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  1. Retina

    MedlinePlus

    As light enters the eye, it strikes the receptor cells of the retina called the rods and cones. A chemical reaction results in the formation of electric impulses, which then travel to the brain through the optic nerve.

  2. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  3. Cancers Affecting the Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ...

  4. Computer retina that models the primate retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Samir; Levine, Martin D.

    1994-06-01

    At the retinal level, the strategies utilized by biological visual systems allow them to outperform machine vision systems, serving to motivate the design of electronic or `smart' sensors based on similar principles. Design of such sensors in silicon first requires a model of retinal information processing which captures the essential features exhibited by biological retinas. In this paper, a simple retinal model is presented, which qualitatively accounts for the achromatic information processing in the primate cone system. The model exhibits many of the properties found in biological retina such as data reduction through nonuniform sampling, adaptation to a large dynamic range of illumination levels, variation of visual acuity with illumination level, and enhancement of spatio temporal contrast information. The model is validated by replicating experiments commonly performed by electrophysiologists on biological retinas and comparing the response of the computer retina to data from experiments in monkeys. In addition, the response of the model to synthetic images is shown. The experiments demonstrate that the model behaves in a manner qualitatively similar to biological retinas and thus may serve as a basis for the development of an `artificial retina.'

  5. A programmable artificial retina

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, T.M. ); Zavidovique, B.Y. . Electrical Engineering Dept. Perception System Lab., Arcueil ); Devos, F.J. . Dept. of Integrated Circuits and Systems)

    1993-07-01

    An artificial retina is a device that intimately associates an imager with processing facilities on a monolithic circuit. Yet, except for simple environments and applications, analog hardware will not suffice to process and compact the raw image flow from the photosensitive array. To solve this output problem, an on-chip array of bare Boolean processors with halftoning facilities might be used, providing versatility from programmability. By setting the pixel memory size to 3 b, the authors have demonstrated both the technological practicality and the computational efficiency of this programmable Boolean retina concept. Using semi-static shifting structures together with some interaction circuitry, a minimal retina Boolean processor can be built with less than 30 transistors and controlled by as few as 6 global clock signals. The successful design, integration, and test of such a 65x76 Boolean retina on a 50-mm[sup 2] CMOS 2-[mu]m circuit are presented.

  6. Retina and Omega-3

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Forte, Raimondo; Souied, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several epidemiological studies based on food frequency questionnaires suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could have a protective role in reducing the onset and progression of retinal diseases. The retina has a high concentration of omega-3, particularly DHA, which optimizes fluidity of photoreceptor membranes, retinal integrity, and visual function. Furthermore, many studies demonstrated that DHA has a protective, for example antiapoptotic, role in the retina. From a nutritional point of view, it is known that western populations, particularly aged individuals, have a higher than optimal omega-6/omega-3 ratio and should enrich their diet with more fish consumption or have DHA supplementation. This paper underscores the potential beneficial effect of omega-3 fatty acids on retinal diseases. PMID:22175009

  7. The infrared retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-12-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher operating temperature. In this paper, we discuss how one needs to develop an increased functionality at the pixel level for these next generation FPAs. This functionality could manifest itself as spectral, polarization, phase or dynamic range signatures that could extract more information from a given scene. This leads to the concept of an infrared retina, which is an array that works similarly to the human eye that has a 'single' FPA but multiple cones, which are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that enable the perception of colour. These cones are then coupled with powerful signal processing techniques that allow us to process colour information from a scene, even with a limited basis of colour cones. Unlike present day multi or hyperspectral systems, which are bulky and expensive, the idea would be to build a poor man's 'infrared colour' camera. We use examples such as plasmonic tailoring of the resonance or bias dependent dynamic tuning based on quantum confined Stark effect or incorporation of avalanche gain to achieve embodiments of the infrared retina.

  8. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Diagnosis Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  9. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  10. [Research and development of artificial retina material].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Yang, Jun; Peng, Chenglin; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Sijie; Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Erxin

    2008-04-01

    The application of artificial retina was introduced. The principal characteristics of artificial retina material were reviewed in particular. Moreover, the recent research development and application prospect were discussed.

  11. The proteome of human retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingbo; Dufresne, Craig; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Venkatraman, Vidya; Karani, Rabia; Lutty, Gerard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Semba, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a delicate tissue that detects light, converts photochemical energy into neural signals, and transmits the signals to the visual cortex of the brain. A detailed protein inventory of the proteome of the normal human eye may provide a foundation for new investigations into both the physiology of the retina and the pathophysiology of retinal diseases. To provide an inventory, proteins were extracted from five retinas of normal eyes and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed in duplicate using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. A total of 3,436 non-redundant proteins were identified in the human retina, including 20 unambiguous protein isoforms, of which 8 have not previously been demonstrated to exist at the protein level. The proteins identified in the retina included most of the enzymes involved in the visual cycle and retinoid metabolism. One hundred and fifty-eight proteins that have been associated with age-related macular degeneration were identified in the retina. The MS proteome database of the human retina may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of retinal biology and disease. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD001242. PMID:25407473

  12. Retina mosaicing using local features.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Philippe C; Bay, Herbert; Van Gool, Luc; Székely, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is a proven procedure to treat various pathologies of the retina. Challenges such as motion compensation, correct energy dosage, and avoiding incidental damage are responsible for the still low success rate. They can be overcome with improved instrumentation, such as a fully automatic laser photocoagulation system. In this paper, we present a core image processing element of such a system, namely a novel approach for retina mosaicing. Our method relies on recent developments in region detection and feature description to automatically fuse retina images. In contrast to the state-of-the-art the proposed approach works even for retina images with no discernable vascularity. Moreover, an efficient scheme to determine the blending masks of arbitrarily overlapping images for multi-band blending is presented.

  13. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  14. The localization of lectin binding sites on photoreceptor outer segments and pigment epithelium of dystrophic retinas.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, B J; Wood, J G

    1980-07-01

    Carbohydrate-containing macromolecules on pigment epithelium (PE) and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) membranes of 14 to 16-day-old Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats and their genetic control (RCS-rdy+) have been localized with peroxidase-conjugated lectins from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ricinus communis (RCA), Lens culinaris (LCA), and concanavalin A (Con A). All lectins stain the plasma membranes of photoreceptor inner segments and intact OSs of normal (RCS-rdy+) and dystrophic (RCS) retinas. In the normal retinas, all lectins stain also the plasma membranes of shed OSs, and WGA stains some intradisc membranes. In contrast, WGA, RCA, and Con A do not label the OS debris membranes in dystrophic retinas, but LCA labels some of them. In both normal and dystophic retinas, WGA uniformly labels both proximal and distal membrane surfaces of PE mcirovilli, whereas RCA labels primarily the distal regions. Con A labels both normal and dystrophic PE microvilli sparsely, and LCA stains the PE microvilli in RCS-rdy+ retinas more intensely than those in the RCS retinas. The major differences between the lectin labeling in normal and dystrophic retinas are the presence of LCA staining on OS debris and the absence of any other lectin staining on these membranes. Other differences are the sparse LCA staining on dystrophic PE microvillous membranes vs. the normal and the presence of WGA staining on OS intradisc membranes of normal retinas. These differences may reflect changes in the accessibility or composition of certain cell surface sugars on OS membranes and PE microvilli which may be related to the diminished rate of phagocytosis in RCS retinas. PMID:6156139

  15. [Implantation of the artificial retina].

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Hayashida, Y

    1999-05-01

    In some degenerative retinal diseases, e.g., retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, the photoreceptors are destroyed to cause serious visual defects. Recent studies on blind human subjects revealed that a large number of ganglion cells remains intact and is capable of transmitting signals to the brain to evoke partial visual perception. This provided hope to compensate for the visual defects with retinal prostheses. The recent progress of microfabrication technique made it possible to implement the Vary Large Scale Integrated circuit, the artificial retina, which emulates a part of retinal function. The idea of implanting the artificial retina to the patients was proposed recently and experiments using animals have been put into practice. This article surveys the front line of the artificial retina implantation.

  16. The rod circuit in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Young, H M; Gynther, I C

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have a well-defined neuronal pathway that serves rod vision. In rabbit retina, the different populations of interneurons in the rod pathway can be selectively labeled, either separately or in combination. The rod bipolar cells show protein kinase C immunoreactivity; the rod (AII) amacrine cells can be distinguished in nuclear-yellow labeled retina; the rod reciprocal (S1 & S2) amacrine cells accumulate serotonin; and the dopaminergic amacrine cells show tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Furthermore, intracellular dye injection of the microscopically identified interneurons enables whole-population and single-cell studies to be combined in the same tissue. Using this approach, we have been able to analyze systematically the neuronal architecture of the rod circuit across the rabbit retina and compare its organization with that of the rod circuit in central cat retina. In rabbit retina, the rod interneurons are not organized in a uniform neuronal module that is simply scaled up from central to peripheral retina. Moreover, peripheral fields in superior and inferior retina that have equivalent densities of each neuronal type show markedly different rod bipolar to AII amacrine convergence ratios, with the result that many more rod photoreceptors converge on an AII amacrine cell in superior retina. In rabbit retina, much of the convergence in the rod circuit occurs in the outer retina whereas, in central cat retina, it is more evenly distributed between the inner and outer retina.

  17. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. ... around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to ...

  18. A hierarchical artificial retina architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Alice C.; Azar, Adi N.

    2009-05-01

    Connectivity in the human retina is complex. Over one hundred million photoreceptors transduce light into electrical signals. These electrical signals are sent to the ganglion cells through amacrine and bipolar cells. Lateral connections involving horizontal and amacrine cells span throughout the outer plexiform layer and inner plexiform layer respectively. Horizontal cells are important for photoreceptor regulation by depolarizing them after an illumination occurs. Horizontal cells themselves form an electrical network that communicates by gap junctions, and these cells exhibit plasticity (change in behavior and structure) with respect to glycine receptors. The bipolar and amacrine cells transfer electrical signals from photoreceptors to the ganglion cells. Furthermore, amacrine cells are responsible for further processing the retinal image. Finally, the ganglion cells receive electrical signals from the bipolar and amacrine cells and will spike at a faster rate if there is a change in the overall intensity for a group of photoreceptors, sending a signal to the brain. Dramatic progress is being made with respect to retinal prostheses, raising hope for an entire synthetic retina in the future. We propose a bio-inspired 3D hierarchical pyramidal architecture for a synthetic retina that mimics the overall structure of the human retina. We chose to use a 3D architecture to facilitate connectivity among retinal cells, maintaining a hierarchical structure similar to that of the biological retina. The first layer of the architecture contains electronic circuits that model photoreceptors and horizontal cells. The second layer contains amacrine and bipolar electronic cells, and the third layer contains ganglion cells. Layer I has the highest number of cells, and layer III has the lowest number of cells, resulting in a pyramidal architecture. In our proposed architecture we intend to use photodetectors to transduce light into electrical signals. We propose to employ

  19. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas. PMID:27354192

  20. Paths to colour in the retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B

    2004-07-01

    The description of colour pathways in the primate retina has become clearer within the past decade. This review summarises current views on the pathways subserving colour vision in the primate retina, beginning in the receptors and outer retina and leading to the mechanisms in the inner retina that add and subtract the receptor signals. Although the main features of colour pathways are now well-defined, there remains uncertainty about some of the wiring details. In particular, the question of how much connectional specificity is present is unresolved. Finally, means of isolating these pathways by psychophysical tests are considered; some current tests are likely to be less specific than hoped.

  1. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas.

  2. Enkephalin in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.Y.; Fry, K.R.; Lam, D.M.; Watt, C.B.

    1986-12-01

    Enkephalin-like immunoreactive amacrine cells were visualized using the highly sensitive avidin-biotin method. The somas of these cells were situated in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. Enkephalin-stained processes were observed in layers 1, 3, and 5 of the inner plexiform layer. The biosynthesis of sulfur-containing compounds in the goldfish retina was studied by means of a pulse-chase incubation with /sup 35/S-methionine. A /sup 35/S-labeled compound, which comigrated with authentic Met5-enkephalin on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was synthesized and was bound competitively by antibodies to enkephalin and by opiate receptors. This compound was tentatively identified as Met5-enkephalin. The newly synthesized /sup 35/S-Met5-enkephalin was released upon depolarization of the retina with a high K+ concentration. This K+-stimulated release was greatly suppressed by 5 mM Co/sup 2 +/, suggesting that the release was Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent. Using a double-label technique, enkephalin immunoreactivity and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were colocalized to some amacrine cells, whereas others labeled only for enkephalin or GABA. The possible significance of enkephalin-GABA interactions is also discussed.

  3. The Functional Architecture of the Retina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masland, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research related to the retina's coding of visual input with emphasis on the organization of two kinds of ganglion cell receptive fields. Reviews current techniques for examining the shapes and arrangement in the retina of entire populations of nerve cells. (ML)

  4. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-11-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand TH-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (TH-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. TH- or SVI-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that TH-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina.

  5. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  6. Quantum biology of the retina.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Luiten, André N; Stace, Thomas M; Wood, John Pm; Casson, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    The emerging field of quantum biology has led to a greater understanding of biological processes at the microscopic level. There is recent evidence to suggest that non-trivial quantum features such as entanglement, tunnelling and coherence have evolved in living systems. These quantum features are particularly evident in supersensitive light-harvesting systems such as in photosynthesis and photoreceptors. A biomimetic strategy utilizing biological quantum phenomena might allow new advances in the field of quantum engineering, particularly in quantum information systems. In addition, a better understanding of quantum biological features may lead to novel medical diagnostic and therapeutic developments. In the present review, we discuss the role of quantum physics in biological systems with an emphasis on the retina.

  7. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    SciTech Connect

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin.

  8. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid. PMID:14756809

  9. Distribution of caveolin isoforms in the lemur retina.

    PubMed

    Berta, Agnes I; Kiss, Anna L; Lukáts, Akos; Szabó, Arnold; Szél, Agoston

    2007-09-01

    The distribution of caveolin isoforms was previously evaluated in the retinas of different species, but has not yet been described in the primate retina. In this study, the distribution of caveolins was assessed via immunochemistry using isoform-specific antibodies in the retina of the black-and-white ruffed lemur. Here, we report the presence of a variety of caveolin isoforms in many layers of the lemur retina. As normal human retinas were not available for research and the retinas of primates are fairly similar to those of humans, the lemur retina can be utilized as a model for caveolin distribution in normal humans.

  10. Complex computation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  11. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  12. Flipping coins in the fly retina.

    PubMed

    Mikeladze-Dvali, Tamara; Desplan, Claude; Pistillo, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Color vision in Drosophila melanogaster relies on the presence of two different subtypes of ommatidia: the "green" and "blue." These two classes are distributed randomly throughout the retina. The decision of a given ommatidium to take on the "green" or "blue" fate seems to be based on a stochastic mechanism. Here we compare the stochastic choice of photoreceptors in the fly retina with other known examples of random choices in both sensory and other systems. PMID:16243594

  13. An analog silicon retina with multichip configuration.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Seiji; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    The neuromorphic silicon retina is a novel analog very large scale integrated circuit that emulates the structure and the function of the retinal neuronal circuit. We fabricated a neuromorphic silicon retina, in which sample/hold circuits were embedded to generate fluctuation-suppressed outputs in the previous study [1]. The applications of this silicon retina, however, are limited because of a low spatial resolution and computational variability. In this paper, we have fabricated a multichip silicon retina in which the functional network circuits are divided into two chips: the photoreceptor network chip (P chip) and the horizontal cell network chip (H chip). The output images of the P chip are transferred to the H chip with analog voltages through the line-parallel transfer bus. The sample/hold circuits embedded in the P and H chips compensate for the pattern noise generated on the circuits, including the analog communication pathway. Using the multichip silicon retina together with an off-chip differential amplifier, spatial filtering of the image with an odd- and an even-symmetric orientation selective receptive fields was carried out in real time. The analog data transfer method in the present multichip silicon retina is useful to design analog neuromorphic multichip systems that mimic the hierarchical structure of neuronal networks in the visual system.

  14. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  15. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Marshak, D; Basinger, S; Walsh, J; Morley, J; Stell, W

    1980-01-01

    A substance with somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) was found in extracts of goldfish, frog, and cow retina. Dilutions of retinal SLI parallel the standard curve for radioimmunoassay obtained with synthetic somatostatin. Chromatography of goldfish retinal extract on Sephadex G-50 revealed two peaks of SLI, one that coeluted with synthetic somatostatin and one that eluted as a larger molecule. Incubation in 8 M urea did not alter the chromatographic pattern of the extract. SLI was present in extracts of frog optic nerve and tectum in concentrations higher than those found in the retina. In goldfish retina, SLI was localized by immunofluorescence to four types of processes in the inner plexiform layer; their origins could be traced to three classes of SLI-containing cell bodies in the proximal row of the inner nuclear layer and one class in the ganglion cell layer. Localization of SLI to cells of the retina and characterizations of the molecular forms of retinal SLI suggest that the retina is a promising model system for studies on the potential neurotransmitter function of somatostatin. Images PMID:6103539

  16. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  17. [Endogenous content of the nitric oxide in the cell layers of the eye retina].

    PubMed

    Kalamkarov, G P; Bugrova, A E; Konstantinova, T S; Shevchenko, T F

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide is a universal molecule that regulates many different functions in an organism. In the eye retina nitric oxide plays both a regulatory role by modulation of the synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells and a toxic role in apoptosis induction in the outer nuclear layer and in the layer of ganglion cells. In this paper there has been made the first attempt to estimate the endogenous NO concentration in retina layers in vivo. The concentration of the nitric oxide was determined by two indepen- dent techniques: ESR spectrometry using spin trap for in vivo determination and NO-sensitive microelectrode for in situ determination in the survival isolated frog retina. The distinct NO con- centration was detected only in the ganglion cells layer (~0.25 μM) and in the inner segments layer of the photoreceptors (~0.6 μM). The activity and the kinetic characteristic of the NO-synthase localized in the same layers were also determined. Key words: retina cells layers, nitric oxide, ESR, NO-sensitive microelectrodes.

  18. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  19. Eye formation in the absence of retina

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, Eric C.; Liu, Chaomei; Shah, Rina; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard A.; Jamrich, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Eye development is a complex process that involves the formation of the retina and the lens, collectively called the eyeball, as well as the formation of auxiliary eye structures such as the eyelid, lacrimal gland, cornea and conjunctiva. The developmental requirements for the formation of each individual structure are only partially understood. We have shown previously that the homeobox-containing gene Rx is a key component in eye formation, as retinal structures do not develop and retina-specific gene expression is not observed in Rx-deficient mice. In addition, Rx−/− embryos do not develop any lens structure, despite the fact that Rx is not expressed in the lens. This demonstrates that during normal mammalian development, retina-specific gene expression is necessary for lens formation. In this paper we show that lens formation can be restored in Rx-deficient embryos experimentally, by the elimination of β-catenin expression in the head surface ectoderm. This suggests that β-catenin is involved in lens specification either through Wnt signaling or through its function in cell adhesion. In contrast to lens formation, we demonstrate that the development of auxiliary eye structures does not depend on retina-specific gene expression or retinal morphogenesis. These results point to the existence of two separate developmental processes involved in the formation of the eye and its associated structures. One involved in the formation of the eyeball and the second involved in the formation of the auxiliary eye structures. PMID:18675797

  20. Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Gautam

    2002-03-01

    Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina is a rare disorder of autosomal recessive nature. There occurs patchy and progressive atrophy of the choroid and retina at the equatorial region with central area being less affected. Here in this case report, one woman of about 47 years attended at the retina clinic, Tenennt Institute of Ophthalmology, Glasgow University with the history of gradual loss of vision. On fundus examination, sharply defined bizarre shaped atrophic areas of fundus was seen in both the eyes. Velvet like fine granular pigments were present in the macula, the zone of healthy retina and the periphery. The colourless, elongated, glittering crystals were scattered over the dark brown pigments visible through 90 dioptre lens. Bone corpuscles pigments were not found. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperfluorescence in the area of gyrate atrophy. Her plasma ornithine level and plasma tiramine level were 1 90 U mol/l and 357 U mol/l. respectively. A rigid schedule of low protein diet including near total elimination of arginine with supplementation of essential amino acids was advised since the diagnosis was established.

  1. In ovo electroporation in embryonic chick retina.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Doh, Sung Tae; Cai, Li

    2012-02-05

    Chicken embryonic retina is an excellent tool to study retinal development in higher vertebrates. Because of large size and external development, it is comparatively very easy to manipulate the chick embryonic retina using recombinant DNA/RNA technology. Electroporation of DNA/RNA constructs into the embryonic retina have a great advantage to study gene regulation in retinal stem/progenitor cells during retinal development. Different type of assays such as reporter gene assay, gene over-expression, gene knock down (shRNA) etc. can be performed using the electroporation technique. This video demonstrates targeted retinal injection and in ovo electroporation into the embryonic chick retina at the Hamburger and Hamilton stage 22-23, which is about embryonic day 4 (E4). Here we show a rapid and convenient in ovo electroporation technique whereby a plasmid DNA that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a marker is directly delivered into the chick embryonic subretinal space and followed by electric pulses to facilitate DNA uptake by retinal stem/progenitor cells. The new method of retinal injection and electroporation at E4 allows the visualization of all retinal cell types, including the late-born neurons(1), which has been difficult with the conventional method of injection and electroporation at E1.5(2).

  2. Abundancias químicas de estrellas de Mercurio-Manganeso obtenidas con espectros EBASIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintado, O. I.; Adelman, S. J.

    Se determinan las abundancias químicas de estrellas de HgMn usando espectros obtenidos con EBASIM en CASLEO en un rango de longitud de onda comprendido entre los 400 y 890 nm. Los valores iniciales de temperatura efectiva y gravedad superficial se calculan con la fotometría uvbyβ. Las abundancias se calculan usando WIDTH9 y SYNTHE. Los resultados se comparan análisis realizados por los autores usando espectros obtenidos con el espectrógrado REOSC del CASLEO, el espectrógrafo echelle del Telescopio Anglo-Australiano y el espectrógrafo Coudé del Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.

  3. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  4. Cell fate determination in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cepko, C L; Austin, C P; Yang, X; Alexiades, M; Ezzeddine, D

    1996-01-01

    In the vertebrate central nervous system, the retina has been a useful model for studies of cell fate determination. Recent results from studies conducted in vitro and in vivo suggest a model of retinal development in which both the progenitor cells and the environment change over time. The model is based upon the notion that the mitotic cells within the retina change in their response properties, or "competence", during development. These changes presage the ordered appearance of distinct cell types during development and appear to be necessary for the production of the distinct cell types. As the response properties of the cells change, so too do the environmental signals that the cells encounter. Together, intrinsic properties and extrinsic cues direct the choice of cell fate. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8570600

  5. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-10

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  6. The avian egg and the retina

    PubMed Central

    MALCOLM, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for study of blood flow has been derived from the avian egg, utilizing the theories of crystallography and photosynthesis. The model is employed to explain the form of the eye and the function of the cells of the human retina, with special reference to colour vision and the pathology of migraine. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4736600

  7. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  8. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  9. Connecting the retina to the brain.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Lynda; Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  10. Reactive gliosis in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer L; Ranski, Alexandra H; Morgan, Gregory W; Thummel, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish posses the remarkable ability to regenerate retinal neurons. Damage to the zebrafish retina induces Müller glia to act as stem cells, generating retinal progenitors for regeneration. In contrast, injury in the mammalian retina results in Müller glial reactive gliosis, a characteristic gliotic response that is normally detrimental to vision. Understanding the signaling pathways that determine how Müller glia respond to injury is a critical step toward promoting regeneration in the mammalian retina. Here we report that zebrafish Müller glia exhibit signs of reactive gliosis even under normal regenerative conditions and that cell cycle inhibition increases this response. Persistently reactive Müller glia increase their neuroprotective functions, temporarily saving photoreceptors from a cytotoxic light lesion. However, the absence of a sustained proliferation response results in a significant inhibition of retinal regeneration. Interestingly, when cell cycle inhibition is released, a partial recovery of regeneration is observed. Together, these data demonstrate that zebrafish Müller glia possess both gliotic and regenerative potential. PMID:26492821

  11. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  12. Bipolar cells of the ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Puller, Christian; Ondreka, Katharina; Haverkamp, Silke

    2011-03-01

    Parallel processing of an image projected onto the retina starts at the first synapse, the cone pedicle, and each cone feeds its light signal into a minimum of eight different bipolar cell types. Hence, the morphological classification of bipolar cells is a prerequisite for analyzing retinal circuitry. Here we applied common bipolar cell markers to the cone-dominated ground squirrel retina, studied the labeling by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and compared the resulting bipolar cell types with those of the mouse (rod dominated) and primate retina. Eight different cone bipolar cell types (three OFF and five ON) and one rod bipolar cell were distinguished. The major criteria for classifying the cells were their immunocytochemical identity, their dendritic branching pattern, and the shape and stratification level of their axons in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Immunostaining with antibodies against Gγ13, a marker for ON bipolar cells, made it possible to separate OFF and ON bipolars. Recoverin-positive OFF bipolar cells partly overlapped with ON bipolar axon terminals at the ON/OFF border of the IPL. Antibodies against HCN4 labeled the S-cone selective (bb) bipolar cell. The calcium-binding protein CaB5 was expressed in two OFF and two ON cone bipolar cell types, and CD15 labeled a widefield ON cone bipolar cell comparable to the DB6 in primate.

  13. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation. PMID:18274898

  14. Person identification using fractal analysis of retina images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, Constantin; Corniencu, Felicia

    2004-10-01

    Biometric is automated method of recognizing a person based on physiological or behavior characteristics. Among the features measured are retina scan, voice, and fingerprint. A retina-based biometric involves the analysis of the blood vessels situated at the back of the eye. In this paper we present a method, which uses the fractal analysis to characterize the retina images. The Fractal Dimension (FD) of retina vessels was measured for a number of 20 images and have been obtained different values of FD for each image. This algorithm provides a good accuracy is cheap and easy to implement.

  15. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with /sup 125/I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed.

  16. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  17. Small field tritanopia in the peripheral retina.

    PubMed

    Volbrecht, Vicki J

    2016-07-01

    If stimuli are made sufficiently small, color-normal individuals report a loss in hue perception, in particular a decrease in the perception of green, in both the fovea and peripheral retina. This effect is referred to as small field tritanopia. It is not clear, however, how rod input may alter the dynamics of small field tritanopia in the peripheral retina. This paper looks at peripheral hue-naming data obtained for small stimuli at mesopic and photopic retinal illuminances under conditions that minimize (bleach) and maximize (no bleach) rod contribution. The data show that attenuation in the perception of green occurs with larger stimuli in the no-bleach condition than in the bleach condition. As retinal illuminance increases, the stimulus size that elicits small field tritanopia decreases, but the stimulus size is still larger under the no-bleach condition. Small field tritanopia in both the bleach and no-bleach conditions may be related to short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cone activity and its potential role in the mediation of the perception of green. The differences in stimulus size for small field tritanopia may be explained by rod input into the magnocellular and koniocellular pathways, which compromises the strength of the chromatic signals and creates a differential loss in the perception of green as compared to the other elemental hues. PMID:27409678

  18. Microcircuits for night vision in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Morigiwa, K; Ueda, M; Sterling, P

    2001-11-01

    Because the mouse retina has become an important model system, we have begun to identify its specific neuron types and their synaptic connections. Here, based on electron micrographs of serial sections, we report that the wild-type mouse retina expresses the standard rod pathways known in other mammals: (1) rod --> cone (via gap junctions) to inject rod signals into the cone bipolar circuit; and (2) rod --> rod bipolar --> AII amacrine --> cone bipolar --> ganglion cell. The mouse also expresses another rod circuit: a bipolar cell with cone input also receives rod input at symmetrical contacts that express ionotropic glutamate receptors (Hack et al., 1999, 2001). We show that this rod-cone bipolar cell sends an axon to the outer (OFF) strata of the inner plexiform layer to form ribbon synapses with ganglion and amacrine cells. This rod-cone bipolar cell receives direct contacts from only 20% of all rod terminals. However, we also found that rod terminals form gap junctions with each other and thus establish partial syncytia that could pool rod signals for direct chemical transmission to the OFF bipolar cell. This third rod pathway probably explains the rod responses that persist in OFF ganglion cells after the well known rod pathways are blocked (Soucy et al., 1998).

  19. MicroRNAs in the Neural Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Nigel G. F.

    2014-01-01

    The health and function of the visual system rely on a collaborative interaction between diverse classes of molecular regulators. One of these classes consists of transcription factors, which are known to bind to DNA and control the transcription activities of their target genes. For a long time, it was thought that the transcription factors were the only regulators of gene expression. More recently, however, a novel class of regulators emerged. This class consists of a large number of small noncoding endogenous RNAs, namely, miRNAs. The miRNAs compose an essential component of posttranscriptional gene regulation, since they ultimately control the fate of gene transcripts. The retina, as a part of the central nervous system, is a well-established model for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal and glial functions. Numerous recent efforts have been made towards identification of miRNAs and their inferred roles in the visual pathway. In this review, we summarize the current state of our knowledge regarding the expression and function of miRNA in the neural retina and we discuss their potential uses as biomarkers for some retinal disorders. PMID:24745005

  20. Association of tuberculosis with vasculitis retinae.

    PubMed

    Habibullah, M; Uddin, M S; Islam, S

    2008-07-01

    Retinal vasculitis is one of the common causes of blindness among the young adult in this subcontinent. Causes of retinal vasculitis are variable and it is one of the common ocular manifestations of tuberculosis. This case control study was carried out on 45 patients with retinal vasculitis of different age groups. All the patients were purposively selected from the department of ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and National Institute of Ophthalmology Dhaka. This study reveals that vasculitis retinae is a disease of younger age group (68.9%). Mean+/-SD age of cases were 31.84+/-10.82 years. It occurs more in male (75.6%) and male female ratio is 3.09:1, single or both eye may involve. Retinal vasculitis occurs more in middle socio-economic status persons (62.2%). It present with floaters (58.9%), hazy media (60%), vitreous haemorrhage (57.8%) and retinal haemorrhage (42.2%). All 45 subjects both cases and control groups were tested with Mantoux test. 18(40%) subjects of cases and 13(28.9%) subjects of control group were found positive Mantoux test. It was observed that the association of tuberculosis with vasculitis retinae is not statistically significant. As tuberculosis is common in this country, further specific and extensive study over a longer period of time is necessary for understanding the role of tuberculosis in retinal vasculitis patients.

  1. Glycinergic pathways in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Marc, R.E.; Lam, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    Autoradiographic localization of high affinity (3H)glycine uptake in the retina of the goldfish has been used to study some anatomical and physiological properties of potentially glycinergic neurons. There are two classes of retinal cells exhibiting high affinity glycine uptake: Aa amacrine cells and I2 interplexiform cells. Aa amacrine cells constitute about 20% of the somas in the amacrine cell layer and send their dendrites to the middle of the inner plexiform layer. There they are both pre- and postsynaptic primarily to other amacrine cells. Photic modulation of glycine uptake indicates that they are probably red-hyperpolarizing/green-depolarizing neurons. I2 interplexiform cells are a newly discovered type of interplexiform cell; in the outer plexiform layer, they receive direct synaptic input from the somas of red-dominated GABAergic H1 horizontal cells and are apparently presynaptic to dendrites of unidentified types of horizontal cells. The connections of I2 interplexiform cells have not been successfully characterized in the inner plexiform layer. These findings extend our knowledge of neurochemically specific pathways in the cyprinid retina and indicate that glycine, like GABA, is a neurotransmitter primarily involved with circuits coding ''red'' information.

  2. The microglia in healthy and diseased retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Eter, Nicole; Heiduschka, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system and, also the retina. They fulfil several tasks of surveillance in the healthy retina. In case of an injury or disease, microglia become activated and tries to repair the damage. However, in a lot of cases it does not work, and microglia deteriorate the situation by releasing toxic and pro-inflammatory compounds. Moreover, they further promote degenerative processes by attacking and phagocytosing damaged neurones and photoreceptors that otherwise would possibly have the chance to survive. Such deleterious action of the microglia has been observed in degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptors, and it takes place in hereditary diseases, infections as well as in case of traumatic or light injuries. Therefore, a number of attempts has been undertaken so far to inhibit the microglia, with varying success. The task remains to study behaviour of the microglia and their interaction with other retinal cell populations in more detail with respect to released factors and expressed receptors including the time points of the corresponding events. The goal has to be to find a better balance between helpful and detrimental actions of the microglia.

  3. A role for adherons in neural retina cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Embryonic chick neural retina cells release glycoprotein complexes, termed adherons, into their culture medium. When absorbed onto the surface of petri dishes, neural retina adherons increase the initial rate of neural retina cell adhesion; they also stimulate the rate of cell-cell aggregation. Adheron-stimulated adhesion is tissue specific, and the spontaneous aggregation of neural retina cells is inhibited by monovalent Fab' fragments prepared from an antiserum against neural retina adherons. Therefore cell surface antigenic determinants shared with adherons are involved in normal cell-cell adhesions. The particles from the heterogeneous neural retina population contain many proteins and several glycosaminoglycans. The adherons migrate as a symmetrical 12S peak on sucrose gradients and are predominantly 15-nm spheres when examined by electron microscopy. Finally, the specific activity of neural retina adherons increases from embryonic days 7 through 12 and then declines. These results suggest that glycoprotein particles may be involved in some of the adhesive interactions between neural retina cells and between the cells and their environment. PMID:6187755

  4. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  5. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  6. Development of the Retina and Optic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Benjamin E.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the development of the retina and visual pathways has seen enormous advances during the past twenty-five years. New imaging technologies, coupled with advances in molecular biology, have permitted a fuller appreciation of the histotypical events associated with proliferation, fate determination, migration, differentiation, pathway navigation, target innervation, synaptogenesis and cell death, and in many instances, in understanding the genetic, molecular, cellular and activity-dependent mechanisms underlying those developmental changes. The present review considers those advances associated with the lineal relationships between retinal nerve cells, the production of retinal nerve cell diversity, the migration, patterning and differentiation of different types of retinal nerve cells, the determinants of the decussation pattern at the optic chiasm, the formation of the retinotopic map, and the establishment of ocular domains within the thalamus. PMID:20647017

  7. Wide-field imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Witmer, Matthew T; Kiss, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    The retinal periphery is the site of pathology in several eye diseases. Imaging of the peripheral retina offers a way to diagnose, monitor, and evaluate responses to the treatment of these conditions. Traditional fundus cameras have offered a 30- to 50-degree field of view. Recent technology has advanced to provide up to a 200-degree field of view. The utility of this technology in clinical practice continues to be investigated; wide-field color photography, autofluorescence imaging, and fluorescein angiography have been used for imaging peripheral retinal disease. Due to the limitations of this imaging technology and the lack of normative data, however, the clinical role of wide-field imaging remains controversial. PMID:23369515

  8. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  9. Development of diabetes-induced acidosis in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that the retina of diabetic animals would be unusually acidic due to increased glycolytic metabolism. Acidosis in tumors and isolated retina has been shown to lead to increased VEGF. To test the hypothesis we have measured the transretinal distribution of extracellular H(+) concentration (H(+)-profiles) in retinae of control and diabetic dark-adapted intact Long-Evans rats with ion-selective electrodes. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Intact rat retinae are normally more acidic than blood with a peak of [H(+)]o in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) that averages 30 nM higher than H(+) in the choroid. Profiles in diabetic animals were similar in shape, but diabetic retinae began to be considerably more acidic after 5 weeks of diabetes. In retinae of 1-3 month diabetics the difference between the ONL and choroid was almost twice as great as in controls. At later times, up to 6 months, some diabetics still demonstrated abnormally high levels of [H(+)]o, but others were even less acidic than controls, so that the average level of acidosis was not different. Greater variability in H(+)-profiles (both between animals and between profiles recorded in one animal) distinguished the diabetic retinae from controls. Within animals, this variability was not random, but exhibited regions of higher and lower H(+). We conclude that retinal acidosis begins to develop at an early stage of diabetes (1-3 months) in rats. However, it does not progress, and the acidity of diabetic rat retina was diminished at later stages (3-6 months). Also the diabetes-induced acidosis has a strongly expressed local character. As result, the diabetic retinas show much wider variability in [H(+)] distribution than controls. pH influences metabolic and neural processes, and these results suggest that local acidosis could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27262608

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the retina: from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-04-01

    This mini-review provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications to study rodent, cat, non-human primate, and human retinas. These techniques include T(1) - and T(2) -weighted anatomical, diffusion, blood flow, blood volume, blood-oxygenation level dependent, manganese-enhanced, physiological, and functional MRI. Applications to study the retinas in diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and retinal degeneration are also reviewed. MRI offers some unique advantages compared with existing imaging techniques and has the potential to further our understanding of physiology and function in healthy and diseased retinas.

  11. Phototoxicity to the retina: mechanisms of damage.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Randolph D

    2002-01-01

    Light damage to the retina occurs through three general mechanisms involving thermal, mechanical, or photochemical effects. The particular mechanism activated depends on the wavelength and exposure duration of the injuring light. The transitions between the various light damage mechanism may overlap to some extent. Energy confinement is a key concept in understanding or predicting the type of damage mechanism produced by a given light exposure. As light energy (either from a laser or an incoherent source) is deposited in the retina, its penetration through, and its absorption in, various tissue compartments is determined by its wavelength. Strongly absorbing tissue components will tend to "concentrate" the light energy. The effect of absorbed light energy largely depends on the rate of energy deposition, which is correlated with the exposure duration. If the rate of energy deposition is too low to produce an appreciable temperature increase in the tissue, then any resulting tissue damage necessarily occurs because of chemical (oxidative) reactions induced by absorption of energetic photons (photochemical damage). If the rate of energy deposition is faster than the rate of thermal diffusion (thermal confinement), then the temperature of the exposed tissue rises. If a critical temperature is reached (typically about 10 degrees C above basal), then thermal damage occurs. If the light energy is deposited faster than mechanical relaxation can occur (stress confinement), then a thermoelastic pressure wave is produced, and tissue is disrupted by shear forces or by cavitation-nonlinear effects. Very recent evidence suggests that ultrashort laser pulses can produce tissue damage through nonlinear and photochemical mechanisms; the latter because of two-photon excitation of cellular chromophores. In addition to tissue damage caused directly by light absorption, light toxicity can be produced by the presence of photosensitizing agents. Drugs excited to reactive states by

  12. Simple Experiments on the Physics of Vision: The Retina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortel, Adolf

    2005-01-01

    Many simple experiments can be performed in the classroom to explore the physics of vision. Students can learn of the two types of receptive cells (rods and cones), their distribution on the retina and the existence of the blind spot.

  13. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP+ axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON–OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs. PMID:26843334

  14. The risk of retina damage from high intensity light sources.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V A; Romanchuk, K G

    1980-05-01

    The risk of thermal damage to the retina of the eye by exposure to excessive light intensities from continuous and pulsed man-made sources is discussed. The probability of injury increases, the larger the radiant power absorbed by the retina and the smaller the size of the retinal image of the source. A mehtod of estimating the temperature increase of the immediately affected area of the retina is presented. The time constants involved are also briefly considered. Using numerical values from literature for the relevant parameters of the eye, threshold values for a variety of conditions can be established. Below these values little risk of retina damage should exist. The degree of hazard when these values are exceeded depends upon the circumstances. A case study of a welding accident showed good agreement between the conclusions of the theoretical analysis and clinical findings.

  15. Catecholaminergic amacrine cells in the dog and wolf retina.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L

    1991-12-01

    Catecholaminergic (presumed dopaminergic) amacrine cells in the retinae of Beagle dogs (canis lupus f. familiaris) and wolves (canis lupus) were visualized with an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). In both species, TH immunoreactivity is found in a population of amacrine cells with large somata (about 14 microns diameter) and large, moderately branched dendritic trees. Somata are located in the proximal inner nuclear layer (normal amacrines) or in the ganglion cell layer (displaced amacrines). Most dendrites stratify in a narrow band in the inner plexiform layer close to the inner nuclear layer, where they form a dense plexus with the characteristic pattern of "dendritic rings." The displaced cells have some of their dendrites in a proximal stratum of the inner plexiform layer. A few immunopositive processes are found in the outer plexiform layer (interplexiform processes). In Beagle dogs, the cell density of catecholaminergic amacrines varies from less than 1/mm2 in far periphery to 40-55/mm2 in central retina (mean density 21/mm2). The proportion of displaced amacrines varies locally from 10 to 85% (overall proportion 41% in one retina). In the wolf, densities of catecholaminergic cells range between about 3/mm2 in peripheral and up to 35/mm2 in central retina. The proportion of displaced cells is somewhat lower than in dogs, varying between 11 and 31% across the retina. The morphology and density distribution of canine catecholaminergic amacrines resemble that of other mammalian retinae. A marked difference, however, is the high percentage of displaced cells in both dog and wolf retina; it is the highest found in any mammal so far. The displaced and normal cells appear to be members of a single functional population. A comparison of the topographic distributions of catecholaminergic amacrines, rods, and ganglion cells in the dog retina shows no consistent density correlations between these neurons that are all part of the rod pathway. PMID:1685328

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lane, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulation of autofluorescence in the retina to determine that noninvasive detection of nutritional iron deficiency is possible. Nutritional iron deficiency (which leads to iron deficiency anemia) affects more than 2 billion people worldwide, and there is an urgent need for a simple, noninvasive diagnostic test. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) is a fluorescent compound that accumulates in red blood cells and is used as a biomarker for nutritional iron deficiency. We developed a computational model of the eye, using parameters that were identified either by literature search, or by direct experimental measurement to test the possibility of detecting ZPP non-invasively in retina. By incorporating fluorescence into Steven Jacques' original code for multi-layered tissue, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence in the retina and determined that if the beam is not focused on a blood vessel in a neural retina layer or if part of light is hitting the vessel, ZPP fluorescence will be 10-200 times higher than background lipofuscin fluorescence coming from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer directly below. In addition we found that if the light can be focused entirely onto a blood vessel in the neural retina layer, the fluorescence signal comes only from ZPP. The fluorescence from layers below in this second situation does not contribute to the signal. Therefore, the possibility that a device could potentially be built and detect ZPP fluorescence in retina looks very promising.

  17. Efficient control structures for digital programmable retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Thierry M.

    2001-05-01

    A digital programmable artificial retina (PAR) is a functional extension of a CMOS imager, in which every pixel is fitted with a local ADC and a tiny digital programmable processor. From an architectural viewpoint, a PAR is an SIMD array processor with local optical input. A PAR is aimed at processing images on-site until they can be output from the array under concentrated form. The overall goal is to get compact, fast and inexpensive vision systems, in particular for robotics applications. A 256 by 256 PAR with up to a few tens bits of local memory per pixel is now within reach at reasonable cost. However, whereas the local memory size benefits quadratically from the feature size decrease, wiring density improvement can only be linear, at best. So control should become more complex with the danger of a growing proportion of the digital pixel area being devoted to instruction or address decoding. We propose efficient scalable solutions to this problem at the architectural, circuit and topological levels, which attempt to minimize both silicon area and power consumption.

  18. Transformation of stimulus correlations by the retina.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Kristina D; Prentice, Jason S; Tkačik, Gašper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather K; Palmer, Stephanie E; Nelson, Philip C; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Redundancies and correlations in the responses of sensory neurons may seem to waste neural resources, but they can also carry cues about structured stimuli and may help the brain to correct for response errors. To investigate the effect of stimulus structure on redundancy in retina, we measured simultaneous responses from populations of retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied greatly in correlation structure; these stimuli and recordings are publicly available online. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were modestly more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but they were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio-temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of pairwise correlations across stimuli where receptive field measurements were possible.

  19. Oxygen tension imaging in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Shonat, Ross D; Kight, Amanda C

    2003-10-01

    A newly developed microscope-based imaging system was used to measure the oxygen tension (PO2) inside the retinal and choroidal vessels of mice and to generate in vivo maps of retinal PO2. These maps were generated from the phosphorescence lifetimes of an injected palladium-porphyrin compound using a frequency-domain measurement. The system was fully calibrated and used to produce retinal PO2 maps at different inspiratory oxygen fractions. PO2 rose accordingly and predictably as inspiratory O2 was stepped from hypoxic to hyperoxic conditions. Important experimental and acquisition parameters necessary for applying phosphorescence lifetime imaging to the mouse eye were investigated, including camera exposure and intensifier gain settings. Because of a need to limit light exposure to the retina, PO2 map quality as measured by the coefficient of determination was investigated as a function of signal-to-noise and accumulated excitation energy deposition. With the development of this technology for use in mice, the potential for investigating the oxygen dynamics in genetically engineered mouse models of retinal disease, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration, is advanced.

  20. Galloxanthin, a carotenoid from the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    WALD, G

    1948-05-20

    A new carotenoid has been isolated from the chicken retina for which the name galloxanthin is proposed. This substance has the properties of a hydroxy carotenoid or xanthophyll. It has not yet been crystallized. On a chromatogram of calcium carbonate it is adsorbed just below astaxanthin and above lutein. The absorption spectrum of galloxanthin lies in a region where natural carotenoids have not ordinarily been found. Its main, central absorption band falls at about 400 mmicro. The position of its spectrum suggests a conjugated system of eight double bonds. This relatively short polyene structure must be reconciled with very strong adsorption affinities. With antimony trichloride, galloxanthin yields a deep blue product, possessing a main absorption band at 785 to 795 mmicro, and a secondary maximum at about 710 mmicro which may not be due to galloxanthin itself. Galloxanthin appears to be one of the carotenoid filter pigments associated with cone vision in the chicken. It may act as an auxiliary to the other filter pigments in differentiating colors; or its primary function may be to exclude violet and near ultraviolet radiations for which the eye has a large chromatic aberration.

  1. Confocal polarimeter for the living human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, D.; Paterson, C.

    2010-06-01

    There is strong evidence [1] that the living human retina has polarization signatures that could be linked to the presence of Glaucoma, an ocular disease that is the second cause of blindness in the western world. In a polarization sensitive ophthalmoscope [2], the amount of light that can be used is limited for the safety of the subject, and the return is typically a small fraction of the light used for illumination, of the order of 10-6. Furthermore, the acquisition rates have to be sufficiently fast to avoid eye-movement artifacts. The light-budget available to produce a polarization image with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope is typically in the order of 10 nW [3], and pixel acquisition sampling rates are of several MHz. We are currently developing an imaging instrument for vision research and clinical vision applications and aim to introduce it to the medical and clinical environment using objective methods of image quality assessment. In this presentation we talk about the stringent imaging requirements and show an optimized design of our instrument [4].

  2. Gene Transcription Profile of the Detached Retina (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) yields many morphologic and functional consequences, including death of the photoreceptor cells, Müller cell hypertrophy, and inner retinal rewiring. Many of these changes are due to the separation-induced activation of specific genes. In this work, we define the gene transcription profile within the retina as a function of time after detachment. We also define the early activation of kinases that might be responsible for the detachment-induced changes in gene transcription. Methods: Separation of the retina from the RPE was induced in Brown-Norway rats by the injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested at 1, 7, and 28 days after separation. Gene transcription profiles for each time point were determined using the Affymetrix Rat 230A gene microarray chip. Transcription levels in detached retinas were compared to those of nondetached retinas with the BRB-ArrayTools Version 3.6.0 using a random variance analysis of variance (ANOVA) model. Confirmation of the significant transcriptional changes for a subset of the genes was performed using microfluidic quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. Kinase activation was explored using Western blot analysis to look for early phosphorylation of any of the 3 main families of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): the p38 family, the Janus kinase family, and the p42/p44 family. Results: Retinas separated from the RPE showed extensive alterations in their gene transcription profile. Many of these changes were initiated as early as 1 day after separation, with significant increases by 7 days. ANOVA analysis defined 144 genes that had significantly altered transcription levels as a function of time after separation when setting a false discovery rate at ≤0.1. Confirmatory RT-PCR was performed on 51 of these 144 genes. Differential transcription detected on the microarray

  3. Characterization of glucagon-expressing neurons in the chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Skorupa, Dana; Schonberg, David L.; Walton, Nathaniel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently identified large glucagon-expressing neurons that densely ramify neurites in the peripheral edge of the retina and regulate the proliferation of progenitors in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ) of the postnatal chicken eye (Fischer et al., 2005). However, nothing is known about the transmitters and proteins that are expressed by the glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. We used antibodies to cell-distinguishing markers to better characterize the different types of glucagon-expressing neurons. We found that the large glucagon-expressing neurons were immunoreactive for substance P, neurofilament, Pax6, AP2α, HuD, calretinin, trkB and trkC. Colocalization of glucagon and substance P in the large glucagon-expressing neurons indicates that these cells are the “bullwhip cells” that have been briefly described by Ehrlich, Keyser and Karten (1987). Similar to the bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, HuD, Pax6, and AP2α. Unlike bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for GABA. While glucagon-immunoreactive amacrine cells were negative for substance P in central regions of the retina, a subset of this type of amacrine cell was immunoreactive for substance P in far peripheral regions of the retina. An additional type of glucagon/substance P-expressing neuron, resembling the bullwhip cells, was found in far peripheral and dorsal regions of the retina. Based on morphology, distribution within the retina, and histological markers, we conclude that there may be 4 different types of glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. PMID:16572462

  4. Dynamics of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in normal and laser photocoagulated retina

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W.; Garrett, K.; da Cruz, L.; Constable, I.; Rakoczy, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the distribution, persistence, and stability of fluorescently labelled phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs) in normal and laser photocoagulated retina following intravitreal injection in the rat.
METHODS—Fluorescently labelled PS-ODNs were injected intravitreally into pigmented eyes at doses of 0.5-10.0 nmol in 2.0 µl solution. The dynamics of PS-ODNs was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy of cryosections and flat mounted retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid-sclera. Genescan analysis was used to assess the integrity of PS-ODNs in the retina after injection. The dynamics of PS-ODNs was also evaluated in the retina following krypton laser photocoagulation with a protocol producing choroidal neovascularisation (CNV).
RESULTS—Following intravitreal injection the PS-ODNs demonstrated dose and time dependent distribution and persistence in the retina, where they accessed all neural layers. However, they preferentially accumulated in the RPE layer, demonstrated as bright granules in the cytoplasm of the cells. Injections of 5.0 and 7.5 nmol of PS-ODNs exhibited strong fluorescence in the retina for 6 weeks after injection. Genescan analysis demonstrated that the PS-ODNs remained almost completely intact for at least 12 weeks. Following laser treatment, the PS-ODNs were concentrated in the regions of laser photocoagulation and retained high intensity for at least 8 weeks after injection, particularly localised to macrophages, RPE, and the local choroidal tissue.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate that PS-ODNs are stable and accessible to most neural layers of the retina, and they preferentially accumulate in the RPE layer following intravitreal injection. The successful delivery of PS-ODNs into normal and laser photocoagulated retina suggests that PS-ODNs may have potential in the development of therapy for attenuating retinal degenerations and CNV.

 PMID:10381674

  5. Multiple Independent Oscillatory Networks in the Degenerating Retina.

    PubMed

    Euler, Thomas; Schubert, Timm

    2015-01-01

    During neuronal degenerative diseases, microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. This can be particularly well observed in the retina, where photoreceptor degeneration triggers rewiring of connections in the retina's first synaptic layer (e.g., Strettoi et al., 2003; Haq et al., 2014), while the synaptic organization of inner retinal circuits appears to be little affected (O'Brien et al., 2014; Figures 1A,B). Remodeling of (outer) retinal circuits and diminishing light-driven activity due to the loss of functional photoreceptors lead to spontaneous activity that can be observed at different retinal levels (Figure 1C), including the retinal ganglion cells, which display rhythmic spiking activity in the degenerative retina (Margolis et al., 2008; Stasheff, 2008; Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Stasheff et al., 2011). Two networks have been suggested to drive the oscillatory activity in the degenerating retina: a network of remnant cone photoreceptors, rod bipolar cells (RBCs) and horizontal cells in the outer retina (Haq et al., 2014), and the AII amacrine cell-cone bipolar cell network in the inner retina (Borowska et al., 2011). Notably, spontaneous rhythmic activity in the inner retinal network can be triggered in the absence of synaptic remodeling in the outer retina, for example, in the healthy retina after photo-bleaching (Menzler et al., 2014). In addition, the two networks show remarkable differences in their dominant oscillation frequency range as well as in the types and numbers of involved cells (Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Haq et al., 2014). Taken together this suggests that the two networks are self-sustained and can be active independently from each other. However, it is not known if and how they modulate each other. In this mini review, we will discuss: (i) commonalities and differences between these two oscillatory networks as well as possible interaction pathways; (ii) how multiple self

  6. Distribution and structure of efferent synapses in the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, S H; Nacsa, N; Blankenship, T; Fitzgerald, P G; Weller, C; Vaney, D I; Wilson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The visual system of birds includes an efferent projection from a visual area, the isthmo-optic nucleus in the midbrain, back to the retina. Using a combination of anterograde labeling of efferent fibers, reconstruction of dye-filled neurons, NADPH-diaphorase staining, and transmission electron microscopy, we have examined the distribution of efferent fibers and their synaptic structures in the chicken retina. We show that efferent fibers terminate strictly within the ventral retina. In two completely mapped retinas, only 2 fibers from a total of 15,359 terminated in the dorsal retina. The major synapse made by each efferent fiber is with a single efferent target amacrine cell (TC). This synapse consists of 5-25 boutons of 2 microm diameter, each with multiple active zones, pressed into the TC soma or synapsing with a basketwork of rudimentary TC dendrites in the inner nuclear layer (INL). This basketwork, which is sheathed by Muller cell processes, defines a private neuropil in the INL within which TCs were also seen to receive input from retinal neurons. In addition to the major synapse, efferent fibers typically produce several very thin processes that terminate nearby in single small boutons and for which the soma of a local amacrine cell is one of the likely postsynaptic partners. A minority of efferent fibers also give rise to a thicker process, terminating in a strongly diaphorase-positive ball about 5 microm in diameter.

  7. Microgravity effects on neural retina regeneration in the newt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    Data on forelimb and eye lens regenerationin in urodeles under spaceflight conditions (SFC) have been obtained in our previous studies. Today, evidence is available that SFC stimulate regeneration in experimental animals rather than inhibit it. The results of control on-ground experiments with simulated microgravity suggest that the stimulatory effect of SFC is due largely to weightlessness. An original experimental model is proposed, which is convenient for comprehensively analyzing neural regeneration under SFC. The initial results described here concern regeneration of neural retina in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to microgravity simulated in radial clinostat. After clinorotation for seven days (until postoperation day 16), a positive effect of altered gravity on structural restoration of detached neural retina was confirmed by a number of criteria. Specifically, an increased number of Müllerian glial cells, an increased relative volume of the plexiform layers, reduced cell death, advanced redifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium, and extended areas of neural retina reattachment were detected in experimental newts. Moreover, cell proliferation in the inner nuclear layer of neural retina increased as compared with control. Thus, low gravity appears to intensify natural cytological and molecular mechanisms of neural retina regeneration in lower vertebrates.

  8. Bmp4 from the optic vesicle specifies murine retina formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Oltean, Alina; Beebe, David C

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of mouse embryos concluded that after the optic vesicle evaginates from the ventral forebrain and contacts the surface ectoderm, signals from the ectoderm specify the distal region of the optic vesicle to become retina and signals from the optic vesicle induce the lens. Germline deletion of Bmp4 resulted in failure of lens formation. We performed conditional deletion of Bmp4 from the optic vesicle to test the function of Bmp4 in murine eye development. The optic vesicle evaginated normally and contacted the surface ectoderm. Lens induction did not occur. The optic cup failed to form and the expression of retina-specific genes decreased markedly in the distal optic vesicle. Instead, cells in the prospective retina expressed genes characteristic of the retinal pigmented epithelium. We conclude that Bmp4 is required for retina specification in mice. In the absence of Bmp4, formation of the retinal pigmented epithelium is the default differentiation pathway of the optic vesicle. Differences in the signaling pathways required for specification of the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium in chicken and mouse embryos suggest major changes in signaling during the evolution of the vertebrate eye.

  9. Divergence of visual channels in the inner retina

    PubMed Central

    Asari, Hiroki; Meister, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar cells (BCs) form parallel channels that carry visual signals from the outer to the inner retina. Each BC type is thought to carry a distinct visual message to select types of amacrine cells (ACs) and ganglion cells (GCs). However, the number of GC types exceeds that of BCs providing their input, suggesting that BC signals diversify on transmission to GCs. Here we explored in the salamander retina how signals from individual BCs feed into multiple GCs, and found that each BC could evoke distinct responses among GCs, differing in kinetics, adaptation, and rectification properties. This signal divergence results primarily from interactions with ACs that allow each BC to send distinct signals to its target GCs. Our results indicate that individual BC-GC connections have distinct transfer functions. This expands the number of visual channels in the inner retina and enhances the computational power and feature selectivity of early visual processing. PMID:23086336

  10. The architecture of functional interaction networks in the retina.

    PubMed

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-02-23

    Sensory information is represented in the brain by the joint activity of large groups of neurons. Recent studies have shown that, although the number of possible activity patterns and underlying interactions is exponentially large, pairwise-based models give a surprisingly accurate description of neural population activity patterns. We explored the architecture of maximum entropy models of the functional interaction networks underlying the response of large populations of retinal ganglion cells, in adult tiger salamander retina, responding to natural and artificial stimuli. We found that we can further simplify these pairwise models by neglecting weak interaction terms or by relying on a small set of interaction strengths. Comparing network interactions under different visual stimuli, we show the existence of local network motifs in the interaction map of the retina. Our results demonstrate that the underlying interaction map of the retina is sparse and dominated by local overlapping interaction modules.

  11. MEMS technologies for epiretinal stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, W.

    2004-09-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yields visual sensations. Therefore, a retina implant for blind humans suffering from retinitis pigmentosa based on this concept seems to be feasible. In Germany, there are two projects funded by the government working on different approaches namely the subretinal and the epiretinal approaches. This paper describes the epiretinal approach for such a system. The extraocular part of this system records visual images. The images are transformed by a neural net into corresponding signals for stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells. These signals are transmitted to a receiver unit of an intraocular implant, the retina stimulator. Integrated circuitry of this unit decodes the signals and transfers the data to a stimulation circuitry that selects stimulation electrodes placed onto the retina and generates current pulses to the electrodes. By this, action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are evoked, causing a visual sensation. This paper concentrates on the MEMS part of this implant.

  12. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Apte, D V; Koutalos, Y; McFarlane, D K; Dawson, M J; Ebrey, T G

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were obtained from living toad retinae and toad retinal extracts at 4 degrees C. Several phosphorus metabolites--nucleoside di- and triphosphates (NTP), phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters--were identified from the spectra of whole retinae. The intracellular pH was determined to be 7.27 +/- 0.06 at 4 degrees C and the intracellular MgNTP/NTP ratio was at least 0.77. These results are consistent with those reported by other techniques, and they show that 31P-NMR spectroscopy can be used for noninvasively and quantitatively studying the metabolism of living toad retinae, and for monitoring its changes over time. PMID:2506940

  13. Synaptic mechanisms of adaptation and sensitization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anton; Leung, Kin-Mei; Odermatt, Benjamin; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems continually adjust the way stimuli are processed. What are the circuit mechanisms underlying this plasticity? We investigated how synapses in the retina of zebrafish adjust to changes in the temporal contrast of a visual stimulus by imaging activity in vivo. Following an increase in contrast, bipolar cell synapses with strong initial responses depressed, whereas synapses with weak initial responses facilitated. Depression and facilitation predominated in different strata of the inner retina, where bipolar cell output was anticorrelated with the activity of amacrine cell synapses providing inhibitory feedback. Pharmacological block of GABAergic feedback converted facilitating bipolar cell synapses into depressing ones. These results indicate that depression intrinsic to bipolar cell synapses causes adaptation of the ganglion cell response to contrast, whereas depression in amacrine cell synapses causes sensitization. Distinct microcircuits segregating to different layers of the retina can cause simultaneous increases or decreases in the gain of neural responses. PMID:23685718

  14. An Image Processing System For Automatic Retina Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Norman; Goldbaum, Michael; Nelson, Mark; Chaudhuri, Subhasis

    1988-06-01

    We are developing a system designed around an IBM PC-AT to perform automatic diagnosis of diseases from images of the retina. The system includes hardware for color image capture and display. We are developing software for performing image enhancement, image analysis, pattern recognition and artificial intelligence. The design goal of the system is to automatically segment a digitized photograph of the retina into its normal and abnormal structures, identifying these objects by various features such as color, size, shape, texture, orientation, etc., and ultimately to provide a list of possible diagnoses with varying degrees of probability. We will discuss algorithms used to identify markedly different objects and to distinguish between those objects which appear very similar to the trained eye. Implementation of these algorithms, which are typically applied to areas such as remote sensing, terrain mapping and robotics, has been very successful when applied to color images of the retina.

  15. Artificial retina: the multichannel processing of the mammalian retina achieved with a neuromorphic asynchronous light acquisition device.

    PubMed

    Lorach, Henri; Benosman, Ryad; Marre, Olivier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Sahel, José A; Picaud, Serge

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Accurate modeling of retinal information processing remains a major challenge in retinal physiology with applications in visual rehabilitation and prosthetics. Most of the current artificial retinas are fed with static frame-based information, losing thereby the fundamental asynchronous features of biological vision. The objective of this work is to reproduce the spatial and temporal properties of the majority of ganglion cell (GC) types in the mammalian retina. Approach. Here, we combined an asynchronous event-based light sensor with a model pulling nonlinear subunits to reproduce the parallel filtering and temporal coding occurring in the retina. We fitted our model to physiological data and were able to reconstruct the spatio-temporal responses of the majority of GC types previously described in the mammalian retina (Roska et al 2006 J. Neurophysiol. 95 3810-22). Main results. Fitting of the temporal and spatial components of the response was achieved with high coefficients of determination (median R(2) = 0.972 and R(2) = 0.903, respectively). Our model provides an accurate temporal precision with a reliability of only few milliseconds-peak of the distribution at 5 ms-similar to biological retinas (Berry et al 1997 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94 5411-16; Gollisch and Meister 2008 Science 319 1108-11). The spiking statistics of the model also followed physiological measurements (Fano factor: 0.331). Significance. This new asynchronous retinal model therefore opens new perspectives in the development of artificial visual systems and visual prosthetic devices.

  16. Effects of endothelin-1 eyedrops on the retina in rats.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Koichi; Miyauchi, Takashi; Takanashi, Masakatsu; Ogata, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Goto, Katsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    Eye disorder accompanied with chronic retinal microvascular obstruction, such as diabetic retinopathy, exists in many diseases. However, it is difficult to produce this model experimentally in the animal eye. Endothelin-1 eyedrops were prepared in order to examine whether the eyedrops affect the rat retina and whether we can produce an obstruction model. Endothelin-1 eyedrops diluted by artificial tears in seven stages from 4 x 10(-5) M to 4 x 10(-11) M were arranged. We administered this solution three times a day in the left eye of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Artificial tears alone were applied to the right eye as a control vehicle. After 2 weeks, rats were sacrificed under anesthesia and the retinal tissues were isolated. As an index to the action of endothelin- 1 eyedrops to the retina, the expressions of endothelin-A (ETA) and endothelin-B (ETB) receptors in the retina were compared in both eyes. Frozen sections of the retina were immunostained to reveal the distribution of the ETA and ETB receptors. We also examined ETA and ETB mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. As a result, the expressions of ETA and ETB receptors are reduced with both immunostaining and the mRNA levels in the left eye, in which endothelin-1 eyedrops were applied at 4 x 10(-5) M. It is suggested that endothelin-1 eyedrops affected the retina and the possibility of producing the experimental model of chronic microvascular obstruction in the rat retina.

  17. Retina-like sensor image coordinates transformation and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Cao, Nan; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-03-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera, the image acquisition, coordinates transformation and interpolation need to be realized. Both of the coordinates transformation and interpolation are computed in polar coordinate due to the sensor's particular pixels distribution. The image interpolation is based on sub-pixel interpolation and its relative weights are got in polar coordinates. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes the real-time image acquisition, coordinate transformation and interpolation.

  18. Localization of the paranodal protein Caspr in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Bhat, Manzoor A.; Peles, Elior

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The retina has the demanding task of encoding all aspects of the visual scene within the space of one fixation period lasting only a few hundred milliseconds. To accomplish this feat, information is encoded in specialized parallel channels and passed on to numerous central nuclei via the optic nerve. These parallel channels achieve specialization in at least three ways: the synaptic networks in which they participate, the neurotransmitter receptors expressed and the types and locations of ion channels or transporters used. Subcellular localization of receptors, channels and transporters is made yet more complex in the retina by the double duty many retinal processes serve. In the present work, we show that the protein Caspr (Contactin Associated Protein), best known for its critical role in the localization of voltage-gated ion channels at the nodes of Ranvier, is present in several types of retinal neurons including amacrine, bipolar, horizontal, and ganglion cells. Methods Using standard double label immunofluorescence protocols, we characterized the pattern of Caspr expression in the rodent retina. Results Caspr labeling was observed through much of the retina, including horizontal, bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells. Among amacrine cells, Caspr was observed in AII amacrine cells through co-localization with Parvalbumin and Disabled-1 in rat and mouse retinas, respectively. An additional amacrine cell type containing Calretinin also co-localized with Caspr, but did not co-localize with choline-acetyltransferase. Nearly all cells in the ganglion cell layer contain Caspr, including both displaced amacrine and ganglion cells. In the outer retina, Caspr was co-localized with PKC labeling in rod bipolar cell dendrites. In addition, Caspr labeling was found inside syntaxin-4 'sandwiches' in the outer plexiform layer, most likely indicating its presence in cone bipolar cell dendrites. Finally, Caspr was co-localized in segments of horizontal cell dendrites

  19. Understanding the retina: a review of computational models of the retina from the single cell to the network level.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tianruo; Tsai, David; Bai, Siwei; Morley, John W; Suaning, Gregg J; Lovell, Nigel H; Dokos, Socrates

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a clearly organized signal-processing system. It contains more than 60 different types of neurons, arranged in three distinct neural layers. Each cell type is believed to serve unique role(s) in encoding visual information. While we now have a relatively good understanding of the constituent cell types in the retina and some general ideas of their connectivity, with few exceptions, how the retinal circuitry performs computation remains poorly understood. Computational modeling has been commonly used to study the retina from the single cell to the network level. In this article, we begin by reviewing retinal modeling strategies and existing models. We then discuss in detail the significance and limitations of these models, and finally, we provide suggestions for the future development of retinal neural modeling.

  20. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Bedore, Jake; Martyn, Amanda C.; Li, Anson K. C.; Dolinar, Eric A.; McDonald, Ian S.; Coupland, Stuart G.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina. Methods & Results A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5) deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox) and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP) amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses. Significance This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina. PMID:26226617

  1. Electrical coupling between cones in turtle retina.

    PubMed Central

    Detwiler, P B; Hodgkin, A L

    1979-01-01

    1. The electrical coupling between cones of known spectral sensitivity in the peripheral part of the turtle's retina was studied by passing current through a micro-electrode inserted into one cone and recording with a second micro-electrode inserted into a neighbouring cone. 2. Spatial sensitivity profiles were determined by recording flash responses to a long narrow strip of light which was moved across the impaled cones in orthogonal directions. These measurements gave both the length constant lambda of electrical spread in the cone network and the separation of the two cones. 3. The cone separation determined from the spatial profiles agreed closely with that measured directly by injecting a fluorescent dye into two cones. 4. The length constant lambda varied from 18 to 39 micron with a mean of 25 micron for red-sensitive cones and 26 micron for green-sensitive cones. 5. The majority of cone pairs studied were electrically coupled provided they had the same spectral sensitivity and were separated by less than 60 micron: thirty-two out of thirty-six red-red pairs, two out of two green-green pairs, none out of eight red-green pairs: no blue cones were observed. 6. The strength of electrical coupling was expressed as a mutual resistance defined as the voltage in one cell divided by the current flowing into the other. Mutual resistances decreased from a maximum value of about 30 M omega at separations close to zero to 0.2 M omega, the lower limit of detectable coupling at separations of about 60 micron. Mutual resistances were always positive and were independent of which cell was directly polarized. The coupling seemed to be ohmic and any rectification or non-linearity probably arose in the cone membranes rather than in the coupling resistances. 7. The results were analysed in terms of the Lamb & Simon (1977) theories of square and hexagonal lattices, which approximate to the continuous sheet model except in the case of the cone to which current is applied. 8. The

  2. The Virtual Retina: Is Good Educational Technology Always Strategic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowie, Sandra

    Educational technology units must continually monitor their strategic plans to ensure that they are aligned with the realities of their institutions. Strategic dissonance occurs when previously successful strategies are no longer achieving the same positive outcomes. The Virtual Retina CD-ROM project is used in this paper as an example of…

  3. Stokes vector analysis of adaptive optics images of the retina.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongxin; Zhao, Yanming; Qi, Xiaofeng; Chui, Yuenping Toco; Burns, Stephen A

    2008-01-15

    A high-resolution Stokes vector imaging polarimeter was developed to measure the polarization properties at the cellular level in living human eyes. The application of this cellular level polarimetric technique to in vivo retinal imaging has allowed us to measure depolarization in the retina and to improve the retinal image contrast of retinal structures based on their polarization properties. PMID:18197217

  4. Expression of TRPV4 in the zebrafish retina during development.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, C; Guerrera, M C; Bonnin-Arias, C; Calavia, M G; Laurà, R; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2012-06-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are involved in sensing mechanical/physical stimuli such as temperature, light, pressure, as well as chemical stimuli. Some TRP channels are present in the vertebrate retina, and the occurrence of the multifunctional channel TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been reported in adult zebrafish. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of TRPV4 in the retina of zebrafish during development using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry from 3 days post fertilization (dpf) until 100 dpf. TRPV4 was detected at the mRNA and protein levels in the eye of zebrafish at all ages sampled. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of TRPV4 in a population of the retinal cells identified as amacrine cells on the basis of their morphology and localization within the retina, as well as the co-localization of TRPV4 with calretinin. TRPV4 was first (3 dpf) found in the soma of cells localized in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, and thereafter (10 dpf) also in the inner plexiform layer. The adult pattern of TRPV4 expression was achieved by 40 dpf the expression being restricted to the soma of some cells in the inner nuclear layer and ganglion cell layers. These data demonstrate the occurrence and developmental changes in the expression and localization of TRPV4 in the retina of zebrafish, and suggest a role of TRPV4 in the visual processing.

  5. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  6. A silicon retina that reproduces signals in the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Kareem A; Boahen, Kwabena

    2006-12-01

    Prosthetic devices may someday be used to treat lesions of the central nervous system. Similar to neural circuits, these prosthetic devices should adapt their properties over time, independent of external control. Here we describe an artificial retina, constructed in silicon using single-transistor synaptic primitives, with two forms of locally controlled adaptation: luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Both forms of adaptation rely on local modulation of synaptic strength, thus meeting the criteria of internal control. Our device is the first to reproduce the responses of the four major ganglion cell types that drive visual cortex, producing 3600 spiking outputs in total. We demonstrate how the responses of our device's ganglion cells compare to those measured from the mammalian retina. Replicating the retina's synaptic organization in our chip made it possible to perform these computations using a hundred times less energy than a microprocessor-and to match the mammalian retina in size and weight. With this level of efficiency and autonomy, it is now possible to develop fully implantable intraocular prostheses.

  7. A digital retina-like low-level vision processor.

    PubMed

    Mertoguno, S; Bourbakis, N G

    2003-01-01

    This correspondence presents the basic design and the simulation of a low level multilayer vision processor that emulates to some degree the functional behavior of a human retina. This retina-like multilayer processor is the lower part of an autonomous self-organized vision system, called Kydon, that could be used on visually impaired people with a damaged visual cerebral cortex. The Kydon vision system, however, is not presented in this paper. The retina-like processor consists of four major layers, where each of them is an array processor based on hexagonal, autonomous processing elements that perform a certain set of low level vision tasks, such as smoothing and light adaptation, edge detection, segmentation, line recognition and region-graph generation. At each layer, the array processor is a 2D array of k/spl times/m hexagonal identical autonomous cells that simultaneously execute certain low level vision tasks. Thus, the hardware design and the simulation at the transistor level of the processing elements (PEs) of the retina-like processor and its simulated functionality with illustrative examples are provided in this paper.

  8. Glaucoma related Proteomic Alterations in Human Retina Samples

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Sebastian; Perumal, Natarajan; Beck, Sabine; Gabel-Scheurich, Silke; Schmelter, Carsten; Teister, Julia; Gerbig, Claudia; Gramlich, Oliver W.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma related proteomic changes have been documented in cell and animal models. However, proteomic studies investigating on human retina samples are still rare. In the present work, retina samples of glaucoma and non-glaucoma control donors have been examined by a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) workflow to uncover glaucoma related proteomic changes. More than 600 proteins could be identified with high confidence (FDR < 1%) in human retina samples. Distinct proteomic changes have been observed in 10% of proteins encircling mitochondrial and nucleus species. Numerous proteins showed a significant glaucoma related level change (p < 0.05) or distinct tendency of alteration (p < 0.1). Candidates were documented to be involved in cellular development, stress and cell death. Increase of stress related proteins and decrease of new glaucoma related candidates, ADP/ATP translocase 3 (ANT3), PC4 and SRFS1-interacting protein 1 (DFS70) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCp2) could be documented by MS. Moreover, candidates could be validated by Accurate Inclusion Mass Screening (AIMS) and immunostaining and supported for the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) by laser capture microdissection (LCM) in porcine and human eye cryosections. The workflow allowed a detailed view into the human retina proteome highlighting new molecular players ANT3, DFS70 and MeCp2 associated to glaucoma. PMID:27425789

  9. A silicon retina that reproduces signals in the optic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2006-12-01

    Prosthetic devices may someday be used to treat lesions of the central nervous system. Similar to neural circuits, these prosthetic devices should adapt their properties over time, independent of external control. Here we describe an artificial retina, constructed in silicon using single-transistor synaptic primitives, with two forms of locally controlled adaptation: luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Both forms of adaptation rely on local modulation of synaptic strength, thus meeting the criteria of internal control. Our device is the first to reproduce the responses of the four major ganglion cell types that drive visual cortex, producing 3600 spiking outputs in total. We demonstrate how the responses of our device's ganglion cells compare to those measured from the mammalian retina. Replicating the retina's synaptic organization in our chip made it possible to perform these computations using a hundred times less energy than a microprocessor—and to match the mammalian retina in size and weight. With this level of efficiency and autonomy, it is now possible to develop fully implantable intraocular prostheses.

  10. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  11. Current-evoked transcellular K+ flux in frog retina.

    PubMed

    Karwoski, C J; Coles, J A; Lu, H K; Huang, B

    1989-05-01

    1. Changes in extracellular K+ concentration (delta[K+]o) evoked by electrical current were measured with K+-selective microelectrodes (K-ISMs) in the retina of the frog eyecup. 2. In the superfusate at 20 microns above the inner limiting membrane (ILM), current-evoked delta[K+] was a function of current polarity and strength; its amplitude decreased as the K-ISM was moved higher above the ILM. Responses were similar whether measured with K-ISMs containing the Corning exchanger or a valinomycin-based liquid membrane. No current-evoked delta[Ca2+] could be detected with Ca-selective microelectrodes (Ca-ISMs). 3. Within the retina, a complex spatiotemporal profile of current-evoked delta[K+]o was observed. Strophanthidin abolished responses in the proximal retina, but had little effect on the response in the superfusate. A blocker of K+ channels (Ba2+) depressed responses in the superfusate, but not in the proximal retina. 4. Quantitative analysis of these responses indicates a transport number for K+ of 0.18 at onset of current, and that decreases over a few seconds. In contrast, a transport number of approximately 0.01 is predicted from the expected ionic concentrations within extracellular space. 5. These findings are compatible with the delta[K+] above the ILM being due to transcellular movement of K+ through Müller cells. The results suggest that K+ spatial buffering may be particularly potent in the retina. Furthermore, determinations of tissue characteristics by passage of electrical current must take into account that at least 17% of the current does not travel through extracellular space.

  12. Immunocytochemical analysis of photoreceptors in the tiger salamander retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    In the tiger salamander retina, visual signals are transmitted to the inner retina via six morphologically distinct types of photoreceptors: large/small rods, large/small single cones, and double cones composed of principal and accessory members. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology of these photoreceptors and their synaptic interconnection with bipolar cells and horizontal cells in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Here we showed that glutamate antibodies labeled all photoreceptors and recoverin antibodies strongly labeled all cones and weakly labeled all rods. Antibodies against calbindin selectively stained accessory members of double cones. Antibodies against S-cone opsin stained small rods, a subpopulation of small single cones, and the outer segments of accessory double cones and a subtype of unidentified single cones. On average, large rods and small S-cone opsin positive rods accounted for 98.6% and 1.4% of all rods, respectively. Large/small cones, principle/accessory double cones, S-cone opsin positive small single cones, and S-cone opsin positive unidentified single cones accounted for about 66.9%, 23%, 4.5%, and 5.6% of the total cones, respectively. Moreover, the differential connection between rods/cones and bipolar/horizontal cells and the wide distribution of AMPA receptor subunits GluR2/3 and GluR4 at the rod/cone synapses were observed. These results provide anatomical evidence for the physiological findings that bipolar/horizontal cells in the salamander retina are driven by rod/cone inputs of different weights, and that AMPA receptors play an important role in glutamatergic neurotransmission at the first visual synapses. The different photoreceptors selectively contacting bipolar and horizontal cells support the idea that visual signals may be conveyed to the inner retina by different functional pathways in the outer retina. PMID:18977238

  13. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina.

    PubMed

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, 'BPD' group) or room air (21% O2, 'control' group) from postnatal day 4-14 (P4-14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=-0.49,P=0.02) and retina (r=-0.70,P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia. PMID:26988760

  14. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, ‘BPD’ group) or room air (21% O2, ‘control’ group) from postnatal day 4–14 (P4–14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=−0.49, P=0.02) and retina (r=−0.70, P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia. PMID:26988760

  15. Diosmin Protects Rat Retina from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nianting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Gong, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lili

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Diosmin, a natural flavone glycoside, possesses antioxidant activity and has been used to alleviate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the administration of diosmin has a protective effect against I/R injury induced using the high intraocular pressure (IOP) model in rat retina, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanisms involved. Methods Retinal I/R injury was induced in the rats by elevating the IOP to 110 mmHg for 60 min. Diosmin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) in the retinal tissues were determined 24 h after I/R injury. At 7 days post-I/R injury, electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded, and the density of surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was estimated by counting retrograde tracer-labeled cells in whole-mounted retinas. Retinal histological changes were also examined and quantified using light microscopy. Results Diosmin significantly decreased the MDA levels and increased the activities of T-SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the retina of rats compared with the ischemia group (P<0.05), and suppressed the I/R-induced reduction in the a- and b-wave amplitudes of the ERG (P<0.05). The thickness of the entire retina, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer, and outer retinal layer and the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer were significantly less after I/R injury (P<0.05), and diosmin remarkably ameliorated these changes on retinal morphology. Diosmin also attenuated the I/R-induced loss of RGCs of the rat retina (P<0.05). Conclusion Diosmin protected the retina from I/R injury, possibly via a mechanism involving the regulation of oxidative parameters. PMID:22509733

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  17. An analog VLSI chip emulating polarization vision of Octopus retina.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Massoud; Titus, Albert H

    2006-01-01

    Biological systems provide a wealth of information which form the basis for human-made artificial systems. In this work, the visual system of Octopus is investigated and its polarization sensitivity mimicked. While in actual Octopus retina, polarization vision is mainly based on the orthogonal arrangement of its photoreceptors, our implementation uses a birefringent micropolarizer made of YVO4 and mounted on a CMOS chip with neuromorphic circuitry to process linearly polarized light. Arranged in an 8 x 5 array with two photodiodes per pixel, each consuming typically 10 microW, this circuitry mimics both the functionality of individual Octopus retina cells by computing the state of polarization and the interconnection of these cells through a bias-controllable resistive network.

  18. [Cataract extraction and blue light--impact on the retina].

    PubMed

    Engelmann, K; Funk, R H

    2009-10-01

    This review focuses on the scientific background for the use of "yellow artificial lenses". We will address the fact that numerous basic scientific publications point to a rationale for this practice although it is often difficult to derive clear-cut evidence from clinical epidemiological studies for the preventive use of yellow artificial lenses. In the first part we refer to studies showing that especially the shortwave part of the visible spectrum of light can be harmful for the retina and optic nerve. For this, we have screened the literature for the major sources of radical production and for the targets of oxidative stress after impingement of "blue light" on the retina. Furthermore, we can show that many studies in cell and molecular biology, animal experiments and first clinical trials point to a preferential use of yellow-tinted lenses especially in the elderly and AMD patients.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  20. Surface mechanics mediate pattern formation in the developing retina.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Carthew, Richard W

    2004-10-01

    Pattern formation of biological structures involves organizing different types of cells into a spatial configuration. In this study, we investigate the physical basis of biological patterning of the Drosophila retina in vivo. We demonstrate that E- and N-cadherins mediate apical adhesion between retina epithelial cells. Differential expression of N-cadherin within a sub-group of retinal cells (cone cells) causes them to form an overall shape that minimizes their surface contact with surrounding cells. The cells within this group, in both normal and experimentally manipulated conditions, pack together in the same way as soap bubbles do. The shaping of the cone cell group and packing of its components precisely imitate the physical tendency for surfaces to be minimized. Thus, simple patterned expression of N-cadherin results in a complex spatial pattern of cells owing to cellular surface mechanics. PMID:15470418

  1. A new silicon retina model and its advantages.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kuntal; Sarkar, Sandip; Bhaumik, Kamales

    2005-01-01

    A new model of silicon retina based on the receptive field structure of retinal ganglion cells has been proposed. Unlike previous neuromorphic models, the proposed model directly incorporates into the receptive field model, contribution from both the inner and outer plexiform layer of the retina, as a linear combination of the two. It has been shown that such a system is capable of aiding in the computation of zero-crossing maps, in higher regions of the brain, using a fourth or higher order derivative. This model is likely to have a neuromorphic implication in generating and implementing a simplistic derivative analyzer mimetic of the Human Visual system (HVS) and is also endowed with additional advantages from the perspective of image retrieval.

  2. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  3. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  4. The Retina and Other Light-sensitive Ocular Clocks.

    PubMed

    Besharse, Joseph C; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-06-01

    Ocular clocks, first identified in the retina, are also found in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), cornea, and ciliary body. The retina is a complex tissue of many cell types and considerable effort has gone into determining which cell types exhibit clock properties. Current data suggest that photoreceptors as well as inner retinal neurons exhibit clock properties with photoreceptors dominating in nonmammalian vertebrates and inner retinal neurons dominating in mice. However, these differences may in part reflect the choice of circadian output, and it is likely that clock properties are widely dispersed among many retinal cell types. The phase of the retinal clock can be set directly by light. In nonmammalian vertebrates, direct light sensitivity is commonplace among body clocks, but in mice only the retina and cornea retain direct light-dependent phase regulation. This distinguishes the retina and possibly other ocular clocks from peripheral oscillators whose phase depends on the pace-making properties of the hypothalamic central brain clock, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, in mice, retinal circadian oscillations dampen quickly in isolation due to weak coupling of its individual cell-autonomous oscillators, and there is no evidence that retinal clocks are directly controlled through input from other oscillators. Retinal circadian regulation in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates uses melatonin and dopamine as dark- and light-adaptive neuromodulators, respectively, and light can regulate circadian phase indirectly through dopamine signaling. The melatonin/dopamine system appears to have evolved among nonmammalian vertebrates and retained with modification in mammals. Circadian clocks in the eye are critical for optimum visual function where they play a role fine tuning visual sensitivity, and their disruption can affect diseases such as glaucoma or retinal degeneration syndromes. PMID:27095816

  5. Parallel information processing channels created in the retina.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Peter H

    2010-10-01

    In the retina, several parallel channels originate that extract different attributes from the visual scene. This review describes how these channels arise and what their functions are. Following the introduction four sections deal with these channels. The first discusses the "ON" and "OFF" channels that have arisen for the purpose of rapidly processing images in the visual scene that become visible by virtue of either light increment or light decrement; the ON channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light increment and the OFF channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light decrement. The second section examines the midget and parasol channels. The midget channel processes fine detail, wavelength information, and stereoscopic depth cues; the parasol channel plays a central role in processing motion and flicker as well as motion parallax cues for depth perception. Both these channels have ON and OFF subdivisions. The third section describes the accessory optic system that receives input from the retinal ganglion cells of Dogiel; these cells play a central role, in concert with the vestibular system, in stabilizing images on the retina to prevent the blurring of images that would otherwise occur when an organism is in motion. The last section provides a brief overview of several additional channels that originate in the retina.

  6. Neurodegeneration in Diabetic Retina and Its Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes causing vision loss and blindness worldwide. DR is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease as evidenced from early changes at cellular and molecular levels in the neuronal component of the diabetic retina, which is further supported by various retinal functional tests indicating functional deficits in the retina soon after diabetes progression. Diabetes alters the level of a number of neurodegenerative metabolites, which increases influx through several metabolic pathways which in turn induce an increase in oxidative stress and a decrease in neurotrophic factors, thereby damage retinal neurons. Loss of neurons may implicate in vascular pathology, a clinical signs of DR observed at later stages of the disease. Here, we discuss diabetes-induced potential metabolites known to be detrimental to neuronal damage and their mechanism of action. In addition, we highlight important neurotrophic factors, whose level have been found to be dysregulated in diabetic retina and may damage neurons. Furthermore, we discuss potential drugs and strategies based on targeting diabetes-induced metabolites, metabolic pathways, oxidative stress, and neurotrophins to protect retinal neurons, which may ameliorate vision loss and vascular damage in DR. PMID:25342945

  7. Photoreceptor types and distributions in the retinae of insectivores.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Künzle, H; Vogel, P

    2000-01-01

    The retinae of insectivores have been rarely studied, and their photoreceptor arrangements and expression patterns of visual pigments are largely unknown. We have determined the presence and distribution of cones in three species of shrews (common shrew Sorex araneus, greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula, dark forest shrew Crocidura poensis; Soricidae) and in the lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi (Tenrecidae). Special cone types were identified and quantified in flattened whole retinae by antisera/antibodies recognizing the middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/L-)cone opsin and the short-wavelength-sensitive (S-)cone opsin, respectively. A combination of immunocytochemistry with conventional histology was used to assess rod densities and cone/rod ratios. In all four species the rods dominate at densities of about 230,000-260,000/mm2. M/L- and S-cones are present, comprising between 2% of the photoreceptors in the nocturnal Echinops telfairi and 13% in Sorex araneus that has equal diurnal and nocturnal activity phases. This suggests dichromatic color vision like in many other mammals. A striking feature in all four species are dramatically higher S-cone proportions in ventral than in dorsal retina (0.5% vs. 2.5-12% in Sorex, 5-15% vs. 30-45% in Crocidura poensis, 3-12% vs. 20-50% in Crocidura russula, 10-30% vs. 40-70% in Echinops). The functional and comparative aspects of these structural findings are discussed.

  8. Targeted microinjection into cells and retina using optoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-12-01

    The laser microbeam has enabled highly precise noncontact delivery of exogenous materials into targeted cells without compromising cell viability, which has been a highly challenging task for traditional methods. Here, we report targeted delivery of impermeable substances into mammalian cells and goldfish retinal explants subsequent to ultrafast laser microbeam assisted injection. Introduction of impermeable dye into the cell through localized pore formation was confirmed by distinct fluorescence at the site of pore formation on the membrane and its spatiotemporal diffusion pattern through the nucleus. Indirect optoporation by bubble formation, external to cell, led to a similar spatial diffusion pattern but with a larger time constant for injection. Using optimized laser intensity, exposure, and a spatial irradiation pattern, desired spatial transfection patterns in goldfish retina explants were achieved as confirmed by the expression of injected plasmids encoded for light-activable channelrhodopsin-2 ion-channel, tagged with fluorescent protein. Laser assisted delivery of exogenous material into a specific area of three-dimensional neuronal tissue, such as the retina, will help to understand the functioning of neuronal circuitry of normal and degenerated retina.

  9. In vivo intrinsic optical signal imaging of mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging is a promising noninvasive method for advanced study and diagnosis of eye diseases. Before pursuing clinical applications, more IOS studies employing animal models are necessary to establish the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. Ample mouse models are available for investigating the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. However, in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas is challenging due to the small ocular lens (compared to frog eyes) and inevitable eye movements. We report here in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas using a custom-designed functional OCT. The OCT system provided high resolution (3 μm) and high speed (up to 500 frames/s) imaging of mouse retinas. An animal holder equipped with a custom designed ear bar and bite bar was used to minimize eye movement due to breathing and heartbeats. Residual eye movement in OCT images was further compensated by accurate image registration. Dynamic OCT imaging revealed rapid IOSs from photoreceptor outer segments immediately (<10 ms) after the stimulation delivery, and unambiguous IOS changes were also observed from inner retinal layers with delayed time courses compared to that of photoreceptor IOSs.

  10. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina.

    PubMed

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-02-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.

  11. Parallel information processing channels created in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, several parallel channels originate that extract different attributes from the visual scene. This review describes how these channels arise and what their functions are. Following the introduction four sections deal with these channels. The first discusses the “ON” and “OFF” channels that have arisen for the purpose of rapidly processing images in the visual scene that become visible by virtue of either light increment or light decrement; the ON channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light increment and the OFF channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light decrement. The second section examines the midget and parasol channels. The midget channel processes fine detail, wavelength information, and stereoscopic depth cues; the parasol channel plays a central role in processing motion and flicker as well as motion parallax cues for depth perception. Both these channels have ON and OFF subdivisions. The third section describes the accessory optic system that receives input from the retinal ganglion cells of Dogiel; these cells play a central role, in concert with the vestibular system, in stabilizing images on the retina to prevent the blurring of images that would otherwise occur when an organism is in motion. The last section provides a brief overview of several additional channels that originate in the retina. PMID:20876118

  12. DNA repair synthesis in the rat retina following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, L.M.; Jose, J.G.; Pitts, D.G.

    1985-03-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to study the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the retina of albino rats following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation. Relative to background labeling in unexposed eyes, there was 8-20 times as much label per unit area in the outer nuclear layer, inner nuclear layer, and ganglion cells of 300-nm exposed retinas. The photoreceptor inner segments also showed thymidine labeling in both control and exposed retinas.

  13. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  14. Retinas from albino rats are more susceptible to ischaemic damage than age-matched pigmented animals.

    PubMed

    Safa, R; Osborne, N N

    2000-04-17

    Age- and sex-matched pigmented (Lister Hooded) and albino (Wistar) rats were used in this study. The retinas of the animals were subjected to pressure-induced ischaemia (35 min, 120 mmHg) and reperfusion (3 days) in precisely the same way. The b-wave of the electroretinogram (ERG) in the pigmented animals recovered to normal levels while those of the albino rats were reduced by more than 80%. Moreover, the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity associated with a sub-set of amacrine cells was almost completely obliterated in the retinas from the albino rats but unaffected in the retinas of the pigmented rats. Also, in certain areas of the retina from albino rats there was a suggestion that the calretinin-immunoreactivity was affected. This was never seen in the retinas of the pigmented animals. The GABA-immunoreactivity in the retina of both albino and pigmented rats appeared to be unaffected by ischaemia/reperfusion. The data presented show that retinas from albino rats are more susceptible to ischaemia/reperfusion than retinas from pigmented animals. The results also show that reduction of the b-wave of the ERG and changes in the nature of the ChAT immunoreactivity represent sensitive markers to detect the effect of ischaemia/reperfusion to the retina.

  15. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor 1A expression in the retina of the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2015-06-01

    The dual development of the retina of lampreys is exceptional among vertebrates and offers an interesting EvoDevo (evolutionary developmental biology) model for understanding the origin and evolution of the vertebrate retina. Only a single type of photoreceptor, ganglion cell and bipolar cell are present in the early-differentiated central retina of lamprey prolarvae. A lateral retina appears later in medium-sized larvae (about 3 years after hatching in the sea lamprey), growing and remaining largely neuroblastic until metamorphosis. In this lateral retina, only ganglion cells and optic fibers differentiate in larvae, whereas differentiation of amacrine, horizontal, photoreceptor and bipolar cells mainly takes place during metamorphosis, which gives rise to the adult retina. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter found in the retina of vertebrates whose synthesis is mediated by the rate-limiting enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). TPH is also the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathways of melatonin in photoreceptor cells. The serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) is a major determinant of the activity of both serotonergic cells and their targets due to its pre- and post-synaptic location. Here, we report the developmental pattern of expression of tph and 5-ht1a transcripts in the sea lamprey retina by means of in situ hybridization. In larvae, strong tph mRNA signal was observed in photoreceptors and putative ganglion cells of the central retina, and in some neuroblasts of the lateral retina. In adults, strong tph expression was observed in bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells and in photoreceptors. In the prolarval (central) retina, all the differentiated retinal cells expressed 5-ht1a transcripts, which were not observed in undifferentiated cells. In larvae, photoreceptors, bipolar cells and ganglion cells in the central retina, and neuroblasts in the lateral retina, showed 5-ht1a expression. In the adult retina, expression of 5-ht1a transcript

  16. Wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, ELIZABETH S.; BORDT, ANDREA S.; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the wide-field ganglion cells, they were injected intracellularly with Neurobiotin using an in vitro preparation of macaque retina and labeled with streptavidin-Cy3. The retinas were then labeled with antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and other markers to indicate the depth of the dendrites within the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and analyzed by confocal microscopy. There were eight different subtypes of narrowly unistratified cells that ramified in each of the 5 strata, S1–5, including narrow thorny, large sparse, large moderate, large dense, large radiate, narrow wavy, large very sparse, and fine very sparse. There were four types of broadly stratified cells with dendritic trees extending from S4 to S2. One type resembled the parvocellular giant cell and another the broad thorny type described previously in primates. Another broadly stratified cell was called multi-tufted based on its distinctive dendritic branching pattern. The fourth type had been described previously, but not named; we called it broad wavy. There was a bistratified type with its major arbor in S5, the same level as the blue cone bipolar cell; it resembled the large, bistratified cell with blue ON-yellow OFF responses described recently. Two wide-field ganglion cell types were classified as diffuse because they had dendrites throughout the IPL. One had many small branches and was named thorny diffuse. The second was named smooth diffuse because it had straighter dendrites that lacked these processes. Dendrites of the large moderate and multi-tufted cells cofasciculated with ON-starburst cell dendrites and were, therefore, candidates to be ON- and ON–OFF direction-selective ganglion cells, respectively. We concluded that there are at least 15 morphoplogical types of wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas. PMID:16212697

  17. Circuitry for color coding in the primate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Dacey, D M

    1996-01-01

    Human color vision starts with the signals from three cone photoreceptor types, maximally sensitive to long (L-cone), middle (M-cone), and short (S-cone) wavelengths. Within the retina these signals combine in an antagonistic way to form red-green and blue-yellow spectral opponent pathways. In the classical model this antagonism is thought to arise from the convergence of cone type-specific excitatory and inhibitory inputs to retinal ganglion cells. The circuitry for spectral opponency is now being investigated using an in vitro preparation of the macaque monkey retina. Intracellular recording and staining has shown that blue-ON/yellow-OFF opponent responses arise from a distinctive bistratified ganglion cell type. Surprisingly, this cone opponency appears to arise by dual excitatory cone bipolar cell inputs: an ON bipolar cell that contacts only S-cones and an OFF bipolar cell that contacts L- and M-cones. Red-green spectral opponency has long been linked to the midget ganglion cells, but an underlying mechanism remains unclear. For example, receptive field mapping argues for segregation of L-and M-cone signals to the midget cell center and surround, but horizontal cell interneurons, believed to generate the inhibitory surround, lack opponency and cannot contribute selective L- or M-cone input to the midget cell surround. The solution to this color puzzle no doubt lies in the great diversity of cell types in the primate retina that still await discovery and analysis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:8570599

  18. Inflamed In Vitro Retina: Cytotoxic Neuroinflammation and Galectin-3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patrik Maximilian; Zalis, Marina Castro; Abdshill, Hodan; Deierborg, Tomas; Johansson, Fredrik; Englund-Johansson, Ulrica

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease progression in retinal neurodegeneration is strongly correlated to immune cell activation, which may have either a neuroprotective or neurotoxic effect. Increased knowledge about the immune response profile and retinal neurodegeneration may lead to candidate targets for treatments. Therefore, we have used the explanted retina as a model to explore the immune response and expression of the immune modulator galectin-3 (Gal-3), induced by the cultivation per se and after additional immune stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how this correlates with retinal neurotoxicity. Methods Post-natal mouse retinas were cultured in a defined medium. One group was stimulated with LPS (100 ng/ml, 24 h). Retinal architecture, apoptotic cell death, and micro- and macroglial activity were studied at the time of cultivation (0 days in vitro (DIV)) and at 3, 4 and 7 DIV using morphological staining, biochemical- and immunohistochemical techniques. Results Our results show that sustained activation of macro- and microglia, characterized by no detectable cytokine release and limited expression of Gal-3, is not further inducing apoptosis additional to the axotomy-induced apoptosis in innermost nuclear layer. An elevated immune response was detected after LPS stimulation, as demonstrated primarily by release of immune mediators (i.e. interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-6, KC/GRO (also known as CLCX1) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)), increased numbers of microglia displaying morphologies of late activation stages as well as Gal-3 expression. This was accompanied with increased apoptosis in the two additional nuclear layers, and damage to retinal gross architecture. Conclusion We demonstrate that an immune response characterized by sustained and increased release of cytokines, along with an increase in Gal-3 expression, is accompanied by significant increased neurotoxicity in the explanted retina. Further investigations using the current setting may lead to

  19. Rod Photoreceptor Differentiation in Fetal and Infant Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Anita; Bumsted-O'Brien, Keely; Natoli, Riccardo; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Possin, Daniel; Provis, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Human rods and cones are arranged in a precise spatial mosaic that is critical for optimal functioning of the visual system. However, the molecular processes that underpin specification of cell types within the mosaic are poorly understood. The progressive differentiation of human rods was tracked from fetal week (Fwk) 9 to postnatal (P) 8 months using immunocytochemical markers of key molecules that represent rod progression from post-mitotic precursors to outer segment-bearing functional photoreceptors. We find two phases associated with rod differentiation. The early phase begins in rods on the foveal edge at Fwk 10.5 when rods are first identified, and the rod-specific proteins NRL and NR2e3 are detected. By Fwk 11-12, these rods label for interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein, recoverin, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1. The second phase occurs over the next month with the appearance of rod opsin at Fwk 15, closely followed by the outer segment proteins rod GTP-gated sodium channel and peripherin. TULP is expressed relatively late at Fwk 18-20 in rods. Each phase proceeds across the retina in a central-peripheral order, such that rods in far peripheral retina are only entering the early phase at the same time that cells in central retina are entering their late phase. During the second half of gestation rods undergo an intracellular reorganization of these proteins, and cellular and OS elongation which continues into infancy. The progression of rod development shown here provides insight into the possible mechanisms underlying human retinal visual dysfunction when there are mutations affecting key rod-related molecules. PMID:18778702

  20. Measuring In Vivo Free Radical Production by the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Bredell, Bryce X.; Davis, Christopher; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Excessive and continuously produced free radicals in the outer retina are implicated in retinal aging and the pathogenesis of sight-threatening retinopathies, yet measuring outer retinal oxidative stress in vivo remains a challenge. Here, we test the hypothesis that continuously produced paramagnetic free radicals from the outer retina can be measured in vivo using high-resolution (22-μm axial resolution) 1/T1magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without and with a confirmatory quench (quench-assisted MRI). Methods Low-dose sodium iodate–treated and diabetic C57Bl6/J mice (and their controls), and rod-dominated (129S6) or cone-only R91W;Nrl−/− mice were studied. In dark-adapted groups, 1/T1 was mapped transretinally in vivo without or with (1) the antioxidant combination of methylene blue (MB) and α-lipoic acid (LPA), or (2) light exposure; in subgroups, retinal superoxide production was measured ex vivo (lucigenin). Results In the sodium iodate model, retinal superoxide production and outer retina-specific 1/T1 values were both significantly greater than normal and corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. Nondiabetic mice at two ages and 1.2-month diabetic mice (before the appearance of oxidative stress) had similar transretinal 1/T1 profiles. By 2.3 months of diabetes, only outer retinal 1/T1 values were significantly greater than normal and were corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. In mice with healthy photoreceptors, a light quench caused 1/T1 of rods, but not cones, to significantly decrease from their values in the dark. Conclusions Quench-assisted MRI is a feasible method for noninvasively measuring normal and pathologic production of free radicals in photoreceptors/RPE in vivo. PMID:26670830

  1. Regulation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tosini, Gianluca; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Michael Iuvone, P

    2006-01-01

    Melatonin synthesis in retinal photoreceptors is under photic and circadian control and is regulated primarily by changes in the activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). Previous investigations demonstrated that Aanat transcripts are predominantly expressed in the photoreceptor cells. AANAT activity is high at night and low during the day, and illumination of the retina during the night induces rapid reduction in the activity of this enzyme. The enzyme is subject to both transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms. AANAT transcription is regulated directly by the circadian clock via the E-box present in the promoter region of the gene; the photic environment and circadian clock also influence AANAT transcription via cAMP-responsive elements. The stability of AANAT is regulated by cAMP, and light, which decreases cAMP levels in photoreceptor cells, results in rapid degradation of AANAT protein by proteasomal proteolysis. The circadian rhythm in the levels of Aanat mRNA in the rat retina persists after the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus has been lesioned, indicative of its relative independence from the master clock in the brain. In non-mammalian vertebrates, the retinal clock controlling melatonin synthesis is in photoreceptor cells, but it has not been definitively localized in mammals. Several studies have also shown that dopamine plays an important role in the regulation of AANAT activity by acting via D2/D4-like receptors that are present on the photoreceptors. Finally, it is important to mention that AANAT, in addition to its role in melatonin synthesis, may play a detoxification role in the vertebrate retina by acetylating arylalkylamines that may react with retinaldehyde.

  2. Efferent system in the retina of the frog, Rana catesbiana.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, K; Tsukahara, Y; Watanabe, M

    1978-12-01

    Single units were recorded through glass microelectrodes placed on the optic disk or on the retina of the opened eye of the frog (Rana catesbiana). Units were classified as A-, B-, and C-fibers according to conduction velocities. By the method of collision between naturally elicited and electrically elicited impulses, many of the B-fibers and some A- and C-fibers, which showed unusual behavior to photic stimulation, were found to be efferent fibers. Retinal effects of the efferent nerves were studied by repetitive stimulation and cooling of the optic nerve. The effects were found to be both inhibitory and excitatory. PMID:314669

  3. Dendrites of rod bipolar cells sprout in normal aging retina

    PubMed Central

    Liets, Lauren C.; Eliasieh, Kasra; van der List, Deborah A.; Chalupa, Leo M.

    2006-01-01

    The aging nervous system is known to manifest a variety of degenerative and regressive events. Here we report the unexpected growth of dendrites in the retinas of normal old mice. The dendrites of many rod bipolar cells in aging mice were observed to extend well beyond their normal strata within the outer plexiform layer to innervate the outer nuclear layer where they appeared to form contacts with the spherules of rod photoreceptors. Such dendritic sprouting increased with age and was evident at all retinal eccentricities. These results provide evidence of retinal plasticity associated with normal aging. PMID:16880381

  4. [Ketamine-induced ultrastructural changes in the retina].

    PubMed

    Magdolina, A

    1978-10-01

    Alterations of the retina caused by ketamin were studied in experiment. After a 60-minutes monoanaesthesia with ketamin ultrastructural changes were observed on the inner members of receptor cells, in the three nuclear layers and in the layer of nerve fibres. Severe damage to the structure of the Müller's glial cells providing nutrition to neural-elements was also revealed. Three days after the anaesthesia beside the regression of these alterations, glycogen deposits could be seen in the Müller's cells. This phenomenon and some side effects caused by ketamin can be explained by increased utilization of oxygen and relative hypoxia.

  5. Combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kanmin; Mellington, Faye; Gout, Irina; Rokerya, Sofia; Olurin, Oyinkan Ibironke; El-Amir, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of combined hamatoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (CHR-RPE), illustrated with ultrasonography, optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography images. CHR-RPE could clinically mimic several other retinal conditions. Failure to distinguish it from serious malignancies such as choroidal melanoma or retinoblastoma has led to unnecessary enucleation in the past. Through these case reports and a review of literature, we show the diagnostic features of CHR-RPE, its key differential diagnoses and the management options. PMID:23162024

  6. Rod-signal interneurons in the rabbit retina: 2. AII amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Gynther, I C; Young, H M

    1991-08-01

    AII amacrine cells, which are the third-order neurons in the rod pathway, can be differentially labelled in rabbit retina by injecting Nuclear Yellow into the posterior chamber. Under ultraviolet excitation, the labelled retina appears strongly metachromatic, with the AII nuclei fluorescing silvery-yellow and the nuclei of other amacrine cells fluorescing blue. Labelled AII cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow under direct microscopic control in a superfused retinal preparation, and the dye was later photoconverted to an opaque reaction product. Rabbit AII amacrines, which number about 525,000 cells, reach a maximum density of 2,500-3,000 cells/mm2 on the peak visual streak, dropping to 400-500 cells/mm2 at the superior margin. These narrow-field amacrines have a bistratified dendritic morphology, with distinctive "lobular appendages" in sublamina a of the inner plexiform layer and wider ranging "arboreal dendrites" in sublamina b. Although the lobular field area increases 10-fold from the visual streak to the far periphery, the lobular field coverage is almost uniform across the retina, averaging 1.0 in inferior retina and 0.8 in superior retina. The dendritic field area of the arboreal dendrites also increases with eccentricity from the visual streak, but there are pronounced differences between inferior and superior retina. The arboreal fields are 2 to 3 times larger than the lobular fields throughout the inferior retina but up to 15 times larger in the superior retina. The arboreal field overlap is only 1.8 at the peak visual streak, increasing slightly to about 2.4 over most of the inferior retina; the overlap increases sharply in the superior retina, however, reaching values of 10 or more in the far periphery. Both the lobular and arboreal fields of AII cells are spaced more regularly than the somata, thus covering apparent gaps in the somatic array. An analysis of the potential convergence and divergence between rod bipolar cells and AII amacrine cells in

  7. Multipurpose semistatic shift registers for digital programmable retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Thierry M.

    2000-05-01

    A digital programmable retina is a functional extension of a CMOS imager, in which every pixel is fitted with a tiny digital programmable processor. We actually call it a PAR, standing for Programmable Artificial Retina. From an architectural viewpoint, a PAR is a SIMD array processor with local optical input. A PAR is aimed at processing images on-site (where they are sensed) until they can be output from the array under concentrated form. The overall goal is to get compact, fast and inexpensive vision systems, e.g. for robotics applications. PAR design is subject to harsh constraints resulting from small pixel area and sensing/processing cohabitation. Meeting these constraints leads to using peculiar architectural and circuit technique solutions. In the last three generations of PARs we have designed, semi-static shift registers have played a crucial role in the maximization of computational power versus silicon area. In particular, the latter have been used to store, shift and--through some slight modifications--to perform local computations on images. Here, we show their abilities to support asynchronous propagation in order to implement `geodesic reconstruction', an extremely useful computational operator, in particular for image segmentation and then for object selection and manipulation purposes.

  8. Glycinergic feedback enhances synaptic gain in the distal retina

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Yang, Jinnan; Purpura, Lauren A; Liu, Yufei; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Glycine input originates with interplexiform cells, a group of neurons situated within the inner retina that transmit signals centrifugally to the distal retina. The effect on visual function of this novel mechanism is largely unknown. Using gramicidin-perforated patch whole cell recordings, intracellular recordings and specific antibody labelling techniques, we examined the effects of the synaptic connections between glycinergic interplexiform cells, photoreceptors and bipolar cells. To confirm that interplexiform cells make centrifugal feedback on bipolar cell dendrites, we recorded the postsynaptic glycine currents from axon-detached bipolar cells while stimulating presynaptic interplexiform cells. The results show that glycinergic interplexiform cells activate bipolar cell dendrites that express the α3 subunit of the glycine receptor, as well as a subclass of unidentified receptors on photoreceptors. By virtue of their synaptic contacts, glycine centrifugal feedback increases glutamate release from photoreceptors and suppresses the uptake of glutamate by the type 2A excitatory amino acid transporter on photoreceptors. The net effect is a significant increase in synaptic gain between photoreceptors and their second-order neurons. PMID:24421349

  9. Gap Junctions between Photoreceptor Cells in the Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Raviola, Elio; Gilula, Norton B.

    1973-01-01

    In the outer plexiform layer of the retina the synaptic endings of cone cells make specialized junctions with each other and with the endings of rod cells. The ultrastructure of these interreceptor junctions is described in retinas of monkeys, rabbits, and turtles, in thin sections of embedded specimens and by the freeze-fracturing technique. Cone-to-rod junctions are ribbon-like areas of close membrane approximation. On either side of the narrowing of the intercellular space, the junctional membranes contain a row of particles located on the fracture face A (cytoplasmic leaflet), while the complementary element, a row of single depressions, is located on fracture face B. The particle rows are surrounded by a membrane region that is devoid of particulate inclusions and bears an adherent layer of dense cytoplasmic material. Cone-to-cone junctions in some places are identical to cone-to-rod junctions, while in other places they closely resemble typical gap junctions (nexus). Interreceptor junctions, therefore, represent a morphological variant of the gap junction, and probably mediate electrotonic coupling between neighboring photoreceptor cells. Images PMID:4198274

  10. Random wiring in the midget pathway of primate retina.

    PubMed

    Jusuf, Patricia R; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2006-04-12

    The present study addresses the questions of how topographically organized neuronal populations are connected, and whether there is anatomical evidence for color-selective wiring in retinal pathways for red-green color vision. The connectivity of OFF midget bipolar and OFF midget ganglion cells was studied in the peripheral retina of dichromatic ("red-green color blind") and trichromatic ("color normal") marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Midget bipolar cells were identified immunohistochemically. Midget ganglion cells were retrogradely labeled from the lateral geniculate nucleus and photofilled. Comparable results were obtained from all retinas studied. Between 3 and 16 bipolar terminals converge onto each ganglion cell. Nearly all bipolar terminals investigated show regions of colocalization (areas of presumed synaptic contacts) with ganglion cell dendrites. This contact area makes up approximately 14% of the axon surface area for a typical midget bipolar cell. The output from individual midget bipolar axons is often shared between midget ganglion cells so that, on average, <70% of the axon terminal area of a midget bipolar cell shows overlap with the dendritic field of a given midget ganglion cell. We conclude that there is no morphological evidence of red-green color selectivity in the connections between midget bipolar and midget ganglion cell mosaics. Furthermore, the results suggest that convergence is based on local interactions between axons and dendrites rather than cell-by-cell recognition between members of each mosaic. PMID:16611806

  11. A Retina Inspired Model for Enhancing Visibility of Hazy Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian retina seems far smarter than scientists have believed so far. Inspired by the visual processing mechanisms in the retina, from the layer of photoreceptors to the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), we propose a computational model for haze removal from a single input image, which is an important issue in the field of image enhancement. In particular, the bipolar cells serve to roughly remove the low-frequency of haze, and the amacrine cells modulate the output of cone bipolar cells to compensate the loss of details by increasing the image contrast. Then the RGCs with disinhibitory receptive field surround refine the local haze removal as well as the image detail enhancement. Results on a variety of real-world and synthetic hazy images show that the proposed model yields results comparative to or even better than the state-of-the-art methods, having the advantage of simultaneous dehazing and enhancing of single hazy image with simple and straightforward implementation. PMID:26733857

  12. Third harmonic generation microscopy of a mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tim C.; Domingue, Scott R.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Bartels, Randy A.; Ammar, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate lipid-specific imaging of the retina through the use of third harmonic generation (THG), a multiphoton microscopic technique in which tissue contrast is generated from optical inhomogeneities. Methods A custom fiber laser and multiphoton microscope was constructed and optimized for simultaneous two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF) and THG retinal imaging. Imaging was performed using fixed-frozen sections of mouse eyes without the use of exogenous fluorescent dyes. In parallel experiments, a fluorescent nuclear stain was used to verify the location of the retinal cell nuclei. Results Simultaneous THG and TPAF images revealed all retinal layers with subcellular resolution. In BALB/c strains, the THG signal stems from the lipidic organelles of the cellular and nuclear membranes. In the C57BL/6 strain, the THG signal from the RPE cells originates from the pigmented granules. Conclusions THG microscopy can be used to image structures of the mouse retina using contrast inherent to the tissue and without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. PMID:25999681

  13. Pharmacological Analysis of Intrinsic Neuronal Oscillations in rd10 Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sonia; Haselier, Christine; Mataruga, Anja; Thumann, Gabriele; Walter, Peter; Müller, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the widely used mouse model of retinal degeneration, rd1, the loss of photoreceptors leads to rhythmic electrical activity of around 10–16 Hz in the remaining retinal network. Recent studies suggest that this oscillation is formed within the electrically coupled network of AII amacrine cells and ON-bipolar cells. A second mouse model, rd10, displays a delayed onset and slower progression of degeneration, making this mouse strain a better model for human retinitis pigmentosa. In rd10, oscillations occur at a frequency of 3–7 Hz, raising the question whether oscillations have the same origin in the two mouse models. As rd10 is increasingly being used as a model to develop experimental therapies, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the spontaneous rhythmic activity. To study the properties of oscillations in rd10 retina we combined multi electrode recordings with pharmacological manipulation of the retinal network. Oscillations were abolished by blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors and gap junctions. Frequency and amplitude of oscillations were modulated strongly by blockers of inhibitory receptors and to a lesser extent by blockers of HCN channels. In summary, although we found certain differences in the pharmacological modulation of rhythmic activity in rd10 compared to rd1, the overall pattern looked similar. This suggests that the generation of rhythmic activity may underlie similar mechanisms in rd1 and rd10 retina. PMID:24918437

  14. Crossover Inhibition Generates Sustained Visual Responses in the Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Juliana M.; Ruehle, Sabine; Ding, Huayu; Lagnado, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Summary In daylight, the input to the retinal circuit is provided primarily by cone photoreceptors acting as band-pass filters, but the retinal output also contains neuronal populations transmitting sustained signals. Using in vivo imaging of genetically encoded calcium reporters, we investigated the circuits that generate these sustained channels within the inner retina of zebrafish. In OFF bipolar cells, sustained transmission was found to depend on crossover inhibition from the ON pathway through GABAergic amacrine cells. In ON bipolar cells, the amplitude of low-frequency signals was regulated by glycinergic amacrine cells, while GABAergic inhibition regulated the gain of band-pass signals. We also provide the first functional description of a subset of sustained ON bipolar cells in which synaptic activity was suppressed by fluctuations at frequencies above ∼0.2 Hz. These results map out the basic circuitry by which the inner retina generates sustained visual signals and describes a new function of crossover inhibition. PMID:27068790

  15. An experimental platform for systemic drug delivery to the retina.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew; Nguyen, Anh T H; Kiang, Anna-Sophia; Tam, Lawrence C S; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Kerskens, Christian; Ni Dhubhghaill, Sorcha; Humphries, Marian M; Farrar, G-Jane; Kenna, Paul F; Humphries, Peter

    2009-10-20

    Degenerative retinopathies, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and hereditary retinal disorders--major causes of world blindness--are potentially treatable by using low-molecular weight neuroprotective, antiapoptotic, or antineovascular drugs. These agents are, however, not in current systemic use owing to, among other factors, their inability to passively diffuse across the microvasculature of the retina because of the presence of the inner blood-retina barrier (iBRB). Moreover, preclinical assessment of the efficacies of new formulations in the treatment of such conditions is similarly compromised. We describe here an experimental process for RNAi-mediated, size-selective, transient, and reversible modulation of the iBRB in mice to molecules up to 800 Da by suppression of transcripts encoding claudin-5, a protein component of the tight junctions of the inner retinal vasculature. MRI produced no evidence indicative of brain or retinal edema, and the process resulted in minimal disturbance of global transcriptional patterns analyzed in neuronal tissue. We show that visual function can be improved in IMPDH1(-/-) mice, a model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, and that the rate of photoreceptor cell death can be reduced in a model of light-induced retinal degeneration by systemic drug delivery after reversible barrier opening. These findings provide a platform for high-throughput drug screening in models of retinal degeneration, and they ultimately could result in the development of a novel "humanized" approach to therapy for conditions with little or no current forms of treatment.

  16. Raman detection of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2000-04-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel, non- invasive, in-vivo optical technique to measure the concentration of carotenoid pigment in the human retina. Using argon laser excitation we are able to measure two strong carotenoid resonance Raman signals at 1159 and 1525 wave numbers, respectively. The required laser power levels are within the limits given by safety standards for ocular exposure. Of the approximately ten carotenoid pigment found in normal human serum, the species lutein and zeaxanthin are concentrated in high amounts in the cells of the human macula, which is an approximately 5 mm diameter area of the retina in which the visual acuity is highest. These carotenoids give the macula a characteristic yellow coloration, and it is speculated that these molecules function as filter to attenuate photochemical damage and/or image degradation under bright UV/blue light exposures. In addition, they are thought to act as free-radical scavenging antioxidants. Studies have shown that there may be a link between macular degenerative diseases, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the US, and the presence or absence of the carotenoids. We describe an instrument capable of measuring the macular carotenoids in human subjects in a non-invasive, rapid and quantitative way.

  17. A new approach towards a minimal invasive retina implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerding, H.

    2007-03-01

    The possibility of using retina implants ('retinal prostheses') for the restoration of basic orientation in blind patients suffering from distal retinal diseases is presently under investigation by at least 18 independent project groups worldwide. It is a common feature of all implants to bypass degenerated retinal layers and to transfer visual information into the retinal network either by direct electrical stimulation or by neurotransmitter release. Contemporary implant designs are differing in the position of stimulating electrodes (epiretinal, subretinal, external) and the anatomical arrangement of implant components (intraocular, extraocular). The latter is of high relevance with regard to possible implant-tissue interactions and biological reactions. During the last few years new types of implants appeared that reduce intraocular components which are now deposited on the outer scleral surface or even in extraorbital position. The extreme of this trend are completely extraocular implants with transchoroidal or extraocular stimulation of the retina. The new type of implant presented in this paper combines the principle of direct retinal stimulation and minimal invasive implantation in a way that stimulating electrodes are the only implant component penetrating the eye via sclera, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. All other device elements are positioned in extraocular position. The new concept necessitates a paradigmatic change about surgical handling of the choroid and multiple penetrations of the eye. Successful data about this type of retinal prosthesis are already available from long-term observation in non-human primates.

  18. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina.

    PubMed

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients.

  19. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina.

    PubMed

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients. PMID:27389181

  20. Sector mapping method for 3D detached retina visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi-Ran; Zhao, Yong; Zhong, Jie; Li, Ke; Lu, Cui-Xin; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A new sphere-mapping algorithm called sector mapping is introduced to map sector images to the sphere of an eyeball. The proposed sector-mapping algorithm is evaluated and compared with the plane-mapping algorithm adopted in previous work. A simulation that maps an image of concentric circles to the sphere of the eyeball and an analysis of the difference in distance between neighboring points in a plane and sector were used to compare the two mapping algorithms. A three-dimensional model of a whole retina with clear retinal detachment was generated using the Visualization Toolkit software. A comparison of the mapping results shows that the central part of the retina near the optic disc is stretched and its edges are compressed when the plane-mapping algorithm is used. A better mapping result is obtained by the sector-mapping algorithm than by the plane-mapping algorithm in both the simulation results and real clinical retinal detachment three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:27480739

  1. Distribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome in the squid retina

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The cephalopod retina contains two kinds of photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. For many years retinochrome has been thought to be localized in the inner segments of the visual cells, whereas rhodopsin is in the outer segments. However, it is now clear that retinochrome can be extracted also from fragments of outer segments. In the dark- adapted retina of Loligo pealei retinochrome is distributed half-and- half in the inner and outer segments. Todarodes pacificus contains much more retinochrome than Loligo, and it is more abundant in the outer than in the inner segments. The outer segments of Loligo contain retinochrome and metarhodopsin in addition to rhodopsin, whether squids are kept in the dark or in the light. But there is extremely little metarhodopsin (about 3% of rhodopsin) even in light-adapted eyes. The inner segments contain only retinochrome, and much less in the light than in the dark. On the other hand, retinochrome in the outer segments increases markedly during light adaptation. These facts suggest the possibility that some retinochrome moves forward from the inner to the outer segments during light adaptation and there reacts with metarhodopsin to promote regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:6620

  2. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  3. Selenium dependent glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the retina of preterm human infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.; Hittner, H.; Barron, S.; Mehta, R.; Kretzer, F.

    1986-03-01

    GSH-Px activity was determined in the retina of 15 preterm human neonates with gestational ages of 17-28 weeks and birth weights of 120 to 960 g. GSH-Px activity was measured using the coupled assay. The infants survived from 0.5 to 9 hours after parturition. The retinas were removed within 3 hours of autopsy. Through electronmicroscopy, there was verification that the entire retina was removed and no contamination of other eye tissues occurred. After removal, the retinas were immediately dissolved in phosphate buffered pH 7.0 saline for assay of GSH-Px activity. The mean GSH-Px activity was 19.44 +/- 6.44 with a range of 11.1 to 32.8 units NAPH/sub 2/ oxidized/min/g protein. There was a negative correlation between birth weight and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.86) and between week of gestation and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.91). The neonatal retina GSH-Px activity was 2 to 15 times higher than found in adult retinas. Thus, this research demonstrates that selenium dependent GSH-Px activity is elevated in the preterm neonate's retina which indicates that retina GSH-Px activity may be an important antioxidation system in the premature neonate.

  4. EST mining of the UniGene dataset to identify retina-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, H; Mah, N; Schulz, H L; Gehrig, A; Fröhlich, S; Weber, B H

    2000-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disorder affecting the visual system with a high prevalence among the elderly population but with no effective therapy available at present. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disorder, the identification of the genetic factors and the determination of their contribution to AMD is needed. Towards this goal, we are pursuing a strategy that makes use of the EST data processed in the UniGene database and aims at the generation of a comprehensive catalogue of genes preferentially active in the human retina. Subsequently, these genes will be systematically assessed in AMD. We performed a retina EST sampling and obtained a total of 673 clusters containing only retina ESTs as well as 568 clusters with at least 30% of the ESTs in each cluster originating from retina cDNA libraries. Of these, 180 representative EST clusters with varying retina and non-retina EST contents were analyzed for their in vitro expression. This approach identified 39 transcripts with retina-specific expression. One of these genes (C18orf2) mapping to chromosome 18 was further characterized. Multiple C18orf2 transcripts display a complex pattern of differential splicing in the human retina. The various isoforms encode hypothetical polypeptides with no homologies to known proteins or protein motifs.

  5. [Intracellular localization of transcription factor PROX1 in the human retina in ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Markitantova, Iu V; Zinov'eva, R D

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal intracellular localization of the transcription factor PROX1 in the human retina during prenatal development (fetal weeks 9.5 to 31) and in the adult human retina was studied for the first time. The PROX1 protein was identified in the cell nuclei of the neuroblast retinal layers at the stage of active cell proliferation (fetal week 9.5) as well as in the nuclei of differentiating neurons of the inner nuclear retinal layer (horizontal, amacrine, and bipolar cells) from weeks 13 to 31 of prenatal development. The PROX1 protein localization in the adult retina was the same as at the late stage of prenatal development. Our results indicate the involvement of the transcription factor PROX1 in the regulation of proliferation of progenitor cells and differentiation of the inner nuclear layer cells of the human retina. These results confirm the conservative functions of Prox1/PROX1 in the vertebrate retina.

  6. Effects of Aging and Anatomic Location on Gene Expression in Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Fields, Mark A.; Hoshino, Risa; Priore, Lucian V. Del

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression in human neural retina. Methods: Macular and peripheral neural retina RNA was isolated from human donor eyes for DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Results: Total RNA integrity from human donors was preserved. Hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrates that the gene expression profiles of young, old, macula, and peripheral retina cluster into four distinct groups. Genes which are highly expressed in macular, peripheral, young, or old retina were identified, including inhibitors of Wnt Signaling Pathway (DKK1, FZD10, and SFRP2) which are preferably expressed in the periphery. Conclusion: The transcriptome of the human retina is affected by age and topographic location. Wnt pathway inhibitors in the periphery may maintain peripheral retinal cells in an undifferentiated state. Understanding the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for age-related eye diseases. PMID:22666212

  7. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  8. [Functional integrity of neural retina in 2. type diabetics].

    PubMed

    Beszédesová, N; Budinská, E; Skorkovská, S

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to investigate early defects in functional integrity of neural retina in 2. type diabetic patients without or with mild diabetic retinopathy (DR) since there is an evidence of early functional changes in neural retina before occurrence of clinical manifestation of DR. Psychophysical test of contrast sensitivity (CS) was used for the detection of these changes. Relation between CS and systemic risk factors (HbAlc, blood pressure (BP), serum lipids and BMI) were also evaluated during a follow-up time. There were 48 recent diabetics without DR included in this study that were examined 3 times and compared to 23 diabetics with mild DR. The CS tests were performed using both Sine Wave Contrast Test (SWCT) and Pelli-Robson (PR) test. The reference values for CS threshold were derived from a CS of a control group of 52 healthy individuals. Abnormal CS ascertained by both methods, SWCT and PR, was observed in diabetics with mild NPDR. In comparison to the control group, there was a statistically significant difference of CS in spatial frequencies (SF) of 1.5, 6, 12, 18 cycles per degree (cy/deg). In comparison to diabetics without DR there was a significant difference of CS in SF of 6, 12 and 18 cy/deg in diabetics with mild NPDR. Abnormal CS was noticed in 47.8% (SWCT) or 21.7% (PR) of diabetics with DR. Statistically significant influence of high systolic BP on CS values and visual acuity was noticed. There were no abnormalities in CS in patients without DR comparing to control group during the whole follow-up. However, there was an improvement of CS in SF of 18 cy/deg observed between 1. and 3. evaluation of CS. Interaction of change in values of HbAlc and total cholesterol to HDL ratio had significant influence on CS improvement. Diabetics without DR had significantly better diabetes and blood pressure control in comparison to the diabetics with DR. In conclusion, it was not proved in this study that CS test is

  9. Purinergic control of vascular tone in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2014-02-01

    Purinergic control of vascular tone in the CNS has been largely unexplored. This study examines the contribution of endogenous extracellular ATP, acting on vascular smooth muscle cells, in controlling vascular tone in the in vivo rat retina. Retinal vessels were labelled by i.v. injection of a fluorescent dye and imaged with scanning laser confocal microscopy. The diameters of primary arterioles were monitored under control conditions and following intravitreal injection of pharmacological agents. Apyrase (500 units ml(-1)), an ATP hydrolysing enzyme, dilated retinal arterioles by 40.4 ± 2.8%, while AOPCP (12.5 mm), an ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitor that increases extracellular ATP levels, constricted arterioles by 58.0 ± 3.8% (P < 0.001 for both), demonstrating the importance of ATP in the control of basal vascular tone. Suramin (500 μm), a broad-spectrum P2 receptor antagonist, dilated retinal arterioles by 50.9 ± 3.7% (P < 0.001). IsoPPADS (300 μm) and TNP-ATP (50 μm), more selective P2X antagonists, dilated arterioles by 41.0 ± 5.3% and 55.2 ± 6.1% respectively (P < 0.001 for both). NF023 (50 μm), a potent antagonist of P2X1 receptors, dilated retinal arterioles by 32.1 ± 2.6% (P < 0.001). A438079 (500 μm) and AZ10606120 (50 μm), P2X7 antagonists, had no effect on basal vascular tone (P = 0.99 and P = 1.00 respectively). In the ex vivo retina, the P2X1 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (300 nm) evoked sustained vasoconstrictions of 18.7 ± 3.2% (P < 0.05). In vivo vitreal injection of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate (150 μm) dilated retinal vessels by 52.3 ± 1.1% (P < 0.001) and inhibited the vasodilatory response to NF023 (50 μm, 7.9 ± 2.0%; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that vascular tone in rat retinal arterioles is maintained by tonic release of ATP from the retina. ATP acts on P2X1 receptors, although contributions from other P2X and P2Y receptors cannot be ruled out. Retinal glial cells are a possible source of the vasoconstricting ATP.

  10. Function and Circuitry of VIP+ Interneurons in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia J.H.; Borghuis, Bart G.; Rahmani, Pouyan; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Visual processing in the retina depends on coordinated signaling by interneurons. Photoreceptor signals are relayed to ∼20 ganglion cell types through a dozen excitatory bipolar interneurons, each responsive to light increments (ON) or decrements (OFF). ON and OFF bipolar cell pathways become tuned through specific connections with inhibitory interneurons: horizontal and amacrine cells. A major obstacle for understanding retinal circuitry is the unknown function of most of the ∼30–40 amacrine cell types, each of which synapses onto a subset of bipolar cell terminals, ganglion cell dendrites, and other amacrine cells. Here, we used a transgenic mouse line in which vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons express Cre recombinase. Targeted whole-cell recordings of fluorescently labeled VIP+ cells revealed three predominant types: wide-field bistratified and narrow-field monostratified cells with somas in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and medium-field monostratified cells with somas in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Bistratified INL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by both ON and OFF pathways with little spatial tuning. Narrow-field INL cells integrated excitation driven by the ON pathway and inhibition driven by both pathways, with pronounced hyperpolarizations at light offset. Monostratified GCL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by the ON pathway and showed center-surround spatial tuning. Optogenetic experiments showed that, collectively, VIP+ cells made strong connections with OFF δ, ON-OFF direction-selective, and W3 ganglion cells but weak, inconsistent connections with ON and OFF α cells. Revealing VIP+ cell morphologies, receptive fields and synaptic connections advances our understanding of their role in visual processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The retina is a model system for understanding nervous system function. At the first stage, rod and cone photoreceptors encode light and

  11. Neuronal cell types and connectivity: lessons from the retina

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H. Sebastian; Sümbül, Uygar

    2014-01-01

    We describe recent progress towards defining neuronal cell types in the mouse retina, and attempt to extract lessons that may be generally useful in the mammalian brain. Achieving a comprehensive catalog of retinal cell types now appears within reach, because researchers have achieved consensus concerning two fundamental challenges. The first is accuracy—defining pure cell types rather than settling for neuronal classes that are mixtures of types. The second is completeness—developing methods guaranteed to eventually identify all cell types, as well as criteria for determining when all types have been found. Case studies illustrate how these two challenges are handled by combining state-of-the-art molecular, anatomical and physiological techniques. Progress is also being made in observing and modeling connectivity between cell types. Scaling up to larger brain regions, such as the cortex, will require not only technical advances but careful consideration of the challenges of accuracy and completeness. PMID:25233310

  12. Visual system based on artificial retina for motion detection.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Díaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo; del Pino, Begoña

    2009-06-01

    We present a bioinspired model for detecting spatiotemporal features based on artificial retina response models. Event-driven processing is implemented using four kinds of cells encoding image contrast and temporal information. We have evaluated how the accuracy of motion processing depends on local contrast by using a multiscale and rank-order coding scheme to select the most important cues from retinal inputs. We have also developed some alternatives by integrating temporal feature results and obtained a new improved bioinspired matching algorithm with high stability, low error and low cost. Finally, we define a dynamic and versatile multimodal attention operator with which the system is driven to focus on different target features such as motion, colors, and textures.

  13. Resonant imaging of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Emakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.

    2002-06-01

    We have generated high spatial resolution images showing the distribution of carotenoid macular pigments in the human retina using Raman spectroscopy. A low level of macular pigments is associated with an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Using excised human eyecups and resonant excitation of the pigment molecules with narrow bandwidth blue light from a mercury arc lamp, we record Raman images originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids comprising human macular pigments. Our Raman images reveal significant differences among subjects, both in regard to absolute levels as well as spatial distribution within the macula. Since the light levels used to obtain these images are well below established safety limits, this technique holds promise for developing a rapid screening diagnostic in large populations at risk for vision loss from age-related macular degeneration.

  14. Label-free nonlinear optical imaging of mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Sicong; Ye, Cong; Sun, Qiqi; Leung, Christopher K.S.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) was developed to image fresh mouse retinas. The morphological and functional details of various retinal layers were revealed by the endogenous NLO signals. Particularly, high resolution label-free imaging of retinal neurons and nerve fibers in the ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers was achieved by capturing endogenous SRS and TPEF signals. In addition, the spectral and temporal analysis of TPEF images allowed visualization of different fluorescent components in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fluorophores with short TPEF lifetime, such as A2E, can be differentiated from other long-lifetime components in the RPE. The NLO imaging method would provide important information for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration and holds the potential to study the biochemical processes of visual cycle in the RPE. PMID:25798325

  15. Label-free nonlinear optical imaging of mouse retina.

    PubMed

    He, Sicong; Ye, Cong; Sun, Qiqi; Leung, Christopher K S; Qu, Jianan Y

    2015-03-01

    A nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) was developed to image fresh mouse retinas. The morphological and functional details of various retinal layers were revealed by the endogenous NLO signals. Particularly, high resolution label-free imaging of retinal neurons and nerve fibers in the ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers was achieved by capturing endogenous SRS and TPEF signals. In addition, the spectral and temporal analysis of TPEF images allowed visualization of different fluorescent components in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fluorophores with short TPEF lifetime, such as A2E, can be differentiated from other long-lifetime components in the RPE. The NLO imaging method would provide important information for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration and holds the potential to study the biochemical processes of visual cycle in the RPE.

  16. Using Stem Cells to Model Diseases of the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yvon, Camille; Ramsden, Conor M.; Lane, Amelia; Powner, Michael B.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J.; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration arises from the loss of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide with limited effective treatment options. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (IPSC)-derived retinal cells and tissues from individuals with retinal degeneration is a rapidly evolving technology that holds a great potential for its use in disease modelling. IPSCs provide an ideal platform to investigate normal and pathological retinogenesis, but also deliver a valuable source of retinal cell types for drug screening and cell therapy. In this review, we will provide some examples of the ways in which IPSCs have been used to model diseases of the outer retina including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Usher syndrome (USH), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), gyrate atrophy (GA), juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and age related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:26106463

  17. MARCKS in advanced stages of neural retina histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an actin-binding protein, is involved in several signal transduction pathways. It is susceptible to be phosphorylated by protein kinases as protein kinase C and some proline-directed kinases. These phosphorylations differently modulate its functions. We previously showed that a phosphorylation at its Ser25 (S25p-MARCKS) in chickens is a signature of this ubiquitous protein in neuron differentiation. To gain insight into the possible involvement of MARCKS in late retinal histogenesis, we compared the developmental expression patterns of the total protein and its S25p variants. Here we show that the most outstanding modifications occur at the outer retina, where S25p disappears at the end of embryonic development and where MARCKS is missing in adults. These results suggest diverse functional specializations in the different retinal layers.

  18. FDTD simulation of electromagnetic wave scattering from retina cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Samer S; Ramahi, Omar; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2007-01-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method was developed to model changes in the light scattering properties of retinal photoreceptors resulting from the functional response of living retina to external light stimulation. Physiological processes such as membrane hyper-polarization and conformation changes of rhodopsin in the photoreceptors outer segment (OS) were simulated by varying the optical properties of the cell organelles. The FDTD code was validated by comparing the results from a 2D simulation of light scattering from an infinite cylinder to the Mie analytical solution for the same geometry. Results from the FDTD simulations show that hyper-polarization of the outer cell membrane is the least likely cause for the observed increase in light scattering in photoreceptors. Other computational data suggests that the experimentally observed changes in reflectivity are most likely related to cell dynamics and to cell volume changes.

  19. MARCKS in advanced stages of neural retina histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an actin-binding protein, is involved in several signal transduction pathways. It is susceptible to be phosphorylated by protein kinases as protein kinase C and some proline-directed kinases. These phosphorylations differently modulate its functions. We previously showed that a phosphorylation at its Ser25 (S25p-MARCKS) in chickens is a signature of this ubiquitous protein in neuron differentiation. To gain insight into the possible involvement of MARCKS in late retinal histogenesis, we compared the developmental expression patterns of the total protein and its S25p variants. Here we show that the most outstanding modifications occur at the outer retina, where S25p disappears at the end of embryonic development and where MARCKS is missing in adults. These results suggest diverse functional specializations in the different retinal layers. PMID:15855766

  20. The developing and evolving retina: using time to organize form.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L

    2008-02-01

    Evolutionary and other functional accounts of the retina and its normal development highlight different aspects of control of its growth and form than genomic and mechanistic accounts. Discussing examples from opsin expression, developmental regulation of the eye's size and optical quality, regulation of eye size with respect to brain and body size, and the development of the fovea, these different aspects of control are contrasted. Contributions of mouse models, particularly with regard to relative timing of events in different species are reviewed, introducing a Web-based utility for exploration of timing issues (www.translatingtime.net). Variation at the individual level, in early experience, and also across species is an essential source of information to understand normal development and its pathologies.

  1. The developing and evolving retina: using time to organize form.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L

    2008-02-01

    Evolutionary and other functional accounts of the retina and its normal development highlight different aspects of control of its growth and form than genomic and mechanistic accounts. Discussing examples from opsin expression, developmental regulation of the eye's size and optical quality, regulation of eye size with respect to brain and body size, and the development of the fovea, these different aspects of control are contrasted. Contributions of mouse models, particularly with regard to relative timing of events in different species are reviewed, introducing a Web-based utility for exploration of timing issues (www.translatingtime.net). Variation at the individual level, in early experience, and also across species is an essential source of information to understand normal development and its pathologies. PMID:17692298

  2. Haemopoietic phagocytes in the early differentiating avian retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cuadros, M A; García-Martín, M; Martin, C; Ríos, A

    1991-01-01

    The existence of specialised phagocytic cells is described in regions of the retinal neuroepithelium undergoing intense cell death during early differentiation of the avian embryo retina (2.5-5 days of incubation). These results were obtained using routine techniques for light microscopy, acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunocytochemical staining with antibodies MB-1 and QH-1, both specific for quail endothelial cells and all blood cells except mature erythrocytes. Specialised phagocytes were distinguishable from neuroepithelial cells on the basis of morphological criteria: in the former, the nucleus was not oval in shape and was not oriented perpendicular to basement membrane neuroepithelium. The cytoplasm of the specialised phagocytes was often filled with dead cell fragments. In contrast to neuroepithelial cells, the specialised phagocytes showed acid phosphatase activity and were labelled with both MB-1 and QH-1 antibodies in normal quail embryos and chick----quail yolk sac chimeras. Moreover, some acid phosphatase positive and MB-1/QH-1 positive cells also appeared in the presumptive vitreous body, at the edges of the optic cup and in the surrounding mesenchyme. As the vitreal cells and the specialised phagocytes of the neural retina were immunolabelled in chick----quail yolk sac chimeras, we conclude that they are derived from haemopoietic cells in the yolk sac. Some images suggest that these cells enter the vitreous body from the surrounding mesenchyme and traverse the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium in the optic disc region to give rise to the specialised phagocytes of the retinal neuroepithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:1769889

  3. An intrinsic neural oscillator in the degenerating mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Joanna; Trenholm, Stuart; Awatramani, Gautam B

    2011-03-30

    The loss of photoreceptors during retinal degeneration (RD) is known to lead to an increase in basal activity in remnant neural networks. To identify the source of activity, we combined two-photon imaging with patch-clamp techniques to examine the physiological properties of morphologically identified retinal neurons in a mouse model of RD (rd1). Analysis of activity in rd1 ganglion cells revealed sustained oscillatory (∼10 Hz) synaptic activity in ∼30% of all classes of cells. Oscillatory activity persisted after putative inputs from residual photoreceptor, rod bipolar cell, and inhibitory amacrine cell synapses were pharmacologically blocked, suggesting that presynaptic cone bipolar cells were intrinsically active. Examination of presynaptic rd1 ON and OFF bipolar cells indicated that they rested at relatively negative potentials (less than -50 mV). However, in approximately half the cone bipolar cells, low-amplitude membrane oscillation (∼5 mV, ∼10 Hz) were apparent. Such oscillations were also observed in AII amacrine cells. Oscillations in ON cone bipolar and AII amacrine cells exhibited a weak apparent voltage dependence and were resistant to blockade of synaptic receptors, suggesting that, as in wild-type retina, they form an electrically coupled network. In addition, oscillations were insensitive to blockers of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (0.5 mm Cd(2+) and 0.5 mm Ni(2+)), ruling out known mechanisms that underlie oscillatory behavior in bipolar cells. Together, these results indicate that an electrically coupled network of ON cone bipolar/AII amacrine cells constitutes an intrinsic oscillator in the rd1 retina that is likely to drive synaptic activity in downstream circuits.

  4. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  5. Immunoproteasome Deficiency Protects in the Retina after Optic Nerve Crush

    PubMed Central

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J.; Lehmann, Ute; Roehrich, Heidi; Rageh, Abrar A.; Heuss, Neal D.; Bratten, Wendy; Gregerson, Dale S.; Ferrington, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    The immunoproteasome is upregulated by disease, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cytokines, suggesting an expanded role for the immunoproteasome in stress signaling that goes beyond its canonical role in generating peptides for antigen presentation. The signaling pathways that are regulated by the immunoproteasome remain elusive. However, previous studies suggest a role for the immunoproteasome in the regulation of PTEN and NF-κB signaling. One well-known pathway upstream of NF-κB and downstream of PTEN is the Akt signaling pathway, which is responsible for mediating cellular survival and is modulated after optic nerve crush (ONC). This study investigated the role of retinal immunoproteasome after injury induced by ONC, focusing on the Akt cell survival pathway. Retinas or retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from wild type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice lacking either one (LMP2) or two (LMP7 and MECL-1) catalytic subunits of the immunoproteasome were utilized in this study. We show that mRNA and protein levels of the immunoproteasome subunits are significantly upregulated in WT retinas following ONC. Mice lacking the immunoproteasome subunits show either a delayed or dampened apoptotic response as well as altered Akt signaling, compared to WT mice after ONC. Treatment of the RPE cells with insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to stimulate Akt signaling confirmed that the immunoproteasome modulates this pathway, and most likely modulates parallel pathways as well. This study links the inducible expression of the immunoproteasome following retinal injury to Akt signaling, which is important in many disease pathways. PMID:25978061

  6. Hemispheric representation of the central retina of commissurotomized subjects.

    PubMed

    Sugishita, M; Hamilton, C R; Sakuma, I; Hemmi, I

    1994-04-01

    It is controversial whether a stimulus projected within 1 to 3 degrees from the boundary between the right and left hemiretina is transmitted to only one cerebral hemisphere or to both cerebral hemispheres. In order to resolve this issue, letter- and word-stimuli were presented for 200 msec with a new type of tachistoscope, called the fundus tachistoscope, in and about the central retina, (i.e. fovea, 1.2 degrees in horizontal diameter) of the right eyes of two commissurotomized subjects (N.G. and A.A.). During stimulus presentation the subjects were attempting to fixate a fixation target. The fundus tachistoscope combined with image analysis of the fundus enables us to measure the position of the stimulus on the retina, relative to the foveal center, as well as whether or not the eye moved during stimulus presentation. The results indicate that the region of the right (temporal) hemiretina represented by both hemispheres in letter processing, if it exists, was estimated as less than 0.6 degrees from the foveal center. The two subjects frequently (27% in N.G. and 46% in A.A.) fixated the fixation target eccentrically, i.e. with a retinal point other than the foveal center, during fixation, namely stimulus presentation. Their eccentric fixations were small with magnitude almost all falling between 1.35 degrees right and 1.25 degrees left of the foveal center. It is therefore recommended that letter-stimuli be presented at least 2.0 degrees from the foveal center in ordinary tachistoscopic studies of cerebral hemispheric differences. Eye movements, which varied in 0.11 degrees and 1.43 degrees horizontally, occurred in about 8% of all the trials during fixation. On the average of the two subjects, the eye movements caused or worsened eccentric fixation in only about one third of the trials, and corrected eccentric fixation in about two thirds of the trials.

  7. Insulin Stimulated-Glucose Transporter Glut 4 Is Expressed in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Peña-Rangel, Ma. Teresa; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro; Salceda, Rocío

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a very metabolically active tissue whose energy demands are normally met through the uptake of glucose and oxygen. Glucose metabolism in this tissue relies upon adequate glucose delivery from the systemic circulation. Therefore, glucose transport depends on the expression of glucose transporters. Here, we show retinal expression of the Glut 4 glucose transporter in frog and rat retinas. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization studies showed Glut 4 expression in the three nuclear layers of the retina: the photoreceptor, inner nuclear and ganglionar cell layers. In the rat retina immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis revealed a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa. 14C-glucose accumulation by isolated rat retinas was significantly enhanced by physiological concentrations of insulin, an effect blocked by inhibitors of phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), a key enzyme in the insulin-signaling pathway in other tissues. Also, we observed an increase in 3H-cytochalasin binding sites in the presence of insulin, suggesting an increase in transporter recruitment at the cell surface. Besides, insulin induced phosphorylation of Akt, an effect also blocked by PI3K inhibition. Expression of Glut 4 was not modified in retinas of a type 1 diabetic rat model. To our knowledge, our results provide the first evidence of Glut4 expression in the retina, suggesting it as an insulin- responsive tissue. PMID:23285235

  8. Meis1 specifies positional information in the retina and tectum to organize the zebrafish visual system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During visual system development, multiple signalling pathways cooperate to specify axial polarity within the retina and optic tectum. This information is required for the topographic mapping of retinal ganglion cell axons on the tectum. Meis1 is a TALE-class homeodomain transcription factor known to specify anterior-posterior identity in the hindbrain, but its role in visual system patterning has not been investigated. Results meis1 is expressed in both the presumptive retina and tectum. An analysis of retinal patterning reveals that Meis1 is required to correctly specify both dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal identity in the zebrafish retina. Meis1-knockdown results in a loss of smad1 expression and an upregulation in follistatin expression, thereby causing lower levels of Bmp signalling and a partial ventralization of the retina. Additionally, Meis1-deficient embryos exhibit ectopic Fgf signalling in the developing retina and a corresponding loss of temporal identity. Meis1 also positively regulates ephrin gene expression in the tectum. Consistent with these patterning phenotypes, a knockdown of Meis1 ultimately results in retinotectal mapping defects. Conclusions In this work we describe a novel role for Meis1 in regulating Bmp signalling and in specifying temporal identity in the retina. By patterning both the retina and tectum, Meis1 plays an important role in establishing the retinotectal map and organizing the visual system. PMID:20809932

  9. Blood supply to the retina in the laboratory shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Isomura, G; Ikeda, S; Ikezaki, K; Miyashita, Y

    1997-06-01

    The blood supply to both retinae was studied light microscopically and by scanning electron microscopy in 48 adult laboratory shrews (Suncus murinus) of both sexes. Thirty-eight of the animals were injected into the left ventricle with Neoprene latex (Du Pont. 601A) or with Mercox (Dai Nippon Ink Ltd., CL-2R) to elucidate the blood supply to the retina from the ophthalmic artery. The remaining animals were kept for histological study of the retina. The central retinal artery, originating from the ophthalmic artery in the muscular part of the orbit, enters the optic nerve, passes through the optic disk together with the central retinal vein and penetrates the vitreous space (cavity of the eye) between the lens and the inner limiting membrane of the retina, where it divides into the dorsal, ventral, and caudal branches. Each branch, moreover, bifurcates into nasal and temporal arterioles and is distributed throughout the retina on the inner limiting membrane as far as the ciliary body and the lens. On the way they obliquely send small vessels through the inner limiting membrane into the outer plexiform layer of the retina. Their vascularization appears to correspond to the membrana vasculosa retinae found in teleosts, amphibia and reptiles.

  10. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  11. The Role of Histamine in the Retina: Studies on the Hdc Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Greferath, Ursula; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Jobling, Andrew I.; Mills, Samuel A.; Bui, Bang V.; He, Zheng; Nag, Nupur; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of histamine in the retina is not well understood, despite it regulating a number of functions within the brain, including sleep, feeding, energy balance, and anxiety. In this study we characterized the structure and function of the retina in mice that lacked expression of the rate limiting enzyme in the formation of histamine, histidine decarboxylase (Hdc−/− mouse). Using laser capture microdissection, Hdc mRNA expression was assessed in the inner and outer nuclear layers of adult C57Bl6J wildtype (WT) and Hdc−/−-retinae. In adult WT and Hdc−/−-mice, retinal fundi were imaged, retinal structure was assessed using immunocytochemistry and function was probed by electroretinography. Blood flow velocity was assessed by quantifying temporal changes in the dynamic fluorescein angiography in arterioles and venules. In WT retinae, Hdc gene expression was detected in the outer nuclear layer, but not the inner nuclear layer, while the lack of Hdc expression was confirmed in the Hdc−/− retina. Preliminary examination of the fundus and retinal structure of the widely used Hdc−/−mouse strain revealed discrete lesions across the retina that corresponded to areas of photoreceptor abnormality reminiscent of the rd8 (Crb1) mutation. This was confirmed after genotyping and the strain designated Hdcrd8/rd8. In order to determine the effect of the lack of Hdc-alone on the retina, Hdc−/− mice free of the Crb1 mutation were bred. Retinal fundi appeared normal in these animals and there was no difference in retinal structure, macrogliosis, nor any change in microglial characteristics in Hdc−/− compared to wildtype retinae. In addition, retinal function and retinal blood flow dynamics showed no alterations in the Hdc−/− retina. Overall, these results suggest that histamine plays little role in modulating retinal structure and function. PMID:25545149

  12. Semiconductor Nanorod–Carbon Nanotube Biomimetic Films for Wire-Free Photostimulation of Blind Retinas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications. PMID:25350365

  13. Mass spectrometric identification and quantification of 5-methoxytryptophol in quail retina

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.W.; Chan, S.F.; Lee, P.P.; Pang, S.F. )

    1989-12-29

    The occurrence of 5-methoxytryptophol (5-MTL) in the quail retina was investigated by capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected ion monitoring using a deuterated internal standard. Based on ion intensity ratios in the mass spectra of pentafluoropropionyl and heptafluorobutyryl derivatives of 5-MTL and deuterated 5-MTL, 5-MTL was unequivocally identified in the quail retina. Similar to the circadian rhythm of retinal melatonin, retinal 5-MTL also exhibited a diurnal variation with high levels at mid-dark. However, no significant correlation between the diurnal levels of 5-MTL and melatonin was observed in the quail retina at mid-light or mid-dark.

  14. In vivo fluorescent imaging of the mouse retina using adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Biss, David P.; Sumorok, Daniel; Burns, Stephen A.; Webb, Robert H.; Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas G.; Côté, Daniel; Veilleux, Israel; Zamiri, Parisa; Lin, Charles P.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the mouse retina using visible and near infrared wavelengths does not achieve diffraction-limited resolution due to wavefront aberrations induced by the eye. Considering the pupil size and axial dimension of the eye, it is expected that unaberrated imaging of the retina would have a transverse resolution of 2 μm. Higher-order aberrations in retinal imaging of human can be compensated for by using adaptive optics. We demonstrate an adaptive optics system for in vivo imaging of fluorescent structures in the retina of a mouse, using a microelectromechanical system membrane mirror and a Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor that detects fluorescent wavefront. PMID:17308593

  15. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    PubMed

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  16. Cyclic nucleotides of cone-dominant retinas. Reduction of cyclic AMP levels by light and by cone degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farber, D B; Souza, D W; Chase, D G; Lolley, R N

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted retinas or whole eyes of 13-line ground squirrels (Citellus tridecemlineatus) and western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) contain higher levels of cyclic AMP than of cyclic GMP. In these cone-dominant retinas, light reduces cyclic AMP content selectively. Freezing of dark- or light-adapted retinas or eyes also reduces cyclic AMP content, with only minimal changes in cyclic GMP levels. In addition, exposure of frozen retinas of dark-adapted ground squirrel to light results in a significant decrease in cyclic AMP content. The destruction of cone visual cells of ground squirrel retina by iodoacetic acid injection decreases the cyclic nucleotide content of the dark-adapted retina. Considering the relative loss of cyclic nucleotides from cone degeneration, we estimate that the content of cyclic AMP in visual cells of ground squirrel retina is about four times greater than that of cyclic GMP. PMID:6256308

  17. Transplantation of ocular stem cells: the role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chacko, David M; Das, Ani V; Zhao, Xing; James, Jackson; Bhattacharya, Sumitra; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2003-04-01

    The incorporation of transplanted cells into the host retina is one of the prerequisites for successful cell replacement therapy to treat retinal degeneration. To test the hypothesis that injury promotes cell incorporation, stem cells/progenitors were isolated from the retina, ciliary epithelium or limbal epithelium and transplanted into the eyes of rats with retinal injury. Different stem cell/progenitor populations incorporated into traumatized or diseased retina but not into the normal retina. The proportion of cells incorporated into the inner retina was consistently higher than in the outer retina. The transplanted cells expressed markers specific to cells of the lamina into which they were incorporated suggesting that cues for specific differentiation are localized within the inner and outer retina. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced cues play a significant role in promoting the incorporation of ocular stem cells/progenitors regardless of their origin or their differentiation along specific retinal sublineage. PMID:12668063

  18. Human retina-specific amine oxidase: genomic structure of the gene (AOC2), alternatively spliced variant, and mRNA expression in retina.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Y; Noda, S; Mashima, Y; Kudoh, J; Oguchi, Y; Shimizu, N

    1998-07-15

    Previously, we reported the isolation of cDNA for human retina-specific amine oxidase (RAO) and the expression of RAO exclusively in retina. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the human RAO gene (AOC2) were mapped to human chromosome 17q21 (Imamura et al., 1997, Genomics 40: 277-283). Here, we report the complete genomic structure of the RAO gene, including 5' flanking sequence, and mRNA expression in retina. The human RAO gene spans 6 kb and is composed of four exons corresponding to the amino acid sequence 1-530, 530-598, 598-641, and 642-729 separated by three introns of 3000, 310, and 351 bp. Screening of a human retina cDNA library revealed the existence of an alternatively spliced cDNA variant with an additional 81 bp at the end of exon 2. The sizes of exons and the locations of exon/intron boundaries in the human RAO gene showed remarkable similarity to those of the human kidney diamine oxidase gene (AOC1). In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA coding for RAO is expressed preferentially in the ganglion cell layer of the mouse retina. We designed four sets of PCR primers to amplify four exons, which will be valuable for analyzing mutations in patients with ocular diseases affecting the retinal ganglion cell layer.

  19. Purinergic control of vascular tone in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic control of vascular tone in the CNS has been largely unexplored. This study examines the contribution of endogenous extracellular ATP, acting on vascular smooth muscle cells, in controlling vascular tone in the in vivo rat retina. Retinal vessels were labelled by i.v. injection of a fluorescent dye and imaged with scanning laser confocal microscopy. The diameters of primary arterioles were monitored under control conditions and following intravitreal injection of pharmacological agents. Apyrase (500 units ml−1), an ATP hydrolysing enzyme, dilated retinal arterioles by 40.4 ± 2.8%, while AOPCP (12.5 mm), an ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor that increases extracellular ATP levels, constricted arterioles by 58.0 ± 3.8% (P < 0.001 for both), demonstrating the importance of ATP in the control of basal vascular tone. Suramin (500 μm), a broad-spectrum P2 receptor antagonist, dilated retinal arterioles by 50.9 ± 3.7% (P < 0.001). IsoPPADS (300 μm) and TNP-ATP (50 μm), more selective P2X antagonists, dilated arterioles by 41.0 ± 5.3% and 55.2 ± 6.1% respectively (P < 0.001 for both). NF023 (50 μm), a potent antagonist of P2X1 receptors, dilated retinal arterioles by 32.1 ± 2.6% (P < 0.001). A438079 (500 μm) and AZ10606120 (50 μm), P2X7 antagonists, had no effect on basal vascular tone (P = 0.99 and P = 1.00 respectively). In the ex vivo retina, the P2X1 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (300 nm) evoked sustained vasoconstrictions of 18.7 ± 3.2% (P < 0.05). In vivo vitreal injection of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate (150 μm) dilated retinal vessels by 52.3 ± 1.1% (P < 0.001) and inhibited the vasodilatory response to NF023 (50 μm, 7.9 ± 2.0%; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that vascular tone in rat retinal arterioles is maintained by tonic release of ATP from the retina. ATP acts on P2X1 receptors, although contributions from other P2X and P2Y receptors cannot be ruled out. Retinal glial cells

  20. [CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RETINA IN CHRONIC STRESS IN LABORATORY RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, A A; Yermilov, V V; Tiurenkov, I N; Smirnov, A V; Grigoriyeva, N V; Zagrebin, V L; Rogova, L N; Antoshkin, O N; Dovgalyov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The retina was studied in albino laboratory male rats of two age groups (12 and 24 months), 10 animals in each subjected to chronic combined stress. The stress was caused in animals by simultaneous exposure to pulsed light, loud sound, swinging and restriction of mobility for 7 days, 30 mm daily. The retina of intact rats of the corresponding age groups (n = 20) served as control. Enucleated eyes of stressed and control animals were processed with standard histological technique and stained with Nissl's method and hematoxylin-eosin. The retina of the stressed animals of both age groups showed the decrease in the number of cells and the disarrangement of its layers, most pronounced in the layers of photoreceptor neurons and ganglion cells. The comparative morphometric analysis demonstrated a reduction of the layer thickness and cell numerical density in the retina of stressed animals, both young (12 months) and old (24 months), as compared to that of control animals. PMID:27487662

  1. Illumination-invariant face recognition with a contrast sensitive silicon retina

    SciTech Connect

    Buhmann, J.M.; Lades, M.; Eeckman, F.

    1993-11-29

    Changes in lighting conditions strongly effect the performance and reliability of computer vision systems. We report face recognition results under drastically changing lighting conditions for a computer vision system which concurrently uses a contrast sensitive silicon retina and a conventional, gain controlled CCD camera. For both input devices the face recognition system employs an elastic matching algorithm with wavelet based features to classify unknown faces. To assess the effect of analog on-chip preprocessing by the silicon retina the CCD images have been digitally preprocessed with a bandpass filter to adjust the power spectrum. The silicon retina with its ability to adjust sensitivity increases the recognition rate up to 50 percent. These comparative experiments demonstrate that preprocessing with an analog VLSI silicon retina generates image data enriched with object-constant features.

  2. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Kirsten H.; Echevarria, Franklin D.; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M.; Edd, Jon F.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  3. Ubiquitous presence of gluconeogenic regulatory enzyme, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, within layers of rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Mamczur, Piotr; Mazurek, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    To shed some light on gluconeogenesis in mammalian retina, we have focused on fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a regulatory enzyme of the process. The abundance of the enzyme within the layers of the rat retina suggests that, in mammals in contrast to amphibia, gluconeogenesis is not restricted to one specific cell of the retina. We propose that FBPase, in addition to its gluconeogenic role, participates in the protection of the retina against reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the nuclear localization of FBPase and of its binding partner, aldolase, in the retinal cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67 indicates that these two gluconeogenic enzymes are involved in non-enzymatic nuclear processes. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00441-010-1008-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20614135

  4. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  5. Active zone protein CAST is a component of conventional and ribbon synapses in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Inoue, Eiji; Takao-Rikitsu, Etsuko; Inoue, Marie; Kitajima, Isao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Takai, Yoshimi

    2006-04-01

    CAST is a novel cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ)-associated protein. In conventional brain synapses, CAST forms a large molecular complex with other CAZ proteins, including RIM, Munc13-1, Bassoon, and Piccolo. Here we investigated the distribution of CAST and its structurally related protein, ELKS, in mouse retina. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that CAST and ELKS showed punctate signals in the outer and inner plexiform layers of the retina that were well-colocalized with those of Bassoon and RIM. Both proteins were found presynaptically at glutamatergic ribbon synapses, and at conventional GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that CAST, like Bassoon and RIM, localized at the base of synaptic ribbons, whereas ELKS localized around the ribbons. Both proteins also localized in the vicinity of the presynaptic plasma membrane of conventional synapses in the retina. These results indicated that CAST and ELKS were novel components of the presynaptic apparatus of mouse retina.

  6. Study of the effects of lead and light on the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Talsma, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is one of the mechanisms by which lead may produce toxic effects. Since the retina possesses characteristics which may cause it to be susceptible to lipid peroxidation, the effects of lead on the rabbit retina were investigated. Changes were found in several indicators of lipid peroxidation including malonaldehyde levels and extractable fluorescence. Histologic and ultrastructural evaluations showed accumulation of lipofuscin and disruption of retinal architecture. The effect of concurrent constant light was also tested and was found to be a modification of the effects produced by lead, probably mediated through a disruption of normal retinal physiology. A decrease in catalase activity was seen in the retinas of lead-exposed animals. Concurrent constant light treatment added to this inhibition. These findings suggest that lead can produce peroxidation effects in the eye and that the retina may be highly susceptible to peroxidated damage.

  7. Vascular and avascular retinae in mammals. A funduscopic and fluorescein angiographic study.

    PubMed

    Buttery, R G; Haight, J R; Bell, K

    1990-01-01

    Intraretinal blood vessels are present in some and absent in other vertebrate species, including the mammals. Among the marsupials, both vascular and avascular retinae are seen. We determined the funduscopic appearance of the eye, investigated the functional aspects of ocular blood flow in both types of retina in marsupials and compared our results with known patterns in placental mammals. The Australian polyprotodont marsupials, the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and the quoll, Dasyurus viverrinus, together with an American polyprotodont, the Virginia opossum, Didelphis virginiana, demonstrate variable degrees of tapetal differentiation, pigmentation and a very close parallel course of their intraretinal arteries and veins over considerable distances. Using the technique of fluorescein angiography, we found that retinal blood flow in the 3 vascular Australian species commenced with arterial filling. Early venous was seen next, followed by the capillary blush. This unusual sequence of vascular flow differs from that of the arterial-capillary-venous filling seen in placental mammals. This difference is most likely a consequence of the known looped, end artery organisation found within marsupial nervous systems, of which the retinae are a part. The 2 diprotodont marsupials examined, the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, and the sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps, possess avascular retinae. Only a small residual tuft of fluorescein-impermeable vessels projects from the optic disc into the vitreous. Interestingly, the structural complexity of the central visual system in diprotodonts all of whom possess avascular retinae) is commonly accepted as being greater than that of the stem polyprotodont line (which possess vascular retinae). If retinal function matches this internal complexity, then retinal avascularity may, as in birds, be associated with superior vision. However, as the retinae of these mammals clearly lack any nutritive mechanisms directly

  8. Development of glutamatergic synapses in the rat retina: the postnatal expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Hack, Iris; Koulen, Peter; Peichl, Leo; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2002-01-01

    We examined the distribution of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4, of the kainate receptor subunits GluR6/7 and KA2, and of the glutamate receptor subunits delta1/2, during postnatal development of the rat retina by immunocytochemistry and light microscopy using receptor subunit specific antisera. The various ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits were expressed early in postnatal rat retina, and most of the subunits, with the exception of delta1/2. were found in both synaptic layers of rat retina. The glutamate receptor subunits studied showed differences in their time of appearance, their spatial distribution patterns, and in their expression levels in the developing rat retina. Interestingly, most of the AMPA receptor subunits were expressed earlier than the kainate receptor subunits in the two synaptic layers of the retina, indicating that AMPA glutamate receptors play an important role in early postnatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We also studied the ultrastructural localization of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4 by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy in the inner plexiform layer of the mature rat retina. Most of the subunits were found postsynaptic to the ribbon synapses of OFF-cone, ON-cone, and rod bipolar cells. The results of this study suggest an involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors in processes of synaptic maturation and the formation of synaptic circuitries in the developing plexiform layers of the retina. Furthermore, AMPA and kainate receptors play a role in synaptic processing and in the development of both the scotopic and photopic pathways in the rat retina.

  9. Electrooptical model of the first retina layers of a visual analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Riabinin, A. D.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Shkvar, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    An electrooptical principle of converting and transmitting optical signals is proposed and used as the basis for constructing a model of the upper layers of the retina of the visual analyzer of animals. An evaluation of multichannel fibrous optical systems, in which the conversion of optical signals is based on the electrooptical principle, to model the upper retina layers is presented. The symbolic circuit of the model and its algorithm are discussed.

  10. Otx2 ChIP-seq Reveals Unique and Redundant Functions in the Mature Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fant, Bruno; Lamonerie, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During mouse retinal development and into adulthood, the transcription factor Otx2 is expressed in pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and bipolar cells. In the mature retina, Otx2 ablation causes photoreceptor degeneration through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism involving Otx2 function in the supporting RPE. Surprisingly, photoreceptor survival does not require Otx2 expression in the neural retina, where the related Crx homeobox gene, a major regulator of photoreceptor development, is also expressed. To get a deeper view of mouse Otx2 activities in the neural retina, we performed chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) on Otx2. Using two independent ChIP-seq assays, we identified consistent sets of Otx2-bound cis-regulatory elements. Comparison with our previous RPE-specific Otx2 ChIP-seq data shows that Otx2 occupies different functional domains of the genome in RPE cells and in neural retina cells and regulates mostly different sets of genes. To assess the potential redundancy of Otx2 and Crx, we compared our data with Crx ChIP-seq data. While Crx genome occupancy markedly differs from Otx2 genome occupancy in the RPE, it largely overlaps that of Otx2 in the neural retina. Thus, in accordance with its essential role in the RPE and its non-essential role in the neural retina, Otx2 regulates different gene sets in the RPE and the neural retina, and shares an important part of its repertoire with Crx in the neural retina. Overall, this study provides a better understanding of gene-regulatory networks controlling photoreceptor homeostasis and disease. PMID:24558479

  11. Chondroitin Sulfate as a Regulator of Neuronal Patterning in the Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittis, Perry A.; Canning, David R.; Silver, Jerry

    1992-02-01

    Highly sulfated proteoglycans are correlated with axon boundaries in the developing central nervous system which suggests that these molecules affect neural pattern formation. In the developing mammalian retina, gradual regression of chondroitin sulfate may help control the onset of ganglion cell differentiation and initial direction of their axons. Changes induced by the removal of chondroitin sulfate from intact retinas in culture confirm the function of chondroitin sulfate in retinal histogenesis.

  12. Vascular and avascular retinae in mammals. A funduscopic and fluorescein angiographic study.

    PubMed

    Buttery, R G; Haight, J R; Bell, K

    1990-01-01

    Intraretinal blood vessels are present in some and absent in other vertebrate species, including the mammals. Among the marsupials, both vascular and avascular retinae are seen. We determined the funduscopic appearance of the eye, investigated the functional aspects of ocular blood flow in both types of retina in marsupials and compared our results with known patterns in placental mammals. The Australian polyprotodont marsupials, the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and the quoll, Dasyurus viverrinus, together with an American polyprotodont, the Virginia opossum, Didelphis virginiana, demonstrate variable degrees of tapetal differentiation, pigmentation and a very close parallel course of their intraretinal arteries and veins over considerable distances. Using the technique of fluorescein angiography, we found that retinal blood flow in the 3 vascular Australian species commenced with arterial filling. Early venous was seen next, followed by the capillary blush. This unusual sequence of vascular flow differs from that of the arterial-capillary-venous filling seen in placental mammals. This difference is most likely a consequence of the known looped, end artery organisation found within marsupial nervous systems, of which the retinae are a part. The 2 diprotodont marsupials examined, the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, and the sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps, possess avascular retinae. Only a small residual tuft of fluorescein-impermeable vessels projects from the optic disc into the vitreous. Interestingly, the structural complexity of the central visual system in diprotodonts all of whom possess avascular retinae) is commonly accepted as being greater than that of the stem polyprotodont line (which possess vascular retinae). If retinal function matches this internal complexity, then retinal avascularity may, as in birds, be associated with superior vision. However, as the retinae of these mammals clearly lack any nutritive mechanisms directly

  13. Changes in the daily rhythm of lipid metabolism in the diabetic retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Tikhonenko, Maria; Bozack, Svetlana N; Lydic, Todd A; Yan, Lily; Panchy, Nicholas L; McSorley, Kelly M; Faber, Matthew S; Yan, Yuanqing; Boulton, Michael E; Grant, Maria B; Busik, Julia V

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of circadian regulation was recently shown to cause diabetes and metabolic disease. We have previously demonstrated that retinal lipid metabolism contributed to the development of diabetic retinopathy. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of diabetes on circadian regulation of clock genes and lipid metabolism genes in the retina and retinal endothelial cells (REC). Diabetes had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the negative clock arm with lower amplitude of the period (per) 1 in the retina; lower amplitude and a phase shift of per2 in the liver; and a loss of cryptochrome (cry) 2 rhythmic pattern in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The positive clock arm was increased by diabetes with higher amplitude of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and brain and muscle aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 1 (bmal1) and phase shift in bmal1 rhythmic oscillations in the retina; and higher bmal1 amplitude in the SCN. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α exhibited rhythmic oscillation in retina and liver; PPARγ had lower amplitude in diabetic liver; sterol regulatory element-binding protein (srebp) 1c had higher amplitude in the retina but lower in the liver in STZ- induced diabetic animals. Both of Elongase (Elovl) 2 and Elovl4 had a rhythmic oscillation pattern in the control retina. Diabetic retinas lost Elovl4 rhythmic oscillation and had lower amplitude of Elovl2 oscillations. In line with the in vivo data, circadian expression levels of CLOCK, bmal1 and srebp1c had higher amplitude in rat REC (rREC) isolated from diabetic rats compared with control rats, while PPARγ and Elovl2 had lower amplitude in diabetic rREC. In conclusion, diabetes causes dysregulation of circadian expression of clock genes and the genes controlling lipid metabolism in the retina with potential implications for the development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24736612

  14. Transcriptome networks in the mouse retina: An exon level BXD RI database

    PubMed Central

    King, Rebecca; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in gene expression provide diverse retina phenotypes and may also contribute to susceptibility to injury and disease. The present study defines the transcriptome of the retina in the BXD RI strain set, using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array to investigate all exons of traditional protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs. These data are presented in a highly interactive database on the GeneNetwork website. Methods In the Normal Retina Database, the mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas was quantified using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array. This database consists of data from male and female mice. The data set includes a total of 52 BXD RI strains, the parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and a reciprocal cross. Results In combination with GeneNetwork, the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Normal Retina Database provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. Protein-coding and non-coding RNAs can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in the genomic sequence. Using this resource, we extracted transcriptome signatures for retinal cells and defined genetic networks associated with the maintenance of the normal retina. Furthermore, we examined differentially expressed exons within a single gene. Conclusions The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among the BXD RI strains makes it possible to identify expression networks that underline differences in retina structure and function. Ultimately, we will use this database to define changes that occur following blast injury to the retina. PMID:26604663

  15. Telmisartan ameliorates neurotrophic support and oxidative stress in the retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ola, M Shamsul; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Abuohashish, Hatem M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2013-08-01

    Neurodegeneration is an early event in the diabetic retina which may lead to diabetic retinopathy. One of the potential pathways in damaging retinal neurons is the activation of renin angiotensin system including angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the diabetic retina. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of telmisartan, an AT1R blocker on retinal level of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glutathione (GSH) and caspase activity in the diabetic rats. The dysregulated levels of these factors are known to cause neurodegeneration in diabetic retina. Three weeks streptozotocin induced diabetic rats were orally treated or untreated with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of treatments, the levels of BDNF and GSH were found to be increased systemically in the sera as well as in the retina of diabetic rats compared to untreated rats as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and biochemical techniques (p < 0.05). The caspase-3 activity in the telmisartan treated diabetic retina was decreased compared to untreated diabetic rats (p < 0.05). Western blotting experiments showed the expression levels of BDNF, CNTF and TH were increased compared to untreated diabetic rats (p < 0.05). Thus, our findings show a beneficial effect of AT1R blocker telmisartan in efficiently increasing neurotrophic support, endogenous antioxidant GSH content, and decreasing signs of apoptosis in diabetic retina. PMID:23624827

  16. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  17. Optic nerve signals in a neuromorphic chip I: Outer and inner retina models.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Kareem A; Boahen, Kwabena

    2004-04-01

    We present a novel model for the mammalian retina and analyze its behavior. Our outer retina model performs bandpass spatiotemporal filtering. It is comprised of two reciprocally connected resistive grids that model the cone and horizontal cell syncytia. We show analytically that its sensitivity is proportional to the space-constant-ratio of the two grids while its half-max response is set by the local average intensity. Thus, this outer retina model realizes luminance adaptation. Our inner retina model performs high-pass temporal filtering. It features slow negative feedback whose strength is modulated by a locally computed measure of temporal contrast, modeling two kinds of amacrine cells, one narrow-field, the other wide-field. We show analytically that, when the input is spectrally pure, the corner-frequency tracks the input frequency. But when the input is broadband, the corner frequency is proportional to contrast. Thus, this inner retina model realizes temporal frequency adaptation as well as contrast gain control. We present CMOS circuit designs for our retina model in this paper as well. Experimental measurements from the fabricated chip, and validation of our analytical results, are presented in the companion paper [Zaghloul and Boahen (2004)].

  18. [Ultrastructure of melanocytes from retina and choroid of the Pacific salmon].

    PubMed

    Zagal'skaia, E O

    2001-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the retina and choroid cells in three species of the Pacific salmon, Oncohrynchus gorbuscha, O. keta and O. masou, was studied. The structure of retina pigment cells is similar in all the three species, only a small difference was found in the percentage of lengthened and rounded forms of melanosomes. Melanocytes of the masu salmon differ also in the structure of their nuclei. The pigment cells of choroid differ from those of retina by a more extended form of melanosomes and by the presence of less rounded melanosomes. In the chum salmon retina we found electron lucent "contact vesicles", whose assignment is open to discussion. In retina pigment cells of the masu salmon smolts ready for migration, the activity of Golgi appararus rises, mitochondria and mature melanosomes increase in number. The choroid pigment cells are slightly swollen, their processes more often and deeper penetrate into the walls of vessels, down to the endothelium. Results of the experiment with the application of an artificial magnetic field (AMF) have shown that the retina and choroid pigment cells in the masu salmon fry react to the field of a certain direction. The phenomenon of magnetosensitivity of pigment cells is discussed in addition to their possible involvement in magnetoreception.

  19. Photodetection and computer analysis of a human eye retina image influenced by glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhacek, Frantisek; Pospisil, Jaroslav

    2003-07-01

    This paper deals with some present methods of the photodetection of a human eye retina image and the following computer analysis of the obtained image dates. There are considered the detection and the computer quantitative evaluations of characteristic symptoms of glaucoma on the human eye retina. These symptoms and their numerical parameters, that are usually used, are shortly described. The main part of this paper describes the methods of the creation and the computer analysis of a three-dimensional map of the blind spot of the human eye retina (papila) and the adjacent area of the retina. The changes important for diagnostics of the above mentioned three-dimensional map are then detected through the computer analysis. Specially, the methods of scanning laser tomography and stereophotographic measurement of the mentioned part of retina are considered. Some concrete results ascertained by the mentioned methods are also shown. Lastly, our suggestions of methods of analyzing two-dimensional images of retina obtained by the colour fundus camera are shown.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well-preserved among these species. However, expression of NAPE-PLD is circumscribed to the photoreceptor layer only in monkeys. In contrast, CB2R expression is variable across these species; in mice, CB2R is found in retinal neurons but not in glial cells; in tree shrews, CB2R is expressed in Müller cell processes of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina of these mammals and suggest a distinctive role of eCBs in visual processing. PMID:26977322

  1. Blood supply to the retina and the lens in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Imada, Hideki; Isomura, Genzoh; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2003-03-01

    The blood supply to the retina and the lens in 32 gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) of both sexes from infancy to maturity was studied under light and stereoscopic microscopes, and a scanning electron microscope. Mercox (CL-2R; Dai Nippon Ink, Tokyo, Japan) was injected into the left ventricle of 30 animals in order to visualize the blood supply to the retina and the lens from the ophthalmic artery. The central retinal artery arises from the ophthalmic artery, passes through the papilla of the optic nerve together with the central retinal vein and penetrates the vitreous space (cavity of the eye) between the lens and the internal limiting membrane of the retina, where it divides into the central branches covering the lens and the parietal branches to supply the retina. The former passes through the hyaloid space after branching several arterioles and then covers the lens like a network from its medial and marginal sides. Different from small experimental animals, the parietal branches, just after separating from the central one, divides into the nasal, dorsal and temporal branches in the vitreous space, each of which then subdivides to distribute across the retina on the inner limiting membrane, then delineates the membrana vasculosa retinae. This basal pattern of vasculization 1 day after birth continues to death. Both the central and parietal branches of the central retinal artery correspond to the branches of the hyaloid artery in embryo and the latter is preserved in adult gerbils. PMID:12680468

  2. Contacts between pigmented retina epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Middleton, C A; Pegrum, S M

    1976-11-01

    The behaviour of primary cultures of dissociated embryonic chick pigmented retina epithelial (PRE) cells has been investigated. Isolated PRE cells have a mean speed of locomotion of 7-16 mum/h. Collisions between the cells normally result in the development of stable contacts between the cells involved. This leads to a gradual reduction in the number of isolated cells and an increase in the number of cells incorporated into islands. Ultrastructural observations of islands of cells after 24 h in culture show that junctional complexes are present between the cells. These complexes consist of 2 components: (a) an apically situated region of focal tight junctions and/or gap junctions, and (b) a more ventrally located zonula adhaerens with associated cytoplasmic filaments forming a band running completely around the periphery of each cell. The intermembrane gap in the region of the zonula is 6-0-12-0 nm. The junctional complexes become more differentiated with time and after 48 h in culture consist of an extensive region of tight junctions and/or gap junctions and a more specialized zonula adhaerens. It is suggested that the development of junctional complexes may be responsible for the stable contacts that the cells display in culture.

  3. Synaptic localization of NMDA receptor subunits in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, E L; Hack, I; Brandstätter, J H; Wässle, H

    2000-04-24

    The distribution and synaptic clustering of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were studied in the rat retina by using subunit specific antisera. A punctate immunofluorescence was observed in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) for all subunits tested, and electron microscopy confirmed that the immunoreactive puncta represent labeling of receptors clustered at postsynaptic sites. Double labeling of sections revealed that NMDA receptor clusters within the IPL are composed of different subunit combinations: NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, and in a small number of synapses NR1/NR2A/NR2B. The majority of NMDA receptor clusters were colocalized with the postsynaptic density proteins PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP 102. Double labeling of the NMDA receptor subunit specific antisera with protein kinase C (PKC), a marker of rod bipolar cells, revealed very little colocalization at the rod bipolar cell axon terminal. This suggests that NMDA receptors are important in mediating neurotransmission within the cone bipolar cell pathways of the IPL. The postsynaptic neurons are a subset of amacrine cells and most ganglion cells. Usually only one of the two postsynaptic processes at the bipolar cell ribbon synapses expressed NMDA receptors. In the outer plexiform layer (OPL), punctate immunofluoresence was observed for the NR1C2; subunit, which was shown by electron microscopy to be localized presynaptically within both rod and cone photoreceptor terminals.

  4. Optimal Prediction in the Retina and Natural Motion Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Jared M.; Palmer, Stephanie E.

    2016-03-01

    Almost all behaviors involve making predictions. Whether an organism is trying to catch prey, avoid predators, or simply move through a complex environment, the organism uses the data it collects through its senses to guide its actions by extracting from these data information about the future state of the world. A key aspect of the prediction problem is that not all features of the past sensory input have predictive power, and representing all features of the external sensory world is prohibitively costly both due to space and metabolic constraints. This leads to the hypothesis that neural systems are optimized for prediction. Here we describe theoretical and computational efforts to define and quantify the efficient representation of the predictive information by the brain. Another important feature of the prediction problem is that the physics of the world is diverse enough to contain a wide range of possible statistical ensembles, yet not all inputs are probable. Thus, the brain might not be a generalized predictive machine; it might have evolved to specifically solve the prediction problems most common in the natural environment. This paper summarizes recent results on predictive coding and optimal predictive information in the retina and suggests approaches for quantifying prediction in response to natural motion. Basic statistics of natural movies reveal that general patterns of spatiotemporal correlation are present across a wide range of scenes, though individual differences in motion type may be important for optimal processing of motion in a given ecological niche.

  5. Machine Visual Motion Detection Modeled On Vertebrate Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, M. R.; Nguyen, H. G.; Kaomea, P. K.

    1988-12-01

    Real-time motion analysis would be very useful for autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) navigation, target tracking, homing, and obstacle avoidance. The perception of motion is well developed in animals from insects to man, providing solutions to similar problems. We have therefore applied a model of the motion analysis subnetwork in the vertebrate retina to visual navigation in the AUV. The model is currently implemented in the C programming language as a discrete- time serial approximation of a continuous-time parallel process. Running on an IBM-PC/AT with digitized video camera images, the system can detect and describe motion in a 16 by 16 receptor field at the rate of 4 updates per second. The system responds accurately with direction and speed information to images moving across the visual field at velocities less than 8 degrees of visual angle per second at signal-to-noise ratios greater than 3. The architecture is parallel and its sparse connections do not require long-term modifications. The model is thus appropriate for implementation in VLSI optoelectronics.

  6. Speeding rod recovery improves temporal resolution in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Fortenbach, Christopher R.; Kessler, Christopher; Peinado, Gabriel; Burns, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal resolution of the visual system progressively increases with light intensity. Under scotopic conditions, temporal resolution is relatively poor, and may be limited by both retinal and cortical processes. Rod photoresponses themselves are quite slow because of the slowly deactivating biochemical cascade needed for light transduction. Here, we have used a transgenic mouse line with faster than normal rod phototransduction deactivation (RGS9-overexpressors) to test whether rod signaling to second-order retinal neurons is rate-limited by phototransduction or by other mechanisms. We compared electrical responses of individual wild-type and RGS9-overexpressing (RGS9-ox) rods to steady illumination and found that RGS9-ox rods required 2-fold brighter light for comparable activation, owing to faster G-protein deactivation. When presented with flickering stimuli, RGS9-ox rods showed greater magnitude fluctuations around a given steady-state current amplitude. Likewise, in vivo electroretinography (ERG) and whole-cell recording from OFF-bipolar, rod bipolar, and horizontal cells of RGS9-ox mice displayed larger than normal magnitude flicker responses, demonstrating an improved ability to transmit frequency information across the rod synapse. Slow phototransduction recovery therefore limits synaptic transmission of increments and decrements of light intensity across the first retinal synapse in normal retinas, apparently sacrificing temporal responsiveness for greater overall sensitivity in ambient light. PMID:25748270

  7. Mapping a complete neural population in the retina.

    PubMed

    Marre, Olivier; Amodei, Dario; Deshmukh, Nikhil; Sadeghi, Kolia; Soo, Frederick; Holy, Timothy E; Berry, Michael J

    2012-10-24

    Recording simultaneously from essentially all of the relevant neurons in a local circuit is crucial to understand how they collectively represent information. Here we show that the combination of a large, dense multielectrode array and a novel, mostly automated spike-sorting algorithm allowed us to record simultaneously from a highly overlapping population of >200 ganglion cells in the salamander retina. By combining these methods with labeling and imaging, we showed that up to 95% of the ganglion cells over the area of the array were recorded. By measuring the coverage of visual space by the receptive fields of the recorded cells, we concluded that our technique captured a neural population that forms an essentially complete representation of a region of visual space. This completeness allowed us to determine the spatial layout of different cell types as well as identify a novel group of ganglion cells that responded reliably to a set of naturalistic and artificial stimuli but had no measurable receptive field. Thus, our method allows unprecedented access to the complete neural representation of visual information, a crucial step for the understanding of population coding in sensory systems.

  8. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  9. Microcystic macular edema detection in retina OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Emily K.; Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Howard S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging tool that is particularly useful for exploring retinal abnormalities in ophthalmological diseases. Recently, it has been used to track changes in the eye associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) where certain tissue layer thicknesses have been associated with disease progression. A small percentage of MS patients also exhibit what has been called microcystic macular edema (MME), where uid collections that are thought to be pseudocysts appear in the inner nuclear layer. Very little is known about the cause of this condition so it is important to be able to identify precisely where these pseudocysts occur within the retina. This identi cation would be an important rst step towards furthering our understanding. In this work, we present a detection algorithm to nd these pseudocysts and to report on their spatial distribution. Our approach uses a random forest classi er trained on manual segmentation data to classify each voxel as pseudocyst or not. Despite having a small sample size of ve subjects, the algorithm correctly identi es 84.6% of pseudocysts as compared to manual delineation. Finally, using our method, we show that the spatial distribution of pseudocysts within the macula are generally contained within an annulus around the fovea.

  10. Network Analysis and Visualization of Mouse Retina Connectivity Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The largest available cellular level connectivity map, of a 0.1 mm sample of the mouse retina Inner Plexiform Layer, was analysed using network models and visualized using spectral graph layouts and observed cell coordinates. This allows key nodes in the network to be identified with retinal neurons. Their strongest synaptic links can trace pathways in the network, elucidating possible circuits. Modular decomposition of the network, by sampling signal flows over nodes and links using the InfoMap method, shows discrete modules of cone bipolar cells that form a tiled mosaic in the retinal plane. The highest flow nodes, calculated by InfoMap, proved to be the most useful landmarks for elucidating possible circuits. Their dominant links to high flow amacrine cells reveal possible circuits linking bipolar through to ganglion cells and show an Off-On discrimination between the Left-Right sections of the sample. Circuits suggested by this analysis confirm known roles for some cells and point to roles for others. PMID:27414405

  11. Electrophysiological fingerprints of OFF bipolar cells in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Vielma, Alex H; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) divide photoreceptor output into different channels for the parallel extraction of temporal and chromatic stimulus properties. In rodents, five types of OFF BCs have been differentiated, based on morphological and functional criteria, but their electrophysiological characterization remains incomplete. This study analyzed OFF BCs with the patch clamp technique in acute slices of rat retina. Their specific voltage-dependent currents and glutamate responses are shown to represent individual fingerprints which define the signal processing and filtering properties of each cell type and allow their unequivocal identification. Two additions to the rat BC repertoire are presented: OFF BC-2', a variation of BC-2 with wider axonal arbours and prominent Na(+) currents, is described for the first time in rodents, and OFF BC-3b, previously identified in mouse, is electrophysiologically characterized in rat. Moreover, the glutamate responses of rat OFF BCs are shown to be differentially sensitive to AMPA- and kainate-receptor blockers and to modulation by nitric oxide (NO) through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. These results contribute to our understanding of the diversity and function of bipolar cells in mammals. PMID:27457753

  12. Spare the rods and spoil the retina: revisited.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, S; Arden, G

    2016-02-01

    Visual function improves with oxygen inhalation in people with diabetes even in the absence of visible retinopathy. Rods consume the most oxygen in the retina due to the high metabolic activity required to maintain the dark current. Therefore, Arden hypothesized that in diabetes where oxygen supply may also be affected due to the changes in retinal vasculature, prevention of dark adaptation may be a viable option to prevent or decrease the rate of progression of diabetic retinopathy. Animal experiments have proven that the absence of rods decreases the development of retinal neovascularisation. The same principle applies to panretinal photocoagulation, an established treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Recently, a few clinical studies have also shown that preventing dark adaptation by suppressing rods with 500-nm light source at night decreases the rate of progression of early diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in the short-term. We await the results of a large two-year multi-centre trial (CLEOPATRA trial) to evaluate the long-term effects of decreasing dark adaptation by applying a 500nm light source as a mask over eyes with non-central diabetic macular oedema.

  13. Molecular probes for imaging of hypoxia in the retina.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie M; Kim, Kwangho; Moore, Chauca E; Uddin, Md Imam; Capozzi, Megan E; Craft, Jason R; Sulikowski, Gary A; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-11-19

    Hypoxia has been associated with retinal diseases which lead the causes of irreversible vision loss, including diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, technologies for imaging hypoxia in the retina are needed for early disease detection, monitoring of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic responses in the patient. Toward this goal, we developed two hypoxia-sensitive imaging agents based on nitroimidazoles which are capable of accumulating in hypoxic cells in vivo. 2-nitroimidazole or Pimonidazole was conjugated to fluorescent dyes to yield the imaging agents HYPOX-1 and HYPOX-2. Imaging agents were characterized in cell culture and animal models of retinal vascular diseases which exhibit hypoxia. Both HYPOX-1 and -2 were capable of detecting hypoxia in cell culture models with >10:1 signal-to-noise ratios without acute toxicity. Furthermore, intraocular administration of contrast agents in mouse models of retinal hypoxia enabled ex vivo detection of hypoxic tissue. These imaging agents are a promising step toward translation of hypoxia-sensitive molecular imaging agents in preclinical animal models and patients.

  14. [Metabolic factors of vasomotor regulation of the inner retina].

    PubMed

    Brazitikos, P D; Pournaras, C J; Tsacopoulos, M; Munoz, J L

    1992-05-01

    Lactic acid, the end metabolic product of anaerobic glycolysis is probably the mediator of the hypoxia induced vasodilation on retinal arterioles. In this study we explored the mechanisms of the retinal vasomotor effect of this metabolite by performing preretinal juxtaarteriolar pulsatile pressure microinjections on the intact eye of anesthetized and artificially ventilated miniature pigs. Microinjections of the levorotatory isomer L-lactic acid (pH: 2) induced a local maximal dilation of retinal arterioles. This vasodilator effect, like that of systemic hypoxia, was not mediated by the release of prostaglandins. Preretinal pulsatile pressure juxtaarteriolar microinjections of neutral-pH solution of L-lactic acid also induced a segmental retinal arteriolar dilation. In contrast, microinjections of the dextrorotatory isomer D-lactic acid (pH: 2, solution), which is not produced by the retina, did not affect significantly the arteriolar diameter. Consequently, the vasodilator effect of lactic acid does not depend on periarteriolar pH modification and probably interferes with retinal metabolism since only the natural levorotatory metabolite is recognized.

  15. Multiscan time-domain optical coherence tomography for retina imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carla Carmelo; Rogers, John; Pedro, Justin; Rosen, Richard; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2007-04-01

    A versatile time-domain optical coherence tomography system is presented that can generate cross-sectional images by using either transverse priority or depth priority scanning. This is made possible by using a transmissive scanning delay line compatible with balance detection operating at a speed similar to that of the transverse scanner used to scan the beam across the target. In vivo images from the retina are generated and shown using the same system switched to either transverse or depth priority scanning regime, by using the scanning delay line either in slow or fast scanning modes, respectively. A comparative analysis of different scanning regimes depending on image size to fit different areas to be imaged is presented. Safety thresholds due to the different continuous irradiation time per transverse pixel in different scanning regimes are also considered. We present the maximum exposure level for a variety of scanning procedures, employing either A scanning (depth priority) or T scanning (transverse priority) when generating cross-sectional images, en face images, or collecting 3D volumes. PMID:17356624

  16. Transcriptome profiling of the rat retina after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Nakamura, Orie; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterized by alterations in the contour of the optic nerve head (ONH), with corresponding visual field defects and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This progressive RGC death is considered to originate in axonal injury caused by compression of the axon bundles in the ONH. However, the molecular pathomechanisms of axonal injury-induced RGC death are not yet well understood. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine transcriptome changes in rat retinas 2 days after optic nerve transection (ONT), and then used computational techniques to predict the resulting alterations in the transcriptional regulatory network. RNA-seq revealed 267 differentially expressed genes after ONT, 218 of which were annotated and 49 unannotated. We also identified differentially expressed transcripts, including potentially novel isoforms. An in silico pathway analysis predicted that CREB1 was the most significant upstream regulator. Thus, this study identified genes and pathways that may be involved in the pathomechanisms of axonal injury. We believe that our data should serve as a valuable resource to understand the molecular processes that define axonal injury-driven RGC death and to discover novel therapeutic targets for glaucoma. PMID:27353354

  17. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bst+/− mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoli; Wang, Xinjian; Rupp, Alan; Vemaraju, Shruti; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lang, Richard A.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Hattar, Samer; Guan, Min-Xin; Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The belly spot and tail (Bst+/−) mouse phenotype is caused by mutations of the ribosomal protein L24 (Rpl24). Among various phenotypes in Bst+/− mice, the most interesting are its retinal abnormalities, consisting of delayed closure of choroid fissures, decreased ganglion cells and subretinal vascularization. We further characterized the Bst+/− mouse and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms to assess the feasibility of using this strain as a model for stem cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss. We found that, although RGCs are significantly reduced in retinal ganglion cell layer in Bst+/− mouse, melanopsin+ RGCs, also called ipRGCs, appear to be unchanged. Pupillary light reflex was completely absent in Bst+/− mice but they had a normal circadian rhythm. In order to examine the pathological abnormalities in Bst+/− mice, we performed electron microscopy in RGC and found that mitochondria morphology was deformed, having irregular borders and lacking cristae. The complex activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were significantly decreased. Finally, for subretinal vascularization, we also found that angiogenesis is delayed in Bst+/− associated with delayed hyaloid regression. Characterization of Bst+/− retina suggests that the Bst+/− mouse strain could be a useful murine model. It might be used to explore further the pathogenesis and strategy of treatment of retinal degenerative diseases by employing stem cell technology. PMID:26035379

  18. High resolution confocal polarimeter for the living human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, D.; Paterson, C.

    2011-09-01

    There is strong evidence that the living human retina has polarization signatures that could be linked to the presence of Glaucoma, an ocular disease that is the second cause of blindness in the western world. In a polarization sensitive ophthalmoscope, the amount of light that can be used is limited for the safety of the subject, and the return is typically a small fraction of the light used for illumination, of the order of 10-6. Furthermore, the acquisition rates have to be sufficiently fast to avoid eye-movement artifacts. The light-budget available to produce a polarization image with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope is typically in the order of 10 nW, and pixel acquisition sampling rates are of several MHz. We are currently developing an imaging instrument for vision research and clinical vision applications and aim to introduce it to the medical and clinical environment using objective methods of image quality assessment. Here we discuss the stringent imaging requirements, polarimeter design, and show high resolution polarization retinal images.

  19. Electrophysiological fingerprints of OFF bipolar cells in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Alex H.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) divide photoreceptor output into different channels for the parallel extraction of temporal and chromatic stimulus properties. In rodents, five types of OFF BCs have been differentiated, based on morphological and functional criteria, but their electrophysiological characterization remains incomplete. This study analyzed OFF BCs with the patch clamp technique in acute slices of rat retina. Their specific voltage-dependent currents and glutamate responses are shown to represent individual fingerprints which define the signal processing and filtering properties of each cell type and allow their unequivocal identification. Two additions to the rat BC repertoire are presented: OFF BC-2′, a variation of BC-2 with wider axonal arbours and prominent Na+ currents, is described for the first time in rodents, and OFF BC-3b, previously identified in mouse, is electrophysiologically characterized in rat. Moreover, the glutamate responses of rat OFF BCs are shown to be differentially sensitive to AMPA- and kainate-receptor blockers and to modulation by nitric oxide (NO) through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. These results contribute to our understanding of the diversity and function of bipolar cells in mammals. PMID:27457753

  20. Generating 3D anatomically detailed models of the retina from OCT data sets: implications for computational modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalbaf, Farzaneh; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Turuwhenua, Jason; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prosthesis has been proposed to restore vision for those suffering from the retinal pathologies that mainly affect the photoreceptors layer but keep the inner retina intact. Prior to costly risky experimental studies computational modelling of the retina will help to optimize the device parameters and enhance the outcomes. Here, we developed an anatomically detailed computational model of the retina based on OCT data sets. The consecutive OCT images of individual were subsequently segmented to provide a 3D representation of retina in the form of finite elements. Thereafter, the electrical properties of the retina were modelled by implementing partial differential equation on the 3D mesh. Different electrode configurations, that is bipolar and hexapolar configurations, were implemented and the results were compared with the previous computational and experimental studies. Furthermore, the possible effects of the curvature of retinal layers on the current steering through the retina were proposed and linked to the clinical observations.

  1. Nonvisual photoreceptors of the deep brain, pineal organs and retina.

    PubMed

    Vigh, B; Manzano, M J; Zádori, A; Frank, C L; Lukáts, A; Röhlich, P; Szél, A; Dávid, C

    2002-04-01

    The role of the nonvisual photoreception is to synchronise periodic functions of living organisms to the environmental light periods in order to help survival of various species in different biotopes. In vertebrates, the so-called deep brain (septal and hypothalamic) photoreceptors, the pineal organs (pineal- and parapineal organs, frontal- and parietal eye) and the retina (of the "lateral" eye) are involved in the light-based entrain of endogenous circadian clocks present in various organs. In humans, photoperiodicity was studied in connection with sleep disturbances in shift work, seasonal depression, and in jet-lag of transmeridional travellers. In the present review, experimental and molecular aspects are discussed, focusing on the histological and histochemical basis of the function of nonvisual photoreceptors. We also offer a view about functional changes of these photoreceptors during pre- and postnatal development as well as about its possible evolution. Our scope in some points is different from the generally accepted views on the nonvisual photoreceptive systems. The deep brain photoreceptors are hypothalamic and septal nuclei of the periventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neuronal system. Already present in the lancelet and representing the most ancient type of vertebrate nerve cells ("protoneurons"), CSF-contacting neurons are sensory-type cells sitting in the wall of the brain ventricles that send a ciliated dendritic process into the CSF. Various opsins and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been demonstrated in telencephalic and hypothalamic groups of these neurons. In all species examined so far, deep brain photoreceptors play a role in the circadian and circannual regulation of periodic functions. Mainly called pineal "glands" in the last decades, the pineal organs actually represent a differentiated form of encephalic photoreceptors. Supposed to be intra- and extracranially outgrown groups of deep brain photoreceptors

  2. Endocannabinoids in the Retina: From Marijuana to Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Yazulla, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), produces numerous beneficial effects, including analgesia, appetite stimulation and nausea reduction, in addition to its psychotropic effects. THC mimics the action of endogenous fatty acid derivatives, referred to as endocannabinoids. The effects of THC and the endocannabinoids are mediated largely by metabotropic receptors that are distributed throughout the nervous and peripheral organ systems. There is great interest in endocannabinoids for their role in neuroplasticity as well as for therapeutic use in numerous conditions, including pain, stroke, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, fertility, neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, among others. However, there has been relatively far less research on this topic in the eye and retina compared with the brain and other organ systems. The purpose of this review is to introduce the “cannabinergic” field to the retinal community. All of the fundamental work on cannabinoids has been performed in non-retinal preparations, necessitating extensive dependence on this literature for background. Happily, the retinal cannabinoid system has much in common with other regions of the central nervous system. For example, there is general agreement that cannabinoids suppress dopamine release and presynaptically reduce transmitter release from cones and bipolar cells. How these effects relate to light and dark adaptation, receptive field formation, temporal properties of ganglion cells or visual perception are unknown. The presence of multiple endocannabinoids, degradative enzymes with their bioactive metabolites, and receptors provides a broad spectrum of opportunities for basic research and to identify targets for therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:18725316

  3. Glycinergic synaptic inputs to bipolar cells in the salamander retina

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Bruce R; Wu, Samuel M

    1998-01-01

    Glycine activated strychnine-sensitive chloride conductances at both the dendrites and the axonal telodendria of most bipolar cells in the salamander retina. The chloride equilibrium potential of bipolar cells was found to be negative to -50 mV, indicating that glycinergic synapses on bipolar cells are inhibitory. Some bipolar cells exhibited discrete, strychnine-sensitive, chloride-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). These were elicited by focal application of glutamate at the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Glycinergic synapses were localized using simultaneous focal application of calcium to retinal slices bathed in calcium-free media. Both dendritic and telodendritic glycinergic IPSCs were observed. The decay of the telodendritic IPSCs was well fitted by a single exponential with a time constant of 17.7 ± 8.7 ms. Similar kinetics were observed for dendritic IPSCs in some cells, but in one class of on-centre bipolar cell the decay of the dendritic IPSCs was better fitted by a sum of two exponentials with time constants 9.9 ± 4.3 and 51.3 ± 24.3 ms. The dendritic IPSCs were best driven by application of glutamate at the distal IPL (the off sublamina), while the telodendritic IPSCs were driven best by application near the telodendria. These results suggest that bipolar cell dendrites receive inhibitory glycinergic inputs from interplexiform cells that are excited by off-centre bipolar cells, whereas bipolar cell telodendria receive glycinergic amacrine cell inputs that are antagonistic to the photoreceptor inputs. Both inputs could be elicited in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but the dendritic IPSCs were sometimes abolished by TTX, suggesting that sodium-dependent spikes play an important role in the transmission of interplexiform cell signals to the outer plexiform layer. PMID:9503334

  4. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  5. In vivo imaging of microscopic structures in the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Wolfe, Robert; Gray, Daniel C.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dubra, Alfredo; Flannery, John G.; Williams, David R.; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ability to resolve single retinal cells in rodents in vivo has applications in rodent models of the visual system and retinal disease. We have characterized the performance of a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (fAOSLO) that provides cellular and subcellular imaging of rat retina in vivo. Methods Green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in retinal ganglion cells of normal Sprague Dawley rats via intravitreal injections of adeno-associated viral vectors. Simultaneous reflectance and fluorescence retinal images were acquired using the fAOSLO. fAOSLO resolution was characterized by comparing in vivo images with subsequent imaging of retinal sections from the same eyes using confocal microscopy. Results Retinal capillaries and eGFP-labeled ganglion cell bodies, dendrites, and axons were clearly resolved in vivo with adaptive optics (AO). AO correction reduced the total root mean square wavefront error, on average, from 0.30 μm to 0.05 μm (1.7-mm pupil). The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the average in vivo line-spread function (LSF) was ∼1.84 μm, approximately 82% greater than the FWHM of the diffraction-limited LSF. Conclusions With perfect aberration compensation, the in vivo resolution in the rat eye could be ∼2× greater than that in the human eye due to its large numerical aperture (∼0.43). While the fAOSLO corrects a substantial fraction of the rat eye's aberrations, direct measurements of retinal image quality reveal some blur beyond that expected from diffraction. Nonetheless, subcellular features can be resolved, offering promise for using AO to investigate the rodent eye in vivo with high resolution. PMID:19578019

  6. Electrical responses of rods in the retina of Bufo marinus

    PubMed Central

    Cervetto, L.; Pasino, E.; Torre, V.

    1977-01-01

    1. Intracellular responses to flashes and steps of light have been recorded from the outer segment and the cell body of rods in the retina of the Bufo marinus. The identification of the origin of recorded responses has been confirmed by intracellular marking. 2. Responses to flashes delivered in darkness or superimposed on a background were analysed. Responses recorded from outer segments conform to the principle of `spectral univariance'. The shape of the response is not affected by enlarging the spot diameter from 150 to 1000 μm. 3. The membrane potential measured in darkness at the outer segments varied from -15 to -25 mV. Injection of steady hyperpolarizing currents increases the size of the response to light; depolarizing currents reduce the response. The mean value of the input resistance is 97 ± 30 MΩ in darkness and increases by 20-30% during illumination. 4. The responses obtained from the cell body of rods have the same shape, time course and spectral sensitivity of those recorded at the outer segment. Injection of steady current at the cell body produces different effects than at the outer segment: hyperpolarizing currents reduce the amplitude of the response to light; depolarizing currents increase the response. 5. The experimental data are fitted according to a model similar to that used to describe the responses of turtle cones (Baylor & Hodgkin, 1974; Baylor, Hodgkin & Lamb, 1974a, b). 6. The model reproduces the electrical responses of the rod outer segment to a variety of stimuli: (a) brief flashes and steps of light in dark adapted conditions; (b) bright flashes superimposed on background illuminations; (c) pairs of flashes delivered at different time intervals. Responses to hyperpolarizing steps of current are also reproduced by the model. ImagesABCD PMID:406383

  7. Crizotinib-Induced Abnormal Signal Processing in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Maeda, Akemi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kaneda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Molecular target therapy for cancer is characterized by unique adverse effects that are not usually observed with cytotoxic chemotherapy. For example, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib causes characteristic visual disturbances, whereas such effects are rare when another ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alectinib, is used. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for these visual disturbances, the responses to light exhibited by retinal ganglion cells treated with these agents were evaluated using a C57BL6 mouse ex vivo model. Both crizotinib and alectinib changed the firing rate of ON and OFF type retinal ganglion cells. However, the ratio of alectinib-affected cells (15.7%) was significantly lower than that of crizotinib-affected cells (38.6%). Furthermore, these drugs changed the response properties to light stimuli of retinal ganglion cells in some of the affected cells, i.e., OFF cells responded to both ON and OFF stimuli, etc. Finally, the expressions of ALK (a target receptor of both crizotinib and alectinib) and of MET and ROS1 (additional target receptors of crizotinib) were observed at the mRNA level in the retina. Our findings suggest that these drugs might target retinal ganglion cells and that the potency of the drug actions on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells might be responsible for the difference in the frequencies of visual disturbances observed between patients treated with crizotinib and those treated with alectinib. The present experimental system might be useful for screening new molecular target agents prior to their use in clinical trials.

  8. Crizotinib-Induced Abnormal Signal Processing in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Maeda, Akemi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kaneda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Molecular target therapy for cancer is characterized by unique adverse effects that are not usually observed with cytotoxic chemotherapy. For example, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib causes characteristic visual disturbances, whereas such effects are rare when another ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alectinib, is used. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for these visual disturbances, the responses to light exhibited by retinal ganglion cells treated with these agents were evaluated using a C57BL6 mouse ex vivo model. Both crizotinib and alectinib changed the firing rate of ON and OFF type retinal ganglion cells. However, the ratio of alectinib-affected cells (15.7%) was significantly lower than that of crizotinib-affected cells (38.6%). Furthermore, these drugs changed the response properties to light stimuli of retinal ganglion cells in some of the affected cells, i.e., OFF cells responded to both ON and OFF stimuli, etc. Finally, the expressions of ALK (a target receptor of both crizotinib and alectinib) and of MET and ROS1 (additional target receptors of crizotinib) were observed at the mRNA level in the retina. Our findings suggest that these drugs might target retinal ganglion cells and that the potency of the drug actions on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells might be responsible for the difference in the frequencies of visual disturbances observed between patients treated with crizotinib and those treated with alectinib. The present experimental system might be useful for screening new molecular target agents prior to their use in clinical trials. PMID:26271036

  9. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors.

  10. Oxytocin Expression and Function in the Posterior Retina: A Novel Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halbach, Patrick; Pillers, De-Ann M.; York, Nathaniel; Asuma, Matti P.; Chiu, Michelle A.; Luo, Wenxiang; Tokarz, Sara; Bird, Ian M.; Pattnaik, Bikash R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Oxytocin (OXT) is recognized as an ubiquitously acting nonapeptide hormone that is involved in processes ranging from parturition to neural development. Its effects are mediated by cell signaling that occurs as a result of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) activation. We sought to determine whether the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is also expressed within the retina. Methods. Immunohistochemistry using cell-specific markers was used to localize OXT within the rhesus retina. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of OXTR in both human and rhesus retina. Single-cell RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine the expression of OXTR in cultured human fetal RPE (hfRPE) cells. Human fetal RPE cells loaded with FURA-2 AM were studied by ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to assess transient mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Results. Oxytocin was expressed in the cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix of the rhesus retina. Oxytocin mRNA and protein were expressed in the human and rhesus RPE. Oxytocin mRNA and protein expression were observed in cultured hfRPE cells, and exposure of these cells to 100 nM OXT induced a transient 79 ± 1.5 nM increase of [Ca2+]i. Conclusions. Oxytocin and OXTR are present in the posterior retina, and OXT induces an increase in hfRPE [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is active in the retina. We propose that OXT activation of the OXTR occurs in the posterior retina and that this may serve as a paracrine signaling pathway that contributes to communication between the cone photoreceptor and the RPE. PMID:25593022

  11. The development of retina and the optic tectum of petromyzon marinus, L. A light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, E; Anadón, R

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evolution of the retina and optic tectum along the stage of ammocoete, transformation and young adult of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) was studied using light microscopic techniques and quantitative morphometry. A retinal differentiated zone surrounding the optic nerve head with a kind of differentiated photoreceptors is present through all the stages studied until stage VI of transformation and its extension is almost unchanged since 60 mm. larve. From this length larval retina grows by extension of the lateral undifferentiated retina, that in large larvae subdivides in a lateral germinal zone and an intermediate differentiating zone more thickened were ganglion cells and the optic fibre layer differentiate early. In the largest larvae outer and inner neuroblastic layers were also recognized in these intermediate zone except in the most lateral retina. Mitotic activity was observed both in germinal and intermediate differentiating zones near the optic ventricle. The germinal zone disappears after the formation of an irideal retina in transforming stages and, with the exception of the photoreceptor layer, retinal layers were differentiated since stage III along the neural retina. The photoreceptor layer develops in the early stage VI along the retina. Adult pattern of retinal pigmentation is found in these stage. A periventricular and a lateral region were recognizable in the optic tectum of the larval period. Tectum of large larvae shows an outline of laminar organization. In the stage III of transformation the tectal lamination is the same of the young adults: the periventricular cell layer is subdivided by fibre bands and in the lateral region a stratum cellulare centralis and a stratum cellulare et fibrosum externum were distinguishable. A comparison between retinal and tectal growths was made. Most retinal and tectal growth and differentiation occurs before adult photoreceptors develop.

  12. Requirement for Microglia for the Maintenance of Synaptic Function and Integrity in the Mature Retina

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Zhang, Jun; Fariss, Robert N.; Ma, Wenxin; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Wang, Minhua; Qian, Hao hua; Badea, Tudor C.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Gan, Wen-Biao; Roger, Jerome E.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the principal resident immune cell of the CNS, exert significant influence on neurons during development and in pathological situations. However, if and how microglia contribute to normal neuronal function in the mature uninjured CNS is not well understood. We used the model of the adult mouse retina, a part of the CNS amenable to structural and functional analysis, to investigate the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina in a sustained manner using genetic methods. We discovered that microglia are not acutely required for the maintenance of adult retinal architecture, the survival of retinal neurons, or the laminar organization of their dendritic and axonal compartments. However, sustained microglial depletion results in the degeneration of photoreceptor synapses in the outer plexiform layer, leading to a progressive functional deterioration in retinal light responses. Our results demonstrate that microglia are constitutively required for the maintenance of synaptic structure in the adult retina and for synaptic transmission underlying normal visual function. Our findings on constitutive microglial function are relevant in understanding microglial contributions to pathology and in the consideration of therapeutic interventions that reduce or perturb constitutive microglial function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglia, the principal resident immune cell population in the CNS, has been implicated in diseases in the brain and retina. However, how they contribute to the everyday function of the CNS is unclear. Using the model of the adult mouse retina, we examined the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina. We found that in the absence of microglia, retinal neurons did not undergo overt cell death or become structurally disorganized in their processes. However, connections between neurons called synapses begin to break down, leading to a decreased ability of the retina to transmit light responses

  13. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Contartese, Daniela S.; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B.; Loidl, Cesar F.; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  14. Signals for color and achromatic contrast in the goldfish inner retina.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Dwight A

    2014-11-01

    A moving stimulus paradigm was designed to investigate color contrast encoding in the retina. Recently, this paradigm yielded suggestive evidence for color contrast encoding in zebrafish but the significance and generality remain uncertain since the properties of color coding in the zebrafish inner retina are largely unknown. Here, the question of color contrast is pursued in the goldfish retina where there is much accumulated evidence for retinal mechanisms of color vision and opponent color-coding, in particular. Recordings of a sensitive local field potential of the inner retina, the proximal negative response, were made in the intact, superfused retina in the light-adapted state. Responses to color contrast and achromatic contrast were analyzed by comparing responses to a green moving bar on green versus red backgrounds. The quantitative form of the irradiance/response curves was distinctly different under a range of conditions in 32 retinas, thereby providing robust evidence for red-green color contrast. The color contrast is based on successive contrast, occurs in the absence of overt color opponency, and clearly differs from previous findings in the goldfish retina for simultaneous color contrast mediated by color-opponent neurons. The form of the irradiance/response curves suggests that successive color contrast is particularly important when achromatic contrast is low, as often occurs in natural environments. The present results provide a parallel with the well-known principle of human color vision, first proposed by Kirschmann as the third law of color contrast, and may also have implications for the evolution of vertebrate color vision.

  15. Zebrafish inner retina: local signals for spatial position, luminance, and color contrast.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Dwight A

    2012-09-01

    The retina of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides an unusually favorable preparation for genetic and developmental studies of the retina. Although the retina has been studied extensively for two decades, the neuronal response of the inner retina is largely unknown. This report describes a prominent local field potential of the inner retina, the Proximal Negative Response (PNR). It is best evoked by small (100 μm) precisely positioned spots of light and is exceedingly sensitive to negative luminance contrast. The polarity, waveform, and other properties of the PNR suggest that it arises primarily from ON-OFF neurons of the proximal retina. The dominant response to negative contrast and its enhancement by light adaptation is believed due to a dominant presynaptic input from OFF bipolar cells. Color contrast was investigated by analyzing responses to a green bar moving on green versus red backgrounds. Over an intermediate range of irradiance, the response to green on red was larger than the response to green on green, thereby providing evidence for the encoding of color contrast. The present findings complement the classic principle of color contrast for human vision known as Kirschmann's third law and bring to mind the view of Walls that color contrast may have been the driving force for the evolution of color vision in lower vertebrates. In sum, the PNR of zebrafish provides clear evidence for the encoding of color and luminance contrast in the inner retina. It exhibits the defining properties common to many other vertebrates, reinforcing the view that the zebrafish may further serve as a model for retinal function and that the PNR may provide a new approach for studies of development, genetics, and retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

  16. Mechanical spectroscopy of retina explants at the protein level employing nanostructured scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mayazur Rahman, S; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zink, Mareike; Mayr, Stefan G

    2016-04-14

    Development of neuronal tissue, such as folding of the brain, and formation of the fovea centralis in the human retina are intimately connected with the mechanical properties of the underlying cells and the extracellular matrix. In particular for neuronal tissue as complex as the vertebrate retina, mechanical properties are still a matter of debate due to their relation to numerous diseases as well as surgery, where the tension of the retina can result in tissue detachment during cutting. However, measuring the elasticity of adult retina wholemounts is difficult and until now only the mechanical properties at the surface have been characterized with micrometer resolution. Many processes, however, such as pathological changes prone to cause tissue rupture and detachment, respectively, are reflected in variations of retina elasticity at smaller length scales at the protein level. In the present work we demonstrate that freely oscillating cantilevers composed of nanostructured TiO2 scaffolds can be employed to study the frequency-dependent mechanical response of adult mammalian retina explants at the nanoscale. Constituting highly versatile scaffolds with strong tissue attachment for long-term organotypic culture atop, these scaffolds perform damped vibrations as fingerprints of the mechanical tissue properties that are derived using finite element calculations. Since the tissue adheres to the nanostructures via constitutive proteins on the photoreceptor side of the retina, the latter are stretched and compressed during vibration of the underlying scaffold. Probing mechanical response of individual proteins within the tissue, the proposed mechanical spectroscopy approach opens the way for studying tissue mechanics, diseases and the effect of drugs at the protein level. PMID:26947970

  17. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B; Loidl, Cesar F; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  18. Purpurin is a key molecule for cell differentiation during the early development of zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Mikiko; Mawatari, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masayuki; Higashi, Tomomi; Saito, Hikaru; Muramoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsukawa, Toru; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Sugitani, Kayo; Kato, Satoru

    2009-12-11

    Recently, we cloned purpurin cDNA as an upregulated gene in the axotomized fish retina. The retina-specific protein was secreted from photoreceptors to ganglion cell layer during an early stage of optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish retina. The purpurin worked as a trigger molecule for axonal regrowth in adult injured fish retina. During zebrafish development, purpurin mRNA first appeared in ventral retina at 2 days post-fertilization (dpf) and spread out to the outer nuclear layer at 3 dpf. Here, we investigated the role of purpurin for zebrafish retinal development using morpholino gene knockdown technique. Injection of purpurin morpholino into the 1-2 cell stage of embryos significantly inhibited the transcriptional and translational expression of purpurin at 3 dpf. In the purpurin morphant, the eyeball was significantly smaller and retinal lamination of nuclear and plexiform layers was not formed at 3 dpf. Retinal cells of purpurin morphants were still proliferative and undifferentiated at 3 dpf. The visual function of purpurin morphant estimated by optomotor response was also suppressed at 5 dpf. By contrast, the control morphants with random sequence morpholino showed retinal lamination with distinct layers and differentiated cells at 3 dpf. These results strongly suggest that purpurin is a key molecule for not only optic nerve regeneration in adult but also cell differentiation during early development in embryo.

  19. Horizontal cells of the rabbit retina are non-selectively connected to the cones.

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Peichl, L

    1999-07-01

    Mammalian horizontal cells have generally been assumed to be spectrally non-selective in their cone contacts until recently, when specific contacts have been found for some species. The rabbit retina is frequently studied as a representative of dichromatic mammalian retinae. These are the reasons for elucidating the connections of the two types of horizontal cells (A-HCs and B-HCs) with the green-sensitive and blue-sensitive cones of the rabbit retina. Individual A-HCs and B-HCs were revealed by Lucifer Yellow injections, the total cone population overlying them was stained using peanut agglutinin, and the blue cones among these were identified by the antiserum JH 455 against blue cone opsin. Both A-HCs and B-HCs indiscriminately contact the two cone types available. This holds for the green cone-dominated dorsal retina and the blue cone-dominated ventral retina. No evidence was found for a third, potentially blue cone-selective, horizontal cell type [postulated by Famiglietti, E. V. (1990) Brain Res., 535, 174-179].

  20. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  1. Zebrafish Cx35: cloning and characterization of a gap junction gene highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Elizabeth; White, Thomas W; Ugonabo, Chioma; Olson, Carl; Nagy, James I; Valdimarsson, Gunnar

    2003-09-15

    The vertebrate connexin gene family encodes protein subunits of gap junction channels, which provide a route for direct intercellular communication. Consequently, gap junctions play a vital role in many developmental and homeostatic processes. Aberrant functioning of gap junctions is implicated in many human diseases. Zebrafish are an ideal vertebrate model to study development of the visual system as they produce transparent embryos that develop rapidly, thereby facilitating morphological and behavioral testing. In this study, zebrafish connexin35 has been cloned from a P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) library. Sequence analysis shows a high degree of similarity to the Cx35/36 orthologous group, which are expressed primarily in nervous tissue, including the retina. The gene encodes a 304-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 35 kDa. Injection of zebrafish Cx35 RNA into paired Xenopus oocytes elicited intercellular electrical coupling with weak voltage sensitivity. In development, Cx35 is first detectable by Northern analysis and RT-PCR, at 2 days post-fertilization (2 dpf), and in the adult it is expressed in the brain and retina. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the Cx35 protein is expressed in two sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer of the adult retina. A similar pattern was seen in the 4 and 5 dpf retina, but no labeling was detected in the retina of earlier embryos.

  2. Long-term glial reactivity in rat retinas ipsilateral and contralateral to experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Nakanishi, Yoriko; Yamada, Yuko; Negi, Akira

    2005-07-01

    Although glaucoma is known to alter glial reactivity, the long-term effect of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) on glial change has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to examine how chronically elevated IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) in unilateral eyes affect reactivities of astrocytes and Müller cells of rats in the treated as well as contralateral eyes over time. EVC in unilateral eyes of Sprague-Dawley rats were performed to produce chronically elevated IOP. Flat mounted retina preparations were made at several points until 6 months, which were subjected to immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Retinal homogenates were one- or two-dimensionally electrophoresed, followed by GFAP immunoblotting. EVC significantly increased IOPs up to 27.8 from 13.1 mmHg, which gradually decreased over time. In flat mounted retinas, astrocytes lost but Müller cells gained GFAP immunoreactivity at 3 days after cauterization. The glial changes were partially reversed over time but last even after IOP normalization. In the contralateral eyes, similar glial changes gradually appeared at 1 month after EVC and thereafter. Immunoblotting demonstrated not only molecular size shifts but also alteration of isoelectric focusing of GFAP both in treated and contralateral retina as compared with age-matched control retina. EVC led to opposite reactions in astrocytes and Müller cells in terms of GFAP immunoreactivity. Late-onset glial reactivity also occurred in the contralateral retina.

  3. Local edge detectors: a substrate for fine spatial vision at low temporal frequencies in rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Michiel; Taylor, W Rowland; Vaney, David I

    2006-12-20

    Visual acuity is limited by the size and density of the smallest retinal ganglion cells, which correspond to the midget ganglion cells in primate retina and the beta-ganglion cells in cat retina, both of which have concentric receptive fields that respond at either light-On or light-Off. In contrast, the smallest ganglion cells in the rabbit retina are the local edge detectors (LEDs), which respond to spot illumination at both light-On and light-Off. However, the LEDs do not predominate in the rabbit retina and the question arises, what role do they play in fine spatial vision? We studied the morphology and physiology of LEDs in the isolated rabbit retina and examined how their response properties are shaped by the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Although the LEDs comprise only approximately 15% of the ganglion cells, neighboring LEDs are separated by 30-40 microm on the visual streak, which is sufficient to account for the grating acuity of the rabbit. The spatial and temporal receptive-field properties of LEDs are generated by distinct inhibitory mechanisms. The strong inhibitory surround acts presynaptically to suppress both the excitation and the inhibition elicited by center stimulation. The temporal properties, characterized by sluggish onset, sustained firing, and low bandwidth, are mediated by the temporal properties of the bipolar cells and by postsynaptic interactions between the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. We propose that the LEDs signal fine spatial detail during visual fixation, when high temporal frequencies are minimal.

  4. The lens controls cell survival in the retina: Evidence from the blind cavefish Astyanax.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Allen G; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2007-11-15

    The lens influences retinal growth and differentiation during vertebrate eye development but the mechanisms are not understood. The role of the lens in retinal growth and development was studied in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which has eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. A lens and laminated retina initially develop in cavefish embryos, but the lens dies by apoptosis. The cavefish retina is subsequently disorganized, apoptotic cells appear, the photoreceptor layer degenerates, and retinal growth is arrested. We show here by PCNA, BrdU, and TUNEL labeling that cell proliferation continues in the adult cavefish retina but the newly born cells are removed by apoptosis. Surface fish to cavefish lens transplantation, which restores retinal growth and rod cell differentiation, abolished apoptosis in the retina but not in the RPE. Surface fish lens deletion did not cause apoptosis in the surface fish retina or affect RPE differentiation. Neither lens transplantation in cavefish nor lens deletion in surface fish affected retinal cell proliferation. We conclude that the lens acts in concert with another optic component, possibly the RPE, to promote retinal cell survival. Accordingly, deficiency in both optic structures may lead to eye degeneration in cavefish.

  5. Candidate molecular mechanisms for establishing cell identity in the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Andrew M.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, individual neurons must occupy appropriate positions within circuits. This requires that these neurons recognize and form connections with specific pre- and postsynaptic partners. Cellular recognition is also required for the spacing of cell bodies and the arborization of dendrites, factors that determine the inputs onto a given neuron. These issues are particularly evident in the retina, where different types of neurons are evenly spaced relative to other cells of the same type. This establishes a reiterated columnar circuitry resembling the insect retina. Establishing these mosaic patterns requires that cells of a given type (homotypic cells) be able to sense their neighbors. Therefore, both synaptic specificity and mosaic spacing require cellular identifiers. In synaptic specificity, recognition often occurs between different types of cells in a pre- and postsynaptic pairing. In mosaic spacing, recognition is often occurring between different cells of the same type, or homotypic self-recognition. Dendritic arborization can require recognition of different neurites of the same cell, or isoneuronal self-recognition. The retina is an extremely amenable system for studying the molecular identifiers that drive these various forms of recognition. The different neuronal types in the retina are well defined, and the genetic tools for marking cell types are increasingly available. In this review we will summarize retinal anatomy and describe cell types in the retina and how they are defined. We will then describe the requirements of a recognition code and discuss newly emerging candidate molecular mechanisms for recognition that may meet these requirements. PMID:21630473

  6. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  7. Interactions leading to horizontal cell responses in the turtle retina.

    PubMed

    Fuortes, M G; Simon, E J

    1974-07-01

    1. Small responses to large fields of dim monochromatic lights were recorded intracellularly from luminosity horizontal cells (L-cells), chromaticity horizontal cells (C-cells) and cones in the retinae of turtles, Pseudemys scripta elegans.2. Responses of cones to brief flashes applied over steady backgrounds were studied in order to interpret the corresponding responses of horizontal cells. Steady red or green backgrounds make the responses of red-sensitive cones smaller, faster and often diphasic. Green backgrounds have similar effects on the responses of green-sensitive cones to green flashes, but red backgrounds do not change them appreciably. Responses of double cones have properties intermediate between those of red and green cones.3. L-cells of both type I and type II are hyperpolarized by all visible wave-lengths, and their spectral sensitivity in the linear range resembles that of red cones. Their responses are not invariant with respect to colour, and their sensitivity to green relative to red stimuli increases during red backgrounds. These properties suggest that L-cells are activated mainly by red cones but also receive impingement from the red members of double cones.4. Spectral properties of red/green C-cells resemble those of green cones as modified by the recurrent action of L-cells. They can be explained assuming that red/green C-cells receive their principal impingement from green cones and subsidiary interactions from green/blue C-cells and the green members of double comes.5. The spectral sensitivity of the hyperpolarizing responses of green/blue C-cells is ascribed to impingement from blue cones. Their depolarizing responses have complex properties which suggest that they are brought about by the activity of both L-cells (probably through the blue cones) and red/green C-cells.6. It is concluded that the main properties of the responses of the horizontal cells can be explained by a simple circuit in which each horizontal cell is connected to a

  8. Microglia response in retina and optic nerve in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Lioba; Kuehn, Sandra; Pedreiturria, Xiomara; Haak, Kathrin; Pfarrer, Christiane; Dick, H Burkhard; Kleiter, Ingo; Joachim, Stephanie C

    2016-09-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a common rodent model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet, the long-term consequences for retina and optic nerve (ON) are unknown. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an encephalitogenic peptide (MOG35-55) and the controls received the carriers or PBS. Clinical symptoms started at day 8, peaked at day 14, and were prevalent until day 60. They correlated with infiltration and demyelination of the ON. In MOG-immunized animals more microglia cells in the ONs and retinas were detected at day 60. Additionally, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was combined with an increased macroglia response. At this late stage, an increased number of microglia was associated with axonal damage in the ON and in the retina with RGC loss. Whether glial activation contributes to repair mechanisms or adversely affects the number of RGCs is currently unclear. PMID:27609273

  9. Wiring patterns in the mouse retina: collecting evidence across the connectome, physiology and light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Felice A; Wong, Rachel O L

    2014-01-01

    The visual system has often been thought of as a parallel processor because distinct regions of the brain process different features of visual information. However, increasing evidence for convergence and divergence of circuit connections, even at the level of the retina where visual information is first processed, chips away at a model of dedicated and distinct pathways for parallel information flow. Instead, our current understanding is that parallel channels may emerge, not from exclusive microcircuits for each channel, but from unique combinations of microcircuits. This review depicts diagrammatically the current knowledge and remaining puzzles about the retinal circuit with a focus on the mouse retina. Advances in techniques for labelling cells and genetic manipulations have popularized the use of transgenic mice. We summarize evidence gained from serial electron microscopy, electrophysiology and light microscopy to illustrate the wiring patterns in mouse retina. We emphasize the need to explore proposed retinal connectivity using multiple methods to verify circuits both structurally and functionally. PMID:25172948

  10. Differential gene expression in mouse retina related to regional differences in vulnerability to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Krisztina; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In the C57BL/6J mouse retina, hyperoxia-induced degeneration of photoreceptors shows strong regional variation, beginning at a locus ~0.5 mm inferior to the optic disc. To identify gene expression differences that might underlie this variability in vulnerability, we have used microarray techniques to describe regional (superior-inferior) variations in gene expression in the retina. Methods Young adult C57BL/6J mice raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h at 5 lx and 12 h in darkness) were exposed to hyperoxia (75% oxygen for two weeks). Retinas were collected from hyperoxia-exposed and control animals without fixation and divided into superior and inferior halves. RNA was extracted from each sample, purified, and hybridized to Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix). The consistency of the microarray results was assessed using quantitative PCR for selected genes. Expression data were analyzed to identify genes and ncRNAs whose differential expression between the superior and inferior retina could be associated with relative vulnerability to hyperoxia. Results In control retinas, only two genes showed a fold difference in expression >2 between the superior and inferior retina; another 25 showed a fold difference of 1.5–2.0. Of these 27, the functions of six genes, including ventral anterior homeobox containing gene 2 (Vax2) and T-box 5 (Tbox5), are related to parameters of anatomic development and the functions of five are related to sensory perception. Among the latter, short-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1sw) was more strongly expressed in the inferior retina and medium-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1mw) in the superior retina. This is consistent with known differences in S- and M-cone distribution, confirming our separation of retinal regions. The highest fold difference was reported for membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), a member from the metallothionein group of cytoprotective proteins. To identify genes whose regulation by hyperoxia was

  11. Microspectrophotometry of single rhabdoms in the retina of the honeybee drone (Apis mellifera male).

    PubMed

    Muri, R B; Jones, G J

    1983-10-01

    The relative absorption spectra of the bistable photopigment of single rhabdoms from the dorsal region of the retina of the honeybee drone were obtained using slices of retina fixed in glutaraldehyde; less accurate measurements on unfixed tissue gave difference spectra that were similar to those for fixed retinae. The method used was based on measurements of absorbance changes during saturating adaptations of the visual pigment to different monochromatic lights. It is similar to previous methods based on measurements of difference spectra amplitudes, but is simpler to use and more accurate. The predominant pigment has states that absorb maximally at 446 (rhodopsin) and 505 nm (metarhodopsin). In addition, there is a small amount of another pigment whose two states absorb maximally at approximately 340 (UV) and 460 nm.

  12. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Rutin in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Ahmad, Rehan; Abuohashish, Hatem M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease of the eye. Increased oxidative stress has been considered the central factor in damaging neural retina in diabetes. Flavonoids, being powerful antioxidants, play protective roles in several oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a potential flavonoid, rutin, in the diabetic rat retina. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by single injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg). In age-matched control (non-diabetic) and 1 week of diabetic rats, rutin (100 mg/kg/day) was orally administered and continued for 5 weeks. In another group of diabetic rats, only saline was supplemented. After treatments, retinas from all the groups were isolated and analyzed for potential neurotrophic factors and apoptotic and oxidative stress markers using biochemical and immunoblotting techniques. Our results indicate that rutin possesses antidiabetic activity, as blood glucose level decreased and insulin level increased in diabetic rats. In the diabetic retina, rutin supplementation enhanced the reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and glutathione (GSH) (P < 0.05), and reduced the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) (P < 0.05). In addition, rutin treatment showed antiapoptotic activity by decreasing the level of caspase-3 and increasing the level of Bcl-2 in the diabetic retina. These results suggest the effectiveness of rutin in ameliorating the levels of neuroprotective factors in diabetic retina. Therefore, rutin might be a potential flavonoid that can prevent the retinal damage and subsequently the development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25929832

  14. Pineal organ-like organization of the retina in megachiroptean bats.

    PubMed

    Fejér, Z; Haldar, C; Ghosh, M; Frank, L C; Szepessy, Z; Szél, A; Manzano e Silva, M J; Vigh, B

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetically originated from photoreceptive structures, the pineal organ adapts the organism to circadian and circannual light periodicity of the environment, while the retina develops to a light-based locator. Bats have a nocturnal life and an echolocator orientation presumably modifying the task of photoreception. Looking for morphological basis of the special functions, in the present work we compared the fine structure and immunocytochemistry of the retina and pineal organ in micro- and megacrochiroptean bats. We found that there is a high similarity between the retina and pineal organ in megachiropterans when compared to other species investigated so far. Besides of photoreceptor derived pinealocytes, the pineal organ of both micro- and megachiropterans contain intrapineal neurons and/or ganglionic cells as well as glial cells. Like spherules and pedicles of retinal photoreceptors, axon-type processes of pinealocytes form synaptic ribbon containig terminals. Similar to retinal photoreceptors and neurons, pinealocytes and pineal neurons contain immunoreactive glutamate and aspartate. In addition, excitatory amino acids accumulate in the pineal neurohormonal endings and might have a role in the hormonal (serotonin?) release of the organ. Concerning the structure of the retina the highest similarity to the organization of the pineal organ was found in the megachiroptean fruit eating bats Cynopterus sphinx and Rusettus niloticus. The retina of these species forms folds and crypts in its photoreceptor layer. This organization is similar to the folds of the pineal wall successively developed during evolution. Since a folded photoreceptor layer is not viable for a photolocator screen in decoding two-dimensional images, we suppose that this peculiar organization of the megachiropteran retina is connected to a "pineal-like" photometer task of the eye needed by these species active at night.

  15. Intraretinal grafting reveals growth requirements and guidance cues for optic axons in the developing avian retina.

    PubMed

    Halfter, W

    1996-07-10

    To study environmental factors controlling the growth and navigation of optic axons in the eye, grafts of retinal, optic disc, optic tectum, and floor plate tissue were transplanted into organ-cultured embryonic chick or quail eyes. The growth of axons into and out of the graft was studied in cross sections of the cultured eyes and by DiI tracing in retinal whole mounts. Based on the location and trajectory of axons and based on the quantity of axons that entered and exited the grafts, several requirements for axonal navigation were established: (1) Axonal growth is restricted to an approximately 10-microm-thick layer at the vitreal surface of the retina. (2) The retinal neuroepithelium prior to axogenesis is nonpermissive for neurite outgrowth. This nonpermissive quality is transient and recedes peripherally as the differentiation of the retina progresses. (3) Embryonic axons are able to grow into neonatal and adult retinal grafts, demonstrating that older retina remains permissive for axonal growth. (4) The trajectory of axons into and from retinal grafts that had been rotated in their peripheral-central orientation showed that the retina has an inherent polarity that permits axon growth toward and away from the optic disc, but does not allow axon growth perpendicular to this direction. This centroperipheral cue operates locally rather than by long distance. (5) The optic disc provides an exit for the axons from the retina, but has no detectable neurotropic activity. Finally, optic axons from the host retina readily enter grafts of their target tissue, the optic tectum, but few axons are able to leave tectal transplants. PMID:8660885

  16. Receptive field properties of rod-driven horizontal cells in the skate retina.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Ripps, H

    1992-09-01

    The large receptive fields of retinal horizontal cells result primarily from extensive intercellular coupling via gap (electrical) junctions; thus, the extent of the receptive field provides an index of the degree to which the cells are electrically coupled. For rod-driven horizontal cells in the dark-adapted skate retina, a space constant of 1.18 +/- 0.15 mm (SD) was obtained from measurements with a moving slit stimulus, and a comparable value (1.43 +/- 0.55 mm) was obtained with variation in spot diameter. These values, and the extensive spread of a fluorescent dye (Lucifer Yellow) from the site of injection to neighboring cells, indicate that the horizontal cells of the all-rod retina of skate are well coupled electrically. Neither the receptive field properties nor the gap-junctional features of skate horizontal cells were influenced by the adaptive state of the retina: (a) the receptive field organization was unaffected by light adaptation, (b) similar dye coupling was seen in both dark- and light-adapted retinae, and (c) no significant differences were found in the gap-junctional particle densities measured in dark- and light-adapted retinas, i.e., 3,184 +/- 286/microns 2 (n = 8) and 3,073 +/- 494/microns 2 (n = 11), respectively. Moreover, the receptive fields of skate horizontal cells were not altered by either dopamine, glycine, GABA, or the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. We conclude that the rod-driven horizontal cells of the skate retina are tightly coupled to one another, and that the coupling is not affected by photic and pharmacological conditions that are known to modulate intercellular coupling between cone-driven horizontal cells in other species. PMID:1359000

  17. Differential distribution of glycine transporters in Müller cells and neurons in amphibian retinas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng; Li, Baoqin; Jursky, Frantisek; Shen, Wen

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian retinas are commonly used for electrophysiological studies on neural function and transduction because they share the same general properties as higher vertebrate retinas. Glycinergic synapses have been well described in amphibian retinas. However, the role of glycine transporters in the synapses is largely unknown. We studied the distribution and function of glycine transporters in the retinas from tiger salamanders, mudpuppies, and leopard frogs by immunofluorescence labeling and whole-cell recording methods. Our results indicated that GlyT1- and GlyT2-like transporters were present in Müller cells and neurons, respectively. GlyT1 labeling was present in Müller glial cells and co-localized with Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a Müller cell marker, whereas the GlyT2 immunoreactivity was present in the somas of amacrine cells (ACs) and processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Because the axon processes of glycinergic interplexiform cells (IPCs) are the only source of glycine input in the OPL, GlyT2 staining revealed a spatial pattern of the axon processes of IPCs in the OPL. The function of GlyT2 in the IPCs was studied in tiger salamander retinal horizontal cells (HCs) by whole-cell gramicidin perforated recording. The results demonstrated that inhibition of GlyT2 by a specific inhibitor, amoxapine, increased a tonic glycine input to HCs. Thus, the GlyT2 transporter is responsible for uptake of synaptic glycine in the outer retina. We also compared the distribution of glycine transporters in other amphibian species: salamander, mudpuppy, and frog. The results are consistent with the general pattern that GlyT1-like transporters are present in Müller cells and GlyT2-like transporters in neurons in amphibian retinas. PMID:17640406

  18. Hazardous effects of fried potato chips on the development of retina in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Sakr, Saber A; Badawy, Gamal M; Afify, Hanaa S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hazardous effects of fried potato chips upon the retina of two developmental stages of the albino rats aged 7 and 14 days from parturition. Methods Pregnant rats were arranged into two groups: control pregnant rats and consequently their delivered newborns until reaching 7 and 14 days old from parturition and fried potato chips group in which pregnant rats at the 6th day of gestation maintained on diet formed of fried potato chips supplied from the market mixed with standard diet at a concentration of 50% per each till 7 and 14 post-partum. Three fold integrated approaches were adopted, namely, histological, ultrastructural and proteomic analysis. Results Histological examination of the retina of the experimental offsprings revealed many histopathological changes, including massive degeneration, vacuolization and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer, as well as general reduction in retinal size. At the ultrastructural level, the retina of experimental offsprings exhibited number of deformities, including ill differentiated and degenerated nuclear layer, malformed and vacuolated pigment epithelium with vesiculated and fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, degenerated outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as swollen choriocapillaris and loss of neuronal cells. Proteomic analysis of retina of the two experimental developmental stages showed variations in the expressed proteins as a result of intoxication which illustrated the adverse toxic effects of fried potato chips upon the retina. Conclusions It can be concluded that the effect of fried potato chips on the development of retina in rats may be due to the presence of acrylamide or its metabolite. PMID:23569770

  19. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  20. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  1. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  2. Design and realization of retina-like three-dimensional imaging based on a MOEMS mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie; Hao, Qun; Xia, Wenze; Peng, Yuxin; Cheng, Yang; Mu, Jiaxing; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    To balance conflicts for high-resolution, large-field-of-view and real-time imaging, a retina-like imaging method based on time-of flight (TOF) is proposed. Mathematical models of 3D imaging based on MOEMS are developed. Based on this method, we perform simulations of retina-like scanning properties, including compression of redundant information and rotation and scaling invariance. To validate the theory, we develop a prototype and conduct relevant experiments. The preliminary results agree well with the simulations.

  3. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis)

    PubMed Central

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J.; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A.; Akinola, Oluwole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  4. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  5. Topographical characterization of cone photoreceptors and the area centralis of the canine retina

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, Freya M.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Williamson, Helen; Williams, David L.; Luthert, Philip J.; Ali, Robin R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The canine is an important large animal model of human retinal genetic disorders. Studies of ganglion cell distribution in the canine retina have identified a visual streak of high density superior to the optic disc with a temporal area of peak density known as the area centralis. The topography of cone photoreceptors in the canine retina has not been characterized in detail, and in contrast to the macula in humans, the position of the area centralis in dogs is not apparent on clinical funduscopic examination. The purpose of this study was to define the location of the area centralis in the dog and to characterize in detail the topography of rod and cone photoreceptors within the area centralis. This will facilitate the investigation and treatment of retinal disease in the canine. Methods We used peanut agglutinin, which labels cone matrix sheaths and antibodies against long/medium wavelength (L/M)- and short wavelength (S)-cone opsins, to stain retinal cryosections and flatmounts from beagle dogs. Retinas were imaged using differential interference contrast imaging, fluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Within the area centralis, rod and cone size and density were quantified, and the proportion of cones expressing each cone opsin subtype was calculated. Using a grid pattern of sampling in 9 retinal flatmounts, we investigated the distribution of cones throughout the retina to predict the location of the area centralis. Results We identified the area centralis as the site of maximal density of rod and cone photoreceptor cells, which have a smaller inner segment cross-sectional area in this region. L/M opsin was expressed by the majority of cones in the retina, both within the area centralis and in the peripheral retina. Using the mean of cone density distribution from 9 retinas, we calculated that the area centralis is likely to be centered at a point 1.5 mm temporal and 0.6 mm superior to the optic disc. For clinical funduscopic examination, this

  6. Impedance as a method to sense proximity at the electrode-retina interface.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aditi; Chan, Leanne Lai-Hang; Gonzalez, Alejandra; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2011-12-01

    Precise positioning of a stimulating electrode in the eye is not possible by simple visualization. However, reliable measurement of responses to retinal stimulation requires consistent positioning. The present study focuses on impedance measurement techniques to sense the proximity of the electrode to the retina. A platinum-iridium stimulation electrode was placed inside the rat eye and impedance was recorded at different positions of the stimulating electrode relative to the retina. The presence of robust electrically evoked response in the superior colliculus indicates that the electrode may not have to be in absolute contact in order to elicit a neural response. Optical coherence tomography imaging confirmed the distance-impedance relationship. PMID:21984523

  7. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  8. Raman spectroscopy reveals spectroscopic changes in histologically normal retinas in a mouse model of alpha-synucleinopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The retina is an extension of the nervous system and is accessible for in vivo assessments. We have previously demonstrated changes in retinal function and pathology associated with scrapie, TME and BSE. The purpose of this work was to determine the utility of the retina to identify early CNS change...

  9. Effects of X radiation on the retina of the albino rabbit as viewed with the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.C.; Barsa-Newton, M.C.; Wardly, J.

    1980-02-01

    The eyes of albino rabbits were exposed in vivo to 7000 rad of X radiation, and the retinas were examined with a scanning electron microscope 24 and 72 h after irradiation. The rods and cones of the retina were observed to show the most severe damage.

  10. Estimación de la incerteza cinemática de los espectros obtenidos con REOSC (CAsLeo), Flamingos-2 y PHOENIX (Gemini) para observaciones de gas ionizado en galaxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, G.; Díaz, R. J.; Güunthardt, G.; Agüuero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Gimeno, G.

    The determination of the radial velocity curves of ionized gas in galaxies requires knowing the value of the internal kinematic uncertainly along the slit for the used spectrographs. We present preliminary results of the study of the variation of the measured radial velocity of both the telluric and comparison emission lines in the spatial direction. This was done for the spectrographs REOSC, Flamingos-2 (F2) and Phoenix. In particular we are interested in using this data to homogenize the rotation curves of nearby galaxies in large-scale ranges. These results will be also useful as references for those works that measure radial velocities of extended objects using only one emission line of ionized gas. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  11. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  12. New HPLC evidence on endogenous tauret in retina and pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Petrosian, A M; Haroutounian, J E; Gundersen, T E; Blomhoff, R; Fugelli, K; Kanli, H

    2000-01-01

    This investigation was improve the separation for tauret (retinylidene taurine) and to compare its content in the retina under dark and light adaptation. To prevent tauret hydrolysis, retinal samples were quickly frozen and lyophilized. Methanol extracts of dried retina and pigment epithelium from both dark- or light-adapted frogs, Rana ridibunda, were injected onto HPLC. Synthetic standard tauret appeared at 4.7 min after the solvent front. At the same time, an endogenous substance was eluted from the mixed retinal and pigment epithelial samples. The UV spectra of this endogenous compound matched with the spectra of synthetic tauret obtained under identical conditions, with lambda(max) = 446 nm at peak. We conclude that the HPLC system used permitted full separation of tauret from the methanol extracts of the retina and pigment epithelium. TLC and further HPLC analysis have shown that tauret quantities were several times higher in the retina and pigment epithelium of the frogs adapted to dark compared with those light-adapted (about 4 h under 1000 1x illumination). Tauret based vitamin A transport is probably involved in other systems as well, where along with its other known beneficial effects taurine probably is necessary to facilitate vitamin A transport.

  13. Species-specific wiring for direction selectivity in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huayu; Smith, Robert G; Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Briggman, Kevin L

    2016-07-01

    Directionally tuned signalling in starburst amacrine cell (SAC) dendrites lies at the heart of the circuit that detects the direction of moving stimuli in the mammalian retina. The relative contributions of intrinsic cellular properties and network connectivity to SAC direction selectivity remain unclear. Here we present a detailed connectomic reconstruction of SAC circuitry in mouse retina and describe two previously unknown features of synapse distributions along SAC dendrites: input and output synapses are segregated, with inputs restricted to proximal dendrites; and the distribution of inhibitory inputs is fundamentally different from that observed in rabbit retina. An anatomically constrained SAC network model suggests that SAC–SAC wiring differences between mouse and rabbit retina underlie distinct contributions of synaptic inhibition to velocity and contrast tuning and receptive field structure. In particular, the model indicates that mouse connectivity enables SACs to encode lower linear velocities that account for smaller eye diameter, thereby conserving angular velocity tuning. These predictions are confirmed with calcium imaging of mouse SAC dendrites responding to directional stimuli. PMID:27350241

  14. Simultaneous ex vivo Functional Testing of Two Retinas by in vivo Electroretinogram System

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types. PMID:25992809

  15. Expression and Distribution Pattern of Aquaporin 4, 5 and 11 in Retinas of 15 Different Species.

    PubMed

    Amann, Barbara; Kleinwort, Kristina J H; Hirmer, Sieglinde; Sekundo, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hauck, Stefanie M; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small integral membrane proteins with 13 members in mammals and are essential for water transport across membranes. They are found in many different tissues and cells. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding retinal aquaporin expression and subcellular localization between genome and protein analyses and among various species. AQP4, 7, 9 and 11 were described in the retina of men; whereas AQP6, 8 and 10 were earlier identified in rat retinas and AQP4, 5 and 11 in horses. Since there is a lack of knowledge regarding AQP expression on protein level in retinas of different animal models, we decided to analyze retinal cellular expression of AQP4, 5 and 11 in situ with immunohistochemistry. AQP4 was detected in all 15 explored species, AQP5 and AQP11 in 14 out of 15. Interestingly, AQP4 was unambiguously expressed in Muller glial cells, whereas AQP5 was differentially allocated among the species analyzed. AQP11 expression was Muller glial cell-specific in 50% of the animals, whereas in the others, AQP11 was detected in ganglion cell layer and at photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate a disparity in aquaporin distribution in retinas of various animals, especially for AQP5 and 11. PMID:27438827

  16. An unconventional glutamatergic circuit in the retina formed by vGluT3 amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghoon; Chen, Lujing; Chen, Minggang; Ye, Meijun; Seal, Rebecca P; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2014-11-19

    In the vertebrate retina, glutamate is traditionally thought to be released only by photoreceptors and bipolar cells to transmit visual signals radially along parallel ON and OFF channels. Lateral interactions in the inner retina are mediated by amacrine cells, which are thought to be inhibitory neurons. Here, we report calcium-dependent glutamate release from vGluT3-expressing amacrine cells (GACs) in the mouse retina. GACs provide an excitatory glutamatergic input to ON-OFF and ON direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) and a subpopulation of W3 ganglion cells, but not to starburst amacrine cells. GACs receive excitatory inputs from both ON and OFF channels, generate ON-OFF light responses with a medium-center, wide-surround receptive field structure, and directly regulate ganglion cell activity. The results reveal a functional glutamatergic circuit that mediates noncanonical excitatory interactions in the retina and probably plays a role in generating ON-OFF responses, crossover excitation, and lateral excitation.

  17. Expression and Distribution Pattern of Aquaporin 4, 5 and 11 in Retinas of 15 Different Species

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Barbara; Kleinwort, Kristina J. H.; Hirmer, Sieglinde; Sekundo, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Deeg, Cornelia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small integral membrane proteins with 13 members in mammals and are essential for water transport across membranes. They are found in many different tissues and cells. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding retinal aquaporin expression and subcellular localization between genome and protein analyses and among various species. AQP4, 7, 9 and 11 were described in the retina of men; whereas AQP6, 8 and 10 were earlier identified in rat retinas and AQP4, 5 and 11 in horses. Since there is a lack of knowledge regarding AQP expression on protein level in retinas of different animal models, we decided to analyze retinal cellular expression of AQP4, 5 and 11 in situ with immunohistochemistry. AQP4 was detected in all 15 explored species, AQP5 and AQP11 in 14 out of 15. Interestingly, AQP4 was unambiguously expressed in Muller glial cells, whereas AQP5 was differentially allocated among the species analyzed. AQP11 expression was Muller glial cell-specific in 50% of the animals, whereas in the others, AQP11 was detected in ganglion cell layer and at photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate a disparity in aquaporin distribution in retinas of various animals, especially for AQP5 and 11. PMID:27438827

  18. Using myc genes to search for stem cells in the ciliary margin of the Xenopus retina.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao Yan; Harris, William A

    2012-04-01

    The ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of fish and frog retinas contains cells that proliferate throughout postembryonic development as the retina grows with increasing body size, indicating the presence of stem cells in this region. However, neither the location nor the molecular identity of retinal stem cells has been identified. Here, we show in Xenopus that c-myc and n-myc are sequentially expressed both during development and in the post-embryonic retina. The c-myc+/n-myc- cells near the extreme periphery of the CMZ cycle more slowly and preferentially retain DNA label compared to their more central cmyc+/n-myc+ neighbors which cycle rapidly and preferentially dilute DNA label. During retinal development c-myc is functionally required earlier than n-myc, and n-myc expression depends on earlier c-myc expression. The expression of c-myc but not n-myc in the CMZ depends on growth factor signaling. Our results suggest that c-myc+/n-myc- cells in the far peripheral CMZ are candidates for a niche-dependent population of retinal stem cells that give rise to more centrally located and rapidly dividing n-myc+ progenitors of more limited proliferative potential. Analysis of homologues of these genes in the zebrafish CMZ suggests that the transition from c-myc to n-myc expression might be conserved in other lower vertebrates whose retinas growth throughout life.

  19. Effects of moderate-intensity light on vitamin A-deficient rat retinas

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Dawson, L.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieri, J.G.

    1981-05-01

    The effects of moderate-intensity light (150 to 200 ft-cd) on retinal structure were compared between retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient rats after 1 to 6 days of light exposure during the 12 hr light phase of the cycle. Both damage to the outer segments and loss of photoreceptor cells were accelerated in retinol-adequate rats. Outer segments in retinas of retinol-adequate rats showed an abnormal staining pattern and disruption of disc structure in the distal portion about 2 days before those of retinol-deficient rats. After 4 days of exposure 24% of the photoreceptor cells had degenerated in the retinol-adequate retinas, but only 6% in the retinol-deficient retinas. By 6 days 65% and 41% of the photoreceptors had degenerated in the retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient retinas, respectively. Thus light exposure induced more rapid degeneration of photoreceptor cells in rats receiving adequate retinol than in those deficient in this vitamin.

  20. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. Visual signals in the retina: from photons to synapses.

    PubMed

    Lagnado, L

    2000-01-01

    The ability to see the world around us is an immediate and striking example of the abilities of the nervous system, and perhaps for this reason, vision is one of the most intensively studied aspects of brain function (Hubel, 1995). This paper examines some of the earliest steps in vision occurring in the retina (Dowling, 1987; Rodieck, 1998).

  1. A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat.

    PubMed

    Baig-Silva, M S; Hathcock, C D; Hetling, J R

    2005-03-01

    A remaining challenge to the development of electronic prostheses for vision is improving the effectiveness of retinal stimulation. Electrode design and stimulus parameters need to be optimized such that the neural output from the retina conveys information to the mind's eye that aids the patient in interpreting his or her environment. This optimization will require a detailed understanding of the response of the retina to electrical stimulation. The identity and response characteristics of the cellular targets of stimulation need to be defined and evaluated. Described here is an in vivo preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in rat at the cellular level. The use of rat makes available a number of well-described models of retinal disease that motivate prosthesis development. Artificial stimulation can be investigated by adapting techniques traditionally employed to study the response of the retina to photic stimuli, such as recording at the cornea, single-cell recording, and pharmacological dissection of the response. Pilot studies include amplitude-intensity response data for subretinal and transretinal stimulation paradigms recorded in wild-type rats and a transgenic rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The ability to record single-unit ganglion cell activity in vivo is also demonstrated.

  2. The Wilms' tumor gene Wt1 is required for normal development of the retina.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Wagner, Nicole; Vidal, Valerie P I; Schley, Gunnar; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Schedl, Andreas; Englert, Christoph; Scholz, Holger

    2002-03-15

    The Wilms' tumor gene Wt1 is known for its important functions during genitourinary and mesothelial formation. Here we show that Wt1 is necessary for neuronal development in the vertebrate retina. Mouse embryos with targeted disruption of Wt1 exhibit remarkably thinner retinas than age-matched wild-type animals. A large fraction of retinal ganglion cells is lost by apoptosis, and the growth of optic nerve fibers is severely disturbed. Strikingly, expression of the class IV POU-domain transcription factor Pou4f2 (formerly Brn-3b), which is critical for the survival of most retinal ganglion cells, is lost in Wt1(-/-) retinas. Forced expression of Wt1 in cultured cells causes an up-regulation of Pou4f2 mRNA. Moreover, the Wt1(-KTS) splice variant can activate a reporter construct carrying 5'-regulatory sequences of the human POU4F2. The lack of Pou4f2 and the ocular defects in Wt1(-/-) embryos are rescued by transgenic expression of a 280 kb yeast artificial chromosome carrying the human WT1 gene. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a continuous requirement for Wt1 in normal retina formation with a critical role in Pou4f2-dependent ganglion cell differentiation.

  3. Mice with hepcidin-resistant ferroportin accumulate iron in the retina.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Milan; Song, Delu; Clark, Esther; Sterling, Jacob; Grieco, Steve; Altamura, Sandro; Galy, Bruno; Hentze, Matthias; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-02-01

    Because ferroportin (Fpn) is the only known mammalian cellular iron exporter, understanding its localization and regulation within the retina would shed light on the direction of retinal iron flux. The hormone hepcidin may regulate retinal Fpn, as it triggers Fpn degradation in the gut. Immunofluorescence was used to label Fpn in retinas of mice with 4 different genotypes (wild type; Fpn C326S, a hepcidin-resistant Fpn; hepcidin knockout; and ceruloplasmin/hephaestin double knockout). No significant difference in Fpn levels was observed in these retinas. Fpn localized to the abluminal side of the outer plexiform vascular endothelial cells, Müller glia cells, and the basolateral side of the retinal pigment epithelium. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-hepcidin was injected into the eyes of hepcidin knockout mice, while AAV-lacZ was injected into the contralateral eyes as a control. AAV-hepcidin injected eyes had increased ferritin immunolabeling in retinal vascular endothelial cells. Fpn C326S mice had systemic iron overload compared to wild type and had the fastest retinal iron accumulation of any hereditary model studied to date. The results suggest that physiologic hepcidin levels are insufficient to alter Fpn levels within the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells, but may limit iron transport into the retina from vascular endothelial cells.

  4. Imaging the primate retina using polarization-sensitve optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsack, Jason D.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Milner, Thomas E.

    2001-06-01

    We report results of a study using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) to measure physical properties of the retina and to create images of retinal microstructure. Our instrument incorporates a mode-locked Ti:Al2O3 laser and achromatic polarization optics to record high resolution images. High-resolution B scans (two-dimensional images) of the in-vivo rhesus monkey retina have been recorded in the optic disk, peripapillary area and macula. Images of the peripapillary area allow measurement of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and calculation of the Stokes parameters of light back-scattered from the retina. Results of our study indicate: 1) PSOCT may be utilized to measure RNFL thickness; 2) PSOCT may be used to measure areas of birefringent tissue in the retina; and 3) selection of a scan pattern surrounding the optic nerve should account for the relatively large radial RNFL thickness gradient. Moreover, since glaucoma manifests in a destruction of the RNFL, PSOCT may be useful as a screening and diagnostic modality.

  5. In vivo imaging of raptor retina with ultra high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Major, James C., Jr.; McKeown, Craig; Wehbe, Hassan; Jiao, Shuliang; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2008-02-01

    Among birds, raptors are well known for their exceptional eyesight, which is partly due to the unique structure of their retina. Because the raptor retina is the most advanced of any animal species, in vivo examination of its structure would be remarkable. Furthermore, a noticeable percentage of traumatic ocular injuries are identified in birds of prey presented to rehabilitation facilities. Injuries affecting the posterior segment have been considered as a major impact on raptor vision. Hence, in vivo examination of the structure of the posterior segment of the raptors would be helpful for the diagnosis of traumatized birds. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the application of ultrahigh-resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) for non contact in vivo imaging of the retina of birds of prey, which to the best of our knowledge has never been attempted. For the first time we present high quality OCT images of the retina of two species of bird of prey, one diurnal hawk and one nocturnal owl.

  6. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33(+) Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases.

  7. Macroglia-microglia interactions via TSPO signaling regulates microglial activation in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minhua; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Ma, Wenxin; Rodriguez, Ignacio R; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T

    2014-03-01

    Chronic retinal inflammation in the form of activated microglia and macrophages are implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. However, molecular biomarkers and targeted therapies for immune cell activation in these disorders are currently lacking. To address this, we investigated the involvement and role of translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker of microglial and astrocyte gliosis in brain degeneration, in the context of retinal inflammation. Here, we find that TSPO is acutely and specifically upregulated in retinal microglia in separate mouse models of retinal inflammation and injury. Concomitantly, its endogenous ligand, diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), is upregulated in the macroglia of the mouse retina such as astrocytes and Müller cells. In addition, we discover that TSPO-mediated signaling in microglia via DBI-derived ligands negatively regulates features of microglial activation, including reactive oxygen species production, TNF-α expression and secretion, and microglial proliferation. The inducibility and effects of DBI-TSPO signaling in the retina reveal a mechanism of coordinated macroglia-microglia interactions, the function of which is to limit the magnitude of inflammatory responses after their initiation, facilitating a return to baseline quiescence. Our results indicate that TSPO is a promising molecular marker for imaging inflammatory cell activation in the retina and highlight DBI-TSPO signaling as a potential target for immodulatory therapies.

  8. Antioxidant Drug Therapy Approaches for Neuroprotection in Chronic Diseases of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Andrew J.; Kaja, Simon; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Kunjukunju, Nancy; Koulen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways contributing to visual signal transduction in the retina generate a high energy demand that has functional and structural consequences such as vascularization and high metabolic rates contributing to oxidative stress. Multiple signaling cascades are involved to actively regulate the redox state of the retina. Age-related processes increase the oxidative load, resulting in chronically elevated levels of oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species, which in the retina ultimately result in pathologies such as glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration, as well as the neuropathic complications of diabetes in the eye. Specifically, oxidative stress results in deleterious changes to the retina through dysregulation of its intracellular physiology, ultimately leading to neurodegenerative and potentially also vascular dysfunction. Herein we will review the evidence for oxidative stress-induced contributions to each of the three major ocular pathologies, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. The premise for neuroprotective strategies for these ocular disorders will be discussed in the context of recent clinical and preclinical research pursuing novel therapy development approaches. PMID:24473138

  9. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J.; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P.; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A.; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33+ Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases. PMID:26755704

  10. Cholinergic neurotransmission in the mammalian retina. Annual report (Summary), 30 September 1983-29 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Pourcho, R.G.

    1984-11-30

    This study is directed toward the cytochemical localization of cholinergic markers in a mammalian (cat) retina and biochemical characterization of the interactions of cholinergic neurons with other neurotransmitters in the retina. Particular attention is paid to localization of acetylcholinesterase and the effects of anticholinesterase organophosphates on normal retinal function. Studies to date have shown the presence of newly synthesized acetylcholine in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. Acetylcholinesterase was localized in both amacrine and ganglion cells. The presumed cholinotoxin, AF64A, causes severe destruction in the cat retina, involving both amacrine and ganglion cells. Although the evidence to date indicates that only amacrine cells are cholinergic, ganglion cells appear to play a major role in cholinergic or related pathways and may be particularly susceptible to organophosphate poisoning. The biochemical component of the study has centered on the development of a superfusion system in which to monitor the release of various amino acid transmitters in response to application of acetylcholine. Preliminary experiments suggest that cholinergic amacrine cells are presynaptic to glycinergic cells in the cat retina. After the normal pattern has been established, it should be possible to investigate the effects of changes in the level of acetylcholinesterase on these responses.

  11. Cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying blood flow regulation in the retina choroid in health disease

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A.; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2012-01-01

    We review the cellular and physiological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of blood flow in the retina and choroid in health and disease. Due to the intrinsic light sensitivity of the retina and the direct visual accessibility of fundus blood vessels, the eye offers unique opportunities for the non-invasive investigation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation. The ability of the retinal vasculature to regulate its blood flow is contrasted with the far more restricted ability of the choroidal circulation to regulate its blood flow by virtue of the absence of glial cells, the markedly reduced pericyte ensheathment of the choroidal vasculature, and the lack of intermediate filaments in choroidal pericytes. We review the cellular and molecular components of the neurovascular unit in the retina and choroid, techniques for monitoring retinal and choroidal blood flow, responses of the retinal and choroidal circulation to light stimulation, the role of capillaries, astrocytes and pericytes in regulating blood flow, putative signaling mechanisms mediating neurovascular coupling in the retina, and changes that occur in the retinal and choroidal circulation during diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. We close by discussing issues that remain to be explored. PMID:22580107

  12. A model microfluidics-based system for the human and mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shawn; Thakur, Ankush; Redenti, Stephen; Vazquez, Maribel

    2015-12-01

    The application of microfluidics technologies to the study of retinal function and response holds great promise for development of new and improved treatments for patients with degenerative retinal diseases. Restoration of vision via retinal transplantation therapy has been severely limited by the low numbers of motile cells observed post transplantation. Using modern soft lithographic techniques, we have developed the μRetina, a novel and convenient biomimetic microfluidics device capable of examing the migratory behavior of retinal lineage cells within biomimetic geometries of the human and mouse retina. Coupled computer simulations and experimental validations were used to characterize and confirm the formation of chemical concentration gradients within the μRetina, while real-time images within the device captured radial and theta cell migration in response to concentration gradients of stromal derived factor (SDF-1), a known chemoattractant. Our data underscore how the μRetina can be used to examine the concentration-dependent migration of retinal progenitors in order to enhance current therapies, as well as develop novel migration-targeted treatments.

  13. Synthesis and secretion of interstitial retinol-binding protein by the human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Fliesler, S.J.; Rayborn, M.E.; Fong, S.L.; Landers, R.A.; Bridges, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) is a soluble glycoprotein present between the retina and pigmented epithelium, which may function to shuttle vitamin A derivatives between these tissues. While previous studies have shown that the retina is solely responsible for IRBP synthesis, the specific retinal cell(s) in which this occurs has not been established. Since the carbohydrate moiety of IRBP contains fucose, the authors have analyzed the sites of incorporation of /sup 3/H-fucose in the human retina in vitro, using autoradiography. Following a 30-min pulse incubation, all retinal layers exhibited incorporation of label; however, the rod photoreceptor inner segments contained one- to two-fold more radioactivity than was present in any other retinal compartment. In autoradiographs of retinas recovered following a 4 hr chase incubation, all retinal layers retained similar levels of radioactivity with the exception of the rod photoreceptors, cone photoreceptors and cells in the inner nuclear layer, which lost 75, 11, and 14 percent, respectively of the radioactivity present immediately following the 30-min pulse. Proteins present in the chase incubation medium were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. The principal labeled component in the chase medium was identified as IRBP by immunoprecipitation with antibovine-IRBP immunoglobulins.

  14. Expression and Function of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina and the Visual Brain

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important retrograde modulators of synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system. Cannabinoid receptors are seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors favoring Gi/o protein. They are known to play an important role in various processes, including metabolic regulation, craving, pain, anxiety, and immune function. In the last decade, there has been a growing interest for endocannabinoids in the retina and their role in visual processing. The purpose of this review is to characterize the expression and physiological functions of the endocannabinoid system in the visual system, from the retina to the primary visual cortex, with a main interest regarding the retina, which is the best-described area in this system so far. It will show that the endocannabinoid system is widely present in the retina, mostly in the through pathway where it can modulate neurotransmitter release and ion channel activity, although some evidence also indicates possible mechanisms via amacrine, horizontal, and Müller cells. The presence of multiple endocannabinoid ligands, synthesizing and catabolizing enzymes, and receptors highlights various pharmacological targets for novel therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:26839718

  15. Retinal Physiology: Non-Bipolar-Cell Excitatory Drive in the Inner Retina.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Euler, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The long-held view that bipolar cells provide the exclusive excitatory drive to the mammalian inner retina has been challenged: new studies indicate that, instead, at least two cells that lack the dendrites characteristic for bipolar cells, and therefore resemble amacrine cells, excite inner retinal circuits using glutamate.

  16. Transmission of light to the young primate retina: possible implications for the formation of lipofuscin.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Elizabeth R; Merriam, John; Zheng, Lei; Dillon, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the transmission properties of the anterior segment of young primate eyes and potentially relate those changes to photochemical processes in the retina that lead to the early, rapid formation of lipofuscin. A simple method has been developed to determine the optical properties of the anterior segment of the intact eye. Using this technique, the transmission/absorption properties of primate cadaver eyes were determined. A young primate anterior segment has a maximum absorption at 365nm due to the presence of the O-β-glucoside of 3-hydroxykynurenine in the lens. This is synthesized in the last trimester of gestation. Although this compound filters out most of the UV light from reaching the retina, there is a small window of transmission centered on an absorption minimum at 320nm. This closes by the second decade of life. The window of transmission of UV light to the primate retina may explain the initial accelerated formation of lipofuscin in the young human retina by a photochemical process. This would be exacerbated by any decrease in the ozone layer with concomitant increase in UV-B reaching the earth's surface.

  17. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. Visual signals in the retina: from photons to synapses.

    PubMed

    Lagnado, L

    2000-01-01

    The ability to see the world around us is an immediate and striking example of the abilities of the nervous system, and perhaps for this reason, vision is one of the most intensively studied aspects of brain function (Hubel, 1995). This paper examines some of the earliest steps in vision occurring in the retina (Dowling, 1987; Rodieck, 1998). PMID:10662887

  18. Effects of Radiation on Rat Retina after 18 days of Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D.; Corbett, R.; Turnbill, C.; Black, S.; Dayhoff, D.; McGourty, J.; Lee, R.; Harrison, G.; Savick, L.

    1978-01-01

    Although cumulative effects an retina from low-dose radiation during prolonged spaceflight are not known, ary impairment of vision could set limits for spaceflight duration. Cosmic rays are now considered to be the cause of the "light flashes" seen during spaceflight by activating retina cells as they pass through the photoreceptors. Previous studies have also shown retinal cellular alterations and cell necrosis from high-energy, particle (HZE) radiation. Ten rats, 5 centrifuged during flight (FC) to simulate gravity and 5 in-flight stationary (FS) experiencing hypogravity, orbited Earth for 18.5 days on Cosmos 936. The animals were sacrificed 25 days post-recovery and the eyes flown to Ames Res. Ctr. The pattern of cell necrosis in the retinas from the FC group showed the same response to radiation as the FS. This would indicate that hypogravity was not a factor in the observed results. Also the cellular response in the retinas exposed in the Berkeley accelerator again matched both the FC and FS eyes. Thus all three conditions provide comparable changes and indicate HZE particles as the possible cause of the cellular alterations, channels, and breakdown.

  19. Hough transform algorithm for real-time pattern recognition using an artificial retina camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xin; Otobe, Kazunori

    2001-04-01

    An artificial retina camera (ARC) is employed for real-time preprocessing of images. And the algorithm of Hough transform is advanced for detecting the biology-images with approximate circle edge-information in the two-dimension space. This method also works in parallel for processing multiple input and partial input patterns.

  20. An atlas of gene expression and gene co-regulation in the human retina

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, Michele; Carissimo, Annamaria; Cutillo, Luisa; Lai, Ching-Hung; Mutarelli, Margherita; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; Singh, Marwah Veer; Karali, Marianthi; Carrella, Diego; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Russo, Francesco; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Angelini, Claudia; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The human retina is a specialized tissue involved in light stimulus transduction. Despite its unique biology, an accurate reference transcriptome is still missing. Here, we performed gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of 50 retinal samples from non-visually impaired post-mortem donors. We identified novel transcripts with high confidence (Observed Transcriptome (ObsT)) and quantified the expression level of known transcripts (Reference Transcriptome (RefT)). The ObsT included 77 623 transcripts (23 960 genes) covering 137 Mb (35 Mb new transcribed genome). Most of the transcripts (92%) were multi-exonic: 81% with known isoforms, 16% with new isoforms and 3% belonging to new genes. The RefT included 13 792 genes across 94 521 known transcripts. Mitochondrial genes were among the most highly expressed, accounting for about 10% of the reads. Of all the protein-coding genes in Gencode, 65% are expressed in the retina. We exploited inter-individual variability in gene expression to infer a gene co-expression network and to identify genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells. We experimentally validated the photoreceptors localization of three genes in human retina that had not been previously reported. RNA-seq data and the gene co-expression network are available online (http://retina.tigem.it). PMID:27235414

  1. IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongkang; Katschke, Kenneth J; Li, Yun; Truong, Tom; Lee, Wyne P; Diehl, Lauri; Rangell, Linda; Tao, Jianhua; Arceo, Rommel; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Hackney, Jason A; Iglesias, Antonio; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Elstrott, Justin; Weimer, Robby M; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population, is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors and can be associated with choroidal neovascularization. Mononuclear phagocytes are often present in AMD lesions, but the processes that direct myeloid cell recruitment remain unclear. Here, we identify IL-33 as a key regulator of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration after retina stress or injury. IL-33(+) Müller cells were more abundant and IL-33 cytokine was elevated in advanced AMD cases compared with age-matched controls with no AMD. In rodents, retina stress resulted in release of bioactive IL-33 that in turn increased inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression in activated Müller cells. Deletion of ST2, the IL-33 receptor α chain, or treatment with a soluble IL-33 decoy receptor significantly reduced release of inflammatory mediators from Müller cells, inhibited accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the outer retina, and protected photoreceptor rods and cones after a retina insult. This study demonstrates a central role for IL-33 in regulating mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to the photoreceptor layer and positions IL-33 signaling as a potential therapeutic target in macular degenerative diseases. PMID:26755704

  2. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  3. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expression in murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Arul K.; Mysona, Barbara A.; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Tawfik, Amany; Sanders, A.; Markand, Shanu; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sigma receptor 1 (σR1) and 2 (σR2) are thought to be two distinct proteins which share the ability to bind multiple ligands, several of which are common to both receptors. Whether σR1 and σR2 share overlapping biological functions is unknown. Recently, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) was shown to contain the putative σR2 binding site. PGRMC1 has not been studied in retina. We hypothesize that biological interactions between σR1 and PGRMC1 will be evidenced by compensatory upregulation of PGRMC1 in σR1−/− mice. Methods Immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting methods were used to analyze expression of PGRMC1 in wild type mouse retina. Tissues from σR1−/− mice were used to investigate whether a biological interaction exists between σR1 and PGRMC1. Results In the eye, PGRMC1 is expressed in corneal epithelium, lens, ciliary body epithelium, and retina. In retina, PGRMC1 is present in Müller cells and retinal pigment epithelium. This expression pattern is similar, but not identical to σR1. PGRMC1 protein levels in neural retina and eye cup from σR1−/− mice did not differ from wild type mice. Nonocular tissues, lung, heart, and kidney showed similar Pgrmc1 gene expression in wild type and σR1−/− mice. In contrast, liver, brain and intestine showed increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in σR1−/− mice. Conclusion Despite potential biological overlap, deletion of σR1 did not result in a compensatory change in PGRMC1 protein levels in σR1−/− mouse retina. Increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in organs with high lipid content such as liver, brain, and intestine indicate a possible tissue specific interaction between σR1 and PGRMC1. The current studies establish the presence of PGRMC1 in retina and lay the foundation for analysis of its biological function. PMID:26642738

  4. Development of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive neurons in normal and intracranially transplanted retinas in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q X; Chau, R M; Yang, S Z; Jen, L S

    1991-10-21

    Retinas from embryonic day 14 (E14) Sprague-Dawley rats were transplanted to the tectum of newborn (P0) recipient rats, and the distribution pattern of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChAT-I) in developing transplants was studied and compared with those observed in the retinas of normal developing rats. In normal retinas, ChAT-I cells were first identified in restricted regions in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) at P4, but were found to cover the entire GCL by P6. A second population of ChAT-I cells was detected in the inner nuclear layer (INL) at P8, and they were observed in most parts of the INL on P10 when two immunoreactive sublaminae began to appear in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The adult pattern of having two distinct populations of ChAT-I cells, organized in mirror symmetrical fashion in the inner retinal layers was basically established by P12. The time course of development and overall distribution pattern of ChAT-I cells in developing retinal transplants on the whole were very similar to those observed in normal retinas. The first identification of these cells and the establishment of their final distribution pattern were made at stages corresponding to P4 and P12 of normal developing retinas respectively. However, ChAT-I somata were located in the INL at a much earlier stage compared with their counterparts in the normal retina, and a transient population of immunoreactive cells with their processes extending to retinal layers other than the IPL was observed in some transplants from P6 to P10. These features were not observed in normal developing retinas. These results suggest that the development of cholinergic neurons, especially the expression of their characteristic antigen and their final distribution pattern is largely determined by programmes which are intrinsic to the original retinal tissue, despite some minor deviation or variation in the developmental process which may occur under certain abnormal conditions. PMID:1769097

  5. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Doublecortin Expression in the Retina of the Sea Lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Romaus-Sanjurjo, Daniel; Senra-Martínez, Pablo; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of doublecortin (DCX) for the development of the nervous system, its expression in the retina of most vertebrates is still unknown. The key phylogenetic position of lampreys, together with their complex life cycle, with a long blind larval stage and an active predator adult stage, makes them an interesting model to study retinal development. Here, we studied the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of DCX in the retina of the sea lamprey. In order to characterize the DCX expressing structures, the expression of acetylated α-tubulin (a neuronal marker) and cytokeratins (glial marker) was also analyzed. Tract-tracing methods were used to label ganglion cells. DCX immunoreactivity appeared initially in photoreceptors, ganglion cells and in fibers of the prolarval retina. In larvae smaller than 100 mm, DCX expression was observed in photoreceptors, in cells located in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers (IPLs) and in fibers coursing in the nuclear and IPLs, and in the optic nerve (ON). In retinas of premetamorphic and metamorphic larvae, DCX immunoreactivity was also observed in radially oriented cells and fibers and in a layer of cells located in the outer part of the inner neuroblastic layer (INbL) of the lateral retina. Photoreceptors and fibers ending in the outer limitans membrane (OLM) showed DCX expression in adults. Some retinal pigment epithelium cells were also DCX immunoreactive. Immunofluorescence for α-tubulin in premetamorphic larvae showed coexpression in most of the DCX immunoreactive structures. No cells/fibers were found showing DCX and cytokeratins colocalization. The perikaryon of mature ganglion cells is DCX negative. The expression of DCX in sea lamprey retinas suggests that it could play roles in the migration of cells that differentiate in the metamorphosis, in the establishment of connections of ganglion cells and in the development of photoreceptors. Our results also suggest that the radial glia and retinal

  6. Expression of Quaking RNA-Binding Protein in the Adult and Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Aono, Kentaro; Kawashima, Togo; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ku, Li; Feng, Yue; Koike, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI), which belongs to the STAR family of KH domain-containing RNA-binding proteins, functions in pre-mRNA splicing, microRNA regulation, and formation of circular RNA. QKI plays critical roles in myelinogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous systems and has been implicated neuron-glia fate decision in the brain; however, neither the expression nor function of QKI in the neural retina is known. Here we report the expression of QKI RNA-binding protein in the developing and mature mouse retina. QKI was strongly expressed by Müller glial cells in both the developing and adult retina. Intriguingly, during development, QKI was expressed in early differentiating neurons, such as the horizontal and amacrine cells, and subsequently in later differentiating bipolar cells, but not in photoreceptors. Neuronal expression was uniformly weak in the adult. Among QKI isoforms (5, 6, and 7), QKI-5 was the predominantly expressed isoform in the adult retina. To study the function of QKI in the mouse retina, we examined quakingviable(qkv) mice, which have a dysmyelination phenotype that results from deficiency of QKI expression and reduced numbers of mature oligodendrocytes. In homozygous qkv mutant mice (qkv/qkv), the optic nerve expression levels of QKI-6 and 7, but not QKI-5 were reduced. In the retina of the mutant homozygote, QKI-5 levels were unchanged, and QKI-6 and 7 levels, already low, were also unaffected. We conclude that QKI is expressed in developing and adult Müller glia. QKI is additionally expressed in progenitors and in differentiating neurons during retinal development, but expression weakened or diminished during maturation. Among QKI isoforms, we found that QKI-5 predominated in the adult mouse retina. Since Müller glial cells are thought to share properties with retinal progenitor cells, our data suggest that QKI may contribute to maintaining retinal progenitors prior to differentiation into neurons. On the other hand, the expression of QKI in

  7. Plasmalemmal and Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in the Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CHENYING; STELLA, SALVATORE L.; HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmalemmal and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters influence neurotransmission by regulating high-affinity GABA uptake and GABA release into the synaptic cleft and extracellular space. Postnatal expression of the plasmalemmal GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1), GAT-3, and the vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT) were evaluated in the developing mouse retina by using immunohistochemistry with affinity-purified antibodies. Weak transporter immunoreactivity was observed in the inner retina at postnatal day 0 (P0). GAT-1 immunostaining at P0 and at older ages was in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL), respectively, and in their processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). At P10, weak GAT-1 immunostaining was in Müller cell processes. GAT-3 immunostaining at P0 and older ages was in amacrine cells and their processes, as well as in Müller cells and their processes that extended radially across the retina. At P10, Müller cell somata were observed in the middle of the INL. VGAT immunostaining was present at P0 and older ages in amacrine cells in the INL as well as processes in the IPL. At P5, weak VGAT immunostaining was also observed in horizontal cell somata and processes. By P15, the GAT and VGAT immunostaining patterns appear similar to the adult immunostaining patterns; they reached adult levels by about P20. These findings demonstrate that GABA uptake and release are initially established in the inner retina during the first postnatal week and that these systems subsequently mature in the outer retina during the second postnatal week. PMID:18975268

  8. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events.

  9. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events. PMID:2888161

  10. Spontaneous glial calcium waves in the retina develop over early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb L; Mishra, Anusha; Newman, Eric A

    2009-09-01

    Intercellular glial Ca(2+) waves constitute a signaling pathway between glial cells. Artificial stimuli have previously been used to evoke these waves, and their physiological significance has been questioned. We report here that Ca(2+) waves occur spontaneously in rat retinal glial cells, both in the isolated retina and in vivo. These spontaneous waves are propagated by ATP release. In the isolated retina, suramin (P2 receptor antagonist) reduces the frequency of spontaneous wave generation by 53%, and apyrase (ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme) reduces frequency by 95-100%. Luciferin-luciferase chemiluminescence reveals waves of ATP matching the spontaneous Ca(2+) waves, indicating that ATP release occurs as spontaneous Ca(2+) waves are generated. Wave generation also depends on age. Spontaneous wave frequency rises from 0.27 to 1.0 per minute per mm(2), as rats age from 20 to 120 d. The sensitivity of glia to ATP does not increase with age, but the ATP released by evoked waves is 31% greater in 120-d-old than in 20-d-old rats, suggesting that increased ATP release in older animals could account for the higher frequency of wave generation. Simultaneous imaging of glial Ca(2+) and arterioles in the isolated retina demonstrates that spontaneous waves alter vessel diameter, implying that spontaneous waves may have a significant impact on retinal physiology. Spontaneous intercellular glial Ca(2+) waves also occur in the retina in vivo, with frequency, speed, and diameter similar to the isolated retina. Increased spontaneous wave occurrence with age suggests that wave generation may be related to retinal pathology.

  11. Effects of ascorbic acid on UV light-mediated photoreceptor damage in isolated rat retina.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Concerns have been raised about whether operating microscopes and endoillumination used during ophthalmic surgeries contribute to retinal damage. Despite the recognition that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) helps to protect the eye from light and the abundance of vitamin C in the retina, artificial aqueous humors used during surgery only contain the antioxidant glutathione. To test whether inclusion of antioxidants other than glutathione in surgical solutions might help to preserve retinal integrity, we studied the effects of vitamin C on acute toxicity in isolated rat retinas. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (PND 30+/-2) were sacrificed for retinal isolation. In the presence or absence of vitamin C (1 or 3 mM), retinas were exposed to 302 nm ultraviolet B (UVB) light for 1 h and were incubated for a total of 5 h at 30 degrees C. Retinal damage was assessed by morphological examination and biochemical assay measuring the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from injured cells. In control retinas, LDH release was significantly increased after UVB exposure. The presence of 1 mM vitamin C in the incubation media significantly reduced LDH release during the post-incubation period following UV exposure. No difference was found between 1 and 3 mM vitamin C. Microscopic examination revealed that disorganization in the outer nuclear layer after UVB exposure was markedly attenuated by administration of 1 mM vitamin C. Vitamin C (1 mM), a concentration found in the anterior chamber in humans, but not glutathione, prevented phototoxic injury following UV exposure. Although vitamin C itself cannot be used in intraocular irrigating solutions because of adverse interactions with iron released during bleeding, inclusion of antioxidants equivalent to vitamin C should be considered to help protect the retina from intraoperative light toxicity.

  12. Evolutionary loss of cone photoreception in balaenid whales reveals circuit stability in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Schweikert, Lorian E; Fasick, Jeffry I; Grace, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    The classical understanding of mammalian vision is that it occurs through "duplex" retinae containing both rod and cone photoreceptors, the signals from which are processed through rod- and/or cone-specific signaling pathways. The recent discovery of rod monochromacy in some cetacean lineages provides a novel opportunity to investigate the effects of an evolutionary loss of cone photoreception on retinal organization. Sequence analysis of right whale (Eubalaena glacialis; family Balaenidae) cDNA derived from long-wavelength sensitive (LWS) cone opsin mRNA identified several mutations in the opsin coding sequence, suggesting the loss of cone cell function, but maintenance of non-photosensitive, cone opsin mRNA-expressing cells in the retina. Subsequently, we investigated the retina of the closely related bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus; family Balaenidae) to determine how the loss of cone-mediated photoreception affects light signaling pathways in the retina. Anti-opsin immunofluorescence demonstrated the total loss of cone opsin expression in B. mysticetus, whereas light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and bipolar cell (protein kinase C-α [PKC-α] and recoverin) immunofluorescence revealed the maintenance of cone soma, putative cone pedicles, and both rod and cone bipolar cell types. These findings represent the first immunological and anatomical evidence of a naturally occurring rod-monochromatic mammalian retina, and suggest that despite the loss of cone-mediated photoreception, the associated cone signaling structures (i.e., cone synapses and cone bipolar cells) may be maintained for multichannel rod-based signaling in balaenid whales. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2873-2885, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972896

  13. Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Protein Expression in the Retina of Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lucia Y.; Chang, Lily Y-L.; Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Araya, Joaquin; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    New studies show that the retina also undergoes pathological changes during the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While transgenic mouse models used in these previous studies have offered insight into this phenomenon, they do not model human sporadic AD, which is the most common form. Recently, the Octodon degus has been established as a sporadic model of AD. Degus display age-related cognitive impairment associated with Aβ aggregates and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Our aim for this study was to examine the expression of AD-related proteins in young, adult and old degus retina using enzyme-linked or fluorescence immunohistochemistry and to quantify the expression using slot blot and western blot assays. Aβ4G8 and Aβ6E10 detected Aβ peptides in some of the young animals but the expression was higher in the adults. Aβ peptides were observed in the inner and outer segment of the photoreceptors, the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Expression was higher in the central retinal region than in the retinal periphery. Using an anti-oligomer antibody we detected Aβ oligomer expression in the young, adult and old retina. Immunohistochemical labeling showed small discrete labeling of oligomers in the GCL that did not resemble plaques. Congo red staining did not result in green birefringence in any of the animals analyzed except for one old (84 months) animal. We also investigated expression of tau and phosphorylated tau. Expression was seen at all ages studied and in adults it was more consistently observed in the NFL-GCL. Hyperphosphorylated tau detected with AT8 antibody was significantly higher in the adult retina and it was localized to the GCL. We confirm for the first time that Aβ peptides and phosphorylated tau are expressed in the retina of degus. This is consistent with the proposal that AD biomarkers are present in the eye. PMID:26267479

  14. Interleukin-6: A Constitutive Modulator of Glycoprotein 130, Neuroinflammatory and Cell Survival Signaling in Retina

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Franklin D.; Rickman, Abigayle E.; Sappington, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines and their signal transducer glycoprotein (gp130) are implicated in inflammatory and cell survival functions in glaucoma. There are several avenues for interdependent modulation of IL-6 family members and gp130 signaling. Here we investigated whether IL-6 modulates gp130 and related neuroinflammatory, cell survival and regulatory signaling in both healthy and glaucomatous retina. Methods In naïve and glaucomatous (Microbead Occlusion Model), wildtype (WT) and IL-6 knockout (IL-6−/−) mice, we examined gp130 protein expression and localization, using western blot and immunohistochemistry. Gene targets related to IL-6 and gp130 signaling and pertinent to neuroinflammation (TNFα, IL-1β), cell health (Bax, Bcl-xl) and STAT3 regulation (Socs3) were quantified using qRTPCR. Results In the naïve retina, IL-6−/− retina contained significantly less gp130 compared to WT retina. This IL-6-related decrease in gp130 was accompanied by a reduction in mRNA expression of TNFα, Socs3 and Bax. After 4 weeks of microbead-induced ocular hypertension, both microbead- and saline-injected (control) eyes of IL-6−/− mice exhibited higher expression of TNFα, compared to WT mice. IL-1β expression was also reduced specifically in IL-6−/− retina with microbead-induced glaucoma. While saline and microbead injection increased Bcl-xl and Socs3 mRNA in both WT and IL-6−/− mice, IL-6−/− deficiency led to smaller increases for both Bcl-xl and Socs3. Conclusions Our findings support a role for IL-6 in setting baseline parameters for neuroinflammatory, cell health and gp130 regulatory signaling that can impact the nature and magnitude of retinal responses to glaucoma-related stressors.

  15. Expression of neuropeptides and their receptors in the developing retina of mammals.

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, P; Dal Monte, M; Casini, G

    2003-10-01

    The present review examines various aspects of the developmental expression of neuropeptides and of their receptors in mammalian retinas, emphasizing their possible roles in retinal maturation. Different peptidergic systems have been investigated with some detail during retinal development, including substance P (SP), somatostatin (SRIF), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), opioid peptides and corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF). Overall, the developmental expression of most peptides is characterized by early appearance, transient features and achievement of the mature pattern at the time of eye opening. Concerning possible developmental actions of neuropeptides, recent studies imply a role of SP in the modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission in early postnatal rabbit retinas, when cholinergic cells participate in the retinal spontaneous waves of activity. In addition, the presence of transient SRIF expressing ganglion cells and recent observations in SRIF receptor knock-out mice indicate variegated roles of this peptide in the development of the retina and of retinofugal projections. Furthermore, VIP and PACAP exert protective and growth-promoting actions that may sustain retinal neurons during their development, and opioid peptides may control cell proliferation in the developing retina. Finally, a peak in the expression of certain peptides, including VIP, NPY and CRF, is present around the time of eye opening, when the retina begins the analysis of structured visual information, suggesting important roles of these peptides during this delicate phase of retinal development. In summary, although the physiological actions of peptides during retinal development are far from being clarified, the data reviewed herein indicate promising perspectives in this field of study.

  16. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Zareba, Mariusz; Subczynski, Witold Karol

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene) and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin). Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls), are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases. PMID:27030822

  17. Two-Photon Autofluorescence Imaging Reveals Cellular Structures Throughout the Retina of the Living Primate Eye

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Robin; Williams, David R.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although extrinsic fluorophores can be introduced to label specific cell types in the retina, endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H, FAD, collagen, and others, are present in all retinal layers. These molecules are a potential source of optical contrast and can enable noninvasive visualization of all cellular layers. We used a two-photon fluorescence adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (TPF-AOSLO) to explore the native autofluorescence of various cell classes spanning several layers in the unlabeled retina of a living primate eye. Methods Three macaques were imaged on separate occasions using a custom TPF-AOSLO. Two-photon fluorescence was evoked by pulsed light at 730 and 920 nm excitation wavelengths, while fluorescence emission was collected in the visible range from several retinal layers and different locations. Backscattered light was recorded simultaneously in confocal modality and images were postprocessed to remove eye motion. Results All retinal layers yielded two-photon signals and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorophores provided optical contrast. Several structural features were observed, such as autofluorescence from vessel walls, Müller cell processes in the nerve fibers, mosaics of cells in the ganglion cell and other nuclear layers of the inner retina, as well as photoreceptor and RPE layers in the outer retina. Conclusions This in vivo survey of two-photon autofluorescence throughout the primate retina demonstrates a wider variety of structural detail in the living eye than is available through conventional imaging methods, and broadens the use of two-photon imaging of normal and diseased eyes. PMID:26903224

  18. Rhodopsin regeneration in the normal and in the detached/replaced retina of the skate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Ripps, H

    1992-11-01

    The bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in the skate retina was studied by means of fundus reflectometry, both in the normal eyecup preparation and after the retina had been detached and then replaced on the surface of the pigment epithelium (RPE). After bleaching virtually all the rhodopsin in the retinal test area of the normal eyecup, more than 90% of the photopigment was reformed after about 2 hr in darkness; over most of this time course, rhodopsin density rose linearly at a rate of 0.875% min-1 with a half-time of 55 min. Detaching the retina from its pigment epithelium resulted in a number of abnormalities, both structural and functional. Histological examination of the detached/replaced (D/R) retina showed striking alterations in the structural integrity of the RPE cells at their interface with the neural retina. The cells appeared vacuolated and misshapen, and the apical processes of the RPE, which normally ensheath the receptor outer segments, were shredded and free of their association with the visual cells. These morphological changes, as well as dilution of the IRBP content of the subretinal space caused by separation of the tissues, appear to be the main factors contributing to the functional abnormalities in rhodopsin kinetics. But despite these abnormalities and the persistent detachment, the rate of regeneration and the amount of rhodopsin reformed after bleaching were reduced by less than 50% of their normal values. The fact that a significant fraction of the bleached rhodopsin was regenerated under these conditions indicates that 11-cis retinal formed in the RPE was able to traverse a much greater than normal subretinal space to reach the opsin-bearing photoreceptor membranes. PMID:1478278

  19. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. PMID:26662863

  20. Diabetes-induced activation of nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, and its inhibition by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Koppolu, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Chen, Shali

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in the retina in diabetes, and long-term administration of antioxidants inhibits the development of retinopathy in diabetic rats. The purpose of this study is to determine how diabetes affects the activation of a redox-sensitive nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, NF-kappaB, and its inhibition by antioxidants. Alloxan diabetic rats were assigned to receive standard diet or the diet supplemented with multiple antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, Trolox, dl alpha-tocopherol acetate, N-acetyl cysteine, beta-carotene, and selenium for up to 14 months. NF-kappaB activation, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were measured in the retina at 2, 8 and 14 months of diabetes. Retinal NF-kappaB was activated by about 60% at two months after induction of diabetes, remained activated for up to 14 months of diabetes, and the duration of diabetes had no effect on the intensity of NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were elevated by over 50% in the retina of rats diabetic for 14 months, and nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by over two folds. Administration of the antioxidants to the rats for the entire duration of diabetes inhibited activation of NF-kappaB and elevations in oxidative stress, nitric oxides and nitrotyrosine formation without ameliorating the severity of hyperglycemia. These in vivo results were confirmed by in vitro studies showing that high glucose activates NF-kappaB and elevates NO and lipid peroxides in both retinal endothelial cells and pericytes that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Thus, the results suggest that the activation of retinal NF-KB in diabetes is an early event in the development of retinopathy, and it remains active when the retinal capillary cell death is accelerating, and histopathology is developing. Beneficial effects of antioxidants on the development of diabetic retinopathy might involve inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and its downstream pathways in the retina.

  1. Vesicular expression and release of ATP from dopaminergic neurons of the mouse retina and midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tracy; Jobling, Andrew I.; Greferath, Ursula; Chuang, Trinette; Ramesh, Archana; Fletcher, Erica L.; Vessey, Kirstan A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is required for active accumulation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) into vesicles for purinergic neurotransmission, however, the cell types that express VNUT in the central nervous system remain unknown. This study characterized VNUT expression within the mammalian retina and brain and assessed a possible functional role in purinergic signaling. Two native isoforms of VNUT were detected in mouse retina and brain based on RNA transcript and protein analysis. Using immunohistochemistry, VNUT was found to co-localize with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive, dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, however, VNUT expression in extranigral non-DA neurons was also observed. In the retina, VNUT labeling was found to co-localize solely with TH-positive DA-cells. In the outer retina, VNUT-positive interplexiform cell processes were in close contact with horizontal cells and cone photoreceptor terminals, which are known to express P2 purinergic-receptors. In order to assess function, dissociated retinal neurons were loaded with fluorescent ATP markers (Quinacrine or Mant-ATP) and the DA marker FFN102, co-labeled with a VNUT antibody and imaged in real time. Fluorescent ATP markers and FFN102 puncta were found to co-localize in VNUT positive neurons and upon stimulation with high potassium, ATP marker fluorescence at the cell membrane was reduced. This response was blocked in the presence of cadmium. These data suggest DA neurons co-release ATP via calcium dependent exocytosis and in the retina this may modulate the visual response by activating purine receptors on closely associated neurons. PMID:26500494

  2. Primary blast injury-induced lesions in the retina of adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of primary blast exposure on the brain is widely reported but its effects on the eye remains unclear. Here, we aim to examine the effects of primary blast exposure on the retina. Methods Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to primary blast high and low injury and sacrificed at 24 h, 72 h, and 2 weeks post injury. The retina was subjected to western analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), aquaporin-4 (AQP4), glutamine synthethase (GS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS and nestin expression; ELISA analysis for cytokines and chemokines; and immunofluorescence for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)/VEGF, GFAP/AQP4, GFAP/nestin, GS/AQP4, lectin/iNOS, and TUNEL. Results The retina showed a blast severity-dependent increase in VEGF, iNOS, eNOS, nNOS, and nestin expression with corresponding increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. There was also increased AQP4 expression and retinal thickness after primary blast exposure that was severity-dependent. Finally, a significant increase in TUNEL+ and Caspase-3+ cells was observed. These changes were observed at 24 h post-injury and sustained up to 2 weeks post injury. Conclusions Primary blast resulted in severity-dependent pathological changes in the retina, manifested by the increased expression of a variety of proteins involved in inflammation, edema, and apoptosis. These changes were observed immediately after blast exposure and sustained up to 2 weeks suggesting acute and chronic injury mechanisms. These changes were most obvious in the astrocytes and Müller cells and suggest important roles for these cells in retina pathophysiology after blast. PMID:23819902

  3. Immuno-histochemical analysis of rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in the inferior and superior canine retina.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model.

  4. Immuno-Histochemical Analysis of Rod and Cone Reaction to RPE65 Deficiency in the Inferior and Superior Canine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model. PMID:24466015

  5. Highly Efficient Delivery of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to the Primate Retina.

    PubMed

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Clark, Mark E; Sandefer, Kristen J; Girkin, Chris A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the preferred vector for targeting gene expression to the retina. Subretinally injected AAV can efficiently transduce retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors in primate retina. Inner and middle primate retina can be transduced by intravitreally delivered AAV, but with low efficiency. This is due to dilution of vector, potential neutralization of capsid because it is not confined to the immune-privileged retinal compartment, and the presence of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a barrier separating the vitreous from the neural retina. We here describe a novel "subILM" injection method that addresses all three issues. Specifically, vector is placed in a surgically induced, hydrodissected space between the ILM and neural retina. In an initial experiment, we injected viscoelastic (Healon(®)), a substance we confirmed was biocompatible with AAV, to create a subILM bleb and subsequently injected AAV2-GFP into the bleb after irrigation with basic salt solution. For later experiments, we used a Healon-AAV mixture to place single, subILM injections. In all cases, subILM delivery of AAV was well tolerated-no inflammation or gross structural changes were observed by ophthalmological examination or optical coherence tomography. In-life fluorescence imaging revealed profound transgene expression within the area of the subILM injection bleb that persisted for the study duration. Uniform and extensive transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was achieved in the areas beneath the subILM bleb. Transduction of Müller glia, ON bipolar cells, and photoreceptors was also observed. Robust central labeling from green fluorescent protein-expressing RGCs confirmed their continued survival, and was observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus, and the pretectum. Our results confirm that the ILM is a major barrier to transduction by AAV in primate retina and that, when it is circumvented, the efficiency and

  6. The active transport of fluorescein by the retinal vessels and the retina

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Vaz, J. G.; Maurice, D. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The movement of fluorescein across the retinal surface of the rabbit's eye was estimated by measuring the concentration gradient of the dye in the vitreous body. These measurements were made in vivo by means of a slit-lamp fluorophotometer, or were taken from frozen sections of enucleated eyes. 2. In the normal eye, fluorescein does not pass from the blood to the vitreous body across any part of the retina. When injected into the vitreous body it passes rapidly out across the entire retinal surface, even against a very large concentration gradient. 3. A variety of metabolic and competitive inhibitors, effective in blocking organic anion transport in the kidney and liver, tend to abolish this unidirectional movement of fluorescein across the retina. 4. The region occupied by the retinal vessels is more sensitive to inhibition than other areas of the retina. Occlusion of the vessels by diathermy prevents the exchange of fluorescein in this region. 5. It appears, then, that there is an active transport of organic anions out of the vitreous body, both by the retinal capillaries and by the retina itself. The latter system is probably located in the pigment epithelium and seems to be carried forward to the rear surface of the iris. 6. Since the walls of the retinal vessels of the rabbit are freely in contact with the vitreous body, the active transport must take place across the capillary endothelial cells themselves. These vessels have structural and permeability characteristics found only in the central nervous system and it is to be presumed that the anion transport system is shared by the capillaries of the brain. 7. The function of the transport in the retina may be to protect the nervous tissue from toxic materials by preventing their entry from the blood or by removing products of metabolism conjugated as organic anions. Alternatively, the mechanism may be concerned in maintaining the normal adhesion of the retina to the choroid, since retinal detachment was

  7. The elevation of intraocular pressure is associated with apoptosis and increased immunoreactivity for nitric oxide synthase in rat retina whereas the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor is unaffected.

    PubMed

    Takır, Selçuk; Gürel-Gürevin, Ebru; Toprak, Ayça; Demirci-Tansel, Cihan; Uydeş-Doğan, B Sönmez

    2016-04-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive ocular disease that stands in the upper rank for the cause of blindness in worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the possible disturbances occurred in the layers of retina due to an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and to verify the effectiveness of retina derived relaxing factor, i.e., RRF in this pathologic condition. The increase in IOP was induced by cauterization of the three of episcleral veins simultaneously in rats. After 8 weeks period, the retinas excised from the vein cauterized eyes were evaluated for the possible histopathological and ultrastructural alterations as well as for the relaxing effects on isolated bovine retinal and rat mesenteric arteries, in comparison with the retinas obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. In the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, profound morphological deteriorations were determined in the ganglion and outer nuclear cell layers which were associated with an increased number of TUNEL positive cells in the ganglion and inner nuclear cell layers. Increased immunohistochemical stainings for three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were defined in almost all layers of the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes, in which eNOS was abundant particularly in the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. An irregular basal folding of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and an increased inter lamellar space of photoreceptor cell layer furtherly characterized the prominent degeneration of those layers in the retinas of IOP-elevated eyes. On the other hand, the relaxing effects of the retina obtained from IOP-elevated eyes were determined to be unchanged on the retinal and mesenteric arteries precontracted either with prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 30 μM) or potassium chloride (K(+), 100 mM), when compared with the relaxations of control retina obtained from contralateral sham-operated eyes. Overall, these findings suggested that the elevation of IOP induces prominent structural changes in

  8. Age-related structural abnormalities in the human retina-choroid complex revealed by two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Giese, Guenter; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Yu, Jiayi; Bille, Josef F; Niemz, Markolf H

    2007-01-01

    The intensive metabolism of photoreceptors is delicately maintained by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. Dysfunction of either the RPE or choroid may lead to severe damage to the retina. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) from endogenous fluorophores in the human retina provides a novel opportunity to reveal age-related structural abnormalities in the retina-choroid complex prior to apparent pathological manifestations of age-related retinal diseases. In the photoreceptor layer, the regularity of the macular photoreceptor mosaic is preserved during aging. In the RPE, enlarged lipofuscin granules demonstrate significantly blue-shifted autofluorescence, which coincides with the depletion of melanin pigments. Prominent fibrillar structures in elderly Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaries represent choroidal structure and permeability alterations. Requiring neither slicing nor labeling, TPEF imaging is an elegant and highly efficient tool to delineate the thick, fragile, and opaque retina-choroid complex, and may provide clues to the trigger events of age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Cell type-specific and light-dependent expression of Rab1 and Rab6 GTPases in mammalian retinas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guo-Yong

    2010-01-01

    The Ras-like Rab1 and Rab6 GTPases modulate protein traffic along the early secretory pathway and are involved in the regulation of maturation of rhodopsin in the outer retina. However, Rab GTPases have not been studied in the inner retinas. Here, we analyzed the anatomatic distribution and expression of Rab1 and Rab6 in the mouse and rat retinas by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. We found that Rab1 was specifically expressed in the rod bipolar cells, while Rab6 was expressed in a different cell type(s) from rod bipolar cells in the inner retina. We also demonstrated that expression of Rab1 and Rab6 was increased with light. These data provided the first evidence implicating that Rab1 and Rab6 may be involved in the regulation of the retinal adaptation. PMID:20003598

  10. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases. PMID:27130417

  11. Aberration-free volumetric high-speed imaging of in vivo retina

    PubMed Central

    Hillmann, Dierck; Spahr, Hendrik; Hain, Carola; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Pfäffle, Clara; Winter, Christian; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2016-01-01

    Certain topics in research and advancements in medical diagnostics may benefit from improved temporal and spatial resolution during non-invasive optical imaging of living tissue. However, so far no imaging technique can generate entirely diffraction-limited tomographic volumes with a single data acquisition, if the target moves or changes rapidly, such as the human retina. Additionally, the presence of aberrations may represent further difficulties. We show that a simple interferometric setup–based on parallelized optical coherence tomography–acquires volumetric data with 10 billion voxels per second, exceeding previous imaging speeds by an order of magnitude. This allows us to computationally obtain and correct defocus and aberrations resulting in entirely diffraction-limited volumes. As demonstration, we imaged living human retina with clearly visible nerve fiber layer, small capillary networks, and photoreceptor cells. Furthermore, the technique can also obtain phase-sensitive volumes of other scattering structures at unprecedented acquisition speeds. PMID:27762314

  12. Chronic lead administration in neonatal rats: electron microscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Anderson, R.M.; Tso, M.O.M.; Valdes, J.J.; Annau, Z.

    1984-03-01

    The morphologic effects on the retina resulting from chronic lead exposure were assessed in neonatal rats. Newborn rats nursed from dams were given a low (0.115%) or a high (4.5%) concentration of lead in their diet. At day 21 the pups were weaned to the mother's diet. The retinas of the pups were studied by electron microscopy at various ages up to day 60. High and low lead concentrations produced necrosis of photoreceptor cells and cells of the inner nuclear layer. The high lead concentration, in addition, was associated with swelling of endothelial cells of the retinal vessels and narrowing of the lumen. Increased permeability of the retinal vessels and pigment epithelium to horseradish peroxidase were also observed under the high-dose condition. The authors conclude that lead can produce direct neuronal damage and, at high doses, produces retinal vascular lesions and alteration of the blood-retinal barrier. 10 figures.

  13. Chronic lead administration in neonatal rats: electron microscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Anderson, R.M.; Tso, M.O.M.; Valdes, J.J.; Annau, Z.

    1984-03-01

    The morphologic effects on the retina resulting from chronic lead exposure were assessed in neonatal rats. Newborn rats nursed from dams were given a low (0.115%) or a high (4.5%) concentration of lead in their diet. At day 21 the pups were weaned to the mother's diet. The retinas of the pups were studied by electron microscopy at various ages up to day 60. High and low lead concentrations produced necrosis of photoreceptor cells and cells of the inner nuclear layer. The high lead concentration, in addition, was associated with swelling of endothelial cells of the retinal vessels and narrowing of the lumen. Increased permeability of the retinal vessels and pigment epithelium to horseradish peroxidase was also observed under the high-dose condition. The authors conclude that lead can produce direct neuronal damage and, at high doses, produces retinal vascular lesions and alteration of the blood-retinal barrier.

  14. Horizontal Cells of the Primate Retina: Cone Specificity Without Spectral Opponency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, Dennis M.; Lee, Barry B.; Stafford, Donna K.; Pokorny, Joel; Smith, Vivianne C.

    1996-02-01

    The chromatic dimensions of human color vision have a neural basis in the retina. Ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, exhibit spectral opponency; they are excited by some wavelengths and inhibited by others. The hypothesis that the opponent circuitry emerges from selective connections between horizontal cell interneurons and cone photoreceptors sensitive to long, middle, and short wavelengths (L-, M-, and S-cones) was tested by physiologically and anatomically characterizing cone connections of horizontal cell mosaics in macaque monkeys. H1 horizontal cells received input only from L- and M-cones, whereas H2 horizontal cells received a strong input from S-cones and a weaker input from L- and M-cones. All cone inputs were the same sign, and both horizontal cell types lacked opponency. Despite cone type selectivity, the horizontal cell cannot be the locus of an opponent transformation in primates, including humans.

  15. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseop S; Greene, Matthew J; Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H Sebastian

    2014-05-15

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, here we reconstruct Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of 'citizen neuroscientists'. On the basis of quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we find evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, whereas another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such 'space-time wiring specificity' could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma.

  16. Electroretinography: A biopotential to assess the function/dysfunction of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Quinteros; Benedetto, M. L.; Maldonado, M. M.; de Payer E., A. C. Vera; Contin, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The Electroretinography (ERG) is a noninvasive technique that allows the assessment of functional integrity of the retina. The ERG recordings are biopotencials acquired in the corneal surface as a response of retinal tissue against controlled light stimuli. In clinical ophthalmology ERG is not commonly used but nowadays, because of the high incidence of degenerative diseases of the retina (RD), its use should be increased. Like other biopotentials as electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyography (EMG), ERG is a low amplitude signal, in this case a few hundred of microvolts (µV), which must be fitted and processed. The ERG signals are affected in morphology in the presence of pathologies that affects the integrity of the different retinal cell groups, for example due to some RD. In advanced cases of RD recordings can be abolished in the time domain; and yet in them it is believed that there is relevant clinical information making the ERG a great potential diagnostic tool.

  17. Processing of S-cone signals in the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J; Grünert, Ulrike; Li, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Color information is encoded by two parallel pathways in the mammalian retina. One pathway compares signals from long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones and generates red-green opponency. The other compares signals from short- and middle-/long-wavelength sensitive cones and generates blue-green (yellow) opponency. Whereas both pathways operate in trichromatic primates (including humans), the fundamental, phylogenetically ancient color mechanism shared among most mammals is blue-green opponency. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how signals from short-wavelength sensitive cones are processed in the primate and nonprimate mammalian retina, with a focus on the inner plexiform layer where bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cell processes interact to facilitate the generation of blue-green opponency. PMID:24016424

  18. Periscope for noninvasive two-photon imaging of murine retina in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Komar, Katarzyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Palczewska, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy allows visualization of subcellular structures in the living animal retina. In previously reported experiments it was necessary to apply a contact lens to each subject. Extending this technology to larger animals would require fitting a custom contact lens to each animal and cumbersome placement of the living animal head on microscope stage. Here we demonstrate a new device, periscope, for coupling light energy into mouse eye and capturing emitted fluorescence. Using this periscope we obtained images of the RPE and their subcellular organelles, retinosomes, with larger field of view than previously reported. This periscope provides an interface with a commercial microscope, does not require contact lens and its design could be modified to image retina in larger animals. PMID:26417507

  19. Optical stabilization system based on deformable mirrors for retina-like sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qun; Fan, Fan; Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Dongdong; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents an optical stabilization system based on deformable mirrors (DMs) for retina-like sensors. This system achieves image stabilization by changing the reflective plate of the DM's compensating tilt angle. The mathematical model is constructed with relative parameters, and the simulation experiments and parameter analysis are discussed to verify the system's reliability. The experimental results show that this system achieved optical image stabilization. The maximum relative error of the compensation angle is 8.78%. The system is close to the diffraction limit, and the distortion is less than 0.33%. This study presents an image stabilization system and offers possible improvement in the aberrations in the system, which will provide great support to retina-like sensors.

  20. Fireworks in the primate retina: in vitro photodynamics reveals diverse LGN-projecting ganglion cell types.

    PubMed

    Dacey, Dennis M; Peterson, Beth B; Robinson, Farrel R; Gamlin, Paul D

    2003-01-01

    Diverse cell types and parallel pathways are characteristic of the vertebrate nervous system, yet it remains a challenge to define the basic components of most neural structures. We describe a process termed retrograde photodynamics that allowed us to rapidly make the link between morphology, physiology, and connectivity for ganglion cells in the macaque retina that project to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Rhodamine dextran injected into the LGN was transported retrogradely and sequestered within the cytoplasm of ganglion cell bodies. Exposure of the retina to light in vitro liberated the tracer and allowed it to diffuse throughout the dendrites, revealing the cell's complete morphology. Eight previously unknown LGN-projecting cell types were identified. Cells could also be targeted in vitro for intracellular recording and physiological analysis. The photodynamic process was also observed in pyramidal cells in a rat neocortical slice.

  1. Regeneration of the retina: toward stem cell therapy for degenerative retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sohee; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-04-01

    Degenerative retinal diseases affect millions of people worldwide, which can lead to the loss of vision. However, therapeutic approaches that can reverse this process are limited. Recent efforts have allowed the possibility of the stem cell-based regeneration of retinal cells and repair of injured retinal tissues. Although the direct differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into terminally differentiated photoreceptor cells comprises one approach, a series of studies revealed the intrinsic regenerative potential of the retina using endogenous retinal stem cells. Muller glial cells, ciliary pigment epithelial cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells are candidates for such retinal stem cells that can differentiate into multiple types of retinal cells and be integrated into injured or developing retina. In this review, we explore our current understanding of the cellular identity of these candidate retinal stem cells and their therapeutic potential for cell therapy against degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:25560700

  2. Readout circuit design of the retina-like CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Song, Shengyu; Bai, Tingzhu; Cao, Nan

    2015-02-01

    Readout circuit is designed for a special retina-like CMOS image sensor. To realize the pixels timing drive and readout of the sensor, the Altera's Cyclone II FPGA is used as a control chip. The voltage of the sensor is supported by a voltage chip initialized by SPI with AVR MCU system. The analog image signal outputted by the sensor is converted to digital image data by 12-bits A/D converter ADS807 and the digital data is memorized in the SRAM. Using the Camera-link image grabber, the data stored in SRAM is transformed to image shown on PC. Experimental results show the circuit works well on retina-like CMOS timing drive and image readout and images can be displayed properly on the PC.

  3. The presynaptic active zone protein bassoon is essential for photoreceptor ribbon synapse formation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Dick, Oliver; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko Detlef; Ammermüller, Josef; Weiler, Reto; Garner, Craig Curtis; Gundelfinger, Eckart Dieter; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2003-03-01

    The photoreceptor ribbon synapse is a highly specialized glutamatergic synapse designed for the continuous flow of synaptic vesicles to the neurotransmitter release site. The molecular mechanisms underlying ribbon synapse formation are poorly understood. We have investigated the role of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon, a major component of the photoreceptor ribbon, in a mouse retina deficient of functional Bassoon protein. Photoreceptor ribbons lacking Bassoon are not anchored to the presynaptic active zones. This results in an impaired photoreceptor synaptic transmission, an abnormal dendritic branching of neurons postsynaptic to photoreceptors, and the formation of ectopic synapses. These findings suggest a critical role of Bassoon in the formation and the function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the mammalian retina.

  4. PIGMENTS OF THE RETINA : II. SEA ROBIN, SEA BASS, AND SCUP.

    PubMed

    Wald, G

    1936-09-20

    1. Visual purple from the sea robin, sea bass, and scup is almost identical spectroscopically with that from frogs. The interrelations of this pigment with vitamin A and retinene are also the same as in the frog. 2. In strong acids or at pH > 11, the visual yellow of sea robin retinas is converted irreversibly into a pH indicator, yellow in acid and almost colorless in alkaline solution. Unlike neutral visual yellow, the indicator is not removed to form either vitamin A or visual purple. In the ammoniacal retina the reversion of visual yellow itself to purple is accelerated. 3. The combined pigment epithelium and choroid layer in these fishes contain vitamin A, flavine, and an unidentified xanthophyll.

  5. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Blood Vessels of the Human Retina by Fractal Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Guedri, Hichem; Malek, Jihen; Belmabrouk, Hafedh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, data from two-dimensional (2D) images of the human retina were taken as a case study. First, the characteristic data points had been removed using the Douglas–Peucker (DP) method, and subsequently, more data points were added using random fractal interpolation approach, to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) model of the blood vessel. By visualizing the result, we can see that all the small blood vessels in the human retina are more visible and detailed. This algorithm of 3D reconstruction has the advantage of being fast with calculation time less than 40 s and also can reduce the 3D image storage level on a disk with a reduction ratio between 78% and 96.65%. PMID:27222695

  6. Spatial order in short-wavelength-sensitive cone photoreceptors: a comparative study of the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Martin, P R; Grünert, U; Chan, T L; Bumsted, K

    2000-03-01

    We compared the spatial distribution of short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS or blue) cone photoreceptors in the retinas of eight primate species. The regularity of the SWS cone array was quantified with a statistic (packing factor) that varies between a random distribution (0) and a triangular array (1). We find wide variability among species, with packing factors varying between 0.06 and 0.3. The SWS cone array in at least two New World monkey species is indistinguishable from a random array. The SWS cone density gradient across the retina was measured in the capuchin monkey Cebus apella and the squirrel monkey Saimiri sciureus. Both species show a peak density of 5,000-8,000 cells/mm2 at the fovea and a 50-fold central-peripheral density gradient. In contrast to the wide variation in local regularity, the spatial density and the topography of SWS cones are well preserved across primates.

  7. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases.

  8. Vitreoretinal surgical technique for transplanting retinal pigment epithelium in rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yamaguchi, K; Young, R W; Gaur, V P; Greven, C M; Slusher, M M; Turner, J E

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells has been proposed as a potential remedial procedure for previously untreatable retinal diseases. In this study, a vitreoretinal surgical technique was used to transplant pigmented RPE cells obtained from pigmented rabbits into the subretinal space of New Zealand White rabbits. At the time the animals were sacrificed, the retina was re-attached in all but 4 of the 24 experimental eyes. Histologically, by one week the transplanted RPE cells had formed a monolayer in patchy areas beneath the attached retina. By electron microscopy, RPE cells with prominent melanin granules were found attached to Bruch's membrane. Three weeks after transplantation, grafted RPE cells had formed apical microvilli and tight junctions with adjacent cells. The nucleus of the cells containing pigment had become oval, and their contact with Bruch's membrane appeared to be composed of bsal infoldings that were well formed. Our findings demonstrated the functional appearance of the transplanted RPE cells.

  9. Optical stabilization system based on deformable mirrors for retina-like sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qun; Fan, Fan; Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Dongdong; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents an optical stabilization system based on deformable mirrors (DMs) for retina-like sensors. This system achieves image stabilization by changing the reflective plate of the DM's compensating tilt angle. The mathematical model is constructed with relative parameters, and the simulation experiments and parameter analysis are discussed to verify the system's reliability. The experimental results show that this system achieved optical image stabilization. The maximum relative error of the compensation angle is 8.78%. The system is close to the diffraction limit, and the distortion is less than 0.33%. This study presents an image stabilization system and offers possible improvement in the aberrations in the system, which will provide great support to retina-like sensors. PMID:27463916

  10. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F.; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, we reconstructed Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of “citizen neuroscientists.” Based on quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we found evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, while another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such “space-time wiring specificity” could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  11. The area centralis in the chicken retina contains efferent target amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Cynthia; Lindstrom, Sarah H.; De Grip, Willem J.; Wilson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The retinas of birds receive a substantial efferent, or centrifugal, input from a midbrain nucleus. The function of this input is presently unclear but previous work in the pigeon has shown that efferent input is excluded from the area centralis, suggesting that the functions of the area centralis and the efferent system are incompatible. Using an antibody specific to rods, we have identified the area centralis in another species, the chicken, and mapped the distribution of the unique amacrine cells that are the postsynaptic partners of efferent fibers. Efferent target amacrine cells are found within the chicken area centralis and their density is continuous across the border of the area centralis. In contrast to the pigeon retina then, we conclude that the chicken area centralis receives efferent input. We suggest that the difference between the 2 species is attributable to the presence of a fovea within the area centralis of the pigeon and its absence from that of the chicken. PMID:19296862

  12. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseop S; Greene, Matthew J; Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H Sebastian

    2014-05-15

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, here we reconstruct Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of 'citizen neuroscientists'. On the basis of quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we find evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, whereas another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such 'space-time wiring specificity' could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  13. Artificial design of three-dimensional retina-like tissue from dissociated cells of the mammalian retina by rotation-mediated cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, Andrée; Biedermann, Thomas; Weigel, Winnie; Kurz, Randy; Rüffer, Markus; Layer, Paul G; Robitzki, Andrea Anneliese

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to establish a reliable three-dimensional culture system for the mammalian retina that allows the analysis of retinal function and dysfunction. To produce three-dimensional retinal tissues in vitro, dissociated retinal cells of neonatal rats were maintained in culture dishes on a self-made orbital shaker. On the basis of well-defined rotation conditions, dissociated free-floating cells reaggregate in the center of the culture dish to form a multicellular cluster. Subsequently, cells begin to proliferate, whereby they form spherelike retinal tissues that grow to a size of 180-210 microm. Immunohistochemical characterization of mature retinal spheres revealed the presence of ganglion cells, amacrine cells, Müller cells, and rod photoreceptors, which are arranged in different retina-like layers. Although a small number of cells undergo programmed cell death, retinal spheres remain viable for at least 35 days in culture as revealed by fluorescein diacetate and TUNEL staining. Because most biological processes involved in tissue organization such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and survival are also observable in retinal spheres, the presented novel mammalian three-dimensional culture system is not only an outstanding model for basic research but may also be of great benefit for stem cell tissue engineering and the pharmaceutical industry.

  14. Identifying differentially expressed genes in the mammalian retina and the retinal pigment epithelium by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schulz, H L; Rahman, F A; Fadl El Moula, F M; Stojic, J; Gehrig, A; Weber, B H F

    2004-01-01

    Retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are of neuroectodermal origin with highly specialized functions in light perception. Identification and characterization of genes differentially expressed in these cells will greatly aid our understanding of their functional roles in retinal biology. As a source enriched for gene transcripts from the retina/RPE, we generated a human retina and a bovine RPE cDNA library applying the PCR-based technique of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Sequencing of 1,080 retina and 2,350 RPE SSH clones resulted in the identification of 321 and 343 non-redundant human transcripts, respectively. Of these, only 27 genes were in common between the two cDNA libraries. One transcript expressed exclusively in retina and RPE is the novel gene C4orf11 which is comprised of four exons on chromosome 4q21.2. We report the full-length cloning of two isoforms of C4orf11, 919 bp and 857 bp in length, both of which contain four identical open reading frames (ORFs). While ORFs 1 to 3 show no homologies to known proteins or protein domains, ORF4 reveals 50% sequence identity to RPE-spondin, a hypothetical protein on 8q13.3 with unknown function. We demonstrate that both the retina and the RPE SSH cDNA libraries are excellent resources for identifying known and novel genes exclusively or abundantly expressed in the retina/RPE complex. In combination with other approaches such as microarray analysis or serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), the availability of highly sensitive and specific SSH cDNA libraries will facilitate the comprehensive description of the retina/RPE transcriptome.

  15. Pannexin1 Channel Proteins in the Zebrafish Retina Have Shared and Unique Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Sarah; Prochnow, Nora; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Klooster, Jan; Zoidl, Christiane; Dermietzel, Rolf; Kamermans, Maarten; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1) is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo. PMID:24194896

  16. The RNA binding protein RBPMS is a selective marker of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Allen R.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    There are few neurochemical markers that reliably identify retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are a heterogeneous population of cells that integrate and transmit the visual signal from the retina to the central visual nuclei. We have developed and characterized a new set of affinity purified guinea pig and rabbit antibodies against RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). On Western blots these antibodies recognize a single band at ~24 kDa, corresponding to RBPMS, and they strongly label RGC and displaced RGC (dRGC) somata in mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and monkey retina. RBPMS immunoreactive cells and RGCs identified by other techniques have a similar range of somal diameters and areas. The density of RBPMS cells in mouse and rat retina is comparable to earlier semi-quantitative estimates of RGCs. RBPMS is mainly expressed in medium and large DAPI-, DRAQ5-, NeuroTrace- and NeuN-stained cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and RBPMS is not expressed in syntaxin (HPC-1) immunoreactive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and GCL, consistent with their identity as RGCs, and not displaced amacrine cells. In mouse and rat retina, most RBPMS cells are lost following optic nerve crush or transection at three weeks, and all Brn3a, SMI-32 and melanopsin immunoreactive RGCs also express RBPMS immunoreactivity. RBPMS immunoreactivity is localized to CFP-fluorescent RGCs in the B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J mouse line. These findings show that antibodies against RBPMS are robust reagents that exclusively identify RGCs and dRGCs in multiple mammalian species, and they will be especially useful for quantification of RGCs. PMID:24318667

  17. Unidirectional Photoreceptor-to-Müller Glia Coupling and Unique K+ Channel Expression in Caiman Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Yomarie; Benedikt, Jan; Ulbricht, Elke; Karl, Anett; Dávila, José; Savvinov, Alexey; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy; Inyushin, Mikhail; Cubano, Luis A.; Pannicke, Thomas; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Francke, Mike; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Eaton, Misty J.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the vertebrate retina, are fundamental for the maintenance and function of neuronal cells. In most vertebrates, including humans, Müller cells abundantly express Kir4.1 inwardly rectifying potassium channels responsible for hyperpolarized membrane potential and for various vital functions such as potassium buffering and glutamate clearance; inter-species differences in Kir4.1 expression were, however, observed. Localization and function of potassium channels in Müller cells from the retina of crocodiles remain, hitherto, unknown. Methods We studied retinae of the Spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus fuscus), endowed with both diurnal and nocturnal vision, by (i) immunohistochemistry, (ii) whole-cell voltage-clamp, and (iii) fluorescent dye tracing to investigate K+ channel distribution and glia-to-neuron communications. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that caiman Müller cells, similarly to other vertebrates, express vimentin, GFAP, S100β, and glutamine synthetase. In contrast, Kir4.1 channel protein was not found in Müller cells but was localized in photoreceptor cells. Instead, 2P-domain TASK-1 channels were expressed in Müller cells. Electrophysiological properties of enzymatically dissociated Müller cells without photoreceptors and isolated Müller cells with adhering photoreceptors were significantly different. This suggests ion coupling between Müller cells and photoreceptors in the caiman retina. Sulforhodamine-B injected into cones permeated to adhering Müller cells thus revealing a uni-directional dye coupling. Conclusion Our data indicate that caiman Müller glial cells are unique among vertebrates studied so far by predominantly expressing TASK-1 rather than Kir4.1 K+ channels and by bi-directional ion and uni-directional dye coupling to photoreceptor cells. This coupling may play an important role in specific glia-neuron signaling pathways and in a new type of K+ buffering. PMID

  18. Effect of increased oxygen tension on flicker-induced vasodilatation in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    In the retina, blood flow and neural activity are tightly coupled. Stimulation of the retina with flickering light is accompanied by an increase in blood flow. The current study seeks to investigate whether an increase in oxygen tension modulates flicker (FL)-induced vasodilatation in the human retina. A total of 52 healthy volunteers were included. Via a breathing mask, 100% oxygen (O(2)) was administered in one, a mixture of 8% carbon dioxide and 92% oxygen (C/O) in a second cohort. Retinal vessel diameters were measured with a Vessel Analyzer and FL responses were assessed before and during the breathing periods. At baseline, FL stimulation increased retinal vessel diameters by +3.7±2.3% in arteries and by +5.1±3.7% in veins. Breathing of C/O led to a decrease in arterial (-9.0±6.9%) and venous (-11.3±5.9%) vessel calibers. Flicker response was increased to 5.7±2.5% in arteries and to 8.6±4.1% in veins. Breathing of pure O2 induced a vasoconstriction of vessel diameters by -14.0±5.3% in arteries and -18.4±7.0% in veins and increased FL responses in arteries (+6.2±2.8%) and veins (+7.2±3.1%). Systemic hyperoxia increases FL-induced retinal vasodilatation in the retina. The mechanism by which oxygen modulates the hyperemic response to FL stimulation remains to be elucidated.

  19. Eye enucleation and regeneration of neural retina in axolotl larvae (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Yew, D T

    1985-01-01

    The eyes of Axolotl larvae were enucleated at stages 30 and 37. Animals with single dorsomedian eyes resulted in the first case (i.e. stage 30). When a piece of pigment epithelium was re-implanted into stage 37 animals at the site of the lesion, limited regeneration was observed when the implant formed a vesicle, but, when the pigment epithelium remained "open" regeneration of the neural retina was extensive. The possible resons for this difference was discussed.

  20. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  1. The midget-parvocellular pathway of marmoset retina: a quantitative light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Telkes, Ildiko; Lee, Sammy C S; Jusuf, Patricia R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2008-10-10

    The midget-parvocellular pathway in foveal retina of primates shows a "private line" (one-to-one) connectivity with cone photoreceptors. The connectivity of this pathway outside the fovea is not well understood. Here, we studied the population of OFF midget bipolar cells across the retinae of marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) by using light microscopy. Cone pedicles were labeled with peanut agglutinin, OFF midget bipolar cells were labeled with antibodies against CD15, and midget ganglion cells were retrogradely labeled from the lateral geniculate nucleus and subsequently photofilled. Each midget bipolar cell contacts a single cone in foveal retina, but outside the fovea midget bipolar cells contact multiple cones: one to two cones at 1 mm ( approximately 8 degrees); three to four cones at 3-4 mm ( approximately 25 degrees); and five or more cones beyond 6 mm (>50 degrees). Throughout this eccentricity range, all medium (M) and long (L) wavelength sensitive cones make similar number of contacts with midget bipolar cells, but short wavelength sensitive (S) cones make little or no contact. By calculating the numerical convergence between midget bipolar and midget ganglion cells, we estimate that midget ganglion cells receive input from up to 25 cones at approximately 5 degrees, and from more than 65 cones at approximately 50 degrees. No obvious differences were seen between the retinae of animals with di- or trichromatic color vision. The finding that the one-to-one connectivity is restricted to the fovea predicts that in marmosets spectral mixing of M/L cone inputs will occur peripheral to 10 degrees of visual angle. PMID:18683219

  2. The effects of direct-current magnetic fields on turtle retinas vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, M.S.

    1983-05-13

    Direct-current magnetic fields of 10 to 100 gauss cause a significant short-term reduction of the in vitro electroretinographic b-wave response in turtle retina. This response compression is not accompanied by the usual reduction in retinal sensitivity that occurs with background illumination. Furthermore, this effect is obtained only briefly after the offset of ambient lighting in the diurnal light-dark cycle of nonhibernating animals.

  3. Novel area serving binocular vision in the retinae of procellariiform seabirds.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B; Martin, G R; Brooke, M de L

    1991-01-01

    Procellariiforms are pelagic seabirds which fly close to the sea surface and feed either by taking items from the surface or by shallow diving. The retinal ganglion cells in five species (Manx shearwater, Puffinus puffinus, Kerguelen petrel, Pterodroma brevirostris, great shearwater, Puffinus gravis, broad-billed prion, Pachyptila vittata, and common diving petrel, Pelecanoides urinatrix) were examined by Nissl staining and also by silver staining in the case of the common diving petrel. In all five species, a well-defined region in the dorsotemporal retina, close to the ora, was identified. This region is characterized by the presence of ganglion cells which are both regularly arrayed and larger than those found in the rest of the retina. These cells also have a large dendritic field of sparsely branched dendrites with much dendritic overlap between cells, thick axons, and dendrites confined to the proximal inner plexiform layer. Morphologically, they appear similar to the alpha cells of the retina in cats. It is suggested that the region containing these cells should be regarded as a retinal area, and the name area giganto cellularis is proposed. In the Manx shearwater, it is found that this novel area projects visually into the binocular field below the bill. Unlike previously described areas in avian retinae, it seems that this novel area is not concerned with high spatial resolution. It may function in the detection of objects on the sea surface and/or be concerned with the detection of the actual sea surface as a bird flies low over it. PMID:2054586

  4. Morphology and function of three VIP-expressing amacrine cell types in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Amacrine cells (ACs) are the most diverse class of neurons in the retina. The variety of signals provided by ACs allows the retina to encode a wide range of visual features. Of the 30-50 AC types in mammalian species, few have been studied in detail. Here, we combine genetic and viral strategies to identify and to characterize morphologically three vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing GABAergic AC types (VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs) in mice. Somata of VIP1- and VIP2-ACs reside in the inner nuclear layer and somata of VIP3-ACs in the ganglion cell layer, and they show asymmetric distributions along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. Neurite arbors of VIP-ACs differ in size (VIP1-ACs ≈ VIP3-ACs > VIP2-ACs) and stratify in distinct sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer. To analyze light responses and underlying synaptic inputs, we target VIP-ACs under 2-photon guidance for patch-clamp recordings. VIP1-ACs depolarize strongly to light increments (ON) over a wide range of stimulus sizes but show size-selective responses to light decrements (OFF), depolarizing to small and hyperpolarizing to large stimuli. The switch in polarity of OFF responses is caused by pre- and postsynaptic surround inhibition. VIP2- and VIP3-ACs both show small depolarizations to ON stimuli and large hyperpolarizations to OFF stimuli but differ in their spatial response profiles. Depolarizations are caused by ON excitation outweighing ON inhibition, whereas hyperpolarizations result from pre- and postsynaptic OFF-ON crossover inhibition. VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs thus differ in response polarity and spatial tuning and contribute to the diversity of inhibitory and neuromodulatory signals in the retina. PMID:26311183

  5. Lipid nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery systems to the retina.

    PubMed

    del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Delgado, Diego; Gascón, Alicia R; Solinís, Maria Ángeles

    2013-03-01

    This review highlights the application of lipid nanoparticles (Solid Lipid Nanoparticles, Nanostructured Lipid Carriers, or Lipid Drug Conjugates) as effective drug/gene delivery systems for retinal diseases. Most drug products for ocular disease treatment are marketed as eye drop formulations but, due to ocular barriers, the drug concentration in the retina hardly ever turns out to be effective. Up to this date, several delivery systems have been designed to deliver drugs to the retina. Drug delivery strategies may be classified into 3 groups: noninvasive techniques, implants, and colloidal carriers. The best known systems for drug delivery to the posterior eye are intravitreal implants; in fact, some of them are being clinically used. However, their long-term accumulation might impact the patient's vision. On the contrary, colloidal drug delivery systems (microparticles, liposomes, or nanoparticles) can be easily administered in a liquid form. Nanoparticular systems diffuse rapidly and are better internalized in ocular tissues than microparticles. In comparison with liposomes, nanoparticles have a higher loading capacity and are more stable in biological fluids and during storage. In addition, their capacity to adhere to the ocular surface and interact with the endothelium makes these drug delivery systems interesting as new therapeutic tools in ophthalmology. Within the group of nanoparticles, those composed of lipids (Solid Lipid Nanoparticles, Nanostructred Lipid Carriers, and Lipid Drug Conjugates) are more biocompatible, easy to produce at large scale, and they may be autoclaved or sterilized. The present review summarizes scientific results that evidence the potential application of lipid nanoparticles as drug delivery systems for the retina and also as nonviral vectors in gene therapy of retina disorders, although much more effort is still needed before these lipidic systems could be available in the market. PMID:23286300

  6. Morphology and function of three VIP-expressing amacrine cell types in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Akrouh, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Amacrine cells (ACs) are the most diverse class of neurons in the retina. The variety of signals provided by ACs allows the retina to encode a wide range of visual features. Of the 30–50 AC types in mammalian species, few have been studied in detail. Here, we combine genetic and viral strategies to identify and to characterize morphologically three vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing GABAergic AC types (VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs) in mice. Somata of VIP1- and VIP2-ACs reside in the inner nuclear layer and somata of VIP3-ACs in the ganglion cell layer, and they show asymmetric distributions along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. Neurite arbors of VIP-ACs differ in size (VIP1-ACs ≈ VIP3-ACs > VIP2-ACs) and stratify in distinct sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer. To analyze light responses and underlying synaptic inputs, we target VIP-ACs under 2-photon guidance for patch-clamp recordings. VIP1-ACs depolarize strongly to light increments (ON) over a wide range of stimulus sizes but show size-selective responses to light decrements (OFF), depolarizing to small and hyperpolarizing to large stimuli. The switch in polarity of OFF responses is caused by pre- and postsynaptic surround inhibition. VIP2- and VIP3-ACs both show small depolarizations to ON stimuli and large hyperpolarizations to OFF stimuli but differ in their spatial response profiles. Depolarizations are caused by ON excitation outweighing ON inhibition, whereas hyperpolarizations result from pre- and postsynaptic OFF-ON crossover inhibition. VIP1-, VIP2-, and VIP3-ACs thus differ in response polarity and spatial tuning and contribute to the diversity of inhibitory and neuromodulatory signals in the retina. PMID:26311183

  7. Interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) enhances rhodopsin regeneration in the experimentally detached retina.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M; Sun, Y; Wiggert, B; Duncan, T; Chader, G J; Ripps, H

    1993-12-01

    Results obtained in a previous study showed that, compared with a normal eyecup preparation, the amount of rhodopsin regenerated and the rate at which it was resynthesized after bleaching were reduced by about 50% when the skate retina was detached from its pigment epithelium (RPE) and replaced immediately on the apical surface of the RPE (Sun and Ripps, 1992). In the present study, these observations have been extended to preparations in which the detachment procedure was performed under fluid in order to dilute the IRBP content of the interphotoreceptor matrix. The goal initially was to determine whether lowering the IRBP concentration of the subretinal space affected the regenerative process. Using fundus reflectometry, it was found that allowing fluid to enter the subretinal space exposed by the detachment procedure caused profound deficits in both the rate and amount of rhodopsin that regenerated after bleaching. Results obtained with SDS-PAGE and immunohistochemistry showed that the molecular weight of the IRBP extracted from the skate retina is similar to that of many other vertebrate species, and that antibodies prepared against mammalian IRBP react with epitopes on skate IRBP within the interphotoreceptor matrix. Accordingly, it was investigated whether it is possible to reverse the detachment-induced anomalies in rhodopsin kinetics by introducing ligand-free IRBP purified from bovine retina to the subretinal space. Again using fundus reflectometry, it was found that instilling 5 microM of a 130 microM IRBP solution between the neural retina and the RPE increased significantly the rate of regeneration, and more than doubled the amount of rhodopsin reformed in darkness. PMID:8150029

  8. Role of the nucleolus in neurodegenerative diseases with particular reference to the retina: a review.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul I; Wood, John Pm; Chidlow, Glyn; Sharma, Shiwani; Craig, Jamie; Casson, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    The nucleolus has emerged as a key regulator of cellular growth and the response to stress, in addition to its traditionally understood function in ribosome biogenesis. The association between nucleolar function and neurodegenerative disease is increasingly being explored. There is also recent evidence indicating that the nucleolus may well be crucial in the development of the eye. In this present review, the role of the nucleolus in retinal development as well as in neurodegeneration with an emphasis on the retina is discussed.

  9. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  10. Lateral Inhibition in the Vertebrate Retina: The Case of the Missing Neurotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Richard H.; Davenport, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Lateral inhibition at the first synapse in the retina is important for visual perception, enhancing image contrast, color discrimination, and light adaptation. Despite decades of research, the feedback signal from horizontal cells to photoreceptors that generates lateral inhibition remains uncertain. GABA, protons, or an ephaptic mechanism have all been suggested as the primary mediator of feedback. However, the complexity of the reciprocal cone to horizontal cell synapse has left the identity of the feedback signal an unsolved mystery. PMID:26656622

  11. Lateral Inhibition in the Vertebrate Retina: The Case of the Missing Neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Richard H; Davenport, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Lateral inhibition at the first synapse in the retina is important for visual perception, enhancing image contrast, color discrimination, and light adaptation. Despite decades of research, the feedback signal from horizontal cells to photoreceptors that generates lateral inhibition remains uncertain. GABA, protons, or an ephaptic mechanism have all been suggested as the primary mediator of feedback. However, the complexity of the reciprocal cone to horizontal cell synapse has left the identity of the feedback signal an unsolved mystery. PMID:26656622

  12. Effect of increased oxygen tension on flicker-induced vasodilatation in the human retina

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In the retina, blood flow and neural activity are tightly coupled. Stimulation of the retina with flickering light is accompanied by an increase in blood flow. The current study seeks to investigate whether an increase in oxygen tension modulates flicker (FL)-induced vasodilatation in the human retina. A total of 52 healthy volunteers were included. Via a breathing mask, 100% oxygen (O2) was administered in one, a mixture of 8% carbon dioxide and 92% oxygen (C/O) in a second cohort. Retinal vessel diameters were measured with a Vessel Analyzer and FL responses were assessed before and during the breathing periods. At baseline, FL stimulation increased retinal vessel diameters by +3.7±2.3% in arteries and by +5.1±3.7% in veins. Breathing of C/O led to a decrease in arterial (−9.0±6.9%) and venous (−11.3±5.9%) vessel calibers. Flicker response was increased to 5.7±2.5% in arteries and to 8.6±4.1% in veins. Breathing of pure O2 induced a vasoconstriction of vessel diameters by −14.0±5.3% in arteries and −18.4±7.0% in veins and increased FL responses in arteries (+6.2±2.8%) and veins (+7.2±3.1%). Systemic hyperoxia increases FL-induced retinal vasodilatation in the retina. The mechanism by which oxygen modulates the hyperemic response to FL stimulation remains to be elucidated. PMID:25248833

  13. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  14. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  15. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals.

  16. Avian Cone Photoreceptors Tile the Retina as Five Independent, Self-Organizing Mosaics

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Yoseph A.; Mantey, Stephanie; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    The avian retina possesses one of the most sophisticated cone photoreceptor systems among vertebrates. Birds have five types of cones including four single cones, which support tetrachromatic color vision and a double cone, which is thought to mediate achromatic motion perception. Despite this richness, very little is known about the spatial organization of avian cones and its adaptive significance. Here we show that the five cone types of the chicken independently tile the retina as highly ordered mosaics with a characteristic spacing between cones of the same type. Measures of topological order indicate that double cones are more highly ordered than single cones, possibly reflecting their posited role in motion detection. Although cones show spacing interactions that are cell type-specific, all cone types use the same density-dependent yardstick to measure intercone distance. We propose a simple developmental model that can account for these observations. We also show that a single parameter, the global regularity index, defines the regularity of all five cone mosaics. Lastly, we demonstrate similar cone distributions in three additional avian species, suggesting that these patterning principles are universal among birds. Since regular photoreceptor spacing is critical for uniform sampling of visual space, the cone mosaics of the avian retina represent an elegant example of the emergence of adaptive global patterning secondary to simple local interactions between individual photoreceptors. Our results indicate that the evolutionary pressures that gave rise to the avian retina's various adaptations for enhanced color discrimination also acted to fine-tune its spatial sampling of color and luminance. PMID:20126550

  17. The protective role of tacrine and donepezil in the retina of acetylcholinesterase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yun-Min; Cai, Li; Shao, Yi; Xu, Man; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of different concentrations of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors tacrine and donepezil on retinal protection in AChE+/− mice (AChE knockout mice) of various ages. METHODS Cultured ARPE-19 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at concentrations of 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 µmol/L and protein levels were measured using Western blot. Intraperitoneal injections of tacrine and donepezil (0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL and 0.4 mg/mL) were respectively given to AChE+/− mice aged 2mo and 4mo and wild-type S129 mice for 7d; phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to the control group. The mice were sacrificed after 30d by in vitro cardiac perfusion and retinal samples were taken. AChE-deficient mice were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using specific genotyping protocols obtained from the Jackson Laboratory website. H&E staining, immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to observe AChE protein expression changes in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer. RESULTS Different concentrations of H2O2 induced AChE expression during RPE cell apoptosis. AChE+/− mice retina were thinner than those in wild-type mice (P<0.05); the retinal structure was still intact at 2mo but became thinner with increasing age (P<0.05); furthermore, AChE+/− mice developed more slowly than wild-type mice (P<0.05). Increased concentrations of tacrine and donepezil did not significantly improve the protection of the retina function and morphology (P>0.05). CONCLUSION In vivo, tacrine and donepezil can inhibit the expression of AChE; the decrease of AChE expression in the retina is beneficial for the development of the retina. PMID:26558196

  18. Rat retina shows robust circadian expression of clock and clock output genes in explant culture

    PubMed Central

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Malan, André; Sandu, Cristina; Jaeger, Catherine; Cipolla-Neto, José; Hicks, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circadian rhythms are central to vision and retinal physiology. A circadian clock located within the retina controls various rhythmic processes including melatonin synthesis in photoreceptors. In the present study, we evaluated the rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock output genes in retinal explants maintained for several days in darkness. Methods Retinas were dissected from Wistar rats, either wild-type or from the Per1-luciferase transgenic line housed under a daily 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD12/12), and put in culture at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 on semipermeable membranes. Explants from wild-type rats were collected every 4 h over 3 days, and total RNA was extracted, quantified, and reverse transcribed. Gene expression was assessed with quantitative PCR, and the periodicity of the relative mRNA amounts was assessed with nonlinear least squares fitting to sine wave functions. Bioluminescence in explants from Per1-luciferase rats was monitored for several days under three different culture protocols. Results Rhythmic expression was found for all studied clock genes and for clock downstream targets such as c-fos and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) genes. Clock and output genes cycled with relatively similar periods and acrophases (peaks of expression during subjective night, except c-fos, which peaked around the end of the subjective day). Data for Per1 were confirmed with bioluminescence monitoring, which also permitted culture conditions to be optimized to study the retina clock. Conclusions Our work shows the free-running expression profile of multiple clock genes and potential clock targets in mammalian retinal explants. This research further strengthens the notion that the retina contains a self-sustained oscillator that can be functionally characterized in organotypic culture. PMID:24940028

  19. Seasonal and post-trauma remodeling in cone-dominant ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Dana K; Sajdak, Benjamin S; Li, Wei; Jones, Bryan W

    2016-09-01

    With a photoreceptor mosaic containing ∼85% cones, the ground squirrel is one of the richest known mammalian sources of these important retinal cells. It also has a visual ecology much like the human's. While the ground squirrel retina is understandably prominent in the cone biochemistry, physiology, and circuitry literature, far less is known about the remodeling potential of its retinal pigment epithelium, neurons, macroglia, or microglia. This review aims to summarize the data from ground squirrel retina to this point in time, and to relate them to data from other brain areas where appropriate. We begin with a survey of the ground squirrel visual system, making comparisons with traditional rodent models and with human. Because this animal's status as a hibernator often goes unnoticed in the vision literature, we then present a brief primer on hibernation biology. Next we review what is known about ground squirrel retinal remodeling concurrent with deep torpor and with rapid recovery upon re-warming. Notable here is rapidly-reversible, temperature-dependent structural plasticity of cone ribbon synapses, as well as pre- and post-synaptic plasticity throughout diverse brain regions. It is not yet clear if retinal cell types other than cones engage in torpor-associated synaptic remodeling. We end with the small but intriguing literature on the ground squirrel retina's remodeling responses to insult by retinal detachment. Notable for widespread loss of (cone) photoreceptors, there is surprisingly little remodeling of the RPE or Müller cells. Microglial activation appears minimal, and remodeling of surviving second- and third-order neurons seems absent, but both require further study. In contrast, traumatic brain injury in the ground squirrel elicits typical macroglial and microglial responses. Overall, the data to date strongly suggest a heretofore unrecognized, natural checkpoint between retinal deafferentiation and RPE and Müller cell remodeling events. As we

  20. Effect of high potassium on dopamine receptor activity in bovine retina

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that dopamine released by light caused a subsensitivity of the dopamine receptor was investigated. Bovine eyes were obtained from a slaughterhouse, and retinas were dissected in a dark room. Filter binding assays were developed to measure agonist and antagonist binding to the dopamine receptor using ({sup 3}H)dopamine and ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390, respectively, in a retinal membrane fraction. Adenylate cyclase activation was measured by the production of ({sup 32}P)cyclic AMP from {sup 32}ATP. In desensitization experiments, bovine retinas were incubated for fifteen minutes with 56 mM potassium, which also causes a release of dopamine in retinas were washed, and membranes were prepared. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase evoked by dopamine and radiolabeled agonist and antagonist binding were measured. In the receptor binding characterization studies, the dissociation constant and the maximum number of binding sites were obtained for ({sup 3}H)dopamine and ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390 binding.

  1. Imaging pulse wave velocity in mouse retina using swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Blood vessel dynamics has been a significant subject in cardiology and internal medicine, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) on artery vessels is a classic evaluation of arterial distensibility, and has never been ascertained as a cardiovascular risk marker. The aim of this study is to develop a high speed imaging technique to capture the pulsatile motion on mouse retina arteries with the ability to quantify PWV on any arterial vessels. We demonstrate a new non-invasive method to assess the vessel dynamics on mouse retina. A Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is used for imaging micro-scale blood vessel motion. The phase-stabilized SS-OCT provides a typical displacement sensitivity of 20 nm. The frame rate of imaging is ~16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of transient pulse waves with adequate temporal resolution. Imaging volumes with repeated B-scans are obtained on mouse retina capillary bed, and the mouse oxymeter signal is recorded simultaneously. The pulse wave on artery and vein are resolved, and with the synchronized heart beat signal, the temporal delay on different vessel locations is determined. The vessel specific measurement of PWV is achieved for the first time with SS-OCT, for pulse waves propagating more than 100 cm/s. Using the novel methodology of retinal PWV assessment, it is hoped that the clinical OCT scans can provide extended diagnostic information of cardiology functionalities.

  2. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases. PMID:26677077

  3. Anatomical and Neurochemical Characterization of Dopaminergic Interplexiform Processes in Mouse and Rat Retinas

    PubMed Central

    WITKOVSKY, PAUL; GÁBRIEL, ROBERT; KRIŽAJ, DAVID

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons of mouse and rat retinas are of the interplexiform subtype (DA-IPC), i.e., they send processes distally toward the outer retina, exhibiting numerous varicosities along their course. The primary question we addressed was whether distally located DA-IPC varicosities, identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity, had the characteristic presynaptic proteins associated with calcium-dependent vesicular release of neurotransmitter. We found that TH immunoreactive varicosities in the outer retina possessed vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and vesicular GABA transporter, but they lacked immunostaining for any of nine subtypes of voltage-dependent calcium channel. Immunoreactivity for other channels that may permit calcium influx such as certain ionotropic glutamate receptors and canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) was similarly absent, although DA-IPC varicosities did show ryanodine receptor immunoreactivity, indicating the presence of intracellular calcium stores. The synaptic vesicle proteins sv2a and sv2b and certain other proteins associated with the presynaptic membrane were absent from DA-IPC varicosities, but the vesicular SNARE protein, vamp2, was present in a fraction of those varicosities. We identified a presumed second class of IPC that is GABAergic but not dopaminergic. Outer retinal varicosities of this putative GABAergic IPC did colocalize synaptic vesicle protein 2a, suggesting they possessed a conventional vesicular release mechanism. PMID:18615559

  4. Developmentally Regulated Production of meso-Zeaxanthin in Chicken Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Choroid and Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Shyam, Rajalekshmy; Li, Binxing; Vachali, Preejith; Subhani, Yumna K.; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose meso-Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that is rarely encountered in nature outside of the vertebrate eye. It is not a constituent of a normal human diet, yet this carotenoid comprises one-third of the primate macular pigment. In the current study, we undertook a systematic approach to biochemically characterize the production of meso-zeaxanthin in the vertebrate eye. Methods Fertilized White Leghorn chicken eggs were analyzed for the presence of carotenoids during development. Yolk, liver, brain, serum, retina, and RPE/choroid were isolated, and carotenoids were extracted. The samples were analyzed on C-30 or chiral HPLC columns to determine the carotenoid composition. Results Lutein and zeaxanthin were found in all studied nonocular tissues, but no meso-zeaxanthin was ever detected. Among the ocular tissues, the presence of meso-zeaxanthin was consistently observed starting at embryonic day 17 (E17) in the RPE/choroid, several days before its consistent detection in the retina. If RPE/choroid of an embryo was devoid of meso-zeaxanthin, the corresponding retina was always negative as well. Conclusions This is the first report of developmentally regulated synthesis of meso-zeaxanthin in a vertebrate system. Our observations suggest that the RPE/choroid is the primary site of meso-zeaxanthin synthesis. Identification of meso-zeaxanthin isomerase enzyme in the developing chicken embryo will facilitate our ability to determine the biochemical mechanisms responsible for production of this unique carotenoid in other higher vertebrates, such as humans. PMID:27082300

  5. Rax : developmental and daily expression patterns in the rat pineal gland and retina.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F

    2011-09-01

    Retina and anterior neural fold homeobox (Rax) gene encodes a transcription factor essential for vertebrate eye development. Recent microarray studies indicate that Rax is expressed in the adult rat pineal gland and retina. The present study reveals that Rax expression levels in the rat change significantly during retinal development with a peak occurring at embryonic day 18, whereas Rax expression in the pineal is relatively delayed and not detectable until embryonic day 20. In both tissues, Rax is expressed throughout postnatal development into adulthood. In the mature rat pineal gland, the abundance of Rax transcripts increases 2-fold during the light period with a peak occurring at dusk. These findings are consistent with the evidence that Rax is of functional importance in eye development and suggest a role of Rax in the developing pineal gland. In addition, it would appear possible that Rax contributes to phenotype maintenance in the mature retina and pineal gland and may facilitate 24-h changes in the pineal transcriptome.

  6. The scotopic electroretinogram of the sugar glider related to histological features of its retina.

    PubMed

    Akula, James D; Esdaille, Tricia M; Caffé, A Romeo; Naarendorp, Franklin

    2011-11-01

    The flash electroretinogram (ERG) was used to characterize the scotopic retinal function in a marsupial. Key parameter values of the a- and b-waves of adult male sugar gliders, Petaurus breviceps breviceps, elicited with ganzfeld flashes were determined under dark- and light-adapted conditions. Using standard histological methods, the thicknesses of the major layers of the retina were assessed to provide insight into the nature of the ERG responses. The ERG and histological results were compared to corresponding data for placental C57Bl/6 mice to establish whether the functional retinal specialization that underlies scotopic visual function in a marsupial parallels that of a placental mouse. The sensitivity of the a-wave assessed with the Lamb and Pugh (Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 47:5138-5152, 2006) "model" and that of the b-wave assessed with standard methods were lower in the sugar glider compared to the mouse. The thickness of the sugar glider retina was two-third of that of the mouse. The high-intensity flash ERG of the sugar glider substantially differed in shape from that of the mouse reflecting perhaps structural and functional differences between the two species at the level of the inner retina.

  7. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Microscopy: A Novel Technique for Imaging the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To image the cellular and noncellular structures of the retina in an intact mouse eye without the application of exogenous fluorescent labels using noninvasive, nondestructive techniques. Methods. Freshly enucleated mouse eyes were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). Cross sectional transverse sections and sequential flat (en face) sagittal sections were collected from a region of sclera approximately midway between the limbus and optic nerve. Imaging proceeded from the surface of the sclera to a depth of ∼60 μm. Results. The fluorescent signal from collagen fibers within the sclera was evident in the TPAF channel; the scleral collagen fibers showed no organization and appeared randomly packed. The sclera contained regions lacking TPAF and CARS fluorescence of ∼3 to 15 μm in diameter that could represent small vessels or scleral fibroblasts. Intense punctate CARS signals from the retinal pigment epithelial layer were of a size and shape of retinyl storage esters. Rod outer segments could be identified by the CARS signal from their lipid-rich plasma membranes. Conclusions. CARS microscopy can be used to image the outer regions of the mammalian retina without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. With technical advancements, CARS/TPAF may represent a new avenue for noninvasively imaging the retina and might complement modalities currently used in clinical practice. PMID:23580484

  8. Wavefront sensorless approaches to adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Daniel J.; Bonora, Stefano; Mata, Oscar S.; Haunerland, Bengt K.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Jian, Yifan

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is necessary to correct aberrations when imaging the mouse eye with high numerical aperture. In order to obtain cellular resolution, we have implemented wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina. Our approach includes a lens-based system and MEMS deformable mirror for aberration correction. The AO system was constructed with a reflectance channel for structural images and fluorescence channel for functional images. The structural imaging was used in real-time for navigation on the retina using landmarks such as blood vessels. We have also implemented a tunable liquid lens to select the retinal layer of interest at which to perform the optimization. At the desired location on the mouse retina, the optimization algorithm used the fluorescence image data to drive a modal hill-climbing algorithm using an intensity or sharpness image quality metric. The optimization requires ~30 seconds to complete a search up to the 20th Zernike mode. In this report, we have demonstrated the AO performance for high-resolution images of the capillaries in a fluorescence angiography. We have also made progress on an approach to AO with pupil segmentation as a possible sensorless technique suitable for small animal retinal imaging. Pupil segmentation AO was implemented on the same ophthalmic system and imaging performance was demonstrated on fluorescent beads with induced aberrations.

  9. Current Progress in Deciphering Importance of VLC-PUFA in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lea D; Anderson, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt-like macular dystrophy-3 (STGD3) is a juvenile-onset disease caused by mutations in ELOVL4 (elongation of very long fatty acids-4). This gene product catalyzes the elongation of long chain saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-FAs and LC-PUFAs) into very long chain FAs and PUFAs (VLC-FAs and VLC-PUFAs). These mutations cause a frame shift in the ELOVL4 transcript, introducing a premature stop codon that results in the translation of a truncated protein that has lost a C-terminus endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention/retrieval signal. The truncated protein is not targeted to the ER, the site of very long-chain PUFA (VLC-PUFA; 28-40 carbons) synthesis. Expression of the ELOVL4 gene is limited mainly to the brain, testis, skin, and photoreceptor cells of the retina. While the skin and brain contain very long chain saturated fatty acids (VLC-FAs), the other tissues expressing ELOVL4 contain VLC-PUFAs, with sperm and the retina having the highest levels. This review focuses on the current information available concerning the role of VLC-PUFAs in the retina. PMID:26427405

  10. Taurine biosynthesis in frog retina: effects of light and dark adaptations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, C.; Ida, S.; Kuriyama, K.

    1983-01-01

    The retinal uptake and metabolism of cysteine, a precursor for taurine biosynthesis, were analysed using the bull frog. The (/sup 14/C) cysteine uptake into isolated retina had some specific properties: It was rather temperature independent, required Na ions, was inhibited by ouabain but not by dinitrophenol, and exhibited saturation kinetics composed of two components. When retinal homogenate was incubated with 12-30 microM of L-(U-/sup 14/C)cysteine, the accumulation of labeled alanine, cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), cysteic acid (CA), hypotaurine, and taurine was detected. The metabolic conversions of (/sup 14/C) cysteine to labeled alanine, hypotaurine, and taurine were linear over 90 minutes. Prolonged light adaptation (3 weeks) induced a significant reduction in the formation of labeled CA, CSA, hypotaurine, and taurine from (/sup 14/C) cysteine. On the other hand, it was found that in dark-adapted retinae, the formation of labeled taurine from (/sup 14/C) cysteine increased significantly in spite of the reduction in the formation of labeled CA. These results indicate that biosynthetic pathways exist for taurine from cysteine in frog retina, and that these metabolic pathways are involved in the regulation of retinal taurine content under continuous visual adaptation.

  11. Design of a MEMS-based retina scanning system for biometric authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing need for reliable authentication for a number of applications such as e commerce. Common authentication methods based on ownership (ID card) or knowledge factors (password, PIN) are often prone to manipulations and may therefore be not safe enough. Various inherence factor based methods like fingerprint, retinal pattern or voice identifications are considered more secure. Retina scanning in particular offers both low false rejection rate (FRR) and low false acceptance rate (FAR) with about one in a million. Images of the retina with its characteristic pattern of blood vessels can be made with either a fundus camera or laser scanning methods. The present work describes the optical design of a new compact retina laser scanner which is based on MEMS (Micro Electric Mechanical System) technology. The use of a dual axis micro scanning mirror for laser beam deflection enables a more compact and robust design compared to classical systems. The scanner exhibits a full field of view of 10° which corresponds to an area of 4 mm2 on the retinal surface surrounding the optical disc. The system works in the near infrared and is designed for use under ambient light conditions, which implies a pupil diameter of 1.5 mm. Furthermore it features a long eye relief of 30 mm so that it can be conveniently used by persons wearing glasses. The optical design requirements and the optical performance are discussed in terms of spot diagrams and ray fan plots.

  12. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  13. Effect of light on global gene expression in the neuroglobin-deficient mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    ILMJÄRV, STEN; REIMETS, RIIN; HUNDAHL, CHRISTIAN ANSGAR; LUUK, HENDRIK

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have raised controversy over the functional role of neuroglobin (Ngb) in the retina. Certain studies indicate a significant impact of Ngb on retinal physiology, whereas others are conflicting. The present is an observational study that tested the effect of Ngb deficiency on gene expression in dark- and light-adapted mouse retinas. Large-scale gene expression profiling was performed using GeneChip® Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays and the results were compared to publicly available data sets. The lack of Ngb was found to have a minor effect on the light-induced retinal gene expression response. In addition, there was no increase in the expression of marker genes associated with hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum-stress and oxidative stress in the Ngb-deficient retina. By contrast, several genes were identified that appeared to be differentially expressed between the genotypes when the effect of light was ignored. The present study indicates that Ngb deficiency does not lead to major alternations in light-dependent gene expression response, but leads to subtle systemic differences of a currently unknown functional significance. PMID:25279145

  14. Wide-dynamic-range APS-based silicon retina with brightness constancy.

    PubMed

    Shimonomura, Kazuhiro; Kameda, Seiji; Iwata, Atsushi; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2011-09-01

    A silicon retina is an intelligent vision sensor that can execute real-time image preprocessing by using a parallel analog circuit that mimics the structure of the neuronal circuits in the vertebrate retina. For enhancing the sensor's robustness to changes in illumination in a practical environment, we have designed and fabricated a silicon retina on the basis of a computational model of brightness constancy. The chip has a wide-dynamic-range and shows a constant response against changes in the illumination intensity. The photosensor in the present chip approximates logarithmic illumination-to-voltage transfer characteristics as a result of the application of a time-modulated reset voltage technique. Two types of image processing, namely, Laplacian-Gaussian-like spatial filtering and computing the frame difference, are carried out by using resistive networks and sample/hold circuits in the chip. As a result of these processings, the chip exhibits brightness constancy over a wide range of illumination. The chip is fabricated by using the 0.25- μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensor technology. The number of pixels is 64 × 64, and the power consumption is 32 mW at the frame rate of 30 fps. We show that our chip not only has a wide-dynamic-range but also shows a constant response to the changes in illumination.

  15. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  16. Synaptic remodeling generates synchronous oscillations in the degenerated outer mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Wadood; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Zrenner, Eberhart; Euler, Thomas; Schubert, Timm

    2014-01-01

    During neuronal degenerative diseases, neuronal microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. The functional consequences of such remodeling are mostly unknown. For instance, in mutant rd1 mouse retina, a common model for Retinitis Pigmentosa, rod bipolar cells (RBCs) establish contacts with remnant cone photoreceptors (cones) as a consequence of rod photoreceptor cell death and the resulting lack of presynaptic input. To assess the functional connectivity in the remodeled, light-insensitive outer rd1 retina, we recorded spontaneous population activity in retinal wholemounts using Ca2+ imaging and identified the participating cell types. Focusing on cones, RBCs and horizontal cells (HCs), we found that these cell types display spontaneous oscillatory activity and form synchronously active clusters. Overall activity was modulated by GABAergic inhibition from interneurons such as HCs and/or possibly interplexiform cells. Many of the activity clusters comprised both cones and RBCs. Opposite to what is expected from the intact (wild-type) cone-ON bipolar cell pathway, cone and RBC activity was positively correlated and, at least partially, mediated by glutamate transporters expressed on RBCs. Deletion of gap junctional coupling between cones reduced the number of clusters, indicating that electrical cone coupling plays a crucial role for generating the observed synchronized oscillations. In conclusion, degeneration-induced synaptic remodeling of the rd1 retina results in a complex self-sustained outer retinal oscillatory network, that complements (and potentially modulates) the recently described inner retinal oscillatory network consisting of amacrine, bipolar and ganglion cells. PMID:25249942

  17. Rotenone induces degeneration of photoreceptors and impairs the dopaminergic system in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Rudd, Julián; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; De Juan, Emilio; Martín-Nieto, José; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2011-10-01

    Rotenone is a widely used pesticide and a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I (NADH-quinone reductase) that elicits the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and thereby the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome. Here we have addressed the alterations induced by rotenone at the functional, morphological and molecular levels in the retina, including those involving both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic retinal neurons. Rotenone-treated rats showed abnormalities in equilibrium, postural instability and involuntary movements. In their outer retina we observed a loss of photoreceptors, and a reduced synaptic connectivity between those remaining and their postsynaptic neurons. A dramatic loss of mitochondria was observed in the inner segments, as well as in the axon terminals of photoreceptors. In the inner retina we observed a decrease in the expression of dopaminergic cell molecular markers, including loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, associated with a reduction of the dopaminergic plexus and cell bodies. An increase in immunoreactivity of AII amacrine cells for parvalbumin, a Ca(2+)-scavenging protein, was also detected. These abnormalities were accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves and an increase in the b-wave implicit time, as well as by a lower amplitude and greater latency in oscillatory potentials. These results indicate that rotenone induces loss of vision by promoting photoreceptor cell death and impairment of the dopaminergic retinal system.

  18. Mosaic properties of midget and parasol ganglion cells in the marmoset retina.

    PubMed

    Szmajda, Brett A; Grünert, Ulrike; Martin, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    We measured mosaic properties of midget and parasol ganglion cells in the retina of a New World monkey, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus . We addressed the functional specialization of these populations for color and spatial vision, by comparing the mosaic of ganglion cells in dichromatic ("red-green color blind") and trichromatic marmosets. Ganglion cells were labelled by photolytic amplification of retrograde marker ("photofilling") following injections into the lateral geniculate nucleus, or by intracellular injection in an in vitro retinal preparation. The dendritic-field size, shape, and overlap of neighboring cells were measured. We show that in marmosets, both midget and parasol cells exhibit a radial bias, so that the long axis of the dendritic field points towards the fovea. The radial bias is similar for parasol cells and midget cells, despite the fact that midget cell dendritic fields are more elongated than are those of parasol cells. The dendritic fields of midget ganglion cells from the same (ON or OFF) response-type array show very little overlap, consistent with the low coverage of the midget mosaic in humans. No large differences in radial bias, or overlap, were seen on comparing retinae from dichromatic and trichromatic animals. These data suggest that radial bias in ganglion cell populations is a consistent feature of the primate retina. Furthermore, they suggest that the mosaic properties of the midget cell population are associated with high spatial resolution rather than being specifically associated with trichromatic color vision. PMID:16212698

  19. Non-mydriatic video ophthalmoscope to measure fast temporal changes of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Ralf P.; Kolář, Radim; Odstrčilík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of fast temporal changes of the human retina can be used to get insight to normal physiological behavior and to detect pathological deviations. This can be important for the early detection of glaucoma and other eye diseases. We developed a small, lightweight, USB powered video ophthalmoscope that allows taking video sequences of the human retina with at least 25 frames per second without dilating the pupil. Short sequences (about 10 s) of the optic nerve head (20° x 15°) are recorded from subjects and registered offline using two-stage process (phase correlation and Lucas-Kanade approach) to compensate for eye movements. From registered video sequences, different parameters can be calculated. Two applications are described here: measurement of (i) cardiac cycle induced pulsatile reflection changes and (ii) eye movements and fixation pattern. Cardiac cycle induced pulsatile reflection changes are caused by changing blood volume in the retina. Waveform and pulse parameters like amplitude and rise time can be measured in any selected areas within the retinal image. Fixation pattern ΔY(ΔX) can be assessed from eye movements during video acquisition. The eye movements ΔX[t], ΔY[t] are derived from image registration results with high temporal (40 ms) and spatial (1,86 arcmin) resolution. Parameters of pulsatile reflection changes and fixation pattern can be affected in beginning glaucoma and the method described here may support early detection of glaucoma and other eye disease.

  20. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  1. Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase Type-1 Synthesizes Retinyl Esters in the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kaylor, Joanna J.; Radu, Roxana A.; Bischoff, Nicholas; Makshanoff, Jacob; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Eddington, Shannan; Bianconi, Tran; Bok, Dean; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinyl esters represent an insoluble storage form of vitamin A and are substrates for the retinoid isomerase (Rpe65) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The major retinyl-ester synthase in RPE cells is lecithin:retinol acyl-transferase (LRAT). A second palmitoyl coenzyme A-dependent retinyl-ester synthase activity has been observed in RPE homogenates but the protein responsible has not been identified. Here we show that diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1) is expressed in multiple cells of the retina including RPE and Müller glial cells. DGAT1 catalyzes the synthesis of retinyl esters from multiple retinol isomers with similar catalytic efficiencies. Loss of DGAT1 in dgat1 -/- mice has no effect on retinal anatomy or the ultrastructure of photoreceptor outer-segments (OS) and RPE cells. Levels of visual chromophore in dgat1 -/- mice were also normal. However, the normal build-up of all-trans-retinyl esters (all-trans-RE’s) in the RPE during the first hour after a deep photobleach of visual pigments in the retina was not seen in dgat1 -/- mice. Further, total retinyl-ester synthase activity was reduced in both dgat1 -/- retina and RPE. PMID:25974161

  2. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor signaling dichotomously modulates inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in rat inner retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Han; Wu, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Miao, Yanying; Zhang, Chuan-Qiang; Dong, Ling-Dan; Yang, Xiong-Li; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2016-01-01

    In the inner retina, ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate and process excitatory signal from bipolar cells (BCs) and inhibitory signal from amacrine cells (ACs). Using multiple labeling immunohistochemistry, we first revealed the expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) at the terminals of ACs and BCs in rat retina. By patch-clamp techniques, we then showed how the activation of this receptor dichotomously regulated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), mediated by GABAA receptors and glycine receptors, and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), mediated by AMPA receptors, of RGCs in rat retinal slices. WIN55212-2 (WIN), a CB1R agonist, reduced the mIPSC frequency due to an inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels no matter whether AMPA receptors were blocked. In contrast, WIN reduced the mEPSC frequency by suppressing T-type Ca(2+) channels only when inhibitory inputs to RGCs were present, which could be in part due to less T-type Ca(2+) channels of cone BCs, presynaptic to RGCs, being in an inactivation state under such condition. This unique feature of CB1R-mediated retrograde regulation provides a novel mechanism for modulating excitatory synaptic transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, depolarization of RGCs suppressed mIPSCs of these cells, an effect that was eliminated by the CB1R antagonist SR141716, suggesting that endocannabinoid is indeed released from RGCs.

  3. Neural apoptosis in the retina during experimental and human diabetes. Early onset and effect of insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, A J; Lieth, E; Khin, S A; Antonetti, D A; Buchanan, A G; Gardner, T W

    1998-01-01

    This study determined whether retinal degeneration during diabetes includes retinal neural cell apoptosis. Image analysis of retinal sections from streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats after 7.5 months of STZ diabetes identified 22% and 14% reductions in the thickness of the inner plexiform and inner nuclear layers, respectively (P < 0. 001). The number of surviving ganglion cells was also reduced by 10% compared to controls (P < 0.001). In situ end labeling of DNA terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) identified a 10-fold increase in the frequency of retinal apoptosis in whole-mounted rat retinas after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of diabetes (P < 0.001, P < 0. 001, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). Most TUNEL-positive cells were not associated with blood vessels and did not colocalize with the endothelial cell-specific antigen, von Willebrand factor. Insulin implants significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells (P < 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was also increased in retinas from humans with diabetes. These data indicate that retinal neural cell death occurs early in diabetes. This is the first quantitative report of an increase in neural cell apoptosis in the retina during diabetes, and indicates that neurodegeneration is an important component of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:9710447

  4. Ultrafast laser assisted microinjection enables distinct spatial localization pattern in cells and retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L.; Shivalingaiah, S.; Mohanty, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Laser microbeam has enabled highly precise non-contact delivery of exogenous materials into targeted cells, which has been a highly challenging task while using traditional methods without compromising cell viability. We report distinct spatial localization of impermeable substances into mammalian cells and goldfish retinal cells in explants subsequent to ultrafast laser microbeam assisted injection, realized by focusing a near infrared tunable Ti: sapphire laser beam. Introduction of impermeable dye into the cell through localized pore formation was confirmed by distinct fluorescence at the site of pore formation on the membrane and its spatiotemporal diffusion pattern through the nucleus. Indirect optoporation by bubble formation, external to cell, led to a similar spatial diffusion pattern but with a larger time constant for injection. Using optimized laser intensity, exposure and spatial irradiation pattern, desired spatial transfection patterns in goldfish retina explants were achieved as confirmed by expression of injected plasmids encoded for light-activable channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) ion channel tagged with fluorescent protein. Laser assisted delivery of exogenous material into specific area of three-dimensional neuronal tissue, such as the retina, will help to understand the functioning of neuronal circuitry of normal and degenerated retina.

  5. Catalytic nanoceria are preferentially retained in the rat retina and are not cytotoxic after intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lily L; Hirst, Suzanne M; Pye, Quentin N; Reilly, Christopher M; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James F

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) possess catalytic and regenerative radical scavenging activities. The ability of nanoceria to maintain cellular redox balance makes them ideal candidates for treatment of retinal diseases whose development is tightly associated with oxidative damage. We have demonstrated that our stable water-dispersed nanoceria delay photoreceptor cell degeneration in rodent models and prevent pathological retinal neovascularization in vldlr mutant mice. The objectives of the current study were to determine the temporal and spatial distributions of nanoceria after a single intravitreal injection, and to determine if nanoceria had any toxic effects in healthy rat retinas. Using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), we discovered that nanoceria were rapidly taken up by the retina and were preferentially retained in this tissue even after 120 days. We also did not observe any acute or long-term negative effects of nanoceria on retinal function or cytoarchitecture even after this long-term exposure. Because nanoceria are effective at low dosages, nontoxic and are retained in the retina for extended periods, we conclude that nanoceria are promising ophthalmic therapeutics for treating retinal diseases known to involve oxidative stress in their pathogeneses.

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and programmed cell death in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Duenker, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a precisely regulated phenomenon essential for the homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Developmental systems, particularly the nervous system, have provided key observations supporting the physiological role of PCD. We have recently shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in mediating ontogenetic PCD in the nervous system. As part of the central nervous system the developing retina serves as an ideal model system for investigating apoptotic processes during neurogenesis in vivo as it is easily accessible experimentally and less complex due to its limited number of different neurons. This review summarizes data indicating a pivotal role of TGF-beta in mediating PCD in the vertebrate retina. The following topics are discussed: expression of TGF-beta isoforms and receptors in the vertebrate retina, the TGF-beta signaling pathway, functions and molecular mechanisms of PCD in the nervous system, TGF-beta-mediated retinal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and interactions of TGF-beta with other pro- and anti-apoptotic factors.

  7. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  8. Light deprivation delays morphological differentiation of bipolar cells in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mu-Ling; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2007-09-19

    Bipolar cells are responsible for transmitting light signals from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells in the vertebrate retina. Their maturation process is not only important for establishing normal visual function, but may also underlie the dendritic remodeling of ganglion cells during development. It is known that light deprivation affects the synaptic connections of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina, but little is known about impact of visual experience on bipolar cell development. We used dye injection and gene gun labeling to identify bipolar cells, and characterized their morphological differentiation in normal-reared and dark-reared rabbits. Our results show that immature bipolar cells can be found as early as P1-3, and most characteristic bipolar cells can be identified during P4-6. More importantly, we found that light deprivation causes a delay rather than a permanent arrest of bipolar cell maturation in the rabbit retina. By eye opening at P10-11, both normal-reared and dark-reared rabbits possessed adult-like bipolar cells. This suggests that visual experience has a facilitating effect on the morphological differentiation of bipolar cells.

  9. Image rotation-elimination based on a retina-like sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Wang, Fan

    2015-12-01

    The pixels of a retina-like sensor are arranged in concentric rings, and the output image is given in log-polar coordinates. Thus, additional residual errors will not be produced when the output image is rotated. Therefore, retina-like sensors have obvious advantages and many prospects for applications in the fields of image rotation and rapid image rotation-elimination. In this study, a theory concerning the image rotation of a retina-like sensor is proposed, and a solution based on the theory is presented and realized for eliminating image rotation caused by camera rotation. The camera rotation angle is obtained using a microelectromechanical systems digital accelerometer and gyroscope; only the readout sequence of each row from static random-access memory must be changed to achieve image rotation-elimination. Several image rotation-elimination experiments have been performed which show that the proposed solution is simple, accurate, and rapid. This rapid image rotation-elimination method can be used in fields that require higher image rotation-elimination processing speeds.

  10. Cryptochromes and neuronal-activity markers colocalize in the retina of migratory birds during magnetic orientation.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Liedvogel, Miriam; Feenders, Gesa; Stalleicken, Julia; Dirks, Petra; Weiler, Reto

    2004-09-28

    Migratory birds can use a magnetic compass for orientation during their migratory journeys covering thousands of kilometers. But how do they sense the reference direction provided by the Earth's magnetic field? Behavioral evidence and theoretical considerations have suggested that radical-pair processes in differently oriented, light-sensitive molecules of the retina could enable migratory birds to perceive the magnetic field as visual patterns. The cryptochromes (CRYs) have been suggested as the most likely candidate class of molecules, but do CRYs exist in the retina of migratory birds? Here, we show that at least one CRY1 and one CRY2 exist in the retina of migratory garden warblers and that garden-warbler CRY1 (gwCRY1) is cytosolic. We also show that gwCRY1 is concentrated in specific cells, particularly in ganglion cells and in large displaced ganglion cells, which also showed high levels of neuronal activity at night, when our garden warblers performed magnetic orientation. In addition, there seem to be striking differences in CRY1 expression between migratory and nonmigratory songbirds at night. The difference in CRY1 expression between migrants and nonmigrants is particularly pronounced in the large displaced ganglion cells known to project exclusively to a brain area where magnetically sensitive neurons have been reported. Consequently, cytosolic gwCRY1 is well placed to possibly be the primary magnetic-sensory molecule required for light-mediated magnetoreception. PMID:15381765

  11. MEMS scanner mirror based system for retina scanning and in eye projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    Many applications could benefit from miniaturized systems to scan blood vessels behind the retina in the human eye, so called "retina scanning". This reaches from access control to sophisticated security applications and medical devices. High volume systems for consumer applications require low cost and a user friendly operation. For example this includes no need for removal of glasses and self-adjustment, in turn guidance of focus and point of attraction by simultaneous projection for the user. A new system has been designed based on the well-known resonantly driven 2-d scanner mirror of Fraunhofer IPMS. A combined NIR and VIS laser system illuminates the eye through an eye piece designed for an operating distance allowing the use of glasses and granting sufficient field of view. This usability feature was considered to be more important than highest miniaturization. The modulated VIS laser facilitates the projection of an image directly onto the retina. The backscattered light from the continuous NIR laser contains the information of the blood vessels and is detected by a highly sensitive photo diode. A demonstrational setup has been realized including readout and driving electronics. The laser power was adjusted to an eye-secure level. Additional security features were integrated. Test measurements revealed promising results. In a first demonstration application the detection of biometric pattern of the blood vessels was evaluated for issues authentication in.

  12. Inhibition of anaerobic glycolysis in bovine retina extracts by salicylate and acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Rinaudo, M T; Curto, M; Bruno, R; Ponzetto, C

    1982-01-01

    1. Na salicylate 31 mM inhibits anaerobic glycolysis from glucose in bovine retina extracts. The formation rate of DAP and GAP increases while that of FDP, G6P, F6P and lactate decreases. All the above modifications are almost completely removed by 1.4 mM NAD+. 2. Bovine retina extracts, preincubated for 1 hr at 0 degrees C with 31 mM Na salicylate show a strongly reduced glycolytic activity. In this system G6P and F6P do accumulate, FDP, DAP, GAP and lactate decrease. These effects are not altered adding 3.5 mM NAD+ to the preincubation mixture. 3. Acetylsalicylate 31 mM inhibits anaerobic glycolysis in crude retina extracts. As the rate of lactate formation decreases, G6P and F6P do accumulate, while FDP, DAP and GAP diminish. 4. Identical modifications are observed adding the inhibitor directly to the incubation mixture, or preincubating it with the extracts at 0 degrees C for 4 hr. 3.5 mM NAD+ does not remove the effects of acetylsalicylate.

  13. The visual input to the retina during natural head-free fixation.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Murat; Victor, Jonathan D; Rucci, Michele

    2014-09-17

    Head and eye movements incessantly modulate the luminance signals impinging onto the retina during natural intersaccadic fixation. Yet, little is known about how these fixational movements influence the statistics of retinal stimulation. Here, we provide the first detailed characterization of the visual input to the human retina during normal head-free fixation. We used high-resolution recordings of head and eye movements in a natural viewing task to examine how they jointly transform spatial information into temporal modulations. In agreement with previous studies, we report that both the head and the eyes move considerably during fixation. However, we show that fixational head and eye movements mostly compensate for each other, yielding a spatiotemporal redistribution of the input power to the retina similar to that previously observed under head immobilization. The resulting retinal image motion counterbalances the spectral distribution of natural scenes, giving temporal modulations that are equalized in power over a broad range of spatial frequencies. These findings support the proposal that "ocular drift," the smooth fixational motion of the eye, is under motor control, and indicate that the spatiotemporal reformatting caused by fixational behavior is an important computational element in the encoding of visual information.

  14. Amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer of the cat retina.

    PubMed

    Wässle, H; Chun, M H; Müller, F

    1987-11-15

    Following transection of the optic nerve, ganglion cells in the cat retina undergo retrograde degeneration. However, many small profiles (less than or equal to 10 micron) survive in the ganglion cell layer. Previously considered to be neuroglia, there is now substantial evidence that they are displaced amacrine cells. Their density increases from approximately 1,000 cells/mm2 in peripheral retina to 7,000 cells/mm2 in the central area. Their total number was found to be 850,000, which is five times the number of ganglion cells and also five times the number of astrocytes. Uptake of 3H-muscimol followed by autoradiography labelled 75% of the displaced amacrine cells; hence, the majority seem to be GABAergic. Immunocytochemistry with an antibody directed against choline-acetyl-transferase labelled approximately 10% of the displaced amacrines in the peripheral retina and 17% in the central area. Uptake of serotonin (5-HT) followed by immunocytochemistry was found in 25-30% of displaced amacrines. NADPH diaphorase histochemistry labelled approximately 5% of displaced amacrine cells. The sum of the various percentages make colocalization likely. Intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow under microscopic control revealed that displaced amacrine cells constitute several morphological types. PMID:3693612

  15. Melanopsin and the Non-visual Photochemistry in the Inner Retina of Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Nicolás M; Morera, Luis P; Guido, Mario E

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin (Opn4), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, is a vitamin A-based opsin in the vertebrate retina that has been shown to be involved in the synchronization of circadian rhythms, pupillary light reflexes, melatonin suppression and other light-regulated tasks. In nonmammalian vertebrates there are two Opn4 genes, Opn4m and Opn4x, the mammalian and Xenopus orthologs respectively. Opn4x is only expressed in nonmammalian vertebrates including reptiles, fish and birds, while Opn4m is found in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the intrinsically photosensitive (ip) RGCs of the inner retina of both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. All opsins described utilize retinaldehyde as chromophore, photoisomerized from 11-cis- to all-trans-retinal upon light exposure. Visual retinal photoreceptor cones and rods, responsible for day and night vision respectively, recycle retinoids through a process called the visual cycle that involves the retinal pigment epithelium or glial Müller cells. Although Opn4 has been characterized as a bistable photopigment, little is known about the mechanism/s involved in its chromophore regeneration. In this review, we will attempt to shed light on the visual cycle taking place in the inner retina and discuss the state of the art in the nonvisual photochemistry of vertebrates. PMID:26500165

  16. Polycomb repressive complex PRC2 regulates Xenopus retina development downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aldiri, Issam; Moore, Kathryn B.; Hutcheson, David A.; Zhang, Jianmin; Vetter, Monica L.

    2013-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase complex PRC2 controls key steps in developmental transitions and cell fate choices; however, its roles in vertebrate eye development remain unknown. Here, we report that in Xenopus, PRC2 regulates the progression of retinal progenitors from proliferation to differentiation. We show that the PRC2 core components are enriched in retinal progenitors and downregulated in differentiated cells. Knockdown of the PRC2 core component Ezh2 leads to reduced retinal progenitor proliferation, in part due to upregulation of the Cdk inhibitor p15Ink4b. In addition, although PRC2 knockdown does not alter eye patterning, retinal progenitor gene expression or expression of the neural competence factor Sox2, it does cause suppression of proneural bHLH gene expression, indicating that PRC2 is crucial for the initiation of neural differentiation in the retina. Consistent with this, knocking down or blocking PRC2 function constrains the generation of most retinal neural cell types and promotes a Müller glial cell fate decision. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling acting through the receptor Frizzled 5, but independent of Sox2, regulates expression of key PRC2 subunits in the developing retina. This is consistent with a role for this pathway in coordinating proliferation and the transition to neurogenesis in the Xenopus retina. Our data establish PRC2 as a regulator of proliferation and differentiation during eye development. PMID:23739135

  17. Differential expression of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon among ribbon synapses in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, J H; Fletcher, E L; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Wässle, H

    1999-10-01

    Bassoon is a 420-kDa presynaptic protein which is highly concentrated at the active zones of nerve terminals of conventional synapses, both excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic, in rat brain. It is thought to be involved in the organization of the cytomatrix at the site of neurotransmitter release. In the retina, there are two structurally and functionally distinct types of synapses: ribbon and conventional synapses. Antibodies against bassoon were applied to sections of rat and rabbit retina. Strong punctate immunofluorescence was found in the outer and inner plexiform layers. Using pre- and post-embedding immunostaining and electron microscopy, bassoon was localized in the outer plexiform layer at ribbon synapses formed by rods and cones but was absent from basal synaptic contacts formed by cones. In the inner plexiform layer a different picture emerged. As in the brain, bassoon was found at conventional inhibitory GABAergic synapses, made by amacrine cells, but it was absent from the bipolar cell ribbon synapses. These data demonstrate differences in the molecular composition of the presynaptic apparatuses of outer and inner plexiform layer ribbon synapses. Thus, differential equipment with cytomatrix proteins may account for the functional differences observed between the two types of ribbon synapses in the retina.

  18. The Endocannabinoid System in the Retina: From Physiology to Practical and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Thomas; Schwan, Raymund; Angioi-Duprez, Karine; Giersch, Anne; Laprevote, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is one of the most prevalent drugs used in industrialized countries. The main effects of Cannabis are mediated by two major exogenous cannabinoids: ∆9-tetrahydroxycannabinol and cannabidiol. They act on specific endocannabinoid receptors, especially types 1 and 2. Mammals are endowed with a functional cannabinoid system including cannabinoid receptors, ligands, and enzymes. This endocannabinoid signaling pathway is involved in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions with a main role in the biology of the central nervous system. As the retina is a part of the central nervous system due to its embryonic origin, we aim at providing the relevance of studying the endocannabinoid system in the retina. Here, we review the distribution of the cannabinoid receptors, ligands, and enzymes in the retina and focus on the role of the cannabinoid system in retinal neurobiology. This review describes the presence of the cannabinoid system in critical stages of retinal processing and its broad involvement in retinal neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, and neuroprotection. Accordingly, we support the use of synthetic cannabinoids as new neuroprotective drugs to prevent and treat retinal diseases. Finally, we argue for the relevance of functional retinal measures in cannabis users to evaluate the impact of cannabis use on human retinal processing. PMID:26881099

  19. DNA Damage Response Is Involved in the Developmental Toxicity of Mebendazole in Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Kon, Tetsuo; Yamanaka, Yukiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminths cause iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women, associated with premature delivery, low birth weight, maternal ill health, and maternal death. Although benzimidazole compounds such as mebendazole (MBZ) are highly efficacious against helminths, there are limited data on its use during pregnancy. In this study, we performed in vivo imaging of the retinas of zebrafish larvae exposed to MBZ, and found that exposure to MBZ during 2 and 3 days post-fertilization caused malformation of the retinal layers. To identify the molecular mechanism underlying the developmental toxicity of MBZ, we performed transcriptome analysis of zebrafish eyes. The analysis revealed that the DNA damage response was involved in the developmental toxicity of MBZ. We were also able to demonstrate that inhibition of ATM significantly attenuated the apoptosis induced by MBZ in the zebrafish retina. These results suggest that MBZ causes developmental toxicity in the zebrafish retina at least partly by activating the DNA damage response, including ATM signaling, providing a potential adverse outcome pathway in the developmental toxicity of MBZ in mammals. PMID:27014071

  20. Making the gradient: Thyroid hormone regulates cone opsin expression in the developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Melanie R.; Srinivas, Maya; Forrest, Douglas; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Reh, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Most mammals have two types of cone photoreceptors, which contain either medium wavelength (M) or short wavelength (S) opsin. The number and spatial organization of cone types varies dramatically among species, presumably to fine-tune the retina for different visual environments. In the mouse, S- and M-opsin are expressed in an opposing dorsal–ventral gradient. We previously reported that cone opsin patterning requires thyroid hormone β2, a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates transcription in conjunction with its ligand, thyroid hormone (TH). Here we show that exogenous TH inhibits S-opsin expression, but activates M-opsin expression. Binding of endogenous TH to TRβ2 is required to inhibit S-opsin and to activate M-opsin. TH is symmetrically distributed in the retina at birth as S-opsin expression begins, but becomes elevated in the dorsal retina at the time of M-opsin onset (postnatal day 10). Our results show that TH is a critical regulator of both S-opsin and M-opsin, and suggest that a TH gradient may play a role in establishing the gradient of M-opsin. These results also suggest that the ratio and patterning of cone types may be determined by TH availability during retinal development. PMID:16606843

  1. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  2. Rhodopsin and retinochrome in the retina of a marine gastropod, Conomulex luhuanus.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, K; Terakita, A; Hara, R; Hara, T

    1986-01-01

    Photopigments in the conch retina were examined with special attention given to the photic vesicles characteristic of gastropod photoreceptors. Three different fractions of visual cell fragments were prepared from the retina: the MV-fraction containing the rhabdomal microvilli, and the PVH- and PVL-fractions containing the photic vesicles located in the visual cell body. Rhodopsin was found in the MV-fraction (lambda max = 474 nm), and yielded a photoequilibrium mixture with metarhodopsin (lambda max = 512 nm) on irradiation with blue light. Retinochrome was found in both of the PVH- and PVL-fractions (lambda max = approximately 510 nm), and was bleached into metaretinochrome by exposure to orange light, showing no marked shift of the absorption peak. Unlike the PVH-fraction, the PVL-fraction contains much aporetinochrome in addition to retinochrome, suggesting that the large mass of photic vesicles around the nucleus may serve as storage for retinal in retinochrome and for newly synthesized aporetinochrome. The total amount of retinochrome in the retina was several times higher than that of rhodopsin, distinguishing the gastropod eye from the cephalopod eye.

  3. Melanopsin-mediated post-illumination pupil response in the peripheral retina.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Daniel S; Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) regulate pupil size by integrating extrinsic rod and cone signals with intrinsic melanopsin-mediated phototransduction. Light adapted pupil diameter is determined by the corneal flux density (CFD), and for central visual field stimulation the melanopsin-mediated post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) follows this same CFD relationship. Rods, cones, and ipRGCs vary in size, density, and distribution across the retina, but how these differences affect the amplitude and timing of the extrinsic and intrinsic pupil light reflex in the central and peripheral retina is unknown. We determined the relationship between stimulus area and photon flux with stimuli constant for CFD, irradiance, or area at central (0°) and peripheral (20°) eccentricities with high and low melanopsin excitation. We show that the pupil constriction amplitude was similar at both eccentricities and the time to minimum diameter increased as melanopsin excitation increased. In contrast, the peripheral PIPR follows a CFD relationship but with lower amplitude compared with that at the fovea. This indicates differences in the spatial and temporal characteristics of extrinsic and intrinsic ipRGC inputs to the pupil control pathway for the central and peripheral retina. The eccentricity-dependent change in PIPR amplitude may be analogous to the hill of vision observed in visual perimetry; such knowledge is an important precursor to the development of pupil perimetry paradigms to measure the PIPR in select regions of the visual field. PMID:27271992

  4. The scotopic electroretinogram of the sugar glider related to histological features of its retina.

    PubMed

    Akula, James D; Esdaille, Tricia M; Caffé, A Romeo; Naarendorp, Franklin

    2011-11-01

    The flash electroretinogram (ERG) was used to characterize the scotopic retinal function in a marsupial. Key parameter values of the a- and b-waves of adult male sugar gliders, Petaurus breviceps breviceps, elicited with ganzfeld flashes were determined under dark- and light-adapted conditions. Using standard histological methods, the thicknesses of the major layers of the retina were assessed to provide insight into the nature of the ERG responses. The ERG and histological results were compared to corresponding data for placental C57Bl/6 mice to establish whether the functional retinal specialization that underlies scotopic visual function in a marsupial parallels that of a placental mouse. The sensitivity of the a-wave assessed with the Lamb and Pugh (Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 47:5138-5152, 2006) "model" and that of the b-wave assessed with standard methods were lower in the sugar glider compared to the mouse. The thickness of the sugar glider retina was two-third of that of the mouse. The high-intensity flash ERG of the sugar glider substantially differed in shape from that of the mouse reflecting perhaps structural and functional differences between the two species at the level of the inner retina. PMID:21744008

  5. Early changes in system [Formula: see text] and glutathione in the retina of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Carpi-Santos, Raul; Ferreira, Marcos Josf; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Cossenza, Marcelo; Calaza, Karin C

    2016-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the main cause of blindness among diabetic patients, affects both neuronal and vascular cells of the retina. Studies show that neuronal cell death begins after 4 weeks of diabetes and could be related with an increase in oxidative stress. System [Formula: see text] is a glutamate/cystine exchanger, formed by a catalytic subunit called xCT and a regulatory subunit 4F2hc, whose activity is crucial to the synthesis of glutathione, which is a key antioxidant molecule for cells. Although some studies have shown that glutamate transport mediated by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in diabetic rats is downregulated, there are no studies investigating system [Formula: see text] in this context. To evaluate whether system [Formula: see text] is modified by early onset of diabetes, primary retinal cell culture exposed to high glucose and retinas of rats 3 weeks after streptozotocin injection were used. We observed that xCT subunit protein expression both in cultures and in vivo were diminished. Furthermore, system [Formula: see text] activity and GSH levels were also decreased whereas oxidative stress was increased in retinas of diabetic animals. Therefore, this study raises the possibility that alterations in system [Formula: see text] expression and activity could occur during early onset of diabetes. In that way, system [Formula: see text] modifications could be related to increased ROS in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26706282

  6. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases.

  7. Cone bipolar cells in the retina of the microbat Carollia perspicillata.

    PubMed

    Butz, Elisabeth; Peichl, Leo; Müller, Brigitte

    2015-04-15

    We studied the retinal cone bipolar cells of Carollia perspicillata, a microchiropteran bat of the phyllostomid family. Microchiroptera are strongly nocturnal, with small eyes and rod-dominated retinae. However, they also possess a significant cone population (2-4%) comprising two spectral types, which are hence the basis for daylight and color vision. We used antibodies against the calcium-binding protein recoverin and the carbohydrate epitope 15 (CD15) as reliable markers for certain cone bipolar cells. Dye injections of recoverin- or CD15-prelabeled cone bipolar cells in vertical slices revealed the morphology of the axon terminal system of individual bipolar cells. Seven distinct cone bipolar cell types were identified. They differed in the morphology and stratification level of their axon terminal system in the inner plexiform layer and in immunoreactivity for recoverin and/or CD15. Additional immunocytochemical markers were used to assess the functional ON/OFF subdivision of the inner plexiform layer. In line with the extended thickness of the ON sublayer of the inner plexiform layer in the microbat retina, more ON than OFF cone bipolar cell types were found, namely, four versus three. Most likely, in the bats' predominantly dark environment, ON signals have greater importance for contrast perception. We conclude that the microbat retina conforms to the general mammalian blueprint, in which light signals of intensities above rod sensitivity are detected by cones and transmitted to various types of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. PMID:25521284

  8. Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase type-1 synthesizes retinyl esters in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kaylor, Joanna J; Radu, Roxana A; Bischoff, Nicholas; Makshanoff, Jacob; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Eddington, Shannan; Bianconi, Tran; Bok, Dean; Travis, Gabriel H

    2015-01-01

    Retinyl esters represent an insoluble storage form of vitamin A and are substrates for the retinoid isomerase (Rpe65) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The major retinyl-ester synthase in RPE cells is lecithin:retinol acyl-transferase (LRAT). A second palmitoyl coenzyme A-dependent retinyl-ester synthase activity has been observed in RPE homogenates but the protein responsible has not been identified. Here we show that diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1) is expressed in multiple cells of the retina including RPE and Müller glial cells. DGAT1 catalyzes the synthesis of retinyl esters from multiple retinol isomers with similar catalytic efficiencies. Loss of DGAT1 in dgat1(-/-) mice has no effect on retinal anatomy or the ultrastructure of photoreceptor outer-segments (OS) and RPE cells. Levels of visual chromophore in dgat1(-/-) mice were also normal. However, the normal build-up of all-trans-retinyl esters (all-trans-RE's) in the RPE during the first hour after a deep photobleach of visual pigments in the retina was not seen in dgat1(-/-) mice. Further, total retinyl-ester synthase activity was reduced in both dgat1(-/-) retina and RPE.

  9. Differential distribution of synaptotagmin immunoreactivity among synapses in the goldfish, salamander, and mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Heidelberger, Ruth; Wang, Meng M; Sherry, David M

    2003-01-01

    Synaptotagmin I is the leading candidate for the calcium sensor that triggers exocytosis at conventional synapses. However, physiological characterization of the calcium sensor for phasic release at the ribbon-style synapses of the goldfish Mb1 bipolar cell demonstrates a lower than predicted affinity for calcium, suggesting that a modified or different sensor triggers exocytosis at this synapse. We examined synaptotagmin immunolabeling in goldfish retina using two different antibodies directed against synaptotagmin epitopes that specifically labeled the expected 65-kDa protein on western blots of goldfish and mouse retinal membranes. The first antiserum strongly labeled conventional synapses in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), but did not label the ribbon-style synapse-containing synaptic terminals of goldfish Mb1 bipolar cells or photoreceptors. The second antibody also specifically labeled the expected 65-kDa protein on western blots but did not label any synapses in the goldfish retina. A third synaptotagmin antibody that performed poorly on western blots selectively labeled goldfish photoreceptor terminals. These results suggest that synaptotagmin may exist in at least three distinct "forms" in goldfish retinal synapses. These forms, which are differentially localized to conventional synapses, bipolar cell, and photoreceptor terminals, may represent differences in isoform, posttranslational modifications, epitope availability, and protein-binding partners. Labeling with these antibodies in the salamander and mouse retina revealed species-specific differences, indicating that synaptotagmin epitopes can vary across species as well as among synapses.

  10. Small molecule screen for compounds that affect vascular development in the zebrafish retina

    PubMed Central

    Kitambi, Satish S.; McCulloch, Kyle J.; Peterson, Randall T.; Malicki, Jarema J.

    2009-01-01

    Blood vessel formation in the vertebrate eye is a precisely regulated process. In the human retina, both an excess and a deficiency of blood vessels may lead to a loss of vision. To gain insight into the molecular basis of vessel formation in the vertebrate retina and to develop pharmacological means of manipulating this process in a living organism, we further characterized the embryonic zebrafish eye vasculature, and performed a small molecule screen for compounds that affect blood vessel morphogenesis. The screening of approximately 2000 compounds revealed four small molecules that at specific concentrations affect retinal vessel morphology but do not produce obvious changes in trunk vessels, or in the neuronal architecture of the retina. Of these, two induce a pronounced widening of vessel diameter without a substantial loss of vessel number, one compound produces a loss of retinal blood vessels accompanied by a mild increase of their diameter, and finally one other generates a severe loss of retinal vessels. This work demonstrates the utility of zebrafish as a screening tool for small molecules that affect eye vasculature and presents several compounds of potential therapeutic importance. PMID:19445054

  11. Rhodopsin and retinochrome in the retina of a marine gastropod, Conomulex luhuanus.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, K; Terakita, A; Hara, R; Hara, T

    1986-01-01

    Photopigments in the conch retina were examined with special attention given to the photic vesicles characteristic of gastropod photoreceptors. Three different fractions of visual cell fragments were prepared from the retina: the MV-fraction containing the rhabdomal microvilli, and the PVH- and PVL-fractions containing the photic vesicles located in the visual cell body. Rhodopsin was found in the MV-fraction (lambda max = 474 nm), and yielded a photoequilibrium mixture with metarhodopsin (lambda max = 512 nm) on irradiation with blue light. Retinochrome was found in both of the PVH- and PVL-fractions (lambda max = approximately 510 nm), and was bleached into metaretinochrome by exposure to orange light, showing no marked shift of the absorption peak. Unlike the PVH-fraction, the PVL-fraction contains much aporetinochrome in addition to retinochrome, suggesting that the large mass of photic vesicles around the nucleus may serve as storage for retinal in retinochrome and for newly synthesized aporetinochrome. The total amount of retinochrome in the retina was several times higher than that of rhodopsin, distinguishing the gastropod eye from the cephalopod eye. PMID:3750849

  12. Changes of retina are not involved in the genesis of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kopal, Aleš; Mejzlíková, Eva; Preiningerová, Jana Lízrová; Brebera, David; Ulmanová, Olga; Ehler, Edvard; Roth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Nonmotor symptoms include primarily visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of our study was to establish whether patients with PD and visual hallucinations (PDH+) have structural changes of retina detected by an optical coherence tomography (OCT) in comparison with PD patients without visual hallucinations (PDH-). We examined 52 PD patients (18 with VH, 34 without VH) and 15 age and sex matched healthy controls. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular thickness and volume were assessed by OCT. Functional impairment of retina was assessed using 2.5% contrast sensitivity test. For OCT outcomes we analyzed 15 PDH+ and 15 PDH- subjects matched for age, gender, and PD duration. For contrast sensitivity we analyzed 8 pairs of patients matched for age, gender, and visual acuity. There was no significant difference in RNFL thickness and macular thickness and macular volume between 15 PDH+ and 15 PDH- subjects, and also between a group of 44 PD patients (both PDH+ and PDH-) and 15 age and gender matched healthy controls. No significant difference was found for 2.5% contrast sensitivity test values between PDH+ and PDH- subjects. Therefore we conclude that functional and structural changes in retina play no role in genesis of VH in PD.

  13. Diffusion and consumption of oxygen in the superfused retina of the drone (Apis mellifera) in darkness.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Poitry, S; Borsellino, A

    1981-06-01

    Double-barreled O2 microelectrodes were used to study O2 diffusion and consumption in the superfused drone (Apis mellifera) retina in darkness at 22 degrees C. Po2 was measured at different sites in the bath and retinas. It was found that diffusion was essentially in one dimension and that the rate of O2 consumption (Q) was practically constant (on the macroscale) down to Po2 s less than 20 mm Hg, a situation that greatly simplified the analysis. The value obtained for Q was 18 +/- 0.7 (SEM) microliter O2/cm3 tissue . min (n = 10), and Krogh's permeation coefficient (alpha D) was 3.24 +/- 0.18 (SEM) X 10(-5) ml O1/min . atm . cm (n = 10). Calculations indicate that only a small fraction of this Q in darkness is necessary for the energy requirements of the sodium pump. the diffusion coefficient (D) in the retina was measured by abruptly cutting off diffusion from the bath and analyzing the time-course of the fall in Po2 at the surface of the tissue. The mean value of D was 1.03 +/- 0.08 (SEM) X 10(-5) cm2/s (n = 10). From alpha D and D, the solubility coefficient alpha was calculated to be 54 +/- 4.0 (SEM) microliter O2 STP/cm3 . atm (n = 10), approximately 1.8 times that for water.

  14. Inhibitory neuron migration and IPL formation in the developing zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Chow, Renee W; Almeida, Alexandra D; Randlett, Owen; Norden, Caren; Harris, William A

    2015-08-01

    The mature vertebrate retina is a highly ordered neuronal network of cell bodies and synaptic neuropils arranged in distinct layers. Little, however, is known about the emergence of this spatial arrangement. Here, we investigate how the three main types of retinal inhibitory neuron (RIN)--horizontal cells (HCs), inner nuclear layer amacrine cells (iACs) and displaced amacrine cells (dACs)--reach their specific laminar positions during development. Using in vivo time-lapse imaging of zebrafish retinas, we show that RINs undergo distinct phases of migration. The first phase, common to all RINs, is bipolar migration directed towards the apicobasal centre of the retina. All RINs then transition to a less directionally persistent multipolar phase of migration. Finally, HCs, iACs and dACs each undergo cell type-specific migration. In contrast to current hypotheses, we find that most dACs send processes into the forming inner plexiform layer (IPL) before migrating through it and inverting their polarity. By imaging and quantifying the dynamics of HCs, iACs and dACs from birth to final position, this study thus provides evidence for distinct and new migration patterns during retinal lamination and insights into the initiation of IPL formation.

  15. PhTx3-4, a Spider Toxin Calcium Channel Blocker, Reduces NMDA-Induced Injury of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Nancy Scardua; Porto Petruceli Carayon, Charles; Agostini, Rafael Mourão; do Nascimento Pinheiro, Ana Cristina; Nascimento Cordeiro, Marta; Romano Silva, Marco Aurélio; Figueira Silva, Juliana; Rita Pereira, Elizete Maria; da Silva Junior, Claudio Antonio; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Sena Guimarães, Andre Luiz; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo neuroprotective effect of PhTx3-4, a spider toxin N-P/Q calcium channel blocker, was studied in a rat model of NMDA-induced injury of the retina. NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate)-induced retinal injury in rats reduced the b-wave amplitude by 62% ± 3.6%, indicating the severity of the insult. PhTx3-4 treatment increased the amplitude of the b-wave, which was almost equivalent to the control retinas that were not submitted to injury. The PhTx3-4 functional protection of the retinas recorded on the ERG also was observed in the neuroprotection of retinal cells. NMDA-induced injury reduced live cells in the retina layers and the highest reduction, 84%, was in the ganglion cell layer. Notably, PhTx3-4 treatment caused a remarkable reduction of dead cells in the retina layers, and the highest neuroprotective effect was in the ganglion cells layer. NMDA-induced cytotoxicity of the retina increased the release of glutamate, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. PhTx3-4 treatment reduced glutamate release, ROS production and oxidative stress measured by malondialdehyde. Thus, we presented for the first time evidence of in vivo neuroprotection from NMDA-induced retinal injury by PhTx3-4 (-ctenitoxin-Pn3a), a spider toxin that blocks N-P/Q calcium channels. PMID:26978403

  16. Genetic analysis of the homeodomain transcription factor Chx10 in the retina using a novel multifunctional BAC transgenic mouse reporter.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Cepko, Constance L

    2004-07-15

    Chx10 is a homeobox-containing transcription factor critical for progenitor cell proliferation and bipolar cell determination in the developing retina. Its expression in the retina has been reported to be restricted to these cell populations. To further understand Chx10 regulation and function, a multifunctional reporter construct consisting of GFP, alkaline phosphatase, and Cre recombinase was integrated into a BAC encoding Chx10. Stable lines of transgenic mice expressing this BAC were generated and analyzed. The reporter expression was faithful to the endogenous retinal Chx10 expression pattern and revealed a previously unappreciated locus of Chx10 expression in a subset of Müller glial cells. In addition, Chx10 reporter activity was identified in mature orJ-Chx10 mutant retinas, although these retinas lack Chx10-expressing bipolar cells. Reporter and molecular analysis showed that the reporter-expressing cells in the mutant had hallmarks of progenitor cells or partially differentiated Müller glial cells. These results strongly suggest that Chx10 promotes bipolar fate by affecting differentiation of late progenitor cells. Crosses of the Chx10 BAC reporter mice to R26R mice for fate-mapping experiments revealed that Chx10 reporter-expressing progenitor cells contribute to all mature cell types of the retina. These results demonstrate the utility of these lines for generation of mosaic or complete genetic manipulations of the retina.

  17. Neuron-specific enolase-like immunoreactivity in the vertebrate retina: selective labelling of Müller cells in Anura.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, M; Straznicky, C; Gábriel, R

    1992-11-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) immunocytochemistry was carried out in retinae of goldfish, axolotl, clawed frog, cane toad, lizard, chick, guinea-pig, rabbit, rat, cat and human. With the exception of Anura, strong immunoreactivity was seen in the large ganglion, amacrine cells and horizontal cells of the retina in all of the other species. Photoreceptors were found to be labelled in the rat and human retina and only one cone type in rabbit. Photoreceptor pedicles and ellipsoids were stained in the goldfish and the somata and inner segments of some photoreceptors in axolotl. In the axolotl retina, besides neurons, Müller cells (MCs) were also immunolabelled. In the retina of the cane toad and the clawed frog MCs were the only stained elements. Similarly in other parts of the central nervous system of the cane toad, glial elements of the optic tectum and spinal cord were immunoreactive. In contrast, in the peripheral nervous system, neurons of the 1st sympathetic ganglion and the 2nd dorsal root ganglion were labelled. In double-labelling experiments, glial fibrillary acidic protein and NSE showed colocalisation both in the glial elements of the optic tectum and spinal cord and in MCs of the retina of the cane toad.

  18. Trefoil factor family peptide 2 acts pro-proliferative and pro-apoptotic in the murine retina.

    PubMed

    Paunel-Görgülü, Adnana N; Franke, Andreas G; Paulsen, Friedrich P; Dünker, Nicole

    2011-05-01

    Although expression of trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides has been reported in the brain, nothing is known about TFF expression in the retina. The aim of this study was to test whether TFF peptides are expressed in the murine retina and have any function here. In contrast to most tissues studied, where TFF1 and TFF3 are the predominant peptides, TFF2 is the only peptide expressed in the murine retina. Immunohistochemical studies on murine retinal sections indicate that cells of the ganglion cell layer are the retinal source for murine TFF2 (Tff2). In organotypic murine retina cell cultures recombinant TFF2 exerted a strong pro-apoptotic and pro-proliferative rather than an anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferating effect described in most human cancer cell lines investigated so far. In blockage experiments we were able to demonstrate that the pro-apoptotic effect of TFF2 is caspase-dependent. Western blot analysis of TFF2 treated retinal wholemount homogenates revealed significant reductions in the phosphorylation level of ERK and STAT3 proteins compared to basal conditions, suggesting that in the developing murine retina survival mechanism are down-regulated upon TFF2 administration. Our results suggest that during retinal cell death periods, requiring a tightly regulated balance between cell survival and cell death, TFF2 acts pro-proliferative and pro-apoptotic at least in developing mouse retinae cultured in vivo.

  19. Mechanical Stress and Antioxidant Protection in the Retina of Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Aziza; Theriot, Corey A.; Alway, Stephen E.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    It has been postulated that hindlimb suspension (HS) causes a cephalad fluid shift in quadrupeds similar to that occurring to humans in microgravity. Therefore, HS may provide a suitable animal model in which to recapitulate the ocular changes observed in the human Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. This work reports preliminary results from a tissue sharing project using 34 week-old Brown Norway rats. Two different experiments compared normal posture controls and HS rats for 2 weeks and rats exposed to HS for 2 weeks but allowed to recover in normal posture for 2 additional weeks. The effects of two nutritional countermeasures, green tea extract (GT) and plant polyphenol resveratrol (Rv), were also evaluated. Green tea contains the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). qPCR gene expression analysis of selected targets was performed on RNA from isolated retinas, and histologic analysis was done on one fixed eye per rat. The transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (Egr1) was upregulated almost 2-fold in HS retinas relative to controls (P = 0.059), and its expression returned to control levels after 2 weeks of recovery in normal posture (P = 0.023). HS-induced upregulation of Egr1 was attenuated (but not significantly) in retinas from rats fed an antioxidant rich (GT extract) diet. In rats fed the GT-enriched diet, antioxidant enzymes were induced, evidenced by the upregulation of the gene heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) (P = 0.042) and the gene superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) (P = 0.0001). Egr1 is a stretch-activated transcription factor, and the Egr1 mechanosensitive response to HS may have been caused by a change in the translaminal pressure and/or mechanical deformation of the eye globe. The observed histologic measurements of the various retinal layers in the HS rats were lower in value than those of the control animal (n = 1), however insufficient data were available for statistical analysis. Aquaporin 4, a water

  20. The neurogenic competence of progenitors from the postnatal rat retina in vitro.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Maren; Wachs, Frank-Peter; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2004-05-01

    The mammalian retina develops from stem or progenitor cells that are of neuroectodermal origin and derive from bilateral invaginations of the neuroepithelium, the optic vesicles. Shortly after birth, around 12 days postnatal in rats, the retina is fully developed in its cellular parts. Even though different cell types in the adult might be potential sources for retinal stem cells or progenitor cells, the retina is a non-neurogenic region and the diseased retina is devoid of any spontaneous regeneration. In an attempt to link late developmental processes to the adult situation, we analyzed the presence and the neurogenic potential of retinal progenitors during the postnatal period and compared it to adult ciliary body (CB) derived retinal progenitors and subventricular zone (SVZ) derived neural stem cells. Retinal progenitor properties were identified by the capacity to proliferate and by the expression of the progenitor markers Nestin, Flk-1, Chx10, Pax6 and the radial glia marker BLBP. The neurogenic potential was assayed by the expression of the neuronal markers doublecortin, betaIII Tubulin, Map2 and NSE, the glial makers A2B5, NG2, GalC and GFAP, and by incorporation of BrdU. The number of Flk-1 positive cells and concomitantly the number of newly born betaIII Tubulin-positive cells decreased within the first postnatal week in retinal progenitor cultures and no newly generated betaIII Tubulin, but GFAP positive cells were detected thereafter. In contrast to neural stem cells derived from the adult SVZ, postnatal and adult CB derived progenitors had a lower and a restricted proliferation potential and did not generate oligodendrocytes. The work demonstrates, however, that the existence of retinal progenitor cells is not restricted to embryonic development. In the sensory retina the differentiation potential of late retinal progenitors becomes restricted to the glial lineage, whereas neurogenic progenitor cells are still present in the CB. In addition, major

  1. Assessment of inner retina dysfunction and progressive ganglion cell loss in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Lara, María J; Santano, Concepción; Guzmán-Aránguez, Ana; Valiente-Soriano, F Javier; Avilés-Trigueros, Marcelino; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; de la Villa, Pedro; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    The DBA/2J mouse is a model of ocular hypertension and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration, the main features of which are iris pigment dispersion (IPD) and iris stromal atrophy (ISA). These animals also experience glaucomatous changes, including an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) beginning at about 9-12 months of age and sectorial RGC death in the retina. The aim of this study was to determine the onset of functional changes exhibited by DBA/2J mice in the inner retina. This was performed by means of electroretinographic recordings (scotopic threshold response, STR) and their correlation with morphological changes (loss of RGCs). To this end, we recorded the scotopic threshold response in control C57BL/6J and in DBA/2J mice at different ages. The RGCs, in both DBA/2J and C57BL/6J animals, were identified at 15 months of age by retrograde tracing with an analogue of fluorogold, hydroxystilbamidine methanesulfonate (OHSt), applied on the superior colliculi. Whole mount retinas were processed to quantify the population of RGCs identified by fluorogold tracing and Brn3a immunodetection, and were counted using image analysis software; an isodensity contour plot was generated for each retina. DBA/2J mice showed a significant reduction in the positive STR (pSTR) amplitudes at 12 months of age, as compared to control C57BL/6J mice of the same age. The pSTR mean amplitude decreased to approximately 27.82% of the values recorded in control mice (p = 0.0058). STR responses decreased in both strains as a result of the natural process of aging, but the decrease was more pronounced in DBA/2J mice. Furthermore, quantification of the total number of RGCs identified by OHSt and Brn3a expression showed a reduced population of RGCs in DBA/2J mice as compared to control mice. Regression analysis revealed significant correlations between the decrease in pSTR and a non-homogeneous reduction in the number of RGCs throughout the retina. Our results indicate the existence of

  2. Volumetric imaging of inner retina with adaptive optics spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan, II; Cense, Barry; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Gao, Weihua; Jones, Steve; Olivier, Scot; Miller, Donald T.

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) coupled with ultra-fast spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has achieved the necessary 3D resolution, sensitivity, and speed for imaging the microscopic retina at the cellular level. While this technology has been rigorously applied to evaluating the 3D morphology of cone photoreceptors, similar detailed studies of cell-sized structures in the inner retina have yet to be undertaken. In this paper, we improve the technical performance of our AO ultrafast SD-OCT and investigate its use for imaging the microscopic inner retina, in particular the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and retinal capillary network. To maximize lateral resolution within the inner retina, focus was controlled with a high stroke, 37-actuator bimorph mirror (AOptix) that also served as the wavefront corrector of the AO. The AO system operated at a closed-loop rate of 25 Hz. The SD-OCT sub-system consisted of a superluminescent diode (λ= 842 nm, Δλ= 50 nm) and a 512 pixel line scan charge-coupled device (CCD) that acquired 72,000 A-scans/sec. Three different B-scan lengths (36, 60, and 120 A-scans/B-scan), which correspond to B-scan exposure durations of 0.5, 0.83, and 1.67 ms, were evaluated to determine the maximum B-scan length that could be tolerated without noticeable loss in image quality due to eye motion in the well fixated eye. Additional technical improvements included sub-pixel registration to remove instrument error and axial registration of the volume images. Small volume images were acquired at 2 and 7 degrees retinal eccentricity with focus systematically shifted through the retina. Small capillaries, some approaching the smallest in the human eye, were readily detected with AO SD-OCT. Appearance of the nerve fiber layer varied noticeably with depth. The most inner portion (presumably the inner limiting membrane) appeared as a thin irregular surface with little characteristic speckle noise. Within the NFL, complex striation patterns (presumably NFL

  3. The effects of the apoE4 genotype on the developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Maharshak, Idit; Salomon-Zimri, Shiran; Antes, Ran; Liraz, Ori; Nisgav, Yael; Livnat, Tami; Weinberger, Dov; Colton, Carol A; Solomon, Arieh S; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with neuronal and vascular impairments. The retina, which is as an extension of the central nervous system (CNS), is a particularly suitable model for studying developmental and functional aspects of the neuronal and vascular systems. This study investigates the apoE4-dependent developmental effects on the retinal vasculature and neuronal systems and on the levels of apoE and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the retina. This was performed utilizing retinas of 4, 7, 12, and of 120-day-old human-apoE4-targeted replacement mice and of corresponding mice that express the AD benign isoform, apoE3. The results obtained revealed retinal vascular pathology in the apoE4 mice, which started on the early post-natal days. This includes transient increase in vascular branching, and vascular buds which are round vascular elements representing sprouting or retracting vessels. These effects peaked and ended during the neonatal period. Examination of the synaptic system utilizing the pre-synaptic marker synaptophysin revealed a significant decrease of retinal synaptic density in the apoE4 mice, which was detectable by post-natal day 12 (P12). These morphological changes are associated with neonatal age-dependent elevation in the apoE levels in both apoE3 and apoE4 retinas which is more profound in the apoE4 mice and a corresponding increase in VEGF levels, which is less profound in the apoE4 mice. Additionally, we observed lower levels of retinal VEGF in the apoE4 mice compared to the apoE3 mice retinas on P12. These results show that apoE4 has a transient vascular effect during retinal development that ends in the neonatal period, which is accompanied by a synaptic effect that begins at the end of the neonatal period. These findings show that the apoE4 genotype can have distinct developmental effects on both the retinal vasculature and on neurons and

  4. Redistribution of insoluble interphotoreceptor matrix components during photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mieziewska, K; Szél, A; Van Veen, T; Aguirre, G D; Philp, N

    1994-07-01

    The development of the nervous system is largely influenced by the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the neural retina, the photoreceptors are surrounded by a unique ECM, the interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). The IPM plays a central and possibly crucial role in the development, maintenance and specific function of the photoreceptors. Therefore, the characterization of IPM components is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating photoreceptor differentiation. The IPM in the mouse retina was examined during photoreceptor morphogenesis with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F22, which recognizes a 250 kDa component of the interphotoreceptor matrix. The binding pattern of MAb F22 revealed a striking redistribution in the expression of the 250 kDa F22 antigen in late stage of postnatal photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina. The F22 staining was detectable in the IPM around the inner segments on the third postnatal day (P3). The MAb F22 initially labeled the region around inner segments, but as the outer segments elongated, the F22 distribution became concentrated to the matrix around the rod and cone outer segments until P16-17. At P17, the F22 label around rods began to disappear, while the label around cones became more defined. The shift in label distribution was largely completed by P20. Residual rod-associated label disappeared within a few days. In the adult animal, the F22 antibody labeled the cone-associated matrix only, and this labeling pattern remained stationary. The change in the distribution of MAb F22 demonstrated by immunolabeling was not accompanied by changes in the size of the molecule; F22 antigen isolated from the IPM of P13-15, and from adult IPM migrated with the same molecular weight on SDS gels. The distribution of MAb F22 was compared to that of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans which are abundant in the IPM. The labeling patterns of MAbs CS-56, C6-S and C4-S were distinct from that of MAb F22. A general decrease of the label

  5. Characterisation of the metabolome of ocular tissues and post-mortem changes in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shi Z; Mullard, Graham; Hollywood, Katherine A; Dunn, Warwick B; Bishop, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    Time-dependent post-mortem biochemical changes have been demonstrated in donor cornea and vitreous, but there have been no published studies to date that objectively measure post-mortem changes in the retinal metabolome over time. The aim of the study was firstly, to investigate post-mortem, time-dependent changes in the rat retinal metabolome and secondly, to compare the metabolite composition of healthy rat ocular tissues. To study post-mortem changes in the rat retinal metabolome, globes were enucleated and stored at 4 °C and sampled at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h post-mortem. To study the metabolite composition of rat ocular tissues, eyes were dissected immediately after culling to isolate the cornea, lens, vitreous and retina, prior to storing at -80 °C. Tissue extracts were subjected to Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). Generally, the metabolic composition of the retina was stable for 8 h post-mortem when eyes were stored at 4 °C, but showed increasing changes thereafter. However, some more rapid changes were observed such as increases in TCA cycle metabolites after 2 h post-mortem, whereas some metabolites such as fatty acids only showed decreases in concentration from 24 h. A total of 42 metabolites were identified across the ocular tissues by GC-MS (MSI level 1) and 2782 metabolites were annotated by UHPLC-MS (MSI level 2) according to MSI reporting standards. Many of the metabolites detected were common to all of the tissues but some metabolites showed partitioning between different ocular structures with 655, 297, 93 and 13 metabolites being uniquely detected in the retina, lens, cornea and vitreous respectively. Only a small percentage (1.6%) of metabolites found in the vitreous were only detected in the retina and not other tissues. In conclusion, mass spectrometry-based techniques have been used for the first time to compare the metabolic composition of

  6. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  7. Raldh2 expression in optic vesicle generates a retinoic acid signal needed for invagination of retina during optic cup formation.

    PubMed

    Mic, Felix A; Molotkov, Andrei; Molotkova, Natalia; Duester, Gregg

    2004-10-01

    Three retinaldehyde dehydrogenase genes (Raldh1, Raldh2, and Raldh3) expressed in unique spatiotemporal patterns may control synthesis of retinoic acid (RA) needed for retina development. However, previous studies indicate that retina formation still proceeds normally in Raldh1-/- mouse embryos lacking RA synthesis in the dorsal neural retina at the optic cup stage. Here, we demonstrate that Raldh2-/- embryos lacking RA synthesis in the optic vesicle exhibit a failure in retina invagination needed to develop an optic cup. This was also observed in Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- double mutants, which develop similarly. Both mutants retain RA activity in the lens placode associated with Raldh3 expression, but this RA activity is insufficient to induce optic cup formation. Maternal RA administration at the optic vesicle stage rescues optic cup formation in Raldh2-/- and Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- embryos, demonstrating that Raldh1 is not required during rescue of optic cup development. The optic cup of rescued Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- embryos exhibits normal RA activity and this is associated with Raldh3 expression in the retina and lens. Thus, RA signaling initiates in the optic vesicle in response to Raldh2 but can be maintained during optic cup formation by a gene other than Raldh1, most likely Raldh3. Loss of optic vesicle RA signaling does not effect expression of early determinants of retina at the optic vesicle stage (Pax6, Six3, Rx, Mitf). Our findings suggest that RA functions as one of the signals needed for invagination of the retina to generate an optic cup. PMID:15366004

  8. Transcriptomic analysis across nasal, temporal, and macular regions of human neural retina and RPE/choroid by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, S Scott; Wagner, Alex H; DeLuca, Adam P; Drack, Arlene V; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Zeng, Shemin; Braun, Terry A; Mullins, Robert F; Scheetz, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    Proper spatial differentiation of retinal cell types is necessary for normal human vision. Many retinal diseases, such as Best disease and male germ cell associated kinase (MAK)-associated retinitis pigmentosa, preferentially affect distinct topographic regions of the retina. While much is known about the distribution of cell types in the retina, the distribution of molecular components across the posterior pole of the eye has not been well-studied. To investigate regional difference in molecular composition of ocular tissues, we assessed differential gene expression across the temporal, macular, and nasal retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid of human eyes using RNA-Seq. RNA from temporal, macular, and nasal retina and RPE/choroid from four human donor eyes was extracted, poly-A selected, fragmented, and sequenced as 100 bp read pairs. Digital read files were mapped to the human genome and analyzed for differential expression using the Tuxedo software suite. Retina and RPE/choroid samples were clearly distinguishable at the transcriptome level. Numerous transcription factors were differentially expressed between regions of the retina and RPE/choroid. Photoreceptor-specific genes were enriched in the peripheral samples, while ganglion cell and amacrine cell genes were enriched in the macula. Within the RPE/choroid, RPE-specific genes were upregulated at the periphery while endothelium associated genes were upregulated in the macula. Consistent with previous studies, BEST1 expression was lower in macular than extramacular regions. The MAK gene was expressed at lower levels in macula than in extramacular regions, but did not exhibit a significant difference between nasal and temporal retina. The regional molecular distinction is greatest between macula and periphery and decreases between different peripheral regions within a tissue. Datasets such as these can be used to prioritize candidate genes for possible involvement in retinal diseases with

  9. Transcriptomic analysis across nasal, temporal, and macular regions of human neural retina and RPE/choroid by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S. Scott; Wagner, Alex H.; DeLuca, Adam P.; Drack, Arlene V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.; Zeng, Shemin; Braun, Terry A.; Mullins, Robert F.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    Proper spatial differentiation of retinal cell types is necessary for normal human vision. Many retinal diseases, such as Best disease and male germ cell associated kinase (MAK)-associated retinitis pigmentosa, preferentially affect distinct topographic regions of the retina. While much is known about the distribution of cell-types in the retina, the distribution of molecular components across the posterior pole of the eye has not been well-studied. To investigate regional difference in molecular composition of ocular tissues, we assessed differential gene expression across the temporal, macular, and nasal retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid of human eyes using RNA-Seq. RNA from temporal, macular, and nasal retina and RPE/choroid from four human donor eyes was extracted, poly-A selected, fragmented, and sequenced as 100 bp read pairs. Digital read files were mapped to the human genome and analyzed for differential expression using the Tuxedo software suite. Retina and RPE/choroid samples were clearly distinguishable at the transcriptome level. Numerous transcription factors were differentially expressed between regions of the retina and RPE/choroid. Photoreceptor-specific genes were enriched in the peripheral samples, while ganglion cell and amacrine cell genes were enriched in the macula. Within the RPE/choroid, RPE-specific genes were upregulated at the periphery while endothelium associated genes were upregulated in the macula. Consistent with previous studies, BEST1 expression was lower in macular than extramacular regions. The MAK gene was expressed at lower levels in macula than in extramacular regions, but did not exhibit a significant difference between nasal and temporal retina. The regional molecular distinction is greatest between macula and periphery and decreases between different peripheral regions within a tissue. Datasets such as these can be used to prioritize candidate genes for possible involvement in retinal diseases with

  10. Dark-rearing-induced reduction of GABA and GAD and prevention of the effect by BDNF in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Gibo, Tricia L; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2006-10-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important retinal neurotransmitter. We studied the expression of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and GAD67 by immunocytochemistry and Western blot, in the retinas of control and dark-reared C57BL/6J black mice. This study asked three questions. First, is visual input necessary for the normal expression of GABA, GAD65 and GAD67? Second, can the retina recover from the effects of dark-rearing if returned to a normal light-dark cycle? Third, does BDNF prevent the influence of dark-rearing on the expression of GABA and GAD? At postnatal day 10 (P10), before eye opening, GABA immunoreactivity was present in the ganglion cell layer (GCL), in the innermost rows of the inner nuclear layer (INL) and throughout the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of control and dark-reared retinas. In P30 control retinas, GABA immunoreactivity showed similar patterns to those at P10. However, in P30 dark-reared retinas, the density of GABA-immunoreactive cells was lower in both the INL and GCL than in control retinas. In addition, visual deprivation retarded GABA immunoreactivity in the IPL. Western blot analysis showed corresponding differences in the levels of GAD65 but not of GAD67 expression between control and dark-rearing conditions. In our study, dark-rearing effects were reversed when the mice were put in normal cyclic light-dark conditions for 2 weeks. Moreover, dark-reared retinas treated with BDNF showed normal expression of both GABA and GAD65. Our data indicate that normal expression of GABA and GAD65 is dependent on visual input. Furthermore, the data suggest that BDNF controls this dependence.

  11. Effects of lesions of the optic nerve, optic tectum and nervus terminalis on rod precursor proliferation in the goldfish retina.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Yaw, V; Kyle, A L; Stell, W K

    1992-04-01

    Teleost retinas grow throughout life by proliferation of neuroblasts at the retinal margin and dedicated rod precursors in the outer nuclear layer. Mechanisms regulating this proliferation are largely unknown. Previous investigators observed that rod precursor replication, as detected by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into cells of the outer nuclear layer, is enhanced after optic nerve crush. We attempted to determine whether this was due to severing of the retinopetal (nervus terminalis, n.t.) or retinofugal (retinal ganglion cell) axons in the optic nerve of the goldfish, Carassius auratus. In the first series of experiments, we ablated unilaterally the optic nerve, olfactory bulb (containing n.t. ganglia), or optic tectum (containing retinal ganglion cell axons and n.t. collaterals). Rod precursor proliferation increased dramatically in both retinas as soon as 5 days after surgery; in addition, the numbers of dividing cells were greater in the ipsilateral retina 10-15 days after optic nerve crush or tectal ablation and in the contralateral retina 20-25 days after olfactory bulb ablation. These observations are not accounted for by the known projections of retinal ganglion cells, but are consistent with the projections of the n.t. In the second series of experiments, n.t. projections to the brain and retina were severed bilaterally 7-8 weeks before the unilateral optic nerve crush or hemitectal ablation. Rod precursor proliferation increased as before, but the quantities of dividing cells were always equal in both retinas. We conclude that the n.t. may modulate rod proliferation locally and that injury to (some) brain regions may cause release of mitogens that affect rod precursors in both retinas. PMID:1515918

  12. Alterations in Energy Metabolism, Neuroprotection and Visual Signal Transduction in the Retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-Treated Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bru-Martínez, Roque; Herrero, María Trinidad; Fernández-Villalba, Emiliano; Cuenca, Nicolás; Martín-Nieto, José

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ±1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to mechanisms thought to

  13. Regression of retinal capillaries following N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced neurotoxicity in the neonatal rat retina.

    PubMed

    Asano, Daiki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of retinal capillaries occurs following N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced retinal neurotoxicity, and the degree of capillary degeneration decreases in an age-dependent manner. To determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the high susceptibility of capillaries to neuronal damage during the early postnatal stage, this study compares the vascular regression patterns between NMDA-treated retinas and retinas treated with N-[2-chloro-4-{(6,7-dimethoxy-4-quinazolinyl)oxy}phenyl]-N'-propylurea (KRN633), a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in neonatal rats. Two days after a single intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) on postnatal day (P) 7, substantial retinal neuron loss and delayed expansion of the retinal vascular bed were observed. The reduction in the capillary density in the central retina reached statistical significance 4 days after NMDA treatment. In retinas of rats injected subcutaneously with KRN633 (10 mg/kg) on P7 and P8, simplified vasculature attributable to capillary regression and prevention of endothelial cell growth were seen on P9, whereas no visible changes in the morphology of the retinal layers were observed. The degree of capillary degeneration in NMDA-treated retinas was less than that in KRN633-treated retinas. No apparent changes in immunoreactivities for VEGF were found 2 days after NMDA treatment. These results indicate that neuronal cell loss in the retina precedes retinal capillary degeneration following NMDA treatment, and VEGF-dependent immature capillaries might be more susceptible to NMDA-induced neuronal damage. PMID:25284371

  14. High-resolution analysis of the human retina miRNome reveals isomiR variations and novel microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Karali, Marianthi; Persico, Maria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Carissimo, Annamaria; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Singh Marwah, Veer; Ambrosio, Concetta; Pinelli, Michele; Carrella, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Nigro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego; Banfi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play a fundamental role in retinal development and function. To characterise the miRNome of the human retina, we carried out deep sequencing analysis on sixteen individuals. We established the catalogue of retina-expressed miRNAs, determined their relative abundance and found that a small number of miRNAs accounts for almost 90% of the retina miRNome. We discovered more than 3000 miRNA variants (isomiRs), encompassing a wide range of sequence variations, which include seed modifications that are predicted to have an impact on miRNA action. We demonstrated that a seed-modifying isomiR of the retina-enriched miR-124-3p was endowed with different targeting properties with respect to the corresponding canonical form. Moreover, we identified 51 putative novel, retina-specific miRNAs and experimentally validated the expression for nine of them. Finally, a parallel analysis of the human Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE)/choroid, two tissues that are known to be crucial for retina homeostasis, yielded notably distinct miRNA enrichment patterns compared to the retina. The generated data are accessible through an ad hoc database. This study is the first to reveal the complexity of the human retina miRNome at nucleotide resolution and constitutes a unique resource to assess the contribution of miRNAs to the pathophysiology of the human retina. PMID:26819412

  15. Gradients of Eph-A6 expression in primate retina suggest roles in both vascular and axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kozulin, Peter; Natoli, Riccardo; Madigan, Michele C.; O’Brien, Keely M. Bumsted

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Recently we identified high levels of expression of Eph-A6 in the macula of developing human retina and showed localization of Eph-A6 to ganglion cells (GC). In the present study we investigated the expression of some members of the ephrin family in developing primate retina, including the topography of Eph-A6 expression, and its ligands, in developing macaque retinas. Methods We extracted RNA from human fetal retinas and probed for Eph-A5–A7, Eph-B1, ephrin-B2, and ephrin-A1-A5 by RT–PCR, then prepared riboprobes for Eph-A5-A7, Eph-B1 and ephrin-A1, -A4 and -B2. Paraffin sections of fetal macaque retinas were used to localize expression of Ephs and ephrins by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results We identified prominent gradients of Eph-A6 mRNA expression in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of fetal macaque retinas of different ages. The gradient of Eph-A6 expression was high near the optic disc and low at the developing macula at fetal day (Fd) 55. At Fd 70 and 80, the gradient of Eph-A6 expression was reversed, being higher temporal to the macula, and low at the disc. By Fd 110, when the fovea begins to form, a pattern of expression was established that persisted into the postnatal period, in which the highest levels of expression were detected at the developing fovea, and progressively lower levels of expression were detected at increasing distance from the fovea. Beginning at Fd 70, we also detected a gradient of Eph-A6 expression running perpendicular to the retinal surface within the GCL of central retina that was high in the inner GCL and low in the outer GCL. This second pattern persisted into the neonatal period. We found the two ligands for Eph-A6, ephrin-A1 and ephrin-A4, expressed by Pax2-immunoreactive astrocytes, in the optic nerve head and in the retina, by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We propose that during development of the retinal vasculature, migration of ligand-bearing astrocytes is slowed along

  16. Exclusive multipotency and preferential asymmetric divisions in post-embryonic neural stem cells of the fish retina

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ander, Janina-J.; Hoeckendorf, Burkhard; Lust, Katharina; Kellner, Tanja; Kraemer, Isabel; Urbany, Cedric; Hasel, Eva; Harris, William A.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The potency of post-embryonic stem cells can only be addressed in the living organism, by labeling single cells after embryonic development and following their descendants. Recently, transplantation experiments involving permanently labeled cells revealed multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) of embryonic origin in the medaka retina. To analyze whether NSC potency is affected by developmental progression, as reported for the mammalian brain, we developed an inducible toolkit for clonal labeling and non-invasive fate tracking. We used this toolkit to address post-embryonic stem cells in different tissues and to functionally differentiate transient progenitor cells from permanent, bona fide stem cells in the retina. Using temporally controlled clonal induction, we showed that post-embryonic retinal NSCs are exclusively multipotent and give rise to the complete spectrum of cell types in the neural retina. Intriguingly, and in contrast to any other vertebrate stem cell system described so far, long-term analysis of clones indicates a preferential mode of asymmetric cell division. Moreover, following the behavior of clones before and after external stimuli, such as injuries, shows that NSCs in the retina maintained the preference for asymmetric cell division during regenerative responses. We present a comprehensive analysis of individual post-embryonic NSCs in their physiological environment and establish the teleost retina as an ideal model for studying adult stem cell biology at single cell resolution. PMID:25142461

  17. Basic difference between brain and computer: integration of asynchronous processes implemented as hardware model of the retina.

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W; Linsay, Paul S; Gaudiano, Paolo; Wilson, Christopher M

    2007-01-01

    There exists a common view that the brain acts like a Turing machine: The machine reads information from an infinite tape (sensory data) and, on the basis of the machine's state and information from the tape, an action (decision) is made. The main problem with this model lies in how to synchronize a large number of tapes in an adaptive way so that the machine is able to accomplish tasks such as object classification. We propose that such mechanisms exist already in the eye. A popular view is that the retina, typically associated with high gain and adaptation for light processing, is actually performing local preprocessing by means of its center-surround receptive field. We would like to show another property of the retina: The ability to integrate many independent processes. We believe that this integration is implemented by synchronization of neuronal oscillations. In this paper, we present a model of the retina consisting of a series of coupled oscillators which can synchronize on several scales. Synchronization is an analog process which is converted into a digital spike train in the output of the retina. We have developed a hardware implementation of this model, which enables us to carry out rapid simulation of multineuron oscillatory dynamics. We show that the properties of the spike trains in our model are similar to those found in vivo in the cat retina.

  18. Ectopic expression of transcription factor AP-2δ in developing retina: effect on PSA-NCAM and axon routing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Monckton, Elizabeth A; Godbout, Roseline

    2014-04-01

    Retinal ganglion cells transmit the visual signal from the retina to the brain. We have previously shown that the activator protein 2 (AP-2)δ (TFAP2D) transcription factor is expressed in one third of ganglion cells in developing retina suggesting a specialized role for these AP-2δ-expressing cells. Here, we address the role of AP-2δ in retina by in ovo electroporation of RCAS/AP-2δ retroviral constructs into the eyes of chick embryos at day 2 of gestation. Ectopic expression of AP-2δ does not affect lineage differentiation in the developing retina. However, immunostaining of retinal tissue with markers associated with axonal growth such as growth-associated protein 43 and polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) demonstrates axonal misrouting and abnormal axonal bundling. Treatment of AP-2δ-misexpressing retinal cell cultures with endoneuraminidase, an enzyme that removes PSA from NCAM, decreases AP-2δ-induced axonal bundling. Our data suggest a role for AP-2δ in polysialylation of NCAM, with ectopic expression of AP-2δ resulting in premature bundling of emerging axons and misrouting of axons. We propose that expression of AP-2δ in a subset of ganglion cells contributes to the fine-tuning of axonal growth in the developing retina. PMID:24188130

  19. Correlation of spatial intensity distribution of light reaching the retina and restoration of vision by optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of retinal neuronal cells using optogenetics via use of chanelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and blue light has opened up a new direction for restoration of vision with respect to treatment of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In addition to delivery of ChR2 to specific retinal layer using genetic engineering, threshold level of blue light needs to be delivered onto the retina for generating action potential and successful behavioral outcome. We report measurement of intensity distribution of light reaching the retina of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse models and compared those results with theoretical simulations of light propagation in eye. The parameters for the stimulating source positioning in front of eye was determined for optimal light delivery to the retina. In contrast to earlier viral method based delivery of ChR2 onto retinal ganglion cells, in-vivo electroporation method was employed for retina-transfection of RP mice. The behavioral improvement in mice with Thy1-ChR2-YFP transfected retina, expressing ChR2 in retinal ganglion cells, was found to correlate with stimulation intensity.

  20. Identification of Radial Glia Progenitors in the Developing and Adult Retina of Sharks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to transient progenitors termed neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and radial glial cells (RGCs). RGCs represent the major source of neurons, glia and adult stem cells in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS). RGCs are mostly transient in mammals, but they are widely maintained in the adult CNS of fishes, where they continue to be morphologically similar to RGCs in the mammalian brain and fulfill similar roles as progenitors and guide for migrating neurons. The retina of fishes offers an exceptional model to approach the study of adult neurogenesis because of the presence of constitutive proliferation from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), containing NECs, and from adult glial cells with radial morphology (the Müller glia). However, the cellular hierarchies and precise contribution of different types of progenitors to adult neurogenesis remain unsolved. We have analyzed the transition from NECs to RGCs and RGC differentiation in the retina of the cartilaginous fish Scyliorhinus canicula, which offers a particularly good spatial and temporal frame to investigate this process. We have characterized progenitor and adult RGCs by immunohistochemical detection of glial markers as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthetase (GS). We have compared the emergence and localization of glial markers with that of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a proliferation maker) and Doublecortin (DCX, which increases at early stages of neuronal differentiation). During retinal development, GFAP-immunoreactive NECs located in the most peripheral CMZ (CMZp) codistribute with DCX-immunonegative cells. GFAP-immunoreactive RGCs and Müller cells are located in successive more central parts of the retina and codistribute with DCX- and DCX/GS-immunoreactive cells, respectively. The same types of progenitors are found in juveniles, suggesting that the contribution of the CMZ to adult neurogenesis implies a transition through the

  1. Metabolic signaling between photoreceptors and glial cells in the retina of the drone (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Brazitikos, P D; Tsacopoulos, M

    1991-12-13

    Experimental evidence showing metabolic interaction and signaling between photoreceptors-neurons and glial cells of the honeybee drone retina is presented. In this tissue [3H]2-deoxyglucose ([3H]2DG) in the dark and during repetitive light stimulation is phosphorylated to [3H]2-deoxyglucose-6P ([3H]2DG-6P) almost exclusively in the glial cells. Hence, stimulus-induced changes in the rate of formation of [3H]2DG-6P occurs predominantly in the glial cells. Repetitive stimulation of the photoreceptors with light flashes induced about a 47% rise in the rate of formation of [3H]2DG-6P in the glial cells and this effect is probably due to the activation of hexokinase. The potent inhibitor of glycolysis iodoacetic acid (IAA), inhibited this phosphorylation by about 75%. Probably this was largely due to an about 70% decrease of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Exposure of the retina to IAA suppressed the transient rise in oxygen consumption (delta QO2) in the photoreceptors and subsequently the light-induced receptor potential. This indicates that the supply of a glycolytic substrate by glial cells to the photoreceptors is greatly reduced by IAA. Anoxia, by rapidly suppressing QO2, abolished the receptor potential of the photoreceptors and caused a rapid drop of about 50% in the ATP content of the retina. At the same time the formation of [3H]2DG-6P was inhibited by about 30%. This indicates that respiring photoreceptors send a metabolic signal to glial cells which is suppressed by anoxia. PMID:1815828

  2. Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yan T.; Halupka, Kerry; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. Approach. Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines. LFPs were simultaneously recorded in response to stimulation of individual electrodes using penetrating microelectrode arrays from the visual cortex. The frequency response of each electrode was extracted using multi-taper spectral analysis and the uniqueness of the responses was determined via a linear decoder. Main results. We found that cortical LFPs are reliably modulated by electrical stimulation of the retina and that the responses are spatially localized. We further characterized the spectral distribution of responses, with maximum information being contained in the low and high gamma bands. Finally, we found that LFP responses are unique to a large range of stimulus parameters (∼40) with a maximum conveyable information rate of 6.1 bits. Significance. These results show that the LFP can be used to validate responses to electrical stimulation of the retina and we provide the first steps towards using these responses to provide more efficacious stimulation strategies.

  3. Overexpression of pairedless Pax6 in the retina disrupts corneal development and affects lens cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiha; Lauderdale, James D

    2008-01-01

    The Pax6 transcription factor is required for multiple aspects of vertebrate eye development. The Pax6 gene encodes isoforms that either contain (Pax6+PD) or lack (Pax6DeltaPD) the N-terminal paired-box DNA-binding domain, in addition to the homeodomain. Alternative promoters control the expression of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD in the eye. Using a modified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgene that specifically expresses Pax6DeltaPD, but not paired-containing Pax6, in the normal endogenous pattern, we show that overexpression of Pax6DeltaPD causes a severe microphthalmic phenotype in both wild-type and Pax6-deficient (Sey(/+)) mice in a dosage-dependent manner. The microphthalmic phenotype is due to lens degeneration during embryonic development. Lens development initiates correctly, but cells in the lens undergo apoptotic cell death between E12 and E13. Concomitantly, in these mice, changes in Bmp4, Msx1, and Wnt2b expression were observed in the mesenchymal cells of the developing cornea. To visualize Pax6DeltaPD expression, we developed a dual-reporter Pax6 BAC transgene in which EGFP and DsRed demonstrate paired-containing and pairedless transcripts, respectively. In BAC transgenic mice, DsRed is predominantly expressed in the peripheral neural retina during early eye development, but not in the developing lens or cornea. Later DsRed is strongly expressed in the developing ciliary body, but not in the iris. We suggest that the ratio of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD isoforms in the distal retina is important for both cornea and lens development, either directly by controlling transcription of necessary growth factors or indirectly by controlling development of the distal neural retina.

  4. Localization of diacylglycerol lipase alpha and monoacylglycerol lipase during postnatal development of the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Cécyre, Bruno; Monette, Marjorie; Beudjekian, Liza; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been increased interest in the physiological roles of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system and its receptors, the cannabinoid receptor types 1 (CB1R) and 2 (CB2R). Exposure to cannabinoids during development results in neurofunctional alterations, which implies that the eCB system is involved in the developmental processes of the brain. Because of their lipophilic nature, eCBs are synthesized on demand and are not stored in vesicles. Consequently, the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation are key regulators of their physiological actions. Therefore, knowing the localization of these enzymes during development is crucial for a better understanding of the role played by eCBs during the formation of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the developmental protein localization of the synthesizing and catabolic enzymes of the principal eCB, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the retinas of young and adult rats. The distribution of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis (DAGLα) and the degradation (MAGL) of 2-AG was determined for every retinal cell type from birth to adulthood. Our results indicate that DAGLα is present early in postnatal development. It is highly expressed in photoreceptor, horizontal, amacrine, and ganglion cells. MAGL appears later during the development of the retina and its presence is limited to amacrine and Müller cells. Overall, these results suggest that 2-AG is strongly present in early retinal development and might be involved in the regulation of the structural and functional maturation of the retina. PMID:25565975

  5. Localization of complement factor H gene expression and protein distribution in the mouse outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Oltjen, Sharon L.; Radu, Roxana A.; Estep, Jason; Nguyen, Anthony T.; Gong, Qizhi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the localization of complement factor H (Cfh) mRNA and its protein in the mouse outer retina. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to determine the expression of Cfh and Cfh-related (Cfhr) transcripts in the RPE/choroid. In situ hybridization (ISH) was performed using the novel RNAscope 2.0 FFPE assay to localize the expression of Cfh mRNA in the mouse outer retina. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to localize Cfh protein expression, and western blots were used to characterize CFH antibodies used for IHC. Results Cfh and Cfhr2 transcripts were detected in the mouse RPE/choroid using qPCR, while Cfhr1, Cfhr3, and Cfhrc (Gm4788) were not detected. ISH showed abundant Cfh mRNA in the RPE of all mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c, 129/Sv) tested, with the exception of the Cfh−/− eye. Surprisingly, the Cfh protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in photoreceptors rather than in RPE cells. The specificity of the CFH antibodies was tested by western blotting. Our CFH antibodies recognized purified mouse Cfh protein, serum Cfh protein in wild-type C57BL/6, BALB/c, and 129/Sv, and showed an absence of the Cfh protein in the serum of Cfh−/− mice. Greatly reduced Cfh protein immunohistological signals in the Cfh−/− eyes also supported the specificity of the Cfh protein distribution results. Conclusions Only Cfh and Cfhr2 genes are expressed in the mouse outer retina. Only Cfh mRNA was detected in the RPE, but no protein. We hypothesize that the steady-state concentration of Cfh protein is low in the cells due to secretion, and therefore is below the detection level for IHC. PMID:25684976

  6. Structural and functional cellular alterations underlying the toxicity of methamphetamine in rat retina and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Cristina; Abrantes, Bruno; Lopes, Isabel; Tavares, Maria Amélia

    2002-06-01

    The consumption of illicit drugs is an increasing problem in contemporary societies, and is one of the major causes of death and illness all over the world. Methamphetamine is among the drugs more widely used. Although evidence for a role of reactive species--especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic events--has been shown, the mechanism(s) underlying the cellular toxicity induced by this drug is not yet fully identified. In this context the elucidation of the cytotoxic effects induced by methamphetamine in rat frontal cortex and retina, which compromise cell viability and ultimately result in cell death, can further contribute to the understanding of its mechanism of action. This knowledge may provide new insights into the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent or ameliorate deleterious alterations of the nervous system. The use of epifluorescence microscopy associated with different fluorescent probes, markers of structural and/or functional cell parameters, can be used as a powerful tool to carry out those studies, in particular, the viability probes propidium iodide (PI) to assess plasma membrane integrity and fluorescein diacetate (FDA), which can monitor intracellular esterase activity and/or pH. In a preliminary study, the kinetic assessment of cellular changes induced by different drug concentrations (0, 1.2, 3, and 6 mM) allowed detection of dose-dependent alterations that are observed earlier in the retina. In fact, in the retina it was possible to monitor alterations (at 4 h of incubation) both in plasma membrane integrity and in esterase activity and/or pH for the lowest drug concentration (1.2 mM). In the prefrontal cortex these changes were only visible for drug concentrations > or = 3 mM. This work is a novel approach to the mechanisms of action of illicit drugs in the central nervous system and will provide the foundations and guidelines for further investigations in the context of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

  7. Progressive inflammatory pathology in the retina of aluminum-fed 5xFAD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pogue, A I; Dua, P; Hill, J M; Lukiw, W J

    2015-11-01

    At least 57 murine transgenic models for Alzheimer's disease (Tg-AD) have been developed to overexpress the 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptide in the central nervous system (CNS). These 'humanized murine Tg-AD models' have greatly expanded our understanding of the contribution of Aβ42 peptide-mediated pro-inflammatory neuropathology to the AD process. A number of independent laboratories using different amyloid-overexpressing Tg-AD models have shown that supplementation of murine Tg-AD diets and/or drinking water with aluminum significantly enhances Aβ42 peptide-mediated inflammatory pathology and AD-type cognitive change compared to animals receiving control diets. In humans AD-type pathology appears to originate in the limbic system and progressively spreads into primary processing and sensory regions such as the retina. In these studies, for the first time, we assess the propagation of Aβ42 and inflammatory signals into the retina of 5xFAD Tg-AD amyloid-overexpressing mice whose diets were supplemented with aluminum. The two most interesting findings were (1) that similar to other Tg-AD models, there was a significantly accelerated development of Aβ42 and inflammatory pathology in 5xFAD Tg-AD mice fed aluminum; and (2) in aluminum-supplemented animals, markers for inflammatory pathology appeared in both the brain and the retina as evidenced by an evolving presence of Aβ42 peptides, and accompanied by inflammatory markers - cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicate that in the 5xFAD Tg-AD model aluminum not only enhances an Aβ42-mediated inflammatory degeneration of the brain but also appears to induce AD-type pathology in an anatomically-linked primary sensory area that involves vision.

  8. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  9. Pharmacological differences between the D-2 autoreceptor and the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Dubocovich, M.L.; Weiner, N.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists was studied on the calcium-dependent release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine elicited by field stimulation at 3 Hz for a duration of 1 min (20 mA, 2 msec) from the rabbit retina in vitro and on adenylate cyclase activity in homogenates of rabbit retina. The relative order of potency of dopamine receptor agonists to inhibit the stimulation-evoked (/sup 3/H)dopamine release was pergolide greater than bromocriptine greater than apomorphine greater than LY 141865 greater than N,N-di-n-propyldopamine greater than or equal to dopamine. The relative order of potencies of dopamine receptor antagonists to increase (/sup 3/H)dopamine release was: S-sulpiride greater than or equal to domperidone greater than or equal to spiroperidol greater than metoclopramide greater than fluphenazine greater than or equal to R-sulpiride. alpha-Flupenthixol (0.01-1 microM) and (+)-butaclamol (0.01-1 microM) did not increase (/sup 3/H)dopamine overflow when added alone, but they antagonized the concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of apomorphine (0.1-10 microM). These results suggest that the dopamine inhibitory autoreceptor involved in the modulation of dopamine release from the rabbit retina possesses the pharmacological characteristics of a D-2 dopamine receptor. Maximal stimulation by 30 microM dopamine resulted in a 3-fold increase in adenylate cyclase activity with half-maximal stimulation occurring at a concentration of 2.46 microM. Apomorphine and pergolide elicited a partial stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. However, at low concentrations both compounds were more potent than dopamine.

  10. Identification of Radial Glia Progenitors in the Developing and Adult Retina of Sharks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to transient progenitors termed neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and radial glial cells (RGCs). RGCs represent the major source of neurons, glia and adult stem cells in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS). RGCs are mostly transient in mammals, but they are widely maintained in the adult CNS of fishes, where they continue to be morphologically similar to RGCs in the mammalian brain and fulfill similar roles as progenitors and guide for migrating neurons. The retina of fishes offers an exceptional model to approach the study of adult neurogenesis because of the presence of constitutive proliferation from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), containing NECs, and from adult glial cells with radial morphology (the Müller glia). However, the cellular hierarchies and precise contribution of different types of progenitors to adult neurogenesis remain unsolved. We have analyzed the transition from NECs to RGCs and RGC differentiation in the retina of the cartilaginous fish Scyliorhinus canicula, which offers a particularly good spatial and temporal frame to investigate this process. We have characterized progenitor and adult RGCs by immunohistochemical detection of glial markers as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamine synthetase (GS). We have compared the emergence and localization of glial markers with that of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a proliferation maker) and Doublecortin (DCX, which increases at early stages of neuronal differentiation). During retinal development, GFAP-immunoreactive NECs located in the most peripheral CMZ (CMZp) codistribute with DCX-immunonegative cells. GFAP-immunoreactive RGCs and Müller cells are located in successive more central parts of the retina and codistribute with DCX- and DCX/GS-immunoreactive cells, respectively. The same types of progenitors are found in juveniles, suggesting that the contribution of the CMZ to adult neurogenesis implies a transition through the

  11. Disruption of Fractalkine Signaling Leads to Microglial Activation and Neuronal Damage in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Sandra M.; Mendiola, Andrew S.; Yang, Ya-Chin; Adkins, Sarina L.; Torres, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Fractalkine (CX3CL1 or FKN) is a membrane-bound chemokine expressed on neuronal membranes and is proteolytically cleaved to shed a soluble chemoattractant domain. FKN signals via its unique receptor CX3CR1 expressed on microglia and other peripheral leukocytes. The aim of this study is to determine the role of CX3CR1 in inflammatory-mediated damage to retinal neurons using a model of diabetic retinopathy. For this, we compared neuronal, microglial, and astroglial densities and inflammatory response in nondiabetic and diabetic (Ins2Akita) CX3CR1-wild-type and CX3CR1-deficient mice at 10 and 20 weeks of age. Our results show that Ins2Akita CX3CR1-knockout mice exhibited (a) decreased neuronal cell counts in the retinal ganglion cell layer, (b) increased microglial cell numbers, and (c) decreased astrocyte responses comparable with Ins2Akita CX3CR1-Wild-type mice at 20 weeks of age. Analyses of the inflammatory response using PCR arrays showed several inflammatory genes differentially regulated in diabetic tissues. From those, the response in Ins2Akita CX3CR1-deficient mice at 10 weeks of age revealed a significant upregulation of IL-1β at the transcript level that was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in soluble retinal extracts. Overall, IL-1β, VEGF, and nitrite levels as a read out of nitric oxide production were abundant in Ins2Akita CX3CR1-deficient retina. Notably, double immunofluorescence staining shows that astrocytes act as a source of IL-1β in the Ins2Akita retina, and CX3CR1-deficient microglia potentiate the inflammatory response via IL-1β release. Collectively, these data demonstrate that dysregulated microglial responses in absence of CX3CR1 contribute to inflammatory-mediated damage of neurons in the diabetic retina. PMID:26514658

  12. Destructive Changes in the Neuronal Structure of the FVB/N Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinnan; Nan, ChangLong; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2015-01-01

    We applied a series of selective antibodies for labeling the various cell types in the mammalian retina. These were used to identify the progressive loss of neurons in the FVB/N mouse, a model of early onset retinal degeneration produced by a mutation in the pde6b gene. The immunocytochemical studies, together with electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, enabled us to examine the time course of the degenerative changes that extended from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells at the proximal end of the retina. Our study indicates that photoreceptors in FVB/N undergo a rapid degeneration within three postnatal weeks, and that there is a concomitant loss of retinal neurons in the inner nuclear layer. Although the loss of rods was detected at an earlier age during which time M- and S-opsin molecules were translocated to the cone nuclei; by 6 months all cones had also degenerated. Neuronal remodeling was also seen in the second-order neurons with horizontal cells sprouting processes proximally and dendritic retraction in rod-driven bipolar cells. Interestingly, the morphology of cone-driven bipolar cells were affected less by the disease process. The cellular structure of inner retinal neurons, i.e., ChAT amacrine cells, ganglion cells, and melanopsin-positive ganglion cells did not exhibit any gross changes of cell densities and appeared to be relatively unaffected by the massive photoreceptor degeneration in the distal retina. However, Muller cell processes began to express GFAP at their endfeet at p14, and it climbed progressively to the cell’s distal ends by 6 months. Our study indicates that FVB/N mouse provides a useful model with which to assess possible intervention strategies to arrest photoreceptor death in related diseases. PMID:26091175

  13. Destructive Changes in the Neuronal Structure of the FVB/N Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinnan; Nan, ChangLong; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2015-01-01

    We applied a series of selective antibodies for labeling the various cell types in the mammalian retina. These were used to identify the progressive loss of neurons in the FVB/N mouse, a model of early onset retinal degeneration produced by a mutation in the pde6b gene. The immunocytochemical studies, together with electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, enabled us to examine the time course of the degenerative changes that extended from the photoreceptors to the ganglion cells at the proximal end of the retina. Our study indicates that photoreceptors in FVB/N undergo a rapid degeneration within three postnatal weeks, and that there is a concomitant loss of retinal neurons in the inner nuclear layer. Although the loss of rods was detected at an earlier age during which time M- and S-opsin molecules were translocated to the cone nuclei; by 6 months all cones had also degenerated. Neuronal remodeling was also seen in the second-order neurons with horizontal cells sprouting processes proximally and dendritic retraction in rod-driven bipolar cells. Interestingly, the morphology of cone-driven bipolar cells were affected less by the disease process. The cellular structure of inner retinal neurons, i.e., ChAT amacrine cells, ganglion cells, and melanopsin-positive ganglion cells did not exhibit any gross changes of cell densities and appeared to be relatively unaffected by the massive photoreceptor degeneration in the distal retina. However, Muller cell processes began to express GFAP at their endfeet at p14, and it climbed progressively to the cell's distal ends by 6 months. Our study indicates that FVB/N mouse provides a useful model with which to assess possible intervention strategies to arrest photoreceptor death in related diseases. PMID:26091175

  14. Polyphenol-enriched cocoa protects the diabetic retina from glial reaction through the sirtuin pathway.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Diego A; Rosales, Mariana Ap B; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Silva, Kamila C; Amancio, Vitor Hugo O; Mendonça, Jacqueline N; Lopes, Norberto P; de Faria, José B Lopes; de Faria, Jacqueline M Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, which are potent antioxidants with established benefits for cardiovascular health but unproven effects on neurodegeneration. Sirtuins (SIRTs), which make up a family of deacetylases, are thought to be sensitive to oxidation. In this study, the possible protective effects of cocoa in the diabetic retina were assessed. Rat Müller cells (rMCs) exposed to normal or high glucose (HG) or H2O2 were submitted to cocoa treatment in the presence or absence of SIRT-1 inhibitor and small interfering RNA The experimental animal study was conducted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats randomized to receive low-, intermediate-, or high-polyphenol cocoa treatments via daily gavage for 16 weeks (i.e., 0.12, 2.9 or 22.9 mg/kg/day of polyphenols). The rMCs exposed to HG or H2O2 exhibited increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and acetyl-RelA/p65 and decreased SIRT1 activity/expression. These effects were cancelled out by cocoa, which decreased reactive oxygen species production and PARP-1 activity, augmented the intracellular pool of NAD(+), and improved SIRT1 activity. The rat diabetic retinas displayed the early markers of retinopathy accompanied by markedly impaired electroretinogram. The presence of diabetes activated PARP-1 and lowered NAD(+) levels, resulting in SIRT1 impairment. This augmented acetyl RelA/p65 had the effect of up-regulated GFAP. Oral administration of polyphenol cocoa restored the above alterations in a dose-dependent manner. This study reveals that cocoa enriched with polyphenol improves the retinal SIRT-1 pathway, thereby protecting the retina from diabetic milieu insult.

  15. The supply of metabolic substrate from glia to photoreceptors in the retina of the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Coles, J A; Van de Werve, G

    1987-01-01

    1. The drone retina is composed essentially of only two types of cells: a population of identical photoreceptor cells occupying 38% of the volume is embedded in a syncytium of glia (called outer pigment cells). Nearly all the mitochondria are in the photoreceptors. 2. A retinal slice consumes 18 microliter O2 (ml tissue)-1 min-1 in the dark for up to 6 h, even without exogenous substrate; in 6 h this would require the equivalent of 127 mM glucose in the photoreceptors or 8.7 mg glycogen (ml tissue)-1. 3. Freshly dissected retinas contain about 45 mg glycogen (ml tissue)-1, but this appears, from electron micrographs and from the PAS reaction, to be exclusively in the glia. After superfusion with substrate-free Ringer solution for 30 min, slices of retina contained less than 20 microM glucose. It therefore appears that to sustain respiration, carbohydrate substrate must be transferred from the glia to the photoreceptors. 4. Even after 6 h superfusion with substrate-free Ringer solution O2 consumption (QO2) was not increased by exogenous glucose, pyruvate, trehalose or lactate, nor decreased by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. QO2 was increased 2-3 fold by either light stimulation or (for at least 20 min) by 50 microM dinitrophenol. 5. QO2 was only slightly reduced when Na-dependent glucose transport was inhibited either by reduction of extracellular [Na+], or the presence of phlorizin. 6. It is suggested that drone retinal function does not require the uptake of glucose by the photoreceptors, but that the glia do take up glucose.

  16. Polyphenol-enriched cocoa protects the diabetic retina from glial reaction through the sirtuin pathway.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Diego A; Rosales, Mariana Ap B; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Silva, Kamila C; Amancio, Vitor Hugo O; Mendonça, Jacqueline N; Lopes, Norberto P; de Faria, José B Lopes; de Faria, Jacqueline M Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, which are potent antioxidants with established benefits for cardiovascular health but unproven effects on neurodegeneration. Sirtuins (SIRTs), which make up a family of deacetylases, are thought to be sensitive to oxidation. In this study, the possible protective effects of cocoa in the diabetic retina were assessed. Rat Müller cells (rMCs) exposed to normal or high glucose (HG) or H2O2 were submitted to cocoa treatment in the presence or absence of SIRT-1 inhibitor and small interfering RNA The experimental animal study was conducted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats randomized to receive low-, intermediate-, or high-polyphenol cocoa treatments via daily gavage for 16 weeks (i.e., 0.12, 2.9 or 22.9 mg/kg/day of polyphenols). The rMCs exposed to HG or H2O2 exhibited increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and acetyl-RelA/p65 and decreased SIRT1 activity/expression. These effects were cancelled out by cocoa, which decreased reactive oxygen species production and PARP-1 activity, augmented the intracellular pool of NAD(+), and improved SIRT1 activity. The rat diabetic retinas displayed the early markers of retinopathy accompanied by markedly impaired electroretinogram. The presence of diabetes activated PARP-1 and lowered NAD(+) levels, resulting in SIRT1 impairment. This augmented acetyl RelA/p65 had the effect of up-regulated GFAP. Oral administration of polyphenol cocoa restored the above alterations in a dose-dependent manner. This study reveals that cocoa enriched with polyphenol improves the retinal SIRT-1 pathway, thereby protecting the retina from diabetic milieu insult. PMID:25448608

  17. Identification of Radial Glia Progenitors in the Developing and Adult Retina of Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Farías, Nuria; Candal, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to transient progenitors termed neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and radial glial cells (RGCs). RGCs represent the major source of neurons, glia and adult stem cells in several regions of the central nervous system (CNS). RGCs are mostly transient in mammals, but they are widely maintained in the adult CNS of fishes, where they continue to be morphologically similar to RGCs in the mammalian brain and fulfill similar roles as progenitors and guide for migrating neurons. The retina of fishes offers an exceptional model to approach the study of adult neurogenesis because of the presence of constitutive proliferation from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), containing NECs, and from adult glial cells with radial morphology (the Müller glia). However, the cellular hierarchies and precise contribution of different types of progenitors to adult neurogenesis remain unsolved. We have analy