer, Joachim W; Lohr, Christian

    2010-08-24

    Neurotransmitter release generally is considered to occur at active zones of synapses, and ectopic release of neurotransmitters has been demonstrated in a few instances. However, the mechanism of ectopic neurotransmitter release is poorly understood. We took advantage of the intimate morphological and functional proximity of olfactory receptor axons and specialized glial cells, olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), to study ectopic neurotransmitter release. Axonal stimulation evoked purinergic and glutamatergic Ca(2+) responses in OECs, indicating ATP and glutamate release. In axons expressing synapto-pHluorin, stimulation evoked an increase in synapto-pHluorin fluorescence, indicative of vesicle fusion. Transmitter release was dependent on Ca(2+) and could be inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and botulinum toxin A. Ca(2+) transients in OECs evoked by ATP, axonal stimulation, and laser photolysis of NP-EGTA resulted in constriction of adjacent blood vessels. Our results indicate that ATP and glutamate are released ectopically by vesicles along axons and mediate neurovascular coupling via glial Ca(2+) signaling.

  4. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  5. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  6. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  7. Calcium releasing action of quercetin on sarcoplasmic reticulum from frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kurebayashi, N; Ogawa, Y

    1984-10-01

    The release of Ca by quercetin from the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been claimed to be a result of the well-known inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity, or to be due to an intrinsic property of quercetin. To get a clearer understanding of the effect of quercetin, we examined it using fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (FSR) from bullfrog skeletal muscle. The rapid phase of Ca release (hereafter simply referred to as "Ca release") from loaded FSR was almost completed within 5 s after addition of quercetin in the presence of ATP. It cannot be ascribed to the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity on the basis of following findings. First, when Ca uptake was driven by carbamylphosphate, no or little Ca release was observed in marked contrast to a stronger reduction in the rate of Ca uptake. Secondly, procaine reverses the Ca releasing action of quercetin, whereas it show a synergistic action in the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Thirdly, HFSR released more Ca than LFSR, while the Ca2+-ATPase activities of both fractions were inhibited to a similar extent. The Ca release by quercetin is enhanced by ATP or beta, gamma-methylene adenosine triphosphate, and decreased by procaine or a high concentration of Mg2+. In the presence of 2.5 mM caffeine, the amount of Ca2+ released by quercetin was decreased, and the dose-effect relationship was shifted to higher doses of quercetin. This indicates that quercetin and caffeine probably overlap in the site(s) of the action, but that quercetin is dissimilar from halothane in the mode of its Ca-releasing action.

  8. Interaction of calcium sulfate with xanthan gum: effect on in vitro bioadhesion and drug release behavior from xanthan gum based buccal discs of buspirone.

    PubMed

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Abhishek, A; Vinay, S; Charde, S Y

    2013-11-01

    Bioadhesive polymers in buccal drug delivery systems play an important role in delivery of therapeutic drug molecules for local and systemic action. Xanthan gum, a GRAS listed natural polymer was used to design buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride by direct compression method. Effect of calcium sulfate on bioadhesive and drug release behavior of xanthan gum buccal discs was studied. Varying amount of calcium sulfate (0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%, w/w) in combination with xanthan gum was used to prepare buccal bioadhesive discs. Increase in calcium sulfate concentration resulted in faster drug release and decreased the bioadhesive strength of the designed discs. Further, in rheological evaluation it was observed that viscosity of xanthan gum gel reduces with increasing concentration of calcium sulfate. Compatibility of drug with various excipients was assessed using DSC and FTIR techniques.

  9. Co-operative action of calcium ions in dopamine release from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Nachshen, D A; Sanchez-Armass, S

    1987-01-01

    1. The release of [3H]dopamine from isolated presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from rat striata was measured as a function of the external Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o). 2. In synaptosomes depolarized by the addition of 50 mM-K+, release of [3H]dopamine increased in a highly non-linear manner with [Ca2+]o. The release could be described as a third power function of [Ca2+]o. 3. Both 45Ca2+ influx and the change in the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, measured with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2) that were evoked by depolarization increased in a linear manner with [Ca2+]o. 4. These results suggest that non-linearity in the [Ca2+]o dependence of transmitter release originates in a co-operative relation between [Ca2+]i and exocytosis. PMID:3656180

  10. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release via ryanodine receptors regulates neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Chen, Yili; Ito, Akihiro; Murayama, Takashi; Oyamada, Hideto; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mori, Nozomu; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Iino, Masamitsu

    2012-01-18

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores regulates a multitude of cellular functions, but the role of intracellular Ca(2+) release via the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in the brain remains incompletely understood. We found that nitric oxide (NO) directly activates RyRs, which induce Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores of central neurons, and thereby promote prolonged Ca(2+) signalling in the brain. Reversible S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) triggers this Ca(2+) release. NO-induced Ca(2+) release (NICR) is evoked by type 1 NO synthase-dependent NO production during neural firing, and is essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity. NO production has also been implicated in pathological conditions including ischaemic brain injury, and our results suggest that NICR is involved in NO-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that NICR via RyR1 plays a regulatory role in the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the brain.

  11. Fife organizes synaptic vesicles and calcium channels for high-probability neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Monica; Ukken, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    The strength of synaptic connections varies significantly and is a key determinant of communication within neural circuits. Mechanistic insight into presynaptic factors that establish and modulate neurotransmitter release properties is crucial to understanding synapse strength, circuit function, and neural plasticity. We previously identified Drosophila Piccolo-RIM-related Fife, which regulates neurotransmission and motor behavior through an unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that Fife localizes and interacts with RIM at the active zone cytomatrix to promote neurotransmitter release. Loss of Fife results in the severe disruption of active zone cytomatrix architecture and molecular organization. Through electron tomographic and electrophysiological studies, we find a decrease in the accumulation of release-ready synaptic vesicles and their release probability caused by impaired coupling to Ca2+ channels. Finally, we find that Fife is essential for the homeostatic modulation of neurotransmission. We propose that Fife organizes active zones to create synaptic vesicle release sites within nanometer distance of Ca2+ channel clusters for reliable and modifiable neurotransmitter release. PMID:27998991

  12. Mechanisms of calcium release induced by GTP and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.L.; Chueh, S.H.; Mullaney, J.M.; Mallet, M.K.

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies show that Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from ER is controlled by a sensitive and specific guanine nucleotide regulatory mechanism. Using microsomes of permeabilized cells derived from N1E-115 neuroblastoma or DDT/sub 1/MF-2 smooth muscle cell lines, both GTP and IP/sub 3/ effect Ca/sup 2 +/ release from a common intracellular pool; however, the mechanisms of activation of Ca/sup 2 +/ release by the two agents appear distinct with regard to several parameters. Studies using liver microsomes are currently investigating whether similar distinctions between the actions of IP/sub 3/ and GTP exist in other cell types. At present it is unknown if GTP-activated Ca/sup 2 +/ release is mediated by a G-protein-like activity. Studies indicate that such release is not altered by pertussis toxin. Since GTP..gamma..S is inactive and blocks the action of GTP, a modified G-protein activation process must be invoked. Current investigations are attempting to identify the protein(s) involved in GTP-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ release by direct photo-crosslinking experiments using (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)GTP. Successful labeling of many nucleotide-binding proteins has been accomplished; most but not all labeling is displaced by ATP. GTP-specifically labeled proteins are being assessed as candidates for the GTP-mediated release process.

  13. Calcium Release at Fertilization in Starfish Eggs Is Mediated by Phospholipase Cγ

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, David J.; Ramarao, Chodavarapu S.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.; Roche, Serge; Terasaki, Mark; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    1997-01-01

    Although inositol trisphosphate (IP3) functions in releasing Ca2+ in eggs at fertilization, it is not known how fertilization activates the phospholipase C that produces IP3. To distinguish between a role for PLCγ, which is activated when its two src homology-2 (SH2) domains bind to an activated tyrosine kinase, and PLCβ, which is activated by a G protein, we injected starfish eggs with a PLCγ SH2 domain fusion protein that inhibits activation of PLCγ. In these eggs, Ca2+ release at fertilization was delayed, or with a high concentration of protein and a low concentration of sperm, completely inhibited. The PLCγSH2 protein is a specific inhibitor of PLCγ in the egg, since it did not inhibit PLCβ activation of Ca2+ release initiated by the serotonin 2c receptor, or activation of Ca2+ release by IP3 injection. Furthermore, injection of a PLCγ SH2 domain protein mutated at its phosphotyrosine binding site, or the SH2 domains of another protein (the phosphatase SHP2), did not inhibit Ca2+ release at fertilization. These results indicate that during fertilization of starfish eggs, activation of phospholipase Cγ by an SH2 domain-mediated process stimulates the production of IP3 that causes intracellular Ca2+ release. PMID:9298985

  14. Multifocal electroretinography in eyes with reticular pseudodrusen.

    PubMed

    Alten, Florian; Heiduschka, Peter; Clemens, Christoph R; Eter, Nicole

    2012-09-14

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) on retinal function by multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), and combined simultaneous confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We included 19 eyes of 15 patients with RPD in the posterior pole and no other phenotypic retinal alteration were included (7 females and 8 males, age 77.2 ± 5.1 years) as well as 24 eyes of 17 healthy control subjects (7 females and 10 males, age 73.2 ± 5.9 years). All patients underwent fundus photography, SD-OCT, fluorescence angiography (FA), fundus autofluorescence, and near-infrared reflectance cSLO. mfERG measurements were performed by stimulating the retina by a field of 103 hexagons covering an area of approximately 30°. Amplitudes and latencies of focal retinal responses obtained at affected and nonaffected sites of RPD eyes and retinal responses of healthy control subjects were compared. In all included study eyes, RPD stages 1-3 could be demonstrated clearly in SD-OCT, FA, and cSLO. The mean amplitudes measured in the areas affected by RPD were 12.5 to 53.1 nV/deg² (control group 19.4-50.1 nV/deg²). The mean latencies were 33.2 to 41.3 ms (control group 33.6-39.7 ms). mfERG amplitudes and latencies of retinal areas affected by RPD were not altered significantly when compared to corresponding nonaffected areas. mfERG measurements did not show a definite influence on electrophysiologic activity in retinal areas affected exclusively with RPD.

  15. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  16. Formulation of a Sustained Release Docetaxel Loaded Cockle Shell-Derived Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles against Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hammadi, Nahidah Ibrahim; Abba, Yusuf; Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Razak, Intan Shameha Abdul; Jaji, Alhaji Zubair; Isa, Tijani; Mahmood, Saffanah Khuder; Zakaria, Md Zuki Abu Bakar

    2017-06-01

    Here, we explored the formulation of a calcium carbonate nanoparticle delivery system aimed at enhancing docetaxel (DTX) release in breast cancer. The designed nano- anticancer formulation was characterized thorough X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The nano- anticancer formulation (DTX- CaCO3NP) was evaluated for drug delivery properties thorough in vitro release study in human body simulated solution at pH 7.4 and intracellular lysosomal pH 4.8. Characterization revealed the successful synthesis of DTX- CaCO3NP, which had a sustained release at pH 7.4. TEM showed uniformly distributed pleomorphic shaped pure aragonite particles. The highest entrapment efficiency (96%) and loading content (11.5%) were obtained at docetaxel to nanoparticles ratio of 1:4. The XRD patterns revealed strong crystallizations in all the nanoparticles formulation, while FTIR showed chemical interactions between the drug and nanoparticles with negligible positional shift in the peaks before and after DTX loading. BET analysis showed similar isotherms before and after DTX loading. The designed DTX- CaCO3NP had lower (p < 0.05) cytotoxity against MCF-7 cells than DTX at 24 h but comparable (p > 0.05) effects at 48 h and 72 h. However, the DTX- CaCO3NP released less than 80% of bond DTX at 48 and 72 h but showed comparable effects with free DTX. The results showed that the developed DTX- CaCO3NP released DTX slower at pH 7.4 and had comparable cytotoxicity with free DTX at 48 and 72 h in MCF-7 cells.

  17. The Involvement of Voltage-Operated Calcium Channels in Somato-Dendritic Oxytocin Release

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Vicky A.; Douglas, Alison J.; Leng, Gareth; Ludwig, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) secrete oxytocin and vasopressin from axon terminals in the neurohypophysis, but they also release large amounts of peptide from their somata and dendrites, and this can be regulated both by activity-dependent Ca2+ influx and by mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. This somato-dendritic release can also be primed by agents that mobilise intracellular Ca2+, meaning that the extent to which it is activity-dependent, is physiologically labile. We investigated the role of different Ca2+ channels in somato-dendritic release; blocking N-type channels reduced depolarisation-induced oxytocin release from SONs in vitro from adult and post-natal day 8 (PND-8) rats, blocking L-type only had effect in PND-8 rats, while blocking other channel types had no significant effect. When oxytocin release was primed by prior exposure to thapsigargin, both N- and L-type channel blockers reduced release, while P/Q and R-type blockers were ineffective. Using confocal microscopy, we found immunoreactivity for Cav1.2 and 1.3 channel subunits (which both form L-type channels), 2.1 (P/Q type), 2.2 (N-type) and 2.3 (R-type) in the somata and dendrites of both oxytocin and vasopressin neurons, and the intensity of the immunofluorescence signal for different subunits differed between PND-8, adult and lactating rats. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, the N-type Ca2+ current density increased after thapsigargin treatment, but did not alter the voltage sensitivity of the channel. These results suggest that the expression, location or availability of N-type Ca2+ channels is altered when required for high rates of somato-dendritic peptide release. PMID:22028774

  18. Loss of the Calmodulin-Dependent Inhibition of RyR1 Calcium Release Channel Upon Oxidation of Methionines in Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B.; Jones, Terry E.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its affect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of 3[H]-ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, where calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium-sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially diminish the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in a minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response to enhance the duration of calcium transients to promote enhanced

  19. Loss of the calmodulin-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel upon oxidation of methionines in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Smallwood, Heather S; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its effect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility determined by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of [3H]ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, in which calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially weaken the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not significantly affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as part of a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress observed during biological aging. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response

  20. Evidence for a dihydropyridine-sensitive and conotoxin-insensitive release of noradrenaline and uptake of calcium in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. J.; Marriott, D. B.; Boarder, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. It has been suggested that neuronal voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) may be divided into dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive (L) and DHP-insensitive (N and T), and that both the L and the N type channels are attenuated by the peptide blocker omega-conotoxin. Here the effects of omega-conotoxin on release of noradrenaline and uptake of calcium in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells were investigated. 2. Release of noradrenaline in response to 25 mM K+, 65 mM K+, 10 nM bradykinin or 10 microM prostaglandin E1 was not affected by omega-conotoxin in the range 10 nM-1 microM. 3. 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by high K+ and prostaglandin was attenuated by 1 microM nitrendipine and enhanced by 1 microM Bay K 8644; these calcium fluxes were not modified by 20 nM omega-conotoxin. 4. With superfused rat brain striatal slices in the same medium as the above cell studies, release of dopamine in response to 25 mM K+ was attenuated by 20 nM omega-conotoxin. 5. These results show that in these neurone-like cells, release may be effected by calcium influx through DHP-sensitive but omega-conotoxin-insensitive VSCC, a result inconsistent with the suggestion that omega-conotoxin blocks both L-type and N-type neuronal calcium channels. PMID:2470457

  1. In vitro study of vancomycin release and osteoblast-like cell growth on structured calcium phosphate-collagen.

    PubMed

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2013-04-01

    A drug delivery vehicle consisting of spherical calcium phosphate-collagen particles covered by flower-like (SFCaPCol) blossoms composed of nanorod building blocks and their cellular response is studied. The spherical structure was achieved by a combination of sonication and freeze-drying. The SFCaPCol blossoms have a high surface area of approximately 280 m(2) g(-1). The blossom-like formation having a high surface area allows a drug loading efficiency of 77.82%. The release profile for one drug, vancomycin (VCM), shows long term sustained release in simulated body fluid (SBF), in a phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution and in culture media over 2 weeks with a cumulative release ~53%, 75% and 50%, respectively, over the first 7 days. The biocompatibility of the VCM-loaded SFCaPCol scaffold was determined by in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation tests of rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells. MTT tests indicated that UMR-106 cells were viable after exposure to the VCM loaded SFCaPCol, meaning that the scaffold (the flower-like blossoms) did not impair the cell's viability. The density of cells on the substrate was seen to increase with increasing cultured time.

  2. Induction of Atrial Ectopic Beats with Calcium Release Inhibition: Local Hierarchy of Automaticity in the Right Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Joung, Boyoung; Kim, Daehyeok; Maruyama, Mitsunori; Luk, Hsiang-Ning; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release underlies the mechanism of sinoatrial node (SAN) acceleration during β-stimulation, indicating the importance of Ca clock in SAN automaticity. Whether or not the same mechanism applies to atrial ectopic pacemakers (AEP) remains unclear. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the mechanism of AEP. Methods We simultaneously mapped intracellular calcium (Cai) and membrane potential in 12 isolated canine right atria. The late diastolic Cai elevation (LDCAE) was used to detect the Ca clock activity. Pharmacological interventions with isoproterenol (ISO), ryanodine, and ZD7288, a blocker of the If membrane current, were performed. Results Ryanodine, which inhibits SR Ca release, reduced LDCAE in SAN, resulting in an inferior shift of the pacemaking site. Cycle length increased significantly in a dose-dependent way. In the presence of 3-10 μmol/L of ryanodine, ISO infusion consistently induces AEPs from the lower crista terminalis. All ectopic beats continuing over 30 seconds were located at the lower crista terminalis. These AEPs were resistant to ryanodine treatment even at high doses. Subsequent blockade of If inhibited the AEP and resulted in profound bradycardia. Conclusion Spontaneous SR Ca release underlies ISO-induced increase of superior SAN activity. As compared with SAN, the AEP is less dependent on the Ca clock and more dependent on the membrane clock for its automaticity. AEPs outside the SAN can effectively serve as backup pacemakers when the Ca clock functionality is reduced. PMID:20129292

  3. Pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate matrix tablets for in vitro controlled release of water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Pseidy Luz; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga, María Dolores

    2015-10-15

    Different pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (ADCP) matrix tablets have been developed in order to obtain controlled release of a water-soluble drug (theophylline). Swelling, buoyancy and dissolution studies have been carried out in different aqueous media (demineralized water, progressive pH medium, simulated gastric fluid, simulated intestinal fluid and simulated colonic fluid), to characterize the matrix tablets. When the pectin/ADCP ratio was ≥0.26 (P1, P2, P3 and P4 tablets) a continuous swelling and low theophylline dissolution rate from the matrices were observed. So, pectin gel forming feature predominated over the ADCP properties, yielding pH-independent drug release behavior from these matrices. On the contrary, pectin/ADCP ratios ≤0.11 (P5 and P6 tablets) allowed to achieve drug dissolution pH dependent. Consequently, the suitable selection of the pectin/ADCP ratio will allow to tailor matrix tablets for controlled release of water-soluble drugs in a specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses premature calcium release in mouse eggs

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Miranda L.; Lowther, Katie M.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; McDonough, Caitlin E.; Lee, Katherine N.; Evsikov, Alexei V.; Uliasz, Tracy F.; Chidiac, Peter; Williams, Carmen J.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    During oocyte maturation, capacity and sensitivity of Ca2+ signaling machinery increases dramatically, preparing the metaphase II (MII)-arrested egg for fertilization. Upon sperm-egg fusion, Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive endoplasmic reticulum stores results in cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that drive egg activation and initiate early embryo development. Premature Ca2+ release can cause parthenogenetic activation prior to fertilization; thus, preventing inappropriate Ca2+ signaling is crucial for ensuring robust MII arrest. Here, we show that regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses Ca2+ release in MII eggs. Rgs2 mRNA was recruited for translation during oocyte maturation, resulting in ∼20-fold more RGS2 protein in MII eggs than in fully grown immature oocytes. Rgs2-siRNA-injected oocytes matured to MII; however, they had increased sensitivity to low pH and acetylcholine (ACh), which caused inappropriate Ca2+ release and premature egg activation. When matured in vitro, RGS2-depleted eggs underwent spontaneous Ca2+ increases that were sufficient to cause premature zona pellucida conversion. Rgs2−/− females had reduced litter sizes, and their eggs had increased sensitivity to low pH and ACh. Rgs2−/− eggs also underwent premature zona pellucida conversion in vivo. These findings indicate that RGS2 functions as a brake to suppress premature Ca2+ release in eggs that are poised on the brink of development. PMID:26160904

  5. Calcium dependent release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Haugstad, T S; Hegstad, E; Langmoen, I A

    1992-07-06

    The release of the amino acids GABA, taurine, glycine, glutamine and leucine from human neocortex was investigated in vitro by utilizing brain tissue removed during 8 standard temporal lobectomies for epilepsy or tumor. Slices (0.5 mm thick) were cut from each biopsy and randomly placed in three different chambers. After 90 min preincubation, the three sets of slices were incubated for 60 s in wells containing, respectively, (A) regular ACSF (control), (B) ACSF with 50 mM K+ (to depolarize the cell membrane) and (C) ACSF with 50 mM K+, 0 mM Ca2+ and 4 mM Mg2+ (depolarization during blocked synaptic transmission). The content of amino acids in the wells was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography after pre-column derivatization of the amino acids with o-phthalaldehyde. Membrane depolarization (well B) increased the GABA release to 650% (620 pmol/mg) of control (well A, 95 pmol/mg). Blocking synaptic transmission (well C) reduced the evoked release by 50% (360 pmol/mg). The release of glycine, taurine, glutamine and leucine during membrane depolarization was not significantly different from the control values. The data provide evidence for a Ca(2+)-dependent release of GABA, supporting a possible role of this amino acid as a neurotransmitter in human neocortex.

  6. Projections to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, J; Cooper, J D; Phillipson, O T

    1990-01-01

    Afferent pathways to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus (Rt) in the rat were studied using anterograde and retrograde lectin tracing techniques, with sensitive immunocytochemical methods. The analysis was carried out to further investigate previously described subregions of the reticular thalamic nucleus, which are related to subdivisions of the dorsal thalamus, in the paraventricular and midline nuclei and three segments of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Cortical inputs to the rostral reticular nucleus were found from lamina VI of cingulate, orbital and infralimbic cortex. These projected with a clear topography to lateral, intermediate and medial reticular nucleus respectively. Thalamic inputs were found from lateral and central segments of the mediodorsal nucleus to the lateral and intermediate rostral reticular nucleus respectively and heavy paraventricular thalamic inputs were found to the medial reticular nucleus. In the basal forebrain, afferents were found from the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band, substantia innominata, ventral pallidum and medial globus pallidus. Brainstem projections were identified from ventrolateral periaqueductal grey and adjacent sites in the mesencephalic reticular formation, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, pedunculopontine nucleus, medial pretectum and ventral tegmental area. The results suggest a general similarity in the organisation of some brainstem Rt afferents in rat and cat, but also show previously unsuspected inputs. Furthermore, there appear to be at least two functional subdivisions of rostral Rt which is reflected by their connections with cortex and thalamus. The studies also extend recent findings that the ventral striatum, via inputs from the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, is included in the circuitry of the rostral Rt, providing further evidence that basal ganglia may function in concert with Rt. Evidence is also outlined with regard to the possibility that rostral Rt plays a significant

  7. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  8. Gamma-oryzanol-loaded calcium pectinate microparticles reinforced with chitosan: optimization and release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Jong Soo; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2009-05-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize microparticle preparation conditions, including the ratio of pectin:gamma-oryzanol (OZ) (X(1)), agitation speed (X(2)), and the concentration of emulsifier (X(3)), for maximal entrapment efficiency (EE) of OZ-loaded Ca pectinate microparticles. The optimized values of X(1), X(2), and X(3) were found to be 2.72:5.28, 1143.5 rpm, and 2.61%, respectively. Experimental results obtained for the optimum formulation agreed favorably with the predicted results, indicating the usefulness of predicting models for EE. In order to evaluate the effect of chitosan-coating and blending on the release pattern of the entrapped OZ from microparticles, chitosan-coated and blended Ca pectinate microparticles were prepared. Release studies revealed that the chitosan treatments, especially the chitosan-coating, were effective in suppressing the release in both simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and intestinal fluid (SIF).

  9. Probing the intracellular calcium sensitivity of transmitter release during synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-03-06

    In nerve terminals, residual Ca(2+) remaining from previous activity can cause facilitation of transmitter release by a mechanism that is still under debate. Here we show that the intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity of transmitter release at the calyx of Held is largely unchanged during facilitation, which leaves an increased microdomain Ca(2+) signal as a possible mechanism for facilitation. We measured the Ca(2+) dependencies of facilitation, as well as of transmitter release, to estimate the required increment in microdomain Ca(2+). These measurements show that linear summation of residual and microdomain Ca(2+) accounts for only 30% of the observed facilitation. However, a small degree of supralinearity in the summation of intracellular Ca(2+) signals, which might be caused by saturation of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer(s), is sufficient to explain facilitation at this CNS synapse.

  10. Association between inhibition of arachidonic acid release and prevention of calcium loading during ATP depletion in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. L.; Miller, J. C.; Hagler, H. K.; Chien, K. R.; Willerson, J. T.; Buja, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of irreversible myocardial ischemic injury is associated with progressive degradation of membrane phospholipids, accumulation of arachidonate and other free fatty acids, and electrolyte derangements, including calcium accumulation. To study the relationship between arachidonate release and calcium loading during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion in cardiac myocytes, the effects of two purported phospholipase inhibitors, mepacrine and U26,384, were evaluated. Cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were pretreated for 90 minutes with 5 to 10 microM U26,384 (a steroidal diamine) or 10 to 50 microM mepacrine (an alkyl acridine) and then treated for 3 hours with 30 microM of the metabolic inhibitor, iodoacetic acid (IAA), with or without an additional dose of drug. IAA treatment resulted in a marked reduction in ATP level and a several-fold increase in free fatty acid radioactivity released from myocytes prelabeled with tritiated arachidonic acid (3H-AA). U26,384 produced substantial inhibition of the increased 3H-AA release, and was effective when given as a single pretreatment dose before IAA exposure or as continuous treatment before and during IAA exposure (for example, with 5 microM U26,384, the percentage of 3H-AA release versus IAA alone was 8% +/- 2% [SEM] [N = 15] for pretreatment only and 13% +/- 4% [N = 10] for continuous treatment). Mepacrine also resulted in significant reduction in 3H-AA release, but was more effective when given as continuous treatment (for example, with 50 microM mepacrine, the percentage of 3H-AA release versus IAA alone was 43% +/- 9% [N = 6] for pretreatment only and 22% +/- 7% [N = 9] for continuous treatment). More detailed analysis showed that U26,384 and mepacrine blocked the IAA-induced redistribution of 3H-AA into free fatty acids from other lipid species. Electron probe x-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections revealed marked electrolyte derangements in myocytes exposed to IAA, including a 24

  11. Curcumin induces crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis mediated by calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal destabilization and mitochondrial events

    PubMed Central

    Moustapha, A; Pérétout, PA; Rainey, NE; Sureau, F; Geze, M; Petit, J-M; Dewailly, E; Slomianny, C; Petit, PX

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) were detectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells. PMID:27551451

  12. Curcumin induces crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis mediated by calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal destabilization and mitochondrial events.

    PubMed

    Moustapha, A; Pérétout, P A; Rainey, N E; Sureau, F; Geze, M; Petit, J-M; Dewailly, E; Slomianny, C; Petit, P X

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) were detectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells.

  13. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D.; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. PMID:25100314

  14. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

  15. Histamine release by exocytosis from rat mast cells on reduction of extracellular sodium: a secretory response inhibited by calcium, strontium, barium or magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, D E; Douglas, W W

    1976-01-01

    1. Histamine release from peritoneal mast cells of the rat was stimulated when the cells were exposed for 10 min to sodium-deficient media where all NaCl had been replaced by KC1, RbC1, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, or Tris, provided calcium was less than about 0-5 mM. 2. Light and electron microscopy showed the response to be exocytosis. 3. The chelating agents, EDTA and EGTA, abolished the response to sodium lack and their inhibitory effects were reversed by re-incubating cells with calcium but not magnesium. 4. The response was inhibited by dinitrophenol combined with glucose-deprivation. 5. The response was inversely related to the concentrations of sodium and calcium below 137-5 and 0-5 mM respectively. 6. The related alkaline earth metals, barium, strontium, and magnesium, resembled calcium in inhibiting the response to sodium lack. 7. No secretory response was seen when the cells were exposed for 10 min to calcium-free medium in which lithium replaced sodium. Exposure to this medium for 60 min, however, elicited secretion. 8. It is concluded that when extracellular calcium is low, a reduction in extracellular sodium induces a conventional exocytotic secretory response dependent on energy and cellular calcium. It is suggested that sodium lack may mobilize calcium from a cellular site possibly the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. Images A B C D E F G H PMID:59804

  16. Copper retention, calcium release and ultrastructural evidence indicate specific Cuprolinic Blue uptake and peculiar modifications in mineralizing aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, F; Tubaro, F; Petrelli, L; Gandaglia, A; Spina, M; Marchini, M

    2002-01-01

    Previously, reactions with copper phthalocyanines at 0.05 M critical electrolyte concentration were found to cause demineralization in calcifying porcine aortic valves after subdermal implantation in rat, as well as simultaneous visualization of peculiar phthalocyanine-positive layers around cells and cell-derived matrix vesicles. In the present investigation, an appraisal was made of the mechanism and specificity of reactions with Cuprolinic Blue by comparing quantitatively calcium release and copper retention by calcified aortic valves reacted with this phthalocyanine under different critical electrolyte concentration conditions, and the corresponding ultrastructural patterns. It was found that (i) decalcifying properties are inversely proportional to salt molarity; (ii) reactivity to Cuprolinic Blue is critical electrolyte concentration-dependent, since the greatest copper retention occurred in 0.05 M critical electrolyte concentration Cuprolinic Blue-reacted samples, the only ones that also exhibited phthalocyanine-positive layers; (iii) the appearance of phthalocyanine-positive layers depends on Cuprolinic Blue uptake, revealing pericellular clustering of calcium-binding, anionic molecules; and (iv) minor Cuprolinic Blue uptake occurs by residual proteoglycans which still remain in the extracellular matrix after 6-week-long subdermal implantation. The present results indicate that this method is appropriate for the study of mineralized tissues and illustrate peculiar tissue modifications occurring at least in the experimental conditions used here.

  17. Osteoblast-like cell responses to ion products released from magnesium- and silicate-containing calcium carbonates.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Ota, Yoshio; Obata, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic ions released from bioceramics and bioactive glasses have been reported to influence osteogenic cell functions. Cell responses depend on types of the ions provided, for example, silicate ion has been found to up-regulate their proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) were cultured in media containing silicate and calcium ions with/without magnesium ion to evaluate their combined effects on the cell's functions. The cells were cultured in the media containing the extract of silicate-containing vaterite (SiV) and magnesium- and siloxane-containing one (MgSiV) and normal medium and then their adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were evaluated. The adhesion of the cells was enhanced when they were cultured in the medium containing MgSiV-extract. Their proliferation and differentiation were up-regulated in both media containing MgSiV-extract and SiV-extract. In particular, the MgSiV-extract significantly enhanced their differentiation than the SiV-extract. This was supported by the mineralization test's results, which showed a large amount of mineral deposit was observed in the cells cultured in the MgSiV-extract medium. Providing the three kinds of ions was effective for up-regulating the cell's mineralization compared to providing silicate and calcium ions without magnesium ion.

  18. Benidipine, a dihydropyridine-calcium channel blocker, inhibits lysophosphatidylcholine-induced endothelial injury via stimulation of nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Yao, Kozo; Hasegawa, Kazuhide

    2006-01-01

    Benidipine hydrochloride (benidipine), which is a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, exerts antihypertensive action via inhibition of Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. In addition, benidipine is shown to restore endothelial function. However, the mechanisms whereby benidipine has protective effects on endothelium are poorly defined. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays important roles in endothelial function. In this study, we examined effects of benidipine on NO production from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Benidipine (0.3-10 microM) augmented eNOS expression and total eNOS enzymatic activities. Benidipine also promoted the production of NO and the accumulation of cGMP, a second messenger of NO. Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), a component of oxidized low-density lipoproteins, induced caspase-3 activation followed by apoptosis of endothelial cells. Benidipine (0.3-10 microM) prevented lysoPC-induced caspase-3 activation, which was canceled by Nomega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) (250-2500 microM), an inhibitor of NOS. Moreover, diethylenetetraamine NONOate (30-100 microM), a NO donor, inhibited the caspase-3 activation. These results suggested that the increase in NO production by benidipine might be involved in the inhibition of caspase induction. The direct enhancement of endothelial NO release by benidipine may be in part responsible for amelioration of endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Calcium Release Flux Underlying Ca2+ Sparks of Frog Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Eduardo; Stern, Michael D.; González, Adom; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Shirokova, Natalia

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of Ca2+ release flux underlying Ca2+ sparks (Blatter, L.A., J. Hüser, and E. Ríos. 1997. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 94:4176–4181) was modified and applied to sparks obtained by confocal microscopy in single frog skeletal muscle fibers, which were voltage clamped in a two-Vaseline gap chamber or permeabilized and immersed in fluo-3–containing internal solution. The performance of the algorithm was characterized on sparks obtained by simulation of fluorescence due to release of Ca2+ from a spherical source, in a homogeneous three-dimensional space that contained components representing cytoplasmic molecules and Ca2+ removal processes. Total release current, as well as source diameter and noise level, was varied in the simulations. Derived release flux or current, calculated by volume integration of the derived flux density, estimated quite closely the current used in the simulation, while full width at half magnitude of the derived release flux was a good monitor of source size only at diameters >0.7 μm. On an average of 157 sparks of amplitude >2 U resting fluorescence, located automatically in a representative voltage clamp experiment, the algorithm reported a release current of 16.9 pA, coming from a source of 0.5 μm, with an open time of 6.3 ms. Fewer sparks were obtained in permeabilized fibers, so that the algorithm had to be applied to individual sparks or averages of few events, which degraded its performance in comparable tests. The average current reported for 19 large sparks obtained in permeabilized fibers was 14.4 pA. A minimum estimate, derived from the rate of change of dye-bound Ca2+ concentration, was 8 pA. Such a current would require simultaneous opening of between 8 and 60 release channels with unitary Ca2+ currents of the level recorded in bilayer experiments. Real sparks differ from simulated ones mainly in having greater width. Correspondingly, the algorithm reported greater spatial extent of the source

  20. Inflammation Promotes Airway Epithelial ATP Release via Calcium-Dependent Vesicular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Seiko F.; Ribeiro, Carla M. P.; Sesma, Juliana I.; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Abdullah, Lubna H.; van Heusden, Catharina; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2013-01-01

    ATP in airway surface liquid (ASL) controls mucociliary clearance functions via the activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. However, abnormally elevated ATP levels have been reported in inflamed airways, suggesting that excessive ATP in ASL contributes to airway inflammation. Despite these observations, little is known about the mechanisms of ATP accumulation in the ASL covering inflamed airways. In this study, links between cystic fibrosis (CF)–associated airway inflammation and airway epithelial ATP release were investigated. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells isolated from CF lungs exhibited enhanced IL-8 secretion after 6 to 11 days, but not 28 to 35 days, in culture, compared with normal HBE cells. Hypotonic cell swelling–promoted ATP release was increased in 6- to 11-day-old CF HBE cells compared with non-CF HBE cells, but returned to normal values after 28 to 35 days in culture. The exposure of non-CF HBE cells to airway secretions isolated from CF lungs, namely, sterile supernatants of mucopurulent material (SMM), also caused enhanced IL-8 secretion and increased ATP release. The SMM-induced increase in ATP release was sensitive to Ca2+ chelation and vesicle trafficking/exocytosis inhibitors, but not to pannexin inhibition. Transcript levels of the vesicular nucleotide transporter, but not pannexin 1, were up-regulated after SMM exposure. SMM-treated cultures displayed increased basal mucin secretion, but mucin secretion was not enhanced in response to hypotonic challenge after the exposure of cells to either vehicle or SMM. We propose that CF airway inflammation up-regulates the capacity of airway epithelia to release ATP via Ca2+-dependent vesicular mechanisms not associated with mucin granule secretion. PMID:23763446

  1. Inflammation promotes airway epithelial ATP release via calcium-dependent vesicular pathways.

    PubMed

    Okada, Seiko F; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario-Vidal, Lucia; Abdullah, Lubna H; van Heusden, Catharina; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-11-01

    ATP in airway surface liquid (ASL) controls mucociliary clearance functions via the activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. However, abnormally elevated ATP levels have been reported in inflamed airways, suggesting that excessive ATP in ASL contributes to airway inflammation. Despite these observations, little is known about the mechanisms of ATP accumulation in the ASL covering inflamed airways. In this study, links between cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated airway inflammation and airway epithelial ATP release were investigated. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells isolated from CF lungs exhibited enhanced IL-8 secretion after 6 to 11 days, but not 28 to 35 days, in culture, compared with normal HBE cells. Hypotonic cell swelling-promoted ATP release was increased in 6- to 11-day-old CF HBE cells compared with non-CF HBE cells, but returned to normal values after 28 to 35 days in culture. The exposure of non-CF HBE cells to airway secretions isolated from CF lungs, namely, sterile supernatants of mucopurulent material (SMM), also caused enhanced IL-8 secretion and increased ATP release. The SMM-induced increase in ATP release was sensitive to Ca(2+) chelation and vesicle trafficking/exocytosis inhibitors, but not to pannexin inhibition. Transcript levels of the vesicular nucleotide transporter, but not pannexin 1, were up-regulated after SMM exposure. SMM-treated cultures displayed increased basal mucin secretion, but mucin secretion was not enhanced in response to hypotonic challenge after the exposure of cells to either vehicle or SMM. We propose that CF airway inflammation up-regulates the capacity of airway epithelia to release ATP via Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular mechanisms not associated with mucin granule secretion.

  2. Antibiotic Release from Calcium Phosphate Materials in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Molecular, Cellular and Pharmaceutical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Manchon, Angel; Prados-Frutos, Juan C; Rueda-Rodriguez, Carmen; Salinas-Goodier, Carmen; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Rojo, Rosa; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Arantza; Berlanga, Ana; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphate materials (CPM) are widely used in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. The presence of microbial biofilms and external infections is responsible for the failure of many procedures of dental implants and bone grafts. In an attempt to reduce the percentage of these infectious processes antibiotics have been associated with CPM improving certain conditions. For instance, antibiotics administered orally or intravenously have less effect and the blood flow in relation to this is poor near implants and grafts. Tissue engineering (TE) has employed CPM as a local drug delivery vehicle to be more effective and efficient in bone infections. This review is presented to describe current antibiotics used and the physical and chemical properties of scaffolds. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  4. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  5. Release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity from the perfused canine thyroid. Selective stimulatory effect of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, P; Orskov, H

    1981-05-01

    It is well accepted that the C cells of the thyroid contain somatostatin, but the role in local endocrine function has not yet been firmly established in this organ, and it has not been proved that thyroidal somatostatin is released into the circulation. We have measured the contents of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the effluent of canine thyroid glands perfused without recirculation with a synthetic buffer medium. During basal conditions a definite release was consistently found in the order of 10 pg/ml corresponding to 12 pg/min. The somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was studied in dilution experiments and by gel-filtration chromatography, and found to have properties identical to those of synthetic cyclic somatostatin, which was also recovered quantitatively when added to sampling tubes. Various compounds were infused in concentrations that are highly active in pancreas perfusion experiments. 14-min infusion of arginine, 5 and 11.5 mmol/liter; isoproterenol, 10 and 23.7 nmol/liter and 68.7 mumol/liter; acetylcholine, 5 mumol/liter, carbamylcholine, 10 and 100 mumol/liter; glucagon, 1 and 30 nmol/liter; and porcine calcitonin, 1 and 100 ng/ml did not affect the basal release of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity significantly. Neither did an increase from the control level of 4 mmol/liter glucose of 10 or 20 mmol/liter, nor an increase in the control level of 4.4 mmol/liter K+ to 7.5 or 14.4 mmol/liter. Each of these compounds were tested in three or four dogs. The effect of an increase in Ca++ from the control level of 1.5 mmol/liter to 2.25, 3.0, and 4.5 mmol/liter was tested in random order in five thyroid lobes. All three doses elicited an immediate increase in effluent somatostatin-like immunoreactivity. In most experiments the response was biphasic with an early spike, followed by a stable level that was maintained during prolonged Ca++ infusion. The secretory response was not diminished through a series of repeated short pulses of calcium infusion

  6. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Alexander V.; Maltsev, Victor A.; Stern, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM) at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates. PMID:28792496

  7. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM) at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  8. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  9. Menadione- (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone-) dependent enzymatic redox cycling and calcium release by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Frei, B; Winterhalter, K H; Richter, C

    1986-07-29

    The results presented in this paper reveal the existence of three distinct menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) reductases in mitochondria: NAD(P)H:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase (D,T-diaphorase), NADPH:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase, and NADH:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase. All three enzymes reduce menadione in a two-electron step directly to the hydroquinone form. NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NADH dehydrogenase) and NAD(P)H azoreductase do not participate significantly in menadione reduction. In mitochondrial extracts, the menadione-induced NAD(P)H oxidation occurs beyond stoichiometric reduction of the quinone and is accompanied by O2 consumption. Benzoquinone is reduced more rapidly than menadione but does not undergo redox cycling. In intact mitochondria, menadione triggers oxidation of intramitochondrial pyridine nucleotides, cyanide-insensitive O2 consumption, and a transient decrease of delta psi. In the presence of intramitochondrial Ca2+, the menadione-induced oxidation of pyridine nucleotides is accompanied by their hydrolysis, and Ca2+ is released from mitochondria. The menadione-induced Ca2+ release leaves mitochondria intact, provided excessive Ca2+ cycling is prevented. In both selenium-deficient and selenium-adequate mitochondria, menadione is equally effective in inducing oxidation of pyridine nucleotides and Ca2+ release. Thus, menadione-induced Ca2+ release is mediated predominantly by enzymatic two-electron reduction of menadione, and not by H2O2 generated by menadione-dependent redox cycling. Our findings argue against D,T-diaphorase being a control device that prevents quinone-dependent oxygen toxicity in mitochondria.

  10. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-07-01

    We used soil columns to study nutrients release from two compressed NPK fertilizers. The columns were filled with soil material from the surface horizon of a granitic soil. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil, and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. These nutrients were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first percolates, reaching a steady state when 1426 mm water have percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in the geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K, Ca and Mg were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with composition 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident.

  11. Modeling Study of the Effects of Membrane Surface Charge on Calcium Microdomains and Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Franciolini, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Synchronous neurotransmitter release is mediated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the build-up of submembrane Ca2+ microdomains. Previous models of Ca2+ microdomains have neglected possible electrostatic interactions between Ca2+ ions and negative surface charges on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. To address the effects of these interactions, we built a computational model of ion electrodiffusion described by the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations. We found that inclusion of a negative surface charge significantly alters the spatial characteristics of Ca2+ microdomains. Specifically, close to the membrane, Ca2+ ions accumulate, as expected from the strong electrostatic attraction exerted on positively charged Ca2+ ions. Farther away from the membrane, increasing the surface charge density results in a reduction of the Ca2+ concentration because of the preferential spread of Ca2+ ions along lateral directions. The model also predicts that the negative surface charge will decrease the spatial gradient of the Ca2+ microdomain in the lateral direction, resulting in increased overlap of microdomains originating from different Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that surface charge increases the probability of vesicle release if the Ca2+ sensor is located within the electrical double layer, whereas this probability is decreased if the Ca2+ sensor lies at greater distances from the membrane. Our data suggest that membrane surface charges exert a significant influence on the profile of Ca2+ microdomains, and should be taken into account in models of neurotransmitter release. PMID:18502810

  12. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  13. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  14. The Reticular Cell Network: A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During infections, the network can suffer damage. A new study has now investigated the network’s structure in detail, using methods from graph theory. The study showed that the network is remarkably robust to damage: it can still support immune responses even when half of the reticular cells are destroyed. This is a further important example of how network connectivity achieves tolerance to failure, a property shared with other important biological and nonbiological networks. PMID:27727272

  15. Calcium and pH-dependent packing and release of the gel-forming MUC2 mucin.

    PubMed

    Ambort, Daniel; Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Nilsson, Harriet E; Ermund, Anna; Johansson, Bengt R; Koeck, Philip J B; Hebert, Hans; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2012-04-10

    MUC2, the major colonic mucin, forms large polymers by N-terminal trimerization and C-terminal dimerization. Although the assembly process for MUC2 is established, it is not known how MUC2 is packed in the regulated secretory granulae of the goblet cell. When the N-terminal VWD1-D2-D'D3 domains (MUC2-N) were expressed in a goblet-like cell line, the protein was stored together with full-length MUC2. By mimicking the pH and calcium conditions of the secretory pathway we analyzed purified MUC2-N by gel filtration, density gradient centrifugation, and transmission electron microscopy. At pH 7.4 the MUC2-N trimer eluted as a single peak by gel filtration. At pH 6.2 with Ca(2+) it formed large aggregates that did not enter the gel filtration column but were made visible after density gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopy studies revealed that the aggregates were composed of rings also observed in secretory granulae of colon tissue sections. The MUC2-N aggregates were dissolved by removing Ca(2+) and raising pH. After release from goblet cells, the unfolded full-length MUC2 formed stratified layers. These findings suggest a model for mucin packing in the granulae and the mechanism for mucin release, unfolding, and expansion.

  16. Stretch of contracting cardiac muscle abruptly decreases the rate of phosphate release at high and low calcium.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G; Curtin, Nancy A; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2012-07-27

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for P(i) with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of P(i) release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca(2+)), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca(2+). The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their P(i)-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the P(i) balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover.

  17. Stretch of Contracting Cardiac Muscle Abruptly Decreases the Rate of Phosphate Release at High and Low Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G.; Curtin, Nancy A.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for Pi with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of Pi release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca2+), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca2+. The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their Pi-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the Pi balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover. PMID:22692210

  18. Measurement of calcium fluxes in permeabilized cells using a ⁴⁵Ca²+ uptake and release assay.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Many cell surface receptors activate phosphoinositidase(s) C, via G proteins that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate to produce the second messengers, inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] and diacylglycerol. Ins(1,4,5)P(3) interacts with specific receptor populations of ligand-gated channels to mobilize nonmitochondrial intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) stores. Because Ins(1,4,5)P(3) is very hydrophilic, it cannot readily cross the intact plasma membrane. Consequently, Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) release was initially demonstrated in permeabilized pancreatic acinar cells, and all subsequent studies in cells have involved the introduction of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) by rendering a cell population permeable, using microinjection techniques or by the presentation of chemically modified membrane-permeable Ins(1,4,5)P(3) analogs, such as photolabile "caged Ins(1,4,5)P(3)" (5). An alternative approach involves disruption of the plasma membrane and preparation of microsomes from the intracellular vesicular Ca(2+) stores, however, these preparations exhibit a loss of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) responsiveness compared to cells. The author will describe a (45)Ca(2+)-release assay used to monitor Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization from nonmitochondrial intracellular Ca(2+) stores using "cytosol-like" buffer (CLB) and permeabilized SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell populations.

  19. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of barnidipine hydrochloride, a calcium channel blocker, in man following oral administration of its sustained release formulation.

    PubMed

    Teramura, T; Watanabe, T; Higuchi, S; Hashimoto, K

    1997-02-01

    1. The metabolism and pharmacokinetics of barnidipine hydrochloride, a 1, 4-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist were evaluated following single oral administration of a sustained release formulation (SR) capsule comprising of quick and slow release pellets to healthy male volunteers. 2. Various metabolites were identified and quantitated by newly established GC-MS analytical methods. Major metabolites were the hydrolyzed product of the benzyl-pyrrolidinyl ester (M-3) in plasma and its oxidized pyridine product (M-4) in plasma and urine. The pyridine form of unchanged barnidipine and the N-debenzylated product were observed as minor metabolites. Therefore, the primary metabolic pathways in man are (a) hydrolysis of the benzylpyrrolidine ester, (b) N-debenzylation, and (c) oxidation of the dihydropyridine ring. 3. When the SR and normal capsules were administered at a dose of 10 mg to six subjects in a crossover design, AUC 0-infinity of unchanged drug, M-3 and 4 in each subject receiving the SR were 97 +/- 15, 85 +/- 31 and 76 +/- 21% respectively of those subjects receiving the normal formulation. The sum of the excretion of urinary metabolites for the SR formulation was 65 +/- 6% of that for the normal formulation. These data suggest that the absorption of the SR formulation is slightly reduced but that its bioavailability is comparable to that of the normal formulation.

  20. Weight loss, ion release and initial mechanical properties of a binary calcium phosphate glass fibre/PCL composite.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Palmer, G; Knowles, J C; Walker, G S; Rudd, C D

    2008-09-01

    Composites comprising a biodegradable polymeric matrix and a bioactive filler show considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine, and could potentially serve as degradable bone fracture fixation devices, depending on the properties obtained. Therefore, glass fibres from a binary calcium phosphate (50P(2)O(5)+50CaO) glass were used to reinforce polycaprolactone, at two different volume fractions (V(f)). As-drawn, non-treated and heat-treated fibres were assessed. Weight loss, ion release and the initial mechanical properties of the fibres and composites produced have been investigated. Single fibre tensile testing revealed a fibre strength of 474MPa and a tensile modulus of 44GPa. Weibull analysis suggested a scale value of 524. The composites yielded flexural strength and modulus of up to 30MPa and 2.5GPa, respectively. These values are comparable with human trabecular bone. An 8% mass loss was seen for the lower V(f) composite, whereas for the two higher V(f) composites an approximate 20% mass loss was observed over the course of the 5week study. A plateau in the degradation profile at 350h indicated that fibre dissolution was complete at this interval. This assertion was further supported via ion release studies. The leaching of fibres from the composite created a porous structure, including continuous channels within the polymer matrix. This offers further scope for tailoring scaffold development, as cells from the surrounding tissue may be induced to migrate into the resulting porous matrix.

  1. RYR1 and RYR3 have different roles in the assembly of calcium release units of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Protasi, F; Takekura, H; Wang, Y; Chen, S R; Meissner, G; Allen, P D; Franzini-Armstrong, C

    2000-01-01

    Calcium release units (CRUs) are junctions between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and exterior membranes that mediates excitation contraction (e-c) coupling in muscle cells. In skeletal muscle CRUs contain two isoforms of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)release channel: ryanodine receptors type 1 and type 3 (RyR1 and RyR3). 1B5s are a mouse skeletal muscle cell line that carries a null mutation for RyR1 and does not express either RyR1 or RyR3. These cells develop dyspedic SR/exterior membrane junctions (i.e., dyspedic calcium release units, dCRUs) that contain dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and triadin, two essential components of CRUs, but no RyRs (or feet). Lack of RyRs in turn affects the disposition of DHPRs, which is normally dictated by a linkage to RyR subunits. In the dCRUs of 1B5 cells, DHPRs are neither grouped into tetrads nor aligned in two orthogonal directions. We have explored the structural role of RyR3 in the assembly of CRUs in 1B5 cells independently expressing either RyR1 or RyR3. Either isoform colocalizes with DHPRs and triadin at the cell periphery. Electron microscopy shows that expression of either isoform results in CRUs containing arrays of feet, indicating the ability of both isoforms to be targeted to dCRUs and to assemble in ordered arrays in the absence of the other. However, a significant difference between RyR1- and RyR3-rescued junctions is revealed by freeze fracture. While cells transfected with RyR1 show restoration of DHPR tetrads and DHPR orthogonal alignment indicative of a link to RyRs, those transfected with RyR3 do not. This indicates that RyR3 fails to link to DHPRs in a specific manner. This morphological evidence supports the hypothesis that activation of RyR3 in skeletal muscle cells must be indirect and provides the basis for failure of e-c coupling in muscle cells containing RyR3 but lacking RyR1 (see the accompanying report, ). PMID:11053125

  2. Calcium-Release Channels in Paramecium. Genomic Expansion, Differential Positioning and Partial Transcriptional Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ladenburger, Eva-Maria; Plattner, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The release of Ca2+ from internal stores is a major source of signal Ca2+ in almost all cell types. The internal Ca2+ pools are activated via two main families of intracellular Ca2+-release channels, the ryanodine and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors. Among multicellular organisms these channel types are ubiquitous, whereas in most unicellular eukaryotes the identification of orthologs is impaired probably due to evolutionary sequence divergence. However, the ciliated protozoan Paramecium allowed us to prognosticate six groups, with a total of 34 genes, encoding proteins with characteristics typical of InsP3 and ryanodine receptors by BLAST search of the Paramecium database. We here report that these Ca2+-release channels may display all or only some of the characteristics of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. In all cases, prediction methods indicate the presence of six trans-membrane regions in the C-terminal domains, thus corresponding to canonical InsP3 receptors, while a sequence homologous to the InsP3-binding domain is present only in some types. Only two types have been analyzed in detail previously. We now show, by using antibodies and eventually by green fluorescent protein labeling, that the members of all six groups localize to distinct organelles known to participate in vesicle trafficking and, thus, may provide Ca2+ for local membrane-membrane interactions. Whole genome duplication can explain radiation within the six groups. Comparative and evolutionary evaluation suggests derivation from a common ancestor of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. With one group we could ascertain, to our knowledge for the first time, aberrant splicing in one thoroughly analyzed Paramecium gene. This yields truncated forms and, thus, may indicate a way to pseudogene formation. No comparable analysis is available for any other, free-living or parasitic/pathogenic protozoan. PMID:22102876

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  4. Unravelling calcium-release channel gating: clues from a 'hot' disease.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, T V; Mackrill, J J

    2004-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular channels that mediate Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum. More than 50 distinct point mutations in one member of this family, RyR1, cause malignant hyperthermia, a potentially lethal pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle. These mutations are not randomly distributed throughout the primary structure of RyR1, but are grouped in three discrete clusters. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Kobayashi et al. present evidence that interdomain interactions between two of these mutation-enriched regions play a key role in the gating mechanism of RyR1. PMID:15154833

  5. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  6. Elevated polyamines in urothelial cells from OAB subjects mediate oxotremorine-evoked rapid intracellular calcium rise and delayed acetylcholine release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkai; Sun, Yan; Tomiya, Noboru; Hsu, Yuchao

    2013-01-01

    Increased polyamine signaling in bladder urothelial cells (BUC) may play a role in the pathophysiology of overactive bladder (OAB). We quantitated intracellular polyamine levels in cultured BUC from OAB and asymptomatic (NB) subjects. We assessed whether polyamines modulated rapid intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) changes and delayed acetylcholine (ACh) release evoked by oxotremorine (OXO, a muscarinic agonist). BUC were cultured from cystoscopic biopsies. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantitated intracellular putrescine, spermidine, and spermine levels. Five-millimeter difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), and one-millimeter methylglyoxalbisguanylhydrazone (MGBG) treatments were used to deplete intracellular polyamines. Ten micrometers of OXO were used to increase [Ca2+]i levels (measured by fura 2 microfluorimetry) and trigger extracellular ACh release (measured by ELISA). Polyamine levels were elevated in OAB compared with NB BUC (0.5 ± 0.15 vs. 0.16 ± 0.03 nmol/mg for putrescine, 2.4 ± 0.21 vs. 1.01 ± 0.13 nmol/mg for spermidine, and 1.90 ± 0.27 vs. 0.86 ± 0.26 nmol/mg for spermine; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). OXO evoked greater [Ca2+]i rise in OAB (205.10 ± 18.82% increase over baseline) compared with in NB BUC (119.54 ± 13.01%; P < 0.05). After polyamine depletion, OXO evoked [Ca2+]i rise decreased in OAB and NB BUC to 43.40 ± 6.45 and 38.82 ± 3.5%, respectively. OXO tended to increase ACh release by OAB vs. NB BUC (9.02 ± 0.1 vs. 7.04 ± 0.09 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Polyamine depletion reduced ACh release by both OAB and NB BUC. In conclusion, polyamine levels were elevated twofold in OAB BUC. OXO evoked greater increase in [Ca2+]i and ACh release in OAB BUC, although these two events may be unrelated. Depletion of polyamines caused OAB BUC to behave similarly to NB BUC. PMID:23698115

  7. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Linhares-Farina, Giane; Sposito, Otávio da Silva; Zanchi, César Henrique; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA) based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA) based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA), in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA). The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter) and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique). The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p < 0.05). All of the materials were found to release calcium ions throughout the 30 days of the study. The addition of CHX increased the calcium ion release of E-MTA to levels statistically similar to W-MTA. E-MTA showed shorter initial and final setting time, compared with W-MTA (p < 0.05). The addition of 2% CHX to MTA prevented setting of the material. The addition of CHX to E-MTA increased its pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material.

  8. Local vanadium release from a calcium sulfate carrier accelerates fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Paglia, David N; Wey, Aaron; Hreha, Jeremy; Park, Andrew G; Cunningham, Catherine; Uko, Linda; Benevenia, Joseph; O'Connor, J Patrick; Lin, Sheldon S

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using calcium sulfate (CaSO4 ) as a carrier for intramedullary delivery of an organic vanadium salt, vanadyl acetylacetonate (VAC) after femoral fracture. VAC can act as an insulin-mimetic and can be used to accelerate fracture healing in rats. A heterogenous mixture of VAC and CaSO4 was delivered to the fracture site of BB Wistar rats, and mechanical testing, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) were performed to measure healing. At 4 weeks after fracture, maximum torque to failure, effective shear modulus, and effective shear stress were all significantly higher (p < 0.05) in rats treated with 0.25 mg/kg VAC-CaSO4 as compared to carrier control rats. Histomorphometry found a 71% increase in percent cartilage matrix (p < 0.05) and a 64% decrease in percent mineralized tissue (p < 0.05) at 2 weeks after fracture in rats treated with 0.25 mg/kg of VAC-CaSO4 . Micro-CT analyses at 4 weeks found a more organized callus structure and higher trending maximum connected z-ray. fraction for VAC-CaSO4 groups. Evaluation of radiographs and serial histological sections at 12 weeks did not show any evidence of ectopic bone formation. As compared to previous studies, CaSO4 was an effective carrier for reducing the dose of VAC required to accelerate femoral fracture healing in rats. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Swelling-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium stores in rat submandibular gland acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, K; Lee, S; Elliott, A C; Kim, J S; Lee, J H

    2002-04-01

    The effects of osmotically-induced cell swelling on cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were studied in acinar cells from rat submandibular gland using microspectrofluorimetry. Video-imaging techniques were also used to measure cell volume. Hypotonic stress (78% control tonicity) caused rapid cell swelling reaching a maximum relative volume of 1.78 +/- 0.05 (n = 5) compared to control. This swelling was followed by regulatory volume decrease, since relative cell volume decreased significantly to 1.61 +/- 0.08 (n = 5) after 10 min exposure to hypotonic medium. Osmotically induced cell swelling evoked by medium of either 78% or 66% tonicity caused a biphasic increase of [Ca2+]i. The rapid phase of this increase in [Ca2+]i was due to release of Ca2 + from intracellular stores, since it was also observed in cells bathed in Ca2+-free solution. The peak increase of [Ca2+]i induced by cell swelling was 3.40 +/- 0.49 (Fura-2 F340/F380 fluorescence ratio, n = 11) and 3.17 +/- 0.43 (n = 17) in the presence and the absence of extracellular Ca2+, respectively, corresponding to an absolute [Ca2+]i of around 1 microm. We found that around two-thirds of cells tested still showed some swelling-induced Ca2+ release (SICR) even after maximal concentrations (10(-5) M - 10(-4) M) of carbachol had been applied to empty agonist-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores. This result was confirmed and extended using thapsigargin to deplete intracellular Ca2+ pools. Hypotonic shock still raised [Ca2+]i in cells pretreated with thapsigargin, confirming that at least some SICR occurred from agonist-insensitive stores. Furthermore, SICR was largely inhibited by pretreatment of cells with carbonyl cyanide m-cholorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) or ruthenium red, inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Our results suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i, which underlies regulatory volume decrease in submandibular acinar cells, results from release of Ca2+ from both agonist-sensitive and

  10. GADS is Required for TCR-Mediated Calcium Influx and Cytokine Release, but not Cellular Adhesion, in Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Zhang, Elizabeth Y.; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M.; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. PMID:25636200

  11. Epinephrine impairs insulin release by a mechanism distal to calcium mobilization. Similarity to lipoxygenase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms that enable epinephrine (EPI) and lipoxygenase inhibitors to impede insulin secretion are unknown. We examined the possibility that EPI inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes as its major mechanism by studying /sup 45/Ca efflux from prelabeled, intact rat islets. EPI (2.5 x 10(-7) to 1 x 10(-5) M) inhibited insulin release induced by the influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ (46 mM K+) or the mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ stores (2 mM Ba/sup 2 +/), but it did not reduce the /sup 45/Ca efflux stimulated by either agonist. EPI also nullified insulin release induced by isobutylmethylxanthine or dibutyryl cAMP, with minimal or no effects on /sup 45/Ca efflux, and blocked the insulinotropic effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (a direct activator of protein kinase C), which is believed primarily to sensitize the exocytotic apparatus to Ca/sup 2 +/ without mobilizing additional Ca/sup 2 +/. Previously we reported that similar effects were induced by inhibitors of pancreatic islet lipoxygenase. In this study, however, pretreatment with either the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine or pertussis toxin did not block the effects of lipoxygenase inhibitors, although either agent did block the effects of EPI. Thus, EPI, via an alpha 2-receptor mechanism, is able to reduce exocytosis largely distal to, or independent of, changes in Ca/sup 2 +/ flux, cAMP formation or its Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing action, or generation of protein kinase C activators. Therefore, EPI may reduce the sensitivity of the exocytotic apparatus to Ca/sup 2 +/. Inhibition of islet lipoxygenase may have a similar effect; however, in this case, the effect would have to be unrelated, or distal, to stimulation of alpha 2-receptors.

  12. Intracellular calcium release through IP3R or RyR contributes to secondary axonal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Orem, Ben C; Pelisch, Nicolas; Williams, Joshua; Nally, Jacqueline M; Stirling, David P

    2017-10-01

    Severed CNS axons often retract or dieback away from the injury site and fail to regenerate. The precise mechanisms underlying acute axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of Ca(2+) store mediated intra-axonal Ca(2+) release in acute axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration. To differentiate between primary (directly transected) and "bystander" axonal injury (axons spared by the initial injury but then succumb to secondary degeneration) in real-time we use our previously published highly focal laser-induced spinal cord injury (LiSCI) ex vivo model. Ascending spinal cord dorsal column axons that express YFP were severed using an 800 nm laser pulse while being imaged continuously using two-photon excitation microscopy. We inhibited two major intra-axonal Ca(2+) store channels, ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3R, with ryanodine or 2-APB, respectively, to individually determine their role in axonal dieback and secondary axonal degeneration. Each antagonist was dissolved in artificial CSF and applied 1h post-injury alone or in combination, and continuously perfused for the remainder of the imaging session. Initially following LiSCI, transected axons retracted equal distances both distal and proximal to the lesion. However, by 4h after injury, the distal axonal segments that are destined for Wallerian degeneration had significantly retracted further than their proximal counterparts. We also found that targeting either RyR or IP3R using pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly reduced proximal axonal dieback and "bystander" secondary degeneration of axons compared to vehicle controls at 6h post-injury. Combined treatment effects on secondary axonal degeneration were similar to either drug in isolation. Together, these results suggest that intra-axonal Ca(2+) store mediated Ca(2+) release through RyR or IP3R contributes to secondary axonal degeneration following SCI. Copyright © 2017

  13. Calcium-dependent glutamate release during neuronal development and synaptogenesis: different involvement of omega-agatoxin IVA- and omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive channels.

    PubMed Central

    Verderio, C; Coco, S; Fumagalli, G; Matteoli, M

    1995-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons maintained in primary culture recycle synaptic vesicles and express functional glutamate receptors since early stages of neuronal development. By analyzing glutamate-induced cytosolic calcium changes to sense presynaptically released neurotransmitter, we demonstrate that the ability of neurons to release glutamate in the extracellular space is temporally coincident with the property of synaptic vesicles to undergo exocytotic-endocytotic recycling. Neuronal differentiation and maturation of synaptic contacts coincide with a change in the subtype of calcium channels primarily involved in controlling neurosecretion. Whereas omega-agatoxin IVA-sensitive channels play a role in controlling neurotransmitter secretion at all stages of neuronal differentiation, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive channels are primarily involved in mediating glutamate release at early developmental stages only. PMID:7604011

  14. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  15. The effect of CPP-ACP-propolis chewing gum on calcium and phosphate ion release on caries-active subjects’ saliva and the formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnamudhia, F.; Bachtiar, E. W.; Sahlan, M.; Soekanto, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CPP-APP and propolis wax if they are combined in a chewing gum formulation, observed from the calcium and phosphate ion level released by CPP-ACP and the emphasis of Streptococcus mutans mass in the biofilm by propolis wax on caries-active subjects’ saliva. Chewing gum simulation was done in vitro on 25 caries-active subjects’ saliva using five concentrations of chewing gum (0% propolis + 0% CPP-ACP, 0% propolis + CPP-ACP, 2% propolis + CPP-ACP, 4% propolis + CPP-ACP, and 6% propolis + CPP-ACP) and was then tested using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer to analyze calcium ion levels, an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer to analyze phosphate ion levels, and a biofilm assay using crystal violet to analyze the decline in biofilm mass. After the chewing simulation, calcium ion levels on saliva+gum eluent increased significantly compared to the saliva control, with the highest calcium level released by CPP-ACP + 2% propolis chewing gum. There was an insignificant phosphate level change between the saliva control and saliva+gum eluent. There was also a significant decline of S. mutans biofilm mass in the saliva+gum eluent, mostly by the CPP-ACP chewing gum and CPP-ACP + 6% propolis. The CPP-ACP-propolis chewing gum simulation generated the largest increase in calcium and phosphate ion level and the largest decline in S. mutans biofilm mass.

  16. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  17. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  18. Association of reticular pseudodrusen and early onset drusen.

    PubMed

    De Bats, Flore; Wolff, Benjamin; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine; Meunier, Isabelle; Denis, Philippe; Kodjikian, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To report an association between reticular pseudodrusen, located above the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and Early Onset Drusen (EOD) as described using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Eight patients (16 eyes) with EOD were examined. EOD were classified into three entities called Large Colloid Drusen (LCD), Malattia Leventinese (ML), and Cuticular Drusen (CD). Best-corrected visual acuity, fundus examination, color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), and SD-OCT were performed in all study patients. Results. Four patients had LCD, 2 had ML, and 2 had CD. Reticular pseudodrusen were observed with SD-OCT in all study patients; all these patients had hyperreflective lesions above and below the RPE. Conclusion. Early Onset Drusen appear to be associated with reticular pseudodrusen. SD-OCT is helpful in distinguishing the location of the deposits that are above and below the RPE in EOD. Further studies are needed to understand the role of reticular pseudodrusen in the pathophysiology of EOD.

  19. Association of Reticular Pseudodrusen and Early Onset Drusen

    PubMed Central

    De Bats, Flore; Wolff, Benjamin; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine; Meunier, Isabelle; Denis, Philippe; Kodjikian, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To report an association between reticular pseudodrusen, located above the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and Early Onset Drusen (EOD) as described using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Eight patients (16 eyes) with EOD were examined. EOD were classified into three entities called Large Colloid Drusen (LCD), Malattia Leventinese (ML), and Cuticular Drusen (CD). Best-corrected visual acuity, fundus examination, color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), and SD-OCT were performed in all study patients. Results. Four patients had LCD, 2 had ML, and 2 had CD. Reticular pseudodrusen were observed with SD-OCT in all study patients; all these patients had hyperreflective lesions above and below the RPE. Conclusion. Early Onset Drusen appear to be associated with reticular pseudodrusen. SD-OCT is helpful in distinguishing the location of the deposits that are above and below the RPE in EOD. Further studies are needed to understand the role of reticular pseudodrusen in the pathophysiology of EOD. PMID:24563787

  20. Acetylcholine-Induced Inhibition of Presynaptic Calcium Signals and Transmitter Release in the Frog Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Khaziev, Eduard; Samigullin, Dmitry; Zhilyakov, Nikita; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Bukharaeva, Ellya; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Nikolsky, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), released from axonal terminals of motor neurons in neuromuscular junctions regulates the efficacy of neurotransmission through activation of presynaptic nicotinic and muscarinic autoreceptors. Receptor-mediated presynaptic regulation could reflect either direct action on exocytotic machinery or modulation of Ca2+ entry and resulting intra-terminal Ca2+ dynamics. We have measured free intra-terminal cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) using Oregon-Green 488 microfluorimetry, in parallel with voltage-clamp recordings of spontaneous (mEPC) and evoked (EPC) postsynaptic currents in post-junctional skeletal muscle fiber. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic and nicotinic receptors with exogenous acetylcholine and its non-hydrolized analog carbachol reduced amplitude of the intra-terminal [Ca2+]i transients and decreased quantal content (calculated by dividing the area under EPC curve by the area under mEPC curve). Pharmacological analysis revealed the role of muscarinic receptors of M2 subtype as well as d-tubocurarine-sensitive nicotinic receptor in presynaptic modulation of [Ca2+]i transients. Modulation of synaptic transmission efficacy by ACh receptors was completely eliminated by pharmacological inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels. We conclude that ACh receptor-mediated reduction of Ca2+ entry into the nerve terminal through N-type Ca2+ channels represents one of possible mechanism of presynaptic modulation in frog neuromuscular junction. PMID:28018246

  1. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-06-24

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro.

  2. GAP43 stimulates inositol trisphosphate-mediated calcium release in response to hypotonicity

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, Marco; Gomis, Ana; Cabedo, Hugo; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The identification of osmo/mechanosensory proteins in mammalian sensory neurons is still elusive. We have used an expression cloning approach to screen a human dorsal root ganglion cDNA library to look for proteins that respond to hypotonicity by raising the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). We report the unexpected identification of GAP43 (also known as neuromodulin or B50), a membrane-anchored neuronal protein implicated in axonal growth and synaptic plasticity, as an osmosensory protein that augments [Ca2+]i in response to hypotonicity. Palmitoylation of GAP43 plays an important role in the protein osmosensitivity. Depletion of intracellular stores or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) activity abrogates hypotonicity-evoked, GAP43-mediated [Ca2+]i elevations. Notably, hypotonicity promoted the selective association of GAP43 with the PLC-δ1 isoform, and a concomitant increase in inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation. Collectively, these findings indicate that hypo-osmotic activation of GAP43 induces Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores. The osmosensitivity of GAP43 furnishes a mechanistic framework that links axon elongation with phospho inositide metabolism, spontaneous triggering of cytosolic Ca2+ transients and the regulation of actin dynamics and motility at the growth cone in response to temporal and local mechanical forces. PMID:12805215

  3. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  4. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Disrupted Calcium Release as a Mechanism for Atrial Alternans Associated with Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kelly C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  6. Noninvasive measurement of the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum at rest and during calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hong; Johannes, Ludger; Goud, Bruno; Antony, Claude; Lingwood, Clifford A.; Daneman, Richard; Grinstein, Sergio

    1998-01-01

    The pH within individual organelles of the secretory pathway is believed to be an important determinant of their biosynthetic activity. However, little is known about the determinants and regulation of the pH in the secretory organelles, which cannot be readily accessed by [H+]-sensitive probes. We devised a procedure for the dynamic, noninvasive measurement of pH in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum in intact mammalian cells. A recombinant form of the B subunit of Shiga toxin, previously modified to include a carboxyl-terminal KDEL sequence and a pH-sensitive fluorophore, was used for a two-stage delivery strategy. Retrograde traffic of endogenous lipids was harnessed to target this protein to the Golgi complex, followed by retrieval to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by KDEL receptors. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy were used to verify the subcellular localization of the modified B fragment. Fluorescence ratio imaging and two independent calibration procedures were applied to determine the pH of the ER in situ. We found that the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum is near neutral and is unaffected during agonist-induced release of calcium. The ER was found to be highly permeable to H+ (equivalents), so that the prevailing [H+] is susceptible to alterations in the cytosolic pH. Plasmalemmal acid-base transporters were shown to indirectly regulate the endoplasmic reticulum pH. PMID:9501204

  7. How cardiomyocyte excitation, calcium release and contraction become altered with age.

    PubMed

    Feridooni, Hirad A; Dibb, Katharine M; Howlett, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death globally, accounting for over 17 million deaths each year. As the incidence of cardiovascular disease rises markedly with age, the overall risk of cardiovascular disease is expected to increase dramatically with the aging of the population such that by 2030 it could account for over 23 million deaths per year. It is therefore vitally important to understand how the heart remodels in response to normal aging for at least two reasons: i) to understand why the aged heart is increasingly susceptible to disease; and ii) since it may be possible to modify treatment of disease in older adults if the underlying substrate upon which the disease first develops is fully understood. It is well known that age modulates cardiac function at the level of the individual cardiomyocyte. Generally, in males, aging reduces cell shortening, which is associated with a decrease in the amplitude of the systolic Ca(2+) transient. This may arise due to a decrease in peak L-type Ca(2+) current. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load appears to be maintained during normal aging but evidence suggests that SR function is disrupted, such that the rate of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)-mediated Ca(2+) removal is reduced and the properties of SR Ca(2+) release in terms of Ca(2+) sparks are altered. Interestingly, Ca(2+) handling is modulated by age to a lesser degree in females. Here we review how cellular contraction is altered as a result of the aging process by considering expression levels and functional properties of key proteins involved in controlling intracellular Ca(2+). We consider how changes in both electrical properties and intracellular Ca(2+) handling may interact to modulate cardiomyocyte contraction. We also reflect on why cardiovascular risk may differ between the sexes by highlighting sex-specific variation in the age-associated remodeling process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled CV Aging

  8. Divergent Regulation of Ryr2 Calcium Release Channels by Arrhythmogenic Human Calmodulin Missense Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun-Seok; Nitu, Florentin R; Yang, Yi; Walweel, Kafa; Pereira, Laetitia; Johnson, Christopher N; Faggioni, Michela; Chazin, Walter J; Laver, Derek; George, Alfred L; Cornea, Razvan L; Bers, Donald M; Knollmann, Björn C

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Calmodulin (CaM) mutations are associated with an autosomal-dominant syndrome of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death that can present with divergent clinical features of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)or long QT syndrome (LQTS).CaM binds to and inhibits RyR2 Ca release channels in the heart, but whether arrhythmogenic CaM mutants alter RyR2 function is not known. Objective To gain mechanistic insight into how human CaM mutations affect RyR2 Ca channels. Methods and Results We studied recombinant CaM mutants associated with CPVT (N54I, N98S) or LQTS (D96V, D130G, F142L). As a group, all LQTS-associated CaM mutants(LQTS-CaMs) exhibited reduced Ca affinity, whereas CPVT-associated CaM mutants(CPVT-CaMs) had either normal or modestly lower Ca affinity. In permeabilized ventricular myocytes, CPVT-CaMs at a physiological intracellular concentration (100nM) promoted significantly higher spontaneous Ca wave and spark activity, a typical cellular phenotype of CPVT. Compared to wild-type (WT) CaM, CPVT-CaMs caused greater RyR2 single channel open probability and showed enhanced binding affinity to RyR2. Even a 1:8 mixture of CPVT-CaM:WT-CaM activated Ca waves, demonstrating functional dominance. By contrast, LQTS-CaMs did not promote Ca waves and exhibited either normal regulation of RyR2 single channels (D96V) or lower RyR2 binding affinity (D130G, F142L). None of the CaM mutants altered Ca/CaM binding to CaM-kinase II. Conclusions A small proportion of CPVT-CaM is sufficient to evoke arrhythmogenic Ca disturbances, whereas LQTS-CaMs do not. Our findings explain the clinical presentation and autosomal dominant inheritance of CPVT-CaM mutations and suggest that RyR2-interactions are unlikely to explain arrhythmogenicity of LQTS-CaM mutations. PMID:24563457

  9. Charged local anesthetics block ionic conduction in the sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, A; Williams, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the effect of the charged local anesthetics QX314, QX222, and Procaine on monovalent cation conduction in the Ca2+ release channel of the sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. All three blockers only affect cation conductance when present at the cytoplasmic face of the channel. QX222 and Procaine act as voltage-dependent blockers. With 500 Hz filtering, this is manifest as a relatively smooth reduction in single-channel current amplitude most prominent at positive holding potentials. Quantitative analysis gives an effective valence of approximately 0.9 for both ions and Kb(0)s of 9.2 and 15.8 mM for QX222 and Procaine, respectively. Analysis of the concentration dependence of block suggests that QX222 is binding to a single site with a Km of 491 microM at a holding potential of 60 mV. The use of amplitude distribution analysis, with the data filtered at 1 to 2 kHz, reveals that the voltage and concentration dependence of QX222 block occurs largely because of changes in the blocker on rate. The addition of QX314 has a different effect, leading to the production of a substate with an amplitude of approximately one-third that of the control. The substate's occurrence is dependent on holding potential and QX314 concentration. Quantitative analysis reveals that the effect is highly voltage dependent, with a valence of approximately 1.5 caused by approximately equal changes in the on and off rates. Kinetic analysis of the concentration dependence of the substate occurrence reveals positive cooperativity with at least two QX314s binding to the conduction pathway, and this is largely accounted for by changes in the on rate. A paradoxical increase in the off rate at high positive holding potentials and with increasing QX314 concentration at 80 mV suggests the existence of a further QX314-dependent reaction that is both voltage and concentration dependent. The substate block is interpreted physically as a form of partial occlusion in the vestibule of the

  10. Priming of neutrophils and macrophages for enhanced release of superoxide anion by the calcium ionophore ionomycin. Implications for regulation of the respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Finkel, T H; Pabst, M J; Suzuki, H; Guthrie, L A; Forehand, J R; Phillips, W A; Johnston, R B

    1987-09-15

    Phagocytic cells can be primed for enhanced stimulated release of superoxide anion (O2-) by exposure to a variety of biologic agents, including gamma-interferon and lipopolysaccharide. We examined the role of calcium ion in this priming, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin. Preincubation with ionomycin, 1 to 10 nM, primed human neutrophils to release up to 7-fold more O2- during stimulation with 1 microM formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-Met-Leu-Phe). With 160 nM phorbol myristate acetate as stimulus, ionomycin caused a doubling of O2- production in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of phagocytes with ionomycin at priming concentrations did not directly stimulate O2- release. Priming of neutrophils occurred in 1-2 min and was associated with a marked reduction in the lag time for O2- release after f-Met-Leu-Phe stimulation and with an increase in the rate of O2- production. Kinetic analysis of NADPH-dependent O2(-)-producing activity in sonicates of resting human neutrophils incubated with sodium dodecyl sulfate suggested that modification of the enzyme responsible for the respiratory burst was not responsible for priming. Priming of neutrophils with ionomycin had no apparent effect on either the activity or subcellular distribution of protein kinase C. The effect of ionomycin on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) was assessed in neutrophils using the calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2. Ionomycin at priming concentrations caused an approximate doubling of the base-line [Ca2+]c. When neutrophils were exposed to various concentrations of ionomycin, a parallel rise in [Ca2+]c and priming was observed. A rise in [Ca2+]c of approximately 0.8 microM caused half-maximal priming. These results suggest that an increase in [Ca2+]c is not sufficient to initiate release of O2-, but they support the concept that Ca2+ can serve as a second messenger in this event.

  11. Development of a calcium phosphate co-precipitate/poly(lactide-co-glycolide) DNA delivery system: release kinetics and cellular transfection studies.

    PubMed

    Kofron, Michelle D; Laurencin, Cato T

    2004-06-01

    One of the most common non-viral methods for the introduction of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cultured cells is calcium phosphate co-precipitate transfection. This technique involves the encapsulation of DNA within a calcium phosphate co-precipitate, particulate addition to in vitro cell culture, endocytosis of the co-precipitate, and exogenous DNA expression by the transfected cell. In this study, we fabricated a novel non-viral gene transfer system by adsorbing DNA, encapsulated in calcium phosphate (DNA/Ca-P) co-precipitates, to biodegradable two- and three-dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) matrices (2D-DNA/Ca-P/PLAGA, 3D-DNA/Ca-P/PLAGA). Co-precipitate release studies demonstrated an initial burst release over the first 48 h. By day 7, approximately 96% of the initially adsorbed DNA/Ca-P co-precipitate had been released. This was followed by low levels of co-precipitate release for 42 days. Polymerase chain reaction was used to demonstrate the ability of the released DNA containing co-precipitates to transfect SaOS-2 cells cultured in vitro on the 3D-DNA/Ca-P/PLAGA matrix and maintenance of the structural integrity of the exogenous DNA. In summary, a promising system for the incorporation and controlled delivery of exogenous genes encapsulated within a calcium phosphate co-precipitate from biodegradable polymeric matrices has been developed and may have applicability to the delivery of therapeutic genes and the transfection of other cell types.

  12. Mitochondria Association to Calcium Release Units is Controlled by Age and Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background At the most basic level, skeletal muscle contraction requires Ca2+ and ATP and, thus, is under direct control of two important intracellular organelles: Ca2+ release units (CRUs) - specialized intracellular junctions, also named triads, which are involved in excitation-contraction (EC) coupling - and mitochondria, the organelles deputed to produce the energy required for most cellular functions (i.e. aerobic ATP production). It is now becoming clear that: a) CRUs and mitochondria interact functionally and structurally, as entry of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix is required to stimulate the respiratory chain, and increase production of ATP (Fig. 1) (Sembrowich et al. 1985 1; Brookes et al. 2004 2; Rossi et al. 2009) 3; b) we recently discovered that, in adult skeletal muscle fibers, mitochondria and CRUs are placed in close proximity to each other (Fig. 2) and structurally linked by small strands called tethers (Fig. 3) (Boncompagni et al. 2009)4. Scientific hypothesis of the study Miss-function of mitochondria and functional/structural changes affecting the EC coupling apparatus have been both proposed to contribute to the age-related decline of skeletal muscle performance (Delbono et al. 1995 5; Boncompagni et al. 2006 6). In this study, we tested the following hypothesis: muscle activity improves/maintains the correct association between CRUs and mitochondria, which is challenged by ageing and inactivity. Experimental Plan We have studied the morphology, frequency, and sarcomericlocalization of both CRUs and mitochondria using light, confocal, and electron microscopy (EM) in: a) Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) muscles from adult (3-12 months of age) and ageing (≥24 months of age) wild type (WT) mice; and b) in human biopsies from sedentary elderly subjects (70 ± 5 years) and age matched sportmen (69 ± 4 years of age) to determine how EC coupling and mitochondrial apparatuses are affected by age and exercise. Results A Studies in mice revealed

  13. The role of PIP2 and the IP3/DAG pathway in intracellular calcium release and cell survival during nanosecond electric pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phospholipid of particular importance in cell-signaling pathways. Hydrolysis of PIP2 releases inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) from the membrane, activating IP3 receptors on the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and facilitating a release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause depletion of PIP2 in the cellular membrane, activating the IP3 signaling pathway. However, the exact mechanism(s) causing this observed depletion of PIP2 are unknown. Complicating the matter, nsPEF create nanopores in the plasma membrane, allowing calcium to enter the cell and thus causing an increase in intracellular calcium. While elevated intracellular calcium can cause activation of phospholipase C (PLC) (a known catalyst of PIP2 hydrolysis), PIP2 depletion has been shown to occur in the absence of both extracellular and intracellular calcium. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the high electric field itself may be playing a direct role in the hydrolysis of PIP2 from the plasma membrane. To support this hypothesis, we used edelfosine to block PLC and prevent activation of the IP3/DAG pathway in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells prior to applying nsPEF. Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor intracellular calcium bursts during nsPEF, while MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) survivability assays were utilized to determine whether edelfosine improved cell survival during nsPEF exposure. This work is critical to refine the role of PIP2 in the cellular response to nsPEF, and also to determine the fundamental biological effects of high electric field exposures.

  14. Design of calcium phosphate ceramics for drug delivery applications in bone diseases: A review of the parameters affecting the loading and release of the therapeutic substance.

    PubMed

    Parent, Marianne; Baradari, Hiva; Champion, Eric; Damia, Chantal; Viana-Trecant, Marylène

    2017-02-21

    Effective treatment of critical-size defects is a key challenge in restorative surgery of bone. The strategy covers the implantation of biocompatible, osteoconductive, bioactive and biodegradable devices which (1) well interact with native tissue, mimic multi-dimensional and hierarchical structure of bone and (2) are able to enhance bone repair, treating post implantation pathologies or bone diseases by local delivery of therapeutic agents. Among different options, calcium phosphate biomaterials are found to be attractive choices, due to their excellent biocompatibility, customisable bioactivity and biodegradability. Several approaches have been established to enhance this material ability to be loaded with a therapeutic agent, in order to obtain an in situ controlled release that meets the clinical needs. This article reviews the most important factors influencing on both drug loading and release capacity of porous calcium phosphate bone substitutes. Characteristics of the carrier, drug/carrier interactions, experimental conditions of drug loading and evaluation of drug delivery are considered successively.

  15. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels: From Transmitter Release to Contraction of Renal Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform of the voltage-gated calcium channels (P/Q-type), is also expressed and contributes functionally to contraction of renal blood vessels in both mice and humans. Furthermore, preglomerular vascular SMCs and aortic SMCs coexpress L-, P-, and Q-type calcium channels within the same cell. Calcium channel blockers are widely used as pharmacological treatments. However, calcium channel antagonists vary in their selectivity for the various calcium channel subtypes, and the functional contribution from P/Q-type channels as compared with L-type should be considered. Confirming the presence of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels in other types of vascular SMCs could be important when investigating phenomena such as hypertension, migraine, and other diseases known to involve SMCs and voltage-gated calcium channels. The purpose of this review was to give a short overview of the possible roles of P/Q-type calcium channels within the vascular system with special focus on the renal vasculature.

  16. A Hyperpigmented Reticular Rash in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    South, Andrew M; Crispin, Milene K; Marqueling, Ann L; Sutherland, Scott M

    Chronically ill patients often develop uncommon exam findings. A 16-year-old female with end-stage renal disease secondary to immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis on peritoneal dialysis (PD) developed a pruritic, hyperpigmented reticular rash on her abdomen, sparing the PD catheter insertion site. The rash appeared approximately 6 weeks after initiating PD. She used a heating pad nightly during PD for dialysis drain pain. Testing for systemic and autoimmune disease was negative. She was referred to dermatology, where the diagnosis of erythema ab igne (EAI), a well-described but less well-known hyperpigmented reticular cutaneous eruption caused by chronic exposure to low levels of infrared heat, was confirmed. The eruption is typically painless but is often pruritic. Common sources of heat include fires, stoves, portable heaters, heating pads, and laptop computers. The association between EAI and PD is unknown. Our patient discontinued the heating pad and her rash resolved.

  17. A damped oscillation in the intramembranous charge movement and calcium release flux of frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Shirokova, N; Pizarro, G; Ríos, E

    1994-09-01

    Asymmetric membrane currents and calcium transients were recorded simultaneously from cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers voltage clamped in a double Vaseline-gap chamber in the presence of high concentration of EGTA intracellularly. An inward phase of asymmetric currents following the hump component was observed in all fibers during the depolarization pulse to selected voltages (congruent to -45 mV). The average value of the peak inward current was 0.1 A/F (SEM = 0.01, n = 18), and the time at which it occurred was 34 ms (SEM = 1.8, n = 18). A second delayed outward phase of asymmetric current was observed after the inward phase, in those experiments in which hump component and inward phase were large. It peaked at more variable time (between 60 and 130 ms) with amplitude 0.02 A/F (SEM = 0.003, n = 11). The transmembrane voltage during a pulse, measured with a glass microelectrode, reached its steady value in less than 10 ms and showed no oscillations. The potential was steady at the time when the delayed component of asymmetric current occurred. ON and OFF charge transfers were equal for all pulse durations. The inward phase moved 1.4 nC/microF charge (SEM = 0.8, n = 6), or about one third of the final value of charge mobilized by these small pulses, and the second outward phase moved 0.7 nC/microF (SEM = 0.8, n = 6), bringing back about half of the charge moved during the inward phase. When repolarization intersected the peak of the inward phase, the OFF charge transfer was independent of the repolarization voltage in the range -60 to -90 mV. When both pre- and post-pulse voltages were changed between -120 mV and -60 mV, the equality of ON and OFF transfers of charge persisted, although they changed from 113 to 81% of their value at -90 mV. The three delayed phases in asymmetric current were also observed in experiments in which the extracellular solution contained Cd2+, La3+ and no Ca2+. Large increases in intracellular [Cl-] were imposed, and had no

  18. Variable Action Potential Backpropagation during Tonic Firing and Low-Threshold Spike Bursts in Thalamocortical But Not Thalamic Reticular Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are indispensable in dendritic signaling. Conflicting Ca2+-imaging data and an absence of dendritic recording data means that the extent of backpropagation in thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons remains unknown. Because TRN neurons signal electrically through dendrodendritic gap junctions and possibly via chemical dendritic GABAergic synapses, as well as classical axonal GABA release, this lack of knowledge is problematic. To address this issue, we made two-photon targeted patch-clamp recordings from rat TC and TRN neuron dendrites to measure bAPs directly. These recordings reveal that “tonic”' and low-thr