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Sample records for reticular calcium release

  1. Bypassing the rumen in dairy ewes: the reticular groove reflex vs. calcium soap of olive fatty acids.

    PubMed

    García, C Dobarganes; Hernández, M Pérez; Cantalapiedra, G; Salas, J M; Merino, J A

    2005-02-01

    A 3 x 3 Latin Square experiment was designed to compare 2 ways of bypassing the effects of the rumen with olive oil fatty acids in 'Manchega' dairy ewes. Treatments were a control diet, CaOFA (control diet plus 45 g of olive fatty acids as calcium soap), and OO (control plus 45 g/d of olive fatty acids as olive oil emulsified in skim milk) and bottle-fed to animals trained to maintain the reticular groove reflex). No differences were found in milk, protein, and lactose yields, but fat yield and milk fat content were greater in treatments with added fat (CaOFA and OO). Content of short- and medium-chain fatty acids in milk fat was greater for control treatment than for the other 2 groups, the yield of these fatty acids being similar for all 3 diets, except that of C12:0, which was greater for the control treatment. Content and yield of C18:0 and isomers of C18:1 others than oleic acid were greater in milk from the CaOFA diet than from the other 2 diets. Oleic acid content and yield were greater in milk after OO treatment (23.9% and 16.8 g/d, respectively), intermediate after CaOFA treatment (19.2% and 13.8 g/d, respectively), and lower after control diet (10.7% and 6.52 g/d, respectively). Linoleic acid yield and content were greater in ewes fed the OO diet than in those on the other 2 diets, both of which showed similar data. All these changes indicated that the "protected" olive fatty acids (as calcium soap) were severely affected by the rumen environment and that the use of the reticular groove reflex seems to be a more effective way of bypassing the rumen in adult lactating dairy ewes.

  2. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  3. Modulation of GABA release from the thalamic reticular nucleus by cocaine and caffeine: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Gingrich, Jay A; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin receptors are targets of drug therapies for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Cocaine inhibits the re-uptake of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and noradrenaline, whereas caffeine blocks adenosine receptors and opens ryanodine receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum. We studied how 5-HT and adenosine affected spontaneous GABAergic transmission from thalamic reticular nucleus. We combined whole-cell patch clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in ventrobasal thalamic neurons during local (puff) application of 5-HT in wild type (WT) or knockout mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A -/-). Inhibition of mIPSCs frequency by low (10 μM) and high (100 μM) 5-HT concentrations was observed in ventrobasal neurons from 5-HT2A -/- mice. In WT mice, only 100 μM 5-HT significantly reduced mIPSCs frequency. In 5-HT2A -/- mice, NAN-190, a specific 5-HT1A antagonist, prevented the 100 μM 5-HT inhibition while blocking H-currents that prolonged inhibition during post-puff periods. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM 5-HT were enhanced in cocaine binge-treated 5-HT2A -/- mice. Caffeine binge treatment did not affect 5-HT-mediated inhibition. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are present in pre-synaptic thalamic reticular nucleus terminals. Serotonergic-mediated inhibition of GABA release could underlie aberrant thalamocortical physiology described after repetitive consumption of cocaine. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A , 5-HT2A and A1 receptors are present in pre-synaptic TRN terminals. 5-HT1A and A1 receptors would down-regulate adenylate cyclase, whereas 5-HT1A would also increase the probability of the opening of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK). Sustained opening of GIRK channels would hyperpolarize pre-synaptic terminals activating H-currents, resulting in less GABA release. 5-HT2A -would activate PLC and IP3 , increasing intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and

  4. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  5. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. PMID:26613410

  6. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  7. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  8. Calcium wave propagation by calcium-induced calcium release: an unusual excitable system.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J; Girard, S; Clapham, D

    1993-03-01

    We discuss in detail the behaviour of a model, proposed by Goldbeter et al. (1990. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. 87, 1461-1465), for intracellular calcium wave propagation by calcium-induced calcium release, focusing our attention on excitability and the propagation of waves in one spatial dimension. The model with no diffusion behaves like a generic excitable system, and threshold behaviour, excitability and oscillations can be understood within this general framework. However, when diffusion is included, the model no longer behaves like a generic excitable system; the fast and slow variables are not distinct and previous results on excitable systems do not necessarily apply. We consider a piecewise linear simplification of the model, and construct travelling pulse and periodic plane wave solutions to the simplified model. The analogous behaviour in the full model is studied numerically. Goldbeter's model for calcium-induced calcium release is an excitable system of a type not previously studied in detail.

  9. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  10. Calcium in the control of renin release.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Malvin, R L

    1978-07-01

    The effect of Ca concentrations in the incubation medium and of estimated intracellular Ca concentrations on renin release was examined with use of pig renal cortical slices. In addition, the Ca requirement for the epinephrine stimulatory effect and for the ouabain inhibitory action on renin release was also tested. In mediums containing 5.9 mM K, variations in Ca concentration had no effect on renin release. In contrast, when the K concentration was 59 mM, a significant inhibition of renin release was attained with all concentrations of calcium. The inhibition of renin release in high K mediums by Ca was attributed to an increase in the intracellular Ca concentration. In addition, both the stimulatory effect of epinephrine and the inhibitory effect of ouabain on renin release required Ca in the medium. These results support the hypothesis that the control of renin secretion is mediated, in part, by changes in the intracellular concentration of Ca, most likely in the juxtaglomerular cells.

  11. Mechanism of enzyme release in the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Ganote, C E; Sims, M A; VanderHeide, R S

    1983-12-01

    Calcium-free rat hearts develop separations of fascia adherens junctions of intercalated discs. Such hearts are susceptible to membrane injury and enzyme release during anoxic contracture. Anoxic enzyme release was exacerbated by distention of heart ventricles with a balloon. Dinitrophenol (DNP) and caffeine were used to induce contracture in calcium-free hearts. Both DNP and caffeine caused a massive enzyme release from calcium-free but not from control hearts. Caffeine-induced enzyme release occurred despite Amytal inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. These results demonstrate that in calcium-free hearts with contracture or ventricular distention, enzyme release occurred without calcium repletion, from hearts depleted of ATP and in the absence of mitochondrial function. A relationship between contracture-mediated enzyme release and the calcium paradox was suggested by studies of the effects of hypothermia on enzyme release. Hypothermia to 22 degrees C protects hearts against both the calcium paradox and anoxic, DNP and caffeine injury. The parallel temperature dependence of protection between contracture-mediated enzyme release and the calcium paradox is evidence that contracture may also be a mediator of sarcolemmal membrane injury and enzyme release in the calcium paradox.

  12. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  13. Intracellular Calcium Release at Fertilization in the Sea Urchin Egg

    PubMed Central

    Steinhardt, R.; Zucker, R.; Schattenand, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization or ionophore activation of Lytechinus pictus eggs can be monitored after injection with the Ca-sensitive photoprotein aequorin to estimate calcium release during activation. We estimate the peak calcium transient to reach concentrations of 2.5–4.5 μM free calcium 45–60 sec after activation and to last 2–3 min, assuming equal Ca2+ release throughout the cytoplasm. Calcium is released from an intracellular store, since similar responses are obtained during fertilization at a wide range of external calcium concentrations or in zero-calcium seawater in ionophore activations. In another effort to estimate free calcium at fertilization, we isolated egg cortices, added back calcium quantitatively, and fixed for observation with a scanning electron microscope. In this way, we determined that the threshold for discharge of the cortical granules is between 9 and 18 μM Ca2+. Therefore, the threshold for the in vitro cortical reaction is about five times the amount of free calcium, assuming equal distribution in the egg. This result suggests that transient calcium release is confined to the inner subsurface of the egg. PMID:326602

  14. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  15. Calcium-induced calcium release contributes to synaptic release from mouse rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Babai, N.; Morgans, C. W.; Thoreson, WB.

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) contributes to synaptic release from rods in mammalian retina. Electron micrographs and immunofluorescent double labeling for the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) and synaptic ribbon protein, ribeye, showed a close association between ER and synaptic ribbons in mouse rod terminals. Stimulating CICR with 10 μM ryanodine evoked Ca2+ increases in rod terminals from mouse retinal slices visualized using confocal microscopy with the Ca2+-sensitive dye, Fluo-4. Ryanodine also stimulated membrane depolarization of individual mouse rods. Inhibiting CICR with a high concentration of ryanodine (100 μM) reduced the ERG b-wave but not a-wave consistent with inhibition of synaptic transmission from rods. Ryanodine (100 μM) also inhibited light-evoked voltage responses of individual rod bipolar cells (RBCs) and presumptive horizontal cells recorded with perforated patch recording techniques. A presynaptic site of action for ryanodine's effects is further indicated by the finding that ryanodine (100 μM) did not alter currents evoked in voltage-clamped RBCs by puffing the mGluR6 antagonist, (RS)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG), onto bipolar cell dendrites in the presence of the mGluR6 agonist L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4). Ryanodine (100 μM) also inhibited glutamatergic outward currents in RBCs evoked by electrical stimulation of rods using electrodes placed in the outer segment layer. Together, these results indicate that, like amphibian retina, CICR contributes to synaptic release from mammalian (mouse) rods. By boosting synaptic release in darkness, CICR may improve the detection of small luminance changes by post-synaptic neurons. PMID:19932743

  16. Calcium-induced calcium release and gap junctions mediate large-scale calcium waves in olfactory ensheathing cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Stavermann, Maren; Meuth, Patrick; Doengi, Michael; Thyssen, Anne; Deitmer, Joachim W; Lohr, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a specialised type of glial cells, supporting axon growth and guidance during development and regeneration of the olfactory nerve and the nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. We measured calcium signalling in OECs in olfactory bulb in-toto preparations using confocal and epifluorescence microscopy and the calcium indicator Fluo-4. We identified two subpopulations of olfactory bulb OECs: OECs in the outer sublamina of the nerve layer responded to purinergic neurotransmitters such as adenosine triphosphate with calcium transients, while OECs in the inner sublamina of the nerve layer did not respond to neurotransmitters. However, the latter generated spontaneous calcium waves that covered hundreds of cells. These calcium waves persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin and in calcium-free saline, but were abolished after calcium store depletion with cyclopiazonic acid or inositol trisphosphate receptor blockage with 2-APB. Calcium waves could be triggered by laser photolysis of caged inositol trisphosphate. Blocking purinoceptors with PPADS had no effect on calcium wave propagation, whereas blocking gap junctions with carbenoxolone or meclofenamic acid entirely suppressed calcium waves. Increasing calcium buffer capacity in OECs with NP-EGTA ("caged" Ca(2+)) prevented calcium wave generation, and laser photolysis of NP-EGTA in a small group of OECs resulted in a calcium increase in the irradiated cells followed by a calcium wave. We conclude that calcium waves in OECs can be initiated by calcium-induced calcium release via InsP3 receptors and propagate through gap junctions, while purinergic signalling is not involved.

  17. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  18. Calcium and phosphate release from resin-based materials containing different calcium orthophosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcela C; Natale, Livia C; Arana-Chaves, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2015-11-01

    The study compared ion release from resin-based materials containing calcium orthophosphates. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and surface area (nitrogen adsorption isotherms, BET method). Nanoparticles were added to a dimethacrylate-based resin and materials were tested for degree of conversion (DC) and calcium/phosphate release up to 28 days under pH 5.5 and 7.0. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 0.05).The crystallinity of DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP were confirmed, as well as the ACP amorphous nature. DCPD and β-TCP presented larger agglomerates than DCPA and ACP. The surface area of ACP was 5-11 times higher than those of the other nanoparticles. Materials showed similar DC. The material containing ACP released significantly more ions than the others, which released similar amounts of calcium and, in most cases, phosphate. Ion release was not affected by pH. Calcium release decreased between 7 and 21 days, while phosphate levels remained constant after 14 days. In conclusion, ACP higher ion release can be ascribed to its high surface area. DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP had similar performances as ion-releasing fillers.

  19. Release of calcium from endolysosomes increases calcium influx through N-type calcium channels: Evidence for acidic store-operated calcium entry in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Geiger, Nicholas H; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Churchill, Grant C; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    Neurons possess an elaborate system of endolysosomes. Recently, endolysosomes were found to have readily releasable stores of intracellular calcium; however, relatively little is known about how such 'acidic calcium stores' affect calcium signaling in neurons. Here we demonstrated in primary cultured neurons that calcium released from acidic calcium stores triggered calcium influx across the plasma membrane, a phenomenon we have termed "acidic store-operated calcium entry (aSOCE)". aSOCE was functionally distinct from store-operated calcium release and calcium entry involving endoplasmic reticulum. aSOCE appeared to be governed by N-type calcium channels (NTCCs) because aSOCE was attenuated significantly by selectively blocking NTCCs or by siRNA knockdown of NTCCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NTCCs co-immunoprecipitated with the lysosome associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and that aSOCE is accompanied by increased cell-surface expression levels of NTCC and LAMP1 proteins. Moreover, we demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of LAMP1 or Rab27a, both of which are key proteins involved in lysosome exocytosis, attenuated significantly aSOCE. Taken together our data suggest that aSOCE occurs in neurons, that aSOCE plays an important role in regulating the levels and actions of intraneuronal calcium, and that aSOCE is regulated at least in part by exocytotic insertion of N-type calcium channels into plasma membranes through LAMP1-dependent lysosome exocytosis.

  20. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  1. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  2. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  3. Superresolution Modeling of Calcium Release in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark A.; Williams, George S.B.; Kohl, Tobias; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Jafri, M. Saleet; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Lederer, W.J.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is critical for maintaining normal cellular contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The fundamental element of CICR in the heart is the calcium (Ca2+) spark, which arises from a cluster of ryanodine receptors (RyR). Opening of these RyR clusters is triggered to produce a local, regenerative release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The Ca2+ leak out of the SR is an important process for cellular Ca2+ management, and it is critically influenced by spark fidelity, i.e., the probability that a spontaneous RyR opening triggers a Ca2+ spark. Here, we present a detailed, three-dimensional model of a cardiac Ca2+ release unit that incorporates diffusion, intracellular buffering systems, and stochastically gated ion channels. The model exhibits realistic Ca2+ sparks and robust Ca2+ spark termination across a wide range of geometries and conditions. Furthermore, the model captures the details of Ca2+ spark and nonspark-based SR Ca2+ leak, and it produces normal excitation-contraction coupling gain. We show that SR luminal Ca2+-dependent regulation of the RyR is not critical for spark termination, but it can explain the exponential rise in the SR Ca2+ leak-load relationship demonstrated in previous experimental work. Perturbations to subspace dimensions, which have been observed in experimental models of disease, strongly alter Ca2+ spark dynamics. In addition, we find that the structure of RyR clusters also influences Ca2+ release properties due to variations in inter-RyR coupling via local subspace Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]ss). These results are illustrated for RyR clusters based on super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. Finally, we present a believed-novel approach by which the spark fidelity of a RyR cluster can be predicted from structural information of the cluster using the maximum eigenvalue of its adjacency matrix. These results provide critical insights into CICR

  4. The calcium-dependent neuronal release of serotonin and its antagonism by lithium.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Catapane, E J; Aiello, E; Hiripi, L

    1980-03-01

    The cilio-excitatory serotonergic innervation of lateral gill cilia of Mytilus edulis was studied in vivo. Peripheral serotonin release was dependent on the external calcium concentration. Serotonin release was inhibited by autodialyzing calcium from the tissue or by increasing the calcium concentration in the medium, as determined by measuring ciliary activity stroboscopically and by biochemical and radioassays of serotonin. Lithium also inhibited serotonin release when added to the external bathing medium. Concomitantly, altering calcium concentrations altered the degree of inhibition of serotonin release caused by lithium. The study demonstrates that the terminal release of the monoamine serotonin is a calcium-dependent mechanism. The pharmacological effects of lithium in this system appear to be interrelated with the calcium-dependent releasing mechanism. PMID:7381459

  5. Tailored Sequential Drug Release from Bilayered Calcium Sulfate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt%) of metronidazole-loaded poly poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) images showed the overall layered geometry as well as homogenous distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4% per day). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. PMID:25175211

  6. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Bryan R; Puleo, David A

    2014-10-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects.

  7. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  8. Detection, Properties, and Frequency of Local Calcium Release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Teleost Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Tort, Lluis; Benítez, Raul; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a central role in the regulation of cardiac contraction and rhythm in mammals and humans but its role is controversial in teleosts. Since the zebrafish is an emerging model for studies of cardiovascular function and regeneration we here sought to determine if basic features of SR calcium release are phylogenetically conserved. Confocal calcium imaging was used to detect spontaneous calcium release (calcium sparks and waves) from the SR. Calcium sparks were detected in 16 of 38 trout atrial myocytes and 6 of 15 ventricular cells. The spark amplitude was 1.45±0.03 times the baseline fluorescence and the time to half maximal decay of sparks was 27±3 ms. Spark frequency was 0.88 sparks µm−1 min−1 while calcium waves were 8.5 times less frequent. Inhibition of SR calcium uptake reduced the calcium transient (F/F0) from 1.77±0.17 to 1.12±0.18 (p = 0.002) and abolished calcium sparks and waves. Moreover, elevation of extracellular calcium from 2 to 10 mM promoted early and delayed afterdepolarizations (from 0.6±0.3 min−1 to 8.1±2.0 min−1, p = 0.001), demonstrating the ability of SR calcium release to induce afterdepolarizations in the trout heart. Calcium sparks of similar width and duration were also observed in zebrafish ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study to consistently report calcium sparks in teleosts and demonstrate that the basic features of calcium release through the ryanodine receptor are conserved, suggesting that teleost cardiac myocytes is a relevant model to study the functional impact of abnormal SR function. PMID:21897853

  9. Incorporation of calcium salts into xanthan gum matrices: hydration, erosion and drug release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Groves, Emma; Chaw, Cheng Shu

    2015-01-01

    Xanthan gum (XG), a hydrophilic biopolymer with modified release properties, was used to produce directly compressed matrix tablets containing a model drug, sodium p-aminosalicylate. Three formulations were prepared, each containing a different calcium dihydrate salt: calcium chloride, calcium sulfate or dibasic calcium phosphate. The aim of the investigation was to relate the calcium ion content and solubility of the calcium salt to the in vitro drug release profile of the xanthan matrices. Tablet hydration, erosion and drug release were determined in distilled water using the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) paddle method. The data showed that the overall drug release was the greatest with addition of calcium sulfate, followed by calcium chloride and dibasic calcium phosphate. The chloride salt formulation displayed the greatest percentage erosion due to rapid mass loss during the initial phase, followed by those with sulfate or phosphate salts. As xanthan gel viscosity increased and drug release was also found to be lower, it can be concluded that drug release is influenced by the solubility of the salt present in the formulation, since these parameters determine the viscosity and structure of the gel layer. PMID:25371230

  10. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. PMID:26725114

  11. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  12. Simulations of intracellular calcium release dynamics in response to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Nguyen, A.; Sridhara, V.; Hu, Q.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Kolb, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    Numerical simulations for electrically induced, intracellular calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum are reported. A two-step model is used for self-consistency. Distributed electrical circuit representation coupled with the Smoluchowski equation yields the ER membrane nanoporation for calcium outflow based on a numerical simulation. This is combined with the continuum Li-Rinzel model and drift diffusion for calcium dynamics. Our results are shown to be in agreement with reported calcium release data. A modest increase (rough doubling) of the cellular calcium is predicted in the absence of extra-cellular calcium. In particular, the applied field of 15kV/cm with 60ns pulse duration makes for a strong comparison. No oscillations are predicted and the net recovery period of about 5min are both in agreement with published experimental results. A quantitative explanation for the lack of such oscillatory behavior, based on the density dependent calcium fluxes, is also provided.

  13. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated.

  14. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  15. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  16. Oxygen increases ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cytosolic calcium via release of calcium from inositol triphosphate-sensitive stores.

    PubMed

    Keck, Maggie; Resnik, Ernesto; Linden, Bradley; Anderson, Franklin; Sukovich, David J; Herron, Jean; Cornfield, David N

    2005-05-01

    In utero, blood shunts away from the lungs via the ductus arteriosus (DA) and the foramen ovale. After birth, the DA closes concomitant with increased oxygen tension. The present experimental series tests the hypothesis that oxygen directly increases DA smooth muscle cell (SMC) cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) through inactivation of a K(+) channel, membrane depolarization, and entry of extracellular calcium. To test the hypothesis, DA SMC were isolated from late-gestation fetal lambs and grown to subconfluence in primary culture in low oxygen tension (25 Torr). DA SMC were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore fura-2 under low oxygen tension conditions and studied using microfluorimetry while oxygen tension was acutely increased (120 Torr). An acute increase in oxygen tension progressively increased DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) by 11.7 +/- 1.4% over 40 min. The effect of acute normoxia on DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) was mimicked by pharmacological blockade of the voltage-sensitive K(+) channel. Neither removal of extracellular calcium nor voltage-operated calcium channel blockade prevented the initial increase in DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i). Manganese quenching experiments demonstrated that acute normoxia initially decreases the rate of extracellular calcium entry. Pharmacological blockade of inositol triphosphate-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, intracellular calcium stores prevented the oxygen-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Endothelin increased [Ca(2+)](i) in acutely normoxic, but not hypoxic, DA SMC. Thus acute normoxia 1) increases DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) via release of calcium from intracellular calcium stores, and subsequent entry of extracellular calcium, and 2) potentiates the effect of contractile agonists. Prolonged patency of the DA may result from disordered intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  17. Evaluation of calcium ion release and change in pH on combining calcium hydroxide with different vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Charu; Shetty, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intracanal medicaments have traditionally been used in endodontics to disinfect root canals between appointments. Calcium hydroxide is widely used as an intracanal medicament for disinfection and to promote periapical healing. It is stable for long periods, harmless to the body, and bactericidal in a limited area. The efficacy of calcium hydroxide as a disinfectant is dependent on the availability of the hydroxyl ions in the solution that depends on the vehicle in which the calcium hydroxide is carried. In general, three types of vehicles are used: Aqueous, viscous or oily. Some in vitro studies have shown that the type of vehicle has a direct relationship with the concentration and the velocity of ionic liberation as well as with the antibacterial action when the paste is carried into a contaminated area. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the calcium ion release and measure the change in pH of the environment that occurred when calcium hydroxide was combined with different vehicles (distilled water, propylene glycol, calcium hydroxide containing gutta-percha points and chitosan) over different time periods. Materials and Methods: Forty single rooted mandibular first premolar teeth were decoronated for this study. Working length was established and the root canals were enlarged and irrigation accomplished with 2 ml of NaOCl solution after every file. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. The canals were then packed with different preparations of calcium hydroxide using the following vehicles-distilled water, propylene glycol, gutta-percha points and chitosan. Calcium ion release in different groups was analyzed using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer at 220 nm. The change in pH of was determined using a pH meter. Results were statistically evaluated using one-way ANOVA test. Result: For calcium ion release, Group 2 showed cumulative drug release of 81.97% at the end of 15 days, whereas Group 1, 3 and 4 showed a release of 99.53, 17.98, 74

  18. Preparation and evaluation of sustained release calcium alginate beads and matrix tablets of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Barzegar-Jalali, M; Hanaee, J; Omidi, Y; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Ziaee, S; Bairami-Atashgah, R; Adibkia, K

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop sustained release dosage forms of acetazolamide (ACZ) preparing its calcium alginate beads and matrix tablets. ACZ was incorporated into calcium alginate beads using microencapsulation method. Two methods were applied to prolong ACZ release rate. In the first method, the drug was incorporated into calcium alginate beads either alone or with various polymers in internal phase. The second method involved the preparation of matrix tablet from the beads benefiting direct compression method with or without various polymers in external phase. The release rate of these prepared formulations and an innovator's sustained-release capsule (Diamox®) were assessed. In-vitro dissolution studies revealed that the matrix tablets prepared by the second method containing NaCMC could sustain ACZ release properly and the drug released until 9 h. It was also found that several parameters such as concentration of sodium alginate, calcium chloride and ACZ; type and concentration of polymers; syringe needle size as well as distance between needle tip and surface of the calcium chloride could affect the properties of beads, matrix tablets and subsequently release profile. Preparation of polymer free beads, incorporation of polymers in internal phase of the beads and direct compression of the beads did not give sustained release property. Whereas, incorporation of NaCMC in the external phase of the beads in matrix tablets or in combination with alginate powder in directly compressed conventional tablets could produce dosage form with sustained release property similar to reference formulation. PMID:23447074

  19. Porcine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1986-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from malignant hyperthermia swine had abnormal concentration-dependency on release modulators. Halothane stimulated half-maximal calcium-release at similar concentrations for malignant hyperthermia and control sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.10 +/- 0.04 mM). However, concentrations causing half-maximal calcium-release were lower for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (P less than 0.001) by an order of magnitude for Ca2+ (28.1 +/- 8.3 versus 1.23 +/- 0.45 nM), adenosine triphosphate (0.33 +/- 0.09 versus 0.023 +/- 0.014 mM) and caffeine (7.79 +/- 1.56 versus 0.80 +/- 0.44 mM). Half-maximal inhibition by Mg2+ occurred at threefold higher concentrations for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.23 +/- 0.02 versus 0.78 +/- 0.17 mM). The Ca2+-sensitivity curves for calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from heterozygotes for the malignant hyperthermia-defect were indistinguishable from the averages of the curves for controls and malignant hyperthermia-homozygotes. Results of this study suggest that malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism which is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed using calcium-release sensitivity-tests on isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3742367

  20. Calcium Release-Activated Calcium (CRAC) Channels Mediate the β2-Adrenergic Regulation of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael J.; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Scott Budinger, G.R.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2014-01-01

    β2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  1. pH-dependent release property of alginate beads containing calcium carbonate particles.

    PubMed

    Han, M R; Kwon, M C; Lee, H Y; Kim, J C; Kim, J D; Yoo, S K; Sin, I S; Kim, S M

    2007-12-01

    Alginate bead containing calcium carbonate particle were prepared by dropping the suspension of alginate/calcium carbonate (4/1, w/w) into aqueous solution of CaCl(2) (0.1 M). The pH-dependent release property of the bead was observed for 12 h using blue dextran as a model drug. The release increased up to 4 h in a saturation manner. When no calcium carbonate was contained, the release exhibited no marked variation with pH and the values were 27-39%. On the other hand, in case calcium carbonate was included in the matrix of alginate beads, intensive release(40-50%) was achieved in acidic and neutral conditions and the degrees of release were suppressed in alkali conditions and the values were approximately 20%. The pH-sensitive release property is possibly because the particles of calcium carbonate embedded in the matrix of beads were leached out in acidic and neutral conditions, leaving cavities in the matrix. The cavities are likely to be main pathways for the release of blue dextran.

  2. Arachidonic acid stimulates /sup 45/calcium efflux and HPL release in isolated trophoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.; Murphy, E.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-01-13

    Previous investigations from this laboratory have indicated that arachidonic acid stimulates a rapid, dose-dependent and reversible increase in hPL release which is not dependent on cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase metabolism. To investigate further the mechanism by which arachidonic acid stimulates the release of hPL, the effect of arachidonic acid on the release of /sup 45/Ca from perifused cells prelabelled with /sup 45/Ca was examined in an enriched cell culture population of term human syncytiotrophoblast. Arachidonic acid (10-100 ..mu..M) stimulated a dose-dependent, rapid, and reversible increase in the release of both /sup 45/Ca and hPL from the perifused placental cells. On the other hand, palmitic acid had little effect on either hPL release or /sup 45/Ca release even at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. Ionophore A23187 (1-10..mu..M) also stimulated a dose-dependent and reversible increase in hPL release. Since arachidonic acid increases the mobilization of cellular calcium, as reflected by the increased /sup 45/calcium efflux, and since an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration appears to stimulate an increase in hPL release, these results suggest that the stimulation of hPL release by arachidonic acid may be due, at least in part, to the effects of the fatty acid on cellular calcium mobilization. 26 references, 5 figures.

  3. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  4. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials. PMID:25492196

  5. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials.

  6. Reticular chemistry for clean energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghi, Omar

    2009-03-01

    Linking molecular building blocks by strong bonds to make networks (Reticular Chemistry) has yielded a number of new classes of materials such as metal-organic frameworks, zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. These are new classes of porous materials in which inorganic 'joints' are linked by organic 'struts' to give extended structures with surface areas greater than 5000 m2/g. Their ultra-high surface area is useful in storing hydrogen and natural gas, and for capturing carbon dioxide. Recently we have shown that MOFs can be quite effective as air purification and capture of harmful gases. This presentation will highlight the milestones and future prospects of this new field

  7. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Weiss, James N.; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR) open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs). We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR). In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers’ escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is modulated

  8. Transient calcium release induced by successive increments of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, T; Stryer, L

    1990-01-01

    Many hormonal, neurotransmitter, and sensory stimuli trigger the formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, which in turn releases calcium from intracellular stores. We report here that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from saponin-permeabilized rat basophilic leukemia cells at 37 degrees C is markedly biphasic, in contrast with nearly monophasic release kinetics at 11 degrees C. Hepatoma, PC-12 neuronal cells, and several other cell types exhibit similar biphasic release at 37 degrees C. The biphasic kinetics are not due to degradation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate or to increased Ca2(+)-ATPase pump activity. Biphasic calcium release was also seen when ATP was quenched to less than 0.4 microM by adding hexokinase and glucose, suggesting that phosphorylation is not involved. External calcium (100 nM-600 nM) range had little influence on the biphasic kinetics. Rapid-mixing experiments revealed that rapid efflux of calcium is followed in approximately 0.5 s by a 30-fold slower efflux. Most striking, successive additions of the same amount of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate induced short bursts of calcium release of similar size. This retention of responsiveness, which we term increment detection, may be a distinct mode of signal transduction. Like inactivation and adaptation, increment detection gives rise to transient responses to sustained stimuli. Systems exhibiting inactivation, adaptation, and increment detection differ in their responsiveness (none, partial, and full, respectively) to stepwise increases in stimulus intensity. Increment detection could be advantageous in generating receptor-triggered calcium oscillations. Images PMID:2339124

  9. Maitotoxin: Effects on calcium channels, phosphoinositide breakdown, and arachidonate release in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, O.H.; Padgett, W.L.; Nishizawa, Y.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Maitotoxin (MTX) increases formation of (3H)inositol phosphates from phosphoinositides and release of (3H)arachidonic acid from phospholipids in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Formation of (3H)inositol phosphates is detected within 1 min of incubation even with concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml (90 pm) MTX, whereas release of (3H)arachidonic acid is not detected until 20 min even with concentrations as high as 1 ng/ml (300 pm) MTX. Stimulation of arachidonic acid release can be detected at 0.03 ng/ml (9 pm) MTX, whereas 0.1 ng/ml (30 pm) MTX is the threshold for detection of phosphoinositide breakdown. Organic and inorganic calcium channel blockers, except Cd2+ and a high concentration of Mn2+, have no effect on MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown, whereas inorganic blockers (e.g., Co2+, Mn2+, Cd2+), but not organic blockers (nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem), inhibit MTX-stimulated arachidonic acid release. All calcium channel blockers, however, inhibited MTX-elicited influx of 45Ca2+ and the MTX-elicited increase in internal Ca2+ measured with fura-2 was markedly reduced by nifedipine. MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and arachidonic acid release are abolished or reduced, respectively, in the absence of extracellular calcium plus chelating agent. The calcium ionophore A23187 has little or no effect alone but, in combination with MTX, A23187 inhibits MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and enhances arachidonic acid release, the latter even in the absence of extracellular calcium. The results suggest that different sites and/or mechanisms are involved in stimulation of calcium influx, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and release of arachidonic acid by MTX.

  10. [Intracellular calcium redistribution in the thrombocytes during aggregation and release reaction].

    PubMed

    Pozin, E Ia; Popov, E G; Gabbasov, Z A; Radin, A Iu; Markosian, R A

    1981-01-01

    With the aid of an original installation there was simultaneously measured aggregation, reaction of release of adenine nucleotides, and redistribution of calcium (by fluorescence of calcium-sensitive probe of chlortetracyclin) in one sample of the suspension of washed platelets of rabbit. For the first time there was found an increase in the intensity of fluorescence in the presence of ADP-induced aggregation which continued long after the platelets desaggregation. The obtained results suggest that this increase indicating the redistribution of calcium ions in cells, is associated with the refractory state of the platelets.

  11. The release rate of curcumin from calcium alginate beads regulated by food emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Song, Shili; Wang, Zhen; Qian, Yuhua; Zhang, Lijie; Luo, Erfeng

    2012-05-01

    Curcumin-loaded alginate beads, which contain different food emulsifiers, have been prepared using CaCl₂ as the cross-linking agent. The controlled release of the curcumin from the beads was investigated at room temperature. For calcium alginate/Span-80/Tween-80 (A/S/T) formulations, almost all of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released into the medium within about 20 h, and the release rates could be regulated by changing the concentration of both Tween-80 and Span-80. However, for the systems of calcium alginate/Q-12A/F-18A (A/Q/F), about 60% of the curcumin loaded in the beads was released at the end of experiments. The studies of scanning electron microscopy indicated that the microstructure of the walls of beads could significantly vary with the concentration or type of emulsifiers. The Fourier transform infrared spectral measurements confirmed that the interactions between calcium alginate and polyglycerol fatty acid esters were stronger than that between calcium alginate and Tween-80/Span-80. The results of swelling studies demonstrated that the initial rates of water uptake for A/Q/F beads were higher than that for A/S/T beads. Moreover, the data of release rates were fitted by an empirical equation, which showed that the release mechanism of curcumin from the alginate gels varied with the composition of emulsifiers for the A/S/T systems. This work provides an important insight into the effect of food emulsifiers on the release rates of the curcumin from calcium alginate beads and will be helpful for the application of the systems in controlled release of other hydrophobic drug.

  12. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  13. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  14. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Rüdiger, Sten; Erban, Radek

    2013-04-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)], 10.1098/rsif.2011.0574 in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with

  15. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, José A G; Sanchez-Andrés, Juan V; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat

    1999-01-01

    The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 μm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50% inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic β-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) ‘primed’ vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) ‘reserved pool’ vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase. PMID:10523416

  16. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  17. Suppression of store overload-induced calcium release by hydroxylated metabolites of carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Malig, Thomas; Xiao, Zhichao; Chen, S R Wayne; Back, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Carvedilol is a drug widely used in the treatment of heart failure and associated cardiac arrhythmias. A unique action of carvedilol is its suppression of store overload-induced calcium release (SOICR) through the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), which can trigger ventricular arrhythmias. Since the effects of carvedilol metabolites on SOICR have not yet been investigated, three carvedilol metabolites hydroxylated at the 3-, 4' and 5'-positions were synthesized and assayed for SOICR inhibition in mutant HEK 293 cells expressing the RyR2 mutant R4496C. This cell line is especially prone to SOICR and calcium release through the defective RyR2 channel was measured with a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye. These results revealed that the 3- and 4'-hydroxy derivatives are slightly more effective than carvedilol in suppressing SOICR, while the 5'-analog proved slightly less active. Metabolic deactivation of carvedilol via these hydroxylation pathways is therefore insignificant.

  18. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  19. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  20. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  1. [The kinetic parameters of retainment and release of deposited in human tissue structures calcium].

    PubMed

    Ermakova, I P; Potanina, T V; Pronchenko, I A; Larina, I M; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of retainment and release kinetics of deposited in tissue structures calcium was made in the hypercalcemic conditions in 28 healthy volunteers (22 males and 6 females) of the age of 33 ± 6.5 years via drip infusion (Groups 1, 2) and in 9 individuals (3 males and 6 females) in 12 trials via stream infusion (Group 3). By the end of each hour after the termination of calcium infusion the amount of calcium retained in tissues was calculated (Mtis./kg); the parameters of its binding (specific buffer volume--β3 sp, association constant--Ka, number of binding centers--n) were established using the Langmuir and Scetchard coordinates. The Group 1 volunteers (n = = 12) showed a section of positive cooperativity (a direct regression on Sketchard coordinates, Hill coefficient 3.36 ± 1.63) and 2 sections of the consecutive calcium separation from one set of noninteracting centers. 5 volunteers of Group 2 and 8 volunteers of Group 3 demonstrated a slight calcium delivery to tissues after 1 hour of observation which then followed for 2 volunteers of Group 2 and for 2 volunteers of Group 3. Other volunteers of Groups 2 and 3 showed a release of tissue-deposited calcium via the mechanism of the consecutive separation from one set of noninteracting centers with βsp 3 times less and Ka 7 times higher than with the calcium infusion. The excretion of calcium in urine was the highest in Group 1 and the lowest in Group 3. The [Ca2+] and Mtis./kg values were normalized in Groups 1 and 2 the next morning and in Group 3 after 2-3 hours of observation. An assumption was made about the relationship between the tissue and kidney [Ca2+] normalizing mechanisms with hypercalcemia.

  2. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  3. Calcium release from milk concentrated by ultrafiltration and diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Corredig, M

    2014-09-01

    The present work studied the solubilization of Ca during acidification in milk concentrated by ultrafiltration (UF) and diafiltration (DF). The effect of heating milk at 80°C for 15min was also evaluated. In addition to measuring buffering capacity, the amount of Ca released as a function of pH was determined. The area of the maximum peak in buffering capacity observed at pH ~5.1, related to the presence of colloidal Ca phosphate, was significantly affected by casein volume fraction but did not increase proportionally with casein concentration. In addition, a lower buffering capacity and less solubilized Ca were measured in 2× DF milk compared with 2× UF milk. Heat treatment did not change the buffering capacity or Ca release in 1× and 2× concentrated milk. On the other hand, at a higher volume fraction (4×), more Ca was present in the soluble phase in heated 4× UF and DF milk compared with unheated milk. This is the first comprehensive study on the effect of concentration, distinguishing the effect of UF from that of DF, before and after heating, on Ca solubilization. PMID:25022683

  4. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  5. ATP released by electrical stimuli elicits calcium transients and gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-12-11

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, with an EC(50) value of 7.8 +/- 3.1 microm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 mum suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y(2) receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 mum ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca(2+) homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  6. Modelling the coupling between intracellular calcium release and the cell cycle during cortical brain development.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2014-04-21

    Most neocortical neurons formed during embryonic brain development arise from radial glial cells which communicate, in part, via ATP mediated calcium signals. Although the intercellular signalling mechanisms that regulate radial glia proliferation are not well understood, it has recently been demonstrated that ATP dependent intracellular calcium release leads to an increase of nearly 100% in overall cellular proliferation. It has been hypothesised that cytoplasmic calcium accelerates entry into S phase of the cell cycle and/or acts to recruit otherwise quiescent cells onto the cell cycle. In this paper we study this cell cycle acceleration and recruitment by forming a differential equation model for ATP mediated calcium-cell cycle coupling via Cyclin D in a single radial glial cell. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations suggest that the cell cycle period depends only weakly on cytoplasmic calcium. Therefore, the accelerative impact of calcium on the cell cycle can only account for a small fraction of the large increase in proliferation observed experimentally. Crucially however, our bifurcation analysis reveals that stable fixed point and stable limit cycle solutions can coexist, and that calcium dependent Cyclin D dynamics extend the oscillatory region to lower Cyclin D synthesis rates, thus rendering cells more susceptible to cycling. This supports the hypothesis that cycling glial cells recruit quiescent cells (in G0 phase) onto the cell cycle, via a calcium signalling mechanism, and that this may be the primary means by which calcium augments proliferation rates at the population scale. Numerical simulations of two coupled cells demonstrate that such a scenario is indeed feasible.

  7. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  8. Synergistic effect of calcium and bicarbonate in enhancing arsenate release from ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, Samantha L.; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2010-09-01

    Many groundwater systems contain anomalously high arsenic concentrations, associated with less than expected retention of As by adsorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Although carbonates are ubiquitous in aquifers, their relationship to arsenate mobilization is not well characterized. This research examines arsenate release from poorly crystalline iron hydroxides in abiotic systems containing calcium and magnesium with bicarbonate under conditions of static and dynamic flow (pH 7.5-8). Aqueous arsenic levels remained low when arsenate-bearing ferrihydrite was equilibrated with artificial groundwater solution containing Ca, Mg, and HCO 3-. In batch titrations in which a solution of Ca and HCO 3- was added repeatedly, the ferrihydrite surface became saturated with adsorbed Ca and HCO 3-, and aqueous As levels increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In columns containing Ca or Mg and HCO 3-, As solubility initially mimicked titrations, but then rapidly increased by an additional order of magnitude (reaching 12 μM As). Separately, calcium chloride and other simple salts did not induce As release, although sodium bicarbonate and lactate facilitated minor As release under flow. Results indicate that adsorption of calcium or magnesium with bicarbonate leads to As desorption from ferrihydrite, to a degree greater than expected from competitive effects alone, especially under dynamic flow. This desorption may be an important mechanism of As mobilization in As-impacted, circumneutral aquifers, especially those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, which induces calcite dissolution and the production of dissolved calcium and bicarbonate.

  9. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  10. Angiogenesis in calcium phosphate scaffolds by inorganic copper ion release.

    PubMed

    Barralet, Jake; Gbureck, Uwe; Habibovic, Pamela; Vorndran, Elke; Gerard, Catherine; Doillon, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Angiogenesis in a tissue-engineered device may be induced by incorporating growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]), genetically modified cells, and=or vascular cells. It represents an important process during the formation and repair of tissue and is essential for nourishment and supply of reparative and immunological cells. Inorganic angiogenic factors, such as copper ions, are therefore of interest in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering due to their low cost, higher stability, and potentially greater safety compared with recombinant proteins or genetic engineering approaches. The purpose of this study was to compare tissue responses to 3D printed macroporous bioceramic scaffolds implanted in mice that had been loaded with either VEGF or copper sulfate. These factors were spatially localized at the end of a single macropore some 7 mm from the surface of the scaffold. Controls without angiogenic factors exhibited only poor tissue growth within the blocks; in contrast, low doses of copper sulfate led to the formation of microvessels oriented along the macropore axis. Further, wound tissue ingrowth was particularly sensitive to the quantity of copper sulfate and was enhanced at specific concentrations or in combination with VEGF. The potential to accelerate and guide angiogenesis and wound healing by copper ion release without the expense of inductive protein(s) is highly attractive in the area of tissue-engineered bone and offers significant future potential in the field of regenerative biomaterials. PMID:19182977

  11. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  13. Solution combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate particles for controlled release of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Junjie; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Feifei; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Hongbin; Chen, JianHua; Wang, XuHong; Yu, Wencong

    2015-05-01

    Four different phase compositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles were prepared via a solution combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis results revealed that the variations in the nominal Ca/P (molar) ratios were found to provide a favorable control in the different proportions of CaP materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behavior. The release profile indicated that the BSA release rates depended on the phase compositions of the CaP particles, and showed an order of TCP-BSA>BCP-1-BSA>BCP-2-BSA>HA-BSA. The results suggested that the BSA protein release rate can be controlled by varying the phase compositions of CaP carriers. Moreover, the release process involved two stages: firstly surface diffusion via ion exchange and secondly intraparticle diffusion.

  14. Calcium released by photolysis of DM-nitrophen stimulates transmitter release at squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, K R; Zucker, R S

    1990-01-01

    1. Transmitter release at the squid giant synapse was stimulated by photolytic release of Ca2+ from the 'caged' Ca2+ compound DM-nitrophen (Kaplan & Ellis-Davies, 1988) inserted into presynaptic terminals. 2. Competing binding reactions cause the amount of Ca2+ released by DM-nitrophen photolysis to depend on the concentrations of DM-nitrophen, total Ca2+, Mg+, ATP and native cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffer. Measurements of presynaptic [Ca2+] changes by co-injection of the fluorescent indicator dye Fura-2 show that DM-nitrophen photolysis causes a transient rise in Ca2+ followed by decay within about 150 ms to an increased steady-state level. 3. Rapid photolysis of Ca2(+)-loaded nitrophen within the presynaptic terminal was followed in less than a millisecond by depolarization of the postsynaptic membrane. As with action potential-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), the light-evoked response was partially and reversibly blocked by 1-3 mM-kainic acid which desensitizes postsynaptic glutamate receptors. 4. Release was similar in magnitude and rate to normal action potential-mediated EPSPs. 5. The release of transmitter by photolysis of Ca2(+)-loaded DM-nitrophen was not affected by removal of Ca2+ from the saline or addition of tetrodotoxin. Photolysis of DM-nitrophen injected into presynaptic terminals without added Ca2+ did not stimulate release of transmitter nor did it interfere with normal action potential-mediated release. 6. Stimulation of presynaptic action potentials in Ca2(+)-free saline during the light-evoked response did not elicit increased release of transmitter if the ganglion was bathed in Ca2(+)-free saline, i.e. in the absence of Ca2+ influx. Increasing the intensity of the light or stimulating presynaptic action potentials in Ca2(+)-containing saline increased the release of transmitter. Therefore the failure of presynaptic voltage change to increase transmitter release resulting from release of caged Ca2+ was not due to saturation or

  15. Increased Asynchronous Release and Aberrant Calcium Channel Activation in Amyloid Precursor Protein Deficient Neuromuscular Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Baiping; Long, Cheng; Wu, Gangyi; Zheng, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca2+ channel function. PMID:17919826

  16. Effect of soft drinks on the release of calcium from enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Surarit, Rudee

    2013-09-01

    Continuous consumption of soft drinks is the main cause of potential oral health problems, including dental caries and erosion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different types of soft drinks on the release of calcium from the enamel surface of teeth. Forty bovine teeth were selected for the experiment. They were divided into four groups (n=10/group): Group 1 (Coke), Group 2 (Pepsi), Group 3 (Sprite), and Group 4 (distilled water, the control). The pH of each beverage was measured using a pH meter. The release of calcium ions was measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer at baseline, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results were assessed by analysis of variance and then by the Tukey test (p< 0.05). Coke, with a pH of 2.39, was the most acidic among the soft drinks. Coke, Pepsi, and Sprite showed no significant mean differences in the calcium released, but there was a significant mean difference of these soft drinks with distilled water at 60 minutes. We concluded that prolonged exposure to soft drinks could lead to significant enamel loss.

  17. Effect of soft drinks on the release of calcium from enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Surarit, Rudee

    2013-09-01

    Continuous consumption of soft drinks is the main cause of potential oral health problems, including dental caries and erosion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different types of soft drinks on the release of calcium from the enamel surface of teeth. Forty bovine teeth were selected for the experiment. They were divided into four groups (n=10/group): Group 1 (Coke), Group 2 (Pepsi), Group 3 (Sprite), and Group 4 (distilled water, the control). The pH of each beverage was measured using a pH meter. The release of calcium ions was measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer at baseline, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results were assessed by analysis of variance and then by the Tukey test (p< 0.05). Coke, with a pH of 2.39, was the most acidic among the soft drinks. Coke, Pepsi, and Sprite showed no significant mean differences in the calcium released, but there was a significant mean difference of these soft drinks with distilled water at 60 minutes. We concluded that prolonged exposure to soft drinks could lead to significant enamel loss. PMID:24437328

  18. Releasing phosphorus from calcium for struvite fertilizer production from anaerobically digested dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianxi; Bowers, Keith E; Harrison, Joseph H; Chen, Shulin

    2010-01-01

    Being a non-renewable resource and a source of potential water pollution, phosphorus could be recovered from animal manure in the form of struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) to be used as a slow-release fertilizer. It was found recently that the majority of phosphorus in anaerobically digested dairy effluent is tied up in a fine suspended calcium-phosphate solid, thus becoming unavailable for struvite formation. Acidification and use of a chelating agent were investigated for converting the calcium-associated phosphorus in the digested effluent to dissolved phosphate ions, so that struvite can be produced. The results demonstrated that the phosphorus in the effluent was released into the solution by lowering the pH. In addition, the phosphorus concentration in the solution increased significantly with increased ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) concentration, as EDTA has a high stability constant with calcium. Most of the phosphorus (91%) was released into the solution after adding EDTA. Further, the freed phosphorus ion precipitated out as struvite provided that sufficient magnesium ions (Mg2+) were present in the solution. Furthermore, the phase structure of the solid precipitate obtained from the EDTA treatment matched well with standard struvite, based on the data from X-ray diffraction analysis. These results provide methods for altering the forms of phosphorus for the design and application of phosphorus-removal technologies for dairy wastewater management. PMID:20112536

  19. Controlled release based on the dissolution of a calcium carbonate layer deposited on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ogomi, Daisuke; Serizawa, Takeshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-03-21

    It is possible that inorganic materials conjugated to suitable organic materials may induce unique mechanical, optical and other functional properties. Therefore, artificial conjugation of organic and inorganic components is attractive for preparing novel functional materials. Recently, we developed an alternate soaking process for calcium salt formation on/in polymer materials. In this study, a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel-calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) composite was prepared by the aforementioned process as a controlled release support. Brilliant blue FCF (Mw = 794), FITC labeled BSA (Mw = 6.6 x 10(4)), FITC labeled dextran-10 k (Mw = 9.5 x 10(3)) and FITC labeled dextran-40 k (Mw = 4.3 x 10(4)) were loaded into the composite as model drugs. CaCO(3) dissolution and model drug release rates increased with a decrease in buffer pH. In addition, model drug release rates increased with a decrease in model drug molecular weight. These results show that CaCO(3) layers on hydrogels behave as capping layers for model drug release; the release rate of model drugs can be controlled by the dissolution rate of CaCO(3) and the molecular weight of the drug.

  20. Effect of calcium ions on the gelling and drug release characteristics of xanthan matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sasa; Pavli, Matej; Kristl, Julijana

    2008-06-01

    Xanthan is a well-known biopolymer. It is an anionic polysaccharide, whose primary structure depends on the bacterial strain and fermentation conditions. Xanthan was extensively studied in combination with galactomannans, and over 90 patents cover the technology of this preparation. Our aim was to investigate the relation between the physical properties of a xanthan matrix in the absence or presence of calcium ions and its influence on the release of pentoxifylline. The release of pentoxifylline from xanthan tablets in purified water was shown to be very slow and governed by the process of polymer relaxation. The presence of calcium ions significantly increased the drug release, changing the release mechanism into a more diffusion controlled one. Xanthan matrices showed substantially faster and more extensive swelling in water than in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Surprisingly, negative correlation between drug release and degree of swelling was obtained for xanthan: the higher the swelling, the slower the drug release. Higher ionic strength led to lower erosion of xanthan tablets, and the gel layers formed were more rigid and of firmer texture, as shown by rheological experiments and textural profiling. The results indicate that the presence of Ca2+ ions in the solution or in matrices does not cause crosslinking of xanthan polymers, but causes charge screening of ionized groups on the trisaccharide side chains of xanthan, leading to lower inter-molecular repulsion and changing water arrangement. The understanding of the parameters influencing drug release leads to the conclusion that xanthan is suitable for controlled release formulations, especially with the incorporation of certain small counterions. PMID:18248802

  1. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30(-/-) mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca(2+)]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30(-/-) CCDs ([Ca(2+)]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca(2+)]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30(-/-) mice. The [Ca(2+)]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption. PMID:24137132

  2. Hollow silica nanospheres coated with insoluble calcium salts for pH-responsive sustained release of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuming; Fang, Qilong; Li, Han; Shi, Weike; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Jing; Jia, Weili; Yang, Lin

    2016-08-23

    Hollow silica nanospheres coated with biocompatible and pH-sensitive inorganic insoluble calcium salts including calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite have been successfully prepared. The results indicate that the nanospheres can efficiently load doxorubicin and release it in a pH-responsive and sustained manner, and improve the treatment efficacy significantly. PMID:27501741

  3. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J Carlos; Wacha, András; Gomes, Pedro S; Alves, Luís C; Fernandes, M Helena Vaz; Salvado, Isabel M Miranda; Fernandes, M Helena R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS-SiO2 have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS-SiO2-CaO-SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO2. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol-gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity. PMID:26952443

  4. Calcium influx and release mechanism(s) in histamine-induced myometrial contraction in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhury, Soumen; Nakade, Udayraj P; Yadav, Rajkumar Singh; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the presence of histamine H1R using molecular biology tools and unravel the influx and release mechanism(s) involved in calcium signalling cascades in histamine-induced myometrial contraction in buffaloes. The presence of H1R mRNA transcript and immunoreactive membrane protein in buffalo myometrium was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Further, histamine produced concentration-dependent (1nM-10μM) contraction in buffalo myometrium with a potency of 7.13±0.11. When myometrial strips were pre-incubated either with Ca(2+) free solution or with nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, dose response curve (DRC) of histamine was significantly (P<0.05) shifted towards right with decline in maximal contraction (Emax). Reduction in Emax of histamine in the presence of nifedipine (55.75±3.10%) was significantly (P<0.001) greater than that in the presence of ruthenium red (93.61±3.43%), a blocker of IP3-gated and RyR-sensitive Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, histamine produced only 26.87±1.99% of the maximum contraction in the presence of both nifedipine and CPA (blocker of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase). Interestingly, following concurrent exposure to U-73122 (a PL-C inhibitor) and nifedipine, the DRC of histamine was significantly (P<0.05) shifted towards left with increase in maximal contraction (126.30±3.36%). Our findings in buffalo uterus thus suggest that influx of extracellular calcium plays a major role in histamine-induced myometrial contraction, while release of intracellular calcium through calcium-release channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum has a minor role. A possible involvement of non-selective cation channels in histamine-induced myometrial contraction cannot be ruled out, and therefore requires further investigations. PMID:24631173

  5. Calcium influx and release mechanism(s) in histamine-induced myometrial contraction in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhury, Soumen; Nakade, Udayraj P; Yadav, Rajkumar Singh; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the presence of histamine H1R using molecular biology tools and unravel the influx and release mechanism(s) involved in calcium signalling cascades in histamine-induced myometrial contraction in buffaloes. The presence of H1R mRNA transcript and immunoreactive membrane protein in buffalo myometrium was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Further, histamine produced concentration-dependent (1nM-10μM) contraction in buffalo myometrium with a potency of 7.13±0.11. When myometrial strips were pre-incubated either with Ca(2+) free solution or with nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, dose response curve (DRC) of histamine was significantly (P<0.05) shifted towards right with decline in maximal contraction (Emax). Reduction in Emax of histamine in the presence of nifedipine (55.75±3.10%) was significantly (P<0.001) greater than that in the presence of ruthenium red (93.61±3.43%), a blocker of IP3-gated and RyR-sensitive Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, histamine produced only 26.87±1.99% of the maximum contraction in the presence of both nifedipine and CPA (blocker of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase). Interestingly, following concurrent exposure to U-73122 (a PL-C inhibitor) and nifedipine, the DRC of histamine was significantly (P<0.05) shifted towards left with increase in maximal contraction (126.30±3.36%). Our findings in buffalo uterus thus suggest that influx of extracellular calcium plays a major role in histamine-induced myometrial contraction, while release of intracellular calcium through calcium-release channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum has a minor role. A possible involvement of non-selective cation channels in histamine-induced myometrial contraction cannot be ruled out, and therefore requires further investigations.

  6. Effect of drug solubility on release behavior of calcium polysaccharide gel-coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Kennedy, Ross A

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of drug solubility on the release behavior from calcium polysaccharide gel (CaPG)-coated pellets. Three different drugs with similar chemical structure, but different water solubility, namely caffeine (CAF), theophylline (TPL) and theobromine (TBR), were used. Drug-loaded spherical pellets were manufactured by an extrusion-spheronization method. The CaPG was applied on the pellets loaded with different drugs by interfacial complexation coating. The encapsulation efficiency of coated pellets was found to vary from 57.6 to 84.3%, depending on the solubility of the active drug and polysaccharide type. Drug release from different uncoated pellets was relatively unaffected by pH and release media but depended mainly on drug solubility. Release behavior was significantly modified in the pellets coated with CaPG, for all of the drugs tested. Drug release from coated pellets of the different drugs showed different release kinetics. The difference in the drug release is probably due to the difference in the drug dissolution within the core, before its partition and diffusion through the CaPG coat. The CAF dissolved faster and achieved a higher concentration in solution, which drove diffusion. The release of TBR from the coated pellets was much slower than that of the CAF or TPL because of its low solubility. However, the release of all drugs was about four- to sixfold slower for coated than uncoated pellets, suggesting that the coating influenced the retardation of drug release from the coated pellets. Therefore, the CaPG coating may provide a sustained release delivery system for all drugs tested.

  7. Synaptic structural complexity as a factor enhancing probability of calcium-mediated transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Winslow, J L; Govind, C K; Atwood, H L

    1996-06-01

    1. In a model synaptic system, the excitatory neuromuscular junction of the freshwater crayfish, the nerve terminals possess synapses that vary in structural complexity, with numbers of active zones ranging from zero to five. Active zones on individual synapses show a wide range of separation distances. We tested the hypothesis that two active zones of a single synapse in close proximity can enhance the localized increase in free calcium ion concentration, thus enhancing the probability of neurotransmission at that synapse. We evaluated the increase in calcium ion concentration as a function of distance between adjacent active zones. 2. To test this hypothesis, a reaction-diffusion model for Ca2+ entering the presynaptic terminals was used. This test was used because 1) present measurement techniques are inadequate to resolve quantitatively the highly localized, transient calcium microdomains at synaptic active zones; and 2) there is presently no suitable preparation for physiological recording from isolated synapses with varying distances between active zones. Included in the model were intracellular buffer and a typical distribution of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels for an active zone, estimated from freeze-fracture micrographs. 3. The model indicated that localized Ca2+ clouds from discrete active zones can overlap to create spatial enhancement of Ca2+ concentration. The degree of interaction between two active zones depends on the distance between them. When two typical active zones are separated by < or = 200 nm, the maximum intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) is greater at 1) the midpoint between them, and 2) the center of each one, than at the corresponding positions for a single isolated active zone. Enhanced [Ca2+]i at the edge of the active zone where "docked" synaptic vesicles occur would be expected to have an effect on transmitter release. 4. When the model includes no intracellular buffer, the increase in [Ca2+]i is a linear function of

  8. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a “leaky” RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25844899

  9. Diffusion characteristics and controlled release of bacterial fertilizers from modified calcium alginate capsules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Jane-Yii; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2008-04-01

    An indigenous Cellulosimicrobium cellulans GS6 isolate able to solubilize insoluble phosphate complexes in soil is a potential bacterial fertilizer. Enclosure of the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) in biodegradable capsules may protect the PSB cells inoculated into soil and, in the meantime, enable the control of cell release that confers long-term fertilizing effects. In this study, calcium alginate (CA) was used as the core matrix to encapsulate cells of C. cellulans GS6. The cell-liberating properties of the CA-based capsules were modified by blending with a variety of supplemental materials (SM), including chitin, cellulose, olive oil, and gelatin. The experimental results showed that the maximum cell-release percentage (MCR%) of the capsules decreased in the order of CA-cellulose>CA-olive oil>CA-chitin>CA-gelatin>CA. Furthermore, a mass transport model was developed to accurately describe the kinetics of cell release results for each capsule. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of each capsule was also determined from the model simulation. We found that the estimated D(e) values are positively correlated to the release rate with rare exceptions. Lastly, as our results underscored the crucial roles that the type of capsules plays in the rate and amount of cell release, controlled release of the bacterial fertilizer (C. cellulans GS6 cells) may be achieved via the design of capsule materials.

  10. Ethyl Pyruvate Inhibits HMGB1 Phosphorylation and Release by Chelating Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Il-Doo; Kim, Seung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Jin, Yinchuan; Park, Ju-Hun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Suh, Chang-Kook; Kwak, Jiyeon; Lee, Keun-Hyeung; Han, Pyung-Lim; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester of pyruvic acid, has been shown to have antiinflammatory effects and to confer protective effects in various pathological conditions. Recently, a number of studies have reported EP inhibits high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) secretion and suggest this might contribute to its antiinflammatory effect. Since EP is used in a calcium-containing balanced salt solution (Ringer solution), we wondered if EP directly chelates Ca2+ and if it is related to the EP-mediated suppression of HMGB1 release. Calcium imaging assays revealed that EP significantly and dose-dependently suppressed high K+-induced transient [Ca2+]i surges in primary cortical neurons and, similarly, fluorometric assays showed that EP directly scavenges Ca2+ as the peak of fluorescence emission intensities of Mag-Fura-2 (a low-affinity Ca2+ indicator) was shifted in the presence of EP at concentrations of ≥7 mmol/L. Furthermore, EP markedly suppressed the A23187-induced intracellular Ca2+ surge in BV2 cells and, under this condition, A23187-induced activations of Ca2+-mediated kinases (protein kinase Cα and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV), HMGB1 phosphorylation and subsequent secretion of HMGB1 also were suppressed. (A23187 is a calcium ionophore and BV2 cells are a microglia cell line.) Moreover, the above-mentioned EP-mediated effects were obtained independent of cell death or survival, which suggests that they are direct effects of EP. Together, these results indicate that EP directly chelates Ca2+, and that it is, at least in part, responsible for the suppression of HMGB1 release by EP. PMID:25333921

  11. Calmodulin modulates the delay period between release of calcium from internal stores and activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Luis; Sampieri, Alicia

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we have explored the role of calmodulin (CaM) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) in the communication process activated after the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the activation of calcium influx via endogenous TRP1 channels from Chinese hamster ovary cells. Experiments using combined rapid confocal calcium and electrophysiology measurements uncovered a consistent delay of around 900 ms between the first detectable calcium released from the ER and the activation of the calcium current. This delay was evident with two different methods used to release calcium from the ER: either the blockade of the microsomal calcium ATPase with thapsigargin or activation of bradykinin receptors linked to the IP(3) cascade. Direct application of IP(3) or a peptide from the NH(2)-terminal region of the IP(3)R activated store operated calcium, reducing the delay period. Introduction of CaM into the cell via the patch pipette increased the delay period from 900 +/- 100 ms to 10 +/- 2.1 s (n = 18). Furthermore, the use of selective CaM antagonists W7 and trifluoperazine maleate resulted in a substantial reduction of the delay period to 200 +/- 100 ms with 5 microm trifluoperazine maleate (n = 16) and 150 +/- 50 ms with 500 nm W7 (n = 22). CaM reduced also the current density activated by thapsigargin or brandykinin to about 60% from control. The CaM antagonists did not affect significantly the current density. The results presented here are consistent with an antagonistic effect of IP(3)R and CaM for the activation of store operated calcium after depletion of the ER. The functional competition between the activating effect of IP(3)R and the inhibiting effect of CaM may modulate the delay period between the release of calcium from the ER and the activation of calcium influx observed in different cells, as well as the amount of current activated after depletion of the ER.

  12. Inhibitors of calcium buffering depress evoked transmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D J; Takeda, K; Umbach, J A

    1985-01-01

    Evoked release of transmitter at the squid giant synapse was examined under conditions where the calcium ion concentration in the presynaptic terminal was manipulated by inhibitors of calcium sequestration. Simultaneous intracellular recordings of presynaptic and post-synaptic resting and action potentials were made during bath application of one of the following metabolic inhibitors: sodium cyanide (NaCN), carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP); ruthenium red (RuR) and sodium-free (lithium) sea water. Cyanide and lithium sea water reversibly depressed the post-synaptic potential (p.s.p.) whilst RuR and FCCP blocked the evoked post-synaptic response irreversibly. The progressive reduction of p.s.p. amplitude was accompanied by a reversible increase in synaptic delay. The time course of block of the p.s.p. was similar for different agents and dependent on the rate of presynaptic activity (30-40 min at 0.01 Hz). Recovery of the post-synaptic action potential following block by cyanide and lithium sea water was obtained within 40 min and 5 min respectively. Synaptic depression by the metabolic inhibitors does not result from changes in presynaptic resting or action potentials, nor from a change in post-synaptic receptor sensitivity. The post-synaptic response to the local ionophoresis of L-glutamate was unchanged following inhibition of evoked release of transmitter by cyanide. Injections of EGTA into presynaptic terminals poisoned by cyanide produced transient increases in p.s.p. amplitude, suggesting that cyanide is having its effect through raising intracellular calcium rather than lowering ATP. Control experiments injecting EGTA into unpoisoned nerve terminals showed no apparent effect on evoked transmitter release. PMID:2419546

  13. Development of sustained-release lipophilic calcium stearate pellets via hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Roblegg, Eva; Jäger, Evelyn; Hodzic, Aden; Koscher, Gerold; Mohr, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas; Khinast, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was the development of retarded release pellets using vegetable calcium stearate (CaSt) as a thermoplastic excipient. The matrix carrier was hot melt extruded and pelletized with a hot-strand cutter in a one step continuous process. Vegetable CaSt was extruded at temperatures between 100 and 130°C, since at these temperatures cutable extrudates with a suitable melt viscosity may be obtained. Pellets with a drug loading of 20% paracetamol released 11.54% of the drug after 8h due to the great densification of the pellets. As expected, the drug release was influenced by the pellet size and the drug loading. To increase the release rate, functional additives were necessary. Therefore, two plasticizers including glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and tributyl citrate (TBC) were investigated for plasticization efficiency and impact on the in vitro drug release. GMS increased the release rate due to the formation of pores at the surface (after dissolution) and showed no influence on the process parameters. The addition of TBC increased the drug release to a higher extent. After dissolving, the pellets exhibited pores at the surface and in the inner layer. Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) revealed no major change in crystalline peaks. The results demonstrated that (nearly) spherical CaSt pellets could be successfully prepared by hot melt extrusion using a hot-strand cutter as downstreaming system. Paracetamol did not melt during the process indicating a solid suspension. Due to the addition of plasticizers, the in vitro release rate could be tailored as desired.

  14. Influence of strontium for calcium substitution in bioactive glasses on degradation, ion release and apatite formation.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Yann C; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Jones, Julian R; Law, Robert V; Hill, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone through the formation of hydroxy-carbonate apatite in body fluids while strontium (Sr)-releasing bioactive glasses are of interest for patients suffering from osteoporosis, as Sr was shown to increase bone formation both in vitro and in vivo. A melt-derived glass series (SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-Na(2)O) with 0-100% of calcium (Ca) replaced by Sr on a molar base was prepared. pH change, ion release and apatite formation during immersion of glass powder in simulated body fluid and Tris buffer at 37°C over up to 8 h were investigated and showed that substituting Sr for Ca increased glass dissolution and ion release, an effect owing to an expansion of the glass network caused by the larger ionic radius of Sr ions compared with Ca. Sr release increased linearly with Sr substitution, and apatite formation was enhanced significantly in the fully Sr-substituted glass, which allowed for enhanced osteoblast attachment as well as proliferation and control of osteoblast and osteoclast activity as shown previously. Studying the composition-structure-property relationship in bioactive glasses enables us to successfully design next-generation biomaterials that combine the bone regenerative properties of bioactive glasses with the release of therapeutically active Sr ions. PMID:21993007

  15. Influence of strontium for calcium substitution in bioactive glasses on degradation, ion release and apatite formation

    PubMed Central

    Fredholm, Yann C.; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S.; Jones, Julian R.; Law, Robert V.; Hill, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone through the formation of hydroxy-carbonate apatite in body fluids while strontium (Sr)-releasing bioactive glasses are of interest for patients suffering from osteoporosis, as Sr was shown to increase bone formation both in vitro and in vivo. A melt-derived glass series (SiO2–P2O5–CaO–Na2O) with 0–100% of calcium (Ca) replaced by Sr on a molar base was prepared. pH change, ion release and apatite formation during immersion of glass powder in simulated body fluid and Tris buffer at 37°C over up to 8 h were investigated and showed that substituting Sr for Ca increased glass dissolution and ion release, an effect owing to an expansion of the glass network caused by the larger ionic radius of Sr ions compared with Ca. Sr release increased linearly with Sr substitution, and apatite formation was enhanced significantly in the fully Sr-substituted glass, which allowed for enhanced osteoblast attachment as well as proliferation and control of osteoblast and osteoclast activity as shown previously. Studying the composition–structure–property relationship in bioactive glasses enables us to successfully design next-generation biomaterials that combine the bone regenerative properties of bioactive glasses with the release of therapeutically active Sr ions. PMID:21993007

  16. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, unfolded protein response, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Song, Xiufang; Shi, Qiong; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-06-15

    Organisms are able to respond to environmental insult to maintain cellular homeostasis, which include the activation of a wide range of cellular adaptive responses with tightly controlled mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle responsible for protein folding and calcium storage. ER stress leads to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen. To be against or respond to this effect, cells have a comprehensive signaling system, called unfolded protein response (UPR), to restore homeostasis and normal ER function or activate the cell death program. Therefore, it is critical to understand how environmental insult regulates the ingredients of ER stress and UPR signalings. Previously, we have demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone caused oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the role of a PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ on ER stress, UPR, and calcium release. PCB29-pQ markedly increased the hallmark genes of ER stress, namely, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), GRP94, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) on both protein and mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. We also confirmed PCB29-pQ induced ER morphological defects by using transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, PCB29-pQ induced intracellular calcium accumulation and calpain activity, which were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of BAPTA-AM (Ca(2+) chelator). These results were correlated with the outcome that PCB29-pQ induces ER stress-related apoptosis through caspase family gene 12, while salubrinal and Z-ATAD-FMK (a specific inhibitor of caspase 12) partially ameliorated this effect, respectively. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) scavenged ROS formation and consequently alleviated PCB29-pQ-induced expression of ER stress-related genes. In conclusion, our result demonstrated for the first time that PCB quinone leads to ROS-dependent induction of ER stress, and UPR and calcium release in HepG2 cells, and the

  18. Incorporation of a controlled-release glass into a calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Khairoun, I; Boltong, M G; Gil, F J; Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Seijas, M M; Martínez, S

    1999-04-01

    A so-called controlled-release glass was synthesized occurring in the system CaO-Na2O-P2O5. A certain sieve fraction of this glass was incorporated in a calcium phosphate cement, of which the powder contained alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and precipitated hydroxyapatite (HA). The glass appeared to retard the cement setting slightly and it reduced considerably the compressive strength after aging in aqueous solutions which were continuously refreshed. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the samples after 5 weeks of aging showed that the glass was not dissolved but that large brushite crystals were formed. Thereby, aging in CaCl2 solutions resulted in more brushite formation than aging in NaCl solutions. The brushite crystals did not reinforce the cement. Neither was the aged glass-containing cement weaker than it was before the brushite formation right after complete setting. In conclusion, the incorporation of controlled-release glasses into a calcium phosphate cement and subsequent aging in aqueous solutions did not result in the formation of macropores in the cement structure, but that of brushite crystals. This incorporation reduced the compressive strength of the cement considerably.

  19. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  20. Calcium uptake and release by isolated cortices and microsomes from the unfertilized egg of the sea urchin strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdorf, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two subcellular fractions of the sea urchin egg were studied for their potential role in regulating the transient rise in cytosolic calcium that accompanies fertilization. Isolated cortices from unfertilized sea urchin eggs sequester calcium in an ATP dependent manner when incubated in a medium containing free calcium levels characteristic of the resting cell. This ATP dependent calcium uptake activity, measured in the presence of 5mM Na Azide to prevent mitochondrial accumulation, was increased by oxalate, and was blocked by 150 ..mu..M quercetin and 50 ..mu..M vanadate. Cortices preloaded with /sup 45/Ca in the presence of ATP dramatically increased their rate of calcium efflux upon the addition of (1) the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M), (2) trifluoperazine (200 ..mu..M), (3) concentrations of free calcium that activated cortical granule exocytosis, and (4) the calcium mobilizing agent inositol trisphosphate (IP3). This pool of calcium is most likely sequestered in the portion of the egg's endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that remains associated with the cortical region during its isolation. They have developed a method for obtaining a high yield of purified microsomal vesicles from whole eggs. This preparation also demonstrates ATP dependent calcium sequestering activity which increases in the presence of oxalate and has similar sensitivities to calcium transport inhibitors, however the isolated microsomal vesicles did not show any detectable release of calcium when exposed to IP3. Procedures originally developed for purifying calsequestrin were used to partially purify a 58,000 MW protein from the egg's microsomal vesicles.

  1. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  2. Dissolved Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates Promote Arsenate Release From Ferrihydrite in Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, S. L.; Bostick, B. C.

    2007-12-01

    Field data from water systems around the world have shown that arsenic can reach toxic concentrations in dynamic groundwater systems. This is generally in contrast to analogous static systems at circumneutral pH, where arsenic is strongly retained by sorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Our research examines the effect of calcium and magnesium carbonates on As(V) mobility. In both dynamic flow and static experiments, arsenate was pre- sorbed to poorly crystalline iron hydroxides (1-10% sorption capacity), with varying aqueous compositions including calcium, magnesium, carbonate, sulfate, lactate, and other common groundwater species (pH 7.5-8). Thus we investigated how the dissolution of common carbonate minerals, specifically CaCO3 and MgCO3, affect arsenic behavior in the context of groundwater solutions. Under static (batch) conditions, no measurable arsenic (<10 μg/L) is released into solutions containing alkaline earth metals (AEMs) and carbonates. When elevated concentrations of AEMs and carbonate are introduced by dynamic flow, however, arsenic is mobilized at up to 500 μg/L, releasing significant proportions the total arsenic present. This is only the case when both of these species are present; with other common ion pairs, little to no arsenic is released. These results indicate that arsenate adsorption is kinetically controlled under flow conditions, resulting in very different mobility relative to otherwise equivalent static systems. Furthermore, the combination of alkaline earth metals and carbonates promotes As(V) mobility in column-based systems. We propose that these phenomena indicate a combination of physical and chemical effects by which diffusion limitation becomes dominant in limiting arsenic sorption in flow systems. Many carbonate-buffered aquifers, as well as those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, could be affected by these processes of AEM-carbonate-limited sorption and increased arsenic mobility.

  3. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days.

  4. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days. PMID:27224568

  5. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements and fortified foods include gluconate, lactate, and phosphate. Calcium absorption is best when a person consumes ... also interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron and zinc, but this effect is not well ...

  7. Impaired Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Uptake and Release Promote Electromechanically and Spatially Discordant Alternans: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrical dynamics are governed by cellular-level properties, such as action potential duration (APD) restitution and intracellular calcium (Ca) handling, and tissue-level properties, including conduction velocity restitution and cell–cell coupling. Irregular dynamics at the cellular level can lead to instabilities in cardiac tissue, including alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential and/or the intracellular Ca transient. In this study, we incorporate a detailed single cell coupled map model of Ca cycling and bidirectional APD-Ca coupling into a spatially extended tissue model to investigate the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and release properties on alternans and conduction block. We find that an intermediate SR Ca uptake rate and larger SR Ca release resulted in the widest range of stimulus periods that promoted alternans. However, both reduced SR Ca uptake and release promote arrhythmogenic spatially and electromechanically discordant alternans, suggesting a complex interaction between SR Ca handling and alternans characteristics at the cellular and tissue level. PMID:27385917

  8. Sustained release of calcium hydroxide from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid microspheres for apexification.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino Isaac; Breceda-Leija, Alejandro; Méndez-González, Verónica; Chavarría-Bolaños, Daniel; Flores-Reyes, Héctor; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Komabayashi, Takashi; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury J

    2016-09-01

    Calcium hydroxide (CH) loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) might be used for apexification requiring a sustained release of Ca(2+). The aim of this study was to formulate and characterize CH-PLGA-MS. The CH-loaded MS were prepared by either oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil/in-water (W/O/W) emulsion solvent evaporation technique. MS produced by the O/W technique exhibited a larger diameter (18.63 ± 7.23 μm) than the MS produced by the W/O/W technique (15.25 ± 7.37 μm) (Mann-Whitney U test P < 0.001). The CH encapsulation efficiency (E e) and Ca(2+) release were calculated from data obtained by absorption techniques. Ca(2+) release profile was evaluated for 30 days. To know the E e, the CH-loaded MS were dissolved in 1 M NaOH to release all its content and a Ca(2+) colorimetric marker was added to this solution. The reagent marked the Ca(2+) in blue color, which was then measured by a UV-Vis system (650 nm). The percentage of E e was calculated on the basis of the theoretical loading. The E e of the O/W-produced MS was higher (24 %) than the corresponding percentage of the W/O/W-produced MS (11 %). O/W- and W/O/W-produced MS released slower and lower Ca(2+) than a control CH paste with polyethylene glycol 400 (Kruskal-Wallis test). O/W-produced MS released higher Ca(2+) than W/O/W-produced MS (statistically significant differences; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the CH-PLGA-MS were successfully formulated; the technique of formulation influenced the size, encapsulation efficiency and release profile. The MS were better sustained release system than the CH paste.

  9. Sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor from calcium-induced alginate hydrogels reinforced by heparin and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Yoon, J J; Lee, J H; Kim, S Y; Jung, H J; Kim, S J; Joh, J W; Lee, H H; Lee, D S; Lee, S K

    2004-10-01

    A possible alternative for immunosuppression is a microencapsulation technique using hydrogels, which have been utilized for cell immobilization and drug delivery systems. Angiogenesis is crucial for delivery of the metabolic products to the host tissues as well as to supply oxygen and nutrients to cells. The local delivery of angiogenic growth factors, such as VEGF and basic FGF, has been recently studied to enhance angiogenesis on peripheral tissue of graft. In this study, we evaluated sustained VEGF release with a model using hydrogels coated with chitosan and heparin in vitro. We fabricated calcium alginate gels and chitosan-coated calcium alginate gels. Heparinized chitosan-coated calcium-induced alginate hydrogel beads were prepared by soaking chitosan-coated calcium alginate gels in heparin solution. We compared the stability and VEGF release manner between three kinds of hydrogels. To compare the stability, 5 mL of each hydrogel was incubated with 20 mL PBS under the rotational culture. Compression forces were measured using a rheometer. The amount of VEGF released from the gels was measured by ELISA. The heparin-coated chitosan alginate hydrogels showed the highest surface stability among the three hydrogels. VEGF from the heparinized gel was released in sustained manner up to 10 days in vitro. Chitosan-coated alginate gels released 90% of loaded VEGF within 5 days. These results suggest that local delivery of VEGF using a heparinized hydrogel may provide a long-term supply of angiogenic growth factor that might induce new vessel formation in vivo.

  10. Maturation of calcium-dependent GABA, glycine, and glutamate release in the glycinergic MNTB-LSO pathway.

    PubMed

    Alamilla, Javier; Gillespie, Deda C

    2013-01-01

    The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is a key nucleus in high-fidelity temporal processing that underlies sound localization in the auditory brainstem. While the glycinergic principal cells of the MNTB project to all primary nuclei of the superior olive, during development the projection from MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO) is of interest because this immature inhibitory projection is known to undergo tonotopic refinement during an early postnatal period, and because during this period individual MNTB terminals in the LSO transiently release glycine GABA and glutamate. Developmental changes in calcium-dependent release are understood to be required to allow various auditory nuclei to follow high frequency activity; however, little is known about maturation of calcium-dependent release in the MNTB-LSO pathway, which has been presumed to have less stringent requirements for high-fidelity temporal following. In acute brainstem slices of rats age postnatal day 1 to 15 we recorded whole-cell responses in LSO principal neurons to electrical stimulation in the MNTB in order to measure sensitivity to external calcium, the contribution of different voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes to vesicular release, and the maturation of these measures for both GABA/glycine and glutamate transmission. Our results establish that release of glutamate at MNTB-LSO synapses is calcium-dependent. Whereas no significant developmental changes were evident for glutamate release, GABA/glycine release underwent substantial changes over the first two postnatal weeks: soon after birth L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) together mediated release, but after hearing onset P/Q-type VGCCs predominated. Blockade of P/Q-type VGCCs reduced the estimated quantal number for GABA/gly and glutamate transmission at P5-8 and the frequency of evoked miniature glycinergic events at P12-15, without apparent effects on spontaneous release of neurotransmitter

  11. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  12. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  13. Calcium channels responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release at rat cerebellar synapses.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, A; Takahashi, T

    1994-04-15

    The effects of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced transmitter release were studied in thin slices of cerebellum from neonatal rats using whole-cell patch clamp methods. Miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recorded from deep cerebellar nuclear neurones in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The frequency of mIPSCs was reproducibly increased by a brief application of high-potassium solution. In the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (10 microM), the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency was suppressed by 49%. Neither the mean amplitude nor the time course of mIPSCs was affected by the blocker. The N-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTX, 3 microM) had no effect on the frequency of potassium-induced mIPSCs. The P-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-Aga-IVA (200 nM) suppressed the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency by 83% without affecting the mean amplitude or time course of mIPSCs. Comparing these data with previous studies of neurally evoked transmission, it is concluded that the Ca2+ channel subtypes responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release may be different from those mediating fast synaptic transmission.

  14. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  15. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  16. Drug release and bone growth studies of antimicrobial peptide-loaded calcium phosphate coating on titanium.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Noordin, Shahryar; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P; Hancock, Robert E W; Wang, Rizhi

    2012-07-01

    Preventing infection is one of the major challenges in total hip and joint arthroplasty. The main concerns of local drug delivery as a solution have been the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the potential inhibition of osseointegration caused by the delivery systems. This work investigated the in vitro drug release, antimicrobial performance, and cytotoxicity, as well as the in vivo bone growth of an antimicrobial peptide loaded into calcium phosphate coated Ti implants in a rabbit model. Two potent AMP candidates (HHC36: KRWWKWWRR, Tet213: KRWWKWWRRC) were first investigated through an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. MTT absorbance values revealed that HHC36 showed much lower cytotoxicity (minimal cytotoxic concentration 200 μg/mL) than Tet 213 (50 μg/mL). The AMP HHC36 loaded onto CaP (34.7 ± 4.2 μg/cm(2)) had a burst release during the first few hours followed by a slow and steady release for 7 days as measured spectrophotometrically. The CaP-AMP coatings were antimicrobial against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in colony-forming units (CFU) in vitro assays. No cytotoxicity was observed on CaP-AMP samples against MG-63 osteoblast-like cells after 5 days in vitro. In a trabecular bone growth in vivo study using cylindrical implants, loading of AMP HHC36 did not impair bone growth onto the implants. Significant bone on-growth was observed on CaP-coated Ti with or without HHC36 loading, as compared with Ti alone. The current AMP-CaP coating thus offers in vivo osteoconductivity to orthopedic implants. It also offers in vitro antimicrobial property, with its in vivo performance to be confirmed in future animal infection models.

  17. Fluoride varnishes with calcium glycerophosphate: fluoride release and effect on in vitro enamel demineralization.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Peters, Bianca Glerean; Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bönecker, Marcelo José Strazzeri

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the amount of fluoride (F) released from varnishes containing calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) and (2) to assess the effect of the experimental varnishes on in vitro demineralization. Six test groups using 5 varnishes: base varnish (no active ingredients); Duraphat® (2.26% NaF); Duofluorid® (5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 1 (1% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 2 (5% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); and no varnish were set up. In stage 1, 60 acrylic blocks were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n = 10). Then 300 µg of each varnish was applied to each block. The blocks were immersed in deionized water, which was changed after 1, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Fluoride concentration in the water was analyzed using a fluoride electrode. In stage 2, 60 bovine enamel samples were distributed into 6 groups (n = 10), and treated with 300 µg of the respective varnish. After 6 h the varnish was removed and the samples were subjected to a 7-day in vitro pH cycle (6 h demineralization/18 h remineralization per day). The demineralization was measured using surface hardness. The results showed that both experimental varnishes released more fluoride than Duofluorid® and Duraphat® (p < 0.05), but Duraphat® showed the best preventive effect by decreasing enamel hardness loss (p < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that even though (1) the experimental varnishes containing CaGP released greater amounts of F, (2) they did not increase in the preventive effect against enamel demineralization. PMID:26176358

  18. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  19. In vitro/in vivo comparison of cefuroxime release from poly(ε-caprolactone)-calcium sulfate implants for osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Yaprakci, Volkan; Erdemli, Ozge; Kayabolen, Alisan; Tezcaner, Aysen; Bozkurt, Fatih; Keskin, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the release of cefuroxime axetil (CF) and calcium from poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-calcium sulfate (CaS) implants (PCL:CaS 2:1-10% CF; PCL:CaS 2:1-20% CF; PCL:CaS 1:1-10% CF) for treating infectious bone diseases. Bioactivity, crystallinity and strength, and release profiles under standard and pressurized release conditions were studied. PCL:CaS 2:1-20% CF had slower release than 10% loading. These groups had no significant change in CF and Ca release in response to pressure. The PCL:CaS 1:1 group had the slowest release despite having higher CaS, probably due to more compaction of discs. In contrast, pressure caused significant differentiation of CF and Ca(2+) release. The presence of CaS enhanced mechanical properties and bioactivity of discs. SEM and XPS results showed calcium-phosphate containing accumulations on surfaces upon SBF incubation. CF-loaded implants were applied in a rabbit osteomyelitis model. In vivo CF release was enhanced with increased CaS proportions, suggesting that in vivo release conditions are closer to pressurized in vitro conditions. In the control group, there was still some inflammation in the bone and no complete coverage with bone was achieved in the defect site. Discs provided a suitable surface for regeneration of bone. However, bone formation in the PCL:CaS 1:1 disc implanted group was more complete and regular than in the 2:1 group.

  20. Opioids potentiate transmitter release from SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells by modulating N-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Keren, O; Gafni, M; Sarne, Y

    1997-08-01

    Opioids induce dual (inhibitory and excitatory) regulation of depolarization-evoked [3H]dopamine release in SK-N-SH cells through either mu or delta receptors. The potentiation of dopamine release by opioid agonists is mediated by N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels and does not involve Gi/Go proteins. Removal of the excitatory opioid effect by blockade with omega-conotoxin, an N-channel antagonist, reveals the inhibitory effect of opioids on release, thus suggesting that both modulatory effects of opioids are exerted in parallel.

  1. In situ cross-linking of sodium alginate with calcium and aluminum ions to sustain the release of theophylline from polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Tailor, Anish

    2004-12-01

    Small matrices of calcium alginate or aluminium alginate have been investigated as possible controlled release systems for drugs. The objective of the present study was to sustain the release of theophylline from alginate matrices using different concentrations of aluminium chloride and calcium chloride in presence and absence of HPMC. Tablets containing differing concentrations of aluminium and calcium chloride were produced and the release rate of theophylline was tested using the basket dissolution apparatus over 8 h. Increasing amounts of aluminium chloride from 0.0001 to 0.00068 moles decreased the release of theophylline from 95.1 +/- 0.27 to 29.5 +/- 1.5, indicating a significant effect of aluminium ions on a reduction in the release rate of theophylline from sodium alginate matrices. In the case of matrices containing different concentrations of calcium ions, as the concentration of calcium chloride increased, the release rate increased to an optimum then declined after this. This was due to insufficient calcium ions being available to cross-link with the sodium alginate to form an insoluble gel. The effect of aluminium ions, as this is a trivalent ion compared to calcium, which is a divalent ion, aluminium ions are able to decrease the release rate with a smaller concentration compared to calcium ions. The results also showed that the presence of HPMC caused a reduction in release rate of theophylline from alginate matrices containing calcium chloride. Whereas, in the case of alginate matrices containing aluminium chloride the release rate of theophylline increased in presence of HPMC. For comparing the dissolution data, dissolution efficiency (DE) was used. The values of DE are consistent with the dissolution data. The results show that within a formulation series, DE values generally decrease when the cation concentration increases and this criterion can be used to describe the effect of calcium and aluminium ions on the release behaviour of theophylline

  2. Self-Setting Calcium Phosphate Cements with Tunable Antibiotic Release Rates for Advanced Antimicrobial Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shreya; Wu, Victoria; Pernal, Sebastian; Uskoković, Vuk

    2016-03-01

    Osteomyelitis, an infectious disease predominantly tied to poor sanitary conditions in underdeveloped regions of the world, is in need of inexpensive, easily in situ synthesizable and administrable materials for its treatment. The results of this study stem from the attempt to create one such affordable and minimally invasive therapeutic platform in the form of a self-setting, injectable cement with a tunable drug release profile, composed of only nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite, the synthetic version of the bone mineral. Cements comprised two separately synthesized hydroxyapatite powders, one of which, HAP2, was precipitated abruptly, retaining the amorphous nature longer, and the other one of which, HAP1, was precipitated at a slower rate, more rapidly transitioning to the crystalline structure. Cements were made with four different weight ratios of the two hydroxyapatite components: 100/0, 85/15, 50/50, and 0/100 with respect to HAP1 and HAP2. Both the setting and the release rates measured on two different antibiotics, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin, were controlled using the weight ratio of the two hydroxyapatite components. Various inorganic powder properties were formerly used to control drug release, but here we demonstrate for the first time that the kinetics of the mechanism of formation of a solid compound can be controlled to produce tunable drug release profiles. Specifically, it was found that the longer the precursor calcium phosphate component of the cement retains the amorphous nature of the primary precipitate, the more active it was in terms of speeding up the diffusional release of the adsorbed drug. The setting rate was, in contrast, inversely proportional to the release rate and to the content of this active hydroxyapatite component, HAP2. The empirical release profiles were fitted to a set of equations that could be used to tune the release rate to the therapeutic occasion. All of the cements loaded with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin inhibited the

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction.

  4. A new hand-held optical reflectometer to measure enamel erosion: correlation with surface hardness and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Baumann, Tommy; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the surface reflection intensity (SRI) was measured from enamel with different induced erosion degrees using a hand-held pen-size reflectometer (Hand-Held) and a Table-Top reflectometer. To validate the Hand-Held reflectometer, we correlated its optical signals with the change of surface microhardness (SMH), and amount of calcium released from the enamel samples during erosion. We used 124 tooth enamel specimens that were exposed to an erosive challenge of either 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 minutes. SRI and SMH were measured before and after the erosive challenge and we also measured the amount of calcium released to the citric acid. Relative SRI loss (rSRIloss) and relative SMH loss (rSMHloss) were calculated. rSRIloss from the Hand-Held and the Table-Top reflectometers were similar and significantly correlated to rSMHloss and calcium release. The regression analyses showed a significant association between rSRIloss from both reflectometers and rSMHloss and calcium, showing that both reflectometers can be used to measure erosive demineralization of enamel. The Hand-Held reflectometer is capable of assessing in vitro erosion, correlating to other commonly used methods. It is small, easy to handle and provides fast measurement, being a possible candidate to measure erosion in clinical studies. PMID:27121129

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis is involved in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Nicola A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Fielding, Barbara; Torrens, Christopher; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) α1-adrenoceptors induces myosin phosphorylation and vasoconstriction via mobilisation of intracellular calcium and production of specific eicosanoids. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved, although the precise mechanism is not known. To address this, we characterised PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells and determined its role in intracellular calcium release and eicosanoid production. Murine VSM cells converted 18:2n-6 to longer chain PUFA including 22:5n-6. Δ6 (D6d) and Δ5 (D5d) desaturase, and elongase (Elovl) 5 were expressed. Elovl2 was not detected in human, mouse or rat VSM cells, or in rat or mouse aortae, but tit was not associated with hypermethylation of its promoter. D6d or D5d inhibition reduced 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6 synthesis, respectively, and induced concentration-related decrease in phenylephrine-mediated calcium release, and in PGE2 and PGF2α secretion. Together these findings suggest that PUFA biosynthesis in VSM cells is involved in calcium release associated with vasoconstriction. PMID:26324193

  6. Calcium release and ionic changes in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of tetanized muscle: an electron-probe study

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 60-70% of the total fiber calcium was localized in the terminal cisternae (TC) in resting frog muscle as determined by electron-probe analysis of ultrathin cryosections. During a 1.2 s tetanus, 59% (69 mmol/kg dry TC) of the calcium content of the TC was released, enough to raise total cytoplasmic calcium concentration by approximately 1 mM. This is equivalent to the concentration of binding sites on the calcium-binding proteins (troponin and parvalbumin) in frog muscle. Calcium release was associated with a significant uptake of magnesium and potassium into the TC, but the amount of calcium released exceeded the total measured cation accumulation by 62 mEq/kg dry weight. It is suggested that most of the charge deficit is apparent, and charge compensation is achieved by movement of protons into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or by the movement of organic co- or counterions not measured by energy dispersive electron-probe analysis. There was no significant change in the sodium or chlorine content of the TC during tetanus. The unchanged distribution of a permeant anion, chloride, argues against the existence of a large and sustained transSR potential during tetanus, if the chloride permeability of the in situ SR is as high as suggested by measurements on fractionated SR. The calcium content of the longitudinal SR (LSR) during tetanus did not show the LSR to be a major site of calcium storage and delayed return to the TC. The potassium concentration in the LSR was not significantly different from the adjacent cytoplasmic concentration. Analysis of small areas of I-band and large areas, including several sarcomeres, suggested that chloride is anisotropically distributed, with some of it probably bound to myosin. In contrast, the distribution of potassium in the fiber cytoplasm followed the water distribution. The mitochondrial concentration of calcium was low and did not change significantly during a tetanus. The TC of both tetanized and resting

  7. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  8. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglicerol decreases calcium induced cytochrome c release from liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zaccagnino, Patrizia; D'Oria, Susanna; Romano, Luigi Luciano; Di Venere, Almerinda; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Lorusso, Michele

    2012-04-01

    2-Arachidonoylglicerol (2-AG) is an endocannabinoid that mimics the pharmacological effects of Δ⁹ tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of the plant Cannabis sativa. It is present in many mammalian tissues, such as brain, liver, spleen, heart and kidney, where it exerts different biological effects either receptor mediated or independently of receptor activation. This work analyzes the effects of 2-AG on liver mitochondrial functions. It is shown that 2-AG causes a relevant decrease of calcium induced cyclosporine A sensitive cytochrome c release from mitochondria, a process representing an early event of the apoptotic program. Cyclosporin sensitive matrix swelling and ROS production measured under the same conditions are, on the contrary, almost unaffected or even enhanced, respectively, by 2-AG. Furthemore, 2-AG is found to stimulate resting state succinate oxidase activity and to inhibit oligomycin sensitive F₀F₁ ATP synthase activity. All these effects are apparently associated with 2-AG dependent alteration in the fluidity of the mitochondrial membranes, which was measured as generalized polarization of laurdan fluorescence. PMID:22437740

  9. Coherence and frequency in the reticular activating system (RAS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit (1) electrical coupling mainly in GABAergic cells, and (2) gamma band activity in virtually all of the cells. Specifically, cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) (1) show electrical coupling, and (2) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanism behind electrical coupling is important because the stimulant modafinil was shown to increase electrical coupling. We also provide recent findings demonstrating that all cells in the PPN and Pf have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential to gamma band activity. On the other hand, all SubCD, and some PPN, cells manifested sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. We speculate that continuous sensory input will modulate coupling and induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions.

  10. Dominance of P/Q-type calcium channels in depolarization-induced presynaptic FM dye release in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, B; Flucher, B E; Obermair, G J

    2013-12-01

    Neurotransmitter release probability is related by high power to the local concentration of calcium in presynaptic terminals, which in turn is controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels. P/Q- and N-type channels trigger synaptic transmission in the majority of neurons of the central nervous system. However, whether and under which conditions both channel types act cooperatively or independently is still insufficiently understood. Previous studies suggested either a dominance of N- or P/Q-type channels, or a synergistic action of both channels, depending on the experimental paradigms. Thus, to provide insight into the properties of neurotransmitter release in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, we used quantitative analysis of FM dye release from presynaptic boutons induced by high potassium membrane depolarization. Increasing extracellular potassium concentrations revealed a sigmoid dependence of FM dye release to the stimulation strength. Individual and combined application of the P/Q- and N-type channel-specific blockers ω-agatoxin-IVA and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, respectively, allowed us to specifically isolate the contribution of both channel types to release triggered with 40 mM KCl. Analysis of the release kinetics and the fractional release amplitude demonstrate that, whereas in only 15% of the synapses release depended exclusively on P/Q-type channels, the majority of synapses (85%) contained both N- and P/Q-type channels. Nevertheless, the kinetics of FM dye release in synapses containing both channel types was determined by the P/Q-type channels. Together, our data suggest a more direct coupling of P/Q-type channels to synaptic release compared to N-type channels, which may explain the high prevalence of neurological P/Q-type channelopathies.

  11. THE RETICULAR MATERIAL OF DEVELOPING BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cowdry, Edmund V.

    1921-01-01

    Erythroblasts, leucocytes, and lymphocytes resemble other cells of the body in containing a restricted area of fluidity in their cytoplasm. In special preparations this fluid appears in the form of a more or less complicated reticulum which seems to be continually but slowly changing in shape. For convenience the fluid may provisionally be referred to as reticular material, emphasis being laid on its composition rather than its form. As a working hypothesis it is safe to assume that the chemical and physical properties of this material vary in cells of different kinds as well as in different stages in the activity of the same cell. The conclusion that it is "identical" in different cells, because the present crude methods of technique reveal no fundamental differences, would be as incorrect as the statement that the serum of different animals is identical, because no difference is observed on microscopic examination. PMID:19868474

  12. Parallel temperature dependence of contracture-associated enzyme release due to anoxia, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), or caffeine and the calcium paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Ganote, C. E.; Sims, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hypothermia during calcium-free perfusion of hearts protects them from injury caused by subsequent calcium repletion at 37 C (calcium paradox). Injury to calcium-free hearts is also associated with contracture caused by anoxia, 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), or caffeine. This study was done for the purpose of determining whether hypothermia during calcium-free perfusions protects hearts from contracture-associated injury. Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were studied in four experimental groups: I) Anoxia: Thirty minutes of anoxic perfusion at 37 C was followed by thirty minutes of anoxic calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C. II) Calcium paradox: Five minutes of calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C was followed by calcium repletion at 37 C. III, IVa) Caffeine or DNP: Five minutes of calcium-free perfusion at 37-18 C was followed by addition of 10 mM caffeine or 1 mM DNP in calcium-free medium at 37 C or, IVb) 1 mM DNP in calcium-free medium at 22 C. Injury was assessed by measurement of serial releases of creatine kinase (CK) in effluents and by cellular morphology. The results show that progressive hypothermia to 22 C during calcium-free perfusion periods produced a progressive reduction of CK release and morphologic evidence of injury due to anoxia, caffeine, or DNP, which closely paralleled protection of hearts from the calcium paradox. Protection from injury in all experimental groups was associated with preservation of sarcolemmal membrane integrity and prevention of cell separations at intercalated disk junctions. It is proposed that weakening of intercalated disks occurs during calcium-free perfusions and may be a cause of mechanical fragility of the sarcolemma. Hypothermia may protect hearts from contracture-associated injury by preserving the integrity of intercalated disk junctions during periods of extracellular calcium depletion. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6742111

  13. Measurement of calcium release due to inositol trisphosphate receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium transients elicited by IP(3) receptors upon electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells (slow calcium signals) are often hard to visualize due to their relatively small amplitude compared to the large transient originated from ryanodine receptors associated to excitation-contraction coupling. The study of slow calcium transients, however, is relevant due to their function in regulation of muscle gene expression and in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Discussed here are the procedures used to record slow calcium signals from both cultured mouse myotubes and from cultured adult skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:22130849

  14. Local Release of Antibiotics for Surgical Site Infection Management Using High-Purity Calcium Sulfate: An In Vitro Elution Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, John J.; Florance, Hannah; Robinson, Matthew T.; Michell, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to characterize the elution of four antibiotics from pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate beads and show that the eluted antibiotics retained efficacy. Methods: Calcium sulfate was combined with gentamicin, tobramycin, vancomycin, or rifampicin (ratio: 20 g of calcium sulfate, to 240 mg, 500 mg, 900 mg, and 600 mg of antibiotic, respectively). Three grams of beads were immersed in 4 mL of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. At each time point (4, 8, 24 h; 2, 7, 14, 28, 42 d), eluates were removed for analysis by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficacy of antibiotics combined with calcium sulfate beads after 42 d was tested by a modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. Results: All samples showed a generally exponential decay in the eluted antibiotic concentration. At the first time point, both gentamicin and tobramycin had eluted to a peak concentration of approximately 10,000 mcg/mL. For rifampicin, the peak concentration occurred at 24 h, whereas for vancomycin, it occurred at 48 h. The eluted concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration for common periprosthetic joint infection pathogens for the entire span of the 42 study days. Mass spectrometry confirmed all antibiotics were unchanged when eluted from the calcium sulfate carrier. Antimicrobial efficacy was unaltered after 42 d in combination with calcium sulfate at 37°C. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical-grade calcium sulfate has the potential for targeted local release of tobramycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, and rifampicin over a clinically meaningful time period. PMID:25148101

  15. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Selectivity and permeation in calcium release channel of cardiac muscle: alkali metal ions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1999-01-01

    Current was measured from single open channels of the calcium release channel (CRC) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (over the range +/-180 mV) in pure and mixed solutions (e.g., biionic conditions) of the alkali metal ions Li+, K+, Na+, Rb+, Cs+, ranging in concentration from 25 mM to 2 M. The current-voltage (I-V) relations were analyzed by an extension of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) formulation of electrodiffusion, which includes local chemical interaction described by an offset in chemical potential, which likely reflects the difference in dehydration/solvation/rehydration energies in the entry/exit steps of permeation. The theory fits all of the data with few adjustable parameters: the diffusion coefficient of each ion species, the average effective charge distribution on the wall of the pore, and an offset in chemical potential for lithium and sodium ions. In particular, the theory explains the discrepancy between "selectivities" defined by conductance sequence and "selectivities" determined by the permeability ratios (i.e., reversal potentials) in biionic conditions. The extended PNP formulation seems to offer a successful combined treatment of selectivity and permeation. Conductance selectivity in this channel arises mostly from friction: different species of ions have different diffusion coefficients in the channel. Permeability selectivity of an ion is determined by its electrochemical potential gradient and local chemical interaction with the channel. Neither selectivity (in CRC) seems to involve different electrostatic interaction of different ions with the channel protein, even though the ions have widely varying diameters. PMID:10049318

  17. Calsequestrin and the calcium release channel of skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Beard, N A; Laver, D R; Dulhunty, A F

    2004-05-01

    Calsequestrin is by far the most abundant Ca(2+)-binding protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal and cardiac muscle. It allows the Ca2+ required for contraction to be stored at total concentrations of up to 20mM, while the free Ca2+ concentration remains at approximately 1mM. This storage capacity confers upon muscle the ability to contract frequently with minimal run-down in tension. Calsequestrin is highly acidic, containing up to 50 Ca(2+)-binding sites, which are formed simply by clustering of two or more acidic residues. The Kd for Ca2+ binding is between 1 and 100 microM, depending on the isoform, species and the presence of other cations. Calsequestrin monomers have a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa and contain approximately 400 residues. The monomer contains three domains each with a compact alpha-helical/beta-sheet thioredoxin fold which is stable in the presence of Ca2+. The protein polymerises when Ca2+ concentrations approach 1mM. The polymer is anchored at one end to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels either via the intrinsic membrane proteins triadin and junctin or by binding directly to the RyR. It is becoming clear that calsequestrin has several functions in the lumen of the SR in addition to its well-recognised role as a Ca2+ buffer. Firstly, it is a luminal regulator of RyR activity. When triadin and junctin are present, calsequestrin maximally inhibits the Ca2+ release channel when the free Ca2+ concentration in the SR lumen is 1mM. The inhibition is relieved when the Ca2+ concentration alters, either because of small changes in the conformation of calsequestrin or its dissociation from the junctional face membrane. These changes in calsequestrin's association with the RyR amplify the direct effects of luminal Ca2+ concentration on RyR activity. In addition, calsequestrin activates purified RyRs lacking triadin and junctin. Further roles for calsequestrin are indicated by the kinase activity of the protein, its

  18. Cytosolic and nuclear calcium signaling in atrial myocytes: IP3-mediated calcium release and the role of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hohendanner, Felix; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit atrial myocytes Ca signaling has unique features due to the lack of transverse (t) tubules, the spatial arrangement of mitochondria and the contribution of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor-induced Ca release (IICR). During excitation-contraction coupling action potential-induced elevation of cytosolic [Ca] originates in the cell periphery from Ca released from the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) and then propagates by Ca-induced Ca release from non-junctional (nj-) SR toward the cell center. The subsarcolemmal region between j-SR and the first array of nj-SR Ca release sites is devoid of mitochondria which results in a rapid propagation of activation through this domain, whereas the subsequent propagation through the nj-SR network occurs at a velocity typical for a propagating Ca wave. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca uptake with the Ca uniporter blocker Ru360 accelerates propagation and increases the amplitude of Ca transients (CaTs) originating from nj-SR. Elevation of cytosolic IP3 levels by rapid photolysis of caged IP3 has profound effects on the magnitude of subcellular CaTs with increased Ca release from nj-SR and enhanced CaTs in the nuclear compartment. IP3 uncaging restricted to the nucleus elicites 'mini'-Ca waves that remain confined to this compartment. Elementary IICR events (Ca puffs) preferentially originate in the nucleus in close physical association with membrane structures of the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasmic reticulum. The data suggest that in atrial myocytes the nucleus is an autonomous Ca signaling domain where Ca dynamics are primarily governed by IICR. PMID:25891132

  19. The modulation of action potential generation by calcium-induced calcium release is enhanced by mitochondrial inhibitors in mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Barstow, K L; Locknar, S A; Merriam, L A; Parsons, R L

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that outward currents activated by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) opposed depolarization-induced action potential (AP) generation in dissociated mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons [J Neurophysiol 88 (2002) 1119]. In the present study, we tested whether AP generation by depolarizing current ramps could be altered by dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential and thus interrupting mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Exposure to the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP; 2 microM) alone or in combination with the mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin (8 microg/ml), increased the latency to AP generation. Exposure to the electron transport chain inhibitor rotenone (10 microM) alone or in combination with oligomycin (8 microg/ml) similarly increased the latency to AP generation. CCCP and oligomycin or rotenone and oligomycin treatment caused rhodamine 123 loss from mitochondria within a few minutes, confirming that the mitochondrial membrane potential was dissipated during drug exposure. Oligomycin alone had no effect on the latency to AP generation and did not cause loss of rhodamine 123 from mitochondria. The increase in latency induced by CCCP and oligomycin was similar when recordings were made with either the perforated patch or standard whole cell patch recording configuration. Exposure to the endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 microM), decreased the latency to AP generation. In cells pretreated with thapsigargin to eliminate CICR, CCCP and oligomycin had no effect on AP latency. Pretreatment with iberiotoxin (IBX; 100 nM), an inhibitor of large conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels, reduced the extent of the CCCP- and oligomycin-induced increase in latency to AP generation. These results indicate that treatment with CCCP or rotenone to dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential, a condition which should minimize sequestration of Ca2+ by

  20. The atrazine metabolite diaminochlorotriazine suppresses LH release from murine LβT2 cells by suppressing GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Gregory P; Tjalkens, Ronald B; Hanneman, William H

    2013-05-01

    The primary metabolite of the herbicide atrazine (ATRA), diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), has been suggested to cause disruption in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) release. DACT is a reactive electrophile known to form covalent protein adducts both in vitro and in vivo following ATRA exposure and maybe targeting proteins involved in GnRH-induced calcium signaling and subsequent LH release. To test this hypothesis, LβT2 pituitary cells were exposed to 300 μM DACT for 24 hrs and examined by fluorescence microscopy for GnRH-induced changes in intracellular calcium and LH release. LβT2 cells exposed to DACT had markedly diminished GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients and a significant decreased LH release in response to GnRH. DACT appeared to cause a selective decrease in caffeine-sensitive ryanodine receptor-operated calcium stores in LβT2 cells, rather than in thapsigargin-sensitive ER calcium stores. This sensitivity correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts by DACT, as determined by mass spectrometry. ERp57 was identified by mass spectrometry as a target of DACT adduction in the ER that could potentially mediate the effects of DACT on inhibition of GnRH-induced calcium signaling and inhibition of LH release. Intracellular calcium responses to GnRH and release of LH were restored in DACT-treated cells with the addition of a calcium ionophore (A23187). These data suggest that DACT forms adducts on proteins involved in calcium handling within the ER and that dysfunction in this critical signaling system is associated with loss of normal sensitivity to GnRH and subsequent decreased release of LH.

  1. The atrazine metabolite diaminochlorotriazine suppresses LH release from murine LβT2 cells by suppressing GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Gregory P.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Hanneman, William H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary metabolite of the herbicide atrazine (ATRA), diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), has been suggested to cause disruption in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) release. DACT is a reactive electrophile known to form covalent protein adducts both in vitro and in vivo following ATRA exposure and maybe targeting proteins involved in GnRH-induced calcium signaling and subsequent LH release. To test this hypothesis, LβT2 pituitary cells were exposed to 300 μM DACT for 24 hrs and examined by fluorescence microscopy for GnRH-induced changes in intracellular calcium and LH release. LβT2 cells exposed to DACT had markedly diminished GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients and a significant decreased LH release in response to GnRH. DACT appeared to cause a selective decrease in caffeine-sensitive ryanodine receptor-operated calcium stores in LβT2 cells, rather than in thapsigargin-sensitive ER calcium stores. This sensitivity correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts by DACT, as determined by mass spectrometry. ERp57 was identified by mass spectrometry as a target of DACT adduction in the ER that could potentially mediate the effects of DACT on inhibition of GnRH-induced calcium signaling and inhibition of LH release. Intracellular calcium responses to GnRH and release of LH were restored in DACT-treated cells with the addition of a calcium ionophore (A23187). These data suggest that DACT forms adducts on proteins involved in calcium handling within the ER and that dysfunction in this critical signaling system is associated with loss of normal sensitivity to GnRH and subsequent decreased release of LH. PMID:24052811

  2. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  3. Comparative evaluation of the calcium release from mineral trioxide aggregate and its mixture with glass ionomer cement in different proportions and time intervals – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Surbhi; Vivekananda Pai, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Addition of glass ionomer cement (GIC) has been suggested to improve the setting time and handling characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). This study evaluated the effect of adding GIC to MTA in terms of calcium release, an issue that has not been previously studied. Materials and methods The study comprised four groups with five samples each: a control group of MTA alone and experimental groups I (1MTA:1GIC), II (2MTA:1GIC), and III (1MTA:2GIC) based on the mixture of MTA and GIC powders in the respective proportions by volume. Calcium release from the samples was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 15 min, 6 h, 24 h, and 1 week after setting. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Groups I (1MTA:1GIC) and III (1MTA:2GIC) released significantly less calcium than the control group at all time periods, except at 15 min for group I. Group II (2MTA:1GIC) showed no significant difference in calcium release compared to the control at any time period. Group II exhibited greater calcium release than group I or III at all time periods, with significant differences between groups I and II at 1 week and between groups I and III at 24 h and 1 week. There were no statistical differences in calcium release between groups I and III. Conclusions Adding GIC to improve the setting time and handling properties of the MTA powder can be detrimental to the calcium-releasing ability of the resultant mixture, depending on the proportion of GIC added. Adding MTA and GIC at a proportion of 2:1 by volume did not impact calcium release from the mixture. These findings should be verified through further clinical studies. PMID:26644757

  4. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  5. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 deletion in the mouse decreases motivation and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Ng, Enoch; Varaschin, Rafael K; Su, Ping; Browne, Caleb J; Hermainski, Joanna; Le Foll, Bernard; Pongs, Olaf; Liu, Fang; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Roder, John C; Wong, Albert H C

    2016-03-15

    Calcium sensors detect intracellular calcium changes and interact with downstream targets to regulate many functions. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1) or Frequenin is widely expressed in the nervous system, and involved in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and learning. NCS-1 interacts with and regulates dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) internalization and is implicated in disorders like schizophrenia and substance abuse. However, the role of NCS-1 in behaviors dependent on dopamine signaling in the striatum, where D2R is most highly expressed, is unknown. We show that Ncs-1 deletion in the mouse decreases willingness to work for food. Moreover, Ncs-1 knockout mice have significantly lower activity-dependent dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens core in acute slice recordings. In contrast, food preference, responding for conditioned reinforcement, ability to represent changes in reward value, and locomotor response to amphetamine are not impaired. These studies identify novel roles for NCS-1 in regulating activity-dependent striatal dopamine release and aspects of motivated behavior.

  6. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 deletion in the mouse decreases motivation and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Ng, Enoch; Varaschin, Rafael K; Su, Ping; Browne, Caleb J; Hermainski, Joanna; Le Foll, Bernard; Pongs, Olaf; Liu, Fang; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Roder, John C; Wong, Albert H C

    2016-03-15

    Calcium sensors detect intracellular calcium changes and interact with downstream targets to regulate many functions. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1) or Frequenin is widely expressed in the nervous system, and involved in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and learning. NCS-1 interacts with and regulates dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) internalization and is implicated in disorders like schizophrenia and substance abuse. However, the role of NCS-1 in behaviors dependent on dopamine signaling in the striatum, where D2R is most highly expressed, is unknown. We show that Ncs-1 deletion in the mouse decreases willingness to work for food. Moreover, Ncs-1 knockout mice have significantly lower activity-dependent dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens core in acute slice recordings. In contrast, food preference, responding for conditioned reinforcement, ability to represent changes in reward value, and locomotor response to amphetamine are not impaired. These studies identify novel roles for NCS-1 in regulating activity-dependent striatal dopamine release and aspects of motivated behavior. PMID:26738968

  7. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor-Triggered Calcium Mobilization Protects Mice against Bacterial Infection through Extracellular ATP Release

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hua; Teng, Yunfei; Tan, Binghe; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Mingyao; Jiang, Wenzheng

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP), released as a “danger signal” by injured or stressed cells, plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses, but the relationship between ATP release and innate immune responses is still uncertain. In this study, we demonstrated that ATP was released through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-associated signaling in both Escherichia coli-infected mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Pam3CSK4-treated macrophages. This ATP release could be blocked completely only by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), not by carbenoxolone (CBX), flufenamic acid (FFA), or probenecid, suggesting the key role of exocytosis in this process. Furthermore, LPS-induced ATP release could also be reduced dramatically through suppressing calcium mobilization by use of U73122, caffeine, and thapsigargin (TG). In addition, the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and CCL-2 was enhanced significantly by ATP, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria was also promoted significantly by ATP stimulation. Furthermore, extracellular ATP reduced the number of invading bacteria and protected mice from peritonitis by activating purinergic receptors. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was overtly increased by ATP in antibacterial immune responses. Accordingly, if we blocked the P2X- and P2Y-associated signaling pathway by using suramin and pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid), tetrasodium salt (PPADS), the ATP-enhanced immune response was restrained significantly. Taken together, our findings reveal an internal relationship between danger signals and TLR signaling in innate immune responses, which suggests a potential therapeutic significance of calcium mobilization-mediated ATP release in infectious diseases. PMID:25245808

  9. Contribution of sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchange and intracellular calcium release to force development in isolated canine ventricular muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the relationship between peak twitch amplitude and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content during changes of stimulation frequency in isolated canine ventricle, and to estimate the extent to which these changes were dependent upon sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange. In physiological [Na+]o, increased stimulation frequency in the 0.2-2-Hz range resulted in a positive inotropic effect characterized by an increase in peak twitch amplitude and a decrease in the duration of contraction, measured as changes in isometric force development or unloaded cell shortening in intact muscle and isolated single cells, respectively. Action potentials recorded from single cells indicated that the inotropic effect was associated with a progressive decrease of action potential duration and a marked reduction in average time spent by the cell near the resting potential during the stimulus train. The frequency-dependent increase of peak twitch force was correlated with an increase of Ca2+ uptake into and release from the SR. This was estimated indirectly using the phasic contractile response to rapid (less than 1 s) lowering of perfusate temperature from 37 degrees C to 0-2 degrees C and changes of twitch amplitude resulting from perturbations in the pattern of electrical stimulation. Lowering [Na+]o from 140 to 70 mM resulted in an increase of contractile strength, which was accompanied by a similar increase of apparent SR Ca2+ content, both of which could be abolished by exposure to ryanodine (1 x 10(-8) M), caffeine (3 x 10(-3) M), or nifedipine (2 x 10(-6) M). Increased stimulation frequency in 70 mM [Na+]o resulted in a negative contractile staircase, characterized by a graded decrease of peak isometric force development or unloaded cell shortening. SR Ca2+ content estimated under identical conditions remained unaltered. Rate constants derived from mechanical restitution studies implied that the depressant effect of increased stimulation

  10. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  11. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity.

  12. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  13. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  14. Calcium transients and the effect of a photolytically released calcium chelator during electrically induced contractions in rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Arner, A; Malmqvist, U; Rigler, R

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ was determined with the fura-2 technique during electrically induced contractions in the rabbit rectococcygeus smooth muscle at 22 degreesC. The muscles were electrically activated to give short, reproducible contractions. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased during activation; the increase in [Ca2+] preceded force development by approximately 2 s. After cessation of stimulation Ca2+ fell, preceding the fall in force by approximately 4 s. The fluorescence properties of fura-2 were determined with time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron light at the MAX-storage ring, Lund, Sweden. The fluorescence decay of free fura-2 was best described by two exponential decays (time constants approximately 0.5 and 1.5 ns) at low Ca2+ (pCa 9). At high Ca2+ (pCa 4.5), fluorescence decay became slower and could be fitted by one exponential decay (1.9 ns). Time-resolved anisotropy of free fura-2 was characteristic of free rotational motion (correlation time 0.3 ns). Motion of fura-2 could be markedly inhibited by high concentrations of creatine kinase. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of muscle fibers loaded with fura-2 showed that the fluorescence lifetime of the probe was longer, suggesting an influence of the chemical environment. Anisotropy measurements revealed, however, that the probe was mobile in the cells. The Ca2+-dependence of contraction and relaxation was studied using a photolabile calcium chelator, diazo-2, which could be loaded into the muscle cells in a similar manner as fura-2. Photolysis of diazo-2 leads to an increase in its Ca2+-affinity and a fall in free Ca2+. When muscles that had been loaded with diazo-2 were illuminated with UV light flashes during the rising phase of contraction, the rate of contraction became slower, suggesting a close relation between intracellular Ca2+ and the cross-bridge interaction. In contrast, photolysis during relaxation did not influence the rate of force decay, suggesting that relaxation of these

  15. Intracellular calcium stores drive slow non-ribbon vesicle release from rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Križaj, David; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Rods are capable of greater slow release than cones contributing to overall slower release kinetics. Slow release in rods involves Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). By impairing release from ribbons, we found that unlike cones where release occurs entirely at ribbon-style active zones, slow release from rods occurs mostly at ectopic, non-ribbon sites. To investigate the role of CICR in ribbon and non-ribbon release from rods, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as a tool for visualizing terminals of isolated rods loaded with fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dyes and synaptic vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pH-sensitive rhodamine. We found that rather than simply facilitating release, activation of CICR by ryanodine triggered release directly in rods, independent of plasma membrane Ca2+ channel activation. Ryanodine-evoked release occurred mostly at non-ribbon sites and release evoked by sustained depolarization at non-ribbon sites was mostly due to CICR. Unlike release at ribbon-style active zones, non-ribbon release did not occur at fixed locations. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-tracker dye in rod terminals showed that ER extends continuously from synapse to soma. Release of Ca2+ from terminal ER by lengthy depolarization did not significantly deplete Ca2+ from ER in the perikaryon. Collectively, these results indicate that CICR-triggered release at non-ribbon sites is a major mechanism for maintaining vesicle release from rods and that CICR in terminals may be sustained by diffusion of Ca2+ through ER from other parts of the cell. PMID:24550779

  16. Nerve-released acetylcholine contracts urinary bladder smooth muscle by inducing action potentials independently of IP3-mediated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Nausch, Bernhard; Heppner, Thomas J; Nelson, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    Nerve-released ACh is the main stimulus for contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Here, the mechanisms by which ACh contracts UBSM are explored by determining Ca(2+) and electrical signals induced by nerve-released ACh. Photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) evoked Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Electrical field stimulation (20 Hz) induced Ca(2+) waves within the smooth muscle that were present only during stimulus application. Ca(2+) waves were blocked by inhibition of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) with atropine and depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and therefore likely reflect activation of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs). Electrical field stimulation also increased excitability to induce action potentials (APs) that were accompanied by Ca(2+) flashes, reflecting Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) during the action potential. The evoked Ca(2+) flashes and APs occurred as a burst with a lag time of approximately 1.5 s after onset of stimulation. They were not inhibited by blocking IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves, but by blockers of mAChRs (atropine) and VDCCs (diltiazem). Nerve-evoked contractions of UBSM strips were greatly reduced by blocking VDCCs, but not by preventing IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling with cyclopiazonic acid or inhibition of PLC with U73122. These results indicate that ACh released from nerve varicosities induces IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) waves during stimulation; but contrary to expectations, these signals do not appear to participate in contraction. In addition, our data provide compelling evidence that UBSM contractions evoked by nerve-released ACh depend on increased excitability and the resultant Ca(2+) entry through VDCCs during APs.

  17. Isolated P/Q Calcium Channel Deletion in Layer VI Corticothalamic Neurons Generates Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, Valerie C.; Aiba, Isamu; Qian, Jing; Mark, Melanie D.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Generalized spike-wave seizures involving abnormal synchronization of cortical and underlying thalamic circuitry represent a major category of childhood epilepsy. Inborn errors of Cacna1a, the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel α subunit gene, expressed throughout the brain destabilize corticothalamic rhythmicity and produce this phenotype. To determine the minimal cellular lesion required for this network disturbance, we used neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1) cre-driver mice to ablate floxed Cacna1a in layer VI pyramidal neurons, which supply the sole descending cortical synaptic input to thalamocortical relay cells and reticular interneurons and activate intrathalamic circuits. Targeted Cacna1a ablation in layer VI cells resulted in mice that display a robust spontaneous spike-wave absence seizure phenotype accompanied by behavioral arrest and inhibited by ethosuximide. To verify the selectivity of the molecular lesion, we determined that P/Q subunit proteins were reduced in corticothalamic relay neuron terminal zones, and confirmed that P/Q-mediated glutamate release was reduced at these synapses. Spike-triggered exocytosis was preserved by N-type calcium channel rescue, demonstrating that evoked release at layer VI terminals relies on both P/Q and N-type channels. Whereas intrinsic excitability of the P/Q channel depleted layer VI neurons was unaltered, T-type calcium currents in the postsynaptic thalamic relay and reticular cells were dramatically elevated, favoring rebound bursting and seizure generation. We find that an early P/Q-type release defect, limited to synapses of a single cell-type within the thalamocortical circuit, is sufficient to remodel synchronized firing behavior and produce a stable generalized epilepsy phenotype. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study dissects a critical component of the corticothalamic circuit in spike-wave epilepsy and identifies the developmental importance of P/Q-type calcium channel-mediated presynaptic glutamate release

  18. Calcium release near L-type calcium channels promotes beat-to-beat variability in ventricular myocytes from the chronic AV block dog.

    PubMed

    Antoons, Gudrun; Johnson, Daniel M; Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J; Ozdemir, Semir; Lenaerts, Ilse; Beekman, Jet D M; Houtman, Marien J C; Sipido, Karin R; Vos, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of ventricular repolarization (BVR) has been proposed as a strong predictor of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). BVR is also observed at the myocyte level, and a number of studies have shown the importance of calcium handling in influencing this parameter. The chronic AV block (CAVB) dog is a model of TdP arrhythmia in cardiac hypertrophy, and myocytes from these animals show extensive remodeling, including of Ca(2+) handling. This remodeling process also leads to increased BVR. We aimed to determine the role that (local) Ca(2+) handling plays in BVR. In isolated LV myocytes an exponential relationship was observed between BVR magnitude and action potential duration (APD) at baseline. Inhibition of Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) with thapsigargin resulted in a reduction of [Ca(2+)]i, and of both BVR and APD. Increasing ICaL in the presence of thapsigargin restored APD but BVR remained low. In contrast, increasing ICaL with preserved Ca(2+) release increased both APD and BVR. Inhibition of Ca(2+) release with caffeine, as with thapsigargin, reduced BVR despite maintained APD. Simultaneous inhibition of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange and ICaL decreased APD and BVR to similar degrees, whilst increasing diastolic Ca(2+). Buffering of Ca(2+) transients with BAPTA reduced BVR for a given APD to a greater extent than buffering with EGTA, suggesting subsarcolemmal Ca(2+) transients modulated BVR to a larger extent than the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient. In conclusion, BVR in hypertrophied dog myocytes, at any APD, is strongly dependent on SR Ca(2+) release, which may act through modulation of the l-type Ca(2+) current in a subsarcolemmal microdomain.

  19. Laser photolysis of caged calcium: rates of calcium release by nitrophenyl-EGTA and DM-nitrophen.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis-Davies, G C; Kaplan, J H; Barsotti, R J

    1996-01-01

    Nitrophenyl-EGTA and DM-nitrophen are Ca2+ cages that release Ca2+ when cleaved upon illumination with near-ultraviolet light. Laser photolysis of nitrophenyl-EGTA produced transient intermediates that decayed biexponentially with rates of 500,000 s-1 and 100,000 s-1 in the presence of saturating Ca2+ and 290,000 s-1 and 68,000 s-1 in the absence of Ca2+ at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C. Laser photolysis of nitrophenyl-EGTA in the presence of Ca2+ and the Ca2+ indicator Ca-orange-5N produced a monotonic increase in the indicator fluorescence, which had a rate of 68,000 s-1 at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C. Irradiation of DM-nitrophen produced similar results with somewhat slower kinetics. The transient intermediates decayed with rates of 80,000 s-1 and 11,000 s-1 in the presence of Ca2+ and 59,000 s-1 and 3,600 s-1 in the absence of Ca2+ at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C. The rate of increase in Ca(2+)-indicator fluorescence produced upon photolysis of the DM-nitrophen: Ca2+ complex was 38,000 s-1 at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C. In contrast, pulses in Ca2+ concentration were generated when the chelator concentrations were more than the total Ca2+ concentration. Photoreleased Ca2+ concentration stabilized under these circumstances to a steady state within 1-2 ms. PMID:8789118

  20. The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the 5-ASA release from calcium alginate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Cristián; Molina, Sergio; Diaz, Alvaro; Abugoch, Lilian; Diaz-Dosque, Mario; Valenzuela, Fernando; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2010-09-01

    The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the mesalamine (5-ASA) release from calcium alginate microparticles (CaAl) was studied, and a delayed release of 5-ASA system intended for colonic drug delivery was developed. The external chitosan coating was developed by immersion of wetted CaAl in chitosan solution and the internal coating by mixing 5-ASA with chitosan solution and drying before the preparation of CaAl. Both systems were coated with Acryl-EZE® using combined fluid bed coating and immersion procedure. The results showed that in phosphate medium (pH 7.5), chitosan as 5-ASA coating promotes a quick erosion process accelerating drug release, but chitosan as external coating (CaAlCS) does not increase the T (50) value compared with the microparticles without chitosan (CaAl). Chitosan as internal or external coating was not effective to avoid the quick 5-ASA release in acidic medium (pH 1.2). The presence of β-glucosidase enzymes increases significantly the 5-ASA release for CaAl, while no effect was observed with chitosan as internal or external coating. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray data revealed that 5-ASA did not form a solid solution but was dispersed in the microparticles. The Acryl-EZE® coating of microparticles was effective because all the formulations showed a low release, less than 15%, of 5-ASA in acid medium at pH 1.2. Significant differences in the percentage of 5-ASA released between formulations were observed in phosphate buffer at pH 6.0. In phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, all the formulations released 100% of 5-ASA.

  1. Effects of shear stress on intracellular calcium change and histamine release in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Jiyao; Zhou, Luwei

    2009-01-01

    Massage, one form of physical therapy, is widely used for a large number of musculoskeletal disorders, but its exact mechanism still remains to be elucidated. One hypothesis is that the shear stress caused by massage may induce cutaneous mast cells to release histamine, thereby improving the local tissue microcirculation of blood. In the present work, a mast cell line (rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3) was used in vitro to study cellular responses to the stimulus of shear stress generated by a rotating rotor in a cell dish. The intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]c) was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy with Fluo-3/AM staining and the released histamine was measured with a fluorescence spectrometer using o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) staining. An elevation of [Ca2+]c occurred immediately after the shear stress, followed by histamine release. However, both [Ca2+]c increase and histamine release disappeared when a Ca2+-free saline was used, indicating that the rise in the [Ca2+]c is due to a Ca2+ influx from the extracellular buffer. Furthermore, Ruthenium red, a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) inhibitor, could effectively block the shear stressinduced histamine release, suggesting that TRPV membrane proteins are the likely targets of the shear stress. Because histamine is a well-known mediator of microvascular tissue dilation, these results may have an important impact on understanding the mechanism involved in massage therapy. PMID:19888909

  2. Renal electrolyte excretion and renin release during calcium and parathormone infusions in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, W S; Roddis, S A; Unwin, R J

    1986-01-01

    Following a random block experimental design in each case, three repeated measurement studies were carried out in three different groups of conscious rabbits, to investigate the renal effects of increasing doses of intravenous calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH). In the first study, each rabbit received either CaCl2 (0.15, 0.3, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1) or vehicle alone (control) for 160 min. In the second study, rabbits were given either PTH (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1), CaCl2 (1.0 mg kg-1 min-1), PTH plus CaCl2 (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1, respectively) or vehicle alone; PTH was infused for just over 60 min. In the third study, a much smaller dose (0.05 mg kg-1 min-1) of CaCl2 was infused for 100 min. CaCl2 infusion produced a striking fall in fractional excretion of sodium of at least 50% (P less than 0.01), but this was not dose related, being almost maximal at the smaller doses infused. Although this effect was evident in the absence of any changes in total plasma calcium concentration at the lower doses of CaCl2, renal calcium excretion was increased between 2- and 20-fold (P less than 0.01) at all doses infused. Fractional excretion of chloride doubled at the two higher doses of CaCl2 (P less than 0.01), but potassium excretion was unchanged. There were no consistent alterations in mean arterial blood pressure, effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate or plasma renin activity (PRA); total plasma calcium concentration was consistently elevated only during infusion of the high dose by just under 1 mmol l-1. PTH infusion had no measured effect on fractional excretion of sodium or renal calcium excretion, but doubled fractional potassium excretion (P less than 0.05). Heart rate and PRA increased (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.05, respectively), the latter by 50%, but systemic pressure and renal haemodynamics were not significantly affected. By contrast, PTH infused with CaCl2 produced a 4-fold rise

  3. By Releasing ADP, Acanthamoeba castellanii Causes an Increase in the Cytosolic Free Calcium Concentration and Apoptosis in Wish Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Tozzi, M. G.; Costa, M.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by soluble molecules that may participate in acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be fully characterized. We demonstrate here that Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites constitutively release ADP in the medium. Cell-free supernatants prepared from A. castellanii, by interaction with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the Wish cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, extensive cell membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal disorganization, and the breakdown of nuclei. Cell damage induced by amoebic supernatants was blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor Suramin. The same results were found in Wish cells exposed to purified ADP. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii may have a cytopathic effect on human epithelial cells through ADP release, by a process that begins with a rise of cytosolic free-calcium concentration, and culminates in apoptosis. PMID:11349088

  4. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  5. Intraterminal injection of synapsin I or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alters neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; McGuinness, T L; Leonard, C S; Sugimori, M; Greengard, P

    1985-01-01

    Synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were pressure-injected into the preterminal digit of the squid giant synapse to test directly the possible regulation of neurotransmitter release by these substances. Neurotransmitter release was determined by measuring the amplitude, rate of rise, and latency of the postsynaptic potential generated in response to presynaptic depolarizing steps under voltage clamp conditions. Injection of dephosphosynapsin I decreased the amplitude and rate of rise of the postsynaptic potential, whereas injection of either phosphosynapsin I or heat-treated dephosphosynapsin I was without effect. Conversely, injection of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, increased the rate of rise and amplitude and decreased the latency of the postsynaptic potential. The effects of these proteins were observed without any detectable change in the initial phase of the presynaptic calcium current. A synapsin I-like protein and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were demonstrated by biochemical and immunochemical techniques to be present in squid nervous tissue. The data support the hypothesis that synapsin I regulates the availability of synaptic vesicles for release; we propose that calcium entry into the nerve terminal activates calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, dissociating it from the vesicles and thereby removing a constraint in the release process. Images PMID:2859595

  6. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  7. The initial response of Limulus ventral photoreceptors to bright flashes. Released calcium as a synergist to excitation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R; Fein, A

    1986-01-01

    The leading edge of the response of Limulus ventral photoreceptors to brief flashes was investigated using a voltage clamp. The leading edge of responses increases linearly with flash intensity when dim flashes produce less than one photoisomerization per square micron of cell surface. Brighter flashes accelerate the initial portion of the response, resulting in a fourth-power relationship between the magnitude of the response at brief times after the flash and the flash intensity. The onset of this nonlinearity with increasing flash intensity is determined by the local density of photoisomerizations within the receptor. Responses to bright 10-15-mum-diam spots therefore rise faster than responses to diffuse flashes producing the same number of photoisomerizations within the receptor. Background illumination shortens the response latency and suppresses the initial nonlinearity. These phenomena can be explained by a model of transduction in which light activates two parallel cascades of reactions. Particles released by the first of these cascades open ionic channels, while the second produces an agent that accelerates the rate of production of particles by the first. Injection of the calcium buffer EGTA slows the initial portion of the response to bright flashes and suppresses its nonlinearity, which suggests that the accelerating agent released by the second cascade is calcium. PMID:3081681

  8. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M O; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X

    2016-01-15

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG.

  9. Lifeguard Inhibits Fas Ligand-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum-Calcium Release Mandatory for Apoptosis in Type II Apoptotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Urresti, Jorge; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Coccia, Elena; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Castellano, José; Fernández-Sanz, Celia; Galenkamp, Koen M O; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S; Llecha-Cano, Núria; Reix, Stéphanie; García-Dorado, David; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Comella, Joan X

    2016-01-15

    Death receptors are members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Lifeguard (LFG) is a death receptor antagonist mainly expressed in the nervous system that specifically blocks Fas ligand (FasL)-induced apoptosis. To investigate its mechanism of action, we studied its subcellular localization and its interaction with members of the Bcl-2 family proteins. We performed an analysis of LFG subcellular localization in murine cortical neurons and found that LFG localizes mainly to the ER and Golgi. We confirmed these results with subcellular fractionation experiments. Moreover, we show by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that LFG interacts with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, but not with Bax or Bak, and this interaction likely occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. We further investigated the relationship between LFG and Bcl-XL in the inhibition of apoptosis and found that LFG protects only type II apoptotic cells from FasL-induced death in a Bcl-XL dependent manner. The observation that LFG itself is not located in mitochondria raises the question as to whether LFG in the ER participates in FasL-induced death. Indeed, we investigated the degree of calcium mobilization after FasL stimulation and found that LFG inhibits calcium release from the ER, a process that correlates with LFG blockage of cytochrome c release to the cytosol and caspase activation. On the basis of our observations, we propose that there is a required step in the induction of type II apoptotic cell death that involves calcium mobilization from the ER and that this step is modulated by LFG. PMID:26582200

  10. Dual pathways of calcium entry in spike and plateau phases of luteinizing hormone release from chicken pituitary cells: sequential activation of receptor-operated and voltage-sensitive calcium channels by gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.S.; Wakefield, I.K.; King, J.A.; Mulligan, G.P.; Millar, R.P.

    1988-04-01

    It has previously been shown that, in pituitary gonadotrope cells, the initial rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induced by GnRH is due to a Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores. This raises the possibility that the initial transient spike phase of LH release might be fully or partially independent of extracellular Ca2+. We have therefore characterized the extracellular Ca2+ requirements, and the sensitivity to Ca2+ channel blockers, of the spike and plateau phases of secretion separately. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ the spike and plateau phases were inhibited by 65 +/- 4% and 106 +/- 3%, respectively. Both phases exhibited a similar dependence on concentration of extracellular Ca2+. However, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel blockers D600 and nifedipine had a negligible effect on the spike phase, while inhibiting the plateau phase by approximately 50%. In contrast, ruthenium red, Gd3+ ions, and Co2+ ions inhibited both spike and plateau phases to a similar extent as removal of extracellular Ca2+. A fraction (35 +/- 4%) of spike phase release was resistant to removal of extracellular Ca2+. This fraction was abolished after calcium depletion of the cells by preincubation with EGTA in the presence of calcium ionophore A23187, indicating that it depends on intracellular Ca2+ stores. Neither absence of extracellular Ca2+, nor the presence of ruthenium red or Gd3+ prevented mobilization of 45Ca2+ from intracellular stores by GnRH. We conclude that mobilization of intracellular stored Ca2+ is insufficient by itself to account for full spike phase LH release.

  11. In situ mineralization of anticancer drug into calcium carbonate monodisperse nanospheres and their pH-responsive release property.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tiezhu; Wan, Zhanghui; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Haihong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Nan; Chen, Zhenhua; Mei, Xifan; Ren, Xiuli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we facilitated the preparation of uniform calcium carbonate nanospheres and the encapsulation of anticancer drug (Doxorubicin, Dox) in one step by a facile bio-inspired mineralization method at room temperature. Hesperidin (Hesp), a natural originated flavanone glycoside, was introduced as crystallization modifier. The obtained Dox encapsulated CaCO3 nanospheres (Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs) having a narrow size range of ~200 nm. The drug loading/release studies reveal that these Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs have a drug loading efficiency (DLE) of 83% and drug loading content (DLC) of 14wt%. Besides, the release of Dox from Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs was pH depended. At pH=7.4, only a small amount (~28%) of Dox was released. While at pH=5.0, all amount of incorporated Dox was released. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image reveals the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can internalize the cells. These results suggest the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can be potentially used to utilize pH-responsive delivery of anticancer drugs.

  12. Interaction of calcium sulfate with xanthan gum: effect on in vitro bioadhesion and drug release behavior from xanthan gum based buccal discs of buspirone.

    PubMed

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Abhishek, A; Vinay, S; Charde, S Y

    2013-11-01

    Bioadhesive polymers in buccal drug delivery systems play an important role in delivery of therapeutic drug molecules for local and systemic action. Xanthan gum, a GRAS listed natural polymer was used to design buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride by direct compression method. Effect of calcium sulfate on bioadhesive and drug release behavior of xanthan gum buccal discs was studied. Varying amount of calcium sulfate (0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%, w/w) in combination with xanthan gum was used to prepare buccal bioadhesive discs. Increase in calcium sulfate concentration resulted in faster drug release and decreased the bioadhesive strength of the designed discs. Further, in rheological evaluation it was observed that viscosity of xanthan gum gel reduces with increasing concentration of calcium sulfate. Compatibility of drug with various excipients was assessed using DSC and FTIR techniques. PMID:23907052

  13. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  14. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  15. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  16. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in transmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, G J; Charlton, M P; Horn, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Several compounds known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels were microinjected into squid 'giant' presynaptic terminals to test the hypothesis that these channels mediate Ca2+-dependent neurotransmitter release. 2. Injection of tetrapentylammonium, nonyl-triethylammonium and decamethonium all reversibly blocked transmission evoked by presynaptic action potentials. 3. All three of these compounds blocked presynaptic Ca2+ channels. The actions of tetrapentylammonium on presynaptic Ca2+ influx were examined in detail and found to be quantitatively sufficient to account for the ability of this compound to inhibit transmitter release. 4. Injection of Ba2+, another agent known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels, also reversibly blocked evoked transmitter release. Ba2+ simultaneously enhanced basal (asynchronous) transmitter release and thus may be decreasing evoked release by depleting transmitter quanta available for release. 5. None of these results provide any support for the hypothesis that Ca2+-activated K+ channels mediate Ca2+-dependent release of transmitter at the squid synapse. However, our results have identified a new class of compounds that block Ca2+ channels from their cytoplasmic surface. PMID:2455797

  17. The Reticular Cell Network: A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During infections, the network can suffer damage. A new study has now investigated the network’s structure in detail, using methods from graph theory. The study showed that the network is remarkably robust to damage: it can still support immune responses even when half of the reticular cells are destroyed. This is a further important example of how network connectivity achieves tolerance to failure, a property shared with other important biological and nonbiological networks. PMID:27727272

  18. Dual effects of tetracaine on spontaneous calcium release in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Györke, S; Lukyanenko, V; Györke, I

    1997-01-01

    1. Confocal microfluorometry was used to study the effects of tetracaine on spontaneous Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. 2. At low concentrations (0.25-1.25 mM), tetracaine caused an initial inhibition of spontaneous release events (Ca2+ sparks) and Ca2+ waves, which was followed by a gradual increase in Ca2+ release activity. The frequency and magnitude of sparks were first decreased and then increased with respect to control levels. At high concentrations (> 1.25 mM), tetracaine abolished all forms of spontaneous release. 3. Exposure of the myocytes to tetracaine resulted in a gradual increase in the SR Ca2+ load as indexed by changes in the magnitude of caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients. 4. In cardiac SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into lipid bilayers, tetracaine (> 0.25 mM) induced a steady inhibition of channel activity. Addition of millimolar Ca2+ to the luminal side of the channel caused an increase in channel open probability under control conditions as well as in the presence of various concentrations of tetracaine. 5. We conclude that the primary effect of tetracaine on SR Ca(2+)-release channels is inhibition of channel activity both in vitro and in situ. The ability of tetracaine to reduce spark magnitude suggests that these events are not due to activation of single channels or non-reducible clusters of channels and, therefore, supports the multichannel origin of sparks. We propose that the paradoxical late potentiation of release by submaximal concentrations of tetracaine is caused by a gradual increase in SR Ca2+ load and subsequent activation of the Ca(2+)-release channels by Ca2+ inside the SR. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9147318

  19. Calcium release by ryanodine receptors mediates hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of ERK and CREB phosphorylation in N2a cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kemmerling, Ulrike; Muñoz, Pablo; Müller, Marioly; Sánchez, Gina; Aylwin, María L; Klann, Eric; Carrasco, M Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, which stimulates ERK phosphorylation and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons, has also been shown to stimulate calcium release in muscle cells by promoting ryanodine receptor redox modification (S-glutathionylation). We report here that exposure of N2a cells or rat hippocampal neurons in culture to 200 microM H2O2 elicited calcium signals, increased ryanodine receptor S-glutathionylation, and enhanced both ERK and CREB phosphorylation. In mouse hippocampal slices, H2O2 (1 microM) also stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation. Preincubation with ryanodine (50 microM) largely prevented the effects of H2O2 on calcium signals and ERK/CREB phosphorylation. In N2a cells, the ERK kinase inhibitor U0126 suppressed ERK phosphorylation and abolished the stimulation of CREB phosphorylation produced by H2O2, suggesting that H2O2 enhanced CREB phosphorylation via ERK activation. In N2a cells in calcium-free media, 200 microM H2O2 stimulated ERK and CREB phosphorylation, while preincubation with thapsigargin prevented these enhancements. These combined results strongly suggest that H2O2 promotes ryanodine receptors redox modification; the resulting calcium release signals, by enhancing ERK activity, would increase CREB phosphorylation. We propose that ryanodine receptor stimulation by activity-generated redox species produces calcium release signals that may contribute significantly to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including plasticity that requires long-lasting ERK-dependent CREB phosphorylation. PMID:17074386

  20. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses premature calcium release in mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Miranda L; Lowther, Katie M; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; McDonough, Caitlin E; Lee, Katherine N; Evsikov, Alexei V; Uliasz, Tracy F; Chidiac, Peter; Williams, Carmen J; Mehlmann, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    During oocyte maturation, capacity and sensitivity of Ca(2+) signaling machinery increases dramatically, preparing the metaphase II (MII)-arrested egg for fertilization. Upon sperm-egg fusion, Ca(2+) release from IP3-sensitive endoplasmic reticulum stores results in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) oscillations that drive egg activation and initiate early embryo development. Premature Ca(2+) release can cause parthenogenetic activation prior to fertilization; thus, preventing inappropriate Ca(2+) signaling is crucial for ensuring robust MII arrest. Here, we show that regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2) suppresses Ca(2+) release in MII eggs. Rgs2 mRNA was recruited for translation during oocyte maturation, resulting in ∼ 20-fold more RGS2 protein in MII eggs than in fully grown immature oocytes. Rgs2-siRNA-injected oocytes matured to MII; however, they had increased sensitivity to low pH and acetylcholine (ACh), which caused inappropriate Ca(2+) release and premature egg activation. When matured in vitro, RGS2-depleted eggs underwent spontaneous Ca(2+) increases that were sufficient to cause premature zona pellucida conversion. Rgs2(-/-) females had reduced litter sizes, and their eggs had increased sensitivity to low pH and ACh. Rgs2(-/-) eggs also underwent premature zona pellucida conversion in vivo. These findings indicate that RGS2 functions as a brake to suppress premature Ca(2+) release in eggs that are poised on the brink of development.

  1. Curcumin induces crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis mediated by calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal destabilization and mitochondrial events

    PubMed Central

    Moustapha, A; Pérétout, PA; Rainey, NE; Sureau, F; Geze, M; Petit, J-M; Dewailly, E; Slomianny, C; Petit, PX

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) were detectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells. PMID:27551451

  2. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D.; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. PMID:25100314

  3. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Baumann, O; Walz, B; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental composition of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 +/- 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight) (mean +/- SEM). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, approximately 50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was approximately 0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca2+ release during cell stimulation and suggest that Mg2+ can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca2+. PMID:1992466

  4. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  5. Copper retention, calcium release and ultrastructural evidence indicate specific Cuprolinic Blue uptake and peculiar modifications in mineralizing aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, F; Tubaro, F; Petrelli, L; Gandaglia, A; Spina, M; Marchini, M

    2002-01-01

    Previously, reactions with copper phthalocyanines at 0.05 M critical electrolyte concentration were found to cause demineralization in calcifying porcine aortic valves after subdermal implantation in rat, as well as simultaneous visualization of peculiar phthalocyanine-positive layers around cells and cell-derived matrix vesicles. In the present investigation, an appraisal was made of the mechanism and specificity of reactions with Cuprolinic Blue by comparing quantitatively calcium release and copper retention by calcified aortic valves reacted with this phthalocyanine under different critical electrolyte concentration conditions, and the corresponding ultrastructural patterns. It was found that (i) decalcifying properties are inversely proportional to salt molarity; (ii) reactivity to Cuprolinic Blue is critical electrolyte concentration-dependent, since the greatest copper retention occurred in 0.05 M critical electrolyte concentration Cuprolinic Blue-reacted samples, the only ones that also exhibited phthalocyanine-positive layers; (iii) the appearance of phthalocyanine-positive layers depends on Cuprolinic Blue uptake, revealing pericellular clustering of calcium-binding, anionic molecules; and (iv) minor Cuprolinic Blue uptake occurs by residual proteoglycans which still remain in the extracellular matrix after 6-week-long subdermal implantation. The present results indicate that this method is appropriate for the study of mineralized tissues and illustrate peculiar tissue modifications occurring at least in the experimental conditions used here.

  6. The BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Binds to Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors to Stimulate Apoptotic Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Hedgepeth, Serena C.; Garcia, M. Iveth; Wagner, Larry E.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Henderson, Beric R.; Brodie, Kirsty M.; Yule, David I.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium channel. Calcium release mediated by IP3Rs influences many signaling pathways, including those regulating apoptosis. IP3R activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, including binding to proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death. Here we show that the IP3R binds to the tumor suppressor BRCA1. BRCA1 binding directly sensitizes the IP3R to its ligand, IP3. BRCA1 is recruited to the ER during apoptosis in an IP3R-dependent manner, and, in addition, a pool of BRCA1 protein is constitutively associated with the ER under non-apoptotic conditions. This is likely mediated by a novel lipid binding activity of the first BRCA1 C terminus domain of BRCA1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation by which BRCA1 can act as a proapoptotic protein. PMID:25645916

  7. Novel nanocomposite biomaterials with controlled copper/calcium release capability for bone tissue engineering multifunctional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, J. P.; Hoppe, A.; Pishbin, F.; Roether, J.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Lucangioli, S.; Mouriño, V.

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to develop novel composite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering (BTE) made of bioactive glass nanoparticles (Nbg) and alginate cross-linked with Cu2+ or Ca2+ (AlgNbgCu, AlgNbgCa, respectively). Two-dimensional scaffolds were prepared and the nanocomposite biomaterials were characterized in terms of morphology, mechanical strength, bioactivity, biodegradability, swelling capacity, release profile of the cross-linking cations and angiogenic properties. It was found that both Cu2+ and Ca2+ are released in a controlled and sustained manner with no burst release observed. Finally, in vitro results indicated that the bioactive ions released from both nanocomposite biomaterials were able to stimulate the differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteogenic lineage. In addition, the typical endothelial cell property of forming tubes in Matrigel was observed for human umbilical vein endothelial cells when in contact with the novel biomaterials, particularly AlgNbgCu, which indicates their angiogenic properties. Hence, novel nanocomposite biomaterials made of Nbg and alginate cross-linked with Cu2+ or Ca2+ were developed with potential applications for preparation of multifunctional scaffolds for BTE. PMID:26269233

  8. Effects of gallopamil on calcium release and intramembrane charge movements in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, D; Melzer, W; Pohl, B

    1990-02-01

    1. Intramembrane charge movements and changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were studied in voltage clamp experiments on cut twitch muscle fibres of the frog. The restoration from inactivation caused by steady depolarization and its modification by the phenylalkylamine Ca2+ channel antagonist gallopamil (D600, 10-30 microM) were investigated. 2. D600 prevented the restoration from inactivation of Ca2+ release which normally occurred at -80 mV. In D600 Ca2+ release recovered from inactivation at -120 mV. 3. D600 did not alter the characteristics of intramembrane charge movements in the depolarized fibre (charge 2) but the increase in the amount of mobile charge in the test voltage range above -60 mV, which normally occurs after changing the holding potential to -80 mV, was suppressed. The charge movement characteristics of D600-paralysed fibres, which were held at -80 mV, equalled those of normal depolarized and inactivated fibres. 4. Control records for the charge movement analysis were always obtained by voltage steps above 0 mV. Using the 'conventional' control in the potential range between -80 and -160 mV led to an underestimation and a kinetic deformation of charge movements in D600-treated fibres, which was due to various amounts of nonlinear charge in the control. 5. Like the restoration of Ca2+ release at -80 mV in normal fibres the recovery from paralysis at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres was accompanied by a significant increase in mobile charge in the potential range positive of -60 mV. Both Ca2+ release and charge movement at test potentials above -60 mV recovered with almost identical time course. 6. Restoration of Ca2+ release at a holding potential of -80 mV in normal fibres or at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres could not be clearly correlated to charge movement changes in the voltage range negative of -60 mV (charge 2). 7. Our results are consistent with a voltage-dependent inhibitory effect of D600 on the charge displacement that controls Ca2

  9. Calcium Release Flux Underlying Ca2+ Sparks of Frog Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Eduardo; Stern, Michael D.; González, Adom; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Shirokova, Natalia

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of Ca2+ release flux underlying Ca2+ sparks (Blatter, L.A., J. Hüser, and E. Ríos. 1997. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 94:4176–4181) was modified and applied to sparks obtained by confocal microscopy in single frog skeletal muscle fibers, which were voltage clamped in a two-Vaseline gap chamber or permeabilized and immersed in fluo-3–containing internal solution. The performance of the algorithm was characterized on sparks obtained by simulation of fluorescence due to release of Ca2+ from a spherical source, in a homogeneous three-dimensional space that contained components representing cytoplasmic molecules and Ca2+ removal processes. Total release current, as well as source diameter and noise level, was varied in the simulations. Derived release flux or current, calculated by volume integration of the derived flux density, estimated quite closely the current used in the simulation, while full width at half magnitude of the derived release flux was a good monitor of source size only at diameters >0.7 μm. On an average of 157 sparks of amplitude >2 U resting fluorescence, located automatically in a representative voltage clamp experiment, the algorithm reported a release current of 16.9 pA, coming from a source of 0.5 μm, with an open time of 6.3 ms. Fewer sparks were obtained in permeabilized fibers, so that the algorithm had to be applied to individual sparks or averages of few events, which degraded its performance in comparable tests. The average current reported for 19 large sparks obtained in permeabilized fibers was 14.4 pA. A minimum estimate, derived from the rate of change of dye-bound Ca2+ concentration, was 8 pA. Such a current would require simultaneous opening of between 8 and 60 release channels with unitary Ca2+ currents of the level recorded in bilayer experiments. Real sparks differ from simulated ones mainly in having greater width. Correspondingly, the algorithm reported greater spatial extent of the source

  10. In situ DOX-calcium phosphate mineralized CPT-amphiphilic gelatin nanoparticle for intracellular controlled sequential release of multiple drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Su, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Chen, San-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    A co-delivery strategy has been developed to achieve the synergistic effect of a hydrophobic drug (camptothecin, CPT) and a hydrophilic drug (doxorubicin, DOX) by utilizing the unique structure of amphiphilic gelatin/camptothecin @calcium phosphate-doxorubicin (AG/CPT@CaP-DOX) nanoparticles as a carriers in order to replace double emulsions while preserving the advantages of inorganic materials. The hydrophobic agent (CPT) was encapsulated via emulsion with an amphiphilic gelatin core, and subsequently mineralized by CaP-hydrophilic drug (DOX) through precipitation to form a CaP shell on the CPT-AG amphiphilic gelatin core so that drug molecules with different characteristics (i.e. hydrophobic and hydrophilic) can be encapsulated in different regions to avoid their interaction. The existence of the CaP shell can protect the DOX against free release and cause an increased transfer of DOX across membranes, overcoming multidrug resistance. Release studies from core-shell carriers showed the possibility of achieving sequential release of more than one type of drug by controlling the pH-sensitive CaP shell and degradable AG core. The highly pH-responsive behavior of the carrier can modulate the dual-drug-release of DOX/CPT, specifically in acidic intracellular pH environments. The AG/CPT@CaP-DOX nanoparticles also exhibited higher drug efficiencies against MCF-7/ADR cells than MCF-7 cells, thanks to a synergistic cell cycle arrest/apoptosis-inducing effect between CPT and DOX. As such, this core-shell system can serve as a general platform for the localized, controlled, sequential delivery of multiple drugs to treat several diseases, especially for multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

  11. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  12. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-07-01

    We used soil columns to study nutrients release from two compressed NPK fertilizers. The columns were filled with soil material from the surface horizon of a granitic soil. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil, and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. These nutrients were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first percolates, reaching a steady state when 1426 mm water have percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in the geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K, Ca and Mg were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with composition 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident.

  13. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  14. Role of calcium in the interaction of alpha and beta adrenoceptor-mediated renin release in isolated, constant pressure perfused rabbit kidneys.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, T J; Zehr, J E

    1983-10-01

    These experiments were designed to study the role of calcium in the modulation of renin secretion by alpha and beta adrenoceptors. Rabbit kidneys were isolated and single-pass perfused with a modified Ringer's solution. Renal perfusion pressure was precisely controlled by an electronic servocontrol system. Tubular events were minimized by ligation of the ureter before initiating the studies. Under these conditions the predominant factor modifying renin secretion was assumed to originate directly on the juxtaglomerular cells. Isoproterenol infused at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight increased renin secretion in a dose-dependent manner whereas phenylephrine infused at identical molar doses did not. In addition, phenylephrine (5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight) blocked the usual response to isoproterenol. Removal of calcium from the perfusing medium had no effect on either the response to isoproterenol or the lack of a response to phenylephrine. On the other hand, when calcium is removed from the perfusate or when D-600, a calcium channel blocker, is added to calcium-containing medium, phenylephrine failed to block the usual response to isoproterenol. We conclude that the suppression of beta adrenoceptor stimulation of renin release by alpha adrenoceptor agonists is calcium dependent by a final mechanism as yet undefined, but probably involving movement of calcium into the juxtaglomerular cells.

  15. Stretch of Contracting Cardiac Muscle Abruptly Decreases the Rate of Phosphate Release at High and Low Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G.; Curtin, Nancy A.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for Pi with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of Pi release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca2+), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca2+. The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their Pi-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the Pi balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover. PMID:22692210

  16. Stretch of contracting cardiac muscle abruptly decreases the rate of phosphate release at high and low calcium.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G; Curtin, Nancy A; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2012-07-27

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for P(i) with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of P(i) release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca(2+)), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca(2+). The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their P(i)-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the P(i) balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover.

  17. XANES Demonstrates the Release of Calcium Phosphates from Alkaline Vertisols to Moderately Acidified Solution.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl O; Tighe, Matthew K; Guppy, Christopher N; Milham, Paul J; McLaren, Timothy I; Schefe, Cassandra R; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-04-19

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) minerals may comprise the main phosphorus (P) reserve in alkaline soils, with solubility dependent on pH and the concentration of Ca and/or P in solution. Combining several techniques in a novel way, we studied these phenomena by progressively depleting P from suspensions of two soils (low P) using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) and from a third soil (high P) with AEM together with a cation-exchange membrane. Depletions commenced on untreated soil, then continued as pH was manipulated and maintained at three constant pH levels: the initial pH (pHi) and pH 6.5 and 5.5. Bulk P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the main forms of inorganic P in each soil were apatite, a second more soluble CaP mineral, and smectite-sorbed P. With moderate depletion of P at pHi or pH 6.5, CaP minerals became more prominent in the spectra compared to sorbed species. The more soluble CaP minerals were depleted at pH 6.5, and all CaP minerals were exhausted at pH 5.5, showing that the CaP species present in these alkaline soils are soluble with decreases of pH in the range achievable by rhizosphere acidification. PMID:26974327

  18. RYR1 and RYR3 have different roles in the assembly of calcium release units of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Protasi, F; Takekura, H; Wang, Y; Chen, S R; Meissner, G; Allen, P D; Franzini-Armstrong, C

    2000-01-01

    Calcium release units (CRUs) are junctions between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and exterior membranes that mediates excitation contraction (e-c) coupling in muscle cells. In skeletal muscle CRUs contain two isoforms of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)release channel: ryanodine receptors type 1 and type 3 (RyR1 and RyR3). 1B5s are a mouse skeletal muscle cell line that carries a null mutation for RyR1 and does not express either RyR1 or RyR3. These cells develop dyspedic SR/exterior membrane junctions (i.e., dyspedic calcium release units, dCRUs) that contain dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and triadin, two essential components of CRUs, but no RyRs (or feet). Lack of RyRs in turn affects the disposition of DHPRs, which is normally dictated by a linkage to RyR subunits. In the dCRUs of 1B5 cells, DHPRs are neither grouped into tetrads nor aligned in two orthogonal directions. We have explored the structural role of RyR3 in the assembly of CRUs in 1B5 cells independently expressing either RyR1 or RyR3. Either isoform colocalizes with DHPRs and triadin at the cell periphery. Electron microscopy shows that expression of either isoform results in CRUs containing arrays of feet, indicating the ability of both isoforms to be targeted to dCRUs and to assemble in ordered arrays in the absence of the other. However, a significant difference between RyR1- and RyR3-rescued junctions is revealed by freeze fracture. While cells transfected with RyR1 show restoration of DHPR tetrads and DHPR orthogonal alignment indicative of a link to RyRs, those transfected with RyR3 do not. This indicates that RyR3 fails to link to DHPRs in a specific manner. This morphological evidence supports the hypothesis that activation of RyR3 in skeletal muscle cells must be indirect and provides the basis for failure of e-c coupling in muscle cells containing RyR3 but lacking RyR1 (see the accompanying report, ). PMID:11053125

  19. Calcium-mediated release of glucanase activity from cortical granules of sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed

    Moy, G W; Kopf, G S; Gache, C; Vacquier, V D

    1983-12-01

    Confluent monolayers of sea urchin eggs were bonded to culture dishes coated with protamine sulfate. The cytoplasm was then sheared away by a jet of isosmotic buffer. About 326,000 circular fragments of individual egg cortices (430 micrograms protein) remained bound to each dish. The fragments are composed of cortical granules (CG), plasma membrane, and vitelline layer. A single dish contains 7.7 X 10(8) CG and is referred to as a CG lawn (CGL). Ca2+-EGTA buffers of estimated free-Ca2+ concentrations (0.06-25.7 microM) were applied to CGL and samples removed and assayed for the CG marker enzyme exo-beta (1 leads to 3)-glucanohydrolase (glucanase). Estimated free-Ca2+ concentrations above 2.75 microM caused the total release of the glucanase to the supernatant within 4 min. The half-maximal rate of appearance of glucanase occurred in 2.5 microM Ca2+. At all Ca2+ concentrations tested, the appearance of enzyme activity exhibited sigmoidal kinetics. The visual disappearance of CG correlated with the appearance of glucanase in the Ca2+ buffer. In response to Ca2+ the CG probably lyse, fuse with adjacent CG, or fuse with the underlying plasma membrane. The calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine inhibited Ca2+-mediated glucanase release from CGL (I50 8 microM). The sensitivity of the CGL to Ca2+ in the 1-10 microM range is rapidly lost during incubation of CGL in the isolation buffer. ATP and low temperature retard the rate of loss of Ca2+ sensitivity. These secretory granules are a model for studying the mechanism of Ca2+-induced secretion. In addition, they contain structural proteins and enzymes which function in the fertilization process. CGL preparations should be useful in studies dealing with the processing of CG components after their release in response to micromolar concentrations of Ca2+.

  20. Calcium-Release Channels in Paramecium. Genomic Expansion, Differential Positioning and Partial Transcriptional Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ladenburger, Eva-Maria; Plattner, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The release of Ca2+ from internal stores is a major source of signal Ca2+ in almost all cell types. The internal Ca2+ pools are activated via two main families of intracellular Ca2+-release channels, the ryanodine and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors. Among multicellular organisms these channel types are ubiquitous, whereas in most unicellular eukaryotes the identification of orthologs is impaired probably due to evolutionary sequence divergence. However, the ciliated protozoan Paramecium allowed us to prognosticate six groups, with a total of 34 genes, encoding proteins with characteristics typical of InsP3 and ryanodine receptors by BLAST search of the Paramecium database. We here report that these Ca2+-release channels may display all or only some of the characteristics of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. In all cases, prediction methods indicate the presence of six trans-membrane regions in the C-terminal domains, thus corresponding to canonical InsP3 receptors, while a sequence homologous to the InsP3-binding domain is present only in some types. Only two types have been analyzed in detail previously. We now show, by using antibodies and eventually by green fluorescent protein labeling, that the members of all six groups localize to distinct organelles known to participate in vesicle trafficking and, thus, may provide Ca2+ for local membrane-membrane interactions. Whole genome duplication can explain radiation within the six groups. Comparative and evolutionary evaluation suggests derivation from a common ancestor of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. With one group we could ascertain, to our knowledge for the first time, aberrant splicing in one thoroughly analyzed Paramecium gene. This yields truncated forms and, thus, may indicate a way to pseudogene formation. No comparable analysis is available for any other, free-living or parasitic/pathogenic protozoan. PMID:22102876

  1. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  2. (De)constructing the ryanodine receptor: modeling ion permeation and selectivity of the calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Xu, Le; Wang, Ying; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-08-18

    Biological ion channels are proteins that passively conduct ions across membranes that are otherwise impermeable to ions. Here, we present a model of ion permeation and selectivity through a single, open ryanodine receptor (RyR) ion channel. Combining recent mutation data with electrodiffusion of finite-sized ions, the model reproduces the current/voltage curves of cardiac RyR (RyR2) in KCl, LiCl, NaCl, RbCl, CsCl, CaCl(2), MgCl(2), and their mixtures over large concentrations and applied voltage ranges. It also reproduces the reduced K(+) conductances and Ca(2+) selectivity of two skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) mutants (D4899N and E4900Q). The model suggests that the selectivity filter of RyR contains the negatively charged residue D4899 that dominates the permeation and selectivity properties and gives RyR a DDDD locus similar to the EEEE locus of the L-type calcium channel. In contrast to previously applied barrier models, the current model describes RyR as a multi-ion channel with approximately three monovalent cations in the selectivity filter at all times. Reasons for the contradicting occupancy predictions are discussed. In addition, the model predicted an anomalous mole fraction effect for Na(+)/Cs(+) mixtures, which was later verified by experiment. Combining these results, the binding selectivity of RyR appears to be driven by the same charge/space competition mechanism of other highly charged channels.

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  4. What we don't know about the structure of ryanodine receptor calcium release channels.

    PubMed

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Pouliquin, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    1. The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is the Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplamic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle and is essential for respiration and heart beat. The RyR channel releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores in a variety of other cell types, where it normally coexists with the inositiol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). The RyR and IP3R, forming a superfamily of homotetrameric ligand-gated intracellular Ca2+ channels, serve discrete functions: they can be located in independent Ca2+ stores with different activation mechanisms and can be coupled to different signalling pathways. 2. Although functional characteristics of the RyR have been investigated intensely, there remain major gaps in our knowledge about the structure of the protein, its ion-conducting pore, its ligand-binding sites and sites supporting the many protein/protein interactions that underlie the in vivo function of the channel. 3. Of particular importance are the transmembrane segments that form the membrane-spanning domain of the protein and the pore, define the conductance and selectivity of the channel and dictate the cytoplasmic and luminal domains and the overall protein structure. Hydropathy profiles predict between four and 12 transmembrane segments. One popular model shows four transmembrane segments in the C-terminal one-tenth of the protein. However, there is substantial evidence for a larger number of membrane-spanning segments located in both the C-terminal and central parts of the protein. 4. A model of the RyR pore based on the Streptomyces lividans KcsA channel structure is presented. Protein/protein interactions between the RyR and other regulatory proteins, as well as within the RyR subunit, are discussed. PMID:14516409

  5. R56865 inhibits catecholamine release from bovine chromaffin cells by blocking calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Garcez-Do-Carmo, L.; Albillos, A.; Artalejo, A. R.; de la Fuente, M. T.; López, M. G.; Gandía, L.; Michelena, P.; García, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of R56865 (a new class of cardioprotective agent which prevents Na+ and Ca2+ overload in cardiac myocytes) on catecholamine release, whole-cell current through Ca2+ channels (IBa) and cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, [Ca2+]i, have been studied in bovine chromaffin cells. 2. R56865 caused a time- and concentration-dependent blockade of catecholamine release from superfused cells stimulated intermittently with 5 s pulses of 59 mM K+. After 5 min superfusion, a 3 microM concentration inhibited secretion by 20%; the blockade increased gradually with perfusion time, to reach 85% after 40 min. The IC50 to block secretion after 5 min periods of exposure to increasing concentrations of R56865 was around 3.1 microM. The blocking effects of R56865 were reversible after 5-15 min wash out. In high Ca2+ solution (10 mM Ca2+), the degree of blockade of secretion diminished by 20% in comparison with 1 mM Ca2+. 3. In electroporated cells, R56865 (10 microM) did not modify the secretory response induced by the application of 10 microM free Ca2+. 4. R56865 blocked the peak IBa current in a concentration- and time-dependent manner; its IC50 was very similar to that obtained for secretion (3 microM). The compound not only reduced the size of the peak current but also promoted its inactivation; when the effects of R56865 were measured at the most inactivated part of the current, its IC50 was 1 microM. Both the inactivation and the reduction of the peak currents were reversible upon washing out the drug.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298803

  6. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  7. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  8. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  9. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  10. An examination of the ability of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate to induce calcium release and tension development in skinned skeletal muscle fibres of frog and crustacea.

    PubMed

    Lea, T J; Griffiths, P J; Tregear, R T; Ashley, C C

    1986-10-20

    We have examined the ability of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) to cause contractions of mechanically skinned muscle fibres of frog and barnacle. InsP3 (10-500 microM) did not cause any tension development in 25 frog skinned fibres and 26 barnacle myofibrillar bundles, although contractions could be readily evoked by caffeine and by replacement of an impermeant anion by Cl-, treatments known to release calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Four barnacle bundles did give responses to InsP3. InsP3 did not modify responses to caffeine or calcium-induced calcium release. Free Mg2+ was lowered to 40 microM and 15 mM D-2,3-diphosphoglycerate was added in order to inhibit the possible breakdown of InsP3 by inositol trisphosphatase. Neither measure revealed a response to InsP3. Arsenazo III absorbance measurements failed to detect any binding of Mg2+ (0-0.5 mM) by 0.35 mM InsP3 in our solutions. Inhibitors of SR calcium uptake (cadium, quercetin, furosemide), omission of EGTA from the solution and varying the temperature from 4 degrees to 22 degrees C also failed to reveal a response of frog skinned fibres to InsP3. The nucleotide GTP, which has been reported to enhance InsP3-induced calcium release from rat liver microsomes, had no effect at 50 microM on the response of frog fibres to InsP3. It is concluded that under conditions in which other calcium release mechanisms operate well, InsP3 is relatively ineffective at releasing calcium from the SR in amounts sufficient to induce contraction. Although we have been unable to find evidence to support the proposed role of InsP3 as an essential link in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, we cannot entirely reject its role if essential cofactors are lost in the skinned preparations.

  11. Disrupted calcium release as a mechanism for atrial alternans associated with human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kelly C; Bayer, Jason D; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  12. STX, a novel nonsteroidal estrogenic compound, induces rapid action in primate GnRH neuronal calcium dynamics and peptide release.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, B P; Keen, K L; Rønnekleiv, O K; Terasawa, E

    2011-08-01

    Previously, we reported that 1 nM 17ß-estradiol (E(2)) induces a rapid action, which is, in part, mediated through the G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 in primate GnRH neurons. Because it has been reported that the diphenylacrylamide compound, STX, causes estrogenic action in the mouse and guinea pig hypothalamus, the present study examined effects of STX in primate GnRH neurons and whether there is an action independent of GPR30. Results are summarized as follows. STX (10 nM) exposure increased 1) the oscillation frequency of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), 2) the percentage of cells stimulated, and 3) the synchronization frequency of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations. STX (10-100 nM) also stimulated GnRH release. The effects of STX on both [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations and GnRH release were similar to those caused by E(2) (1 nM), although with less magnitude. STX (10 nM)-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations were not altered by GPR30 small interfering RNA transfection, indicating that STX-sensitive receptors differ from GPR30. Finally, a higher dose of E(2) (10 nM) induced a larger change in [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations than that with a smaller dose of E(2) (1 nM), and the effects of 10 nM E(2) were reduced but not completely blocked by GPR30 small interfering RNA transfection, indicating that the effects of 10 nM E(2) in primate GnRH neurons are mediated by multiple membrane receptors, including GPR30 and STX-sensitive receptors. Collectively, the rapid action of E(2) mediated through GPR30 differs from that mediated through STX-sensitive receptors. The molecular structure of the STX-sensitive receptor remains to be identified.

  13. Calcium release and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane potential in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1984-01-01

    -contraction coupling. Theoretical waveforms of s.r. membrane potential were computed using a typical waveform of s.r. Ca2+ release (from Baylor, Chandler & Marshall, 1983) under the assumption that Ca2+ crosses the s.r. membrane as electrical current. Voltage waveforms were calculated using several combinations of electrical parameters for the s.r. membrane. Only certain combinations gave theoretical potential changes similar to the intrinsic retardation or Nile Blue A fluorescence signal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 9 PMID:6716284

  14. The role of PIP2 and the IP3/DAG pathway in intracellular calcium release and cell survival during nanosecond electric pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phospholipid of particular importance in cell-signaling pathways. Hydrolysis of PIP2 releases inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) from the membrane, activating IP3 receptors on the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and facilitating a release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause depletion of PIP2 in the cellular membrane, activating the IP3 signaling pathway. However, the exact mechanism(s) causing this observed depletion of PIP2 are unknown. Complicating the matter, nsPEF create nanopores in the plasma membrane, allowing calcium to enter the cell and thus causing an increase in intracellular calcium. While elevated intracellular calcium can cause activation of phospholipase C (PLC) (a known catalyst of PIP2 hydrolysis), PIP2 depletion has been shown to occur in the absence of both extracellular and intracellular calcium. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the high electric field itself may be playing a direct role in the hydrolysis of PIP2 from the plasma membrane. To support this hypothesis, we used edelfosine to block PLC and prevent activation of the IP3/DAG pathway in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells prior to applying nsPEF. Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor intracellular calcium bursts during nsPEF, while MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) survivability assays were utilized to determine whether edelfosine improved cell survival during nsPEF exposure. This work is critical to refine the role of PIP2 in the cellular response to nsPEF, and also to determine the fundamental biological effects of high electric field exposures.

  15. Absence of triadin, a protein of the calcium release complex, is responsible for cardiac arrhythmia with sudden death in human

    PubMed Central

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Cacheux, Marine; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Fauconnier, Jeremy; Brocard, Julie; Denjoy, Isabelle; Durand, Philippe; Guicheney, Pascale; Kyndt, Florence; Leenhardt, Antoine; Le Marec, Hervé; Lucet, Vincent; Mabo, Philippe; Probst, Vincent; Monnier, Nicole; Ray, Pierre F.; Santoni, Elodie; Trémeaux, Pauline; Lacampagne, Alain; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Marty, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease so far related to mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) or the cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Because mutations in RYR2 or in CASQ2 are not retrieved in all CPVT cases, we searched for mutations in the physiological protein partners of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a large cohort of CPVT patients with no detected mutation in these two genes. Based on a candidate gene approach, we focused our investigations on triadin and junctin, two proteins that link RyR2 and CSQ2. Mutations in the triadin (TRDN) and in the junctin (ASPH) genes were searched in a cohort of 97 CPVT patients. We identified three mutations in triadin which cosegregated with the disease on a recessive mode of transmission in two families, but no mutation was found in junctin. Two TRDN mutations, a 4 bp deletion and a nonsense mutation, resulted in premature stop codons; the third mutation, a p.T59R missense mutation, was further studied. Expression of the p.T59R mutant in COS-7 cells resulted in intracellular retention and degradation of the mutant protein. This was confirmed after in vivo expression of the mutant triadin in triadin knock-out mice by viral transduction. In this work, we identified TRDN as a new gene responsible for an autosomal recessive form of CPVT. The mutations identified in the two families lead to the absence of the protein, thereby demonstrating the importance of triadin for the normal function of the cardiac calcium release complex in humans. PMID:22422768

  16. Retention and release of oil-in-water emulsions from filled hydrogel beads composed of calcium alginate: impact of emulsifier type and pH.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Saberi, Amir Hossein; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-03-21

    Delivery systems based on filled hydrogel particles (microgels) can be fabricated from natural food-grade lipids and biopolymers. The potential for controlling release characteristics by modulating the electrostatic interactions between emulsifier-coated lipid droplets and the biopolymer matrix within hydrogel particles was investigated. A multistage procedure was used to fabricate calcium alginate beads filled with lipid droplets stabilized by non-ionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic emulsifiers. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by Tween 60, DTAB, SDS, or whey protein were prepared by microfluidization, mixed with various alginate solutions, and then microgels were formed by simple extrusion into calcium solutions. The microgels were placed into a series of buffer solutions with different pH values (2 to 11). Lipid droplets remained encapsulated under acidic and neutral conditions, but were released under highly basic conditions (pH 11) due to hydrogel swelling when the alginate concentration was sufficiently high. Lipid droplet release increased with decreasing alginate concentration, which could be attributed to an increase in the pore size of the hydrogel matrix. These results have important implications for the design of delivery systems to entrap and control the release of lipophilic bioactive components within filled hydrogel particles. PMID:25646949

  17. Effects of synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on spontaneous neurotransmitter release in the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J W; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R; McGuinness, T L; Greengard, P

    1990-01-01

    The molecular events that control synaptic vesicle availability in chemical synaptic junctions have not been fully clarified. Among the protein molecules specifically located in presynaptic terminals, synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) have been shown to modulate evoked transmitter release in the squid giant synapse. In the present study, analysis of synaptic noise in this chemical junction was used to determine whether these proteins also play a role in the control of spontaneous and enhanced spontaneous transmitter release. Injections of dephosphorylated synapsin I into the presynaptic terminal reduced the rate of spontaneous and enhanced quantal release, whereas injection of phosphorylated synapsin I did not modify such release. By contrast CaM kinase II injection increased enhanced miniature release without affecting spontaneous miniature frequency. These results support the view that dephosphorylated synapsin I "cages" synaptic vesicles while CaM kinase II, by phosphorylating synapsin I, "decages" these organelles and increases their availability for release without affecting the release mechanism itself. Images PMID:1978321

  18. Altered expression of triadin 95 causes parallel changes in localized Ca2+ release events and global Ca2+ signals in skeletal muscle cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, János; Gönczi, Monika; Sztretye, Monika; Dienes, Beatrix; Oláh, Tamás; Szabó, László; Csoma, Eszter; Szentesi, Péter; Szigeti, Gyula P; Marty, Isabelle; Csernoch, László

    2008-01-01

    The 95 kDa triadin (Trisk 95), an integral protein of the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in skeletal muscle, interacts with both the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and calsequestrin. While its role in the regulation of calcium homeostasis has been extensively studied, data are not available on whether the overexpression or the interference with the expression of Trisk 95 would affect calcium sparks the localized events of calcium release (LCRE). In the present study LCRE and calcium transients were studied using laser scanning confocal microscopy on C2C12 cells and on primary cultures of skeletal muscle. Liposome- or adenovirus-mediated Trisk 95 overexpression and shRNA interference with triadin translation were used to modify the level of the protein. Stable overexpression in C2C12 cells significantly decreased the amplitude and frequency of calcium sparks, and the frequency of embers. In line with these observations, depolarization-evoked calcium transients were also suppressed. Similarly, adenoviral transfection of Trisk 95 into cultured mouse skeletal muscle cells significantly decreased both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous global calcium transients. Inhibition of endogenous triadin expression by RNA interference caused opposite effects. Primary cultures of rat skeletal muscle cells expressing endogenous Trisk 95 readily generated spontaneous calcium transients but rarely produced calcium sparks. Their transfection with specific shRNA sequence significantly reduced the triadin-specific immunoreactivity. Functional experiments on these cells revealed that while caffeine-evoked calcium transients were reduced, LCRE appeared with higher frequency. These results suggest that Trisk 95 negatively regulates RyR function by suppressing localized calcium release events and global calcium signals in cultured muscle cells. PMID:18845610

  19. Thalamic reticular impairment underlies attention deficit in Ptchd1(Y/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Wells, Michael F; Wimmer, Ralf D; Schmitt, L Ian; Feng, Guoping; Halassa, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    Developmental disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), affect one in six children in the USA. Recently, gene mutations in patched domain containing 1 (PTCHD1) have been found in ~1% of patients with ID and ASD. Individuals with PTCHD1 deletion show symptoms of ADHD, sleep disruption, hypotonia, aggression, ASD, and ID. Although PTCHD1 is probably critical for normal development, the connection between its deletion and the ensuing behavioural defects is poorly understood. Here we report that during early post-natal development, mouse Ptchd1 is selectively expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a group of GABAergic neurons that regulate thalamocortical transmission, sleep rhythms, and attention. Ptchd1 deletion attenuates TRN activity through mechanisms involving small conductance calcium-dependent potassium currents (SK). TRN-restricted deletion of Ptchd1 leads to attention deficits and hyperactivity, both of which are rescued by pharmacological augmentation of SK channel activity. Global Ptchd1 deletion recapitulates learning impairment, hyper-aggression, and motor defects, all of which are insensitive to SK pharmacological targeting and not found in the TRN-restricted deletion mouse. This study maps clinically relevant behavioural phenotypes onto TRN dysfunction in a human disease model, while also identifying molecular and circuit targets for intervention. PMID:27007844

  20. Thalamic reticular impairment underlies attention deficit in Ptchd1(Y/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Wells, Michael F; Wimmer, Ralf D; Schmitt, L Ian; Feng, Guoping; Halassa, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    Developmental disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), affect one in six children in the USA. Recently, gene mutations in patched domain containing 1 (PTCHD1) have been found in ~1% of patients with ID and ASD. Individuals with PTCHD1 deletion show symptoms of ADHD, sleep disruption, hypotonia, aggression, ASD, and ID. Although PTCHD1 is probably critical for normal development, the connection between its deletion and the ensuing behavioural defects is poorly understood. Here we report that during early post-natal development, mouse Ptchd1 is selectively expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a group of GABAergic neurons that regulate thalamocortical transmission, sleep rhythms, and attention. Ptchd1 deletion attenuates TRN activity through mechanisms involving small conductance calcium-dependent potassium currents (SK). TRN-restricted deletion of Ptchd1 leads to attention deficits and hyperactivity, both of which are rescued by pharmacological augmentation of SK channel activity. Global Ptchd1 deletion recapitulates learning impairment, hyper-aggression, and motor defects, all of which are insensitive to SK pharmacological targeting and not found in the TRN-restricted deletion mouse. This study maps clinically relevant behavioural phenotypes onto TRN dysfunction in a human disease model, while also identifying molecular and circuit targets for intervention.

  1. Thalamic reticular impairment underlies attention deficit in Ptchd1Y/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Michael F.; Wimmer, Ralf D.; Schmitt, L. Ian; Feng, Guoping; Halassa, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability (ID), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), affect 1 in 6 children in the United States. Recently, PTCHD1 (Patched-domain containing protein 1) gene mutations have been found in ~1% of patients with ID and ASD. PTCHD1 deletion patients show symptoms of ADHD, sleep disruption, hypotonia, aggression, ASD, and ID. Although PTCHD1 is likely critical for normal development, the connection between its deletion and the ensuing behavioral defects is poorly understood. Here, we report that during early postnatal development, mouse Ptchd1 is selectively expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a group of GABAergic neurons that regulate thalamo-cortical transmission, sleep rhythms, and attention. Ptchd1 deletion attenuates TRN activity by reducing calcium-dependent potassium currents (SK). Restricted TRN deletion of Ptchd1 leads to attention deficits and hyperactivity, both of which are rescued by pharmacological augmentation of SK channels. Global Ptchd1 deletion recapitulates learning impairment, hyper-aggression, and motor defects, all of which are insensitive to SK pharmacological targeting and not found in the TRN-restricted deletion mouse. This study maps clinically-relevant behavioral phenotypes onto TRN dysfunction in a human disease model, while also identifying molecular and circuit targets for intervention. PMID:27007844

  2. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  3. Effect of particle size of calcium phosphate based bioceramic drug delivery carrier on the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan

    2013-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is the constituent of calcium phosphate based bone cement and it is extensively used as a bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle in various biomedical applications. In the present study we investigated the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin loaded HAP and analyzed its ability to function as a targeted and sustained release drug carrier. Synthesis of HAP was carried out by combustion method using tartaric acid as a fuel and nitric acid as an oxidizer. Powder XRD and FTIR techniques were employed to characterize the phase purity of the drug carrier and to verify the chemical interaction between the drug and carrier. The synthesized powders were sieve separated to make two different drug carriers with different particle sizes and the surface topography of the pellets of the drug carrier was imaged by AFM. Surface area and porosity of the drug carrier was carried out using surface area analyzer. The in-vitro drug release kinetics was performed in simulated body fluid, at 37.3°C. The amount of ciprofloxacin released is measured using UV-visible spectroscopy following the characteristic λ max of 278 nm. The release saturates around 450 h which indicates that it can be used as a targeted and sustained release carrier for bone infections.

  4. Prevention of bone demineralization by calcium supplementation in precocious puberty during gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, F; Bertoldo, F; Lauriola, S; Sirpresi, S; Gasperi, E; Zamboni, G; Tatò, L

    1999-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a negative impact on peak bone mass in girls with precocious puberty treated with GnRH agonist (GnRHa). Several studies have shown that a high calcium intake positively influences bone mass in prepubertal girls and leads to a higher peak bone mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium supplementation in girls with precocious puberty during GnRHa treatment. Forty girls affected by true central precocious puberty and treated with the GnRHa triptorelin were studied for 2 yr. After diagnosis, the patients were randomly assigned to three groups: group A, treated only with GnRHa; group B, treated for 12 months solely with GnRHa and then supplemented with calcium gluconolactate/carbonate (1 g calcium/day in two doses) for 12 months; and group C, treated from the beginning with combined GnRHa and calcium. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry at the beginning of the study and after 12 and 24 months and was expressed as the calculated true volumetric density (BMDv) in milligrams per cm3. Group A showed a decrease in absolute BMDv levels, in SD score for chronological age (CA), and even more in SD score for bone age (BA). Group B showed the same behavior during the first year, but this trend was reversed in the second year, when calcium supplementation was added to GnRHa treatment. Group C showed an increase in absolute BMDv levels and in SD score for CA and BA. BMDv variations (expressed as absolute values, SD score for CA, and SD score for BA) became statistically significant at 24 months between groups C and A (P = 0.036, P = 0.032, and P = 0.025, respectively). The behavior of the lumbar spine BMDv in the three groups is consistent with a positive effect of calcium supplementation during GnRHa treatment. In calcium-supplemented patients, the normal process of bone mass accretion at puberty is preserved despite GnRHa treatment. Therefore, the reduction in BMD

  5. Hybrid Markov-mass action law model for cell activation by rare binding events: Application to calcium induced vesicular release at neuronal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Guerrier, Claire; Holcman, David

    2016-01-01

    Binding of molecules, ions or proteins to small target sites is a generic step of cell activation. This process relies on rare stochastic events where a particle located in a large bulk has to find small and often hidden targets. We present here a hybrid discrete-continuum model that takes into account a stochastic regime governed by rare events and a continuous regime in the bulk. The rare discrete binding events are modeled by a Markov chain for the encounter of small targets by few Brownian particles, for which the arrival time is Poissonian. The large ensemble of particles is described by mass action laws. We use this novel model to predict the time distribution of vesicular release at neuronal synapses. Vesicular release is triggered by the binding of few calcium ions that can originate either from the synaptic bulk or from the entry through calcium channels. We report here that the distribution of release time is bimodal although it is triggered by a single fast action potential. While the first peak follows a stimulation, the second corresponds to the random arrival over much longer time of ions located in the synaptic terminal to small binding vesicular targets. To conclude, the present multiscale stochastic modeling approach allows studying cellular events based on integrating discrete molecular events over several time scales. PMID:27752087

  6. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  7. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channels and calcium-ATPase lengthens the period of hepatic clock gene Per1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role played by calcium as a regulator of circadian rhythms is not well understood. The effect of the pharmacological inhibition of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), and endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), as well as the intracellular Ca2+-chelator BAPTA-AM was explored on the 24-h rhythmicity of the liver-clock protein PER1 in an experimental model of circadian synchronization by light and restricted-feeding schedules. Methods Liver explants from Period1-luciferase (Per1-luc) transgenic rats with either free food access or with a restricted meal schedule were treated for several days with drugs to inhibit the activity of IP3Rs (2-APB), RyRs (ryanodine), or SERCA (thapsigargin) as well as to suppress intracellular calcium fluctuations (BAPTA-AM). The period of Per1-luc expression was measured during and after drug administration. Results Liver explants from rats fed ad libitum showed a lengthened period in response to all the drugs tested. The pharmacological treatments of the explants from meal-entrained rats induced the same pattern, with the exception of the ryanodine treatment which, unexpectedly, did not modify the Per1-luc period. All effects associated with drug application were reversed after washout, indicating that none of the pharmacological treatments was toxic to the liver cultures. Conclusions Our data suggest that Ca2+ mobilized from internal deposits modulates the molecular circadian clock in the liver of rats entrained by light and by restricted meal access. PMID:21740569

  8. T-cell movement on the reticular network.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M; Lythe, Grant

    2012-02-21

    The idea that the apparently random motion of T cells in lymph nodes is a result of movement on a reticular network (RN) has received support from dynamic imaging experiments and theoretical studies. We present a mathematical representation of the RN consisting of edges connecting vertices that are randomly distributed in three-dimensional space, and models of lymphocyte movement on such networks including constant speed motion along edges and Brownian motion, not in three-dimensions, but only along edges. The simplest model, in which a cell moves with a constant speed along edges, is consistent with mean-squared displacement proportional to time over intervals long enough to include several changes of direction. A non-random distribution of turning angles is one consequence of motion on a preformed network. Confining cell movement to a network does not, in itself, increase the frequency of cell-cell encounters.

  9. Hydrogeochemical signatures of catchment evolution - the role of calcium and sulphate release in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, Ina; Hu, Yuzhu; Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Hinz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment is an ecohydrological system in an initial state of development. The catchment with an area of 6 ha was built up from quaternary sediments in the post-mining landscape of Lusatia in Eastern Germany and serves as a critical zone observatory for detecting ecosystem transition. The soil substrate is characterized as sands to loamy sands with low carbonate contents but significant amounts of gypsum in the sediments of the catchment. The catchment undergoes a strong transition from an abiotic system in the initial years to a system with growing influence of biota. Concerning the hydrology, a regime shift from surface runoff to groundwater flow dominated processes is significant. It is of interest, whether the catchment transition is also reflected by hydrogeochemical indicators. We assume gypsum dissolution as dominant process at the catchment scale. In order to investigate the hydrogeochemical evolution of the catchment we analysed electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations and pH-values of biweekly composite samples from 2007-2013 of the atmospheric deposition, of runoff and soil water. The two observation points in the flowing water represent surface runoff and groundwater discharge respectively. Soil water has been analysed at four soil pits in three depths. The monitoring data were provided by the Research Platform Chicken Creek (https://www.tu-cottbus.de/projekte/en/oekosysteme/startseite.html). From the macroscopic data analysis we found an exponential decay of the electric conductivity, calcium and sulphate concentrations in the flowing waters and some of the soil pits. In the flowing water, the decrease slope of the electric conductivity and the calcium and sulphate concentrations is almost identical. The calcium / sulphate molar ratio as an indicator of gypsum dissolution is almost equal to one up to 2010, afterwards more calcium than sulphate is released. The pH-values in the flowing

  10. Descending spinal projections from the rostral gigantocellular reticular nuclei complex.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gerlinda E; Holmes, Gregory M; Rogers, Richard C; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2003-01-01

    Electrophysiological and physiological studies have suggested that the ventral medullary gigantocellular reticular nuclei (composed of the gigantocellular ventralis and pars alpha nuclei as well as the adjacent lateral paragigantocellular nucleus; abbreviated Gi-LPGi complex) provide descending control of pelvic floor organs (Mackel [1979] J. Physiol. (Lond.) 294:105-122; Hubscher and Johnson [1996] J. Neurophysiol. 76:2474-2482; Hubscher and Johnson [1999] J. Neurophysiol. 82:1381-1389; Johnson and Hubscher [1998] Neuroreport 9:341-345). Specifically, this complex of paramedian reticular nuclei has been implicated in the inhibition of sexual reflexes. In the present study, an anterograde fluorescent tracer was used to investigate direct descending projections from the Gi-LPGi complex to retrogradely labeled pudendal motoneurons (MN) in the male rat. Our results demonstrated that, although a high density of arborizations from Gi-LPGi fibers appears to be in close apposition to pudendal MNs, this relationship also applies to other MNs throughout the entire spinal cord. The Gi-LPGi also projects to spinal autonomic regions, i.e., both the intermediolateral cell column and the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, as well as to regions of the intermediate gray, which contain interneurons involved in the organization of pelvic floor reflexes. Lastly, throughout the length of the spinal cord, numerous neurons located primarily in laminae VII-X, were retrogradely labeled with Fluoro-Ruby after injections into the Gi-LPGi. The diffuse descending projections and arborizations of this pathway throughout the spinal cord suggest that this brainstem area is involved in the direct, descending control of a variety of spinal activities. These results are in contrast with our observations of the discrete projections of the caudal nucleus raphe obscurus, which target the autonomic and somatic MNs involved specifically in sexual and eliminative functions (Hermann et al. [1998] J. Comp

  11. Protein kinase C modulates the release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine in the spinal cord of the rat: the role of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Jones, D J

    1992-11-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in modulating the release of neurotransmitter from K(+)-depolarized rat spinal cord synaptosomes. Activators of PKC, such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), mezerein and oleoyl acetylglycerol produced a concentration-dependent potentiation of K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT). Enhanced release was dependent on the concentration of both Ca2+ and K+ in the superfusion medium. Calcium-independent release of [3H]5-HT or release induced by the Ca2+ ionophore were unaffected by PKC activators. Calcium-dependent release of [3H]5-HT, evoked by K+, was enhanced under similar conditions by the L-type Ca2+ channel agonists Bay K 8644 and (+)-SDZ 202-791. Nimodipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist, while having no independent effect on K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-HT, abolished the potentiative effects of Bay K 8644 and PMA. Similarly, the PKC inhibitors, polymyxin B and staurosporine, blocked effects of both PMA and Bay K 8644 on K(+)-stimulated release of [3H]5-HT. Neither PMA nor Bay K 8644 altered the uptake of [3H]5-HT. These results suggest that PKC-dependent mechanisms utilize calcium influx, via the L-type calcium channel, to modulate release of neurotransmitter and indicate a possible functional link between PKC and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in the spinal cord.

  12. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae. I. Electrically-induced intracellular calcium transient and protein release during the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Yu, X C; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The present study was designed to compare the cardiac actions of the extract and individual components, tetrandrine (Tet) and fangchinoline (Fan), of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST). We measured the electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient in single rat ventricular myocytes and protein release following perfusion with a Ca2+ free solution (the Ca2+ paradox) from the isolated perfused rat heart, both of which are known to relate to Ca2+ influx. We found that Tet inhibited both electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient and protein release during the Ca2+ paradox, while Fan had no significant effects. The RST extract containing 9% Tet and 6% Fan by weight also affected the [Ca2+]i transient, and was only slightly, though significantly, less effective/potent than Tet alone. On the other hand, RST extract had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on protein release during the Ca2+ paradox than Tet alone. The observations suggest that the RST extract, which contains a mixture of components, may have more potent effects in the heart than its main active component. PMID:11432451

  13. The toxicity of the N-hydroxy and 6-hydroxy metabolites of 3,4-dichloropropionanilide does not depend on calcium release-activated calcium channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tricia L; Holásková, Ida; Barnett, John B

    2013-02-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2-4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630-645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites of

  14. Papillary fibroblasts differentiate into reticular fibroblasts after prolonged in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Janson, David; Saintigny, Gaëlle; Mahé, Christian; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2013-01-01

    The dermis can be divided into two morphologically different layers: the papillary and reticular dermis. Fibroblasts isolated from these layers behave differently when cultured in vitro. During skin ageing, the papillary dermis decreases in volume. Based on the functional differences in vitro, it is hypothesized that the loss of papillary fibroblasts contributes to skin ageing. In this study, we aimed to mimic certain aspects of skin ageing by using high-passage cultures of reticular and papillary fibroblasts and investigated the effect of these cells on skin morphogenesis in reconstructed human skin equivalents. Skin equivalents generated with reticular fibroblasts showed a reduced terminal differentiation and fewer proliferating basal keratinocytes. Aged in vitro papillary fibroblasts had increased expression of biomarkers specific to reticular fibroblasts. The phenotype and morphology of skin equivalents generated with high-passage papillary fibroblasts resembled that of reticular fibroblasts. This demonstrates that papillary fibroblasts can differentiate into reticular fibroblasts in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesize that papillary fibroblasts represent an undifferentiated phenotype, while reticular fibroblasts represent a more differentiated population. The differentiation process could be a new target for anti-skin-ageing strategies.

  15. Mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with mesopore size and pore volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with a pore size of 15 nm (MCS-15) and pore volume of 1.43 cm(3)/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the pore-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium-silicon xerogels with a pore size of 4 nm (MCS-4). The pore size and pore volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore size and higher pore volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction.

  16. Biofunctionalized Calcium Phosphate Cement to Enhance the Attachment and Osteodifferentiation of Stem Cells Released from Fast-Degradable Alginate-Fibrin Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchuan; Weir, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell-encapsulating microbeads could be mixed into a paste such as calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the microbeads could protect the cells from the mixing and injection forces. After being placed, the microbeads could quickly degrade to release the cells throughout the scaffold, while creating macropores. The objectives of this study were to (1) construct alginate-fibrin microbeads encapsulating human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) embedded in the surface of novel biofunctionalized CPC and (2) investigate microbead degradation, cell release, and osteodifferentiation on CPC. Hydrogel microbeads were fabricated that encapsulated hUCMSCs at 1×106 cells/mL. CPC was biofunctionalized with fibronectin (Fn) and Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Four scaffolds were tested: CPC control, CPC mixed with Fn, CPC mixed with RGD, and CPC grafted with RGD. The degradable microbeads released hUCMSCs at 7 days, which attached to CPC. Adding Fn or RGD to CPC greatly improved cell attachment. CPC grafted with RGD showed the fastest cell proliferation, with cell density being ninefold that on CPC control. The released hUCMSCs underwent osteodifferentiation. Alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, collagen 1, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) gene expression increased by 10 to 30 fold at 7–21 days, compared with day 1. The released cells on CPC synthesized bone minerals, with the mineralization amount at 21 days being two orders of magnitude higher than that at 7 days. In conclusion, alginate-fibrin microbeads embedded in CPC surface were able to quickly release the hUCMSCs that attached to biofunctionalized CPC. Incorporating Fn and RGD into CPC greatly improved cell function, and CPC grafted with RGD had the fastest cell proliferation. The released cells on CPC differentiated into the osteogenic lineage and synthesized bone minerals. The new biofunctionalized CPC with hUCMSC-encapsulating microbeads is promising for bone regeneration applications. PMID:22435653

  17. Intracellular P2X receptors as novel calcium release channels and modulators of osmoregulation in Dictyostelium: a comparison of two common laboratory strains.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venketesh; Fountain, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptors are calcium permeable ligand-gated ion channels activated by ATP. Their role as cell surface receptors for extracellular ATP released physiologically by mammalian cells is well established. However, the cellular function of P2X receptor subtypes that populate the membranes of intracellular compartments is not defined. An initial report described how intracellular P2X receptors control the function of the contractile vacuole, an osmoregulatory organelle in Dictyostelium and other protists, and that genetic disruption of P2X receptors severely impaired cell volume control during hypotonic stress. However, later studies refuted a functional role of intracellular P2X receptors in Dictyostelium. Here we provide evidence that the discrepancies reported between the studies are due to the laboratory strain of Dictyostelium employed, which display different phenotypes in response to hypotonic stress and a varied dependency upon P2X receptors for osmoregulation. We use the recent discovery that intracellular P2X receptors are novel calcium release channels to provide some mechanistic insight in an effort to explain why the strain variance may exist.

  18. Acetylcholine and muscarinic receptor function in cerebral cortex of diabetic young and old male Wistar rats and the role of muscarinic receptors in calcium release from pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Savitha, Balakrishnan; Joseph, Binoy; Peeyush Kumar, T; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-01

    We investigated acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine and muscarinic M1, M3 receptors kinetics in the cerebral cortex of young and old streptozotocin induced and insulin treated diabetic rats. The role of muscarinic receptors in intracellular calcium release from pancreatic islets was studied in vitro. Wistar rats of 7 and 90-weeks old were used. All studies were done in cerebral cortex. AChE assay was done by spectrophotometric method. Radioreceptor binding assays were done for Acetylcholine, Muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors using specific ligands. Calcium imaging was done using fluo4-AM in pancreatic cells. Ninety-weeks old control rats showed significantly decreased Vmax and increased Km for AChE compared to 7-weeks old control rats. An increased Vmax observed in both 7 and 90-weeks old diabetic groups with significant decrease in Km. Scatchard analysis using specific agonists showed significant decrease in the B (max) and K (d) of acetylcholine and muscarinic M1 receptors in 90-weeks old control rats compared to 7-weeks old control. Binding studies for M3 receptors showed no significant change compared to 7-weeks old control. Acetylcholine, muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor number significantly increased in 90-weeks old diabetic rat groups compared to their respective controls. Insulin treatment significantly reversed the binding parameters to near control compared to diabetic group. In vitro studies showed that acetylcholine through muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors' stimulated calcium release from the pancreatic islets. Thus our studies suggest that Insulin signaling play an important part in differentially regulating pancreatic cholinergic activity, and the diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions with age.

  19. Calcium storage and release properties of F-actin: evidence for the involvement of F-actin in cellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Lange, K; Brandt, U

    1996-10-21

    Preceding studies have shown that the bulk of the ATP-dependent, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ store of hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells is located in microvilli on the cell surface. Similar results were obtained with isolated rat hepatocytes. Moreover, in vesicles of microvillar origin, passive fluxes of Ca2+, ATP, and IP3 occur through cation and anion channels, respectively, suggesting that Ca2+ storage is due to ATP-dependent Ca2+ binding to an intravesicular component. Here we demonstrate that F-actin may be a possible candidate for this function. ATP-actin monomers bind Ca2+ with high affinity (Kd = 2-8 nM) to their divalent cation binding sites. Polymerization of actin monomers decreases the rate constant for divalent cation exchange at this binding site by more than 3 orders of magnitude rendering bound cations nearly unavailable. F-actin-bound Ca2+ can be released by depolymerization and dissociation from Ca(2+)-ADP-actin monomers (Kd = 375 nM). We now provide additional evidence for the possible involvement of actin in Ca2+ storage. (1) Preincubation of surface-derived Ca(2+)-storing vesicles from HIT cells with the F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin, strongly inhibited ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake, reducing the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ pool by 70%. Phalloidin, when added after the loading process, affected neither the amount of stored Ca2+ nor IP3 action on the store. (2) F-actin polymerized in the presence of Mg2+ in nominally Ca(2+)-free buffer still contained about half of the high affinity sites occupied with Ca2+ (Mg/Ca-F-actin). (3) Using the fura-2 technique, we found that in the presence of ATP, Mg/Ca-F-actin incorporated free Ca2+ at a relatively low rate. Short pulses of ultrasound (3-10 s) strongly accelerated Ca2+ uptake, decreasing free Ca2+ from 500 nM to below 100 nM. (4) In the presence of physiological levels of Mg2+ (0.5 mM), sonication liberated large amounts of Ca2+ from Mg/Ca-F-actin. (5) Ca-F-actin released bound Ca2+ at a very

  20. Electrospinning of calcium phosphate-poly (d,l-lactic acid) nanofibers for sustained release of water-soluble drug and fast mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qi-Wei; Zi, Yun-Peng; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Rong; Cai, Zhu-Yun; Zheng, Wei-Jie; Chen, Feng; Qian, Qi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based biomaterials have been well studied in biomedical fields due to their outstanding chemical and biological properties which are similar to the inorganic constituents in bone tissue. In this study, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) nanoparticles were prepared by a precipitation method, and used for preparation of ACP-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (ACP-PLA) nanofibers and water-soluble drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers by electrospinning. Promoting the encapsulation efficiency of water-soluble drugs in electrospun hydrophobic polymer nanofibers is a common problem due to the incompatibility between the water-soluble drug molecules and hydrophobic polymers solution. Herein, we used a native biomolecule of lecithin as a biocompatible surfactant to overcome this problem, and successfully prepared water-soluble drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers. The lecithin and ACP nanoparticles played important roles in stabilizing water-soluble drug in the electrospinning composite solution. The electrospun drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers exhibited fast mineralization in simulated body fluid. The ACP nanoparticles played the key role of seeds in the process of mineralization. Furthermore, the drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers exhibited sustained drug release which simultaneously occurred with the in situ mineralization in simulated body fluid. The osteoblast-like (MG63) cells with spreading filopodia were well observed on the as-prepared nanofibrous mats after culturing for 24 hours, indicating a high cytocompatibility. Due to the high biocompatibility, sustained drug release, and fast mineralization, the as-prepared composite nanofibers may have potential applications in water-soluble drug loading and release for tissue engineering. PMID:27785016

  1. [Appearance of phosphatase reticular cells in the spleen parenchyme of normal and tumor-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Catayée, G; Chalet, M

    1976-01-01

    The splenic mouse parenchyma presents 3 reticular cells types revealed by histo-enzymatic technics: the phagocytic cells show a strong phosphatasic acid activity, the endothelial cells possess a phosphatasic alcalin or adenosine-triphosphatasic reaction, the perithelial cells are 5' nucleotidasic. These different cells are distributed by forming specific topographic structures in the splenic tissue. The phosphatasic alcalin reticular cells seem to be, with their distribution, characteristic elements of mouse spleen. Indeed the modifications in tumoral animal interest chiefly this cell category. In this case, the reticular cells form a deep and large membrane between marginal zone and perivascular lymphoid sheath of the white pulp. These different reticular cells probably react for the defense system of the animal.

  2. The thalamic reticular nucleus: structure, function and concept.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier

    2004-08-01

    On the basis of theoretical, anatomical, psychological and physiological considerations, Francis Crick (1984) proposed that, during selective attention, the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) controls the internal attentional searchlight that simultaneously highlights all the neural circuits called on by the object of attention. In other words, he submitted that during either perception, or the preparation and execution of any cognitive and/or motor task, the TRN sets all the corresponding thalamocortical (TC) circuits in motion. Over the last two decades, behavioural, electrophysiological, anatomical and neurochemical findings have been accumulating, supporting the complex nature of the TRN and raising questions about the validity of this speculative hypothesis. Indeed, our knowledge of the actual functioning of the TRN is still sprinkled with unresolved questions. Therefore, the time has come to join forces and discuss some recent cellular and network findings concerning this diencephalic GABAergic structure, which plays important roles during various states of consciousness. On the whole, the present critical survey emphasizes the TRN's complexity, and provides arguments combining anatomy, physiology and cognitive psychology.

  3. A toxic extract of the marine phytoflagellate Prymnesium parvum induces calcium-dependent release of glutamate from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mariussen, Espen; Nelson, George Nicholas; Fonnum, Frode

    2005-01-01

    Blooms of the marine phytoflagellate Prymnesium parvum produced mass mortality of fish in Norway and many other parts of the world. The effects of a purified algae extract of P. parvum on transmitter release from rat brain synaptosomes were studied to characterize its toxic action. Synaptosomes are detached nerve terminals and represent a simple system that has retained the machinery for uptake, synthesis, storage, and release of neurotransmitters. A crude methanol extract of P. parvum was purified by reverse-phase column for fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The purified extract stimulated Ca2+-dependent spontaneous release of glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner. The release was increased by addition of extracellular Ca2+. The release of glutamate was suppressed by the Ca2+-channel blockers flunarizine (10 microM), diltiazem (10 microM), and verapamil (10 microM). The stimulation of release of glutamate from rat brain synaptosomes induced by the toxin may be due to an ionophorelike property of the algae extract such as previously reported for the potent algal toxin maitotoxin. At high concentrations the toxin primarily acts as a powerful lytic agent. PMID:15739805

  4. Thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman crocodilus: Relationship with the dorsal thalamus.

    PubMed

    Pritz, M B

    2016-05-13

    The thalamic reticular nucleus was investigated in one group of crocodilians, Caiman crocodilus. This neuronal aggregate is composed of two parts: a compact portion and a diffuse region made up of scattered cells within the forebrain bundles. In Caiman, both the lateral and medial forebrain bundles project to the telencephalon and the thalamic reticular nucleus is associated with each fiber tract. In the lateral forebrain bundle, the compact area is termed the nucleus of the dorsal peduncle (dorsal peduncular nucleus) while the diffuse part is called the perireticular area. In the medial forebrain bundle, the interstitial nucleus comprises one part of the compact area while another region without a specific neuronal label is also present. Similar to the perireticular cells of the lateral forebrain bundle, scattered cells are also present in the medial forebrain bundle. Morphological features of the thalamic reticular nucleus are revealed with stains for the following: fibers; cells; succinic acid dehydrogenase; and acetylcholinesterase. Regardless of which dorsal thalamic nucleus was injected, a localized region of the thalamic reticular nucleus contained retrogradely labeled cells and anterogradely labeled axons and terminals. This grouping was termed clusters and was felt to represent the densest interconnection between the dorsal thalamus and the reticular nucleus. Using clusters as an index of interconnections, the reticular nucleus was divided into sectors, each of which was associated with a specific dorsal thalamic nucleus. An organization similar to that found in Caiman is present in other sauropsids as well as in mammals. These data suggest that a thalamic reticular nucleus is present in all amniotes and has morphological properties similar to those described in this analysis. Lastly, a hypothesis is presented to explain how the external shape of the reticular nucleus in Caiman might be transformed into the homologous area in a representative bird and

  5. The effect of calcium ions and temperature on the binomial parameters that control acetylcholine release by a nerve impulse at amphibian neuromuscular synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. R.; Fisher, C.; Florin, T.; Quine, M.; Robinson, J.

    1977-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the effects of changing the external calcium concentration, [Ca]o, and the temperature on both the number of quanta available for release by the nerve impulse (n) as well as the increase in release probability of a quantum p(t) during the release period (from 0 to T) following a nerve impulse at synapses in amphibian striated muscle. 2. When [Ca]o was increased in the low range from 0·25 to 0·4 mM at 18 °C, the average quantal content of the e.p.p. (m̄) increased as the fourth power of [Ca]o and this was primarily due to a third power dependence of n on [Ca]o; the dissociation constants and power dependence of n on calcium determined in the [Ca]o range from 0·25 to 1·0 mM were successfully used to predict the changes in size of the e.p.p. in the very high [Ca]o range from 1 to 10 mM. When the temperature was increased from 7 to 18 °C in a [Ca]o of 0·6 mM or 0·35 mM, n increased with a Q10 of 2·5. 3. When [Ca]o was increased in the range from 0·25 to 1·0 mM at 18 °C, the probability that a quantum initially available for release is released during the release period (p(T)) was very sensitive to [Ca]o, increasing as the third power of [Ca]o and with a dissociation constant of 0·13 mM. When the temperature was increased from 7 to 18 °C in a [Ca]o of 0·6 mM or 0·35 mM, p(T) decreased. 4. The histograms of latencies of individual quanta following a nerve impulse was very temperature dependent: the time to peak of the histograms (i.e. the interval in which most quanta fell) had a Q10 of over 4 as did the time constant of decline of the histograms in the temperature range from 7 to 18 °C. 5. The average number of quanta released up to time t during the release period following a nerve impulse, namely np(t), was well described by a stochastic process in which p(t) was determined by two reactions; one of these reactions released available quanta from the nerve terminal whilst the other made some of the available quanta

  6. Open-loop organization of thalamic reticular nucleus and dorsal thalamus: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Willis, Adam M; Slater, Bernard J; Gribkova, Ekaterina D; Llano, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a shell of GABAergic neurons that surrounds the dorsal thalamus. Previous work has shown that TRN neurons send GABAergic projections to thalamocortical (TC) cells to form reciprocal, closed-loop circuits. This has led to the hypothesis that the TRN is responsible for oscillatory phenomena, such as sleep spindles and absence seizures. However, there is emerging evidence that open-loop circuits are also found between TRN and TC cells. The implications of open-loop configurations are not yet known, particularly when they include time-dependent nonlinearities in TC cells such as low-threshold bursting. We hypothesized that low-threshold bursting in an open-loop circuit could be a mechanism by which the TRN could paradoxically enhance TC activation, and that enhancement would depend on the relative timing of TRN vs. TC cell stimulation. To test this, we modeled small circuits containing TC neurons, TRN neurons, and layer 4 thalamorecipient cells in both open- and closed-loop configurations. We found that open-loop TRN stimulation, rather than universally depressing TC activation, increased cortical output across a broad parameter space, modified the filter properties of TC neurons, and altered the mutual information between input and output in a frequency-dependent and T-type calcium channel-dependent manner. Therefore, an open-loop model of TRN-TC interactions, rather than suppressing transmission through the thalamus, creates a tunable filter whose properties may be modified by outside influences onto the TRN. These simulations make experimentally testable predictions about the potential role for the TRN for flexible enhancement of cortical activation.

  7. Evidence of a role for calmodulin in the regulation of calcium release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, G.

    1986-01-14

    The effect of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on the Ca2+ release channel of heavy skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. SR vesicles were passively loaded with 45Ca2+ in the presence of calmodulin and its inhibitors, followed by measurement of 45Ca2+ release rates by means of a rapid-quench-Millipore filtration method. Calmodulin at a concentration of 2-10 microM reduced 45Ca2+ efflux rates from passively loaded vesicles by a factor of 2-3 in media containing 10(-6)-10(-3) M Ca2+. At 10(-9) M Ca2+, calmodulin was without effect. 45Ca2+ release rates were varied 1000-fold (k1 approximately equal to 0.1-100 s-1) by using 10(-5) M Ca2+ with either Mg2+ or the ATP analogue adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-methylenetriphosphate) in the release medium. In all instances, a similar 2-3-fold reduction in release rates was observed. At 10(-5) M Ca2+, 45Ca2+ release was half-maximally inhibited by about 2 X 10(-7) M calmodulin, and this inhibition was reversible. Heavy SR vesicle fractions contained 0.1-02 micrograms of endogenous calmodulin/mg of vesicle protein. However, the calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, calmidazolium, and compound 48/80 were without significant effect on 45Ca2+ release at concentrations which inhibit calmodulin-mediated reactions in other systems. Studies with actively loaded vesicles also suggested that heavy SR vesicles contain a Ca2+ permeation system that is inhibited by calmodulin.

  8. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Modeling the influence of short term depression in vesicle release and stochastic calcium channel gating on auditory nerve spontaneous firing statistics

    PubMed Central

    Moezzi, Bahar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    We propose several modifications to an existing computational model of stochastic vesicle release in inner hair cell ribbon synapses, with the aim of producing simulated auditory nerve fiber spiking data that more closely matches empirical data. Specifically, we studied the inter-spike-interval (ISI) distribution, and long and short term ISI correlations in spontaneous spiking in post-synaptic auditory nerve fibers. We introduced short term plasticity to the pre-synaptic release probability, in a manner analogous to standard stochastic models of cortical short term synaptic depression. This modification resulted in a similar distribution of vesicle release intervals to that estimated from empirical data. We also introduced a biophysical stochastic model of calcium channel opening and closing, but showed that this model is insufficient for generating a match with empirically observed spike correlations. However, by combining a phenomenological model of channel noise and our short term depression model, we generated short and long term correlations in auditory nerve spontaneous activity that qualitatively match empirical data. PMID:25566047

  10. A controlled release of antibiotics from calcium phosphate-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles and their in vitro efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Bastari, Kelsen; Arshath, Mohamed; Ng, Zhi Hui Melissa; Chia, Jia Hua; Yow, Zhi Xian Daniel; Sana, Barindra; Tan, Meng Fong Cherine; Lim, Sierin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Ceramic-polymer hybrid particles, intended for osteomyelitis treatment, were fabricated by preparing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles through an emulsion solvent evaporation technique, followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) coating via a surface adsorption-nucleation method. The presence of CaP coating on the surface of the particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, two antibiotics for treating bone infection, nafcillin (hydrophilic) and levofloxacin (amphiphilic), were loaded into these hybrid particles and their in vitro drug release studies were investigated. The CaP coating was shown to reduce burst release, while providing sustained release of the antibiotics for up to 4 weeks. In vitro bacterial study against Staphylococcus aureus demonstrated the capability of these antibiotic-loaded hybrid particles to inhibit biofilm formation as well as deteriorate established biofilm, making this hybrid system a potential candidate for further investigation for osteomyelitis treatment.

  11. RIM-binding protein 2 regulates release probability by fine-tuning calcium channel localization at murine hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Willmes, Claudia G.; Brockmann, Marisa M.; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Rosenmund, Tanja; Pangalos, Maria; Vardar, Gülçin; Stumpf, Alexander; Walter, Alexander M.; Rost, Benjamin R.; Eickholt, Britta J.; Haucke, Volker; Schmitz, Dietmar; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The tight spatial coupling of synaptic vesicles and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaVs) ensures efficient action potential-triggered neurotransmitter release from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Rab-interacting molecule-binding proteins (RIM-BPs) interact with Ca2+ channels and via RIM with other components of the release machinery. Although human RIM-BPs have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders, little is known about the role of mammalian RIM-BPs in synaptic transmission. We investigated RIM-BP2–deficient murine hippocampal neurons in cultures and slices. Short-term facilitation is significantly enhanced in both model systems. Detailed analysis in culture revealed a reduction in initial release probability, which presumably underlies the increased short-term facilitation. Superresolution microscopy revealed an impairment in CaV2.1 clustering at AZs, which likely alters Ca2+ nanodomains at release sites and thereby affects release probability. Additional deletion of RIM-BP1 does not exacerbate the phenotype, indicating that RIM-BP2 is the dominating RIM-BP isoform at these synapses. PMID:27671655

  12. Diastolic Calcium Release Controls the Beating Rate of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells: Numerical Modeling of the Coupling Process

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Stern, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies employing Ca2+ indicators and confocal microscopy demonstrate substantial local Ca2+ release beneath the cell plasma membrane (subspace) of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) occurring during diastolic depolarization. Pharmacological and biophysical experiments have suggested that the released Ca2+ interacts with the plasma membrane via the ion current (INaCa) produced by the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and constitutes an important determinant of the pacemaker rate. This study provides a numerical validation of the functional importance of diastolic Ca2+ release for rate control. The subspace Ca2+ signals in rabbit SANCs were measured by laser confocal microscopy, averaged, and calibrated. The time course of the subspace [Ca2+] displayed both diastolic and systolic components. The diastolic component was mainly due to the local Ca2+ releases; it was numerically approximated and incorporated into a SANC cellular electrophysiology model. The model predicts that the diastolic Ca2+ release strongly interacts with plasma membrane via INaCa and thus controls the phase of the action potential upstroke and ultimately the final action potential rate. PMID:15041695

  13. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Glutamate Release Through Inhibition of Voltage-Dependent Calcium Entry in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects and possible mechanism of ferulic acid, a naturally occurring phenolic compound, on endogenous glutamate release in the nerve terminals of the cerebral cortex in rats. Results show that ferulic acid inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effect of ferulic acid on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca2+ ions, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Ferulic acid suppressed the depolarization-induced increase in a cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration, but did not alter 4-AP–mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of ferulic acid on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These results show that ferulic acid inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry. PMID:23342970

  14. Activation of the inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate calcium gate receptor is required for HIV-1 Gag release.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Lorna S; Medina, Gisselle N; Khan, Mahfuz B; Powell, Michael D; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Carter, Carol A

    2010-07-01

    The structural precursor polyprotein, Gag, encoded by all retroviruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), is necessary and sufficient for the assembly and release of particles that morphologically resemble immature virus particles. Previous studies have shown that the addition of Ca(2+) to cells expressing Gag enhances virus particle production. However, no specific cellular factor has been implicated as mediator of Ca(2+) provision. The inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) gates intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Following activation by binding of its ligand, IP3, it releases Ca(2+) from the stores. We demonstrate here that IP3R function is required for efficient release of HIV-1 virus particles. Depletion of IP3R by small interfering RNA, sequestration of its activating ligand by expression of a mutated fragment of IP3R that binds IP3 with very high affinity, or blocking formation of the ligand by inhibiting phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of the precursor, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate, inhibited Gag particle release. These disruptions, as well as interference with ligand-receptor interaction using antibody targeted to the ligand-binding site on IP3R, blocked plasma membrane accumulation of Gag. These findings identify IP3R as a new determinant in HIV-1 trafficking during Gag assembly and introduce IP3R-regulated Ca(2+) signaling as a potential novel cofactor in viral particle release.

  15. Ultrastructure of cardiac muscle in reptiles and birds: optimizing and/or reducing the probability of transmission between calcium release units.

    PubMed

    Perni, Stefano; Iyer, V Ramesh; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2012-06-01

    It is known that cardiac myocytes contain three categories of calcium release units (CRUs) all bearing arrays of RyR2: peripheral couplings, constituted of an association of the junctional SR (jSR) with the plasmalemma; dyads, associations between jSR and T tubules; internal extended junctional jSR (EjSR)/corbular jSR that is not associated with plasmalemma/T tubules. The bird hearts, even if fast beating (e.g., in finch and hummingbird) have no T tubules, despite fiber sizes comparable to those of mammalian ventricle, but are rich in EjSR/corbular SR. The heart of small lizard also lacks T tubule, but it has only peripheral couplings and compensates for lack of internal CRUs by the small diameter of its cells. We have extended previous information on chicken heart to finch and lizard by establishing a spatial relationship between RyR2 clusters in jSR of peripheral couplings and clusters of intra-membrane particles identifiable as voltage sensitive calcium channels (CaV1.2) in the adjacent plasmalemma. This provides the structural basis for initiation of the heart beat in all three species. Further we evaluated the distances separating peripheral couplings from each other and between EjSR/corbular SR sites within the bird muscles in all three hearts. The distances suggest that peripheral coupling sites are most likely to act independently of each other and that a calcium wave-front propagation from one internal CRU site to the other across the level of the Z line, may be marginally successful in the chicken, but certainly very effective in the finch.

  16. Effects of two fast-setting calcium-silicate cements on cell viability and angiogenic factor release in human pulp-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chooryung J; Kim, Euiseong; Song, Minju; Park, Jeong-Won; Shin, Su-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is considered a pulp-capping agent of choice, but has the drawback of a long setting time. This study aimed to assess two different types of calcium-silicate cements as pulp-capping agents, by investigating their in vitro cytotoxicity and angiogenic effects in human pulp cells. ProRoot MTA, Endocem Zr, and Retro MTA were prepared as set or freshly mixed pellets. Human pulp-derived cells were grown in direct contact with these three cements, Dycal, or no cement, for 7 days. Initial cell attachment, viability, calcium release, and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenin, and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) were evaluated statistically using a linear mixed model (P < 0.05). The biocompatibility of Retro MTA was similar to those of the control and ProRoot MTA. Endocem Zr groups showed fewer and more rounded cells after a 3-day culture; however, the initial cytotoxicity appeared transient. All test materials showed significant increases in calcium concentration compared with the control group (P < 0.05). VEGF and angiogenin levels in ProRoot MTA and Retro MTA groups were significantly higher than those in the Endocem Zr group (P < 0.05). FGF-2 levels were not significantly different between groups (P > 0.05). We demonstrate that Retro MTA, which has a short setting time, has similar biocompatibility and angiogenic effects on human pulp cells, and can therefore potentially be as effective in pulp capping as ProRoot MTA. Endocem Zr showed intermittent cytotoxicity and elicited lower levels of VEGF and angiogenin expression.

  17. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Yulia; Volynski, Kirill E

    2015-01-01

    Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca(2+) buffers that shape [Ca(2+)] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca(2+) faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca(2+) buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca(2+) dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using experimentally constrained three-dimensional diffusion modeling of Ca(2+) influx-exocytosis coupling at small excitatory synapses we show that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, Ca(2+) buffering by calmodulin plays a dominant role in inhibiting vesicular release and in modulating short-term synaptic plasticity. We also propose a novel and potentially powerful mechanism for short-term facilitation based on Ca(2+)-dependent dynamic dislocation of calmodulin molecules from the plasma membrane within the active zone. PMID:26190970

  18. Calcium Carbonate Nanoplate Assemblies with Directed High-Energy Facets: Additive-Free Synthesis, High Drug Loading, and Sustainable Releasing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yu; Xie, Hao; Su, Bao-Lian; Yao, Bin; Yin, Yixia; Li, Shipu; Chen, Fang; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-07-29

    Developing drug delivery systems (DDSs) with high drug-loading capacity and sustainable releasing is critical for long-term chemotherapeutic efficacy, and it still remains challenging. Herein, vaterite CaCO3 nanoplate assemblies with exposed high-energy {001} facets have been synthesized via a novel, additive-free strategy. The product shows a high doxorubicin-loading capacity (65%); the best of all the CaCO3-based DDSs so far. Also, the product's sustainable releasing performance and its inhibition of the initial burst release, together, endow it with long-term drug efficacy. The work may shed light on exposing directed high-energy facets for rationally designing of a drug delivery system with long-term efficacy.

  19. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  20. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways.

  1. C-terminal clipping of chemokine CCL1/I-309 enhances CCR8-mediated intracellular calcium release and anti-apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Denis, Catherine; Deiteren, Kathleen; Mortier, Anneleen; Tounsi, Amel; Fransen, Erik; Proost, Paul; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lambeir, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase M (CPM) targets the basic amino acids arginine and lysine present at the C-terminus of peptides or proteins. CPM is thought to be involved in inflammatory processes. This is corroborated by CPM-mediated trimming and modulation of inflammatory factors, and expression of the protease in inflammatory environments. Since the function of CPM in and beyond inflammation remains mainly undefined, the identification of natural substrates can aid in discovering the (patho)physiological role of CPM. CCL1/I-309, with its three C-terminal basic amino acids, forms a potential natural substrate for CPM. CCL1 plays a role not only in inflammation but also in apoptosis, angiogenesis and tumor biology. Enzymatic processing differently impacts the biological activity of chemokines thereby contributing to the complex regulation of the chemokine system. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether (i) CCL1/I-309 is prone to trimming by CPM, and (ii) the biological activity of CCL1 is altered after C-terminal proteolytic processing. CCL1 was identified as a novel substrate for CPM in vitro using mass spectrometry. C-terminal clipping of CCL1 augmented intracellular calcium release mediated by CCR8 but reduced the binding of CCL1 to CCR8. In line with the higher intracellular calcium release, a pronounced increase of the anti-apoptotic activity of CCL1 was observed in the BW5147 cellular model. CCR8 signaling, CCR8 binding and anti-apoptotic activity were unaffected when CPM was exposed to the carboxypeptidase inhibitor DL-2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidino-ethylthiopropanoic acid. The results of this study suggest that CPM is a likely candidate for the regulation of biological processes relying on the CCL1-CCR8 system. PMID:22479563

  2. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone) at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels), and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels) in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2) phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER) were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively). Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation) of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are vulnerable to very

  3. Bone mass at final height in precocious puberty after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist with and without calcium supplementation.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, Franco; Zamboni, Giorgio; Bertoldo, Francesco; Lauriola, Silvana; Mengarda, Fabio; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Tatò, Luciano

    2003-03-01

    The aim of our longitudinal study was to evaluate bone mass in girls affected by central precocious puberty (CPP) that have reached final height, treated with GnRH agonist triptorelin (GnRHa), with or without calcium supplementation. We studied 48 Caucasian females affected by CPP (age at diagnosis, 7.19 +/- 0.96 yr), randomly assigned to two groups: group A (n = 21) treated with GnRHa and group B (n = 27) treated with GnRHa plus calcium gluconolactate and carbonate (1 g calcium/day in two doses) for at least 2 yr. Auxological parameters (standing height, weight, body mass index) and bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine [L2-L4, anteroposterior (AP)-BMD; lateral BMD; volumetric (v)BMD)] by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry were evaluated at the beginning [chronological age (CA), 7.29 +/- 0.91 yr; bone age (BA), 8.80 +/- 1.24 yr] and end of treatment (CA, 11.27 +/- 0.97 yr; BA, 12.35 +/- 0.43 yr) and at final height (CA, 16.17 +/- 1.9 yr; BA, 16.93 +/- 0.98 yr, in each case >15 yr). Total bone mineral content, total BMD, and fat percentage were evaluated at the end of the study period using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Final height was significantly higher than predicted height at diagnosis (159.9 +/- 6.3 cm vs. 152.9 +/- 9.6 cm; P < 0.05). Body mass index and fat percentage were not statistically different from control values. Densitometric values at final evaluation in groups A and B together were lower than in controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. The vBMD was significantly higher in group B than in group A at the end of treatment period (0.213 +/- 0.022 g/cm(3) vs. 0.192 +/- 0.021 g/cm(3); P < 0.01) and at final evaluation (0.246 +/- 0.023 g/cm(3) vs. 0.227 +/- 0.024 g/cm(3); P < 0.05). The percentage change (Delta%) between the start and end of treatment period in AP-BMD and vBMD was significantly higher in group B than in group A (Delta% AP-BMD: 20.36% +/- 1.10% vs. 16.16% +/- 1.90%, P < 0.01; Delta% vBMD: 19.08% +/- 3

  4. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca2+) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca2+]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca2+ channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca2+ influx via opening of L-type Ca2+ channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca2+ release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. PMID:27009047

  5. Intrathecal P/Q- and R-type calcium channel blockade of spinal substance P release and c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Tetsuji; Xu, Qinghao; Yamaguchi, Shigeki; Yaksh, Tony L

    2013-12-01

    Intrathecal (IT) studies have shown that several voltage sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs), such as the L-, N- and T-type may play roles in nociception and that of these only the N-type regulates primary afferent substance P (SP) release. However, the actions of other VSCCs at the spinal level are not well known. We investigated the roles of spinal P/Q- and R-type VSCCs, by IT administration of R-type (SNX-482) and P/Q-type (ω-agatoxin IVA) VSCC blockers on intraplantar formalin-evoked flinching, SP release from primary afferents and c-Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn. Intraplantar injection of formalin (2.5%, 50 μL) produced an intense, characteristic biphasic paw flinching response. In rats with IT catheters, IT SNX-482 (0.5 μg) reduced formalin-evoked paw flinching in both phase 1 and 2 compared with vehicle. Intraplantar formalin caused robust neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r) internalization (indicating SP release) and c-Fos expression in the ipsilateral dorsal horn, which were blocked by IT SNX-482. IT ω-agatoxin IVA (0.03, 0.125 and 0.5 μg) did not reduce formalin-evoked paw flinching or c-Fos expression at any doses, with higher doses resulting in motor dysfunction. Thus, we demonstrated that blockade of spinal R-type, but not P/Q type VSCCs attenuated formalin-induced pain behavior, NK1r internalization and c-Fos expression in the superficial dorsal horn. This study supports a role for Cav2.3 in presynaptic neurotransmitter release from peptidergic nociceptive afferents and pain behaviors. PMID:23810829

  6. One, two and three photon excitation in laser scanning fluorescence microscopy: Live cell measurements of phospholipase hydrolysis, serotonin release and calcium sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rebecca Marie

    1997-10-01

    This work consists primarily of an examination of three live cell processes as measured by Multiphoton Excitation Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPE-LSM). One of the factors that can severely limit both the speed of acquisition and the total amount of information derived from a live cell fluorescence imaging experiment is illumination induced fluorophore photobleaching. Here a new technique is described for the measurement of fluorophore photobleaching under laser scanning conditions. Photobleaching quantum yields for fluorescein under both one- and two-photon illumination are reported. Two of the live cell measurements are carried out using RBL-2H3 cells, a well-characterized mucosal mast cell line, which secrete histamine, serotonin and other inflammatory mediators in response to allergenic stimulation. Exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2) hydrolysis of RBL-2H3 cell plasma membranes is measured using both linear and nonlinear imaging of reporter doubly acyl-labeled phospholipid probes. The RBL-2H3 cells, normally resistant to exogenous PLA2 hydrolysis, experience a 3-5 fold enhancement of enzymatic activity upon allergenic stimulation. Previously it has been shown that serotonin (5- hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) distributions can be imaged in RBL-2H3 cells using a three-photon process to excite native 5-HT fluorescence (Maiti, 1997). Here three-photon excitation imaging measurements of the secretion process are reported. The third live cell study is a characterization of spontaneous calcium 'sparking' activity found in developing skeletal muscle cell cultures using MPE-LSM and confocal microscopy in conjunction with the calcium indicator dyes Indo-1 and Fluo-3. Double stain imaging experiments reveal that spark activity is most likely to occur in perinuclear regions. Because of their magnitudes of release (105-106 ions) and mitigation by ryanodine, the sparks are proposed to be the result of calcium conduction through T-type calcium channels in early excitation

  7. The release of nickel from nickel-titanium (NiTi) is strongly reduced by a sub-micrometer thin layer of calcium phosphate deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Surmenev, R A; Ryabtseva, M A; Shesterikov, E V; Pichugin, V F; Peitsch, T; Epple, M

    2010-04-01

    Thin calcium phosphate coatings were deposited on NiTi substrates (plates) by rf-magnetron sputtering. The release of nickel upon immersion in water or in saline solution (0.9% NaCl in water) was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for 42 days. The coating was analyzed before and after immersion by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). After an initial burst during the first 7 days that was observed for all samples, the rate of nickel release decreased 0.4-0.5 ng cm(-2) d(-1) for a 0.5 mum-thick calcium phosphate coating (deposited at 290 W). This was much less than the release from uncoated NiTi (3.4-4.4 ng cm(-2) d(-1)). Notably, the nickel release rate was not significantly different in pure water and in aqueous saline solution.

  8. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  9. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  10. External electric field induced hydrogen storage/release on calcium-decorated single-layer and bilayer silicene.

    PubMed

    Song, Er Hong; Yoo, Sung Ho; Kim, Jae Joon; Lai, Shiau Wu; Jiang, Qing; Cho, Sung Oh

    2014-11-21

    Hydrogen storage and release are two essential parameters that define the efficiency of a hydrogen storage medium. Herein, we investigate the effects of the external electric field F on the adsorption-desorption of H2 on a Ca-decorated silicene system (Ca-silicene) based on density functional theory calculations. Our study demonstrates that nine H2 molecules per Ca atom can be adsorbed and 6.4 wt% H2 can be adsorbed on Ca-silicene with an average binding energy of 0.19 eV per H2, while the appropriate F can be used to effectively enhance the hydrogen storage-release on the Ca-silicene system. The high synergetic effect may be attributed to the observation that F induces an enhancement of the charge transfer between H2 molecules and the Ca-silicene system. Thus, the Ca-silicene system together with the synergy of F can efficiently facilitate H2 adsorption-desorption, completing the whole hydrogen storage-release cycle.

  11. Slow-release of methanogenic inhibitors derived from encapsulated calcium carbide using paraffin wax and/or rosin: matrix optimization and diffusion characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tiantao, Zhao; Youcai, Zhao; Lijie, Zhang; Haoquan, Chen; Feng, Shi; Haiyan, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    Acetylene has been found to significantly inhibit biological activity of methanogens and thus might be applicable for reducing the generation and emission of methane from municipal solid waste landfills. However, acetylene is gaseous and so it is considered physically infeasible to directly apply this gas to waste in landfill conditions. In the present study, a novel acetylene release mechanism was tested, using a matrix of acetylene entrapped in high hydrophobic paraffin wax and/or rosin and calcium carbide capsules with a ratio of 1.0 g g(-1) matrix and a diameter of 10 mm to facilitate the gradual release of acetylene. A diffusion mechanism model (Q = &b.gamma; × t (0.5)) for the matrix was derived based on the T. Higuchi equation, and the effective diffusion coefficients (D(e)) were acquired by linear fitting. Additionally, it was found that D(e) remained constant when the rosin content was up to more than 20% g g(-1) matrix.

  12. Effect of Local Sustainable Release of BMP2-VEGF from Nano-Cellulose Loaded in Sponge Biphasic Calcium Phosphate on Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sukul, Mousumi; Nguyen, Thuy Ba Linh; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a coordinated process mainly regulated by multiple growth factors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteogenesis during bone healing process. The aim of this study was to investigate how these growth factors released locally and sustainably from nano-cellulose (NC) simultaneously effect bone formation. A biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)-NC-BMP2-VEGF (BNBV) scaffold was fabricated for this purpose. The sponge BCP scaffold was prepared by replica method and then loaded with 0.5% NC containing BMP2-VEGF. Growth factors were released from NC in a sustainable manner from 1 to 30 days. BNBV scaffolds showed higher cell attachment and proliferation behavior than the other scaffolds loaded with single growth factors. Bare BCP scaffolds and BNBV scaffolds seeded with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were implanted ectopically and orthotopically in nude mice for 4 weeks. No typical bone formation was exhibited in BNBV scaffolds in ectopic sites. BMP2 and VEGF showed positive effects on new bone formation in BNBV scaffolds, with and without seeded stem cells, in the orthotopic defects. This study demonstrated that the BNBV scaffold could be beneficial for improved bone regeneration. Stem cell incorporation into this scaffold could further enhance the bone healing process. PMID:25808925

  13. Behavior of POP-calcium carbonate hydrogel as bone substitute with controlled release capability: a study in rat.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Anne Handrini; Ana, Ika Dewi; Wolke, Joop; Jansen, John

    2015-10-01

    Gypsum or calcium sulfate (CS) or plaster of Paris (POP) is considered as a fast degradable material that usually resorbs before the bone defect area is completely filled by new bone. In this study, the incorporation of CaCO3 hydrogel into POP in different compositions was proposed to enhance the bone biological activity of POP and to decrease its degradability. The mechanical and degradation properties of the various materials were characterized by in vitro analysis. Subsequently, the materials were inserted into cylindrically sized bone defects as created into the femoral condyle of rats and left in situ for 1, 4, and 8 weeks. Histological analysis of the retrieved specimens indicated that the addition of CaCO3 hydrogel into POP increased bone formation, angiogenesis and collagen density and resulted into faster bone formation and maturation. It was also confirmed that the degradation rate of the POP decreased by the addition of CaCO3 hydrogel. The in vivo findings did corroborate with the in vitro analysis. In conclusion, the incorporation of CaCO3 hydrogel provides a promising technology to improve the properties of POP, the oldest biomaterial used for bone grafting.

  14. Osteoblastic differentiation under controlled bioactive ion release by silica and titania doped sodium-free calcium phosphate-based glass.

    PubMed

    Shah Mohammadi, Maziar; Chicatun, Florencia; Stähli, Christoph; Muja, Naser; Bureau, Martin N; Nazhat, Showan N

    2014-09-01

    Sodium-free phosphate-based glasses (PGs) doped with both SiO2 and TiO2 (50P2O5-40CaO-xSiO2-(10-x)TiO2, where x=10, 7, 5, 3, and 0mol%) were developed and characterised for controlled ion release applications in bone tissue engineering. Substituting SiO2 with TiO2 directly increased PG density and glass transition temperature, indicating a cross-linking effect of Ti on the glass network which was reflected by significantly reduced degradation rates in an aqueous environment. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of Ti(P2O7) in crystallised TiO2-containing PGs, and nuclear magnetic resonance showed an increase in Q(1) phosphate species with increasing TiO2 content. Substitution of SiO2 with TiO2 also reduced hydrophilicity and surface energy. In biological assays, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts effectively adhered to the surface of PG discs and the incorporation of TiO2, and hence higher stability of the PG network, significantly increased cell viability and metabolic activity indicating the biocompatibility of the PGs. Addition of SiO2 increased ionic release from the PG, which stimulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells upon ion exposure. The incorporation of 3mol% TiO2 was required to stabilise the PG network against unfavourable rapid degradation in aqueous environments. However, ALP activity was greatest in PGs doped with 5-7mol% SiO2 due to up-regulation of ionic concentrations. Thus, the properties of PGs can be readily controlled by modifying the extent of Si and Ti doping in order to optimise ion release and osteoblastic differentiation for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:24945606

  15. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in rapid-eye-movement sleep controlling regions of the brainstem reticular formation in GAD67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that brainstem GABAergic neurons may control rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, understanding their pharmacology/physiology has been hindered by difficulty in identification. Here we report that mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GAD67 promoter (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) exhibit numerous GFP-positive neurons in the central gray and reticular formation, allowing on-line identification in vitro. Small (10-15 microm) or medium-sized (15-25 microm) GFP-positive perikarya surrounded larger serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and reticular neurons, and > 96% of neurons were double-labeled for GFP and GABA, confirming that GFP-positive neurons are GABAergic. Whole-cell recordings in brainstem regions important for promoting REM sleep [subcoeruleus (SubC) or pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) regions] revealed that GFP-positive neurons were spontaneously active at 3-12 Hz, fired tonically, and possessed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing steps. Many neurons also exhibited a small, low-threshold calcium spike. GFP-positive neurons were tested with pharmacological agents known to promote (carbachol) or inhibit (orexin A) REM sleep. SubC GFP-positive neurons were excited by the cholinergic agonist carbachol, whereas those in the PnO were either inhibited or excited. GFP-positive neurons in both areas were excited by orexins/hypocretins. These data are congruent with the hypothesis that carbachol-inhibited GABAergic PnO neurons project to, and inhibit, REM-on SubC reticular neurons during waking, whereas carbachol-excited SubC and PnO GABAergic neurons are involved in silencing locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe aminergic neurons during REM sleep. Orexinergic suppression of REM during waking is probably mediated in part via excitation of acetylcholine-inhibited GABAergic neurons.

  16. Cellular Hypertrophy and Increased Susceptibility to Spontaneous Calcium-Release of Rat Left Atrial Myocytes Due to Elevated Afterload.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifei; Cannell, Mark B; Kim, Shang Jin; Watson, Judy J; Norman, Ruth; Calaghan, Sarah C; Orchard, Clive H; James, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Atrial remodeling due to elevated arterial pressure predisposes the heart to atrial fibrillation (AF). Although abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function has been associated with AF, there is little information on the effects of elevated afterload on atrial Ca2+-handling. We investigated the effects of ascending aortic banding (AoB) on Ca2+-handling in rat isolated atrial myocytes in comparison to age-matched sham-operated animals (Sham). Myocytes were either labelled for ryanodine receptor (RyR) or loaded with fluo-3-AM and imaged by confocal microscopy. AoB myocytes were hypertrophied in comparison to Sham controls (P<0.0001). RyR labeling was localized to the z-lines and to the cell edge. There were no differences between AoB and Sham in the intensity or pattern of RyR-staining. In both AoB and Sham, electrical stimulation evoked robust SR Ca2+-release at the cell edge whereas Ca2+ transients at the cell center were much smaller. Western blotting showed a decreased L-type Ca channel expression but no significant changes in RyR or RyR phosphorylation or in expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, SR Ca2+ ATPase or phospholamban. Mathematical modeling indicated that [Ca2+]i transients at the cell center were accounted for by simple centripetal diffusion of Ca2+ released at the cell edge. In contrast, caffeine (10 mM) induced Ca2+ release was uniform across the cell. The caffeine-induced transient was smaller in AoB than in Sham, suggesting a reduced SR Ca2+-load in hypertrophied cells. There were no significant differences between AoB and Sham cells in the rate of Ca2+ extrusion during recovery of electrically-stimulated or caffeine-induced transients. The incidence and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-transients following rapid-pacing (4 Hz) was greater in AoB than in Sham myocytes. In conclusion, elevated afterload causes cellular hypertrophy and remodeling of atrial SR Ca2+-release. PMID:26713852

  17. Effect of abomasal infusion of saliva on reticular motility and ruminal liquid contents of steers.

    PubMed

    Froetschel, M A

    1995-11-01

    Two Holstein and two Jersey steers with ruminal and abomasal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment to test the effects of abomasal infusion of saliva on reticular contractions and on contents of the reticulorumen. Steers were fed a ration based on sorghum silage (58.3% DM) at 2-h intervals in 12 equal amounts at 1.25 times the maintenance requirement. Saliva was collected from eight esophageally fistulated steers, pooled, and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Saliva was mixed with McDougall's buffer (0, 33.3, 66.7, or 100% saliva) and infused abomasally at a rate of 1.5 L/h for 3 h. Abomasal infusion of saliva resulted in linear decreases in ruminal liquid and DM contents. Ruminal dilution rate tended to be faster for infused steers as concentration of saliva increased. Frequency of reticular contractions increased linearly as saliva infusion increased. The influence of saliva infusion on duration of reticular contractions was complicated by inverse patterns of response for each separate phase of the reticular contraction. The first phase of the contraction was influenced by saliva infusion in a negative, quadratic manner; the second phase exhibited an opposite response pattern. A quadratic effect was evident for both amplitude and area of contractions, indicating that the contraction strength was decreased at the intermediate salivary infusion. Postruminal passage of saliva may influence ruminal digestive function by regulating reticular motility and digesta passage.

  18. Lumbar interbody fusion with porous biphasic calcium phosphate enhanced by recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2/silk fibroin sustained-released microsphere: an experimental study on sheep model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Hai-Long; Gu, Yong; Feng, Yu; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) has been investigated extensively as a bone substitute nowadays. However, the bone formation capacity of BCP is limited owing to lack of osteoinduction. Silk fibroin (SF) has a structure similar to type I collagen, and could be developed to a microsphere for the sustained-release of rhBMP-2. In our previous report, bioactivity of BCP could be enhanced by rhBMP-2/SF microsphere (containing 0.5 µg rhBMP-2) in vitro. However, the bone regeneration performance of the composite in vivo was not investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BCP/rhBMP-2/SF in a sheep lumbar fusion model. A BCP and rhBMP-2/SF microsphere was developed, and then was integrated into a BCP/rhBMP-2/SF composite. BCP, BCP/rhBMP-2 and BCP/rhBMP-2/SF were implanted randomly into the disc spaces of 30 sheep at the levels of L1/2, L3/4 and L5/6. After sacrificed, the fusion segments were evaluated by manual palpation, CT scan, biomechanical testing and histology at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The composite demonstrated a burst-release of rhBMP-2 (39.1 ± 2.8 %) on the initial 4 days and a sustained-release (accumulative 81.3 ± 4.9 %) for more than 28 days. The fusion rates, semi-quantitative CT scores, fusion stiffness in bending in all directions and histologic scores of BCP/rhBMP-2/SF were significantly greater than BCP and BCP/rhBMP-2 at each time point, respectively (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that the SF microspheres containing a very low dose of rhBMP-2 improve fusion in sheep using BCP constructs.

  19. Development and Optimization of Gastro-Retentive Controlled-Release Tablet of Calcium-Disodium Edentate and its In Vivo Gamma Scintigraphic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Soni, Sandeep; Singh, Thakuri; Kumar, Amit; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-12-01

    Medical management of heavy metal toxicity, including radioactive ones, is a cause for concern because of their increased use in energy production, healthcare, and mining. Though chelating agents like EDTA and DTPA in parenteral form are available, no suitable oral formulation is there that can trap ingested heavy metal toxicants in the stomach itself, preventing their systemic absorption. The objective of the present study was to develop and optimize gastro-retentive controlled-release tablets of calcium-disodium edentate (Ca-Na2EDTA). Gastro-retentive tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was prepared by direct compression method. Thirteen tablet formulations were designed using HPMC-K4M, sodium chloride, and carbopol-934 along with effervescing agents sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Tablet swelling ability, in vitro buoyancy, and drug dissolution studies were conducted in 0.1 N HCl at 37 ± 0.5°C. Ca-Na2EDTA was radiolabeled with technetium-99m for scintigraphy-based in vivo evaluation. Formula F8 (Ca-Na2EDTA 200 mg, carbopol 100 mg, avicel 55 mg, citric acid 30 mg, NaHCO3 70 mg, NaCl 100 mg, and HPMC 95 mg) was found to be optimum in terms of excellent floating properties and sustained drug release. F8 fitted best for Korsmeyer-Peppas equation with an R (2) value of 0.993. Gamma scintigraphy in humans showed mean gastric retention period of 6 h. Stability studies carried out in accordance with ICH guidelines and analyzed at time intervals of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 months have indicated insignificant difference in tablet hardness, drug content, total floating duration, or matrix integrity of the optimized formulation. Gastro-retentive, controlled-release tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was successfully developed using effervescent technique as a potential oral antidote for neutralizing ingested heavy metal toxicity. PMID:25771737

  20. Growth differentiation factor-15 promotes glutamate release in medial prefrontal cortex of mice through upregulation of T-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Dong; Lu, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Qian-Ru; Hu, Changlong; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) has been implicated in ischemic brain injury and synapse development, but its involvement in modulating neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of GDF-15 on non-evoked miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) and neurotransmitter release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mice. Incubation of mPFC slices with GDF-15 for 60 min significantly increased the frequency of mEPSCs without effect on their amplitude. GDF-15 also significantly elevated presynaptic glutamate release, as shown by HPLC. These effects were blocked by dual TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) and TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) antagonists, but not by a TβRI antagonist alone. Meanwhile, GDF-15 enhanced pERK level, and inhibition of MAPK/ERK activity attenuated the GDF-15-induced increases in mEPSC and glutamate release. Blocking T-type calcium channels reduced the GDF-15 induced up-regulation of synaptic transmission. Membrane-protein extraction and use of an intracellular protein-transport inhibitor showed that GDF-15 promoted CaV3.1 and CaV3.3 α-subunit expression by trafficking to the membrane. These results confirm previous findings in cerebellar granule neurons, in which GDF-15 induces its neurobiological effects via TβRII and activation of the ERK pathway, providing novel insights into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in cortical neurons. PMID:27353765

  1. Alcohol-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction is mediated via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R)-gated intracellular calcium release.

    PubMed

    Haorah, James; Knipe, Bryan; Gorantla, Santhi; Zheng, Jialin; Persidsky, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC), pericytes and astrocytes controls the transport of ions, peptides and leukocytes in and out of the brain. Tight junctions (TJ) composed of TJ proteins (occludin, claudins and zonula occludens) ensure the structural integrity of the BMVEC monolayer. Neuropathologic studies indicated that the BBB was impaired in alcohol abusers; however, the underlying mechanism of BBB dysfunction remains elusive. Using primary human BMVEC, we previously demonstrated that oxidative stress induced by ethanol (EtOH) metabolism in BMVEC activated myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), resulting in the enhanced phosphorylation of either cytoskeletal or TJ proteins, and in BBB impairment. We proposed that EtOH metabolites stimulated inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R)-operated intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release, thereby causing the activation of MLCK in BMVEC. Indeed, treatment of primary human BMVEC with EtOH or its metabolites resulted in the increased expression of IP(3)R protein and IP(3)R-gated intracellular Ca(2+) release. These functional changes paralleled MLCK activation, phosphorylation of cytoskeletal/TJ proteins, loss of BBB integrity, and enhanced leukocyte migration across BMVEC monolayers. Inhibition of either EtOH metabolism or IP(3)R activation prevented BBB impairment. These findings suggest that EtOH metabolites act as signaling molecules for the activation of MLCK via the stimulation of IP(3)R-gated intracellular Ca(2+) release in BMVEC. These putative events can lead to BBB dysfunction in the setting of alcoholism, and to neuro-inflammatory disorders promoting leukocyte migration across the BBB.

  2. Development and Optimization of Gastro-Retentive Controlled-Release Tablet of Calcium-Disodium Edentate and its In Vivo Gamma Scintigraphic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Soni, Sandeep; Singh, Thakuri; Kumar, Amit; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-12-01

    Medical management of heavy metal toxicity, including radioactive ones, is a cause for concern because of their increased use in energy production, healthcare, and mining. Though chelating agents like EDTA and DTPA in parenteral form are available, no suitable oral formulation is there that can trap ingested heavy metal toxicants in the stomach itself, preventing their systemic absorption. The objective of the present study was to develop and optimize gastro-retentive controlled-release tablets of calcium-disodium edentate (Ca-Na2EDTA). Gastro-retentive tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was prepared by direct compression method. Thirteen tablet formulations were designed using HPMC-K4M, sodium chloride, and carbopol-934 along with effervescing agents sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Tablet swelling ability, in vitro buoyancy, and drug dissolution studies were conducted in 0.1 N HCl at 37 ± 0.5°C. Ca-Na2EDTA was radiolabeled with technetium-99m for scintigraphy-based in vivo evaluation. Formula F8 (Ca-Na2EDTA 200 mg, carbopol 100 mg, avicel 55 mg, citric acid 30 mg, NaHCO3 70 mg, NaCl 100 mg, and HPMC 95 mg) was found to be optimum in terms of excellent floating properties and sustained drug release. F8 fitted best for Korsmeyer-Peppas equation with an R (2) value of 0.993. Gamma scintigraphy in humans showed mean gastric retention period of 6 h. Stability studies carried out in accordance with ICH guidelines and analyzed at time intervals of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 months have indicated insignificant difference in tablet hardness, drug content, total floating duration, or matrix integrity of the optimized formulation. Gastro-retentive, controlled-release tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was successfully developed using effervescent technique as a potential oral antidote for neutralizing ingested heavy metal toxicity.

  3. Myoplasmic free calcium concentration reached during the twitch of an intact isolated cardiac cell and during calcium-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of a skinned cardiac cell from the adult rat or rabbit ventricle

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Intact cardiac cells from the adult rat or rabbit ventricle were isolated by enzymatic digestion with a progressive increase of the [free Ca2+] in the solution. These cells were electrically stimulated in the presence of 2.50 mM free Ca2+, and a twitch of maximum amplitude was elicited by the positive inotropic interventions that were found to be optimum. Then the cells were chemically skinned, and the maximum tension induced by a saturating [free Ca2+] was used as a reference to express the tension developed during the twitch of the intact cells. The myoplasmic [free Ca2+] reached during the twitch was inferred from the tension-pCa curve. In mechanically skinned cells of the same animal species, the myoplasmic [free Ca2+] reached during Ca2+-induced release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was inferred by two methods using (a) the tension-pCa curve and (b) a direct calibration of the transients of aequorin bioluminescence. The induction of a maximum Ca2+ release from the SR required a larger Ca2+ preload of the SR and a higher [free Ca2+] trigger in the rabbit than in the rat skinned cells. However, the results obtained with the two methods of inference of the myoplasmic [free Ca2+] suggest that in both animal species a maximum myoplasmic [free Ca2+] of pCa approximately 5.40 was reached during both the optimum Ca2+-induced release of Ca2+ from the SR of the skinned cells and the optimum twitch of the intact cells. This was much lower than the [free Ca2+] necessary for the full activation of the myofilaments (pCa approximately 4.90). PMID:6796647

  4. Critical Role of Intracellular RyR1 Calcium Release Channels in Skeletal Muscle Function and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Pratt, Stephen J. P.; Lovering, Richard M.; Schneider, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel, also known as ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1), is the largest ion channel protein known and is crucial for effective skeletal muscle contractile activation. RyR1 function is controlled by Cav1.1, a voltage gated Ca2+ channel that works mainly as a voltage sensor for RyR1 activity during skeletal muscle contraction and is also fine-tuned by Ca2+, several intracellular compounds (e.g., ATP), and modulatory proteins (e.g., calmodulin). Dominant and recessive mutations in RyR1, as well as acquired channel alterations, are the underlying cause of various skeletal muscle diseases. The aim of this mini review is to summarize several current aspects of RyR1 function, structure, regulation, and to describe the most common diseases caused by hereditary or acquired RyR1 malfunction. PMID:26793121

  5. [Y-27632 induces calcium-independent glutamate release in rat brain synaptosomes by the mechanism which is distinct from exocytosis].

    PubMed

    Lemeshchenko, V V; Pekun, T G; Vasim, T V; Fedorovich, S V

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitor of Rho-kinase Y-27632 induces non-secretory exocytosis in PC12 cells. The influence of this compound on central synapses remains uninvestigated. We showed that Y-27632 at the concentration 100 jtM led to spontaneous [14C]glutamate release in synaptosomes, which was not accompanied by plasma membrane depolarization. Membrane potential was registered by fluorescent dye DiSC3(5). Y27632 induced an increase of acridine orange fluorescence, exercising no influence over fluorescence of FM2-10 dye. These results suggest that Rho-kinase inhibition decreases pH gradient of synaptic vesicles not inducing exocytosis. Dissipation of the gradient leads to leakage of neurotransmitters to cytosol pumping them out by plasma membrane transporters. Our results show the involvement of Rho-dependent branch of intracellular signaling in regulation of pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. PMID:22873069

  6. Reactive calcium-phosphate-containing poly(ester-co-ether) methacrylate bone adhesives: setting, degradation and drug release considerations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Olsen, Irwin; Pratten, Jonathan; Knowles, Jonathan C; Young, Anne M

    2011-09-01

    This study has investigated novel bone adhesives consisting of fluid photo-polymerizable poly(lactide-co-propylene glycol-co-lactide)dimethacrylate (PGLA-DMA) mixed with systematically varying fillers of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), for the delivery of an antibacterial drug chlorhexidine (CHX). All formulations were found to polymerize fully within 200 s after exposure to blue light. In addition, water sorption by the polymerized materials catalyzed varying filler conversion to dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (i.e. brushite and monetite). With greater DCP levels, faster degradation was observed. Moreover, increase in total filler content enhanced CHX release, associated with higher antibacterial activity. These findings thus suggest that such rapid-setting and degradable adhesives with controllable drug delivery property could have potential clinical value as bone adhesives with antibacterial activity.

  7. Modulation of cellular calcium by sigma-2 receptors: release from intracellular stores in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vilner, B J; Bowen, W D

    2000-03-01

    Human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells expressed sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors with similar pharmacological profiles to those of rodent-derived tissues, although sigma-2 receptors exhibited some affinity differences that might suggest heterogeneity or species differences. Structurally diverse sigma ligands produced two types of increases in intracellular (cytosolic) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in these cells. CB-64D, CB-64L, JL-II-147, BD737, LR172, BD1008, haloperidol, reduced haloperidol, and ibogaine all produced an immediate, dose-dependent, and transient rise in [Ca(2+)](i). Sigma-inactive compounds structurally similar to the most active sigma ligands and ligands for several neurotransmitter receptors produced little or no effect. The high activity of CB-64D and ibogaine (sigma-2-selective ligands) compared with the low activity of (+)-pentazocine and other (+)-benzomorphans (sigma-1-selective ligands), in addition to enantioselectivity for CB-64D over CB-64L, strongly indicated mediation by sigma-2 receptors. The effect of CB-64D and BD737 was blocked by the sigma antagonists BD1047 and BD1063, further confirming specificity as a receptor-mediated event. The transient rise in [Ca(2+)](i) occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and was completely eliminated by pretreatment of cells with thapsigargin. Thus, sigma-2 receptors stimulate a transient release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Prolonged exposure of cells to sigma-receptor ligands resulted in a latent and sustained rise in [Ca(2+)](i), with a pharmacological profile identical to that of the transient rise. This sustained rise in [Ca(2+)](i) was affected by neither the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) nor thapsigargin pretreatment, suggesting latent sigma-2 receptor-induced release from thapsigargin-insensitive intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Sigma-2 receptors may use Ca(2+) signals in producing cellular effects.

  8. The CLEC-2–podoplanin axis controls fibroblastic reticular cell contractility and lymph node microarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Astarita, Jillian L.; Cremasco, Viviana; Fu, Jianxin; Darnell, Max C.; Peck, James R.; Nieves-Bonilla, Janice M.; Song, Kai; Woodruff, Matthew C.; Gogineni, Alvin; Onder, Lucas; Ludewig, Burkhard; Weimer, Robby M.; Carroll, Michael C.; Mooney, David J.; Xia, Lijun; Turley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    In lymph nodes, fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form a collagen-based reticular network that supports migratory dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells and transports lymph. A hallmark of FRCs is their propensity to contract collagen, yet this function is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that podoplanin (PDPN) regulated actomyosin contractility in FRCs. Under resting conditions, when FRCs are unlikely to encounter mature DCs expressing the PDPN receptor, CLEC-2, PDPN endowed FRCs with contractile function and exerted tension within the reticulum. Upon inflammation, CLEC-2 on mature DCs potently attenuated PDPN-mediated contractility, resulting in FRC relaxation and reduced tissue stiffness. Disrupting PDPN function altered the homeostasis and spacing of FRCs and T cells, resulting in an expanded reticular network and enhanced immunity. PMID:25347465

  9. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on action potential conduction and transmitter release in the guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, D. T.; Cunnane, T. C.; Muir, T. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the Ca2+ channel antagonists amlodipine, cobalt, diltiazem, nifedipine and verapamil and the local anaesthetic lignocaine were investigated on action potential conduction in and on evoked transmitter release from sympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens. Transmitter release was investigated by measurement of evoked (trains of pulses at 1 and 2 Hz, 0.1-0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) using microelectrodes; tension was recorded simultaneously; tritium [3H] overflow from vasa preincubated (37 degrees C, 30 min) in Krebs solution containing either [3H]-noradrenaline (NA, 25 microCi ml-1, 2 X 10(-6) M NA) or [3H]-adenosine (50 microCi ml-1, 1 X 10(-6) M adenosine). Amlodipine (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (0.5-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-8 X 10(-4) M), lignocaine (0.1-2 X 10(-3) M) and cobalt (2-6 X 10(-2) M) in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-3) M), increased the latency and inhibited, then abolished, the amplitude and number of action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Amlodipine (0.5-1 X 10(-4) M), verapamil (1-2 X 10(-4) M), diltiazem (1-5 X 10(-4) M) and cobalt (1 X 10(-3) M), in descending order of potency, but not nifedipine (5 X 10(-4) M), inhibited then abolished evoked e.j.ps in a concentration-dependent manner. Cobalt inhibited e.j.ps at a lower concentration than that (2-6 X 10(-2) M) required to block action potential conduction. In unstimulated tissues, the resting [3H] overflow following preincubation with [3H]-NA consisted largely of 4-hydroxy 3-methoxymandelic acid (VMA), 4-hydroxy 3-methoxy phenylglycol (MOPEG), 3,4 dihydroxyphenylglycol (DOPEG) and NA; stimulated tissues (300 pulses at 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) released mainly NA. Verapamil (0.1-1 X 10(-4) M), amlodipine (0.05-1 X 10(-4) M) and nifedipine (1-5 X 10(-4) M), but not cobalt (2 X 10(-3) M), increased, significantly, the resting overflow of 3H comprising mainly DOPEG

  10. Mode switching is the major mechanism of ligand regulation of InsP3 receptor calcium release channels.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Lucian; White, Carl; Cheung, King-Ho; Shuai, Jianwei; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E; Foskett, J Kevin; Mak, Don-On Daniel

    2007-12-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptor (InsP(3)R) plays a critical role in generation of complex Ca(2+) signals in many cell types. In patch clamp recordings of isolated nuclei from insect Sf9 cells, InsP(3)R channels were consistently detected with regulation by cytoplasmic InsP(3) and free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) very similar to that observed for vertebrate InsP(3)R. Long channel activity durations of the Sf9-InsP(3)R have now enabled identification of a novel aspect of InsP(3)R gating: modal gating. Using a novel algorithm to analyze channel modal gating kinetics, InsP(3)R gating can be separated into three distinct modes: a low activity mode, a fast kinetic mode, and a burst mode with channel open probability (P(o)) within each mode of 0.007 +/- 0.002, 0.24 +/- 0.03, and 0.85 +/- 0.02, respectively. Channels reside in each mode for long periods (tens of opening and closing events), and transitions between modes can be discerned with high resolution (within two channel opening and closing events). Remarkably, regulation of channel gating by [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] does not substantially alter channel P(o) within a mode. Instead, [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] affect overall channel P(o) primarily by changing the relative probability of the channel being in each mode, especially the high and low P(o) modes. This novel observation therefore reveals modal switching as the major mechanism of physiological regulation of InsP(3)R channel activity, with implications for the kinetics of Ca(2+) release events in cells.

  11. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 ≥ −0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 ≥ −0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42–0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo. PMID:22029364

  12. Effects of niobium ions released from calcium phosphate invert glasses containing Nb2O5 on osteoblast-like cell functions.

    PubMed

    Obata, Akiko; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Miyajima, Tomohiro; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2012-10-24

    The effects of niobium ions released from 60CaO-30P(2)O(5)-(10-x)Na(2)O-xNb(2)O(5) (mol %, x = 0-10) glasses on MC3T3-E1 cell functions were evaluated by culture tests with two systems; cell culture on glass plates, or in culture media containing glass extracts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cells cultured on the glass plates containing 3 and 5 mol % of Nb(2)O(5) was significantly higher than that on the Nb(2)O(5)-free glass, although proliferation was not enhanced on all glasses containing Nb(2)O(5). Cells cultured in the medium containing 3 × 10(-7) M niobium ions showed the highest ALP activity in comparison with other Nb-containing media or normal medium, regardless of the presence of osteogenic factors (ascorbic acid, β-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone) in the media. Calcium deposition by the cells cultured in the medium containing 3 × 10(-7) M niobium ions was twice as high as those cultured in medium containing no niobium ions. The effects of niobium ions were thought to depend on ion concentration, and to enhance differentiation and mineralization of osteogenic cells rather than their initial adhesion or proliferation.

  13. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r(2) ≥ -0.86) as well as calcium release (r(2) ≥ -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r(2) = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  14. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 >= -0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 >= -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  15. Combination of calcium sulfate and simvastatin-controlled release microspheres enhances bone repair in critical-sized rat calvarial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Chih-Kuang; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Most allogenic bone graft substitutes have only osteoconductive properties. Developing new strategies to improve the osteoinductive activity of bone graft substitutes is both critical and practical for clinical application. Previously, we developed novel simvastatin-encapsulating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (SIM/PLGA) that slowly release simvastatin and enhance fracture healing. In this study, we combined SIM/PLGA with a rapidly absorbable calcium sulfate (CS) bone substitute and studied the effect on bone healing in critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model. The cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility of this combination was tested in vitro using lactate dehydrogenase leakage and a cell attachment assay, respectively. Combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute had no cytotoxic effect on bone marrow stem cells. Compared with the control, cell adhesion was substantially enhanced following combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute. In vivo, implantation of the combination bone substitute promoted healing of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in rats; furthermore, production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and neovascularization were enhanced in the area of the defect. In summary, the combination of SIM/PLGA and a CS bone substitute has osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, indicating that it could be used for regeneration of bone in the clinical setting. PMID:26664114

  16. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r(2) ≥ -0.86) as well as calcium release (r(2) ≥ -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r(2) = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo. PMID:22029364

  17. Combination of calcium sulfate and simvastatin-controlled release microspheres enhances bone repair in critical-sized rat calvarial bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yin-Chih; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Chih-Kuang; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Most allogenic bone graft substitutes have only osteoconductive properties. Developing new strategies to improve the osteoinductive activity of bone graft substitutes is both critical and practical for clinical application. Previously, we developed novel simvastatin-encapsulating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (SIM/PLGA) that slowly release simvastatin and enhance fracture healing. In this study, we combined SIM/PLGA with a rapidly absorbable calcium sulfate (CS) bone substitute and studied the effect on bone healing in critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model. The cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility of this combination was tested in vitro using lactate dehydrogenase leakage and a cell attachment assay, respectively. Combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute had no cytotoxic effect on bone marrow stem cells. Compared with the control, cell adhesion was substantially enhanced following combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute. In vivo, implantation of the combination bone substitute promoted healing of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in rats; furthermore, production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and neovascularization were enhanced in the area of the defect. In summary, the combination of SIM/PLGA and a CS bone substitute has osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, indicating that it could be used for regeneration of bone in the clinical setting. PMID:26664114

  18. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels: their expression and modulation of glutamate release from nerve terminals isolated from rat trigeminal caudal nucleus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Samengo, Irene; Currò, Diego; Barrese, Vincenzo; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Martire, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels [big potassium (BK) channel] consist of a tetramer of pore-forming α-subunit and distinct accessory β-subunits (β1-4) that modify the channel's properties. In this study, we analyzed the effects of BK channel activators and blockers on glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from synaptosomes isolated from the cerebral cortices or trigeminal caudal nuclei (TCN) of rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to characterize BK channel α and β(1-4) subunit expression in the cortex and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), whose neurons project primary terminal afferents into the TCN. Immunocytochemistry was used to localize these subunits on cortical and TCN synaptosomes. The BK channels regulating [(3)H]D-aspartate release from primary afferent nerve terminals projecting into the TCN displayed limited sensitivity to iberiotoxin, whereas those expressed on cortical synaptosomes were highly sensitive to this toxin. BK channels did not appear to be present on GABAergic nerve terminals from the TCN since [(3)H]-γ-aminobutyric acid release in this model was unaffected by BK channel activators or blockers. Gene expression studies revealed expression levels of the α subunit in the TG that were only 31.2 ± 2.1% of those found in cortical tissues. The β4 subunit was the accessory subunit expressed most abundantly in both the cortex and TG. Levels of β1 and β2 were low in both these areas although β2 expression in the TG was higher than that found in the cortex. Immunocytochemistry experiments showed that co-localization of α and β4 subunits (the accessory subunit most abundantly expressed in both brain areas) was more common in TCN synaptosomes than in cortical synaptosomes. On the basis of these findings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that BK channels expressed on glutamatergic terminals in the TCN and cortex have distinct pharmacological profiles, which probably reflect different α and

  19. Structure and connections of the thalamic reticular nucleus: Advancing views over half a century.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Harting, John K

    2003-09-01

    The advance of knowledge of the thalamic reticular nucleus and its connections has been reviewed and Max Cowan's contributions to this knowledge and to the methods used for studying the nucleus have been summarized. Whereas 50 years ago the nucleus was seen as a diffusely organized cell group closely related to the brain stem reticular formation, it can now be seen as a complex, tightly organized entity that has a significant inhibitory, modulatory action on the thalamic relay to cortex. The nucleus is under the control, on the one hand, of topographically organized afferents from the cerebral cortex and the thalamus, and on the other of more diffuse afferents from brain stem, basal forebrain, and other regions. Whereas the second group of afferents can be expected to have global actions on thalamocortical transmission, relevant for overall attentive state, the former group will have local actions, modulating transmission through the thalamus to cortex with highly specific local effects. Since it appears that all areas of cortex and all parts of the thalamus are linked directly to the reticular nucleus, it now becomes important to define how the several pathways that pass through the thalamus relate to each other in their reticular connections. PMID:12836172

  20. "Reticular" and "Areticular" Nissl Bodies in Sympathetic Neurons of a Lizard

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stuart W.

    1959-01-01

    Sympathetic ganglia of the horned lizard, Phrynosoma cornutum, were fixed in OsO4 and imbedded in methacrylate. Thin sections were cut for electron microscopy. Some adjacent thick sections were cut for light microscopy and were stained in acidified, dilute thionine both before and after digestion by RNase. In the light microscope two types of Nissl bodies are found, both removable by RNase: (1) a deep, diffuse, indistinctly bounded, metachromatic variety, and (2) a superficial, dense, sharply delimited, orthochromatic sort. Electron microscopically, the former ("reticular" Nissl bodies) corresponds to the granulated endoplasmic reticular structure of Nissl material previously described by others, whereas the latter ("areticular" Nissl bodies) comprises compact masses of particles of varying internal density and devoid of elements of endoplasmic reticulum. The constituent particles of the areticular Nissl material are 4 to 8 x the diameter of single ribonucleoprotein granules of the reticular Nissl substance and seem, near zones of junction with the reticular type, to arise by clustering of such granules with subsequent partial dispersion of the substance of the granules into an added, less dense material. It is suggested that the observed orthochromasia of the areticular Nissl substance is due to accumulation of a large amount of protein bound to RNA and, further, that these Nissl bodies may represent storage depots of RNA and protein. PMID:13673051

  1. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus are selective for diverse and complex visual features.

    PubMed

    Vaingankar, Vishal; Soto-Sanchez, Cristina; Wang, Xin; Sommer, Friedrich T; Hirsch, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    All visual signals the cortex receives are influenced by the perigeniculate sector (PGN) of the thalamic reticular nucleus, which receives input from relay cells in the lateral geniculate and provides feedback inhibition in return. Relay cells have been studied in quantitative depth; they behave in a roughly linear fashion and have receptive fields with a stereotyped center-surround structure. We know far less about reticular neurons. Qualitative studies indicate they simply pool ascending input to generate non-selective gain control. Yet the perigeniculate is complicated; local cells are densely interconnected and fire lengthy bursts. Thus, we employed quantitative methods to explore the perigeniculate using relay cells as controls. By adapting methods of spike-triggered averaging and covariance analysis for bursts, we identified both first and second order features that build reticular receptive fields. The shapes of these spatiotemporal subunits varied widely; no stereotyped pattern emerged. Companion experiments showed that the shape of the first but not second order features could be explained by the overlap of On and Off inputs to a given cell. Moreover, we assessed the predictive power of the receptive field and how much information each component subunit conveyed. Linear-non-linear (LN) models including multiple subunits performed better than those made with just one; further each subunit encoded different visual information. Model performance for reticular cells was always lesser than for relay cells, however, indicating that reticular cells process inputs non-linearly. All told, our results suggest that the perigeniculate encodes diverse visual features to selectively modulate activity transmitted downstream. PMID:23269915

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  3. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    High levels of urine calcium (above 300 mg/day) may be due to: Chronic kidney disease High vitamin D levels Leaking of calcium from the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking ...

  4. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (p<0.05). We identified the ARAS between the pontine RF and the hypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS.

  5. A comparative analysis of reticular crack on ceramic plate driven by thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, XiangHong; Sheng, ShiLong; Tian, Cheng; Yuan, WenJun

    2016-07-01

    Reticular crack is generally found on the surface of ceramic material that has been subjected to a thermal-shock condition. In the present study, a quantitative effect of thermal shock and quench temperature has been studied and investigated. Experimental tests were carried out to characterize the reticular crack that has been found in the Ge Kiln, which is a famous art of the ancient Chinese culture. After comparative analysis between thermal-shock cracks and the glaze crack patterns of the Ge Kiln porcelain, it is found that this study is expected to provide a powerful tool for recurrence of the long-lost firing and cooling process of the Ge Kiln porcelain.

  6. [Neurons of the rabbit midbrain reticular formation during a defensive conditioned reflex].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, D G

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of unit activity of the midbrain reticular formation was carried out on alert rabbits during defensive conditioning. Most of the examined neurones exhibited phasic responses corresponding in time to the components of the evoked potential (EP) recorded in the cortical visual area in response to the "indifferent" stimulus, and to the conditioned stimulus and electric cutaneous reinforcement. The data obtained are considered from the standpoint of the Anokhin functional systems theory. A conclusion has been made regarding the participation of reticular units in providing all the basic mechanisms of the functional system of the behavioral act. Discharges of one and the same neurone may correspond to different components of the EPs to conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. In different behavioral acts a neurone may apparently participate in different systemic mechanisms.

  7. Observations on the connectivity of the parvicellular reticular formation with respect to a vomiting center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRF) that have been demonstrated by fiber degeneration studies and studied by more recently introduced horseradish peroxidase retrograde cell labeling are reviewed in an attempt to delimit the connectivity of the region in the PCRF where electrical stimulation produced emesis. Evidence is presented that certain specific functional subdivisions in PCRF such as the salivatory nuclei and the cells which give rise to the vestibular efferent projections can be delimited. An attempt is made to differentiate the sources of brain stem afferent connections with the nucleus of the tractus solitarius, the vagal nucleus and the nucleus ambiguus complex. The literature bearing on the histochemistry of the brain stem is reviewed in a search for clues to possible unique histo- or immunochemical cytological subdivisions in the parvicellular reticular formation.

  8. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  9. Positive and negative regulation of T cell responses by fibroblastic reticular cells within paracortical regions of lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Stefanie; Luther, Sanjiv A.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC) form the structural backbone of the T cell rich zones in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), but also actively influence the adaptive immune response. They provide a guidance path for immigrating T lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DC) and are the main local source of the cytokines CCL19, CCL21, and IL-7, all of which are thought to positively regulate T cell homeostasis and T cell interactions with DC. Recently, FRC in lymph nodes (LN) were also described to negatively regulate T cell responses in two distinct ways. During homeostasis they express and present a range of peripheral tissue antigens, thereby participating in peripheral tolerance induction of self-reactive CD8+ T cells. During acute inflammation T cells responding to foreign antigens presented on DC very quickly release pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon γ. These cytokines are sensed by FRC which transiently produce nitric oxide (NO) gas dampening the proliferation of neighboring T cells in a non-cognate fashion. In summary, we propose a model in which FRC engage in a bidirectional crosstalk with both DC and T cells to increase the efficiency of the T cell response. However, during an acute response, FRC limit excessive expansion and inflammatory activity of antigen-specific T cells. This negative feedback loop may help to maintain tissue integrity and function during rapid organ growth. PMID:22973278

  10. Age-related alterations in immunoreactivity of the midsized neurofilament subunit in the brainstem reticular formation of the cat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1997-09-19

    In the present study, we compared the immunoreactivity of the midsized subunit of neurofilaments (NF-M) in the brainstem reticular formation of adult and old cats. There was a dramatic decrease in immunoreactivity in most reticular nuclei in the old cats. The most obvious reduction in these regions occurred in dendritic arborizations. In contrast, a small number of nuclei showed a slight increase in immunoreactivity in the aged animals. The age-related changes in immunoreactivity indicate that there is an alteration of NF-M content in reticular neurons and their processes in old age. Such changes in NF-M content may be the basis for the alterations in the morphology of reticular neurons in aged animals. PMID:9374292

  11. Direct reticular projections of trigeminal sensory fibers immunoreactive to CGRP: potential monosynaptic somatoautonomic projections

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Few trigeminal sensory fibers project centrally beyond the trigeminal sensory complex, with only projections of fibers carried in its sensory anterior ethmoidal (AEN) and intraoral nerves described. Fibers of the AEN project into the brainstem reticular formation where immunoreactivity against substance P and CGRP are found. We investigated whether the source of these peptides could be from trigeminal ganglion neurons by performing unilateral rhizotomies of the trigeminal root and looking for absence of label. After an 8–14 days survival, substance P immunoreactivity in the trigeminal sensory complex was diminished, but we could not conclude that the sole source of this peptide in the lateral parabrachial area and lateral reticular formation arises from primary afferent fibers. Immunoreactivity to CGRP after rhizotomy however was greatly diminished in the trigeminal sensory complex, confirming the observations of others. Moreover, CGRP immunoreactivity was nearly eliminated in fibers in the lateral parabrachial area, the caudal ventrolateral medulla, both the peri-ambiguus and ventral parts of the rostral ventrolateral medulla, in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus, and diminished in the caudal pressor area. The nearly complete elimination of CGRP in the lateral reticular formation after rhizotomy suggests this peptide is carried in primary afferent fibers. Moreover, the arborization of CGRP immunoreactive fibers in these areas mimics that of direct projections from the AEN. Since electrical stimulation of the AEN induces cardiorespiratory adjustments including an apnea, peripheral vasoconstriction, and bradycardia similar to those seen in the mammalian diving response, we suggest these perturbations of autonomic behavior are enhanced by direct somatic primary afferent projections to these reticular neurons. We believe this to be first description of potential direct somatoautonomic projections to brainstem neurons regulating autonomic activity. PMID

  12. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  13. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  14. Biomimetic coating of organic polymers with a protein-functionalized layer of calcium phosphate: the surface properties of the carrier influence neither the coating characteristics nor the incorporation mechanism or release kinetics of the protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-12-01

    Polymers that are used in clinical practice as bone-defect-filling materials possess many essential qualities, such as moldability, mechanical strength and biodegradability, but they are neither osteoconductive nor osteoinductive. Osteoconductivity can be conferred by coating the material with a layer of calcium phosphate, which can be rendered osteoinductive by functionalizing it with an osteogenic agent. We wished to ascertain whether the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of unfunctionalized and bovine-serum-albumin (BSA)-functionalized calcium-phosphate coatings were influenced by the surface properties of polymeric carriers. The release kinetics of the protein were also investigated. Two sponge-like materials (Helistat® and Polyactive®) and two fibrous ones (Ethisorb™ and poly[lactic-co-glycolic acid]) were tested. The coating characteristics were evaluated using state-of-the-art methodologies. The release kinetics of BSA were monitored spectrophotometrically. The characteristics of the amorphous and the crystalline phases of the coatings were not influenced by either the surface chemistry or the surface geometry of the underlying polymer. The mechanism whereby BSA was incorporated into the crystalline layer and the rate of release of the truly incorporated depot were likewise unaffected by the nature of the polymeric carrier. Our biomimetic coating technique could be applied to either spongy or fibrous bone-defect-filling organic polymers, with a view to rendering them osteoconductive and osteoinductive.

  15. The direct pathway from the brainstem reticular formation to the cerebral cortex in the ascending reticular activating system: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-10-01

    Precise evaluation of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is important for diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and management of patients with disorders of impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the direct neural pathway between the brainstem reticular formation (RF) and the cerebral cortex in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty-one healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTIs were performed using a sensitivity-encoding head coil at 1.5Tesla with FMRIB Software Library. For connectivity of the brainstem RF, we used two regions of interest (ROIs) for the brainstem RF (seed ROI) and the thalamus and hypothalamus (exclusion ROI). Connectivity was defined as the incidence of connection between the brainstem RF and target brain regions at the threshold of 5 and 50 streamlines. Regarding the thresholds of 5 and 50, the brainstem RF showed high connectivity to the lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC, 67.1% and 20.7%) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, 50.0% and 18.3%), respectively. In contrast, the brainstem RF showed low connectivity to the primary motor cortex (31.7% and 3.7%), premotor cortex (24.4% and 3.7%), primary somatosensory cortex (23.2% and 2.4%), orbitofrontal cortex (17.1% and 7.3%), and posterior parietal cortex (12.2% and 0%), respectively. The brainstem RF was mainly connected to the prefrontal cortex, particularly lPFC and vmPFC. We believe that the methodology and results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. PMID:26363340

  16. Favorable response of reticular erythematous mucinosis to ultraviolet B irradiation using a 308-nm excimer lamp.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Ken; Miyajima, Osamu; Yokogawa, Maki; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2010-02-01

    Abstract Reticular erythematous mucinosis (REM) is a rare chronic mucinosis. Histologically, the presence of mucin in the upper dermis is the most specific feature. A 73-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with a 4-year history of netlike macular erythema with slight edema on her left arm. She was diagnosed as having REM on the basis of the clinical picture and histological findings. She was treated with ultraviolet B irradiation using the VTRAC Excimer Lamp system with favorable response. This is the first reported case that was treated with a 308-nm excimer lamp. PMID:20175851

  17. Vibration Measurement on Reticular Lamina and Basilar Membrane at Multiple Longitudinal Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The longitudinal distribution of the organ of Corti vibration is important for both understanding the energy delivery and the timing of the cochlear amplification. Recent development on low coherence interferomtry technique allows measuring vibration inside the cochlea. The reticular lamina (RL) vibration spectrum demonstrates that RL vibration leads the basilar membrane (BM). This phase lead is consistent with the idea that the active process may lead the BM vibration. In this study, measurements on multiple longitudinal locations demonstrated similar phase lead. Results on this study suggests that there may be another longitudinal coupling mechanism inside the cochlea other than the traveling wave on BM.

  18. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. Anatomical Evidence that the Superior Colliculus Controls Saccades through Central Mesencephalic Reticular Formation Gating of Omnipause Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niping; Perkins, Eddie; Zhou, Lan; Warren, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Omnipause neurons (OPNs) within the nucleus raphe interpositus (RIP) help gate the transition between fixation and saccadic eye movements by monosynaptically suppressing activity in premotor burst neurons during fixation, and releasing them during saccades. Premotor neuron activity is initiated by excitatory input from the superior colliculus (SC), but how the tectum's saccade-related activity turns off OPNs is not known. Since the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) is a major SC target, we explored whether this nucleus has the appropriate connections to support tectal gating of OPN activity. In dual-tracer experiments undertaken in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), cMRF neurons labeled retrogradely from injections into RIP had numerous anterogradely labeled terminals closely associated with them following SC injections. This suggested the presence of an SC–cMRF–RIP pathway. Furthermore, anterograde tracers injected into the cMRF of other macaques labeled axonal terminals in RIP, confirming this cMRF projection. To determine whether the cMRF projections gate OPN activity, postembedding electron microscopic immunochemistry was performed on anterogradely labeled cMRF terminals with antibody to GABA or glycine. Of the terminals analyzed, 51.4% were GABA positive, 35.5% were GABA negative, and most contacted glycinergic cells. In summary, a trans-cMRF pathway connecting the SC to the RIP is present. This pathway contains inhibitory elements that could help gate omnipause activity and allow other tectal drives to induce the bursts of firing in premotor neurons that are necessary for saccades. The non-GABAergic cMRF terminals may derive from fixation units in the cMRF. PMID:24107960

  20. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  1. Measurement of calcium transients and slow calcium current in myotubes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize excitation-contraction (e- c) coupling in myotubes for comparison with e-c coupling of adult skeletal muscle. The whole cell configuration of the patch clamp technique was used in conjunction with the calcium indicator dye Fluo-3 to study the calcium transients and slow calcium currents elicited by voltage clamp pulses in cultured myotubes obtained from neonatal mice. Cells were held at -80 mV and stimulated with 15-20 ms test depolarizations preceded and followed by voltage steps designed to isolate the slow calcium current. The slow calcium current had a threshold for activation of about 0 mV; the peak amplitude of the current reached a maximum at 30 to 40 mV a and then declined for still stronger depolarizations. The calcium transient had a threshold of about -10 mV, and its amplitude increased as a sigmoidal function of test potential and did not decrease again even for test depolarizations sufficiently strong (> or = 50 mV) that the amplitude of the slow calcium current became very small. Thus, the slow calcium current in myotubes appears to have a negligible role in the process of depolarization-induced release of intracellular calcium and this process in myotubes is essentially like that in adult skeletal muscle. After repolarization, however, the decay of the calcium transient in myotubes was very slow (hundreds of ms) compared to adult muscle, particularly after strong depolarizations that triggered larger calcium transients. Moreover, when cells were repolarized after strong depolarizations, the transient typically continued to increase slowly for up to several tens of ms before the onset of decay. This continued increase after repolarization was abolished by the addition of 5 mM BAPTA to the patch pipette although the rapid depolarization-induced release was not, suggesting that the slow increase might be a regenerative response triggered by the depolarization-induced release of calcium. The addition of

  2. Decalcification of calcium polycarbophil in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Saito, T; Takahara, E; Nagata, O; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1997-03-01

    The in vivo decalcification of calcium polycarbophil was examined. The decalcification ratio of [45Ca]calcium polycarbophil in the stomach after oral dosing to rats was more than 70% at each designated time and quite closely followed in the in vitro decalcification curve, indicating that the greater part of the calcium ion is released from calcium polycarbophil under normal gastric acidic conditions. The residual radioactivity in rat gastrointestine was nearly equal to that after oral administration of either [45Ca]calcium chloride + polycarbophil. The serum level of radioactivity was nearly equal to that after oral dosing of [45Ca]calcium lactate. These results indicate that the greater part of orally administered calcium polycarbophil released calcium ions to produce polycarbophil in vivo.

  3. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    PubMed Central

    Katakai, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is supported by several non-hematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs), covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs. PMID:22807928

  4. A bifractal nature of reticular patterns induced by oxygen plasma on polymer films

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Junwan; Lee, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma etching was demonstrated to be a promising tool for generating self-organized nano-patterns on various commercial films. Unfortunately, dynamic scaling approach toward fundamental understanding of the formation and growth of the plasma-induced nano-structure has not always been straightforward. The temporal evolution of self-aligned nano-patterns may often evolve with an additional scale-invariance, which leads to breakdown of the well-established dynamic scaling law. The concept of a bifractal interface is successfully applied to reticular patterns induced by oxygen plasma on the surface of polymer films. The reticular pattern, composed of nano-size self-aligned protuberances and underlying structure, develops two types of anomalous dynamic scaling characterized by super-roughening and intrinsic anomalous scaling, respectively. The diffusion and aggregation of short-cleaved chains under the plasma environment are responsible for the regular distribution of the nano-size protuberances. Remarkably, it is uncovered that the dynamic roughening of the underlying structure is governed by a relaxation mechanism described by the Edwards-Wilkinson universality class with a conservative noise. The evidence for the basic phase, characterized by the negative roughness and growth exponents, has been elusive since its first theoretical consideration more than two decades ago. PMID:25997075

  5. Fibroblastic reticular cell-derived lysophosphatidic acid regulates confined intranodal T-cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Akira; Kobayashi, Daichi; Aoi, Keita; Sasaki, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Tohya, Kazuo; Inoue, Asuka; Hata, Erina; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kikuta, Junichi; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Ishii, Satoshi; Aoki, Junken; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Masaru; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Umemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are highly confined environments with a cell-dense three-dimensional meshwork, in which lymphocyte migration is regulated by intracellular contractile proteins. However, the molecular cues directing intranodal cell migration remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) produced by LN fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) acts locally to LPA2 to induce T-cell motility. In vivo, either specific ablation of LPA-producing ectoenzyme autotaxin in FRCs or LPA2 deficiency in T cells markedly decreased intranodal T cell motility, and FRC-derived LPA critically affected the LPA2-dependent T-cell motility. In vitro, LPA activated the small GTPase RhoA in T cells and limited T-cell adhesion to the underlying substrate via LPA2. The LPA-LPA2 axis also enhanced T-cell migration through narrow pores in a three-dimensional environment, in a ROCK-myosin II-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that FRC-derived LPA serves as a cell-extrinsic factor that optimizes T-cell movement through the densely packed LN reticular network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10561.001 PMID:26830463

  6. The Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Patient With Severe Injury of the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We reported on the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) finding of a patient in whom severe injury of the cerebral cortex was detected following a hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). A 67-year-old female patient who suffered from HIBI induced by cardiac arrest after surgery for lumbar disc herniation underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation approximately 20 to 30 minutes after cardiac arrest. The patient exhibited impaired alertness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 4 (eye opening: 2, best verbal response: 1, and best motor response: 1). Approximately 3 years after onset, she began to whimper sometimes and showed improved consciousness, with a GCS score of 10 (eye opening: 4, best verbal response: 2, and best motor response: 4) and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score of 9 (auditory function: 1, visual function: 1, motor function: 2, verbal function: 2, communication: 1, and arousal: 2). Results of diffusion tensor tractography for the upper connectivity of the ARAS showed decreased neural connectivity to each cerebral cortex in both hemispheres. The right lower ARAS between the pontine reticular formation and the thalamic intralaminar nuclei (ILN) was thinner compared with the left side. Severe injury of the upper portion of the ARAS between the thalamic ILN and cerebral cortex was demonstrated in a patient with some level of consciousness. PMID:26496328

  7. Striatum and globus pallidus control the electrical activity of reticular thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Nelson; Oviedo-Chávez, Aldo; Alatorre, Alberto; Ríos, Alain; Barrientos, Rafael; Delgado, Alfonso; Querejeta, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Through GABAergic fibers, globus pallidus (GP) coordinates basal ganglia global function. Electrical activity of GP neurons depends on their membrane properties and afferent fibers, including GABAergic fibers from striatum. In pathological conditions, abnormal electrical activity of GP neurons is associated with motor deficits. There is a GABAergic pathway from the GP to the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTn) whose contribution to RTn neurons electrical activity has received little attention. This fact called our attention because the RTn controls the overall information flow of thalamic nuclei to cerebral cortex. Here, we study the spontaneous electrical activity of RTn neurons recorded in vivo in anesthetized rats and under pharmacological activation or inhibition of the GP. We found that activation of GP predominantly diminishes the spontaneous RTn neurons firing rate and its inhibition increases their firing rate; however, both activation and inhibition of GP did not modified the burst index (BI) or the coefficient of variation (CV) of RTn neurons. Moreover, stimulation of striatum predominantly diminishes the spiking rate of GP cells and increases the spiking rate in RTn neurons without modifying the BI or CV in reticular neurons. Our data suggest a GP tight control over RTn spiking activity.

  8. Gremlin 1 Identifies a Skeletal Stem Cell with Bone, Cartilage, and Reticular Stromal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Worthley, Daniel L.; Churchill, Michael; Compton, Jocelyn T.; Tailor, Yagnesh; Rao, Meenakshi; Si, Yiling; Levin, Daniel; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Uygur, Aysu; Hayakawa, Yoku; Gross, Stefanie; Renz, Bernhard W.; Setlik, Wanda; Martinez, Ashley N.; Chen, Xiaowei; Nizami, Saqib; Lee, Heon Goo; Kang, H. Paco; Caldwell, Jon-Michael; Asfaha, Samuel; Westphalen, C. Benedikt; Graham, Trevor; Jin, Guangchun; Nagar, Karan; Wang, Hongshan; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Kolhe, Alka; Carpenter, Jared; Glaire, Mark; Nair, Abhinav; Renders, Simon; Manieri, Nicholas; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G.; Reichert, Maximilian; Giraud, Andrew S.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Pradere, Jean-Phillipe; Walton, Katherine; Prakash, Ajay; Gumucio, Deborah; Rustgi, Anil K.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Friedman, Richard A.; Gershon, Michael D.; Sims, Peter; Grikscheit, Tracy; Lee, Francis Y.; Karsenty, Gerard; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells that maintain and repair the postnatal skeleton remain undefined. One model suggests that perisinusoidal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, marrow stromal cells, and adipocytes, although the existence of these cells has not been proven through fate-mapping experiments. We demonstrate here that expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin 1 defines a population of osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells in the bone marrow. OCR stem cells self-renew and generate osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and reticular marrow stromal cells, but not adipocytes. OCR stem cells are concentrated within the metaphysis of long bones not in the perisinusoidal space and are needed for bone development, bone remodeling, and fracture repair. Grem1 expression also identifies intestinal reticular stem cells (iRSCs) that are cells of origin for the periepithelial intestinal mesenchymal sheath. Grem1 expression identifies distinct connective tissue stem cells in both the bone (OCR stem cells) and the intestine (iRSCs). PMID:25594183

  9. Transient structures of the human fetal brain: subplate, thalamic reticular complex, ganglionic eminence.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Neudörfer, F; Bohl, J

    2000-07-01

    Morphological features of the subplate, the thalamic reticular complex and the ganglionic eminence, which represent three major transient structures of the human fetal forebrain, are summarized with special reference to their functional roles. The subplate harboring various neuronal types is an outstandingly wide zone subjacent to the cortical plate in the human fetal brain. Within the subplate various cortical afferents establish synaptic contacts for a prolonged period before entering the cortical plate. Therefore, the subplate is regarded as a "waiting compartment" which is required for the formation of mature cortical connections. Next to the thalamic reticular nucleus, within the fibers of internal capsule, the perireticular nucleus is located which has been established as a distinct entity during development. Its various neuronal types express a number of different neuroactive substances. Perinatally, the perireticular nucleus is drastically reduced in size. It is involved in the guidance of corticofugal and thalamocortical fibers. The ganglionic eminence is a conspicuous proliferative area that persists throughout nearly the entire fetal period. In the human fetal brain it extends medially upon the dorsal thalamic nuclei which receive precursor cells from the ganglionic eminence. Postmitotic cells in the marginal zone of the ganglionic eminence serve as an intermediate target for growing axons. On the whole, all three structures establish transient neural circuitries that may be essential for the formation of adult projections. The characteristics of the three transient structures are particularly relevant for developmental neuropathology as these structures may be damaged in disorders that preferentially occur in preterm infants. PMID:10963122

  10. Ultrasonographic evaluation of reticular motility during rest, eating, rumination and stress in 30 healthy cows.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Rauch, S

    2008-11-01

    A 3.5 MHz linear transducer was used to assess the motility of the reticulum in 30 healthy, standing, non-sedated cows while they were at rest, eating, ruminating and under stress. The ultrasonographic examinations were made over periods of nine minutes and video recorded for analysis. The reticulum contracted in a biphasic pattern while the cows were resting, eating or stressed. The first contraction was incomplete and was followed by a period of incomplete relaxation. A complete second contraction occurred immediately afterwards, followed by an interval of complete relaxation and the return of the organ to its original position. When the cows were ruminating, a regurgitation contraction, which was incomplete, occurred immediately before the biphasic contraction. The number of reticular contractions in a nine-minute period was largest when the cows were eating (13.9 contractions, or approximately 1.5 per minute) and smallest when they were stressed (9.3 contractions, or approximately 1 per minute). The duration of the first reticular contraction was shortest during rumination (2.4 seconds) and longest when the cows were eating (3.0 seconds). The interval between two biphasic contractions was shortest when the cows were eating (31.6 seconds) and longest when they were stressed (53.8 seconds).

  11. The Immediately Releasable Pool of Mouse Chromaffin Cell Vesicles Is Coupled to P/Q-Type Calcium Channels via the Synaptic Protein Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Yanina D.; Belingheri, Ana Verónica; Perez Bay, Andrés E.; Javis, Scott E.; Tedford, H. William; Zamponi, Gerald; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the immediately releasable pool is a group of readily releasable vesicles that are closely associated with voltage dependent Ca2+ channels. We have previously shown that exocytosis of this pool is specifically coupled to P/Q Ca2+ current. Accordingly, in the present work we found that the Ca2+ current flowing through P/Q-type Ca2+ channels is 8 times more effective at inducing exocytosis in response to short stimuli than the current carried by L-type channels. To investigate the mechanism that underlies the coupling between the immediately releasable pool and P/Q-type channels we transiently expressed in mouse chromaffin cells peptides corresponding to the synaptic protein interaction site of Cav2.2 to competitively uncouple P/Q-type channels from the secretory vesicle release complex. This treatment reduced the efficiency of Ca2+ current to induce exocytosis to similar values as direct inhibition of P/Q-type channels via ω-agatoxin-IVA. In addition, the same treatment markedly reduced immediately releasable pool exocytosis, but did not affect the exocytosis provoked by sustained electric or high K+ stimulation. Together, our results indicate that the synaptic protein interaction site is a crucial factor for the establishment of the functional coupling between immediately releasable pool vesicles and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:23382986

  12. Calcium Signaling in Taste Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Kathryn F.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. PMID:25450977

  13. Studies on the histogenesis of the tunica mucosa of the stomach of the Egyptian water buffalo (Bos bubalus L.). II. Histogenesis of the reticular mucosa.

    PubMed

    Osman, A H; Berg, R

    1981-01-01

    In the fetus with 9 cm CRL the reticular mucosa was made up of a Lamina epithelialis and a Lamina Propria/submucosa. The primordia of the reticular crests firstly appeared in the fetus with 16 cm CRL as evaginations of the basal zone of the Lamina epithelialis into the superficial one. Invaginations from the luminal surface of the Lamina epithelialis above the tips of the long reticular crests were formed in the fetus with 27 cm CRL. Aggregations of smooth muscle cells appeared in the cores of the long reticular crests in the fetus with 50 cm CRL. In the fetus with 73 cm CRL invaginations of various depths were formed to separate the reticular crests from the mass of epithelium. The epithelium in the different fetal stages were missing a Stratum corneum.

  14. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release in the organelle layers of the stratified, intact egg of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Using double-barreled, Ca2(+)-sensitive microelectrodes, we have examined the characteristics of the Ca2+ release by inositol 1,4,5- trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) in the various layers of Xenopus laevis eggs in which the organelles had been stratified by centrifugation. Centrifugation of living eggs stratifies the organelles yet retains them in the normal cytoplasmic milieu. The local increase in intracellular free Ca2+ in each layer was directly measured under physiological conditions using theta-tubing, double-barreled, Ca2(+)- sensitive microelectrodes in which one barrel was filled with the Ca2+ sensor and the other was filled with Ins(1,4,5)P3 for microinjection. The two tips of these electrodes were very close to each other (3 microns apart) enabling us to measure the kinetics of both the highly localized intracellular Ca2+ release and its subsequent removal in response to Ins(1,4,5)P3 injection. Upon Ins(1,4,5)P3 injection, the ER- enriched layer exhibited the largest release of Ca2+ in a dosage- dependent manner, whereas the other layers, mitochondria, lipid, and yolk, released 10-fold less Ca2+ in a dosage-independent manner. The removal of released Ca2+ took place within approximately 1 min. The sensitivity to Ins(1,4,5)P3 and the time course of intracellular Ca2+ release in the unstratified (unactivated) egg is nearly identical to that observed in the ER layer of the stratified egg. Our data suggest that the ER is the major organelle of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ store in the egg of Xenopus laevis. PMID:2324195

  15. Collapsed Reticular Network and its Possible Mechanism during the Initiation and/or Progression of Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shi-Lei; Feng, Shi; Tang, Shi-Hang; Gao, Jin-Hang; Zhang, Lin-hao; Tong, Huan; Yan, Zhao-Ping; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Among the researches on hepatic fibrosis, great attention was paid to both hepatocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, little focus was drawn on reticular fibrous network, which is important for demarcation and support of hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the change pattern of reticular fibers in hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis and its underlying mechanism. In this study, thioacetamide (TAA) and bile duct ligation (BDL) were utilized to induce rat hepatic fibrosis respectively, and Human liver cirrhotic microassay was analyzed with IHC to confirm the results in animal experiment and to detect the metalloproteinases (MMPs) expressions. As a result, the reticular fibers decreased markedly after 1 week in TAA and 1 day in BDL treated rats. Multiple representative regulators of MMPs and MMPs increased significantly in their expressions and activities. Further more, in human liver cirrhotic microassay, MMPs expressions also showed similar patterns as that of animal experiment. In Conclusions: Degradation or collapse of reticular fibers in hepatic sinusoid can be considered as a pathological feature during the initiation and/or progression of hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, such degradation is associated with and probably caused by the over/dysregulated expression of MMPs. PMID:27739503

  16. Toward compositional design of reticular type porous films by mixing and coating titania-based frameworks with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed reticular type porous structure, which can be fabricated as the film through the soft colloidal block copolymer (e.g., PS-b-PEO) templating, is very promising as the porous platform showing high-performance based on its high surface area as well as high diffusivity of targeted organic molecules and effective accommodation of bulky molecules, but the compositional design of oxide frameworks has not been developed so enough to date. Here, I report reliable synthetic methods of the reticular type porous structure toward simple compositional variations. Due to the reproducibility of reticular type porous titania films from titanium alkoxide (e.g., TTIP; titanium tetraisopropoxide), a titania-silica film having similar porous structure was obtained by mixing silicon alkoxide (e.g., tetraethoxysilane) and TTIP followed by their pre-hydrolysis, and the mixing ratio of Ti to Si composition was easily reached to 1.0. For further compositional design, a concept of surface coating was widely applicable; the reticular type porous titania surfaces can be coated with other oxides such as silica. Here, a silica coating was successfully achieved by the simple chemical vapor deposition of silicon alkoxide (e.g., tetramethoxysilane) without water (with water at the humidity level), which was also utilized for pore filling with silica by the similar process with water.

  17. Influence of the midbrain reticular formation irradiation with luminescent incoherent light on evoked potential of cerebral cortex in cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana L.; Abakarov, Asadulla; Monich, Victor A.

    1996-11-01

    In acute experiments on cats it is shown, that direct, of- low-intensity incoherent light exposure on midbrain reticular formation, cases brain cortex projection areas functional state changes, which find expression in shifting amplitude of both positive and negative components of cortex evoked potentials on visual stimuli.

  18. Selectively driving cholinergic fibers optically in the thalamic reticular nucleus promotes sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Kun-Ming; Hou, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Ci-Hang; Dong, Ping; Li, Yue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Ping; Berg, Darwin K; Duan, Shumin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and brainstem are thought to play important roles in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and arousal. Using transgenic mice in which channelrhdopsin-2 is selectively expressed in cholinergic neurons, we show that optical stimulation of cholinergic inputs to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) activates local GABAergic neurons to promote sleep and protect non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It does not affect REM sleep. Instead, direct activation of cholinergic input to the TRN shortens the time to sleep onset and generates spindle oscillations that correlate with NREM sleep. It does so by evoking excitatory postsynaptic currents via α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inducing bursts of action potentials in local GABAergic neurons. These findings stand in sharp contrast to previous reports of cholinergic activity driving arousal. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms controlling sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10382.001 PMID:26880556

  19. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators.

  20. Measurement of Basilar Membrane, Reticular Lamina, and Tectorial Membrane Vibrations in the Intact Mouse Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2011-11-01

    A scanning low-coherence heterodyne interferometer (SLHI) was developed for measuring the microstructural vibration inside the cochlear partition of the intact living cochlea of mice. The sensitivity, frequency response, and dynamic range of the SLHI are comparable with those of a sensitive laser interferometer but the SLHI has a higher spatial resolution along the optical axis. The magnitude and phase of sound-induced vibrations were measured as a function of the focal position along the optical axis. Our data show that the SLHI has sufficient sensitivity, dynamic range, and temporal and spatial resolution to measure sub-nanometer vibrations of the basilar membrane, reticular lamina, and tectorial membrane in the intact living mouse cochlea. High spatial and temporal resolution, compact heterodyne design, and scanning capability make this interferometer an ideal tool to study molecular mechanisms of hearing in normal and genetically-modified mice.

  1. Reticular and myxoid non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an unusual case mimicking a salivary gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Vijayadwaja, Desai; Loh, Kwok Seng; Tan, Kong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NK-NPC) with an unusual histopathological pattern. The neoplastic cells were arranged in anastomosing cords embedded in a stroma which contained a significant component of alcian blue-positive myxoid substance forming a reticular pattern. These histopathological features gave an initial impression of a salivary gland-type carcinoma. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells were strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratins (AE1-3 and 5/6) and p63 and there was strong and diffuse nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA on in situ hybridization. This case highlights the histomorphological variability of NK-NPC. Awareness of the histological spectrum of NK-NPC is important in clinical practice and this is not always adequately highlighted in currently used standard textbooks of Head and Neck Pathology. PMID:24323539

  2. Reticular and myxoid non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an unusual case mimicking a salivary gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Vijayadwaja, Desai; Loh, Kwok Seng; Tan, Kong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NK-NPC) with an unusual histopathological pattern. The neoplastic cells were arranged in anastomosing cords embedded in a stroma which contained a significant component of alcian blue-positive myxoid substance forming a reticular pattern. These histopathological features gave an initial impression of a salivary gland-type carcinoma. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells were strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratins (AE1-3 and 5/6) and p63 and there was strong and diffuse nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA on in situ hybridization. This case highlights the histomorphological variability of NK-NPC. Awareness of the histological spectrum of NK-NPC is important in clinical practice and this is not always adequately highlighted in currently used standard textbooks of Head and Neck Pathology.

  3. Fibroblastic Reticular Cells: Organization and Regulation of the T Lymphocyte Life Cycle1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Flavian D.; Turley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    The connective tissue of any organ in the body is generally referred to as stroma. This complex network is commonly composed of leukocytes, extracellular matrix components, mesenchymal cells and a collection of nerves, blood and lymphoid vessels. Once viewed primarily as a structural entity, stromal cells of mesenchymal origin are now being intensely examined for their ability to directly regulate various components of immune cell function. There is particular interest in the ability of stromal cells to influence the homeostasis, activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes. One example of this regulation occurs in the lymph node (LN) where fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) support the maintenance of naïve T cells, induce antigen-specific tolerance and restrict the expansion of newly activated T cells. In an effort to highlight the varied immunoregulatory properties of FRCs, we have reviewed the most recent advances in this field and provide some insights into potential future directions. PMID:25663676

  4. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators. PMID:24303193

  5. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V.; Turley, Shannon J.; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses. PMID:27415420

  6. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality.

    PubMed

    Novkovic, Mario; Onder, Lucas; Cupovic, Jovana; Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V; Bocharov, Gennady; Turley, Shannon J; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses.

  7. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality.

    PubMed

    Novkovic, Mario; Onder, Lucas; Cupovic, Jovana; Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V; Bocharov, Gennady; Turley, Shannon J; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses. PMID:27415420

  8. The lateral reticular nucleus; integration of descending and ascending systems regulating voluntary forelimb movements

    PubMed Central

    Alstermark, Bror; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar control of movements is dependent on mossy fiber input conveying information about sensory and premotor activity in the spinal cord. While much is known about spino-cerebellar systems, which provide the cerebellum with detailed sensory information, much less is known about systems conveying motor information. Individual motoneurones do not have projections to spino-cerebellar neurons. Instead, the fastest route is from last order spinal interneurons. In order to identify the networks that convey ascending premotor information from last order interneurons, we have focused on the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN), which provides the major mossy fiber input to cerebellum from spinal interneuronal systems. Three spinal ascending systems to the LRN have been investigated: the C3-C4 propriospinal neurones (PNs), the ipsilateral forelimb tract (iFT) and the bilateral ventral flexor reflex tract (bVFRT). Voluntary forelimb movements involve reaching and grasping together with necessary postural adjustments and each of these three interneuronal systems likely contribute to specific aspects of forelimb motor control. It has been demonstrated that the command for reaching can be mediated via C3-C4 PNs, while the command for grasping is conveyed via segmental interneurons in the forelimb segments. Our results reveal convergence of ascending projections from all three interneuronal systems in the LRN, producing distinct combinations of excitation and inhibition. We have also identified a separate descending control of LRN neurons exerted via a subgroup of cortico-reticular neurones. The LRN projections to the deep cerebellar nuclei exert a direct excitatory effect on descending motor pathways via the reticulospinal, vestibulospinal, and other supraspinal tracts, and might play a key role in cerebellar motor control. Our results support the hypothesis that the LRN provides the cerebellum with highly integrated information, enabling cerebellar control of complex forelimb

  9. Induction of rhythmic jaw movements by stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Katayama, T; Ishiwata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) induces rhythmic jaw movements (RJMs) and, if it does so, to determine the RJM-inducing region in the MRF in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. The results were as follows: (1) Repetitive electrical stimulation of the MRF at the level of the red nucleus induced rhythmic EMG bursts in the anterior digastric muscle (DIG). (2) The duration and cycle time of the rhythmic DIG EMG burst induced from the medial MRF were longer than those induced from the lateral MRF. (3) Repetitive MRF stimulation after paralysis still induced rhythmic multiple-unit activities in the anterior digastric motoneuron pool. (4) Neither precollicular decerebration nor cerebellectomy affected the MRF induction of RJMs. (5) Transverse hemisection at the rostral border of the pons abolished the RJMs induced from the contralateral, but not ipsilateral, MRF. Midline section of the midbrain abolished RJMs induced from the MRF on either side. (6) A lesion in the pontine pyramidal tract abolished the RJMs induced by stimulation of the ipsilateral cortical masticatory area (CMA), but not those induced from the contralateral MRF. (7) A unilateral lesion of the oral portion of the gigantocellular reticular nucleus, where the rhythm generator for the CMA-induced RJMs is located, abolished RJMs induced from not only the CMA, but also MRF on the contralateral side. (8) Microinjection of L-glutamate into the lateral, but not medial, MRF induced RJMs similar to those elicited by repetitive electrical stimulation of the same site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Projections of brainstem core cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of cat to intralaminar and reticular thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Paré, D; Smith, Y; Parent, A; Steriade, M

    1988-04-01

    We combined the retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated with horseradish peroxidase with choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry to study the projections of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of the upper brainstem core to rostral and caudal intralaminar thalamic nuclei, reticular thalamic complex and zona incerta in the cat. After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the rostral pole of the reticular thalamic nucleus, the distribution and amount of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were similar to those found after tracer injection in thalamic relay nuclei (see preceding paper). After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the caudal intralaminar centrum medianum-parafascicular complex, rostral intralaminar central lateral-paracentral wing, and zona incerta, the numbers of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were more than three times higher than those found after injections in thalamic relay nuclei. The larger numbers of horseradish peroxidase-positive brainstem reticular neurons after tracer injections in intralaminar or zona incerta injections results from a more substantial proportion of labeled neurons in the central tegmental field at rostral midbrain (perirubral) levels and in the ventromedial part of the pontine reticular formation, ipsi- and contralaterally to the injection site. Of all retrogradely labeled neurons in the caudal midbrain core at the level of the cholinergic peribrachial area and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, 45-50% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injections into central lateral-paracentral and reticular nuclei, while only 25% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injection into the centrum medianum-parafascicular complex. These findings are discussed in the light of physiological evidence of brainstem cholinergic mechanisms involved in the blockade of synchronized oscillations and in activation processes of

  11. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  12. Temperature and nucleotide dependence of calcium release by myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.; Smith, L.; Higgins, B.L.

    1985-11-25

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) rapidly increased UVCaS efflux from a nonmitochondrial organelle in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells that were permeabilized with saponin. A nucleotide, preferably ATP, was essential for IP3-evoked UVCaS release. Two nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues satisfied the nucleotide requirement for IP3-evoked UVCaS release. IP3 strongly stimulated UVCaS efflux at low temperatures (1 to 15 degrees C). Decreasing the temperature from 37 to 4 degrees C inhibited the rate of IP3-stimulated efflux by only about 33%. The failure of such low temperatures to strongly inhibit IP3-induced UVCaS efflux suggests that IP3 activated a CaS channel, rather than a carrier, by a ligand-binding, rather than a metabolic, reaction.

  13. N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels regulate differentially the release of noradrenaline, ATP and β-NAD in blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lisa M.; Yamboliev, Ilia A.; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.

    2009-01-01

    Using HPLC techniques we evaluated the electrical field stimulation-evoked overflow of noradrenaline (NA), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) in the presence of low nanomolar concentrations of ω-conotoxin GVIA or ω-agatoxin IVA in the canine mesenteric arteries and veins. ω-conotoxin GVIA abolished the evoked overflow of NA and β-NAD in artery and vein, whereas the evoked overflow of ATP remained unchanged in the presence of ω-conotoxin GVIA. ω-agatoxin IVA significantly reduced the evoked overflow of ATP and β-NAD. The overflow of NA remained largely unaffected by ω-agatoxin IVA, except at 16 Hz in the vein where the overflow of NA was reduced by about 50%. Artery and vein exhibited similar expression levels of the α1B (CaV2.2, N-type) subunit, whereas the vein showed greater levels of the α1A (CaV2.1, P/Q-type) subunit than artery. Therefore, there are at least two release sites for NA, β-NAD and ATP in the canine mesenteric artery and vein: an N-type-associated site releasing primarily NA, β-NAD and some ATP, and a P/Q-type-associated site releasing ATP, β-NAD and some NA. The N-type-mediated mechanisms are equally expressed in artery and vein, whereas the P/Q-type-mediated mechanisms are more pronounced in the vein and may ensure additional neurotransmitter release at higher levels of neural activity. In artery, β-NAD caused a dual effect consisting of vasodilatation or vasoconstriction depending on concentrations, whereas vein responded with vasodilatation only. In contrast, ATP caused vasoconstriction in both vessels. β-NAD and ATP may mediate disparate functions in the canine mesenteric resistive and capacitative circulations. PMID:18824011

  14. alpha-latrotoxin of black widow spider venom depolarizes the plasma membrane, induces massive calcium influx, and stimulates transmitter release in guinea pig brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, D G; Rugolo, M; Scott, I G; Meldolesi, J

    1982-01-01

    The effect of alpha-latrotoxin from black widow spider venom upon guinea pig cerebral cortical synaptosomes is described. Plasma membrane potential (delta psi p), in situ mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m), Ca2+ transport, gamma-amino[3H]butyrate release, [3H]noradrenaline release, and synaptosomal ATP were monitored under parallel conditions. Potentials were determined both isotopically and with a tetraphenylphosphonium-selective electrode. alpha-Latrotoxin depolarizes delta psi p selectively, both in the presence and absence of Ca2+. A slight toxin-induced depolarization of delta psi m is a consequence of a massive Ca2+ uptake across the plasma membrane. Depolarization of delta psi p is insensitive to tetrodotoxin, and Ca2+ entry is only partially inhibited by verapamil. Release of [3H]noradrenaline and gamma-amino[3H]butyrate is markedly stimulated by the toxin in the presence of Ca2+, and this effect is only slightly reduced in Ca2+-free conditions. PMID:6961460

  15. TRPA1 Channels Are Regulators of Astrocyte Basal Calcium Levels and Long-Term Potentiation via Constitutive d-Serine Release

    PubMed Central

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Huckstepp, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are found throughout the brain where they make extensive contacts with neurons and synapses. Astrocytes are known to display intracellular Ca2+ signals and release signaling molecules such as d-serine into the extracellular space. However, the role(s) of astrocyte Ca2+ signals in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity involved in learning and memory, remains unclear. Here, we explored a recently discovered novel TRPA1 channel-mediated transmembrane Ca2+ flux pathway in astrocytes. Specifically, we determined whether block or genetic deletion of TRPA1 channels affected LTP of Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. Using pharmacology, TRPA1−/− mice, imaging, electrophysiology, and d-serine biosensors, our data indicate that astrocyte TRPA1 channels contribute to basal Ca2+ levels and are required for constitutive d-serine release into the extracellular space, which contributes to NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. The findings have broad relevance for the study of astrocyte–neuron interactions by demonstrating how TRPA1 channel-mediated fluxes contribute to astrocyte basal Ca2+ levels and neuronal function via constitutive d-serine release. PMID:23761909

  16. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    PubMed

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  17. JTT-305, an orally active calcium-sensing receptor antagonist, stimulates transient parathyroid hormone release and bone formation in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Yushi; Ishida, Yuji; Okamoto, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Mikio

    2011-10-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) has a potent anabolic effect on bone in humans and animals. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists stimulate endogenous PTH secretion through CaSR on the surface of parathyroid cells and thereby may be anabolic agents for osteoporosis. JTT-305 is a potent oral short-acting CaSR antagonist and transiently stimulates endogenous PTH secretion. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of JTT-305 on PTH secretion and bone in ovariectomized rats. Female rats, immediately after ovariectomy (OVX), were orally administered vehicle or JTT-305 (0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. The serum PTH concentrations were transiently elevated with increasing doses of JTT-305. In the proximal tibia, JTT-305 prevented OVX-induced decreases in both the cancellous and total bone mineral density (BMD) except for the 0.3mg/kg dose. At the 3mg/kg dose, JTT-305 increased the mineralizing surface and bone formation rate in histomorphometry. The efficacy of JTT-305 at the 3mg/kg dose on the BMD corresponded to that of exogenous rat PTH1-84 injection at doses between 3 and 10 μg/kg. In conclusion, JTT-305 stimulated endogenous transient PTH secretion and bone formation, and consequently prevented bone loss in OVX rats. These results suggest that JTT-305 is orally active and has the potential to be an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  18. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  19. Cardiac calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in control and cardiomyopathic human hearts: mRNA and protein contents are differentially regulated.

    PubMed

    Sainte Beuve, C; Allen, P D; Dambrin, G; Rannou, F; Marty, I; Trouvé, P; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandgjbakch, I; Charlemagne, D

    1997-04-01

    Abnormal intracellular calcium handling in cardiomyopathic human hearts has been associated with an impaired function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but previous reports on the gene expression of the ryanodine receptors (Ry2) are contradictory. We measured the mRNA levels, the protein levels and the number of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding sites in the left ventricle of non-failing (n = 9) and failing human hearts [idiopathic dilated (IDCM n = 16), ischemic (ICM n = 7) or mixed (MCM n = 8) cardiomyopathies]. Ry2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in IDCM (-30%) and unchanged in MCM and ICM and Ry2 protein levels were similar. In contrast, we observed a two-fold increase in the number of high affinity Ry2 (B(max) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 v 0.22 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.01) and an unchanged K(d). Furthermore, levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA and protein per g of tissue were similar in failing and non-failing hearts, suggesting that the observed differences in Ry2 are not caused by the increase in fibrosis in failing heart. Therefore, the dissociation between the two-fold increase in the number of high affinity ryanodine receptors observed in all failing hearts and the slightly decreased mRNA level or unchanged protein level suggests that the ryanodine binding properties are affected in failing myocardium and that such modifications rather than a change in gene expression alter the channel activity and could contribute to abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ handling. PMID:9160875

  20. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by enabling the Ca2+-dependent inactivation of calcium release-activated calcium/orai channels normally prevented by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Valero, Ruth A; Quintana, Ariel; Hoth, Markus; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation contributes to occlusive and proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. Salicylate and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit VSMC proliferation by an unknown mechanism unrelated to anti-inflammatory activity. In search for this mechanism, we have studied the effects of salicylate and other NSAIDs on subcellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+)-dependent cell proliferation in rat aortic A10 cells, a model of neointimal VSMCs. We found that A10 cells displayed both store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry (VOCE), the former being more important quantitatively than the latter. Inhibition of SOCE by specific Ca(2+) released-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC/Orai) channels antagonists prevented A10 cell proliferation. Salicylate and other NSAIDs, including ibuprofen, indomethacin, and sulindac, inhibited SOCE and thereby Ca(2+)-dependent, A10 cell proliferation. SOCE, but not VOCE, induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in A10 cells, and mitochondrial depolarization prevented SOCE, thus suggesting that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake controls SOCE (but not VOCE) in A10 cells. NSAIDs depolarized mitochondria and prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that they favor the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of CRAC/Orai channels. NSAIDs also inhibited SOCE in rat basophilic leukemia cells where mitochondrial control of CRAC/Orai is well established. NSAIDs accelerate slow inactivation of CRAC currents in rat basophilic leukemia cells under weak Ca(2+) buffering conditions but not in strong Ca(2+) buffer, thus excluding that NSAIDs inhibit SOCE directly. Taken together, our results indicate that NSAIDs inhibit VSMC proliferation by facilitating the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of CRAC/Orai channels which normally is prevented by mitochondria clearing of entering Ca(2+).

  1. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  2. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  3. Sustained release poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres of bone morphogenetic protein 2 plasmid/calcium phosphate to promote in vitro bone formation and in vivo ectopic osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Bin; Liu, Jinzhong; Song, Jiyu; Hu, Yue; Yang, Shihui; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration often requires continuous stimulation to promote local bone formation. In the present study, calcium phosphate (CaPi) was used to promote transfection of human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) cDNA plasmid, and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used to prepare microspheres of pBMP-2/CaPi (i.e., PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi) using W/O/W double emulsion solvent evaporation method. We showed that PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres were spherical with smooth surface, and the particle size ranged from 0.5 to 35 μm. Encapsulation efficiency was up to 30~50%. The release of BMP-2 cDNA from microspheres continued more than 30 days and constituted, less than 7.5% of total plasmid amount within the first 24 h. Real-time PCR results showed that co-culturing of PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increased calcium deposition and gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), SP7, and collagen type I (COLL I) in a time-dependent manner. Finally, X-ray analysis demonstrated that in vivo delivery of PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres into the tibialis anterior muscles of rats promoted the generation of osteoblasts, bone tissue, and bone structure. The findings suggested that PLGA@pBMP-2/CaPi microspheres can promote ectopic osteogenesis in non-bone tissues, with strong prospects in promoting bone regeneration. PMID:26885257

  4. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  5. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  6. Glycinergic Pathways of the Central Auditory System and Adjacent Reticular Formation of the Rat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Chyren

    The development of techniques to visualize and identify specific transmitters of neuronal circuits has stimulated work on the characterization of pathways in the rat central nervous system that utilize the inhibitory amino acid glycine as its neurotransmitter. Glycine is a major inhibitory transmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem of vertebrates where it satisfies the major criteria for neurotransmitter action. Some of these characteristics are: uneven distribution in brain, high affinity reuptake mechanisms, inhibitory neurophysiological actions on certain neuronal populations, uneven receptor distribution and the specific antagonism of its actions by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Behaviorally, antagonism of glycinergic neurotransmission in the medullary reticular formation is linked to the development of myoclonus and seizures which may be initiated by auditory as well as other stimuli. In the present study, decreases in the concentration of glycine as well as the density of glycine receptors in the medulla with aging were found and may be responsible for the lowered threshold for strychnine seizures observed in older rats. Neuroanatomical pathways in the central auditory system and medullary and pontine reticular formation (RF) were investigated using retrograde transport of tritiated glycine to identify glycinergic pathways; immunohistochemical techniques were used to corroborate the location of glycine neurons. Within the central auditory system, retrograde transport studies using tritiated glycine demonstrated an ipsilateral glycinergic pathway linking nuclei of the ascending auditory system. This pathway has its cell bodies in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and projects to the ventrocaudal division of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VLL). Collaterals of this glycinergic projection terminate in the ipsilateral lateral superior olive (LSO). Other glycinergic pathways found were afferent to the VLL and have their origin

  7. A neural model of the saccade generator in the reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Gancarz, Gregory; Grossberg, Stephen

    1998-10-01

    A neural model is developed of the neural circuitry in the reticular formation that is used to generate saccadic eye movements. The model simulates the behavior of identified cell types-such as long-lead burst neurons, short-lead excitatory and inhibitory burst neurons, omnipause neurons, and tonic neurons-under many experimental conditions. Simulated phenomena include: saccade staircases, duration and amplitude of cell discharges for saccades of variable amplitude, component stretching to achieve straight oblique saccades, saturation of saccade velocity after saturation of saccade amplitude in response to high stimulation frequencies, trade-offs between saccade velocity and duration to generate constant saccade amplitude, conservation of saccade amplitude in response to sufficiently brief stimulation of omnipause neurons, and high velocity smooth eye movements evoked by high levels of electrical stimulation of the superior colliculus. Previous saccade generator models have not explained this range of data. These models have also invoked mechanisms for which no neurophysiological evidence has been forthcoming, such as resetable integrators, perfect integrators, or target position movement commands. The present model utilizes only known reticular formation neurons. It suggests that a key part of the feedback loop within the saccade generator is realized by inhibitory feedback from short-lead to long-lead burst neurons, in response to excitatory feedforward signals from long-lead to short-lead burst neurons. When this property is combined with opponent interactions between agonist and antagonist muscle-controlling neurons, and motor error, or vector, inputs from the superior colliculus and other saccade-controlling brain regions, all of the above data can be explained. Taken together, these components generate a saccade reset cycle whereby activation of long-lead burst neurons inhibits omnipause neurons and thereby disinhibits short-lead excitatory burst neurons. The

  8. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  9. Electrically evoked reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in mice with alpha tectorin C1509G mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical coupling between the tectorial membrane and the hair bundles of outer hair cells is crucial for stimulating mechanoelectrical transduction channels, which convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signal, and for transmitting outer hair cell-generated force back to the basilar membrane to boost hearing sensitivity. It has been demonstrated that the detached tectorial membrane in mice with C1509G alpha tectorin mutation caused hearing loss, but enhanced electrically evoked otoacoustic emissions. To understand how the mutated cochlea emits sounds, the reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations were measured in the electrically stimulated cochlea in this study. The results showed that the electrically evoked basilar membrane vibration decreased dramatically while the reticular lamina vibration and otoacoustic emissions exhibited no significant change in C1509G mutation mice. This result indicates that a functional cochlear amplifier and a normal basilar membrane vibration are not required for the outer hair cell-generated sound to exit the cochlea.

  10. Amorphous SnO2-SiO2 thin films with reticular porous morphology for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chen, L. B.; Li, C. C.; Wang, T. H.

    2008-12-01

    Amorphous SnO2-SiO2 thin films with reticular porous morphology were fabricated by electrostatic spray deposition method for lithium-ion batteries. An initial discharge capacity of the SnO2-SiO2 electrodes with 15% of SiO2 was about 1271 mA h/g, and the reversible capacity stayed in the range of 869-501 mA h/g during the successive 100 cycles, but only 1141 and 694-174 mA h/g for the pure SnO2 electrodes. The high capacity was attributed to the addition of SiO2, which facilitated the formation of the Li-Sn alloy. The improved cycle performance was due to reticular porous structure, which accommodated the volume change during cycling.

  11. Strychnine blockade of the non-reciprocal inhibition of trigeminal motoneurons induced by stimulation of the parvocellular reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-12-20

    Stimulation of a region within the parvocellular medullary reticular formation (PcRF) that contains somas of premotor interneurons produces short latency inhibitory synaptic potentials (IPSPs) in cat trigeminal motoneurons. The present study was undertaken to determine whether glycinergic synapses are responsible for these IPSPs. The intravenous administration of strychnine, an established glycine antagonist, abolished these PcRF-IPSPs. This effect appears to be specific for glycinergic inhibitory synapses because the short lasting component of the IPSP produced by inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) stimulation was also abolished, whereas, in contrast, the long lasting non-glycinergic component of this IPSP was not suppressed. These results indicate that a glycinergic system in the reticular formation is responsible for the non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition of trigeminal motoneurons. PMID:1817740

  12. [An experimental study on a slow-release complex with rifampicin-polylactic-co-glycolic acid-calcium 
phosphate cement].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhuang; Ding, Zhou; Lei, Qing; Li, Miao; Liang, Yan; Lu, Tao

    2016-09-28

    目的:制备利福平(rifampicin,RFP)-聚乳酸-羟基乙酸(polylactic-co-glycolic acid,PLGA)-磷酸钙骨水泥(calcium phosphate cement,CPC)缓释复合体(RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体),并研究其理化性质及体外释药性能。方法:采用乳化-溶剂挥发法制备RFP-PLGA缓释微球。实验分为CPC组、包埋了RFP的CPC组(RFP-CPC组)、载有RFP的PLGA缓释微球与自固化CPC复合体组(RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组)。测定3组材料的凝固时间﹑孔隙率。通过体外药物释放实验观察释药前后的抗压强度、断面形态的变化以及体外释药情况。结果:CPC组的凝固时间最短,RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组的凝固时间最长。CPC组的孔隙率同RFP-CPC组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);CPC组和RFP-CPC组的孔隙率与RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组比较,差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.01)。RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组的抗压强度与CPC组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);而RFP-CPC组和CPC组之间的抗压强度随着时间的变化逐渐表现出显著性差异(3 d: P<0.05;30和60 d:P<0.01)。CPC组在降解过程中的抗压强度的变化不大。PLGA微球的大小均一,粒径基本在100~150 μm之间,微球的形态呈现出球体或是类球体,微球的表面圆润光滑,无杂质附着; CPC组的断面空隙在浸泡3 d直至60 d都没有明显变化;而RFP-CPC组的微结构变化亦不大,其断面均是小的微粒形成的;RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组断面的孔隙明显增多,一直到60 d时PLGA微球逐渐消失,剩下空洞。RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体组无明显短时间内药物大量释放现象,60 d累计释药率达到近95%,将该复合体释药行为进行线性拟合,发现药物以恒速进行局部释放,符合零级动力学方程F=0.168×t。结论:RFP-PLGA-CPC复合体孔隙率显著高于CPC,能够持续缓慢释放有效抗结核药物,并能较长时间维持一定的力学强度。.

  13. Essential role of TNF-alpha in development of spleen fibroblastic reticular cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lintao; Chen, Junying; Liu, Lina; Gao, Jianbao; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2015-02-01

    TNF-alpha plays an important role in the development of secondary lymphoid tissues. Earlier studies showed that fibroblastic reticular cells express TNF-alpha receptor, suggesting that TNF-alpha may affect the development of FRCs. To test this, we analyzed the development and function of FRCs in wild-type or TNF-alpha knockout mice. We found that GP38 expression was down-regulated in the spleen of TNF-alpha knockout mice. Chemokines, mainly secreted by GP38(+) FRCs, were also down-regulated. Additionally, we found that absence of TNF-alpha decreased the homing ability to direct T cells to the spleen. However, absence of TNF-alpha did not affect the development of lymph nodes FRCs. These data reveal that TNF-alpha plays an important role in the development of spleen FRCs. Absence of TNF-alpha could cause abnormality of spleen FRCs, thereby weakening the homing ability of T cells to localize to the spleen T cell zone.

  14. Endogenous GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation are greater during wakefulness than during REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Wathen, Bradley L.; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2011-01-01

    Studies using drugs that increase or decrease GABAergic transmission suggest that GABA in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) promotes wakefulness and inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cholinergic transmission in the PRF promotes REM sleep, and levels of endogenous acetylcholine (ACh) in the PRF are significantly greater during REM sleep than during wakefulness or non-REM (NREM) sleep. No previous studies have determined whether levels of endogenous GABA in the PRF vary as a function of sleep and wakefulness. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA levels in cat PRF are greatest during wakefulness and lowest during REM sleep. Extracellular GABA levels were measured during wakefulness, NREM sleep, REM sleep, and the REM sleep-like state (REMNeo) caused by microinjecting neostigmine into the PRF. GABA levels varied significantly as a function of sleep and wakefulness, and decreased significantly below waking levels during REM sleep (−42%) and REMNeo (−63%). The decrease in GABA levels during NREM sleep (22% below waking levels) was not statistically significant. Compared to NREM sleep, GABA levels decreased significantly during REM sleep (−27%) and REMNeo (−52%). Comparisons of REM sleep and REMNeo revealed no differences in GABA levels or cortical EEG power. GABA levels did not vary significantly as a function of dialysis site within the PRF. The inverse relationship between changes in PRF levels of GABA and ACh during REM sleep indicates that low GABAergic tone combined with high cholinergic tone in the PRF contributes to the generation of REM sleep. PMID:21325533

  15. Differential gating of thalamo-cortical signals by reticular nucleus of thalamus during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Marlinski, Vladimir; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) provides inhibition to the dorsal thalamus, and forms a crucial interface between thalamo-cortical and cortico-thalamic signals. Whereas there has been significant interest in the role of the RE in organizing thalamo-cortical signaling, information on the activity of the RE in the awake animal is scant. Here we investigated the activity of neurons within the ‘motor’ compartment of the RE in the awake, unrestrained cat during simple locomotion on a flat surface and complex locomotion along a horizontal ladder that required visual control of stepping. The activity of 88% of neurons in this region was modulated during locomotion. Neurons with receptive fields on the shoulder were located dorsally in the nucleus and had regular discharges; during locomotion they had relatively low activity and modest magnitudes of stride-related modulation, and their group activity was distributed over the stride. In contrast, neurons with receptive fields on the wrist/paw were located more ventrally, often discharged sleep-type bursts during locomotion, were very active and profoundly modulated, and their group activity was concentrated in the swing and end of stance. 75% of RE neurons had different activity during the two locomotion tasks. We conclude that during locomotion the RE differentially gates thalamo-cortical signals transmitted during different phases of the stride, in relation to different parts of the limb, and the type of locomotion task. PMID:23136421

  16. Lymph node fibroblastic reticular cell transplants show robust therapeutic efficacy in high-mortality murine sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Anne L; Elman, Jessica S; Astarita, Jillian; Murray, Ryan; Saeidi, Nima; D'Rozario, Joshua; Knoblich, Konstantin; Brown, Flavian D; Schildberg, Frank A; Nieves, Janice M; Heng, Tracy S P; Boyd, Richard L; Turley, Shannon J; Parekkadan, Biju

    2014-08-13

    Sepsis is an aggressive inflammatory syndrome and a global health burden estimated to kill 7.3 million people annually. Single-target molecular therapies have not addressed the multiple disease pathways triggered by septic injury. Cell therapies might offer a broader set of mechanisms of action that benefit complex, multifocal disease processes. We describe a population of immune-specialized myofibroblasts derived from lymph node tissue, termed fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). Because FRCs have an immunoregulatory function in lymph nodes, we hypothesized that ex vivo-expanded FRCs would control inflammation when administered therapeutically. Indeed, a single injection of ex vivo-expanded allogeneic FRCs reduced mortality in mouse models of sepsis when administered at early or late time points after septic onset. Mice treated with FRCs exhibited lower local and systemic concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and reduced bacteremia. When administered 4 hours after induction of lipopolysaccharide endotoxemia, or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis in mice, FRCs reduced deaths by at least 70%. When administered late in disease (16 hours after CLP), FRCs still conveyed a robust survival advantage (44% survival compared to 0% for controls). FRC therapy was dependent on the metabolic activity of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) as the primary molecular mechanism of drug action in the mice. Together, these data describe a new anti-inflammatory cell type and provide preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy in severe sepsis that warrants further translational study.

  17. [Modulation by the GABA of the ventro-oral-pontine reticular REM sleep-inducing neurons].

    PubMed

    Reinoso Suárez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    From a multidisciplinary study in our laboratory we have compiled numerous findings on the role played by the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the ventral part of the oral pontine reticular nucleus (vRPO), REM sleep induction and maintenance brainstem structure. Functional GABA in the vRPO is located in a few small and scattered neuronal bodies, and in an abundant number of synaptic terminals: 30% of all synaptic terminals in vRPO are GABAergic. These terminals form inhibitory, symmetric synapses on the soma and different segments of the dendritic tree of the vRPO neurons, mainly in those of large diameter. In unitary intracellular studies, in vitro, we have demonstrated that GABA produces hyperpolarization of the vRPO neurons. In vivo experiments in freely moving cats, local microinjections of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol decreased REM sleep. The different densities of GABA-immunoreactions and the diverse and complex morphological ultrastructure of the vRPO GABAergic terminals suggest that they have different origins and physiologic functions. There are GABAergic projections to the vRPO from diencephalic structures related with the other phases of the sleep-wakefulness cycle: wakefulness and non-REM sleep, which may be anatomical substrata for the GABAergic inhibition of the vRPO REM sleep-inducing neurons during these other phases.

  18. Thalamic reticular nucleus induces fast and local modulation of arousal state

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Laura D; Voigts, Jakob; Flores, Francisco J; Schmitt, L Ian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    During low arousal states such as drowsiness and sleep, cortical neurons exhibit rhythmic slow wave activity associated with periods of neuronal silence. Slow waves are locally regulated, and local slow wave dynamics are important for memory, cognition, and behaviour. While several brainstem structures for controlling global sleep states have now been well characterized, a mechanism underlying fast and local modulation of cortical slow waves has not been identified. Here, using optogenetics and whole cortex electrophysiology, we show that local tonic activation of thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) rapidly induces slow wave activity in a spatially restricted region of cortex. These slow waves resemble those seen in sleep, as cortical units undergo periods of silence phase-locked to the slow wave. Furthermore, animals exhibit behavioural changes consistent with a decrease in arousal state during TRN stimulation. We conclude that TRN can induce rapid modulation of local cortical state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08760.001 PMID:26460547

  19. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  20. Dendritic cells control fibroblastic reticular network tension and lymph node expansion.

    PubMed

    Acton, Sophie E; Farrugia, Aaron J; Astarita, Jillian L; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Jenkins, Robert P; Nye, Emma; Hooper, Steven; van Blijswijk, Janneke; Rogers, Neil C; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rosewell, Ian; Moita, Luis F; Stamp, Gordon; Turley, Shannon J; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-10-23

    After immunogenic challenge, infiltrating and dividing lymphocytes markedly increase lymph node cellularity, leading to organ expansion. Here we report that the physical elasticity of lymph nodes is maintained in part by podoplanin (PDPN) signalling in stromal fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and its modulation by CLEC-2 expressed on dendritic cells. We show in mouse cells that PDPN induces actomyosin contractility in FRCs via activation of RhoA/C and downstream Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Engagement by CLEC-2 causes PDPN clustering and rapidly uncouples PDPN from RhoA/C activation, relaxing the actomyosin cytoskeleton and permitting FRC stretching. Notably, administration of CLEC-2 protein to immunized mice augments lymph node expansion. In contrast, lymph node expansion is significantly constrained in mice selectively lacking CLEC-2 expression in dendritic cells. Thus, the same dendritic cells that initiate immunity by presenting antigens to T lymphocytes also initiate remodelling of lymph nodes by delivering CLEC-2 to FRCs. CLEC-2 modulation of PDPN signalling permits FRC network stretching and allows for the rapid lymph node expansion--driven by lymphocyte influx and proliferation--that is the critical hallmark of adaptive immunity.

  1. Role of glutamate receptors in the dorsal reticular nucleus in formalin-induced secondary allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Ramirez-López, Fernanda; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, And René

    2013-10-01

    The role of glutamate receptors present in the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) in the formalin test and formalin-induced secondary nociception was studied in rats. Secondary mechanical allodynia was assessed with von Frey filaments applied to the rat's hindpaw, and secondary thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated with the tail-immersion test. The selective glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) (AMPA/KA receptor antagonist) and A841720 (metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonist) were injected into the DRt before or 6 days after formalin injection in the rat. In the formalin test, the three antagonists significantly reduced the number of flinches in both phases of the test. DRt microinjection of MK801 or A841720, but not of CNQX, reduced both secondary nociceptive behaviors. Moreover, pre-treatment with the three antagonists injected into the DRt prevented the development of secondary mechanical allodynia and secondary thermal hyperalgesia. Similarly, in these rats, the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive neurons were markedly reduced in both the superficial and deep lamina of the dorsal horn. Our findings support the role of DRt as a pain facilitator in acute and chronic pain states, and suggest a key role of glutamate receptors during the development and maintenance of formalin-induced secondary allodynia. PMID:23869620

  2. The phosphorylation status of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 in astrocytes and neurons from rat hippocampus determines the thrombin-induced calcium release and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Gregor; Reiser, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Challenge of protease-activated receptors induces cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ](c)) increase, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation with a bandwidth of responses in individual cells. We detected in this study in situ the thrombin-induced [Ca(2+) ](c) rise and ROS formation in dissociated hippocampal astrocytes and neurons in a mixed culture. In identified cells, single cell responses were correlated with extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation level. On average, in astrocytes, thrombin induced a transient [Ca(2+) ](c) rise with concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and extrusion rate and high ERK1/2 phosphorylation level. Correlation analysis of [Ca(2+) ](c) response characteristics of single astrocytes reveals that astrocytes with nuclear phosphoERK1/2 localization have a smaller Ca(2+) amplitude and extrusion rate compared with cells with a cytosolic phosphoERK1/2 localization. In naive neurons, without thrombin challenge, variable ERK1/2 phosphorylation patterns are observed. ROS were detected by hydroethidine. Only in neurons with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation level, we see sustained intracellular rise in fluorescence of the dye lasting over several minutes. ROS formation was abolished by pre-incubation with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Additionally, thrombin induced an immediate, transient hydroethidine fluorescence increase. This was interpreted as NADPH oxidase-mediated O(2) (•-) -release into the extracellular milieu, because it was decreased by pre-incubation with apocynin, and could be eluted by superfusion. In conclusion, the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2 determines the thrombin-dependent [Ca(2+) ](c) increase and ROS formation and, thus, influences the capacity of thrombin to regulate neuroprotection or neurodegeneration. PMID:21988180

  3. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). Results The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Conclusions Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use. PMID:23131192

  4. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  5. Amifostine-conjugated pH-sensitive calcium phosphate-covered magnetic-amphiphilic gelatin nanoparticles for controlled intracellular dual drug release for dual-targeting in HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Huang, Wei-Chen; Su, Chia-Wei; Chiang, Min-Yu; Chen, Jian-Yi; Chen, San-Yuan

    2015-12-28

    We developed a surfactant-free method utilizing amifostine to stably link a targeting ligand (Herceptin) to amphiphilic gelatin (AG)-iron oxide@calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles with hydrophobic curcumin (CUR) and hydrophilic doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in the AG core and CaP shell (AGIO@CaP-CD), respectively. This multi-functional nanoparticle system has a pH-sensitive CaP shell and degradable amphiphilic gelatin (AG) core, which enables controllable sequential release of the two drugs. The dual-targeting system of AGIO@CaP-CD (HER-AGIO@CaP-CD) with a bioligand and magnetic targeting resulted in significantly elevated cellular uptake in HER2-overexpressing SKBr3 cells and more efficacious therapy than delivery of targeting ligand alone due to the synergistic cell multi-drug resistance/apoptosis-inducing effect of the CUR and DOX combination. This nanoparticle combined with Herceptin and iron oxide nanoparticles not only provided a dual-targeting functionality, but also encapsulated CUR and DOX as a dual-drug delivery system for the combination therapy. This study further demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacy of this dual-targeting co-delivery system can be improved by modifying the application duration of magnetic targeting, which makes this combination therapy system a powerful new tool for in vitro/in vivo cancer therapy, especially for HER2-positive cancers.

  6. IRBIT, Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate (IP3) Receptor-binding Protein Released with IP3, Binds Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE3 and Activates NHE3 Activity in Response to Calcium*

    PubMed Central

    He, Peijian; Zhang, Huanchun; Yun, C. Chris

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates various cellular processes. Previous studies showed that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ regulates the activity of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3). However, the effect of Ca2+-dependent signaling on NHE3 activity varies depending on cell types. In this study, we report the identification of IP3 receptor-binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) as a NHE3 interacting protein and its role in regulation of NHE3 activity. IRBIT bound to the carboxyl-terminal domain of NHE3, which is necessary for acute regulation of NHE3. Ectopic expression of IRBIT resulted in Ca2+-dependent activation of NHE3 activity, whereas silencing of endogenous IRBIT resulted in inhibition of NHE3 activity. Ca2+-dependent stimulation of NHE3 activity was dependent on the binding of IRBIT to NHE3. Previously Ca2+-dependent inhibition of NHE3 was demonstrated in the presence of NHERF2. Co-expression of IRBIT was able to reverse the NHERF2-dependent inhibition of NHE3. We also showed that IRBIT-dependent activation of NHE3 involves exocytic trafficking of NHE3 to the plasma membrane and this activation was blocked by inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) or CaM-dependent kinase II. These results suggest that the overall effect of Ca2+ on NHE3 activity is balanced by IRBIT-dependent activation and NHERF2-dependent inhibition. PMID:18829453

  7. GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse modulate neurochemical, electrographic, and behavioral phenotypes of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Flint, RaShonda R; Chang, Theresa; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-09-15

    Drugs that potentiate transmission at GABA(A) receptors are widely used to enhance sleep and to cause general anesthesia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) of mouse modulate five phenotypes of arousal: sleep and wakefulness, cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO, breathing, and recovery time from general anesthesia. Microinjections into the PnO of saline (vehicle control), the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, muscimol with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and bicuculline alone were performed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 33) implanted with EEG recording electrodes. Muscimol caused a significant increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These effects were reversed by coadministration of bicuculline. Bicuculline administered alone caused a significant decrease in wakefulness and increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep. Muscimol significantly increased EEG power in the delta range (0.5-4 Hz) during wakefulness and in the theta range (4-9 Hz) during REM sleep. Dialysis delivery of bicuculline to the PnO of male mice (n = 18) anesthetized with isoflurane significantly increased ACh release in the PnO, decreased breathing rate, and increased anesthesia recovery time. All drug effects were concentration dependent. The effects on phenotypes of arousal support the conclusion that GABA(A) receptors in the PnO promote wakefulness and suggest that increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO may be one mechanism underlying the phenomenon of paradoxical behavioral activation by some benzodiazepines.

  8. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  9. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  10. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  11. Caffeine-induced myocardial injury in calcium-free perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Vander Heide, R S; Ganote, C E

    1985-01-01

    Hearts depleted of extracellular calcium become susceptible to injury caused by repletion of extracellular calcium (calcium paradox). It has been suggested that calcium-free perfusion causes weakening of intercalated disks and that the physical stress of contracture may cause sarcolemmal membrane rupture and creatine kinase (CK) release. To further investigate this hypothesis, the effects of caffeine on contracture, cellular morphology, and CK release were studied in control and calcium-free perfused isolated rat hearts. Control hearts perfused with 2.5 mM calcium retained normal ultrastructure for long periods of perfusion. Calcium-free hearts perfused for 12 minutes developed separations of fascia adherens portions of intercalated disks but retained intact nexus junctions. Hearts subjected to 5-minute calcium-free perfusion, followed by calcium repletion, developed a massive CK release and extensive contraction band necrosis (calcium paradox). Ten millimolar caffeine, which causes rapid calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), produced contracture, but not CK release, from control hearts perfused with medium containing 2.5 mM calcium. In calcium-free perfused hearts, caffeine caused sudden CK release accompanied by contracture, development of contraction bands, wide separations of cells at intercalated disks, and sarcolemmal membrane injury. Caffeine-induced injury occurred despite 3 mM amobarbital inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Hearts perfused with caffeine in the presence of calcium relaxed when made calcium-free and did not release CK. Addition of caffeine following calcium-free perfusion at 22 C, which protects the heart from the calcium paradox, produced a rapid, transient contracture. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that myocardial cell injury in calcium-free hearts is not dependent on repletion of extracellular calcium or mitochondrial function, but can result from contracture following caffeine-induced release of

  12. Early postnatal switch in GABAA receptor α-subunits in the reticular thalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Sieghart, Werner; Rudolph, Uwe; Parada, Isabel; Huguenard, John R

    2016-03-01

    The GABAergic neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (nRt) provide the primary source of inhibition within the thalamus. Using physiology, pharmacology, and immunohistochemistry in mice, we characterized postsynaptic developmental changes in these inhibitory projection neurons. First, at postnatal days 3-5 (P3-5), inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) decayed very slowly, followed by a biphasic developmental progression, becoming faster at P6-8 and then slower again at P9-11 before stabilizing in a mature form around P12. Second, the pharmacological profile of GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated IPSCs differed between neonatal and mature nRt neurons, and this was accompanied by reciprocal changes in α3 (late) and α5 (early) subunit expression in nRt. Zolpidem, selective for α1- and α3-containing GABA(A)Rs, augmented only mature IPSCs, whereas clonazepam enhanced IPSCs at all stages. This effect was blocked by the α5-specific inverse agonist L-655,708, but only in immature neurons. In α3(H126R) mice, in which α3-subunits were mutated to become benzodiazepine insensitive, IPSCs were enhanced compared with those in wild-type animals in early development. Third, tonic GABA(A)R activation in nRt is age dependent and more prominent in immature neurons, which correlates with early expression of α5-containing GABA(A)Rs. Thus neonatal nRt neurons show relatively high expression of α5-subunits, which contributes to both slow synaptic and tonic extrasynaptic inhibition. The postnatal switch in GABA(A)R subunits from α5 to α3 could facilitate spontaneous network activity in nRt that occurs at this developmental time point and which is proposed to play a role in early circuit development. PMID:26631150

  13. Abnormal tuning of saccade-related cells in pontine reticular formation of strabismic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mustari, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus is a common disorder, characterized by a chronic misalignment of the eyes and numerous visual and oculomotor abnormalities. For example, saccades are often highly disconjugate. For humans with pattern strabismus, the horizontal and vertical disconjugacies vary with eye position. In monkeys, manipulations that disturb binocular vision during the first several weeks of life result in a chronic strabismus with characteristics that closely match those in human patients. Early onset strabismus is associated with altered binocular sensitivity of neurons in visual cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that brain stem circuits specific to saccadic eye movements are abnormal. We targeted the pontine paramedian reticular formation, a structure that directly projects to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus. In normal animals, neurons in this structure are characterized by a high-frequency burst of spikes associated with ipsiversive saccades. We recorded single-unit activity from 84 neurons from four monkeys (two normal, one exotrope, and one esotrope), while they made saccades to a visual target on a tangent screen. All 24 neurons recorded from the normal animals had preferred directions within 30° of pure horizontal. For the strabismic animals, the distribution of preferred directions was normal on one side of the brain, but highly variable on the other. In fact, 12/60 neurons recorded from the strabismic animals preferred vertical saccades. Many also had unusually weak or strong bursts. These data suggest that the loss of corresponding binocular vision during infancy impairs the development of normal tuning characteristics for saccade-related neurons in brain stem. PMID:26063778

  14. Internal pallidum and substantia nigra control different parts of the mesopontine reticular formation in primate.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Anne-Sophie; Karachi, Carine; Muriel, Marie-Paule; Hirsch, Etienne C; François, Chantal

    2011-08-01

    The locomotor area has recently emerged as a target for deep brain stimulation to lessen gait disturbances in advanced parkinsonian patients. An important step in choosing this target is to define anatomical limits of its 2 components, the pedunculopontine nucleus and the cuneiform nucleus, their connections with the basal ganglia, and their output descending pathway. Based on the hypothesis that pedunculopontine nucleus controls locomotion whereas cuneiform nucleus controls axial posture, we analyzed whether both nuclei receive inputs from the internal pallidum and substantia nigra using anterograde and retrograde tract tracing in monkeys. We also examined whether these nuclei convey descending projections to the reticulospinal pathway. Pallidal terminals were densely distributed and restricted to the pedunculopontine nucleus, whereas nigral terminals were diffusely observed in the whole extent of both the pedunculopontine nucleus and the cuneiform nucleus. Moreover, nigral terminals formed symmetric synapses with pedunculopontine nucleus and cuneiform nucleus dendrites. Retrograde tracing experiments confirmed these results because labeled cell bodies were observed in both the internal pallidum and substantia nigra after pedunculopontine nucleus injection, but only in the substantia nigra after cuneiform nucleus injection. Furthermore, anterograde tracing experiments revealed that the pedunculopontine nucleus and cuneiform nucleus project to large portions of the pontomedullary reticular formation. This is the first anatomical evidence that the internal pallidum and the substantia nigra control different parts of the brain stem and can modulate the descending reticulospinal pathway in primates. These findings support the functional hypothesis that the nigro-cuneiform nucleus pathway could control axial posture whereas the pallido-pedunculopontine nucleus pathway could modulate locomotion. PMID:21469212

  15. Electrophysiological properties and cholinergic responses of rat ventral oral pontine reticular neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, A; De la Roza, C; Rodrigo-Angulo, M L; Buño, W; Reinoso-Suárez, F

    1997-04-18

    In order to characterize the electrophysiological properties of morphologically identified neurons of the ventral part of the oral pontine reticular (vRPO) nucleus and the effects of cholinergic agonists on them, intracellular recordings were obtained from 45 cells in a rat brain-slice preparation. Intracellular staining was performed with 2% biocytin in potassium acetate (1 M)-filled micropipettes. Results demonstrated the presence of two types of vRPO neurons. Type I cells (n = 12, 24%) were characterized by a break with a decrease of the depolarizing slope following hyperpolarizing pulses which delayed the return to the resting Vm and subsequent spike-firing. The delay was antagonized by 4-AP (200-500 microM) which specifically blocks the transient outward K+-mediated current I(A). Type II neurons (n = 38, 76%) displayed a typical depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing current pulses which was blocked by Cs+. This behavior is characteristic of the hyperpolarization-activated current I(Q). These two neuronal types displayed different morphological features. Most type I and II cells (100 and 73.7%, respectively) were depolarized by acetylcholine (1-15 microM), carbachol (0.5-1 microM) and muscarine (1-10 microM) through the activation of post-synaptic muscarinic receptors. The remaining type II cells (26.3%) were hyperpolarized (1-10 min, 3-15 mV) through the activation of post-synaptic muscarinic receptors. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vRPO could be a neuronal target of Cch in eliciting paradoxical sleep because most of its neurons are activated by muscarinic agonists.

  16. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels-one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms-feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  17. Calcium-Dependent Signaling and Kinases in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Billker, Oliver; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David

    2009-01-01

    Summary Calcium controls many critical events in the complex life cycles of apicomplexan parasites including protein secretion, motility, and development. Calcium levels are normally tightly regulated and rapid release of calcium into the cytosol activates a family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are normally characteristic of plants. CDPKs present in apicomplexans have acquired a number of unique domain structures likely reflecting their diverse functions. Calcium regulation in parasites is closely linked to signaling by cyclic nucleotides and their associated kinases. This review summarizes the pivotal roles that calcium-and cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases play in unique aspects of parasite biology. PMID:19527888

  18. Motoneuron properties during motor inhibition produced by microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Engelhardt, J K; Soja, P J; Pereda, A E; Chase, M H

    1987-04-01

    It is well established that cholinergic agonists, when injected into the pontine reticular formation in cats, produce a generalized suppression of motor activity (1, 3, 6, 14, 18, 27, 33, 50). The responsible neuronal mechanisms were explored by measuring ventral root activity, the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex, and the basic electrophysiological properties of hindlimb motoneurons before and after carbachol was microinjected into the pontine reticular formation of decerebrate cats. Intrapontine microinjections of carbachol (0.25-1.0 microliter, 16 mg/ml) resulted in the tonic suppression of ventral root activity and a decrease in the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex. An analysis of intracellular records from lumbar motoneurons during the suppression of motor activity induced by carbachol revealed a considerable decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant as well as a reduction in motoneuron excitability, as evidenced by a nearly twofold increase in rheobase. Discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were also observed following carbachol administration. The changes in motoneuron properties (rheobase, input resistance, and membrane time constant), as well as the development of discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, indicate that spinal cord motoneurons were postsynaptically inhibited following the pontine administration of carbachol. In addition, the inhibitory processes that arose after carbachol administration in the decerebrate cat were remarkably similar to those that are present during active sleep in the chronic cat. These findings suggest that the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation activates the same brain stem-spinal cord system that is responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of alpha-motoneurons that occurs during active sleep. PMID:3585456

  19. Calcium, iron and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T

    2007-01-01

    Calcium and iron play dual roles in neuronal function: they are both essential but when present in excess they cause neuronal damage and may even induce neuronal death. Calcium signals are required for synaptic plasticity, a neuronal process that entails gene expression and which is presumably the cellular counterpart of cognitive brain functions such as learning and memory. Neuronal activity generates cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium signals that in turn stimulate pathways that promote the transcription of genes known to participate in synaptic plasticity. In addition, evidence discussed in this article shows that iron deficiency causes learning and memory impairments that persist following iron repletion, indicating that iron is necessary for normal development of cognitive functions. Recent results from our group indicate that iron is required for long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 neurons and that iron stimulates ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium release through ROS produced via the Fenton reaction leading to stimulation of the ERK signaling pathway. These combined results support a coordinated action between iron and calcium in synaptic plasticity and raise the possibility that elevated iron levels may contribute to neuronal degeneration through excessive intracellular calcium increase caused by iron-induced oxidative stress. PMID:17505966

  20. B Lymphocyte Calcium InFlux

    PubMed Central

    King, Leslie B.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in cytoplasmic calcium concentration dictate the immunological fate and functions of lymphocytes. During the past few years important details have been revealed about the mechanism of store-operated calcium entry in lymphocytes, including the molecular identity of calcium-release activated (CRAC) channels and the ER calcium sensor (STIM1) responsible for CRAC channel activation following calcium depletion of stores. However, details of the potential fine regulation of CRAC channel activation that may be imposed on lymphocytes following physiologic stimulation within an inflammatory environment have not been fully addressed. In this review, we discuss several underexplored aspects of store-operated (CRAC-mediated) and store-independent calcium signaling in B lymphocytes. First, we discuss the potential novel requirement for antigen-receptor linked pathways in initiating CRAC channel activation. Second, we will discuss results suggesting that coupling between stores and CRAC channels may be regulated, allowing for graded activation in response to partial depletion of ER stores. Third, we will discuss mechanisms that sustain the duration of calcium entry via CRAC channels. Finally, we discuss distinct calcium permeant non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) that are activated by innate stimuli in B cells, potential means by which these innate calcium signaling pathways and CRAC channels crossregulate one another and the mechanistic basis and physiologic consequences of innate calcium signaling. PMID:19754903

  1. Vitamin D-enhanced duodenal calcium transport.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-01-01

    For humans and rodents, duodenum is a very important site of calcium absorption since it is exposed to ionized calcium released from dietary complexes by gastric acid. Calcium traverses the duodenal epithelium via both transcellular and paracellular pathways in a vitamin D-dependent manner. After binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] upregulates the expression of several calcium transporter genes, e.g., TRPV5/6, calbindin-D9k, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase1b, and NCX1, thereby enhancing the transcellular calcium transport. This action has been reported to be under the regulation of parathyroid-kidney-intestinal and bone-kidney-intestinal axes, in which the plasma calcium and fibroblast growth factor-23 act as negative feedback regulators, respectively. 1,25(OH)2D3 also modulates the expression of tight junction-related genes and convective water flow, presumably to increase the paracellular calcium permeability and solvent drag-induced calcium transport. However, vitamin D-independent calcium absorption does exist and plays an important role in calcium homeostasis under certain conditions, particularly in neonatal period, pregnancy, and lactation as well as in naturally vitamin D-impoverished subterranean mammals.

  2. Substance P in the descending cholinergic projection to REM sleep-induction regions of the rat pontine reticular formation: anatomical and electrophysiological analyses.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Burns, Joan; Reiner, Peter B; Semba, Kazue

    2002-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine within the pontine reticular formation (PRF) from the axon terminals of mesopontine cholinergic neurons has long been hypothesized to play an important role in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation. As some of these cholinergic neurons are known to contain substance P (SP), we used anatomical, electrophysiological and pharmacological techniques to characterize this projection in the rat. Double immunofluorescence demonstrated that 16% of all cholinergic neurons within the mesopontine tegmentum contained SP; this percentage increased to 27% in its caudal regions. When double immunofluorescence was combined with retrograde tracing techniques, it was observed that up to 11% of all SP-containing cholinergic neurons project to the PRF. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from in vitro brainstem slices revealed that SP administration depolarized or evoked an inward current in a dose-dependent manner in all PRF neurons examined, and that these effects were antagonized by a SP antagonist. The amplitude of the SP-induced inward current varied with changes in the Na+ concentration, did not reverse at the calculated K+ or Cl- equilibrium potentials, and was not attenuated in the presence of tetrodotoxin, low Ca2+ concentration or caesium ions. These data suggest that activation of a tetrodotoxin-insensitive cation channel(s) permeable to Na+ is responsible for a SP-induced inward current at resting membrane potentials. The depolarizing actions of SP appeared to be primarily due to activation of the adenylate cyclase pathway, and were additive with cholinergic receptor activation even at maximal concentrations. These data indicate that SP is colocalized in a subpopulation of mesopontine tegmental cholinergic neurons projecting to REM sleep-induction regions of the PRF, and that actions of these two neuroactive substances on PRF neurons are additive. If SP is coreleased with acetylcholine, the additive actions of the two neurotransmitters might

  3. "Caged calcium" in Aplysia pacemaker neurons. Characterization of calcium-activated potassium and nonspecific cation currents

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have studied calcium-activated potassium current, IK(Ca), and calcium-activated nonspecific cation current, INS(Ca), in Aplysia bursting pacemaker neurons, using photolysis of a calcium chelator (nitr-5 or nitr-7) to release "caged calcium" intracellularly. A computer model of nitr photolysis, multiple buffer equilibration, and active calcium extrusion was developed to predict volume-average and front-surface calcium concentration transients. Changes in arsenazo III absorbance were used to measure calcium concentration changes caused by nitr photolysis in microcuvettes. Our model predicted the calcium increments caused by successive flashes, and their dependence on calcium loading, nitr concentration, and light intensity. Flashes also triggered the predicted calcium concentration jumps in neurons filled with nitr-arsenazo III mixtures. In physiological experiments, calcium- activated currents were recorded under voltage clamp in response to flashes of different intensity. Both IK(Ca) and INS(Ca) depended linearly without saturation upon calcium concentration jumps of 0.1-20 microM. Peak membrane currents in neurons exposed to repeated flashes first increased and then declined much like the arsenazo III absorbance changes in vitro, which also indicates a first-order calcium activation. Each flash-evoked current rose rapidly to a peak and decayed to half in 3-12 s. Our model mimicked this behavior when it included diffusion of calcium and nitr perpendicular to the surface of the neuron facing the flashlamp. Na/Ca exchange extruding about 1 pmol of calcium per square centimeter per second per micromolar free calcium appeared to speed the decline of calcium-activated membrane currents. Over a range of different membrane potentials, IK(Ca) and INS(Ca) decayed at similar rates, indicating similar calcium stoichiometries independent of voltage. IK(Ca), but not INS(Ca), relaxes exponentially to a different level when the voltage is suddenly changed. We have estimated

  4. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  5. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  6. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Fat-Moon; Lien, Gi-Shih; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Chia-Nan; Lu, Shao-Yu; Yan, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    Activating transcription factor-(ATF-) 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002) is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG) derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK), and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug. PMID:24222778

  7. A Novel Microtubule-Disrupting Agent Induces Endoplasmic Reticular Stress-Mediated Cell Death in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chun-Te; Chang, Yu-Jia; Yang, Li-Xi; Wei, Po-Li; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Liu, Jun-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present evidence of a novel microtubule-disrupting agent, N-deacetyl-N-(chromone-2-carbonyl)-thiocolchicine (TCD), exhibiting potent antitumor activity (with IC50 values in the nanomolar range) against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Cell cycle analysis revealed that TCD induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both Hep-J5 and Mahlavu HCC cell lines. TCD also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and caused DNA damage. Mechanistically, TCD activated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticular kinase and several transcription factors, including activating transcription factor (ATF) 6, ATF4, ATF3, and the CCAAT-enhancer binding protein homologous protein. These data clearly demonstrate that the antitumor activity of TCD is mechanistically linked to its capacity to trigger both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cell death via endoplasmic reticular stress pathway. The potent antitumor activity of TCD was similarly demonstrated in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model, where 5 and 10 mg/kg doses of TCD significantly arrested Hep-J5 and Mahlavu tumor growth. Our finding suggests that TCD is a promising therapeutic agent against hepatocellular carcinoma; further translational assessment of its clinical usage is warranted. PMID:26355599

  8. The Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Patient With Severe Injury of the Cerebral Cortex: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do

    2015-10-01

    We reported on the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) finding of a patient in whom severe injury of the cerebral cortex was detected following a hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI).A 67-year-old female patient who suffered from HIBI induced by cardiac arrest after surgery for lumbar disc herniation underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation approximately 20 to 30 minutes after cardiac arrest. The patient exhibited impaired alertness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 4 (eye opening: 2, best verbal response: 1, and best motor response: 1). Approximately 3 years after onset, she began to whimper sometimes and showed improved consciousness, with a GCS score of 10 (eye opening: 4, best verbal response: 2, and best motor response: 4) and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score of 9 (auditory function: 1, visual function: 1, motor function: 2, verbal function: 2, communication: 1, and arousal: 2).Results of diffusion tensor tractography for the upper connectivity of the ARAS showed decreased neural connectivity to each cerebral cortex in both hemispheres. The right lower ARAS between the pontine reticular formation and the thalamic intralaminar nuclei (ILN) was thinner compared with the left side.Severe injury of the upper portion of the ARAS between the thalamic ILN and cerebral cortex was demonstrated in a patient with some level of consciousness. PMID:26496328

  9. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  10. Excitability in a stochastic differential equation model for calcium puffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, S.

    2014-06-01

    Calcium dynamics are essential to a multitude of cellular processes. For many cell types, localized discharges of calcium through small clusters of intracellular channels are building blocks for all spatially extended calcium signals. Because of the large noise amplitude, the validity of noise-approximating model equations for this system has been questioned. Here we revisit the master equations for local calcium release, examine the multiple scales of calcium concentrations in the cluster domain, and derive adapted stochastic differential equations. We show by comparison of discrete and continuous trajectories that the Langevin equations can be made consistent with the master equations even for very small channel numbers. In its deterministic limit, the model reveals that excitability, a dynamical phenomenon observed in many natural systems, is at the core of calcium puffs. The model also predicts a bifurcation from transient to sustained release which may link local and global calcium signals in cells.

  11. Low-calcium-induced enhancement of chemical synaptic transmission from photoreceptors to horizontal cells in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Piccolino, M; Byzov, A L; Kurennyi, D E; Pignatelli, A; Sappia, F; Wilkinson, M; Barnes, S

    1996-01-01

    According to the classical calcium hypothesis of synaptic transmission, the release of neurotransmitter from presynaptic terminals occurs through an exocytotic process triggered by depolarization-induced presynaptic calcium influx. However, evidence has been accumulating in the last two decades indicating that, in many preparations, synaptic transmitter release can persist or even increase when calcium is omitted from the perfusing saline, leading to the notion of a "calcium-independent release" mechanism. Our study shows that the enhancement of synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and horizontal cells of the vertebrate retina induced by low-calcium media is caused by an increase of calcium influx into presynaptic terminals. This paradoxical effect is accounted for by modifications of surface potential on the photoreceptor membrane. Since lowering extracellular calcium concentration may likewise enhance calcium influx into other nerve cells, other experimental observations of "calcium-independent" release may be reaccommodated within the framework of the classical calcium hypothesis without invoking unconventional processes. PMID:8637867

  12. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  13. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  14. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  15. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  16. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Lauren; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, Michael J; Conway, Stuart J; Bootman, Martin D

    2004-12-15

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (approximately 2 microm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the subsarcolemmal calcium signal did not spread in a fully regenerative manner through the interior of a cell. Rather, there was a diminishing centripetal propagation of calcium. The lack of regeneration was due to mitochondria and SERCA pumps preventing the inward movement of calcium. Inhibiting these calcium buffering mechanisms allowed the globalisation of action potential-evoked responses. In addition, physiological positive inotropic agents, such as endothelin-1 and beta-adrenergic agonists, as well as enhanced calcium current, calcium store loading and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate infusion also led to regenerative global responses. The consequence of globalising calcium signals was a significant increase in cellular contraction. These data indicate how calcium signals and their consequences are determined by the interplay of multiple subcellular calcium management systems.

  17. Calcitonin control of calcium metabolism during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to elucidate calcitonin role in calcium homeostasis during weightlessness. In this investigation our objectives are to study: the effect of weightlessness on thyroid and serum calcitonin, the effect of weightlessness on the circadian variation of calcitonin in serum and the thyroid gland, the role of light as zeitgeber for calcitonin circadian rhythm, the circadian pattern of thyroid sensitivity to release calcitonin in response to calcium load, and the role of serotonin and norepinephrine in the control of calcitonin release. The main objective of this research/proposal is to establish the role of calcitonin in calcium metabolism during weightlessness condition. Understanding the mechanism of these abnormalities will help in developing therapeutic means to counter calcium imbalance in spaceflights.

  18. In vivo Calcium Imaging of Evoked Calcium Waves in the Embryonic Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Pellegrino, Christophe; Jokinen, Ville; Andriichuk, Liliia; Khirug, Stanislav; Khiroug, Leonard; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intracellular calcium fluxes are instrumental in the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neuronal cells. Knowledge thus far of the relationship between these calcium changes and physiological processes in the developing brain has derived principally from ex vivo and in vitro experiments. Here, we present a new method to image intracellular calcium flux in the cerebral cortex of live rodent embryos, whilst attached to the dam through the umbilical cord. Using this approach we demonstrate induction of calcium waves by laser stimulation. These waves are sensitive to ATP-receptor blockade and are significantly increased by pharmacological facilitation of intracellular-calcium release. This approach is the closest to physiological conditions yet achieved for imaging of calcium in the embryonic brain and as such opens new avenues for the study of prenatal brain development. Furthermore, the developed method could open the possibilities of preclinical translational studies in embryos particularly important for developmentally related diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. PMID:26778965

  19. Free calcium concentration in brain nerve endings of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, S.N.; Pokudin, N.I.; Kravstov, G.M.; Postnov, Yu.V.; Okun', I.M.; Shukanova, N.A.; Rakovich, A.A.; Aksentsev, S.L.; Konev, S.V.

    1987-10-01

    The frequency of neurotransmitter release from the synaptic vesicles of nerve endings by exocytosis depends primarily on the free calcium concentration in the cytoplasm which is controlled by calcium transporting and calcium binding systems. In this paper, in an attempt to determine the state of these systems in primary hypertension and the effects of neurotransmitter release on the increased resistance in the peripheral circulatory system, the authors study the exchange, uptake, and concentration of calcium 45 cations by synaptosomes.

  20. Estimation of rumen outflow in dairy cows fed grass silage-based diets by use of reticular sampling as an alternative to sampling from the omasal canal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TA study was conducted to compare nutrient flows determined by a reticular sampling technique with those made by sampling of digesta from the omasal canal. Six lactating dairy cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a design with a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and 4 periods. Trea...

  1. Basilar membrane and reticular lamina motion in a multi-scale finite element model of the mouse cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soons, Joris; Dirckx, Joris; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    A multi-scale finite element (FE) model of the mouse cochlea, based on its anatomy and material properties is presented. The important feature in the model is a lattice of 400 Y-shaped structures in the longitudinal direction, each formed by Deiters cells, phalangeal processes and outer hair cells (OHC). OHC somatic motility is modeled by an expansion force proportional to the shear on the stereocilia, which in turn is proportional to the pressure difference between the scala vestibule and scala tympani. Basilar membrane (BM) and reticular lamina (RL) velocity compare qualitatively very well with recent in vivo measurements in guinea pig [2]. Compared to the BM, the RL is shown to have higher amplification and a shift to higher frequencies. This comes naturally from the realistic Y-shaped cell organization without tectorial membrane tuning.

  2. Projections from the rostral mesencephalic reticular formation to the spinal cord - An HRP and autoradiographical tracing study in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, G.; Cowie, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase was injected, or implanted unilaterally, into various levels of the spinal cord of anesthetized cats, to trace the distribution of projections to the spinal cord, of neurons in Field H of Forel, including the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (riMLF), and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal with adjacent reticular formation (INC-RF). Results indicate that, unlike the neurons projecting to the extraocular muscle motoneurons, the major portion of the spinally projecting neurons are not located in the riMLF or INC proper, but in adjacent areas, i.e., the ventral and lateral parts of the caudal third of the Field H of Forel and in the INC-RF. Neurons in caudal Field H of Forel, project, via the ventral part of the ventral funicululs, to the lateral part of the upper cervical ventral horn.

  3. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker. PMID:27517606

  4. Effects of the intra-arterial injection of bradykinin into the limbs, upon the activity of mesencephalic reticular units.

    PubMed

    Lombard, M C; Guilbaud, G; Besson, J M

    1975-02-01

    The changes in firing rate of mesencephalic reticular units after intra-arterial injection into the limbs of a potent nociceptive agent, bradykinin, were studied in cats (unanesthetized, immobilized with flaxedil and hyperventilated). 30 per cent of the d35 studied cells were affected, 56 per cent were excited, 23 per cent inhibited and 5 per cent had mixed effects. Among the 75 excited cells, the activation of 16 of them seemed to related to the arousa- processes (group A); for 56 cells the increase seemed dire-tly dependent on the nociceptive stimulation itself (group B). The changes of firing rate were repruducible; their latencies and durations were of the same order as the latencies and duration of the nociceptive reactions and painful sensation s, which have been obtained in animals and men after bradykinin injections. The modifications induced by bradykinin administration were suppressed by Ketamin and Thiopental.

  5. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker.

  6. Estimation of rumen outflow in dairy cows fed grass silage-based diets by use of reticular sampling as an alternative to sampling from the omasal canal.

    PubMed

    Krizsan, S J; Ahvenjärvi, S; Volden, H; Broderick, G A

    2010-03-01

    A study was conducted to compare nutrient flows determined by a reticular sampling technique with those made by sampling digesta from the omasal canal. Six lactating dairy cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a design with a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and 4 periods. Treatments were 3 grass silages differing mainly in neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentrations: 412, 530, or 639 g/kg of dry matter, each combined with 1 of 2 levels of concentrate feed. Digesta was collected from the reticulum and the omasal canal to represent a 24-h feeding cycle. Nutrient flow was calculated using the reconstitution system based on 3 markers (Co, Yb, and indigestible NDF) and using (15)N as a microbial marker. Large and small particles and the fluid phase were recovered from digesta collected at both sampling sites. Bacterial samples from the reticulum and the omasum were separated into liquid- and particle-associated bacteria. Reticular samples were sieved through a 1-mm sieve before isolation of digesta phases and bacteria. Composition of the large particle phase differed mainly in fiber content of the digesta obtained from the 2 sampling sites. Sampling site did not affect marker concentration in any of the phases with which the markers were primarily associated. The (15)N enrichment of bacterial samples did not differ between sampling sites. The reticular and omasal canal sampling techniques gave similar estimates of marker concentrations in reconstituted digesta, estimates of ruminal flow, and ruminal digestibility values for dry matter, organic matter, starch, and N. Sampling site x diet interactions were also not significant. Concentration of NDF was 2.2% higher in reconstituted omasal digesta than in reconstituted reticular digesta. Ruminal NDF digestibility was 2.7% higher when estimated by sampling the reticulum than by sampling the omasal canal. The higher estimate of ruminal NDF digestibility with the reticular sampling technique was due to

  7. Pontine Reticular Formation (PnO) Administration of Hypocretin-1 Increases PnO GABA Levels and Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher J.; Soto-Calderon, Haideliza; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: GABAergic transmission in the oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) increases wakefulness. The hypothalamic peptide hypocretin-1 (orexin A) promotes wakefulness, and the PnO receives hypocretinergic input. The present study tested the hypothesis that PnO administration of hypocretin-1 increases PnO GABA levels and increases wakefulness. This study also tested the hypothesis that wakefulness is either increased or decreased, respectively, by PnO administration of drugs known to selectively increase or decrease GABA levels. Design: A within-subjects design was used for microdialysis and microinjection experiments. Setting: University of Michigan. Patients or Participants: Experiments were performed using adult male Crl:CD® (SD)IGS BR (Sprague-Dawley) rats (n = 46). Interventions: PnO administration of hypocretin-1, nipecotic acid (a GABA uptake inhibitor that increases extracellular GABA levels), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (a GABA synthesis inhibitor that decreases extracellular GABA levels; 3-MPA), and Ringer solution (vehicle control). Measurements and Results: Dialysis administration of hypocretin-1 to the PnO caused a statistically significant, concentration-dependent increase in PnO GABA levels. PnO microinjection of hypocretin-1 or nipecotic acid caused a significant increase in wakefulness and a significant decrease in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and REM sleep. Microinjecting 3-MPA into the PnO caused a significant increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep and a significant decrease in wakefulness. Conclusions: An increase or a decrease in PnO GABA levels causes an increase or decrease, respectively, in wakefulness. Hypocretin-1 may promote wakefulness, at least in part, by increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO. Citation: Watson CJ; Soto-Calderon H; Lydic R; Baghdoyan HA. Pontine reticular formation (PnO) administration of hypocretin-1 increases PnO GABA levels and wakefulness. SLEEP 2008;31(4):453-464. PMID:18457232

  8. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, D. C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  9. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  10. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  11. Management of calcium channel antagonist overdose.

    PubMed

    Salhanick, Steven D; Shannon, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are used primarily for the treatment of hypertension and tachyarrhythmias. Overdose of calcium channel antagonists can be lethal. Calcium channel antagonists act at the L-type calcium channels primarily in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decreases in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy and chronotropy. The L-type calcium channel is a complex structure and is thus affected by a large number of structurally diverse antagonists. In the setting of overdose, patients may experience vasodilatation and bradycardia leading to a shock state. Patients may also be hyperglycaemic and acidotic due to the blockade of L-type calcium channels in the pancreatic islet cells that affect insulin secretion. Aggressive therapy is warranted in the setting of toxicity. Gut decontamination with charcoal, or whole bowel irrigation or multiple-dose charcoal in the setting of extended-release products is indicated. Specific antidotes include calcium salts, glucagon and insulin. Calcium salts may be given in bolus doses or may be employed as a continuous infusion. Care should be exercised to avoid the administration of calcium in the setting of concomitant digoxin toxicity. Insulin administration has been used effectively to increase cardiac inotropy and survival. The likely mechanism involves a shift to carbohydrate metabolism in the setting of decreased availability of carbohydrates due to decreased insulin secretion secondary to blockade of calcium channels in pancreatic islet cells. Glucose should be administered as well to maintain euglycaemia. Supportive care including the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, adrenergic agents, cardiac pacing, balloon pump or extracorporeal bypass is frequently indicated if antidotal therapy is not effective. Careful evaluation of asymptomatic patients, including and electrocardiogram and a period of observation, is indicated. Patients ingesting a nonsustained-release

  12. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates. PMID:26679945

  13. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

  14. The effect of the calcium-antagonist nitrendipine on intracellular calcium concentration in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, A.; Schomecker, G.; Breitkopf, K.; Dhein, S.; Klaus, W.

    1996-01-01

    1. Nitrendipine induces NO-release from coronary vascular endothelium presumably by activating endothelial NO-synthase. We have investigated whether this effect may be mediated by an influence on the intracellular calcium in endothelial cells. 2. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were incubated with Fura-2/AM (1 microM) for 30 min and Fura-2 fluorescence was measured at 510 nm in response to chopped excitation with both 340 and 380 nm. The ratio 340/380 nm (known to reflect changes in intracellular calcium) was calculated from these data. 3. Nitrendipine (0.1 to 100 microM) led to a significant, concentration-dependent, monophasic increase in [Ca2+]i in suspended BAEC by 11 +/- 2 nM (0.1 microM), 23 +/- 3 nM (1 microM), 34 +/- 4 nM (10 microM) and by 47 +/- 5 nM (100 microM) from a control levels of 118 +/- 10 nM. 4. This elevation of intracellular calcium was prevented by pretreatment of BAECs with gadolinium (100 microM) or by incubation with calcium free saline solution. In contrast, the application of 0.3 microM thapsigargin did not abolish the nitrendipine-induced calcium signal. In additional experiments it was shown that the nitrendipine-induced NO-release (as measured with the oxy-haemoglobin-method could also be inhibited by gadolinium and was absent in calcium-free solution. 5. Thus, nitrendipine elevates intracellular calcium in suspended BAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. This elevation is mainly due to a gadolinium-sensitive calcium influx from the extracellular space rather than a calcium release from intracellular stores. Images Figure 5 PMID:8864521

  15. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  16. Spatiotemporal properties of high-speed calcium oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a component of the reticular activating system (RAS), and is involved in the activated states of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Gamma oscillations (approximately 30–80 Hz) are evident in all PPN neurons and are mediated by high-threshold voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels. We tested the hypothesis that high-speed calcium imaging would reveal calcium-mediated oscillations in dendritic compartments in synchrony with patch-clamp recorded oscillations during depolarizing current ramps. Patch-clamped 8- to 16-day-old rat PPN neurons (n = 67 out of 121) were filled with Fura 2, Bis Fura, or OGB1/CHR. This study also characterized a novel ratiometric technique using Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB1) with coinjections of a new long-stokes-shift dye, Chromeo 494 (CHR). Fluorescent calcium transients were blocked with the nonspecific calcium channel blocker cadmium, or by the combination of ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific P/Q-type calcium channel blocker, and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, a specific N-type calcium channel blocker. The calcium transients were evident in different dendrites (suggesting channels are present throughout the dendritic tree) along the sampled length without interruption (suggesting channels are evenly distributed), and appeared to represent a summation of oscillations present in the soma. We confirm that PPN calcium channel-mediated oscillations are due to P/Q- and N-type channels, and reveal that these channels are distributed along the dendrites of PPN cells. PMID:23990242

  17. Aminergic and cholinergic afferents to REM sleep induction regions of the pontine reticular formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Semba, K

    1993-04-22

    Microinjection of cholinergic agonists in a dorsolateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum has been shown to induce a rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-like state. Physiological evidence indicates that not only acetylcholine but also various amine transmitters, including those implicated in behavioral state regulation, affect neuronal activity in this region of the pontine reticular formation. In the present study, sources of select aminergic and cholinergic inputs to this REM sleep induction zone were identified and quantitatively analyzed by using fluorescence retrograde tracing combined with immunofluorescence in the rat. In addition to previously demonstrated cholinergic projections from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei, the REM sleep induction zone received various aminergic inputs that originated in widely distributed regions of the brainstem and hypothalamus. Serotoninergic afferents represented a mean of 44% of all aminergic/cholinergic source neurons projecting to the REM sleep induction zone, which was comparable to the mean percentage of 39% represented by cholinergic afferent neurons. The serotoninergic afferents originated from the raphe nuclei at all brainstem levels, with heavier projections from the pontine than from the medullary raphe nuclei. Unexpectedly, an additional major serotoninergic input was provided by serotoninergic neurons in the nucleus prosupralemniscus (B9). Noradrenergic afferent neurons represented a mean of 14% of all aminergic/cholinergic source neurons, which was only about one-third of the mean percentage of either cholinergic or serotoninergic source neurons. These noradrenergic projection neurons were located not only in the locus ceruleus (8%) but also in the lateral tegmentum, including the A5 (4%) and A7 (2%) cell groups. Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary hypothalamic nucleus represented a minor group of afferent neurons (3%), and a still smaller input came from adrenergic C1 neurons. The

  18. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  19. Calcium store-mediated signaling in sustentacular cells of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove; Irwin, Mavis; Lucero, Mary T

    2009-04-15

    Sustentacular cells have structural features that allude to functions of secretion, absorption, phagocytosis, maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients, metabolism of noxious chemicals, and regulation of cell turnover. We present data detailing their dynamic activity. We show, using a mouse olfactory epithelium slice model, that sustentacular cells are capable of generating two types of calcium signals: intercellular calcium waves where elevations in intracellular calcium propagate between neighboring cells, and intracellular calcium oscillations consisting of repetitive elevations in intracellular calcium confined to single cells. Sustentacular cells exhibited rapid, robust increases in intracellular calcium in response to G-protein coupled muscarinic and purinergic receptor stimulation. In a subpopulation of sustentacular cells, oscillatory calcium transients were evoked. We pharmacologically characterized the properties of purinergic-evoked increases in intracellular calcium. Calcium transients were elicited by release from intracellular stores and were not dependent on extracellular calcium. BAPTA-AM, a cytosolic calcium chelator, and cyclopiazonic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor irreversibly blocked the purinergic-induced calcium transient. Phospholipase C antagonist U73122 inhibited the purinergic-evoked calcium transient. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists tetracaine and ryanodine, inhibited the UTP-induced calcium transients. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of the phospholipase C pathway, IP(3)-mediated calcium release, and subsequent calcium-induced-calcium release is involved in ATP-elicited increases in intracellular calcium. Our findings indicate that sustentacular cells are not static support cells, and, like glia in the central nervous system, have complex calcium signaling.

  20. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na/sup +/ or K/sup +/ (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer.

  1. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  2. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  3. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... only gets the calcium it needs through the food you eat, or from supplements. If you do ... materials it needs to build bones. High-calcium foods include: Milk Cheese Ice cream Leafy green vegetables, ...

  4. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  5. Fatty acid composition, sarcoplasmic reticular lipid oxidation, and immunity of hard clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed different dietary microalgae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Tseng, Kai-Yi; Huang, Chen-Huei

    2015-07-01

    Fatty acid profiles, activities of biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and immunity of a seawater clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed three species of dietary microalgae were investigated. Clams of a marketable size (25 g mean weight) were fed Tetraselmis chui, Chaetoceros muelleri, or Isochrysis galbana for 8 weeks. Fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the polar lipid fractions of clams reflected those of the dietary algae species. Clams fed with T. chui and C. muelleri contained higher proportion of non-methylene interrupted (NMI) fatty acids than those fed I. galbana. Proportion of DHA in lipids of the clams fed with I. galbana was the highest among test groups. The NADH-dependent sarcoplasmic reticular lipid peroxidation activity of clams fed I. galbana was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui or C. muelleri. The hemocyte adhesion capacity of clams fed C. muelleri or I. galbana was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui. No significant differences (p ≥ 0.05) in total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, clearance efficiency hemocyte and phagocytosis were detected among clams fed different microalgae.

  6. Recovery of Hypersomnia Concurrent With Recovery of an Injured Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed recovery of hypersomnia concurrent with the recovery of an injured ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).A 70-year-old female patient underwent coiling of the left ruptured posterior communicating artery after subarachnoid hemorrhage and both extraventricular drainage for management of an intraventricular hemorrhage. At 2 months after onset, when she started rehabilitation, she exhibited intact consciousness, with the full score on the Glasgow Coma Scale: 15. However, she showed severe hypersomnia: she always fell asleep without external stimulation and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EPS) score was 24 (full score: 24, cut off for hypersomnia: 10). She underwent comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including neurotropic drugs, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Her hypersomnia has shown improvement as 14 (3 months after onset), 11 (4 months after onset), 7 (12 months after onset), and 6 (24 months after onset), respectively.On 2-month DTT, narrowing of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs was observed on both sides: in particular, among 4 neural tracts of the lower ARAS, the right lower ventral ARAS was the narrowest. By contrast, on 24-month DTT, the 4 narrowed neural tracts of both lower dorsal and ventral ARASs were thickened compared with those of 2-month DTT.Recovery of hypersomnia with recovery of an injured lower ARAS on DTT was observed in a stroke patient. Our results suggest that evaluation of the lower ARAS using DTT might be useful for stroke patients with hypersomnia.

  7. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Sarah M.; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  8. Role of the lateral reticular nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-03-01

    We found in a previous study that stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) facilitated the low-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR) and suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. It has been reported that the RN projections to the contralateral lateral reticular nucleus (LRt), and stimulation of the LRt inhibits the nociceptive JOR. These facts suggest that RN-induced modulation of the JOR is mediated via the LRt. We investigated whether electrically induced lesions of the LRt, or microinjection of muscimol into the LRt, affects RN-induced modulation of the JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Electrically induced lesion of the LRt and microinjection of muscimol into the LRt reduced the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR, but did not affect the RN-induced facilitation of the low-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. These results suggest that the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the contralateral LRt. PMID:24370814

  9. Microcystic/Reticular Schwannoma Arising in the Submandibular Gland: A Rare Benign Entity that Mimics More Common Salivary Gland Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ryan P; Melamed, Jonathan; Yee-Chang, Melissa; Marcus, Sonya; Givi, Babak; Zamuco, Ronaldo

    2016-09-01

    Microcystic/reticular schwannoma is a recently described variant of schwannoma with a predilection for the gastrointestinal tract, rarely involving the head/neck region. This is the first reported case involving the submandibular gland. We present a case in a 34 year old man with 4.5 cm submandibular mass. Fine needle aspiration suggested a spindle cell lesion. Frozen section evaluation raised the possibility of mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Resection showed a well circumscribed mass with a mucoid appearance. Histologic findings include a lobular architecture with fibrous septa, a lympho-plasmacytic infiltrate, and scattered lymphoid aggregates at the periphery. There are two distinct histologic patterns with solid areas of spindle cells and areas of spindle/ovoid cells with a microcystic pattern in a myxoid background. The tumor has a pushing border, with extension into adipose and adjacent parenchyma, without cytologic atypia or necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains are positive for S-100 and CD34, and negative for calponin, mammoglobin, ALK1, p63, ER, GFAP, SMA, desmin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, and C-Kit. Mucicarmine stain is negative. Recognition of this benign unusual variant of schwannoma is paramount for appropriate conservative treatment due to the morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with primary salivary gland carcinomas.

  10. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fader, Sarah M; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  11. Mechanisms on the morphology variation of hematite crystals by Al substitution: The modification of Fe and O reticular densities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liang, Xiaoliang; An, Pengfei; Feng, Xionghan; Tan, Wenfeng; Qiu, Guohong; Yin, Hui; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Al substitution in hematite is ubiquitous in soils. With the increase of Al amount, the hematite morphology changes from rhombohedral crystals to disk-shaped ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, a series of Al-substituted hematite were synthesized and characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution electron transmission microscopy (HRTEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, to investigate the effects of Al3+ substitution on the hematite structure and morphology. EXAFS and Rietveld structural refinement analyses find an increase in face-sharing (along c axis) Fe-Me (Me = Al, Fe) distances, edge-sharing (in a-b plane) Fe-Me (Me = Al, Fe) distances, and O-O average distances. Moreover, the face-sharing Fe-Me distances and O-O distances along c axis increase more significantly. This indicates a more apparent decrease in the reticular densities of Fe and O along the direction of c axis, which facilitates faster crystal growth along c axis and results in the evolution of morphology of Al-substituted hematite to disk-shaped crystals. The above results provide new insights into the morphology changes and environmental geochemistry behaviors of Al-contained hematite in soils, and are benefit for the control of crystal morphologies during its application as environmentally-friendly materials. PMID:27786290

  12. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps and cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Arbabian, Atousa; Gélébart, Pascal; Kovács, Tünde; Bobe, Régis; Enouf, Jocelyne; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Apáti, Agota

    2012-03-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major intracellular calcium storage pool and a multifunctional organelle that accomplishes several calcium-dependent functions involved in many homeostatic and signaling mechanisms. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA)-type calcium pumps. SERCA activity can determine ER calcium content available for intra-ER functions and for calcium release into the cytosol, and can shape the spatiotemporal characteristics of calcium signals. SERCA function therefore constitutes an important nodal point in the regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis and signaling, and can exert important effects on cell growth, differentiation and survival. In several cell types such as cells of hematopoietic origin, mammary, gastric and colonic epithelium, SERCA2 and SERCA3-type calcium pumps are simultaneously expressed, and SERCA3 expression levels undergo significant changes during cell differentiation, activation or immortalization. In addition, SERCA3 expression is decreased or lost in several tumor types when compared to the corresponding normal tissue. These observations indicate that ER calcium homeostasis is remodeled during cell differentiation, and may present defects due to decreased SERCA3 expression in tumors. Modulation of the state of differentiation of the ER reflected by SERCA3 expression constitutes an interesting new aspect of cell differentiation and tumor biology.

  14. [Bone and tooth in calcium and phosphate metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of serum concentrations of calcium and phosphate is indispensable for maintaining normal physiological condition. Imbalance of this regulation leads to pathophysiological disorders including heart disease, chronic kidney disease, and ectopic calcification. Formation and mineralization of bone and tooth are greatly influenced by calcium and phosphate metabolism since both organs are mainly consist of calcium-phosphate. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis is under hormonal control on its target organs such as kidney, bone and intestine. Calcium and phosphate are absorbed in intestine and reabsorbed and excreted in kidney. Bone store and release them in response to changing physiological demand by osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Bone is also important as an endocrine organ that releases FGF23 from osteocytes, a novel hormone that targets the kidney to inhibit phosphate reabsorption and 1α, 25 (OH) (2)D(3) production. PMID:22201094

  15. Mitochondria: the calcium connection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Drago, Ilaria; Zampese, Enrico; Pozzan, Tullio

    2010-01-01

    Calcium handling by mitochondria is a key feature in cell life. It is involved in energy production for cell activity, in buffering and shaping cytosolic calcium rises and also in determining cell fate by triggering or preventing apoptosis. Both mitochondria and the mechanisms involved in the control of calcium homeostasis have been extensively studied, but they still provide researchers with long-standing or even new challenges. Technical improvements in the tools employed for the investigation of calcium dynamics have been-and are still-opening new perspectives in this field, and more prominently for mitochondria. In this review we present a state-of-the-art toolkit for calcium measurements, with major emphasis on the advantages of genetically encoded indicators. These indicators can be efficiently and selectively targeted to specific cellular sub-compartments, allowing previously unavailable high-definition calcium dynamic studies. We also summarize the main features of cellular and, in more detail, mitochondrial calcium handling, especially focusing on the latest breakthroughs in the field, such as the recent direct characterization of the calcium microdomains that occur on the mitochondrial surface upon cellular stimulation. Additionally, we provide a major example of the key role played by calcium in patho-physiology by briefly describing the extensively reported-albeit highly controversial-alterations of calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease, casting lights on the possible alterations in mitochondrial calcium handling in this pathology.

  16. Role of intracellular calcium stores in hair-cell ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium stores control many neuronal functions such as excitability, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and synaptic release. Although the existence of calcium stores along with calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) has been demonstrated in conventional and ribbon synapses, functional significance and the cellular mechanisms underlying this role remains unclear. This review summarizes recent experimental evidence identifying contribution of CICR to synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in the CNS, retina and inner ear. In addition, the potential role of CICR in the recruitment of vesicles to releasable pools in hair-cell ribbon synapses will be specifically discussed. PMID:24971053

  17. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  18. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  19. Activity of long-lead burst neurons in pontine reticular formation during head-unrestrained gaze shifts

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Primates explore a visual scene through a succession of saccades. Much of what is known about the neural circuitry that generates these movements has come from neurophysiological studies using subjects with their heads restrained. Horizontal saccades and the horizontal components of oblique saccades are associated with high-frequency bursts of spikes in medium-lead burst neurons (MLBs) and long-lead burst neurons (LLBNs) in the paramedian pontine reticular formation. For LLBNs, the high-frequency burst is preceded by a low-frequency prelude that begins 12–150 ms before saccade onset. In terms of the lead time between the onset of prelude activity and saccade onset, the anatomical projections, and the movement field characteristics, LLBNs are a heterogeneous group of neurons. Whether this heterogeneity is endemic of multiple functional subclasses is an open question. One possibility is that some may carry signals related to head movement. We recorded from LLBNs while monkeys performed head-unrestrained gaze shifts, during which the kinematics of the eye and head components were dissociable. Many cells had peak firing rates that never exceeded 200 spikes/s for gaze shifts of any vector. The activity of these low-frequency cells often persisted beyond the end of the gaze shift and was usually related to head-movement kinematics. A subset was tested during head-unrestrained pursuit and showed clear modulation in the absence of saccades. These “low-frequency” cells were intermingled with MLBs and traditional LLBNs and may represent a separate functional class carrying signals related to head movement. PMID:24174648

  20. Phenotypic and morphological properties of germinal center dark zone Cxcl12-expressing reticular cells (CRCs) 1,2

    PubMed Central

    Rodda, Lauren B.; Bannard, Oliver; Ludewig, Burkhard; Nagasawa, Takashi; Cyster, Jason G.

    2015-01-01

    The germinal center (GC) is divided into a dark zone (DZ) and a light zone (LZ). GC B cells must cycle between these zones to achieve efficient antibody affinity maturation. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are well characterized for their role in supporting B cell antigen encounter in primary follicles and in the GC LZ. However, the properties of stromal cells supporting B cells in the DZ are relatively unexplored. Recent work identified a novel stromal population of Cxcl12-expressing reticular cells (CRCs) in murine GC DZs. Here we report that CRCs have diverse morphologies, appearing in ‘open’ and ‘closed’ networks, with variable distribution in lymphoid tissue GCs. CRCs are also present in splenic and peripheral lymph node primary follicles. Real-time two-photon microscopy of Peyer’s patch GCs demonstrates B cells moving in close association with CRC processes. CRCs are gp38+ with low to undetectable expression of FDC markers, but CRC-like cells in the DZ are lineage marked, along with FDCs and FRCs, by CD21-Cre and Ccl19-Cre directed fluorescent reporters. In contrast to FDCs, CRCs do not demonstrate dependence on lymphotoxin or TNF for chemokine expression or network morphology. CRC distribution in the DZ does require CXCR4 signaling, which is necessary for GC B cells to access the DZ and likely to interact with CRC processes. Our findings establish CRCs as a major stromal cell type in the GC DZ and suggest CRCs support critical activities of GC B cells in the DZ niche through Cxcl12 expression and direct cell-cell interactions. PMID:26453751

  1. GABAergic Transmission in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation Regulates the Induction Phase of Anesthesia and Modulates Hyperalgesia Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia, and pain. The role of PnO GABA in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to Loss and time to Resumption of Righting Response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (1) pharmacologically manipulating GABA level