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Sample records for retina obtenidos con

  1. Retina

    MedlinePlus

    As light enters the eye, it strikes the receptor cells of the retina called the rods and cones. A chemical reaction results in the formation of electric impulses, which then travel to the brain through the optic nerve.

  2. Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pilli S, Nguyen DH, Park SS. The anatomy and cell biology of the retina. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Foundations of Clinical Ophthalmology . 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 1;chap 19. Coleman DJ, Silverman RH, Rondeau MJ, ...

  3. Angio-OCT de la zona avascular foveal en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina.

    PubMed

    Wons, Juliana; Pfau, Maximilian; Wirth, Magdalena A; Freiberg, Florentina J; Becker, Matthias D; Michels, Stephan

    2017-07-11

    Objetivo: El objetivo del estudio comprendía visualizar y cuantificar las alteraciones patológicas de la zona avascular foveal (ZAF) mediante angio-OCT en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina (OVR) en comparación con el ojo contralateral sano. Procedimientos: La angio-OCT se llevó a cabo mediante el sistema Avanti® RTVue 100 XR (Optovue Inc., Fremont, Calif., EE. UU.). Los bordes de la capa vascular superficial (CVS) se definieron como 3 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y 15 μm por debajo de la capa plexiforme interna y, para la capa vascular profunda (CVP), como 15 y 70 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y de la capa plexiforme interna, respectivamente. La longitud de la ZAF horizontal, vertical y máxima de la CVS y la CVP en cada ojo se midió de forma manual. Además, se midió el ángulo entre el diámetro máximo de la ZAF y el plano papilomacular. Resultados: La angio-OCT representó los defectos dentro de la vasculatura en el área perifoveal en ojos con oclusión de rama venosa de la retina (ORVR; n = 11) y con oclusión de la vena central de la retina (OVCR; n = 8). Esto resultó en un crecimiento del diámetro máximo de la ZAF en ojos con OVR (n = 19) en comparación con el ojo contralateral (n = 19; 921 ± 213 frente a 724 ± 145 µm; p = 0,008). Además, se observó una correlación significativa entre la mejor agudeza visual corregida (MAVC) y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF en la CVP (ρ de Spearman = -0,423, p < 0,01). Por último, en los ojos con OVR, el ángulo entre el plano papilomacular y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF se dio tan solo en el 21,05% (CVS) y en el 15,79% (CVP) de los casos a 0 ± 15 ó 90 ± 15°, respectivamente. En ojos sanos, estos ángulos (que supuestamente representan una configuración de la ZAF regular) fueron más prevalentes (CVS 68,42 frente a 21,05%, p = 0,003; CVP 73,68 frente a 15,79%, p < 0,001). Conclusiones: La angio-OCT muestra alteraciones morfológicas de la ZAF en ojos con

  4. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay [Albuquerque, NM; Hayat, Majeed M [Albuquerque, NM; Tyo, J Scott [Tucson, AZ; Jang, Woo-Yong [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  5. Cancers Affecting the Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ...

  6. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    MedlinePlus

    ... for RGC reprogramming is understanding the cues that direct their maturation and integration with other cells. The ... the retina. The report appears in Translational Vision Science and Technology. Learn more about the NEI AGI ...

  7. PIGMENTS OF THE RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George

    1936-01-01

    1. Visual purple from the sea robin, sea bass, and scup is almost identical spectroscopically with that from frogs. The interrelations of this pigment with vitamin A and retinene are also the same as in the frog. 2. In strong acids or at pH > 11, the visual yellow of sea robin retinas is converted irreversibly into a pH indicator, yellow in acid and almost colorless in alkaline solution. Unlike neutral visual yellow, the indicator is not removed to form either vitamin A or visual purple. In the ammoniacal retina the reversion of visual yellow itself to purple is accelerated. 3. The combined pigment epithelium and choroid layer in these fishes contain vitamin A, flavine, and an unidentified xanthophyll. PMID:19872983

  8. Drugs and the retina.

    PubMed

    Constable, Simon; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2004-05-01

    The retina is relatively protected from systemic drug administration because of the blood-retinal barrier, a highly selective mechanism adapted to providing a regulated homeostatic environment for this highly specialised tissue. However, a number of drugs have been associated with retinal toxicity. Vigabatrin, as an adjunctive therapy for the management of partial epilepsy, is associated with visual field defects in approximately 40% of patients. Hydroxychloroquine, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, is also associated with a retinopathy. In view of this, ophthalmological screening and monitoring is recommended during prescription of both of these drugs. In these cases, the retina is the site for an adverse drug reaction and the dose of therapy may be important in determining the likelihood of retinal toxicity. However, in the case of cytomegalovirus retinitis, the retina is the intended site for pharmacological action. The treatment of this condition with the antiviral agents ganciclovir, valganciclovir, foscarnet and cidofovir, can also be associated with significant systemic toxicity.

  9. The infrared retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-12-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher operating temperature. In this paper, we discuss how one needs to develop an increased functionality at the pixel level for these next generation FPAs. This functionality could manifest itself as spectral, polarization, phase or dynamic range signatures that could extract more information from a given scene. This leads to the concept of an infrared retina, which is an array that works similarly to the human eye that has a 'single' FPA but multiple cones, which are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that enable the perception of colour. These cones are then coupled with powerful signal processing techniques that allow us to process colour information from a scene, even with a limited basis of colour cones. Unlike present day multi or hyperspectral systems, which are bulky and expensive, the idea would be to build a poor man's 'infrared colour' camera. We use examples such as plasmonic tailoring of the resonance or bias dependent dynamic tuning based on quantum confined Stark effect or incorporation of avalanche gain to achieve embodiments of the infrared retina.

  10. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  11. Tunable retina encoders for retina implants: why and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmiller, Rolf; Neumann, Dirk; Baruth, Oliver

    2005-03-01

    Current research towards retina implants for partial restoration of vision in blind humans with retinal degenerative dysfunctions focuses on implant and stimulation experiments and technologies. In contrast, our approach takes the availability of an epiretinal multi-electrode neural interface for granted and studies the conditions for successful joint information processing of both retinal prosthesis and brain. Our proposed learning retina encoder (RE) includes information processing modules to simulate the complex mapping operation of parts of the 5-layered neural retina and to provide an iterative, perception-based dialog between RE and human subject. Alternative information processing technologies in the learning RE are being described, which allow an individual optimization of the RE mapping operation by means of iterative tuning with learning algorithms in a dialog between implant wearing subject and RE. The primate visual system is modeled by a retina module (RM) composed of spatio-temporal (ST) filters and a central visual system module (VM). RM performs a mapping 1 of an optical pattern P1 in the physical domain onto a retinal output vector R1(t) in a neural domain, whereas VM performs a mapping 2 of R1(t) in a neural domain onto a visual percept P2 in the perceptual domain. Retinal ganglion cell properties represent non-invertible ST filters in RE, which generate ambiguous output signals. VM generates visual percepts only if the corresponding R1(t) is properly encoded, contains sufficient information, and can be disambiguated. Based on the learning RE and the proposed visual system model, a novel retina encoder (RE*) is proposed, which considers both ambiguity removal and miniature eye movements during fixation. Our simulation results suggest that VM requires miniature eye movements under control of the visual system to retrieve unambiguous patterns P2 corresponding to P1. For retina implant applications, RE* can be tuned to generate optimal ganglion cell

  12. A hierarchical artificial retina architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Alice C.; Azar, Adi N.

    2009-05-01

    Connectivity in the human retina is complex. Over one hundred million photoreceptors transduce light into electrical signals. These electrical signals are sent to the ganglion cells through amacrine and bipolar cells. Lateral connections involving horizontal and amacrine cells span throughout the outer plexiform layer and inner plexiform layer respectively. Horizontal cells are important for photoreceptor regulation by depolarizing them after an illumination occurs. Horizontal cells themselves form an electrical network that communicates by gap junctions, and these cells exhibit plasticity (change in behavior and structure) with respect to glycine receptors. The bipolar and amacrine cells transfer electrical signals from photoreceptors to the ganglion cells. Furthermore, amacrine cells are responsible for further processing the retinal image. Finally, the ganglion cells receive electrical signals from the bipolar and amacrine cells and will spike at a faster rate if there is a change in the overall intensity for a group of photoreceptors, sending a signal to the brain. Dramatic progress is being made with respect to retinal prostheses, raising hope for an entire synthetic retina in the future. We propose a bio-inspired 3D hierarchical pyramidal architecture for a synthetic retina that mimics the overall structure of the human retina. We chose to use a 3D architecture to facilitate connectivity among retinal cells, maintaining a hierarchical structure similar to that of the biological retina. The first layer of the architecture contains electronic circuits that model photoreceptors and horizontal cells. The second layer contains amacrine and bipolar electronic cells, and the third layer contains ganglion cells. Layer I has the highest number of cells, and layer III has the lowest number of cells, resulting in a pyramidal architecture. In our proposed architecture we intend to use photodetectors to transduce light into electrical signals. We propose to employ

  13. MEMS technologies for artificial retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, Wilfried

    2010-02-01

    The mostly cause of blindness in the developed countries is a degeneration of the retina. For restoring this loss of vision one possible approach is the substitution of the lost functions by means of an electronic implant. This approach is based on MEMS technologies. It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yield visual sensations1. Therefore, an artificial retina for blind humans based on this concept seems to be feasible. Besides electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells also the direct electrical stimulation of the optic nerve2 and the visual cortex3 have been under investigation. This paper wants to give an overview about the activities on the retinal ganglion cell stimulation.

  14. A Computational Framework for Realistic Retina Modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Morillas, Christian; Pino, Begoña; Ros, Eduardo; Pelayo, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Computational simulations of the retina have led to valuable insights about the biophysics of its neuronal activity and processing principles. A great number of retina models have been proposed to reproduce the behavioral diversity of the different visual processing pathways. While many of these models share common computational stages, previous efforts have been more focused on fitting specific retina functions rather than generalizing them beyond a particular model. Here, we define a set of computational retinal microcircuits that can be used as basic building blocks for the modeling of different retina mechanisms. To validate the hypothesis that similar processing structures may be repeatedly found in different retina functions, we implemented a series of retina models simply by combining these computational retinal microcircuits. Accuracy of the retina models for capturing neural behavior was assessed by fitting published electrophysiological recordings that characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The retinal microcircuits are part of a new software platform for efficient computational retina modeling from single-cell to large-scale levels. It includes an interface with spiking neural networks that allows simulation of the spiking response of ganglion cells and integration with models of higher visual areas.

  15. Autoimmunity and the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A H; Addison, D J

    1983-01-01

    Structurally and therefore antigenically the retina is a complex tissue. Since it develops as an extension from the neural tube it shares with the brain several cell membranes and cytoplasm associated antigens including those present in neurofilaments of the various neurones and the glial filaments of the astrocytes. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has helped to dissect, in detail, the antigenic makeup of the retina. Nervous system antigens (NS-3, 4 and 7) are generously represented in the retina. At least in the chick eye there seems to be a concentration gradient of retinal antigens along a dorsoventral axis which is believed to provide means by which neurones of developing retinal signal and receive the positional information necessary for the formation of specific synapses. It now seems certain that organ-specific antigens are presented not only in the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium but also in the retinal ganglion cells and the astrocytes. Photoreceptor outer-segment contains soluble antigens which when injected in rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs or monkeys produce varying degrees of intraocular inflammation leading to uveitis, retinal detachment, photoreceptor degeneration and occasionally retinal vasculitis. Both cell-mediated and humoral immunity to photoreceptor antigen has been demonstrated in various types of uveitis (including toxoplasmosis and sarcoidosis), pars planitis, vitriitis, Behçets disease, sympathetic ophthalmitis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, birdshot retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal vasculitis. Retinal autoimmunity is also found in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, particularly after Argon laser photocoagulation. Antibodies to retinal antigens are also found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic immune disorders without ocular involvement. The precise pathogenetic role of retinal autoimmunity in eye disease is therefore uncertain. It may simply represent an

  16. Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H.; Bornfeld, N.; Vij, O.; Coupland, S.; Bechrakis, N.; Kellner, U.; Foerster, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina (VPTR) are benign tumours of unknown origin, occurring mostly in otherwise healthy patients. VPTR may be associated with other chorioretinal diseases, such as uveitis. The tumours, which histologically represent reactive gliovascular proliferations, are characterised by a pink to yellow appearance on funduscopy and are accompanied by exudative and haemorrhagic changes of the retina.
METHODS—22 cases of VPTR in 21 patients were examined with a follow up period between 1 month and 6 years. Ophthalmological changes associated with VPTR were intraretinal and subretinal exudations (n=18), exudative detachments of the surrounding sensory retina (n=13), intraretinal and subretinal haemorrhages (n=10), exudative changes within the macula (n=10), hyperpigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium at the border of the exudative retinal changes (n=9), and vitreous haemorrhages (n=4). Tumour biopsy was performed in two cases. Treatment consisted of plaque radiotherapy (n=14), plaque radiotherapy and cryotherapy (two), cryotherapy only (two), observation (three), and enucleation in one case of a blind and painful eye.
RESULTS—Regression of the tumour and the associated exudative changes could be observed in all treated cases. Visual acuity at last follow up improved two lines or more in two cases, remained within two lines of the initial visual acuity in 15 cases, and worsened in the remaining five. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens and the tumour of the enucleated eye showed massive capillary proliferation with perivascular spindle-shaped glial cells of retinal origin.
CONCLUSION—The correct diagnosis of VPTR is of importance as these lesions may lead to visual loss. Further, VPTR must be differentiated from angiomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease as well as from ocular and systemic malignancies. Regression of tumour thickness and associated retinal changes can be achieved with

  17. Enkephalin in the goldfish retina

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.Y.; Fry, K.R.; Lam, D.M.; Watt, C.B.

    1986-12-01

    Enkephalin-like immunoreactive amacrine cells were visualized using the highly sensitive avidin-biotin method. The somas of these cells were situated in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. Enkephalin-stained processes were observed in layers 1, 3, and 5 of the inner plexiform layer. The biosynthesis of sulfur-containing compounds in the goldfish retina was studied by means of a pulse-chase incubation with /sup 35/S-methionine. A /sup 35/S-labeled compound, which comigrated with authentic Met5-enkephalin on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was synthesized and was bound competitively by antibodies to enkephalin and by opiate receptors. This compound was tentatively identified as Met5-enkephalin. The newly synthesized /sup 35/S-Met5-enkephalin was released upon depolarization of the retina with a high K+ concentration. This K+-stimulated release was greatly suppressed by 5 mM Co/sup 2 +/, suggesting that the release was Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent. Using a double-label technique, enkephalin immunoreactivity and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake were colocalized to some amacrine cells, whereas others labeled only for enkephalin or GABA. The possible significance of enkephalin-GABA interactions is also discussed.

  18. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  19. [Ultrastructure of the retina in flunitrazepam anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Antal, M

    1980-10-01

    Ultrastructure of the retina under experimental flunitrazepam anaesthesia of 1 hour duration was studied. Alterations of neurons and glial cells were not revealed neither after cessation of anaesthesia, nor following 24 or 48 hours after it. These findings seem to indicate that flunitrazepam has no effect on the metabolism of the retina, thus its application in the ophtalmology is free of side effects.

  20. The Functional Architecture of the Retina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masland, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research related to the retina's coding of visual input with emphasis on the organization of two kinds of ganglion cell receptive fields. Reviews current techniques for examining the shapes and arrangement in the retina of entire populations of nerve cells. (ML)

  1. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-11-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand TH-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (TH-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. TH- or SVI-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that TH-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina.

  2. Quantum biology of the retina.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Luiten, André N; Stace, Thomas M; Wood, John Pm; Casson, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    The emerging field of quantum biology has led to a greater understanding of biological processes at the microscopic level. There is recent evidence to suggest that non-trivial quantum features such as entanglement, tunnelling and coherence have evolved in living systems. These quantum features are particularly evident in supersensitive light-harvesting systems such as in photosynthesis and photoreceptors. A biomimetic strategy utilizing biological quantum phenomena might allow new advances in the field of quantum engineering, particularly in quantum information systems. In addition, a better understanding of quantum biological features may lead to novel medical diagnostic and therapeutic developments. In the present review, we discuss the role of quantum physics in biological systems with an emphasis on the retina.

  3. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    SciTech Connect

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin.

  4. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid.

  5. Color sensitive retina based on bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, M; Silfsten, P; Parkkinen, S; Parkkinen, J; Jaaskelainen, T

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a membrane protein of a microorganism Halobacterium salinarium has been studied since the 80's as a potential material for information technology. The information processing applications of BR employ either photochromic or photoelectric properties of the protein. In this study we discuss about design principles and describe our study of the use of bacteriorhodopsin as a sensor material for a color sensitive artificial retina. This retina includes low-level processing of input information. The design of a color sensitive matrix element, the self-organizing color adaptation algorithm and a system model for the retina are presented.

  6. Complex computation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  7. Distribution of caveolin isoforms in the lemur retina

    PubMed Central

    Berta, Ágnes I; Kiss, Anna L; Lukáts, Ákos; Szabó, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of caveolin isoforms was previously evaluated in the retinas of different species, but has not yet been described in the primate retina. In this study, the distribution of caveolins was assessed via immunochemistry using isoform-specific antibodies in the retina of the black-and-white ruffed lemur. Here, we report the presence of a variety of caveolin isoforms in many layers of the lemur retina. As normal human retinas were not available for research and the retinas of primates are fairly similar to those of humans, the lemur retina can be utilized as a model for caveolin distribution in normal humans. PMID:17679778

  8. Distribution of caveolin isoforms in the lemur retina.

    PubMed

    Berta, Agnes I; Kiss, Anna L; Lukáts, Akos; Szabó, Arnold; Szél, Agoston

    2007-09-01

    The distribution of caveolin isoforms was previously evaluated in the retinas of different species, but has not yet been described in the primate retina. In this study, the distribution of caveolins was assessed via immunochemistry using isoform-specific antibodies in the retina of the black-and-white ruffed lemur. Here, we report the presence of a variety of caveolin isoforms in many layers of the lemur retina. As normal human retinas were not available for research and the retinas of primates are fairly similar to those of humans, the lemur retina can be utilized as a model for caveolin distribution in normal humans.

  9. Imaging Single Cells in the Living Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A quarter century ago, we were limited to a macroscopic view of the retina inside the living eye. Since then, new imaging technologies, including confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and adaptive optics fundus imaging, transformed the eye into a microscope in which individual cells can now be resolved noninvasively. These technologies have enabled a wide range of studies of the retina that were previously impossible. PMID:21596053

  10. Learning retina implants with epiretinal contacts.

    PubMed

    Eckmiller, R

    1997-01-01

    Retina implants are currently being developed by several interdisciplinary research consortia worldwide for blind humans with various retinal degenerative diseases. It is the aim of our retina implant project to develop a novel type of visual prosthesis to regain a moderate amount of vision such as perception of location and shape of large objects in the first stage and to approach reading quality in a subsequent stage. In our planned retina implant, a retina encoder (RE) outside the eye has to replace the information processing of the retina. A retina stimulator (RS), implanted adjacently to the retinal ganglion cell layer, has to contact a sufficient number of retinal ganglion cells/fibers for electrical elicitation of spikes. A wireless signal and energy transmission system has to provide the communication between the RE and RS. This paper outlines the retina implant project of our consortium of 14 expert groups and describes first results of the learning RE. The RE approximates the typical receptive field (RF) properties of primate retinal ganglion cells by means of individually tunable spatiotemporal RF filters. The RE as a cluster of RF filters maps visual patterns onto spike trains for a number of contacted ganglion cells. A concept is presented to train the individual RF filters in an unsupervised learning process, which employs neural networks in a dialog with the individual human subject. The desired aim of this dialog is an optimization of the visual perception by matching the various RF filter properties with those 'expected' by the central visual system for each contacted ganglion cell.

  11. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  12. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Muir, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its application to image anatomy, physiology, and function in the retina of animals. It describes technical issues and solutions in performing retinal MRI, anatomical MRI, blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI), and blood-flow MRI both of normal retinas and of retinal degeneration. MRI offers unique advantages over existing retinal imaging techniques, including the ability to image multiple layers without depth limitation and to provide multiple clinically relevant data in a single setting. Retinal MRI has the potential to complement existing retinal imaging techniques. PMID:19763752

  14. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  15. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed.

  16. The neurovascular retina in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Anne B; Hansen, Ronald M; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D

    2009-11-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP.

  17. Ultraviolet colour opponency in the turtle retina.

    PubMed

    Ventura, D F; Zana, Y; de Souza, J M; DeVoe, R D

    2001-07-01

    We have examined the functional architecture of the turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans retina with respect to colour processing, extending spectral stimulation into the ultraviolet, which has not been studied previously in the inner retina. We addressed two questions. (i) Is it possible to deduce the ultraviolet cone spectral sensitivity function through horizontal cell responses? (ii) Is there evidence for tetrachromatic neural mechanisms, i.e. UV/S response opponency? Using a constant response methodology we have isolated the ultraviolet cone input into the S/LM horizontal cell type and described it in fine detail. Monophasic (luminosity), biphasic L/M (red-green) and triphasic S/LM (yellow-blue) horizontal cells responded strongly to ultraviolet light. The blue-adapted spectral sensitivity function of a S/LM cell peaked in the ultraviolet and could be fitted to a porphyropsin cone template with a peak at 372 nm. In the inner retina eight different combinations of spectral opponency were found in the centre of the receptive field of ganglion cells. Among amacrine cells the only types found were UVSM-L+ and its reverse. One amacrine and four ganglion cells were also opponent in the receptive field surround. UV/S opponency, seen in three different types of ganglion cell, provides a neural basis for discrimination of ultraviolet colours. In conclusion, the results strongly suggest that there is an ultraviolet channel and a neural basis for tetrachromacy in the turtle retina.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Duong, Timothy Q; Ngan, Shing-Chung; Ugurbil, Kamil; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2002-04-01

    This study explored the feasibility of mapping the retina's responses to visual stimuli noninvasively, by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was performed on a 9.4-Tesla scanner to map activity-evoked signal changes of the retina-choroid complex associated with visual stimulation in anesthetized cats (n = 6). Three to 12 1-mm slices were acquired in a single shot using inversion-recovery, echo-planar imaging with a nominal in-plane resolution of 468 x 468 microm(2). Visual stimuli were presented to the full visual field and to the upper and lower visual fields. The stimuli were drifting or stationary gratings, which were compared with the dark condition. Activation maps were computed using cross-correlation analysis and overlaid on anatomic images. Multislice activation maps were reconstructed and flattened onto a two-dimensional surface. fMRI activation maps showed robust increased activity in the retina-choroid complex after visual stimulation. The average stimulus-evoked fMRI signal increase associated with drifting-grating stimulus was 1.7% +/- 0.5% (P < 10(-4), n = 6) compared with dark. Multislice functional images of the retina flattened onto a two-dimensional surface showed relatively uniform activation. No statistically significant activation was observed in and around the optic nerve head. Hemifield stimulation studies demonstrated that stimuli presented to the upper half of the visual field activated the lower part of the retina, and stimuli presented to the lower half of the visual field activated the upper part of the retina, as expected. Signal changes evoked by the stationary gratings compared with the dark basal condition were positive but were approximately half that evoked by the drifting gratings (1.0% +/- 0.1% versus 2.1% +/- 0.3%, P < 10(-4)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study of the retina, demonstrating its feasibility in imaging retinal function dynamically in a noninvasive manner and at

  19. Abundancias químicas de estrellas de Mercurio-Manganeso obtenidas con espectros EBASIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintado, O. I.; Adelman, S. J.

    Se determinan las abundancias químicas de estrellas de HgMn usando espectros obtenidos con EBASIM en CASLEO en un rango de longitud de onda comprendido entre los 400 y 890 nm. Los valores iniciales de temperatura efectiva y gravedad superficial se calculan con la fotometría uvbyβ. Las abundancias se calculan usando WIDTH9 y SYNTHE. Los resultados se comparan análisis realizados por los autores usando espectros obtenidos con el espectrógrado REOSC del CASLEO, el espectrógrafo echelle del Telescopio Anglo-Australiano y el espectrógrafo Coudé del Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.

  20. Amino acid immunoreactivity in normal human retina and after brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Clairton F; Acosta, Monica L; Polkinghorne, Philip J; McGhee, Charles N J; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2013-09-01

    We localised amino acids in the mid-peripheral aged human retina and a retina that had undergone radiation treatment 10 years earlier. The distribution pattern of glutamate, γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), glycine, glutamine and taurine, reflected patterns established in the primate retina. The retina that had undergone radiation exposure displayed both anatomical and neurochemical remodelling. The proximal retina comprised around 40 to 45 per cent of the total retina and neuronal kinesis and aberrant neuronal projections were also present. Amino acid neurochemistry was strikingly different with Müller cells displaying GABA loading, glycinergic neurons displaced and displaying a very high level of glycine labelling. We conclude that radiation exposure triggered these changes in the human retina and likely reflects general remodelling of structure and function following ischaemic damage to endothelial cells.

  1. Microscopic and biochemical characterization of lectin binding sites in the cephalopod retina.

    PubMed

    Taba, A; Quezada, B H; Robles, L J

    1989-05-22

    Using light and electron microscope cytochemistry and lectin blotting techniques, we have shown that the lectins concanavalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bind to specific glycoconjugants in the adult cephalopod retina. For light microscope lectin cytochemistry, aldehyde-fixed, frozen, or Araldite-embedded, etched sections of cephalopod retinas were incubated with FITC- or TRITC-conjugated lectins and examined by using epifluorescence microscopy. Con A labeled structures in the entire retina including the inner limiting membrane (ILM), rhabdomeric membranes, interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM), and structures in the photoreceptor inner segments. RCA labeling was similar to that of Con A except that there was a decrease in the staining of the rhabdom tips near the ILM. PNA labeled only the interphotoreceptor matrix between apposing rhabdomeres. The intensity of staining of the IPM by PNA also decreased or was absent toward the rhabdom tips. None of the lectins labeled the myeloid bodies located in the photoreceptor inner segments. Electron microscope (EM) lectin cytochemistry was performed on aldehyde-fixed, LR White-embedded tissue or on Araldite-embedded, periodate-etched sections by using gold-conjugated lectins. EM results confirmed the observations made by light microscopy. Lectin blots with a retinal extract or light-sensitive membrane fraction revealed a variety of protein bands labeled by all three lectins. Con A and RCA labeled opsin and its aggregates whereas PNA did not. None of the lectins labeled retinochrome. The labeling of the cephalopod IPM by PNA suggests a structural similarity between the IPM of vertebrates and invertebrates. In other studies, we have demonstrated the presence of a retinoid binding protein in the IPM of cephalopods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  3. Spectral mechanisms in the tree squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Blakeslee, B; Jacobs, G H; Neitz, J

    1988-04-01

    The retina of the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) contains rods and cones in a ratio of about 2:3. The spectral mechanisms in this retina were examined in behavioral and electrophysiological experiments. Tests of color vision revealed that this animal has a spectral neutral point at about 500 nm and, thus, dichromatic color vision. Recordings made from single optic nerve fibers and results obtained from an analysis of the flicker photometric electroretinogram (ERG) indicated that vision in the gray squirrel is based on three spectral mechanisms. One of these, presumably rod-based, has peak sensitivity at about 502 nm. The other two mechanisms reflect the presence of two classes of cone having average peak sensitivity of about 444 nm and 543 nm.

  4. Optical coherence tomography findings in commotio retina.

    PubMed

    Sony, Parul; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Gadaginamath, Shailesh; Garg, Sat Pal

    2006-08-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented with diminished visual acuity of 6/60 following blunt trauma to his right eye with a cricket ball. Fundus examination showed commotio retinae. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated increased reflectivity with small optically clear spaces in the area corresponding to the photoreceptor outer segment. At 2-month follow up the visual acuity improved to 6/6. A small area of retinal opacification persisted nasally, and OCT of the corresponding area continued to show increased reflectivity in the area of photoreceptor outer segment. Increased reflectivity on OCT in eyes with commotio retinae probably denotes photoreceptor outer segment disruption and seems to be reversible to a variable extent.

  5. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-10

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  6. The avian egg and the retina

    PubMed Central

    MALCOLM, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for study of blood flow has been derived from the avian egg, utilizing the theories of crystallography and photosynthesis. The model is employed to explain the form of the eye and the function of the cells of the human retina, with special reference to colour vision and the pathology of migraine. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4736600

  7. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Patrick; Flamant, Frédéric; Godement, Pierre; Glösmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a crucial regulator of gene expression in the developing and adult retina. Here we sought to map sites of thyroid hormone signaling at the cellular level using the transgenic FINDT3 reporter mouse model in which neurons express β-galactosidase (β-gal) under the control of a hybrid Gal4-TRα receptor when triiodothyronine (T3) and cofactors of thyroid receptor signaling are present. In the adult retina, nearly all neurons of the ganglion cell layer (GCL, ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells) showed strong β-gal labeling. In the inner nuclear layer (INL), a minority of glycineric and GABAergic amacrine cells showed β-gal labeling, whereas the majority of amacrine cells were unlabeled. At the level of amacrine types, β-gal labeling was found in a large proportion of the glycinergic AII amacrines, but only in a small proportion of the cholinergic/GABAergic ‘starburst’ amacrines. At postnatal day 10, there also was a high density of strongly β-gal-labeled neurons in the GCL, but only few amacrine cells were labeled in the INL. There was no labeling of bipolar cells, horizontal cells and Müller glia cells at both stages. Most surprisingly, the photoreceptor somata in the outer nuclear layer also showed no β-gal label, although thyroid hormone is known to control cone opsin expression. This is the first record of thyroid hormone signaling in the inner retina of an adult mammal. We hypothesize that T3 levels in photoreceptors are below the detection threshold of the reporter system. The topographical distribution of β-gal-positive cells in the GCL follows the overall neuron distribution in that layer, with more T3-signaling cells in the ventral than the dorsal half-retina. PMID:27942035

  8. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Mammalian Retina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    1983) Neuronal subpopulations in cat retina which accumulate the GABA agonist , ( H)muscimol: A combined Golgi and autoradiographic study, J. Comp...chromatography.Preliminary findings indicate that acetylcholine produces no significant changes in the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid or taurine but causes a...gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, and taurine . Concentrations of ACh less than 1 mmol were ineffective in 6 causing amino acid release. After exposure

  9. TRPM3 expression in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Brown, R Lane; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Peters, James H; Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Strycharska-Orczyk, Iwona; Reed, Brian T; Morgans, Catherine W; Duvoisin, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3(-/-) mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS), stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1(‑/‑) mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice.

  10. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  11. Three-dimensional printing of the retina.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R

    2016-05-01

    Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing.

  12. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  13. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  14. Nitric oxide synthase in tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Kurenni, D E; Thurlow, G A; Turner, R W; Moroz, L L; Sharkey, K A; Barnes, S

    1995-10-23

    Previous studies have indicated that nitric oxide, a labile freely diffusible biological messenger synthesized by nitric oxide synthase, may modulate light transduction and signal transmission in the retina. In the present work, the large size of retinal cells in tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) allowed the utilization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry to delineate the cell-specific intracellular localization of nitric oxide synthase. NADPH-diaphorase activity was highly concentrated in the outer retina, in rod and cone inner segment ellipsoids, and between and adjacent to the photoreceptor cell bodies in the outer nuclear layer. Examination of enzymatically isolated retinal cells indicated that outer nuclear layer NADPH-diaphorase activity was localized to the distal processes of the retinal glial (Müller) cells and to putative bipolar cell Landolt clubs. Less intense NADPH-diaphorase activity was seen in the photoreceptor inner segment myoid region, in a small number of inner nuclear layer cells, in cap-like configurations at the distal poles of cells in the ganglion cell layer and surrounding ganglion cell layer somata, and in punctate form within both plexiform layers, the pigment epithelium, and the optic nerve. Nitric oxide synthase-like immunoreactivity was similarly localized, but was also concentrated along a thin sublamina centered within the inner plexiform layer. The potential for nitric oxide generation at multiple retinal sites suggests that this molecule may play a number of roles in the processing of visual information in the retina.

  15. Connecting the Retina to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Eloisa

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is beautifully crafted to transmit information of the external world to visual processing and cognitive centers in the brain. For visual information to be relayed to the brain, a series of axon pathfinding events must take place to ensure that the axons of retinal ganglion cells, the only neuronal cell type in the retina that sends axons out of the retina, find their way out of the eye to connect with targets in the brain. In the past few decades, the power of molecular and genetic tools, including the generation of genetically manipulated mouse lines, have multiplied our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in the sculpting of the visual system. Here, we review major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the differentiation of RGCs, guidance of their axons from the retina to the primary visual centers, and the refinement processes essential for the establishment of topographic maps and eye-specific axon segregation. Human disorders, such as albinism and achiasmia, that impair RGC axon growth and guidance and, thus, the establishment of a fully functioning visual system will also be discussed. PMID:25504540

  16. The neural retina in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ronald M; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D; Fulton, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a neurovascular disease that affects prematurely born infants and is known to have significant long term effects on vision. We conducted the studies described herein not only to learn more about vision but also about the pathogenesis of ROP. The coincidence of ROP onset and rapid developmental elongation of the rod photoreceptor outer segments motivated us to consider the role of the rods in this disease. We used noninvasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and retinal imaging procedures to study the function and structure of the neurosensory retina. Rod photoreceptor and post-receptor responses are significantly altered years after the preterm days during which ROP is an active disease. The alterations include persistent rod dysfunction, and evidence of compensatory remodeling of the post-receptor retina is found in ERG responses to full-field stimuli and in psychophysical thresholds that probe small retinal regions. In the central retina, both Mild and Severe ROP delay maturation of parafoveal scotopic thresholds and are associated with attenuation of cone mediated multifocal ERG responses, significant thickening of post-receptor retinal laminae, and dysmorphic cone photoreceptors. These results have implications for vision and control of eye growth and refractive development and suggest future research directions. These results also lead to a proposal for noninvasive management using light that may add to the currently invasive therapeutic armamentarium against ROP.

  17. Bipolar cells of the ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Puller, Christian; Ondreka, Katharina; Haverkamp, Silke

    2011-03-01

    Parallel processing of an image projected onto the retina starts at the first synapse, the cone pedicle, and each cone feeds its light signal into a minimum of eight different bipolar cell types. Hence, the morphological classification of bipolar cells is a prerequisite for analyzing retinal circuitry. Here we applied common bipolar cell markers to the cone-dominated ground squirrel retina, studied the labeling by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and compared the resulting bipolar cell types with those of the mouse (rod dominated) and primate retina. Eight different cone bipolar cell types (three OFF and five ON) and one rod bipolar cell were distinguished. The major criteria for classifying the cells were their immunocytochemical identity, their dendritic branching pattern, and the shape and stratification level of their axons in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Immunostaining with antibodies against Gγ13, a marker for ON bipolar cells, made it possible to separate OFF and ON bipolars. Recoverin-positive OFF bipolar cells partly overlapped with ON bipolar axon terminals at the ON/OFF border of the IPL. Antibodies against HCN4 labeled the S-cone selective (bb) bipolar cell. The calcium-binding protein CaB5 was expressed in two OFF and two ON cone bipolar cell types, and CD15 labeled a widefield ON cone bipolar cell comparable to the DB6 in primate. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Fgf19 is required for zebrafish lens and retina development.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Ayumi; Nakagawa, Yu; Mido, Tomotaka; Yoshikawa, Maya; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-15

    Fgf signaling plays crucial roles in morphogenesis. Fgf19 is required for zebrafish forebrain development. Here, we examined the roles of Fgf19 in the formation of the lens and retina in zebrafish. Knockdown of Fgf19 caused a size reduction of the lens and the retina, failure of closure of the choroids fissure, and a progressive expansion of the retinal tissue to the midline of the forebrain. Fgf19 expressed in the nasal retina and lens was involved in cell survival but not cell proliferation during embryonic lens and retina development. Fgf19 was essential for the differentiation of lens fiber cells in the lens but not for the neuronal differentiation and lamination in the retina. Loss of nasal fate in the retina caused by the knockdown of Fgf19, expansion of nasal fate in the retina caused by the overexpression of Fgf19 and eye transplantation indicated that Fgf19 in the retina was crucial for the nasal-temporal patterning of the retina that is critical for the guidance of retinal ganglion cell axons. Knockdown of Fgf19 also caused incorrect axon pathfinding. The present findings indicate that Fgf19 positively regulates the patterning and growth of the retina, and the differentiation and growth of the lens in zebrafish.

  19. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation.

  20. Person identification using fractal analysis of retina images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, Constantin; Corniencu, Felicia

    2004-10-01

    Biometric is automated method of recognizing a person based on physiological or behavior characteristics. Among the features measured are retina scan, voice, and fingerprint. A retina-based biometric involves the analysis of the blood vessels situated at the back of the eye. In this paper we present a method, which uses the fractal analysis to characterize the retina images. The Fractal Dimension (FD) of retina vessels was measured for a number of 20 images and have been obtained different values of FD for each image. This algorithm provides a good accuracy is cheap and easy to implement.

  1. [In vitro organotypic cultivation of adult newt and rat retinas].

    PubMed

    Novikova, Iu P; Aleĭnikova, K S; Krasnov, M S; Poplinskaia, V A; Grigorian, E N

    2010-01-01

    Adult rat and newt retinas were studied during long organotypic 3D cultivation. A high proliferation level was discovered in the region of growth by applying DNA synthesis markers and in vitro mitosis registration in newt retina. Aggregates were formed in the retina spheroid cavity because dedifferentiated cells migrated into this region. Small cell populations in nuclear layers also had dividing and migration capacity. Rosette formation has been shown in newt retina. It is a characteristic of fetal retinal development under pathological conditions. The antiG FAP antibody dye demonstrated an increase in the parent M@uller cell population and generation of a small cell pool with short GFAP-extensions de novo. Recoverin expression studies detected its translocation from photoreceptor extensions to the cell bodies. Moreover, protein was presented in some cells inside the spheroid. It has been shown for the first time that cell proliferation occurred in the developing adult rat retinal spheroid in vitro; BrdU-positive cells and multiple mitoses were revealed in this zone. However, the source of proliferation was not in the peripheral retina, and stable macrophages and glial cells located among neurons of the inner nuclear layer had the ability to divide. The antiGFAP antibody showed an increase in GFAP fibers in the rat retina as well as in the newt retina. Recoverin translocated into photoreceptor perikaryons and the outer plexiform layer in cultivated rat retina. Interestingly, some cells with probably de novo expression of recoverin were discovered in rat and newt retinas.

  2. Architecture of cannabinoid signaling in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Arnold, Andy; Hutchens, Jacqueline M.; Radicke, Josh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Wager-Miller, Jim; Mackie, Ken; Straiker, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands constitute an endogenous signaling system that is found throughout the body, including the eye. This system can be activated by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major drug of abuse. Cannabinoids offer considerable therapeutic potential in modulating ocular immune and inflammatory responses and in regulating intraocular pressure. The location of cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1) in the retina is known, but recently a constellation of proteins has been identified that produce and break down endocannabinoids (eCBs) and modulate CB1 function. Localization of these proteins is critical to defining specific cannabinoid signaling circuitry in the retina. Here we show the localization of diacylglycerol lipase α and β (DGLα/β), implicated in the production of the eCB 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG); monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) and α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6), both implicated in the breakdown of 2-AG; cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a), a protein that may modulate CB1 function; Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) which have been shown to break down the eCB anandamide and related acyl amides. In our most prominent finding, DGLα is present in post-synaptic Type 1 OFF cone bipolar cells juxtaposed to CB1-containing cone photoreceptor terminals. Interestingly, CRIP1a is reliably presynaptic to DGLα, consistent with a possible role in cannabinoid signaling, NAAA is restricted to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), while DGLβ is limited to retinal blood vessels. These results taken together with previous anatomic and functional studies define specific cannabinoid circuitry likely to modulate eCB signaling at the first synapse of the retina as well as in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). PMID:20653038

  3. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  4. Parallel visual cycles in the zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Fleisch, Valerie C; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2010-11-01

    Vertebrate vision necessitates continuous recycling of the chromophore 11-cis retinal (RAL). The classical (or canonical) visual cycle employs a number of enzymes located in the photoreceptor outer segment and RPE (retinal pigment epithelium) of the retina to regenerate 11-cis RAL from all-trans RAL. Cone-dominant species are believed to utilize a second, intra-retinal, pathway for 11-cis RAL generation, involving retinal Müller glia cells. This review summarizes the efforts made in zebrafish to gain a better understanding of the role of these two visual cycles for rod and cone photoreceptor chromophore recycling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    This dissertation presents recent progress in several areas related to modeling laser damage to the retina. In Chapter 3, we consider the consequences of using the Arrhenius damage model to predict the damage thresholds of multiple pulse, or repetitive pulse, exposures. We have identified a few fundamental trends associated with the multiple pulse damage predictions made by the Arrhenius model. These trends differ from what would be expected by non-thermal mechanisms, and could prove useful in differentiating thermal and non-thermal damage. Chapter 4 presents a new rate equation damage model hypothesized to describe photochemical damage. The model adds a temperature dependent term to the simple rate equation implied by the principle of reciprocity that is characteristic of photochemical damage thresholds. A recent damage threshold study, conducted in-vitro, has revealed a very sharp transition between thermal and photochemical damage threshold trends. For the wavelength used in the experiment (413 nm), thermal damage thresholds were observed at exposure levels that were twice the expected photochemical damage threshold, based on the traditional understanding of photochemical damage. Our model accounts for this observed trend by introducing a temperature dependent quenching, or repair, rate to the photochemical damage rate. For long exposures that give a very small temperature rise, the model reduces to the principle of reciprocity. Near the transition region between thermal and photochemical damage, the model allows the damage threshold to be set by thermal mechanisms, even at exposure above the reciprocity exposure. In Chapter 5, we describe a retina damage model that includes thermal lensing in the eye by coupling beam propagation and heat transfer models together. Thermal lensing has recently been suggested as a contributing factor to the large increase in measured retinal damage thresholds in the near infrared. The transmission of the vitreous decreases

  6. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Mammalian Retina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-30

    I -AI ~M COINIRGIC NEUROTRAISHISSION lIN THdE INUIALIAN RETINA 1/ I (U) MAYNE STATE UdIV DETROIT DEPT OF ANATONY R G POURCHO 28 NOV 85 DAND17-82-C...this report, the investigator adhered to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals ," prepared by the Committee on Care and Use of...Laboratory Animals of the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, National Research Council (DHEW Publication No. (NIH) 78-23, Revised 1978). Citations of

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Lutein in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yoko; Sasaki, Mariko; Takahashi, Noriko; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Miyake, Seiji; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Although a large variety of pharmaceutical therapies for treating disease have been developed in recent years, there has been little progress in disease prevention. In particular, the protection of neural tissue is essential, because it is hardly regenerated. The use of nutraceuticals for maintaining the health has been supported by several clinical studies, including cross-sectional and interventional studies for age-related macular disease. However, mechanistic evidence for their effects at the molecular level has been very limited. In this review, we focus on lutein, which is a xanthophyll type of carotenoid. Lutein is not synthesized in mammals, and must be obtained from the diet. It is delivered to the retina, and in humans, it is concentrated in the macula. Here, we describe the neuroprotective effects of lutein and their underlying molecular mechanisms in animal models of vision-threatening diseases, such as innate retinal inflammation, diabetic retinopathy, and light-induced retinal degeneration. In lutein-treated mouse ocular disease models, oxidative stress in the retina is reduced, and its downstream pathological signals are inhibited. Furthermore, degradation of the functional proteins, rhodopsin (a visual substance) and synaptophysin (a synaptic vesicle protein also influenced in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease), the depletion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and DNA damage are prevented by lutein, which preserves visual function. We discuss the possibility of using lutein, an antioxidant, as a neuroprotective treatment for humans. PMID:22211688

  8. Pigment Deposition in the Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Hojman, Anne S; Otzen, Louise W D; Schrøder-Hansen, Lise Maj; Wegener, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Incidental findings in the rat eye are not uncommon in acute and long-term toxicological studies. These findings can be associated with a number of causes unrelated to treatment with the test article, including congenital malformation, trauma, infection, metabolic disease, genetic predisposition, and age-related changes. The occurrence of pigment deposition in the retina of Wistar Hannover (Crl:WI (Han)) rats in a 4-week toxicity study is reported in this communication. The microscopic examination of the eyes in the 4-week toxicity study revealed focal yellow-brown pigment deposits in the retina, mainly located in the ganglion cell layer. The retinal pigment deposits were randomly distributed in the control and treated groups and were considered incidental. The deposits were clearly positive for ferric iron in the Perls' stain but not for lipofuscin by the Schmorl's and Long Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The iron-containing pigment is likely to represent hemosiderin accumulation after retinal micro-hemorrhage or could be indicative of the normal intraretinal iron transport and turnover.

  9. Retina projection using curved lens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hao-Ren; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-channel imaging system which combines the principles of an insect's compound eye and optical cluster eye. The system consists of two curved structure lens arrays with different pitches. Both of them have the same curvature and the radiuses of the lenses in the arrays are optimized to focus rays on the retina. The optical axes of different channels are tilted to each other in order to reduce the optical system volume and transmit a wide field of view. Each channel of an array of multiple optical system transfers only a part of the field of view. Each partial image passes through each channel and stitches together on the retina to reconstruct a complete image. In order to simulate the image stitching, we also build an eye model. The thickness from the panel to the last surface of lens group is less than 25mm. The panel size is designed to be 4 inch which is the scale of eyeglass. The system can provide a large field of view about 150 degrees which is much wider than the commercial products. By using the 3D printer, we can make a model of lens array to achieve our design.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of lutein in the retina.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Yoko; Sasaki, Mariko; Takahashi, Noriko; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Miyake, Seiji; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Although a large variety of pharmaceutical therapies for treating disease have been developed in recent years, there has been little progress in disease prevention. In particular, the protection of neural tissue is essential, because it is hardly regenerated. The use of nutraceuticals for maintaining the health has been supported by several clinical studies, including cross-sectional and interventional studies for age-related macular disease. However, mechanistic evidence for their effects at the molecular level has been very limited. In this review, we focus on lutein, which is a xanthophyll type of carotenoid. Lutein is not synthesized in mammals, and must be obtained from the diet. It is delivered to the retina, and in humans, it is concentrated in the macula. Here, we describe the neuroprotective effects of lutein and their underlying molecular mechanisms in animal models of vision-threatening diseases, such as innate retinal inflammation, diabetic retinopathy, and light-induced retinal degeneration. In lutein-treated mouse ocular disease models, oxidative stress in the retina is reduced, and its downstream pathological signals are inhibited. Furthermore, degradation of the functional proteins, rhodopsin (a visual substance) and synaptophysin (a synaptic vesicle protein also influenced in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease), the depletion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and DNA damage are prevented by lutein, which preserves visual function. We discuss the possibility of using lutein, an antioxidant, as a neuroprotective treatment for humans.

  11. The microglia in healthy and diseased retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Eter, Nicole; Heiduschka, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system and, also the retina. They fulfil several tasks of surveillance in the healthy retina. In case of an injury or disease, microglia become activated and tries to repair the damage. However, in a lot of cases it does not work, and microglia deteriorate the situation by releasing toxic and pro-inflammatory compounds. Moreover, they further promote degenerative processes by attacking and phagocytosing damaged neurones and photoreceptors that otherwise would possibly have the chance to survive. Such deleterious action of the microglia has been observed in degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptors, and it takes place in hereditary diseases, infections as well as in case of traumatic or light injuries. Therefore, a number of attempts has been undertaken so far to inhibit the microglia, with varying success. The task remains to study behaviour of the microglia and their interaction with other retinal cell populations in more detail with respect to released factors and expressed receptors including the time points of the corresponding events. The goal has to be to find a better balance between helpful and detrimental actions of the microglia.

  12. Pharmacological study of direction selectivity in the archer fish retina.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Ehud; Donchin, Opher; Segev, Ronen

    2015-09-18

    Direction selective cells have been found in the retina, the first level of the visual system, in mammals and recently also in the archer fish. These cells are involved in a variety of fast neural computation processes, from the control of eye movements to the detection of prey by the archer fish. The standard model for this mechanism in mammalian retina is well understood and is based on the asymmetry of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the retinal ganglion cells. However, it remains unclear whether the mechanism that underlies direction selectivity is similar across animal classes. This study reports a pharmacological investigation designed to elucidate the mechanism that underlies motion detection in the archer fish retina. Direction selectivity in the retina was characterized under the influence of specific channel blockers that are known to be present in the different types of neurons of the retina. The results show that the direction-selective mechanism in the archer fish retina is modified only when the inhibitory channels of GABA and Glycine are manipulated. This suggests that the mechanism of direction selectivity in the archer fish retina is fundamentally different from the mechanism of direction selectivity in the mammalian retina.

  13. Glucose, Lactate, and Shuttling of Metabolites in Vertebrate Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, James B.; Lindsay, Kenneth J.; Du, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has specific functions and structures that give it a unique set of constraints on the way in which it can produce and use metabolic energy. The retina’s response to illumination influences its energy requirements, and the retina’s laminated structure influences the extent to which neurons and glia can access metabolic fuels. There are fundamental differences between energy metabolism in retina and that in brain. The retina relies on aerobic glycolysis much more than the brain does, and morphological differences between retina and brain limit the types of metabolic relationships that are possible between neurons and glia. This Mini-Review summarizes the unique metabolic features of the retina with a focus on the role of lactate shuttling. PMID:25801286

  14. Probing Metabolism in the Intact Retina Using Stable Isotope Tracers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Linton, Jonathan D; Hurley, James B

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate retinas have several characteristics that make them particularly interesting from a metabolic perspective. The retinas have a highly laminated structure, high energy demands, and they share several metabolic features with tumors, such as a strong Warburg effect and abundant pyruvate kinase M2 isoform expression. The energy demands of retinas are both qualitatively and quantitatively different in light and darkness and metabolic dysfunction could cause retinal degeneration. Stable isotope-based metabolic analysis with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to trace the dynamic metabolic reactions and reveal novel metabolic pathways within cells and between cells in retina. Here, we describe methods to quantify retinal metabolism in intact retinas and discuss applications of these methods to the understanding of neuron-glia interaction, light and dark adaptation, and retinal degenerative diseases.

  15. Oxygen distribution and consumption within the retina in vascularised and avascular retinas and in animal models of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, D Y; Cringle, S J

    2001-03-01

    Maintenance of an adequate oxygen supply to the retina is critical for retinal function. In species with vascularised retinas, such as man, oxygen is delivered to the retina via a combination of the choroidal vascular bed, which lies immediately behind the retina, and the retinal vasculature, which lies within the inner retina. The high-oxygen demands of the retina, and the relatively sparse nature of the retinal vasculature, are thought to contribute to the particular vulnerability of the retina to vascular disease. A large proportion of retinal blindness is associated with diseases having a vascular component, and disrupted oxygen supply to the retina is likely to be a critical factor. Much attention has therefore been directed at determining the intraretinal oxygen environment in healthy and diseased eyes. Measurements of oxygen levels within the retina have largely been restricted to animal studies in which oxygen sensitive microelectrodes can be used to obtain high-resolution measurements of oxygen tension as a function of retinal depth. Such measurements can immediately identify which retinal layers are supplied with oxygen from the different vascular elements. Additionally, in the outer retinal layers, which do not have any intrinsic oxygen sources, the oxygen distribution can be analysed mathematically to quantify the oxygen consumption rate of specific retinal layers. This has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity of oxygen requirements of different components of the outer retina, with the inner segments of the photoreceptors being the dominant oxygen consumers. Since the presence of the retinal vasculature precludes such a simple quantitative analysis of local oxygen consumption within the inner retina, our understanding of the oxygen needs of the inner retinal components is much less complete. Although several lines of evidence suggest that in the more commonly studied species such as cat, pig, and rat, the oxygen demands of the inner retina as a whole is

  16. Designing and Implementation of Retina Image Drawing System and Automatic Report Generation from Retina Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza; Mokhtaran, Mehrshad; Tahmasebian, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic medical records as one of major parts of electronic health records is an important application of Medical Informatics. EMR includes different types of data, Graphical items being one of these data types. To this end, a standard structure for storing and recovering and finally exchanging this data type is required. In order to standardize information items in this research, UMLS standard is used. In this research, graphical information from fondues designing in retina surgery forms is used for the task of implementation. Implementation: Three-layer software architecture is used for implementation of this system, which includes user interface, data base access and business logic. XML database is used for storing and exchanging of data. User interface is designed by the means of Adobe Flash. Also in the user interface for eye examinations, appropriate icons compatible with current pathologies in retina examinations are considered and UMLS codes are used for standardizations purposes. Results: As this project is independently implemented in Adobe Flash, it can be run in most of electronic patient records software. For evaluation purposes of this research, an EMR system for eye clinics is used. Tree structure is used for data entry and finally a text report based on the entered data will be generated. By storing graphical items in this software editing and searching in medical concepts and also comparing features will be available. Conclusion: One of the data items that we encounter in various medical records is graphical data. In order to cover the patient’s complete electronic medical records, the Electronic Implementation of this information is important. For this purpose, graphical items in retina surgery forms were used and finally a software application for drawing retina picture was developed. Also, XML files were used for the purpose of storing valuable medical data from the pictures, and also UMLS were applied for the standardization

  17. Designing and Implementation of Retina Image Drawing System and Automatic Report Generation from Retina Examinations.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Reza; Mokhtaran, Mehrshad; Tahmasebian, Shahram

    2016-10-01

    Electronic medical records as one of major parts of electronic health records is an important application of Medical Informatics. EMR includes different types of data, Graphical items being one of these data types. To this end, a standard structure for storing and recovering and finally exchanging this data type is required. In order to standardize information items in this research, UMLS standard is used. In this research, graphical information from fondues designing in retina surgery forms is used for the task of implementation. Three-layer software architecture is used for implementation of this system, which includes user interface, data base access and business logic. XML database is used for storing and exchanging of data. User interface is designed by the means of Adobe Flash. Also in the user interface for eye examinations, appropriate icons compatible with current pathologies in retina examinations are considered and UMLS codes are used for standardizations purposes. As this project is independently implemented in Adobe Flash, it can be run in most of electronic patient records software. For evaluation purposes of this research, an EMR system for eye clinics is used. Tree structure is used for data entry and finally a text report based on the entered data will be generated. By storing graphical items in this software editing and searching in medical concepts and also comparing features will be available. One of the data items that we encounter in various medical records is graphical data. In order to cover the patient's complete electronic medical records, the Electronic Implementation of this information is important. For this purpose, graphical items in retina surgery forms were used and finally a software application for drawing retina picture was developed. Also, XML files were used for the purpose of storing valuable medical data from the pictures, and also UMLS were applied for the standardization purpose. The developed software is currently being

  18. Development of the Retina and Optic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Benjamin E.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the development of the retina and visual pathways has seen enormous advances during the past twenty-five years. New imaging technologies, coupled with advances in molecular biology, have permitted a fuller appreciation of the histotypical events associated with proliferation, fate determination, migration, differentiation, pathway navigation, target innervation, synaptogenesis and cell death, and in many instances, in understanding the genetic, molecular, cellular and activity-dependent mechanisms underlying those developmental changes. The present review considers those advances associated with the lineal relationships between retinal nerve cells, the production of retinal nerve cell diversity, the migration, patterning and differentiation of different types of retinal nerve cells, the determinants of the decussation pattern at the optic chiasm, the formation of the retinotopic map, and the establishment of ocular domains within the thalamus. PMID:20647017

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  20. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  1. How variable clones build an invariant retina.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Zhang, Gen; Almeida, Alexandra D; Cayouette, Michel; Simons, Benjamin D; Harris, William A

    2012-09-06

    A fundamental question in developmental neuroscience is how a collection of progenitor cells proliferates and differentiates to create a brain of the appropriate size and cellular composition. To address this issue, we devised lineage-tracing assays in developing zebrafish embryos to reconstruct entire retinal lineage progressions in vivo and thereby provide a complete quantitative map of the generation of a vertebrate CNS tissue from individual progenitors. These lineage data are consistent with a simple model in which the retina is derived from a set of equipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) that are subject to stochastic factors controlling lineage progression. Clone formation in mutant embryos reveals that the transcription factor Ath5 acts as a molecular link between fate choice and mode of cell division, giving insight into the elusive molecular mechanisms of histogenesis, the conserved temporal order by which neurons of different types exit the cell cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lateral interactions in the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Mangel, Stuart C

    2012-09-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (I(Ca)) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones.

  3. Isolevuglandins and Mitochondrial Enzymes in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Casey; Liao, Wei-Li; Heo, Gun-Young; Laird, James; Salomon, Robert G.; Turko, Illarion V.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first peptide mapping and sequencing of an in vivo isolevuglandin-modified protein. Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitous multifunctional sterol C27-hydroxylase that eliminates cholesterol and likely 7-ketocholesterol from the retina and many other tissues. We investigated the post-translational modification of this protein with isolevuglandins, arachidonate oxidation products. Treatment of purified recombinant CYP27A1 with authentic iso[4]levuglandin E2 (iso[4]LGE2) in vitro diminished enzyme activity in a time- and phospholipid-dependent manner. A multiple reaction monitoring protocol was then developed to identify the sites and extent of iso[4]LGE2 adduction. CYP27A1 exhibited only three Lys residues, Lys134, Lys358, and Lys476, that readily interact with iso[4]LGE2 in vitro. Such selective modification enabled the generation of an internal standard, 15N-labeled CYP27A1 modified with iso[4]LGE2, for the subsequent analysis of a human retinal sample. Two multiple reaction monitoring transitions arising from the peptide AVLK358(-C20H26O3)ETLR in the retinal sample were observed that co-eluted with the corresponding two 15N transitions from the supplemented standard. These data demonstrate that modified CYP27A1 is present in the retina. We suggest that such protein modification impairs sterol elimination and likely has other pathological sequelae. We also propose that the post-translational modifications identified in CYP27A1 exemplify a general mechanism whereby oxidative stress and inflammation deleteriously affect protein function, contributing, for example, to cholesterol-rich lesions associated with age-related macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease. The proteomic protocols developed in this study are generally applicable to characterization of lipid-derived oxidative protein modifications occurring in vivo, including proteins bound to membranes. PMID:21498512

  4. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  5. Red-shifted channelrhodopsin stimulation restores light responses in blind mice, macaque retina, and human retina.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhishek; Chaffiol, Antoine; Macé, Emilie; Caplette, Romain; Desrosiers, Mélissa; Lampič, Maruša; Forster, Valérie; Marre, Olivier; Lin, John Y; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Dalkara, Deniz; Duebel, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Targeting the photosensitive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) to the retinal circuitry downstream of photoreceptors holds promise in treating vision loss caused by retinal degeneration. However, the high intensity of blue light necessary to activate channelrhodopsin-2 exceeds the safety threshold of retinal illumination because of its strong potential to induce photochemical damage. In contrast, the damage potential of red-shifted light is vastly lower than that of blue light. Here, we show that a red-shifted channelrhodopsin (ReaChR), delivered by AAV injections in blind rd1 mice, enables restoration of light responses at the retinal, cortical, and behavioral levels, using orange light at intensities below the safety threshold for the human retina. We further show that postmortem macaque retinae infected with AAV-ReaChR can respond with spike trains to orange light at safe intensities. Finally, to directly address the question of translatability to human subjects, we demonstrate for the first time, AAV- and lentivirus-mediated optogenetic spike responses in ganglion cells of the postmortem human retina. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Richt, Jürgen A; Casey, Thomas A; Rasmussen, Mark A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Petrich, Jacob W

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated with the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model system to study age-related accumulation of lipofuscin, which has been investigated by monitoring the increasing fluorescence with age covering its entire life span. The current work aims at developing mice retina as a convenient model system to diagnose scrapie and other fatal TSE diseases in animals such as sheep and cows. The objective of the research reported here was to determine whether the spectral features are conserved between two different species namely mice and sheep, and whether an appropriate small animal model system could be identified for diagnosis of scrapie based on the fluorescence intensity in retina. The results were consistent with the previous reports on fluorescence studies of healthy and scrapie-infected retina of sheep. The fluorescence from the retinas of scrapie-infected sheep was significantly more intense and showed more heterogeneity than that from the retinas of uninfected mice. Although the structural characteristics of fluorescence spectra of scrapie-infected sheep and mice eyes are slightly different, more importantly, murine retinas reflect the enhancement of fluorescence intensity upon infecting the mice with scrapie, which is consistent with the observations in sheep eyes.

  7. Method to Remove Photoreceptors from Wholemount Retina in vitro.

    PubMed

    Walston, Steven T; Chang, Yao-Chuan; Weiland, James D; Chow, Robert H

    2017-08-30

    Patch clamp recordings of neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina are difficult to conduct in a wholemount retina preparation because surrounding neurons block the path of the patch pipette. Vertical slice preparations or dissociated retina cell cultures provide access to bipolar cells at the cost of severing lateral connection between neurons. We have developed a technique to remove photoreceptors from the rodent retina that exposes inner nuclear layer neurons, allowing access for patch clamp recording. Repeated application and removal of filter paper to the photoreceptor side of an isolated retina effectively and efficiently removes photoreceptor cells and, in degenerate retina, hypertrophied Müller cell endfeet. Live-dead assays applied to neurons remaining after photoreceptor removal demonstrated mostly viable cells. Patch clamp recordings from bipolar cells reveal responses similar to those recorded in traditional slice and dissociated cell preparations. An advantage of the photoreceptor peel technique is that it exposes inner retinal neurons in a wholemount retina preparation for investigation of signal processing. A disadvantage is that photoreceptor removal alters input to remaining retinal neurons. The technique may be useful for investigations of extracellular electrical stimulation, photoreceptor DNA analysis, and non-pharmacological removal of light input. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  8. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Topography of ganglion cell production in the cat's retina

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.; Polley, E.H.

    1985-03-01

    The ganglion cells of the cat's retina form several classes distinguishable in terms of soma size, axon diameter, dendritic morphology, physiological properties, and central connections. Labeling with (/sup 3/H)thymidine shows that the ganglion cells which survive in the adult are produced as several temporally shifted, overlapping waves: medium-sized cells are produced before large cells, whereas the smallest ganglion cells are produced throughout the period of ganglion cell generation. Large cells and medium-sized cells show the same distinctive pattern of production, forming rough spirals around the area centralis. The oldest cells tend to lie superior and nasal to the area centralis, whereas cells in the inferior nasal retina and inferior temporal retina are, in general, progressively younger. Within each retinal quadrant, cells nearer the area centralis tend to be older than cells in the periphery, but there is substantial overlap. The retinal raphe divides the superior temporal quadrant into two zones with different patterns of cell addition. Superior temporal retina near the vertical meridian adds cells only slightly later than superior nasal retina, whereas superior temporal retina near the horizontal meridian adds cells very late, contemporaneously with inferior temporal retina. The broader wave of production of smaller ganglion cells seems to follow this same spiral pattern at its beginning and end. The presence of the area centralis as a nodal point about which ganglion cell production in the retinal quadrants pivots suggests that the area centralis is already an important retinal landmark even at the earliest stages of retinal development.

  10. Development of diabetes-induced acidosis in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that the retina of diabetic animals would be unusually acidic due to increased glycolytic metabolism. Acidosis in tumors and isolated retina has been shown to lead to increased VEGF. To test the hypothesis we have measured the transretinal distribution of extracellular H(+) concentration (H(+)-profiles) in retinae of control and diabetic dark-adapted intact Long-Evans rats with ion-selective electrodes. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Intact rat retinae are normally more acidic than blood with a peak of [H(+)]o in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) that averages 30 nM higher than H(+) in the choroid. Profiles in diabetic animals were similar in shape, but diabetic retinae began to be considerably more acidic after 5 weeks of diabetes. In retinae of 1-3 month diabetics the difference between the ONL and choroid was almost twice as great as in controls. At later times, up to 6 months, some diabetics still demonstrated abnormally high levels of [H(+)]o, but others were even less acidic than controls, so that the average level of acidosis was not different. Greater variability in H(+)-profiles (both between animals and between profiles recorded in one animal) distinguished the diabetic retinae from controls. Within animals, this variability was not random, but exhibited regions of higher and lower H(+). We conclude that retinal acidosis begins to develop at an early stage of diabetes (1-3 months) in rats. However, it does not progress, and the acidity of diabetic rat retina was diminished at later stages (3-6 months). Also the diabetes-induced acidosis has a strongly expressed local character. As result, the diabetic retinas show much wider variability in [H(+)] distribution than controls. pH influences metabolic and neural processes, and these results suggest that local acidosis could play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hedgehogs and retinal ganglion cells: organizers of the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Dakubo, Gabriel D; Wallace, Valerie A

    2004-03-01

    The mature vertebrate retina develops from a population of multipotential neural progenitor cells that give rise to all of the retinal neurons and one glial cell type. Retinal histogenesis is regulated, in part, by cell extrinsic cues. A growing number of studies now implicate signaling by members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of morphogens in vertebrate retinal development. In this review we will discuss the role of Hh signals from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the projection neurons of the retina, on proliferation, differentiation and lamination in the neural retina.

  12. Simple Experiments on the Physics of Vision: The Retina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortel, Adolf

    2005-01-01

    Many simple experiments can be performed in the classroom to explore the physics of vision. Students can learn of the two types of receptive cells (rods and cones), their distribution on the retina and the existence of the blind spot.

  13. Early functional neural networks in the developing retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R. O. L.; Chernjavsky, A.; Smith, S. J.; Shatz, C. J.

    1995-04-01

    IN the adult mammalian retina, the principal direction of information flow is along a vertical pathway from photoreceptors to retinal interneurons to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina. We report here, however, that initially in development, at a time when the photoreceptors are not yet even present, there are already functionally defined networks within the retina. These networks are spontaneously active rather than visually driven, and they involve horizontal rather than vertical pathways. By means of optical recording using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2, we have found that sets of retinal ganglion cells and amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron, undergo synchronized oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration. These oscillations are highly correlated among subgroups of neighbouring cells, and spread in a wave-like fashion tangentially across the retina. Thus, in development of retinal circuitry, the initial patterning of neuronal function occurs in the horizontal domain before the adult pattern of vertical information transfer emerges.

  14. Central and Peripheral Retina Arise through Distinct Developmental Paths

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    In the mature eye, three distinct tissue fates, retina, ciliary body, and iris, arrange with a strict linear organization along the central (back) to peripheral (front) axis. The establishment of this topographical relationship within the optic vesicle is not well understood. We use a targeted vital labeling strategy to test the derivation of mature eye tissues from the optic vesicle of the chick embryo. Fate mapping uncovers two distinct origins of the neural retina. Contrary to expectations, the central neural retina has a discrete origin within the posterior optic vesicle. The peripheral retina derives from the distal optic vesicle, sharing a common origin with more peripheral tissue fates. This study identifies for the first time two distinct retinal sub-domains, central and peripheral, which arise during embryogenesis. Identification of these discrete retinal compartments provides a framework for understanding functional and disease processes throughout retinal tissue. PMID:23613848

  15. Transplanted neurons integrate into adult retinas and respond to light.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Praseeda; Wang, Yan; Nguyen, Tu; Huang, Abigail; Muller, Kenneth J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2016-02-04

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) degenerate in diseases like glaucoma and are not replaced in adult mammals. Here we investigate whether transplanted RGCs can integrate into the mature retina. We have transplanted GFP-labelled RGCs into uninjured rat retinas in vivo by intravitreal injection. Transplanted RGCs acquire the general morphology of endogenous RGCs, with axons orienting towards the optic nerve head of the host retina and dendrites growing into the inner plexiform layer. Preliminary data show in some cases GFP(+) axons extending within the host optic nerves and optic tract, reaching usual synaptic targets in the brain, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. Electrophysiological recordings from transplanted RGCs demonstrate the cells' electrical excitability and light responses similar to host ON, ON-OFF and OFF RGCs, although less rapid and with greater adaptation. These data present a promising approach to develop cell replacement strategies in diseased retinas with degenerating RGCs.

  16. Pharmacology of the GABAB receptor in amphibian retina.

    PubMed

    Tian, N; Slaughter, M M

    1994-10-17

    Amacrine and ganglion cells in the amphibian retina contain GABAB, as well as GABAA, receptors. Baclofen, a GABAB agonist, hyperpolarizes the dark membrane potential of these third order neurons and makes their light responses more transient. GABAB receptors in the retina have a similar agonist profile to GABAB receptors described at other sites in the brain. Namely, preferential activation by the R-enantiomer of baclofen, and agonist sensitivity in the order 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid > baclofen > 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid. The GABAB receptor was not activated by 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid. Several antagonists, such as phaclofen, saclofen, and 2-hydroxysaclofen, were ineffective in the amphibian retina. However, CGP35348 blocked the action of applied baclofen and produced effects on the light response that were opposite to those of baclofen. Applied agonists and antagonists support the hypothesis that GABAB receptors serve to regulate the balance of sustained and transient signals to the inner retina.

  17. Light-evoked S-nitrosylation in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Ryan E; Vigh, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the retina is triggered by light stimulation. NO has been shown to modulate visual signal processing at multiple sites in the vertebrate retina, via activation of the most sensitive target of NO signaling, soluble guanylate cyclase. NO can also alter protein structure and function and exert biological effects directly by binding to free thiol groups of cysteine residues in a chemical reaction called S-nitrosylation. However, in the central nervous system, including the retina, this reaction has not been considered to be significant under physiological conditions. Here we provide immunohistochemical evidence for extensive S-nitrosylation that takes place in the goldfish and mouse retinas under physiologically relevant light intensities, in an intensity-dependent manner, with a strikingly similar pattern in both species. Pre-treatment with NEM, which occludes S-nitrosylation, or with TRIM, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, eliminated the light-evoked increase in S-nitrosylated protein immunofluorescence (SNI) in the retinas of both species. Similarly, light did not increase SNI, above basal levels, in retinas of transgenic mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. Qualitative analysis of the light-adapted mouse retina with mass spectrometry revealed more than 300 proteins that were S-nitrosylated upon illumination, many of which are known to participate directly in retinal signal processing. Our data strongly suggest that in the retina, light-evoked NO production leads to extensive S-nitrosylation and that this process is a significant post-translational modification affecting a wide range of proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:25823749

  18. Neuroprotective effects of quercetin in diabetic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Ola, Mohammad S; Ahmed, M M; Shams, Shakeeb; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a severe complication of diabetes and the leading cause of blindness among working adults worldwide. DR is being widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease of the retina, since, retinal neurons are damaged soon after diabetes onset. Diabetes-induced oxidative stress is considered as central factor that dysregulates neurotrophic factors and activates apoptosis, thereby damages neurons in the diabetic retina. Flavonoids being a powerful antioxidant have been considered to protect neurons in diabetic retina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the beneficial effects of flavonoid, quercetin to protect neurons in the diabetic rat retina. We quantitated the expression levels of BDNF, NGF, TrkB, synaptophysin, Akt, Bcl-2, cytochrome c and caspase-3 using Western blotting techniques in the diabetic retina with and without quercetin treatments and compared with non-diabetic rats. In addition, we employed ELISA techniques to determine the level of BDNF. Caspase-3 activity and the level of glutathione were analyzed by biochemical methods. Our results indicate that quercetin treatment to diabetic rats caused a significant increase in the level of neurotrophic factors and inhibited the level of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity in the diabetic retina. Furthermore, the level of an anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was augmented in quercetin treated diabetic retina. Thus, quercetin, may protect the neuronal damage in diabetic retina by ameliorating the levels of neurotrophic factors and also by inhibiting the apoptosis of neurons. Therefore, this study suggests that quercetin can be a suitable therapeutic agent to prevent neurodegeneration in diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Light-evoked S-nitrosylation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Ryan E; Vigh, Jozsef

    2015-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the retina is triggered by light stimulation. NO has been shown to modulate visual signal processing at multiple sites in the vertebrate retina, via activation of the most sensitive target of NO signaling, soluble guanylate cyclase. NO can also alter protein structure and function and exert biological effects directly by binding to free thiol groups of cysteine residues in a chemical reaction called S-nitrosylation. However, in the central nervous system, including the retina, this reaction has not been considered to be significant under physiological conditions. Here we provide immunohistochemical evidence for extensive S-nitrosylation that takes place in the goldfish and mouse retinas under physiologically relevant light intensities, in an intensity-dependent manner, with a strikingly similar pattern in both species. Pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which occludes S-nitrosylation, or with 1-(2-trifluromethylphenyl)imidazole (TRIM), an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, eliminated the light-evoked increase in S-nitrosylated protein immunofluorescence (SNI) in the retinas of both species. Similarly, light did not increase SNI, above basal levels, in retinas of transgenic mice lacking neuronal NO synthase. Qualitative analysis of the light-adapted mouse retina with mass spectrometry revealed more than 300 proteins that were S-nitrosylated upon illumination, many of which are known to participate directly in retinal signal processing. Our data strongly suggest that in the retina light-evoked NO production leads to extensive S-nitrosylation and that this process is a significant posttranslational modification affecting a wide range of proteins under physiological conditions.

  20. Melanopsin Signaling in Mammalian Iris and Retina

    PubMed Central

    Xue, T.; Do, M. T. H.; Riccio, A.; Jiang, Z.; Hsieh, J.; Wang, H. C.; Merbs, S. L.; Welsbie, D. S.; Yoshioka, T.; Weissgerber, P.; Stolz, S.; Flockerzi, V.; Freichel, M.; Simon, M. I.; Clapham, D. E.; Yau, K.-W.

    2011-01-01

    Lower vertebrates have an intrinsically-photosensitive iris and thus a local pupillary light reflex (PLR). In contrast, it has been a dogma that the PLR in mammals generally requires neuronal circuitry connecting the eye and the brain. We report here that an intrinsic component of the PLR is actually widespread in nocturnal and crepuscular mammals. In mouse, this intrinsic PLR requires the visual pigment, melanopsin. It also requires PLCβ4, the vertebrate homolog of the Drosophila NorpA phospholipase C mediating rhabdomeric phototransduction. The Plcβ4−/− genotype, besides removing the intrinsic PLR, also essentially eliminates the intrinsic light response of the M1-subtype of melanopsin-expressing, intrinsically-photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (M1-ipRGCs), by far the most photosensitive ipRGCs and with the largest responses. Ablating in mouse the expression of both TRPC6 and TRPC7, members of the TRP channel superfamily, likewise essentially eliminated the M1-ipRGC light response, but spared the intrinsic PLR. Thus, melanopsin signaling exists in both iris and retina, involving a PLCβ4-mediated pathway that nonetheless diverges in the two locations. PMID:22051675

  1. Melanopsin signalling in mammalian iris and retina.

    PubMed

    Xue, T; Do, M T H; Riccio, A; Jiang, Z; Hsieh, J; Wang, H C; Merbs, S L; Welsbie, D S; Yoshioka, T; Weissgerber, P; Stolz, S; Flockerzi, V; Freichel, M; Simon, M I; Clapham, D E; Yau, K-W

    2011-11-02

    Non-mammalian vertebrates have an intrinsically photosensitive iris and thus a local pupillary light reflex (PLR). In contrast, it is thought that the PLR in mammals generally requires neuronal circuitry connecting the eye and the brain. Here we report that an intrinsic component of the PLR is in fact widespread in nocturnal and crepuscular mammals. In mouse, this intrinsic PLR requires the visual pigment melanopsin; it also requires PLCβ4, a vertebrate homologue of the Drosophila NorpA phospholipase C which mediates rhabdomeric phototransduction. The Plcb4(-/-) genotype, in addition to removing the intrinsic PLR, also essentially eliminates the intrinsic light response of the M1 subtype of melanopsin-expressing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (M1-ipRGCs), which are by far the most photosensitive ipRGC subtype and also have the largest response to light. Ablating in mouse the expression of both TRPC6 and TRPC7, members of the TRP channel superfamily, also essentially eliminated the M1-ipRGC light response but the intrinsic PLR was not affected. Thus, melanopsin signalling exists in both iris and retina, involving a PLCβ4-mediated pathway that nonetheless diverges in the two locations.

  2. Vehicle detection system using artificial retina chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koichi; Tamura, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kyuma, Kazuo

    2001-05-01

    The AR chip is a versatile CMOS image sensor, functions are not only normal image acquisition but also on-chip image processing. Such features can accelerate algorithms of image processing and the controls of proper image. We have developed the low-cost and compact vehicle detection system using he AR chips. The system is composed of a processing module and an AR camera module. The AR Camera module has dual artificial retina chips to cover the wide dynamic range of the outdoor brightness environment. The ND filter is coated on the lens of one of the chips, each AR chip covers different range of the brightness. The control algorithm of image acquisition is designed to select an adequate chip based on the image quality. The images of the selected chip are processed by on-chip functions for pre-processing and they are transferred to the processing module. Finally the processing module judges the existence of vehicles and detects several kinds of attributive information of the detected vehicle such as moving direction. In our paper, we describe details of the system and the algorithm and we show several result data through field experiments under the real road environment.

  3. Transformation of Stimulus Correlations by the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Tkačik, Gašper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather K.; Palmer, Stephanie E.; Nelson, Philip C.; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Redundancies and correlations in the responses of sensory neurons may seem to waste neural resources, but they can also carry cues about structured stimuli and may help the brain to correct for response errors. To investigate the effect of stimulus structure on redundancy in retina, we measured simultaneous responses from populations of retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied greatly in correlation structure; these stimuli and recordings are publicly available online. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were modestly more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but they were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio-temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of pairwise correlations across stimuli where receptive field measurements were possible. PMID:24339756

  4. Galloxanthin, a carotenoid from the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    WALD, G

    1948-05-20

    A new carotenoid has been isolated from the chicken retina for which the name galloxanthin is proposed. This substance has the properties of a hydroxy carotenoid or xanthophyll. It has not yet been crystallized. On a chromatogram of calcium carbonate it is adsorbed just below astaxanthin and above lutein. The absorption spectrum of galloxanthin lies in a region where natural carotenoids have not ordinarily been found. Its main, central absorption band falls at about 400 mmicro. The position of its spectrum suggests a conjugated system of eight double bonds. This relatively short polyene structure must be reconciled with very strong adsorption affinities. With antimony trichloride, galloxanthin yields a deep blue product, possessing a main absorption band at 785 to 795 mmicro, and a secondary maximum at about 710 mmicro which may not be due to galloxanthin itself. Galloxanthin appears to be one of the carotenoid filter pigments associated with cone vision in the chicken. It may act as an auxiliary to the other filter pigments in differentiating colors; or its primary function may be to exclude violet and near ultraviolet radiations for which the eye has a large chromatic aberration.

  5. Analysis of the retina via suprafusion electroretinography.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, J F; Flower, R W; Mowbray, G H

    1980-01-01

    Electroretinographic (ERG) transient responses elicited in monkeys by abrupt changes in the periodicity of a rapidly intermittent (suprafusion) luminance stimulus were studied experimentally, and analyzed and interpreted through a theory of dynamic retinal responses. The suprafusion ERG transients are confirmed to behave in accord with theoretical expectation, as elemental responses (retinal Green's functions). By aid of the theory the ERG wave-forms can be reduced to two significant elements. One element, accounting for approximately two-thirds of the total ERG variance, is strictly linear, and correlates well with simultaneously evoked cortical (VEP) transients which were previously related to suprafusion perception in humans. The other element, comprising approximately one-third the ERG transient, is a rectification, with properties indicating that it may arise from a specific layer of retinal neurons (amacrine cells); on this assumption the theory demonstrates that high-frequency nonlinear ERG flicker can isolate activities proximal and distal to the rectifying (amacrine) layer. Thus, the hypothesis of an amacrine origin for the rectifying element entails the possibility that suprafusion ERG studies could accomplish in vivo "dissection" of the human retina. PMID:7295863

  6. Imaging retina to study dementia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Ikram, M Kamran; Chen, Christopher; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-03-01

    With increase in life expectancy, the number of persons suffering from common age-related brain diseases, including neurodegenerative (e.g., dementia) and cerebrovascular (e.g., stroke) disease is expected to rise substantially. As current neuro-imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging may not be able to detect subtle subclinical changes (resolution <100-500 μm) in dementia and stroke, there is an urgent need for other complementary techniques to probe the pathophysiology of these diseases. The retina - due to its anatomical, embryological and physiological similarities with the brain - offers a unique and accessible "window" to study correlates and consequences of subclinical pathology in the brain. Retinal components such as the microvasculature and retinal ganglion cell axons can now be visualized non-invasively using different retinal imaging techniques e.g., ocular fundus photography and optical coherence tomography. Advances in retinal imaging may provide new and potentially important insights into cerebrovascular neurodegenerative processes in addition to what is currently possible with neuro-imaging. In this review, we present an overview of the current literature on the application of retinal imaging in the study of dementia and stroke. We discuss clinical implications of these studies, novel state-of-the-art retinal imaging techniques and future directions aimed at evaluating whether retinal imaging can be an additional investigation tool in the study of dementia and stroke.

  7. Transformation of stimulus correlations by the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Jason; Simmons, Kristina; Tkacik, Gasper; Homann, Jan; Yee, Heather; Palmer, Stephanie; Nelson, Phillip; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2014-03-01

    Correlations in the responses of sensory neurons seem to waste neural resources, but can carry cues about structured stimuli and help the brain correct for response errors. To assess how the retina negotiates this tradeoff, we measured simultaneous responses from many retinal ganglion cells presented with natural and artificial stimuli that varied in correlation structure. Responding to spatio-temporally structured stimuli such as natural movies, pairs of ganglion cells were more correlated than in response to white noise checkerboards, but were much less correlated than predicted by a non-adapting functional model of retinal response. Meanwhile, responding to stimuli with purely spatial correlations, pairs of ganglion cells showed increased correlations consistent with a static, non-adapting receptive field and nonlinearity. We found that in response to spatio- temporally correlated stimuli, ganglion cells had faster temporal kernels and tended to have stronger surrounds. These properties of individual cells, along with gain changes that opposed changes in effective contrast at the ganglion cell input, largely explained the pattern of correlations across stimuli.

  8. Cholecystokinin-like immunoreactive amacrine cells in the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Sally I.; Varela, Carolina; De La Villa, Pedro; Marshak, David W.

    2012-01-01

    High levels of endogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) are present in the rat retina (Eskay & Beinfeld, 1982), but the cellular localization and physiological actions of CCK in the rat retina are uncertain. The goals of this study were to characterize the cells containing CCK, identify cell types that interact with CCK cells, and investigate the effects of CCK on rod bipolar cells. Rat retinas were labeled with antibody to gastrin-CCK (gCCK) using standard immunofluorescence techniques. Patch-clamp methods were used to record from dissociated rod bipolar cells from rats and mice. Gastrin-CCK immunoreactive (-IR) axons were evenly distributed throughout the retina in stratum 5 of the inner plexiform layer of the rat retina. However, the gCCK-IR somata were only detected in the ganglion cell layer in the peripheral retina. The gCCK-IR cells contained glutamate decarboxylase, and some of them also contained immunoreactive substance P. Labeled axons contacted PKC-IR rod bipolar cells, and recoverin-IR ON-cone bipolar cells. CCK-octapeptide inhibits GABAC but not GABAA mediated currents in dissociated rod bipolar cells. PMID:12511085

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lane, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulation of autofluorescence in the retina to determine that noninvasive detection of nutritional iron deficiency is possible. Nutritional iron deficiency (which leads to iron deficiency anemia) affects more than 2 billion people worldwide, and there is an urgent need for a simple, noninvasive diagnostic test. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) is a fluorescent compound that accumulates in red blood cells and is used as a biomarker for nutritional iron deficiency. We developed a computational model of the eye, using parameters that were identified either by literature search, or by direct experimental measurement to test the possibility of detecting ZPP non-invasively in retina. By incorporating fluorescence into Steven Jacques' original code for multi-layered tissue, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence in the retina and determined that if the beam is not focused on a blood vessel in a neural retina layer or if part of light is hitting the vessel, ZPP fluorescence will be 10-200 times higher than background lipofuscin fluorescence coming from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer directly below. In addition we found that if the light can be focused entirely onto a blood vessel in the neural retina layer, the fluorescence signal comes only from ZPP. The fluorescence from layers below in this second situation does not contribute to the signal. Therefore, the possibility that a device could potentially be built and detect ZPP fluorescence in retina looks very promising.

  10. Age-related changes in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Townes-Anderson, E; Colantonio, A; St Jules, R S

    1998-05-01

    Tiger salamanders have been used in visual science because of the large size of their cells and the ease of preparation and maintenance of in vitro retinal preparations. We have found that salamanders over 27 cm in length show a variety of visual abnormalities. Compared to smaller animals (15-23 cm), large animals exhibited a decrease in visual responses determined by tests of the optomotor reflex. Small animals responded correctly an average of 84.5% of the time in visual testing at three light levels compared to an average of 68.4% for the large animals with the poorest visual performance at the lowest level of illumination. In addition, large animals contained (i) histological degeneration of the outer retina, in particular, loss and disruption of outer segments and abnormalities of the retinal pigmented epithelium, (ii) loss of cells, including photoreceptors, by apoptosis as evaluated with the TUNEL technique, and (iii) an increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes within the retina as determined by morphological examination. These histological changes were present in all large animals and all quadrants of their retinas. In contrast, small animals showed virtually no retinal degeneration, no TUNEL-positive cells, and few immune-like cells in the retina. Since large animals are also older animals. the visual changes are age-related. Loss of visual function and histological degeneration in the outer retina also typify aged human eyes. Thus, we propose that large salamanders serve as an animal model for age-related retinal degeneration. In addition to providing a source of aging retina that is readily accessible to experimental manipulation, the salamander provides a pigmented retina with a mixed (2:1, rod:cone) population of photoreceptors, similar to the degeneration-prone parafoveal region of the human eye.

  11. Characterization of glucagon-expressing neurons in the chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Skorupa, Dana; Schonberg, David L.; Walton, Nathaniel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently identified large glucagon-expressing neurons that densely ramify neurites in the peripheral edge of the retina and regulate the proliferation of progenitors in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ) of the postnatal chicken eye (Fischer et al., 2005). However, nothing is known about the transmitters and proteins that are expressed by the glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. We used antibodies to cell-distinguishing markers to better characterize the different types of glucagon-expressing neurons. We found that the large glucagon-expressing neurons were immunoreactive for substance P, neurofilament, Pax6, AP2α, HuD, calretinin, trkB and trkC. Colocalization of glucagon and substance P in the large glucagon-expressing neurons indicates that these cells are the “bullwhip cells” that have been briefly described by Ehrlich, Keyser and Karten (1987). Similar to the bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, HuD, Pax6, and AP2α. Unlike bullwhip cells, the conventional glucagon-expressing amacrine cells were immunoreactive for GABA. While glucagon-immunoreactive amacrine cells were negative for substance P in central regions of the retina, a subset of this type of amacrine cell was immunoreactive for substance P in far peripheral regions of the retina. An additional type of glucagon/substance P-expressing neuron, resembling the bullwhip cells, was found in far peripheral and dorsal regions of the retina. Based on morphology, distribution within the retina, and histological markers, we conclude that there may be 4 different types of glucagon-expressing neurons in the avian retina. PMID:16572462

  12. Blood-flow magnetic resonance imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxia; Cheng, Haiying; Duong, Timothy Q

    2008-02-15

    This study describes a novel MRI application to image basal blood flow, physiologically induced blood-flow changes, and the effects of isoflurane concentration on blood flow in the retina. Continuous arterial-spin-labeling technique with a separate neck coil for spin labeling was used to image blood flow of the rat retina at 90 x 90 x 1500-microm resolution. The average blood flow of the whole retina was 6.3+/-1.0 ml/g/min under 1% isoflurane, consistent with the high blood flow in the retina reported using other techniques. Blood flow is relatively constant along the length of the retina, except it dipped slightly around the optic nerve head and dropped significantly at the distal edges where the retina terminates. Hyperoxia (100% O(2)) decreased blood flow 25+/-6% relative to baseline (air) due to vasoconstriction. Hypercapnia (5% CO(2)+21% O(2)) increased blood flow 16+/-6% due to vasodilation. Increasing isoflurane (a potent vasodilator) concentration to 1.5% increased blood flow to 9.3+/-2.7 ml/g/min. Blood-flow signals were confirmed to be genuine by repeating measurements after the animals were sacrificed in the MRI scanner. This study demonstrates a proof of concept that quantitative blood flow of the retina can be measured using MRI without depth limitation. Blood-flow MRI has the potential to provide unique insights into retinal physiology, serve as an early biomarker for some retinal diseases, and could complement optically based imaging techniques.

  13. Multiple Independent Oscillatory Networks in the Degenerating Retina.

    PubMed

    Euler, Thomas; Schubert, Timm

    2015-01-01

    During neuronal degenerative diseases, microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. This can be particularly well observed in the retina, where photoreceptor degeneration triggers rewiring of connections in the retina's first synaptic layer (e.g., Strettoi et al., 2003; Haq et al., 2014), while the synaptic organization of inner retinal circuits appears to be little affected (O'Brien et al., 2014; Figures 1A,B). Remodeling of (outer) retinal circuits and diminishing light-driven activity due to the loss of functional photoreceptors lead to spontaneous activity that can be observed at different retinal levels (Figure 1C), including the retinal ganglion cells, which display rhythmic spiking activity in the degenerative retina (Margolis et al., 2008; Stasheff, 2008; Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Stasheff et al., 2011). Two networks have been suggested to drive the oscillatory activity in the degenerating retina: a network of remnant cone photoreceptors, rod bipolar cells (RBCs) and horizontal cells in the outer retina (Haq et al., 2014), and the AII amacrine cell-cone bipolar cell network in the inner retina (Borowska et al., 2011). Notably, spontaneous rhythmic activity in the inner retinal network can be triggered in the absence of synaptic remodeling in the outer retina, for example, in the healthy retina after photo-bleaching (Menzler et al., 2014). In addition, the two networks show remarkable differences in their dominant oscillation frequency range as well as in the types and numbers of involved cells (Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Haq et al., 2014). Taken together this suggests that the two networks are self-sustained and can be active independently from each other. However, it is not known if and how they modulate each other. In this mini review, we will discuss: (i) commonalities and differences between these two oscillatory networks as well as possible interaction pathways; (ii) how multiple self

  14. Microgravity effects on neural retina regeneration in the newt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    Data on forelimb and eye lens regenerationin in urodeles under spaceflight conditions (SFC) have been obtained in our previous studies. Today, evidence is available that SFC stimulate regeneration in experimental animals rather than inhibit it. The results of control on-ground experiments with simulated microgravity suggest that the stimulatory effect of SFC is due largely to weightlessness. An original experimental model is proposed, which is convenient for comprehensively analyzing neural regeneration under SFC. The initial results described here concern regeneration of neural retina in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to microgravity simulated in radial clinostat. After clinorotation for seven days (until postoperation day 16), a positive effect of altered gravity on structural restoration of detached neural retina was confirmed by a number of criteria. Specifically, an increased number of Müllerian glial cells, an increased relative volume of the plexiform layers, reduced cell death, advanced redifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium, and extended areas of neural retina reattachment were detected in experimental newts. Moreover, cell proliferation in the inner nuclear layer of neural retina increased as compared with control. Thus, low gravity appears to intensify natural cytological and molecular mechanisms of neural retina regeneration in lower vertebrates.

  15. Bipolar surface electrical stimulation of the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Humayun, M; Propst, R; de Juan, E; McCormick, K; Hickingbotham, D

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa with attendant photoreceptor loss can cause a profound visual handicap. We have postulated that an intraocular prosthesis that could electrically stimulate the inner retina might provide vision to some of these patients. For such a prosthesis to be feasible, electrical stimulation of the inner retina must elicit a focal retinal response. The stimulating current densities required to elicit such a response must not result in irreversible toxic reactions at the electrode-tissue interface. To test the feasibility of this approach, we used bipolar platinum wire electrodes to electrically stimulate the inner retinal surface in bullfrog eyecup preparations and, using similar methods, we electrically stimulated rabbit eyes after injecting intravenous sodium iodate (40 mg/kg), a retinal pigment epithelial toxin with secondary effects on the photoreceptors. Surface electrical stimulation of the inner retina in normal eyes and in eyes with outer retinal degeneration can elicit a localized retinal response. The threshold stimulating currents resulted in charge densities of 2.98 microcoulombs per square centimeter (bullfrog), 8.92 microC/cm2 (normal rabbit), and 11.9 microC/cm2 (rabbit retinas with outer retinal degenerations). These charge densities are within the previously delineated safe limits for long-term electrical stimulation of neural tissue using platinum microelectrodes (100 microC/cm2). Multifocal electrical stimulation of the retina might be a viable approach to provide some vision to patients who have profound visual loss due to outer retinal degenerations.

  16. Bmp4 from the optic vesicle specifies murine retina formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Oltean, Alina; Beebe, David C

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of mouse embryos concluded that after the optic vesicle evaginates from the ventral forebrain and contacts the surface ectoderm, signals from the ectoderm specify the distal region of the optic vesicle to become retina and signals from the optic vesicle induce the lens. Germline deletion of Bmp4 resulted in failure of lens formation. We performed conditional deletion of Bmp4 from the optic vesicle to test the function of Bmp4 in murine eye development. The optic vesicle evaginated normally and contacted the surface ectoderm. Lens induction did not occur. The optic cup failed to form and the expression of retina-specific genes decreased markedly in the distal optic vesicle. Instead, cells in the prospective retina expressed genes characteristic of the retinal pigmented epithelium. We conclude that Bmp4 is required for retina specification in mice. In the absence of Bmp4, formation of the retinal pigmented epithelium is the default differentiation pathway of the optic vesicle. Differences in the signaling pathways required for specification of the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium in chicken and mouse embryos suggest major changes in signaling during the evolution of the vertebrate eye.

  17. Distribution and structure of efferent synapses in the chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, SH; Nacsa, N; Blankenship, T; Fitzgerald, PG; Weller, C; Vaney, DI; Wilson, M

    2012-01-01

    The visual system of birds includes an efferent projection from a visual area, the isthmooptic nucleus in the midbrain, back to the retina. Using a combination of anterograde labeling of efferent fibers, reconstruction of dye-filled neurons, NADPH-diaphorase staining, and transmission electron microscopy we have examined the distribution of efferent fibers and their synaptic structures in the chicken retina. We show that efferent fibers terminate strictly within the ventral retina. In 2 completely mapped retinas, only 2 fibers from a total of 15,359 terminated in the dorsal retina. The major synapse made by each efferent fiber is with a single Efferent Target Amacrine Cell (TC). This synapse consists of 5-25 boutons of 2μm diameter, each with multiple active zones, pressed into the TC soma or synapsing with a basketwork of rudimentary TC dendrites in the inner nuclear layer (INL). This basketwork, which is sheathed by Muller cells processes, defines a private neuropil in the INL within which TCs were also seen to receive input from retinal neurons. In addition to the major synapse, efferent fibers typically produce several very thin processes that terminate nearby in single small boutons and for which the soma of a local amacrine cell is one of the likely postsynaptic partners. A minority of efferent fibers also give rise to a thicker process terminating in a strongly diaphorase positive ball about 5μm in diameter. PMID:19439107

  18. Microgravity effects on neural retina regeneration in the newt.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, E N; Anton, H J; Mitashov, V I

    1998-01-01

    Data on forelimb and eye lens regeneration in urodeles under spaceflight conditions (SFC) have been obtained in our previous studies. Today, evidence is available that SFC stimulate regeneration in experimental animals rather than inhibit it. The results of control on-ground experiments with simulated microgravity suggest that the stimulatory effect of SFC is due largely to weightlessness. An original experimental model is proposed, which is convenient for comprehensively analyzing neural regeneration under SFC. The initial results described here concern regeneration of neural retina in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to microgravity simulated in radial clinostat. After clinorotation for seven days (until postoperation day 16), a positive effect of altered gravity on structural restoration of detached neural retina was confirmed by a number of criteria. Specifically, an increased number of Mullerian glial cells, an increased relative volume of the plexiform layers, reduced cell death, advanced redifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium, and extended areas of neural retina reattachment were detected in experimental newts. Moreover, cell proliferation in the inner nuclear layer of neural retina increased as compared with control. Thus, low gravity appears to intensify natural cytological and molecular mechanisms of neural retina regeneration in lower vertebrates.

  19. Towards metabolic mapping of the human retina.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, D; Schenke, S; Hammer, M; Schweitzer, F; Jentsch, S; Birckner, E; Becker, W; Bergmann, A

    2007-05-01

    = 190 ps) originates from the retinal pigment epithelium and the second lifetime (t2 = 1,000 ps) from the neural retina. The lifetime t3 approximately 5.5 ns might be influenced by the long decay of the fluorescence in the crystalline lens. In vitro analysis of the spectral properties of expected fluorophores under the condition of the living eye lightens the interpretation of in vivo measurements. Taking into account the transmission of the ocular media, the excitation of NADH is unlikely at the fundus. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Apte, D V; Koutalos, Y; McFarlane, D K; Dawson, M J; Ebrey, T G

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were obtained from living toad retinae and toad retinal extracts at 4 degrees C. Several phosphorus metabolites--nucleoside di- and triphosphates (NTP), phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters--were identified from the spectra of whole retinae. The intracellular pH was determined to be 7.27 +/- 0.06 at 4 degrees C and the intracellular MgNTP/NTP ratio was at least 0.77. These results are consistent with those reported by other techniques, and they show that 31P-NMR spectroscopy can be used for noninvasively and quantitatively studying the metabolism of living toad retinae, and for monitoring its changes over time. PMID:2506940

  1. Control of rod shedding in the frog retina.

    PubMed

    Basinger, S F; Hollyfield, J G

    1980-01-01

    In all vertebrate species examined thus far, rod outer segment shedding follows a cyclic pattern in which the outer segment tips are shed shortly after the onset of light. Work in the rat retina suggests that rod shedding may follow a circadian rhythm which is controlled by one or more circadian oscillators. Our results in the frog retina are significantly different in that: rod shedding can be driven by the onset of light or other environmental cues; shedding does not persist in constant darkness; shedding is unaffected in frogs with chronic unilateral or bilateral optic nerve section; and shedding will rapidly phase shift to the time of light onset on a wide variety of diurnal cycles. Thus, rod shedding in the frog retina does not appear to be a classical circadian rhythm.

  2. RNA sequencing analysis of the developing chicken retina

    PubMed Central

    Langouet-Astrie, Christophe J.; Meinsen, Annamarie L.; Grunwald, Emily R.; Turner, Stephen D.; Enke, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing transcriptome analysis using massively parallel next generation sequencing technology provides the capability to understand global changes in gene expression throughout a range of tissue samples. Development of the vertebrate retina requires complex temporal orchestration of transcriptional activation and repression. The chicken embryo (Gallus gallus) is a classic model system for studying developmental biology and retinogenesis. Existing retinal transcriptome projects have been critical to the vision research community for studying aspects of murine and human retinogenesis, however, there are currently no publicly available data sets describing the developing chicken retinal transcriptome. Here we used Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of the developing chicken retina in an effort to identify genes critical for retinal development in this important model organism. These data will be valuable to the vision research community for characterizing global changes in gene expression between ocular tissues and critical developmental time points during retinogenesis in the chicken retina. PMID:27996968

  3. MEMS technologies for epiretinal stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, W.

    2004-09-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells yields visual sensations. Therefore, a retina implant for blind humans suffering from retinitis pigmentosa based on this concept seems to be feasible. In Germany, there are two projects funded by the government working on different approaches namely the subretinal and the epiretinal approaches. This paper describes the epiretinal approach for such a system. The extraocular part of this system records visual images. The images are transformed by a neural net into corresponding signals for stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells. These signals are transmitted to a receiver unit of an intraocular implant, the retina stimulator. Integrated circuitry of this unit decodes the signals and transfers the data to a stimulation circuitry that selects stimulation electrodes placed onto the retina and generates current pulses to the electrodes. By this, action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are evoked, causing a visual sensation. This paper concentrates on the MEMS part of this implant.

  4. The architecture of functional interaction networks in the retina.

    PubMed

    Ganmor, Elad; Segev, Ronen; Schneidman, Elad

    2011-02-23

    Sensory information is represented in the brain by the joint activity of large groups of neurons. Recent studies have shown that, although the number of possible activity patterns and underlying interactions is exponentially large, pairwise-based models give a surprisingly accurate description of neural population activity patterns. We explored the architecture of maximum entropy models of the functional interaction networks underlying the response of large populations of retinal ganglion cells, in adult tiger salamander retina, responding to natural and artificial stimuli. We found that we can further simplify these pairwise models by neglecting weak interaction terms or by relying on a small set of interaction strengths. Comparing network interactions under different visual stimuli, we show the existence of local network motifs in the interaction map of the retina. Our results demonstrate that the underlying interaction map of the retina is sparse and dominated by local overlapping interaction modules.

  5. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing sarcoma of the retina.

    PubMed

    Grossniklaus, Hans E; Shehata, Bahig; Sorensen, Poul; Bergstrom, Chris; Hubbard, G Baker

    2012-07-01

    An 11-year-old boy underwent enucleation of his left eye for an intraocular tumor. Examination showed a small, round blue cell tumor arising in the peripheral retina near the ciliary body. Immunohistochemical stain results were positive for neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 99 (CD99), Friend leukemia integration 1, and CD56. Ultrastructural findings included occasional intracytoplasmic dense core granules. Polymerase chain reaction of the tumor showed a Ewing sarcoma/Friend leukemia integration gene fusion product. The tumor was classified as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing sarcoma of the retina and should be distinguished from retinoblastoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the retina.

  6. Retinal metabolism: A comparative look at energetics in the retina.

    PubMed

    Country, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    The retina is part of the central nervous system, and shares the characteristically high metabolism of the brain. The high energy demand of the retina is normally matched with a large supply of metabolites. When supply does not equal demand (e.g. if retinal blood flow is impaired), retinal neurons are at risk of excitotoxic cell death and vision is impaired or lost. Understanding the energetic budget of the retina is therefore crucial for understanding the pathology and treatment of retinal disease. In this minireview I give an overview of the energetics of the retina, with a focus on lessons learnt from comparative physiology. Retinas of all species studied thus far receive blood flow from choroidal capillaries. Additionally, fish, reptiles, and birds each have unique structures to increase metabolite supply. Primates and some mammals also have intra- and supraretinal vasculature to supply the retina, while other mammals rely solely on the choroid at the cost of retinal thickness. Neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding protein, may assist in oxygen delivery to counteract large diffusion distances from capillaries to mitochondria. Energy demand differs among models, as does mitochondrial location. More ATP is consumed in the dark due to Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity to counteract the dark current, whereas phototransduction dominates ATP demand in the light. Photoreceptor metabolism is therefore especially high, and may be sustained with phosphocreatine and lactate shuttles. This comparative physiology approach raises new research questions, and suggests caution in comparing animal models of retinal disease, as they differ greatly in vasculature and energetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Toward a theory of the functional organization of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Charles P.

    2007-12-01

    The retina streams visual information to the brain through parallel channels with highly stereotyped patterns of organization and connection. Much progress has been made toward identifying the types of neurons present, and their connectivity. A key problem is inferring the function of a neural system based on its known anatomy and physiology, and identifying the advantages conferred by its particular design. Often, characterizing its architecture reveals some strange features of its organization, and the utility of these features is not always explained easily. Here evidence is presented that several intriguing 'design features' of the retina can be explained by careful application of a single hypothesis: that the retina is organized to maximize the information transmitted about natural visual stimuli, subject to a set of biophysical constraints. Specifically, the input neurons to the retina (photoreceptors) and the output neurons (ganglion cells) exhibit the following interesting features: (1) In trichromats, cone photoreceptors with peak sensitivity to long (L), medium (M) and short (S) wavelengths of light are asymmetrically distributed, so that the ratio of L/M (red/green) cones is highly variable, and S (blue) cones are relatively scarce. (2) Ganglion cell receptive fields are organized so that 3-4 cells of the same type represent each point in a visual image. (3) The retina devotes more resources to ganglion cells selective for negative contrasts (OFF cells) than those selective for positive contrasts (ON cells). (4) The shape of ganglion cell center/surround receptive fields depends on their spatial scale, so that the ratio of surround size to center size decreases with the visual angle subtended by the receptive field. In each case, statistical properties of natural visual stimuli could be coupled with realistic biophysical constraints to account for the features described. The analyses here constitute progress toward long-standing questions concerning the

  8. Lipofuscin autofluorescence: evidence for vitamin A involvement in the retina.

    PubMed

    Katz, M L; Eldred, G E; Robison, W G

    1987-06-01

    A lipofuscin-like autofluorescence develops in the degenerating photoreceptor cells of the RCS rat, a strain with inherited retinal dystrophy. In animals with normal retinas, age-related lipofuscin accumulation in the eye is restricted to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Previous investigations have established that RPE lipofuscin accumulation in the normal rat retina can be reduced by dietary vitamin A deficiency. In order to determine whether the photoreceptor-derived fluorescence in the RCS rat retina is related to RPE lipofuscin fluorescence, the influence of dietary vitamin A on the fluorophore content of the RCS rat retina was studied. Vitamin A deficiency substantially reduced the autofluorescence associated with degenerating photoreceptor cells of the RCS rat retina. A specific vitamin A-dependent fluorophore was isolated from these retinas using thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The mobility of this fluorophore on TLC differs from that of the major age-dependent fluorophore isolated from the RPE of normal rats. Thus, if the vitamin A-dependent fluorophores of the photoreceptors and RPE are related, it appears that the fluorophore generated in the photoreceptor cells must undergo chemical modification once it has been taken up by the RPE. The fact that both the RPE- and photoreceptor-associated fluorophores are vitamin A-dependent suggests that such a relationship between them is likely. These experiments indicate that the RPE is somewhat different from other lipofuscin-accumulating tissues in that a major precursor of RPE lipofuscin fluorophores originates in another cell type and enters the RPE via phagocytosis.

  9. Development of Retinal Layers in Prenatal Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Anita

    2016-01-01

    To determine the developmental sequence of retinal layers to provide information on where in utero pathologic events might affect retinal development. Qualitative and quantitative descriptive research. A histology collection of human eyes from fetal week (Fwk) 8 to postnatal (P) 10 weeks was analyzed. The length of the nasal and temporal retina was measured along the horizontal meridian in 20 eyes. The location of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and outer plexiform layer (OPL) was identified at each age, and its length measured. The human eye retinal length increased from 5.19 mm at Fwk 8 to 20.92 mm at midgestation to 32.88 mm just after birth. The IPL appeared in the presumptive fovea at Fwk 8, reached the eccentricity of the optic nerve by Fwk 12, and was present to both nasal and temporal peripheral edges by Fwk 18-21. By contrast, the OPL developed slowly. A short OPL was first present in the Fwk 11 fovea and did not reach the eccentricity of the optic nerve until midgestation. The OPL reached the retinal edges by Fwk 30. Laminar development of both IPL and OPL occurred before vascular formation. In human fetal retina, the IPL reached the far peripheral edge of the retina by midgestation and the OPL by late gestation. Only very early in utero events could affect IPL lamination in the central retina, but events occurring after Fwk 20 in the peripheral retina would overlap OPL laminar development in outer retina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retina-like sensor image coordinates transformation and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Cao, Nan; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-03-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera, the image acquisition, coordinates transformation and interpolation need to be realized. Both of the coordinates transformation and interpolation are computed in polar coordinate due to the sensor's particular pixels distribution. The image interpolation is based on sub-pixel interpolation and its relative weights are got in polar coordinates. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes the real-time image acquisition, coordinate transformation and interpolation.

  11. Efficient Coding of Spatial Information in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Eizaburo; Gauthier, Jeffrey L.; Field, Greg D.; Shlens, Jonathon; Sher, Alexander; Greschner, Martin; Machado, Timothy A.; Jepson, Lauren H.; Mathieson, Keith; Gunning, Deborah E.; Litke, Alan M.; Paninski, Liam; Chichilnisky, E. J.; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory neurons have been hypothesized to efficiently encode signals from the natural environment subject to resource constraints. The predictions of this efficient coding hypothesis regarding the spatial filtering properties of the visual system have been found consistent with human perception, but they have not been compared directly with neural responses. Here, we analyze the information that retinal ganglion cells transmit to the brain about the spatial information in natural images subject to three resource constraints: the number of retinal ganglion cells, their total response variances, and their total synaptic strengths. We derive a model that optimizes the transmitted information and compare it directly with measurements of complete functional connectivity between cone photoreceptors and the four major types of ganglion cells in the primate retina, obtained at single-cell resolution. We find that the ganglion cell population exhibited 80% efficiency in transmitting spatial information relative to the model. Both the retina and the model exhibited high redundancy (~30%) among ganglion cells of the same cell type. A novel and unique prediction of efficient coding, the relationships between projection patterns of individual cones to all ganglion cells, was consistent with the observed projection patterns in the retina. These results indicate a high level of efficiency with near-optimal redundancy in visual signaling by the retina. PMID:23152609

  12. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  14. Genetic Variations Strongly Influence Phenotypic Outcome in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jelcick, Austin S.; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D.; Cox, Lakeisha C.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Qiu, Fang; Schenk, Sarah; Sachs, Andrew J.; Morrison, Margaux A.; Nystuen, Arne M.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Haider, Neena B.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in genetic background can significantly influence the phenotypic outcome of both disease and non-disease associated traits. Additionally, differences in temporal and strain specific gene expression can also contribute to phenotypes in the mammalian retina. This is the first report of microarray based cross-strain analysis of gene expression in the retina investigating genetic background effects. Microarray analyses were performed on retinas from the following mouse strains: C57BL6/J, AKR/J, CAST/EiJ, and NOD.NON-H2-nb1 at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) and postnatal day 30.5 (P30.5). Over 3000 differentially expressed genes were identified between strains and developmental stages. Differential gene expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Three major gene networks were identified that function to regulate retinal or photoreceptor development, visual perception, cellular transport, and signal transduction. Many of the genes in these networks are implicated in retinal diseases such as bradyopsia, night-blindness, and cone-rod dystrophy. Our analysis revealed strain specific variations in cone photoreceptor cell patterning and retinal function. This study highlights the substantial impact of genetic background on both development and function of the retina and the level of gene expression differences tolerated for normal retinal function. These strain specific genetic variations may also be present in other tissues. In addition, this study will provide valuable insight for the development of more accurate models for human retinal diseases. PMID:21779340

  15. Transmembrane semaphorin signalling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ryota L; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2011-02-10

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo for the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes.

  16. Transmembrane semaphorin signaling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ryota L.; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T.; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C.; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L.

    2010-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells, and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL)1–3: a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae1,2. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs), and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo with respect to the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes. PMID:21270798

  17. Cysteamine prevents vascular leakage through inhibiting transglutaminase in diabetic retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Hwang, JongYun; Jeon, Sohee; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2017-10-01

    Cysteamine (an aminothiol), which is derived from coenzyme A degradation and metabolized into taurine, has beneficial effects against cystinosis and neurodegenerative diseases; however, its role in diabetic complications is unknown. Thus, we sought to determine the preventive effect of cysteamine against hyperglycemia-induced vascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. Cysteamine and ethanolamine, the sulfhydryl group-free cysteamine analogue, inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of the amine compounds prevented hyperglycemia-induced vascular leakage in the retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We then investigated the potential roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transglutaminase (TGase) in the cysteamine prevention of VEGF-induced vascular leakage. Cysteamine, but not ethanolamine, inhibited VEGF-induced ROS generation in endothelial cells and diabetic retinas. In contrast, VEGF-induced TGase activation was prevented by both cysteamine and ethanolamine. Our findings suggest that cysteamine protects against vascular leakage through inhibiting VEGF-induced TGase activation rather than ROS generation in diabetic retinas. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. NEURAL RESPONSES ELICITED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Jen; Mahadevappa, Manjunatha; Roizenblatt, Roberto; Weiland, James; Humayun, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To study electrically elicited responses (EERs) that are produced by epiretinal stimulation of normal and degenerated retina. Methods Three biological models of retinal degeneration are compared: normal and rd1 mouse, normal and RCD1 dog, and human with retinitis pigmentosa. In mouse, epiretinal stimulation was accomplished by means of a wire inserted in the vitreous cavity, and single-unit activity was recorded in visual cortex. In dog and human, an implantable retinal stimulator was used to stimulate the retina, and evoked potentials were recorded from the cortical surface (dog) or scalp (human). Results Analysis of EERs revealed distinct early (less than 10 ms) and late (greater than 50 ms) responses. Synaptic blockers abolished the late response but not the early response. For eliciting the early response in normal and rd mice, a square pulse stimulus was more efficient than the sine wave or pulse train. In normal and degenerate canine retina, electrically elicited responses also exhibited early and late phases. EERs in a retinal prosthesis test subject (with retinitis pigmentosa) showed latency similar to the canine, but no evidence of an early response, possibly due to the lack of sensitivity in scalp (human) vs cortical surface (canine) electrode placement. Conclusion EERs could be elicited from both normal and degenerated retina. Mouse, dog, and human EERs showed common characteristics. PMID:17471346

  19. Functional Architecture of the Retina: Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Mrinalini; Okawa, Haruhisa; Santina, Luca Della; Wong, Rachel O.L.

    2014-01-01

    Structure and function are highly correlated in the vertebrate retina, a sensory tissue that is organized into cell layers with microcircuits working in parallel and together to encode visual information. All vertebrate retinas share a fundamental plan, comprising five major neuronal cell classes with cell body distributions and connectivity arranged in stereotypic patterns. Conserved features in retinal design have enabled detailed analysis and comparisons of structure, connectivity and function across species. Each species, however, can adopt structural and/or functional retinal specializations, implementing variations to the basic design in order to satisfy unique requirements in visual function. Recent advances in molecular tools, imaging and electrophysiological approaches have greatly facilitated identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that establish the fundamental organization of the retina and the specializations of its microcircuits during development. Here, we review advances in our understanding of how these mechanisms act to shape structure and function at the single cell level, to coordinate the assembly of cell populations, and to define their specific circuitry. We also highlight how structure is rearranged and function is disrupted in disease, and discuss current approaches to re-establish the intricate functional architecture of the retina. PMID:24984227

  20. A silicon retina that reproduces signals in the optic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2006-12-01

    Prosthetic devices may someday be used to treat lesions of the central nervous system. Similar to neural circuits, these prosthetic devices should adapt their properties over time, independent of external control. Here we describe an artificial retina, constructed in silicon using single-transistor synaptic primitives, with two forms of locally controlled adaptation: luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Both forms of adaptation rely on local modulation of synaptic strength, thus meeting the criteria of internal control. Our device is the first to reproduce the responses of the four major ganglion cell types that drive visual cortex, producing 3600 spiking outputs in total. We demonstrate how the responses of our device's ganglion cells compare to those measured from the mammalian retina. Replicating the retina's synaptic organization in our chip made it possible to perform these computations using a hundred times less energy than a microprocessor—and to match the mammalian retina in size and weight. With this level of efficiency and autonomy, it is now possible to develop fully implantable intraocular prostheses.

  1. Neurochemical anatomy of the zebrafish retina as determined by immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Yazulla, S; Studholme, K M

    2001-07-01

    The zebrafish retina is rapidly becoming a major preparation for the study of molecular genetic mechanisms underlying neural development and visual behavior. Studies utilizing retinal mutants would benefit by the availability of a data base on the distribution of neurotransmitter systems in the wild-type fish. To this end, the neurochemical anatomy of the zebrafish retina was surveyed by light microscopic immunocytochemistry. An extensive series of 60 separate antibodies were used to describe the distribution of major transmitter systems and a variety of neuron-associated membrane channels and proteins. These include markers (i.e., antibodies against enzymes, receptors, transporters) for transmitters: GABA, glycine, glutamate, biogenic amines, acetylcholine, cannabinoids and neuropeptides; as well as a sample of voltage-gated channels and synapse associated membrane proteins. Discussion of the comparative localization of these antibodies is restricted to other teleost fishes, particularly goldfish. Overall, there was great similarity in the distribution of the various markers, as might be expected. However, there were some notable differences, including several antibodies that did not label zebrafish at all, even though goldfish retinas that were processed in parallel, labeled beautifully. This survey is extensive, but not exhaustive, and hopefully will serve as a valuable resource for future studies of the zebrafish retina.

  2. Immunolocalization of aquaporin-6 in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Iandiev, Ianors; Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Hollborn, Margrit; Pannicke, Thomas; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2011-02-25

    Previous RT-PCR experiments revealed that the neural retina of the rat contains gene transcripts of numerous aquaporins (AQPs), including AQP6 (Tenckhoff et al., Neuroreport 16 (2005) 53-56). In the present study, we investigated the localization of AQP6 immunoreactivity in slices of the rat neural retina, and determined whether blue light injury of the retina affects the tissue distribution of this channel. AQP6 immunoreactivity was found to be selectively localized to the outer plexiform layer. Around the ribbon synapses in this layer, AQP6 labeling was co-localized with the glial water channel AQP4. AQP6 labeling was not colocalized with the marker of horizontal cells, calbindin, nor with the marker of rod bipolar cells, protein kinase Cα. Along with the degeneration of photoreceptor cells after blue light treatment of the retina, AQP6-labeled ribbon synapses disappeared, and a punctate AQP6 staining redistributed into the inner nuclear layer. The co-localization of AQP6 and the glial water channel AQP4 suggests a preferential localization of AQP6 in glial membranes that surround the ribbon synapses in the outer plexiform layer. AQP6 might be involved in the glia-mediated osmo and ion regulation of the extracellular space in this layer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  4. A silicon retina that reproduces signals in the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Kareem A; Boahen, Kwabena

    2006-12-01

    Prosthetic devices may someday be used to treat lesions of the central nervous system. Similar to neural circuits, these prosthetic devices should adapt their properties over time, independent of external control. Here we describe an artificial retina, constructed in silicon using single-transistor synaptic primitives, with two forms of locally controlled adaptation: luminance adaptation and contrast gain control. Both forms of adaptation rely on local modulation of synaptic strength, thus meeting the criteria of internal control. Our device is the first to reproduce the responses of the four major ganglion cell types that drive visual cortex, producing 3600 spiking outputs in total. We demonstrate how the responses of our device's ganglion cells compare to those measured from the mammalian retina. Replicating the retina's synaptic organization in our chip made it possible to perform these computations using a hundred times less energy than a microprocessor-and to match the mammalian retina in size and weight. With this level of efficiency and autonomy, it is now possible to develop fully implantable intraocular prostheses.

  5. Adaptation to temporal contrast in primate and salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Chander, D; Chichilnisky, E J

    2001-12-15

    Visual adaptation to temporal contrast (intensity modulation of a spatially uniform, randomly flickering stimulus) was examined in simultaneously recorded ensembles of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in tiger salamander and macaque monkey retina. Slow contrast adaptation similar to that recently discovered in salamander and rabbit retina was observed in monkey retina. A novel method was developed to quantify the effect of temporal contrast on steady-state sensitivity and kinetics of light responses, separately from nonlinearities that would otherwise significantly contaminate estimates of sensitivity. Increases in stimulus contrast progressively and reversibly attenuated and sped light responses in both salamander and monkey RGCs, indicating that a portion of the contrast adaptation observed in visual cortex originates in the retina. The effect of adaptation on sensitivity and kinetics differed in simultaneously recorded populations of ON and OFF cells. In salamander, adaptation affected the sensitivity of OFF cells more than ON cells. In monkey, adaptation affected the sensitivity of ON cells more than OFF cells. In both species, adaptation sped the light responses of OFF cells more than ON cells. Functionally defined subclasses of ON and OFF cells also exhibited asymmetric adaptation. These findings indicate that contrast adaptation differs in parallel retinal circuits that convey distinct visual signals to the brain.

  6. PROTEIN TYROSINE-O-SULFATION IN THE RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Yogita; Hoffhines, Adam; Rauhauser, Alysha; Murray, Anne; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine-O-sulfation, a post-translational modification, is catalyzed by two independent tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases (TPSTs). As an initial step towards understanding the role of TPSTs in retinal function, this study was undertaken to determine the extent to which tyrosine-O-sulfation of proteins is utilized in the retina. A previously characterized anti-sulfotyrosine antibody was used to determine the presence and localization of tyrosine-O-sulfated proteins (TOSPs) in the retina. Using Western blot, RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses, we detected TOSPs in the retinas from diverse species, including frog, fish, mouse and human. Some of the variability in the observed sizes of retinal TOSPs in the mouse, at least, may result from differential patterns of glycosylation; however, there seem to be species-specific sulfated retinal proteins as well. TOSPs were detected in most of the retinal layers as well as in the retinal pigment epithelium from human and mouse. Several retinal TOSPs were detected in the inter-photoreceptor matrix, which is consistent with the secreted nature of some sulfated proteins. Transcripts for both TPST-1 and -2 were expressed in both the human and mouse retinas. These data show that retinal protein tyrosine-O-sulfation is highly conserved which suggest a functional significance of these proteins to retinal function and structure. PMID:19523945

  7. Neural Responses to Multielectrode Stimulation of Healthy and Degenerate Retina.

    PubMed

    Halupka, Kerry J; Abbott, Carla J; Wong, Yan T; Cloherty, Shaun L; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Sergeev, Evgeni N; Luu, Chi D; Brandli, Alice; Allen, Penelope J; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous stimulation of multiple retinal electrodes in normally sighted animals shows promise in improving the resolution of retinal prostheses. However, the effects of simultaneous stimulation on degenerate retinae remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the characteristics of cortical responses to multielectrode stimulation of the degenerate retina. Four adult cats were bilaterally implanted with retinal electrode arrays in the suprachoroidal space after unilateral adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced retinal photoreceptor degeneration. Functional and structural changes were characterized by using electroretinogram a-wave amplitude and optical coherence tomography. Multiunit activity was recorded from both hemispheres of the visual cortex. Responses to single- and multielectrode stimulation of the ATP-injected and fellow control eyes were characterized and compared. The retinae of ATP-injected eyes displayed structural and functional changes consistent with mid- to late-stage photoreceptor degeneration and remodeling. Responses to multielectrode stimulation of the ATP-injected eyes exhibited shortened latencies, lower saturated spike counts, and higher thresholds, compared to stimulation of the fellow control eyes. Electrical receptive field sizes were significantly larger in the ATP-injected eye than in the control eye, and positively correlated with the extent of degeneration. Significant differences exist between cortical responses to stimulation of healthy and degenerate retinae. Our results highlight the importance of using a retinal degeneration model when evaluating the efficacy of novel stimulation paradigms.

  8. CHANGES IN NEUROTRANSMITTER GENE EXPRESSION IN THE AGING RETINA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand mechanisms of neurotoxicity in susceptible populations, we examined age-related changes in constitutive gene expression in the retinas of young (4mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) male Long Evans rats. Derived from a pouch of the forebrain during develop...

  9. Glaucoma related Proteomic Alterations in Human Retina Samples

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Sebastian; Perumal, Natarajan; Beck, Sabine; Gabel-Scheurich, Silke; Schmelter, Carsten; Teister, Julia; Gerbig, Claudia; Gramlich, Oliver W.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma related proteomic changes have been documented in cell and animal models. However, proteomic studies investigating on human retina samples are still rare. In the present work, retina samples of glaucoma and non-glaucoma control donors have been examined by a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) workflow to uncover glaucoma related proteomic changes. More than 600 proteins could be identified with high confidence (FDR < 1%) in human retina samples. Distinct proteomic changes have been observed in 10% of proteins encircling mitochondrial and nucleus species. Numerous proteins showed a significant glaucoma related level change (p < 0.05) or distinct tendency of alteration (p < 0.1). Candidates were documented to be involved in cellular development, stress and cell death. Increase of stress related proteins and decrease of new glaucoma related candidates, ADP/ATP translocase 3 (ANT3), PC4 and SRFS1-interacting protein 1 (DFS70) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCp2) could be documented by MS. Moreover, candidates could be validated by Accurate Inclusion Mass Screening (AIMS) and immunostaining and supported for the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) by laser capture microdissection (LCM) in porcine and human eye cryosections. The workflow allowed a detailed view into the human retina proteome highlighting new molecular players ANT3, DFS70 and MeCp2 associated to glaucoma. PMID:27425789

  10. Morphological evidence of neurotoxicity in retina after methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Mela, Maritana; Grötzner, Sonia Regina; Legeay, Alexia; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Ventura, Dora Fix; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto

    2012-06-01

    The visual system is particularly sensitive to methylmercury (MeHg) exposure and, therefore, provides a useful model for investigating the fundamental mechanisms that direct toxic effects. During a period of 70 days, adult of a freshwater fish species Hoplias malabaricus were fed with fish prey previously labeled with two different doses of methylmercury (0.075 and 0.75 μgg(-1)) to determine the mercury distribution and morphological changes in the retina. Mercury deposits were found in the photoreceptor layer, in the inner plexiform layer and in the outer plexiform layer, demonstrating a dose-dependent bioaccumulation. The ultrastructure analysis of retina revealed a cellular deterioration in the photoreceptor layer, morphological changes in the inner and outer segments of rods, structural changes in the plasma membrane of rods and double cones, changes in the process of removal of membranous discs and a structural discontinuity. These results lead to the conclusion that methylmercury is able to cross the blood-retina barrier, accumulate in the cells and layers of retina and induce changes in photoreceptors of H. malabaricus even under subchronic exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Virtual Retina: Is Good Educational Technology Always Strategic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowie, Sandra

    Educational technology units must continually monitor their strategic plans to ensure that they are aligned with the realities of their institutions. Strategic dissonance occurs when previously successful strategies are no longer achieving the same positive outcomes. The Virtual Retina CD-ROM project is used in this paper as an example of…

  12. Expression of TRPV4 in the zebrafish retina during development.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, C; Guerrera, M C; Bonnin-Arias, C; Calavia, M G; Laurà, R; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2012-06-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are involved in sensing mechanical/physical stimuli such as temperature, light, pressure, as well as chemical stimuli. Some TRP channels are present in the vertebrate retina, and the occurrence of the multifunctional channel TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been reported in adult zebrafish. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of TRPV4 in the retina of zebrafish during development using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry from 3 days post fertilization (dpf) until 100 dpf. TRPV4 was detected at the mRNA and protein levels in the eye of zebrafish at all ages sampled. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of TRPV4 in a population of the retinal cells identified as amacrine cells on the basis of their morphology and localization within the retina, as well as the co-localization of TRPV4 with calretinin. TRPV4 was first (3 dpf) found in the soma of cells localized in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, and thereafter (10 dpf) also in the inner plexiform layer. The adult pattern of TRPV4 expression was achieved by 40 dpf the expression being restricted to the soma of some cells in the inner nuclear layer and ganglion cell layers. These data demonstrate the occurrence and developmental changes in the expression and localization of TRPV4 in the retina of zebrafish, and suggest a role of TRPV4 in the visual processing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is viewed with confocal microscopy and laser speckle flowmetry to monitor glial cell responses and retinal blood flow. Retinal glial cells are labeled with the Ca2+ indicator dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 and the caged Ca2+ compound NP-EGTA by injection of the compounds into the vitreous humor. Glial cells are stimulated by photolysis of caged Ca2+ and the activation state of the cells assessed by monitoring Ca2+ indicator dye fluorescence. We find that, as in the ex vivo retina, retinal glial cells in vivo generate both spontaneous and evoked intercellular Ca2+ waves. We also find that stimulation of glial cells leads to the dilation of neighboring retinal arterioles, supporting the hypothesis that glial cells regulate blood flow in the retina. This in vivo preparation holds great promise for assessing glial cell function in the healthy and pathological retina. PMID:22144328

  14. Desgarros del epitelio pigmentario de la retina: factores de riesgo, mecanismo y control terapéutico.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Christoph R; Eter, Nicole

    2017-07-11

    Los desgarros del epitelio pigmentario de la retina (EPR) se asocian en la mayoría de los casos con los desprendimientos vascularizados del EPR debido a una degeneración macular asociada a la edad (DMAE), y normalmente implican una pérdida adversa de la agudeza visual. Estudios recientes indican que ha habido un aumento en la incidencia de desgarros del EPR desde la introducción de fármacos anti-factor de crecimiento del endotelio vascular (anti-VEGF) así como una asociación temporal entre el desgarro y la inyección intravítrea. Dado que el número de pacientes con DMAE y el número de inyecciones anti-VEGF va en aumento, tanto la dificultad de prevenir desgarros del EPR como el tratamiento tras la formación de los desgarros han adquirido una mayor relevancia. De forma paralela, la evolución de la imagenología de la retina ha contribuido de manera significativa a comprender mejor el desarrollo de los desgarros del EPR en los últimos años. Esta revisión resume los conocimientos que se poseen actualmente sobre el desarrollo, los factores pronósticos y las estrategias terapéuticas de los desgarros del EPR antes y después de que estos se formen. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. [The ultrastructure changes of rabbit retina after periodical vacuum suction].

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-shan; Zhou, Xiao-dong; Chu, Ren-yuan

    2005-12-01

    To study the effects of periodical vacuum-suction of different pressures on the ultrastructure of rabbits' retina. Rabbits involved in the present study were divided into a control group and four treatment groups, which were treated with vacuum-suction of different pressures through scleral suction ring. The suction pressure was increased at a rate of 100 mm Hg/3 sec (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) and reached (200 +/- 20) mm Hg (group I), (300 +/- 20) mm Hg (group II); (400 +/- 20) mm Hg (group III) and (500 +/- 20) mm Hg (group IV). The suction pressure was maintained for 5 seconds before released to zero. The corresponding intraocular pressure examined by Tonopen was 35 mm Hg, 45 mm Hg, 55 mm Hg and 75 mm Hg in these 4 groups, respectively. This circle was repeated for 10 times with 1 minute interval. The test was repeated every other day. The retina was examined by electron microscope after 2 weeks. There was no obvious difference in the retina ultrastructure between the control group and group I. The retina ultrastructure changed slightly in group II which showed more active metabolism. Some significant changes were found in group III and group IV with cell necrosis in group IV. Different elevations of intraocular pressure following periodical vacuum-suction have different effects on the retina of rabbit. Pressure less than 45 mm Hg has almost no effect, but some effects appear at 55 mm Hg pressure, and obviously damages are caused by 75 mm Hg pressure.

  16. Distribution of photon absorption rates across the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T P; Webbers, J P P; Giordano, L; Henderson, R P

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the distribution of light intensity across the rat retina was carried out on excised, intact rat eyes exposed to Ganzfeld illumination from a helium-neon laser (543 nm). Some of the light entering the eyes exits through the sclera where its intensity can be monitored with an optical ‘pick-up’ that samples the intensity coming from a small region of external sclera and underlying retina. The spatial resolution of the pick-up is such that it samples light that has passed through ca 2% of the rods in the rat eye. Some of the laser light is absorbed by the rod pigment, rhodopsin, which gradually bleaches. Bleaching in the retina, in turn, causes an exponential increase in intensity emanating from the sclera. By monitoring this intensity increase, we are able to measure two important parameters in a single bleaching run: the local rhodopsin concentration and the local intensity falling on the rods. With an ocular transmission photometer, we have measured both the local intensity and the local rhodopsin concentration across wide regions of rat retina. Both pigmented and albino rats were studied. The distributions of rhodopsin and intensity were both nearly uniform; consequently, the product, (rhodopsin concentration) × (intensity), was similarly nearly equal across the retina. This means that the initial rate of photon absorption is about the same at all retinal locations. Interpreted in terms of photostasis (the regulation of daily photon catch), this means that the rate of photon absorption is about the same in each rod, viz. 14 400 photons absorbed per rod per second. Since this rate of absorption is sufficient to saturate the rod, one possible purpose of photostasis is to maintain the rod system in a saturated state during daylight hours. PMID:9508814

  17. Immunocytochemical analysis of photoreceptors in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M

    2009-01-01

    In the tiger salamander retina, visual signals are transmitted to the inner retina via six morphologically distinct types of photoreceptors: large/small rods, large/small single cones, and double cones composed of principal and accessory members. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology of these photoreceptors and their synaptic interconnection with bipolar cells and horizontal cells in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Here we showed that glutamate antibodies labeled all photoreceptors and recovering antibodies strongly labeled all cones and weakly labeled all rods. Antibodies against calbindin selectively stained accessory members of double cones. Antibodies against S-cone opsin stained small rods, a subpopulation of small single cones, and the outer segments of accessory double cones and a subtype of unidentified single cones. On average, large rods and small S-cone opsin positive rods accounted for 98.6% and 1.4% of all rods, respectively. Large/small cones, principle/accessory double cones, S-cone opsin positive small single cones, and S-cone opsin positive unidentified single cones accounted for about 66.9%, 23%, 4.5%, and 5.6% of the total cones, respectively. Moreover, the differential connection between rods/cones and bipolar/horizontal cells and the wide distribution of AMPA receptor subunits GluR2/3 and GluR4 at the rod/cone synapses were observed. These results provide anatomical evidence for the physiological findings that bipolar/horizontal cells in the salamander retina are driven by rod/cone inputs of different weights, and that AMPA receptors play an important role in glutamatergic neurotransmission at the first visual synapses. The different photoreceptors selectively contacting bipolar and horizontal cells support the idea that visual signals may be conveyed to the inner retina by different functional pathways in the outer retina.

  18. Expression of aquaporins in the retina of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hollborn, Margrit; Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Pannicke, Thomas; Ulbricht, Elke; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2011-09-01

    The development of retinal edema is the main reason of impaired vision in non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Water transport through aquaporins (AQPs) has been suggested to facilitate the development of ischemic edema in the retina. Here, we investigated whether experimental diabetic retinopathy in rats results in alterations of the AQP expression in the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Experimental diabetes in rats was induced by a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg body weight). The gene expression of AQPs in tissues from control and diabetic rats was examined by real-time RT-PCR. Retinal cryosections were immunostained against AQP5, 6, and 9. The total RNAs extracted from the neural retina and RPE contained gene transcripts for AQP0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, and 12. Experimental diabetes was associated with an upregulation of AQP1 in the neural retina, and of AQP5, 9, 11, and 12 in the RPE. Furthermore, diabetes was associated with a downregulation of AQP6 and AQP11 in the neural retina, and of AQP0 in the RPE. AQP5 and AQP9 immunolabelings of the RPE were increased, and AQP6 labeling of the outer plexiform layer was decreased in retinal slices from diabetic rats in comparison to slices from control rats. The data suggest that experimental diabetic retinopathy is associated with a complex pattern of alteration in the retinal AQP expression. These alterations might be involved in the adaptation of retinal cells to hyperglycemic conditions and the development and/or resolution of retinal edema.

  19. The expression and function of midkine in the vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Gramage, E; Li, J; Hitchcock, P

    2014-01-01

    The functional role of midkine during development, following injury and in disease has been studied in a variety of tissues. In this review, we summarize what is known about midkine in the vertebrate retina, focusing largely on recent studies utilizing the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model. Zebrafish are a valuable animal model for studying the retina, due to its very rapid development and amazing ability for functional neuronal regeneration following neuronal cell death. The zebrafish genome harbours two midkine paralogues, midkine-a (mdka) and midkine-b (mdkb), which, during development, are expressed in nested patterns among different cell types. mdka is expressed in the retinal progenitors and mdkb is expressed in newly post-mitotic cells. Interestingly, studies of loss-and gain-of-function in zebrafish larvae indicate that midkine-a regulates cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, both mdka and mdkb are expressed in different cell types in the normal adult zebrafish retina, but after light-induced death of photoreceptors, both are up-regulated and expressed in proliferating Müller glia and photoreceptor progenitors, suggesting an important and (perhaps) coincident role for these cytokines during stem cell-based neuronal regeneration. Based on its known role in other tissues and the expression and function of the midkine paralogues in the zebrafish retina, we propose that midkine has an important functional role both during development and regeneration in the retina. Further studies are needed to understand this role and the mechanisms that underlie it. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24460673

  20. Calpain-5 Expression in the Retina Localizes to Photoreceptor Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Kellie A.; Toral, Marcus A.; Velez, Gabriel; Cox, Allison J.; Baker, Sheila A.; Borcherding, Nicholas C.; Colgan, Diana F.; Bondada, Vimala; Mashburn, Charles B.; Yu, Chen-Guang; Geddes, James W.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We characterize calpain-5 (CAPN5) expression in retinal and neuronal subcellular compartments. Methods CAPN5 gene variants were classified using the exome variant server, and RNA-sequencing was used to compare expression of CAPN5 mRNA in the mouse and human retina and in retinoblastoma cells. Expression of CAPN5 protein was ascertained in humans and mice in silico, in mouse retina by immunohistochemistry, and in neuronal cancer cell lines and fractionated central nervous system tissue extracts by Western analysis with eight antibodies targeting different CAPN5 regions. Results Most CAPN5 genetic variation occurs outside its protease core; and searches of cancer and epilepsy/autism genetic databases found no variants similar to hyperactivating retinal disease alleles. The mouse retina expressed one transcript for CAPN5 plus those of nine other calpains, similar to the human retina. In Y79 retinoblastoma cells, the level of CAPN5 transcript was very low. Immunohistochemistry detected CAPN5 expression in the inner and outer nuclear layers and at synapses in the outer plexiform layer. Western analysis of fractionated retinal extracts confirmed CAPN5 synapse localization. Western blots of fractionated brain neuronal extracts revealed distinct subcellular patterns and the potential presence of autoproteolytic CAPN5 domains. Conclusions CAPN5 is moderately expressed in the retina and, despite higher expression in other tissues, hyperactive disease mutants of CAPN5 only manifest as eye disease. At the cellular level, CAPN5 is expressed in several different functional compartments. CAPN5 localization at the photoreceptor synapse and with mitochondria explains the neural circuitry phenotype in human CAPN5 disease alleles. PMID:27152965

  1. Immunocytochemical analysis of photoreceptors in the tiger salamander retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    In the tiger salamander retina, visual signals are transmitted to the inner retina via six morphologically distinct types of photoreceptors: large/small rods, large/small single cones, and double cones composed of principal and accessory members. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology of these photoreceptors and their synaptic interconnection with bipolar cells and horizontal cells in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Here we showed that glutamate antibodies labeled all photoreceptors and recoverin antibodies strongly labeled all cones and weakly labeled all rods. Antibodies against calbindin selectively stained accessory members of double cones. Antibodies against S-cone opsin stained small rods, a subpopulation of small single cones, and the outer segments of accessory double cones and a subtype of unidentified single cones. On average, large rods and small S-cone opsin positive rods accounted for 98.6% and 1.4% of all rods, respectively. Large/small cones, principle/accessory double cones, S-cone opsin positive small single cones, and S-cone opsin positive unidentified single cones accounted for about 66.9%, 23%, 4.5%, and 5.6% of the total cones, respectively. Moreover, the differential connection between rods/cones and bipolar/horizontal cells and the wide distribution of AMPA receptor subunits GluR2/3 and GluR4 at the rod/cone synapses were observed. These results provide anatomical evidence for the physiological findings that bipolar/horizontal cells in the salamander retina are driven by rod/cone inputs of different weights, and that AMPA receptors play an important role in glutamatergic neurotransmission at the first visual synapses. The different photoreceptors selectively contacting bipolar and horizontal cells support the idea that visual signals may be conveyed to the inner retina by different functional pathways in the outer retina. PMID:18977238

  2. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina.

    PubMed

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-04-15

    Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, 'BPD' group) or room air (21% O2, 'control' group) from postnatal day 4-14 (P4-14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=-0.49,P=0.02) and retina (r=-0.70,P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia.

  3. Impact of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on brain and retina

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Ma, Emilie Xiao Hang; Vadivel, Arul; Jung, Suna; Khoja, Zehra; Stephens, Laurel; Thébaud, Bernard; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many premature newborns develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease resulting from prolonged mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia. BPD survivors typically suffer long-term injuries not only to the lungs, but also to the brain and retina. However, currently it is not clear whether the brain and retinal injuries in these newborns are related only to their prematurity, or also to BPD. We investigated whether the hyperoxia known to cause histologic changes in the lungs similar to BPD in an animal model also causes brain and retinal injuries. Sprague Dawley rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2, ‘BPD’ group) or room air (21% O2, ‘control’ group) from postnatal day 4–14 (P4–14); the rat pups were housed in room air between P14 and P28. At P28, they were sacrificed, and their lungs, brain, and eyes were extracted. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on lung and brain sections; retinas were stained with Toluidine Blue. Hyperoxia exposure resulted in an increased mean linear intercept in the lungs (P<0.0001). This increase was associated with a decrease in some brain structures [especially the whole-brain surface (P=0.02)], as well as a decrease in the thickness of the retinal layers [especially the total retina (P=0.0008)], compared to the room air control group. In addition, a significant negative relationship was observed between the lung structures and the brain (r=−0.49, P=0.02) and retina (r=−0.70, P=0.0008) structures. In conclusion, hyperoxia exposure impaired lung, brain, and retina structures. More severe lung injuries correlated with more severe brain and retinal injuries. This result suggests that the same animal model of chronic neonatal hyperoxia can be used to simultaneously study lung, brain and retinal injuries related to hyperoxia. PMID:26988760

  4. In vivo characterization of ischemic retina in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reznicek, Lukas; Kernt, Marcus; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael; Neubauer, Aljoscha S

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to characterize pathomorphologic changes within particular layers of fluorescein angiographically ‘ischemic’ compared to ‘nonischemic’ retina in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods Cross-sectional images of ischemic retinal areas were obtained using Heidelberg Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT). Presumed retinal ischemia was defined as focal hypofluorescence in early or early and late phase fluorescein angiography. Pathomorphologic changes on OCT were evaluated and the thickness of retinal layers measured and compared with nonischemic retina at corresponding topographic locations in a matched-pairs design based on 22 eyes (mean age 64 ± 14). Results In all eyes, based on spectral domain-OCT cross-section images, the retina layers in ischemic retinal areas could be segmented. Total retinal thickness was significantly increased in ischemic compared to nonischemic areas (381 ± 94 μm versus 323 ± 89 μm, P = 0.005). Middle retinal layers (inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, and outer nuclear layer) were significantly thickened in retinal ischemic areas (215 ± 82 μm versus 168 ± 62 μm, P = 0.002). The inner retinal layers (retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and inner plexiform layer) showed a nonsignificant change (117 ± 53 μm versus 98 ± 30 μm), while the outer layers were slightly thinned (photoreceptors plus retinal pigment epithelium layer; 51 ± 9 μm versus 57 ± 8 μm, P = 0.02) in ischemic versus nonischemic retina. Conclusions Ischemic diabetic retina seems to be thickened due to thickening of, in particular, middle retinal layers, which can be measured with high-resolution OCT. PMID:21311655

  5. Optical coherence tomography identifies outer retina thinning in frontotemporal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Benjamin J; Irwin, David J; Song, Delu; Daniel, Ebenezer; Leveque, Jennifer D; Raquib, Aaishah R; Pan, Wei; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Aleman, Tomas S; Dunaief, Joshua L; Grossman, Murray

    2017-09-08

    Whereas Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with inner retina thinning visualized by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), we sought to determine if the retina has a distinguishing biomarker for frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Using a cross-sectional design, we examined retinal structure in 38 consecutively enrolled patients with FTD and 44 controls using a standard SD-OCT protocol. Retinal layers were segmented with the Iowa Reference Algorithm. Subgroups of highly predictive molecular pathology (tauopathy, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, unknown) were determined by clinical criteria, genetic markers, and a CSF biomarker (total tau: β-amyloid) to exclude presumed AD. We excluded eyes with poor image quality or confounding diseases. SD-OCT measures of patients (n = 46 eyes) and controls (n = 69 eyes) were compared using a generalized linear model accounting for intereye correlation, and correlations between retinal layer thicknesses and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated. Adjusting for age, sex, and race, patients with FTD had a thinner outer retina than controls (132 vs 142 μm, p = 0.004). Patients with FTD also had a thinner outer nuclear layer (ONL) (88.5 vs 97.9 μm, p = 0.003) and ellipsoid zone (EZ) (14.5 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.009) than controls, but had similar thicknesses for inner retinal layers. The outer retina thickness of patients correlated with MMSE (Spearman r = 0.44, p = 0.03). The highly predictive tauopathy subgroup (n = 31 eyes) also had a thinner ONL (88.7 vs 97.4 μm, p = 0.01) and EZ (14.4 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.01) than controls. FTD is associated with outer retina thinning, and this thinning correlates with disease severity. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. MRI of blood flow of the human retina.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qi; Zhang, Yi; Nateras, Oscar San Emeterio; van Osch, Matthias J P; Duong, Timothy Q

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a high-resolution MRI approach to image basal blood flow and hypercapnia-induced blood-flow changes in the unanesthetized human retina on a 3-T MRI scanner. Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling technique with static tissue suppression was implemented to minimize movement artifacts and improve blood-flow sensitivity. Turbo spin-echo acquisition was used to achieve high spatial resolution free of susceptibility artifacts. The size, shape, and position of a custom-made receive radiofrequency coil were optimized for sensitivity in the posterior retina. Synchronized eye blink and respiration to the end of each data readout minimized eye movement and physiological fluctuation. Robust high-contrast blood-flow MRI of the unanesthetized human retina was obtained at 500 × 800 μm(2) in-plane resolution. Blood flow in the posterior retina was 93 ± 31 mL/(100 mL min) (mean ± standard deviation, N = 5). Hypercapnic inhalation (5% CO(2)) increased blood flow by 12 ± 4% relative to air (P < 0.01, N = 5). This study demonstrates the feasibility of blood-flow MRI of the retina of unanesthetized human. Because blood flow is tightly coupled to metabolic function under normal conditions and it is often perturbed in diseases, this approach could provide unique insights into retinal physiology and serve as an objective imaging biomarker for disease staging and testing of novel therapeutic strategies. This approach could open up new avenue of retinal research. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Diosmin Protects Rat Retina from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nianting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Gong, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lili

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Diosmin, a natural flavone glycoside, possesses antioxidant activity and has been used to alleviate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the administration of diosmin has a protective effect against I/R injury induced using the high intraocular pressure (IOP) model in rat retina, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanisms involved. Methods Retinal I/R injury was induced in the rats by elevating the IOP to 110 mmHg for 60 min. Diosmin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) in the retinal tissues were determined 24 h after I/R injury. At 7 days post-I/R injury, electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded, and the density of surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was estimated by counting retrograde tracer-labeled cells in whole-mounted retinas. Retinal histological changes were also examined and quantified using light microscopy. Results Diosmin significantly decreased the MDA levels and increased the activities of T-SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the retina of rats compared with the ischemia group (P<0.05), and suppressed the I/R-induced reduction in the a- and b-wave amplitudes of the ERG (P<0.05). The thickness of the entire retina, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer, and outer retinal layer and the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer were significantly less after I/R injury (P<0.05), and diosmin remarkably ameliorated these changes on retinal morphology. Diosmin also attenuated the I/R-induced loss of RGCs of the rat retina (P<0.05). Conclusion Diosmin protected the retina from I/R injury, possibly via a mechanism involving the regulation of oxidative parameters. PMID:22509733

  8. Using stem cells to mend the retina in ocular disease.

    PubMed

    Bull, Natalie D; Martin, Keith R

    2009-11-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are the leading cause of incurable blindness worldwide. Furthermore, existing pharmacological and surgical interventions are only partially effective in halting disease progression, thus adjunctive neuroprotective strategies are desperately needed to preserve vision. Stem cells appear to possess inherent neuroprotective abilities, at least in part by providing neurotrophic support to injured neurons. Advances in stem cell biology offer the hope of new therapies for a broad range of neurodegenerative conditions, including those of the retina. Experimental cell-mediated therapies also hint at the tantalizing possibility of achieving retinal neuronal replacement and regeneration, once cells are lost to the disease process. This article summarizes the latest advances in cell therapies for neuroprotection and regeneration in neurodegenerative pathologies of both the inner and outer retina.

  9. Optical combing to align photoreceptors in detached retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shizhuo; Gardner, Thomas W.; Wu, Fei; Cholker, Milind S.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel micro-manipulating method, called 'optical combing', that could improve the retina reattachment surgery results. Optical combing adopts the working principle of optical tweezers (i.e., focused Gaussian beam produces a trapping force when it incidents onto a micro-object. The trapping force can pull the micro-object to the central point of focused laser beam. Optical combing is implemented by scanning a focused laser beam on the misaligned micro objects (such as misaligned photoreceptors). In our preliminary experiment, a set of misaligned micro glass rods was re-aligned by applying this optical combing technology, which verified our theory. In the future, this technique will be used to re-align misaligned photoreceptors in real retina.

  10. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  11. Arteriovenous malformation in the retina of a monkey.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T; Gass, D M; David, N J

    1976-12-01

    A vascular abnormality of the retina of a rhesus monkey was studied with fluorescein angiography, microvascular examination after silicone rubber injection, and histological examination. Fluorescein angiography revealed that this abnormality was an arteriovenous shunt. Microvascular examination showed a vascular abnormality on the sclera and an end-to-end communication of the arteriovenous malformation that was a continuation of abnormally large central retinal vessels observed just before their insertion into the optic nerve in the orbit. Histologic examination proved that the arteriovenous shunt originated from the central retinal vessels in the orbit; that degeneration of the retina and the choroid was extensive near the abnormal vessels; that the abnormal vessels had normal endothelium and adventitia but remarkably widened media; and that the cavernous hamangioma-like structure in the optic disk was clearly distinguishable from a cavernous hamangioma.

  12. Segregation of object and background motion in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ölveczky, Bence P.; Baccus, Stephen A.; Meister, Markus

    2003-05-01

    An important task in vision is to detect objects moving within a stationary scene. During normal viewing this is complicated by the presence of eye movements that continually scan the image across the retina, even during fixation. To detect moving objects, the brain must distinguish local motion within the scene from the global retinal image drift due to fixational eye movements. We have found that this process begins in the retina: a subset of retinal ganglion cells responds to motion in the receptive field centre, but only if the wider surround moves with a different trajectory. This selectivity for differential motion is independent of direction, and can be explained by a model of retinal circuitry that invokes pooling over nonlinear interneurons. The suppression by global image motion is probably mediated by polyaxonal, wide-field amacrine cells with transient responses. We show how a population of ganglion cells selective for differential motion can rapidly flag moving objects, and even segregate multiple moving objects.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  14. Characterization of displaced bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Maple, Bruce R; Zhang, Jian; Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M

    2005-03-01

    In immunocytochemical studies of the tiger salamander retina, 17% of neurons in the outer nuclear layer did not label for recoverin, a photoreceptor marker. Lucifer yellow injection showed a population of cells in the ONL to be displaced bipolar cells, with axon terminals that stratified exclusively in the OFF sublamina of the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and predominately within the cone-dominated region of the OFF sublamina. Glutamate generated a dendritic cationic conductance increase in all displaced bipolar cells tested, and typical cone-dominated bipolar cell light responses were observed among displaced cells that stratified in the central IPL. We conclude that displaced bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina are entirely OFF-center cells, and predominately cone-dominated cells.

  15. [Image diagnostic of the retina with fundus cameras].

    PubMed

    Koschmieder, Ingo; Müller, Lothar

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of the retina of the human eye is an essential aid for medical diagnosis. The technical realization of photos of the ocular fundus is not trivial because of the optical properties of the eye. Established devices to obtain images are so called fundus cameras with digital documentation capabilities. New procedures do not need the use of pupils enlarging measures at the patient and work with infrared illumination. The quality of the diagnostic findings depends on the one hand fundamentally on the lay-out of the optical design of the fundus camera. On the other hand there are limitations caused by the eye itself which is always a part of the beam path. Both impacts define the attainable results. Special applications deal with the stereoscopic imaging of the retina or with spectral reflection characteristics.

  16. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in the vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V. S.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphoinositide (PI) cycle, discovered over 50 years ago by Mabel and Lowell Hokin, describes a series of biochemical reactions that occur on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane of cells in response to receptor activation by extracellular stimuli. Studies from our laboratory have shown that the retina and rod outer segments (ROSs) have active PI metabolism. Biochemical studies revealed that the ROSs contain the enzymes necessary for phosphorylation of phosphoinositides. We showed that light stimulates various components of the PI cycle in the vertebrate ROS, including diacylglycerol kinase, PI synthetase, phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). This article describes recent studies on the PI3K-generated PI lipid second messengers in the control and regulation of PI-binding proteins in the vertebrate retina. PMID:19638643

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  18. Transcriptome of the human retina, retinal pigmented epithelium and choroid

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lifeng; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista L; Bowman, Anita S; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Stambolian, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The retina and its adjacent supporting tissues -- retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid -- are critical structures in human eyes required for normal visual perception. Abnormal changes in these layers have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. With the advent of high-throughput methods, such as serial analysis of gene expression, cDNA microarray, and RNA sequencing, there is unprecedented opportunity to facilitate our understanding of the normal retina, RPE, and choroid. This information can be used to identify dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. In this review, we describe the current status in our understanding of these transcriptomes through the use of high throughput techniques. PMID:25645700

  19. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  20. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pérez De Sevilla Müller, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:25349920

  1. Immunohistochemical and calcium imaging methods in wholemount rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C; Pérez De Sevilla Müller, Luis

    2014-10-13

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer.

  2. Age related macular degeneration and drusen: neuroinflammation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Elisa; Piras, Antonio; Nuzzi, Raffaele; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2011-09-15

    Inflammation protects from dangerous stimuli, restoring normal tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory response in the nervous system ("neuroinflammation") has distinct features, which are shared in several diseases. The retina is an immune-privileged site, and the tight balance of immune reaction can be disrupted and lead to age-related macular disease (AMD) and to its peculiar sign, the druse. Excessive activation of inflammatory and immunological cascade with subsequent induction of damage, persistent activation of resident immune cells, accumulation of byproducts that exceeds the normal capacity of clearance giving origin to a chronic local inflammation, alterations in the activation of the complement system, infiltration of macrophages, T-lymphocytes and mast-cells from the bloodstream, participate in the mechanisms which originate the drusen. In addition, aging of the retina and AMD involve also para-inflammation, by which immune cells react to persistent stressful stimuli generating low-grade inflammation, aimed at restoring function and maintaining tissue homeostasis by varying the set point in relation to the new altered conditions. This mechanism is also seen in the normal aging retina, but, in the presence of noxious stimuli as in AMD, it can become chronic and have an adverse outcome. Finally, autophagy may provide new insights to understand AMD pathology, due to its contribution in the removal of defective proteins. Therefore, the AMD retina can represent a valuable model to study neuroinflammation, its mechanisms and therapy in a restricted and controllable environment. Targeting these pathways could represent a new way to treat and prevent both exudative and dry forms of AMD.

  3. Myopia-aphakia. II. Vitreous and peripheral retina.

    PubMed Central

    Hyams, S W; Neumann, E; Friedman, Z

    1975-01-01

    Biomicroscopical examination of the vitreous and peripheral retina was performed on 103 aphakic eyes with myopia of at least -6-0 dioptres. Retinal breaks were found in 19 eyes (18-4 per cent). Posterior vitreous detachment was present in all but one of the eyes. The high prevalence of retinal breaks in aphakic eyes with high myopia is compatible with the high incidence of retinal detachment in such eyes. PMID:1203234

  4. The Retina and Other Light-sensitive Ocular Clocks.

    PubMed

    Besharse, Joseph C; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-06-01

    Ocular clocks, first identified in the retina, are also found in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), cornea, and ciliary body. The retina is a complex tissue of many cell types and considerable effort has gone into determining which cell types exhibit clock properties. Current data suggest that photoreceptors as well as inner retinal neurons exhibit clock properties with photoreceptors dominating in nonmammalian vertebrates and inner retinal neurons dominating in mice. However, these differences may in part reflect the choice of circadian output, and it is likely that clock properties are widely dispersed among many retinal cell types. The phase of the retinal clock can be set directly by light. In nonmammalian vertebrates, direct light sensitivity is commonplace among body clocks, but in mice only the retina and cornea retain direct light-dependent phase regulation. This distinguishes the retina and possibly other ocular clocks from peripheral oscillators whose phase depends on the pace-making properties of the hypothalamic central brain clock, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, in mice, retinal circadian oscillations dampen quickly in isolation due to weak coupling of its individual cell-autonomous oscillators, and there is no evidence that retinal clocks are directly controlled through input from other oscillators. Retinal circadian regulation in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates uses melatonin and dopamine as dark- and light-adaptive neuromodulators, respectively, and light can regulate circadian phase indirectly through dopamine signaling. The melatonin/dopamine system appears to have evolved among nonmammalian vertebrates and retained with modification in mammals. Circadian clocks in the eye are critical for optimum visual function where they play a role fine tuning visual sensitivity, and their disruption can affect diseases such as glaucoma or retinal degeneration syndromes.

  5. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  6. Isoaspartyl Protein Damage and Repair in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenxia; Yang, Jing; Klassen, Henry J.; Aswad, Dana W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the propensity of retinal proteins for spontaneous damage via formation of isoaspartyl sites, a common type of protein damage that could contribute to retinal disease. Methods. Tissue extracts were obtained from retinas and brains of control mice and from mice in which the gene for protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT; an enzyme that repairs isoaspartyl protein damage) was knocked out. PIMT expression in these extracts was measured by Western blot, and its specific activity was assayed by monitoring the rate of [3H]methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-[methyl-3H]L-methionine to γ-globulin. Isoaspartate levels in extracts were measured by their capacity to accept [3H]methyl groups via the PIMT-catalyzed methylation reaction. To compare molecular weight distributions of isoaspartyl-rich proteins in retina versus brain, proteins from PIMT knockout (KO) and control mice were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Isoaspartyl proteins were 3H-labeled on-blot using a PIMT overlay and imaged by autoradiography. Results. When normalized to the β-actin content of each tissue, retina was found to be nearly identical to brain with regard to expression and activity of PIMT and its propensity to accumulate isoaspartyl sites when PIMT is absent. The two tissues show distinct differences in the molecular weight distribution of isoaspartyl proteins. Conclusions. The retina is rich in PIMT activity and contains a wide range of proteins that are highly susceptible to this type of protein damage. Recoverin may be one such protein. Isoaspartate formation, along with oxidation, should be considered as a potential source of protein dysfunction and autoimmunity in retinal disease. PMID:24550364

  7. In vitro and ex vivo retina angiogenesis assays.

    PubMed

    Rezzola, Sara; Belleri, Mirella; Gariano, Giuseppina; Ribatti, Domenico; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Presta, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Pathological angiogenesis of the retina is a key component of irreversible causes of blindness, as observed in proliferative diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinopathy of prematurity. Seminal studies in the early 1980 s about the angiogenic activity exerted by mammalian retinal tissue extracts on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane and the later discovery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) accumulation in eyes of patients with diabetic retinopathy paved the way for the development of anti-angiogenic VEGF blockers for the treatment of retinal neovascularization. Since then, numerous preclinical and clinical studies about diabetic retinopathy and other retinal disorders have opened new lines of angiogenesis inquiry, indicating that limitations to anti-VEGF therapies may exist. Moreover, the production of growth factors other than VEGF may affect the response to anti-VEGF approaches. Thus, experimental models of retinal angiogenesis remain crucial for investigating novel anti-angiogenic therapies and bringing them to patients. To this aim, in vitro and ex vivo angiogenesis assays may be suitable for a rapid screening of potential anti-angiogenic molecules before in vivo validation of the putative lead compounds. This review focuses on the different in vitro and ex vivo angiogenesis assays that have been developed over the years based on the isolation of endothelial cells from the retina of various animal species and ex vivo cultures of neonatal and adult retina explants. Also, recent observations have shown that eye neovascularization in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, an in vivo animal platform experimentally analogous to in vitro/ex vivo models, may represent a novel target for the identification of angiogenesis inhibitors. When compared to in vivo assays, in vitro and ex vivo models of retina neovascularization, including zebrafish embryo, may represent cost-effective and rapid tools for the screening of novel anti

  8. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina

    PubMed Central

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-01-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380–780 nm; (400–700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution. PMID:26541085

  9. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina.

    PubMed

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-02-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.

  10. The Effects of Metformin on Obesity-Induced Dysfunctional Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andy Jeesu; Chang, Janet Ya-An; Shi, Liheng; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of metformin on dysfunctional retinas in obesity-induced type 2 diabetic mice. Methods A high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mouse model (C57BL/6J) was used in this study. After 2 months of the HFD regimen, HFD mice were given daily metformin through oral gavage. Body weights, glucose tolerance, and retinal light responses were monitored regularly. Fluorescein angiography (FA) was used to assess changes in retinal vasculature. Ocular tissues (retina, vitreous, and lens) were harvested and analyzed for molecular changes as determined by immunofluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and cytokine profiling. Results Starting 1 month after the diet regimen, mice fed the HFD had mildly compromised retinal light responses as measured by electroretinography (ERG), which worsened over time compared to that in the control. In HFD mice treated with metformin, systemic glucose levels reverted back to normal, and their weight gain slowed. Metformin reversed HFD-induced changes in phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), and 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) in the retina. However, metformin treatments for 3 months did not restore the retinal light responses nor lessen the HFD-induced retinal neovascularization, even though it did reduce intraocular inflammation. Conclusions Although metformin was able to reverse systemic changes induced by HFD, it was not able to restore HFD-caused retinal light responses or deter neovascularization. PMID:28114566

  11. In vivo intrinsic optical signal imaging of mouse retinas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-02-13

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging is a promising noninvasive method for advanced study and diagnosis of eye diseases. Before pursuing clinical applications, more IOS studies employing animal models are necessary to establish the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. Ample mouse models are available for investigating the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. However, in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas is challenging due to the small ocular lens (compared to frog eyes) and inevitable eye movements. We report here in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas using a custom-designed functional OCT. The OCT system provided high resolution (3 μm) and high speed (up to 500 frames/s) imaging of mouse retinas. An animal holder equipped with a custom designed ear bar and bite bar was used to minimize eye movement due to breathing and heartbeats. Residual eye movement in OCT images was further compensated by accurate image registration. Dynamic OCT imaging revealed rapid IOSs from photoreceptor outer segments immediately (<10 ms) after the stimulation delivery, and unambiguous IOS changes were also observed from inner retinal layers with delayed time courses compared to that of photoreceptor IOSs.

  12. Response of the retina at low temporal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Burns, S A; Elsner, A E

    1996-03-01

    We investigated the low-frequency temporal response of the retina by measuring the corneal electroretinogram elicited by flickering lights. A sum of two temporal sine-wave modulations was used to generate difference frequencies between a 36-Hz standard stimulus and a series of low-frequency stimuli. The response of the retina at the difference frequency did not change as the low-frequency component of the stimulus was varied from 0.5 to 4 Hz. We also replicated an earlier study, stimulating the retina with a sum of two sine waves that were varied in average frequency but keeping the difference frequency constant. These data showed no change in the amplitude of the difference frequency as the average stimulus frequency was varied from 8 to almost 40 Hz. Taken together, the two sets of data support the notion that the in vivo early retinal response is low pass and extends without attenuation to frequencies greater than 30 Hz, in contrast to the sensitivity of the visual system measured by psychophysical techniques.

  13. In vivo intrinsic optical signal imaging of mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging is a promising noninvasive method for advanced study and diagnosis of eye diseases. Before pursuing clinical applications, more IOS studies employing animal models are necessary to establish the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. Ample mouse models are available for investigating the relationship between IOS distortions and eye diseases. However, in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas is challenging due to the small ocular lens (compared to frog eyes) and inevitable eye movements. We report here in vivo IOS imaging of mouse retinas using a custom-designed functional OCT. The OCT system provided high resolution (3 μm) and high speed (up to 500 frames/s) imaging of mouse retinas. An animal holder equipped with a custom designed ear bar and bite bar was used to minimize eye movement due to breathing and heartbeats. Residual eye movement in OCT images was further compensated by accurate image registration. Dynamic OCT imaging revealed rapid IOSs from photoreceptor outer segments immediately (<10 ms) after the stimulation delivery, and unambiguous IOS changes were also observed from inner retinal layers with delayed time courses compared to that of photoreceptor IOSs.

  14. Ethanol increases GABA release in the embryonic avian retina.

    PubMed

    Pohl-Guimarães, Fernanda; Calaza, Karin da Costa; Yamasaki, Edna Nanami; Kubrusly, Regina Célia Cussa; Reis, Ricardo Augusto de Melo

    2010-04-01

    Several mechanisms underlying ethanol action in GABAergic synapses have been proposed, one of these mechanisms is on GABA release. Here, we report that in ovo exposure to ethanol induces an increase on GABA release in the embryonic chick retina. Eleven-day-old chick embryos (E11) received an injection of either phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or ethanol (10%, v/v, diluted in PBS), and were allowed to develop until E16. A single glutamate stimulus (2 mM) showed approximately a 40% increase on GABA release in E16 retinas when compared to controls. The effect was dependent on NMDA receptors and GAD65 mRNA levels, which were increased following the ethanol treatment. However, the numbers of GABA-, GAD-, and NR1-immunoreactive cells, and the expression levels of these proteins, were not affected. We conclude that ethanol treatment at a time point when synapses are being formed during development selectively increases GABA release in the retina via a NMDA receptor-dependent process.

  15. Statistics of Optical Coherence Tomography Data From Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    de Juan, Joaquín; Ferrone, Claudia; Giannini, Daniela; Huang, David; Koch, Giorgio; Russo, Valentina; Tan, Ou; Bruni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has recently become one of the primary methods for noninvasive probing of the human retina. The pseudoimage formed by OCT (the so-called B-scan) varies probabilistically across pixels due to complexities in the measurement technique. Hence, sensitive automatic procedures of diagnosis using OCT may exploit statistical analysis of the spatial distribution of reflectance. In this paper, we perform a statistical study of retinal OCT data. We find that the stretched exponential probability density function can model well the distribution of intensities in OCT pseudoimages. Moreover, we show a small, but significant correlation between neighbor pixels when measuring OCT intensities with pixels of about 5 µm. We then develop a simple joint probability model for the OCT data consistent with known retinal features. This model fits well the stretched exponential distribution of intensities and their spatial correlation. In normal retinas, fit parameters of this model are relatively constant along retinal layers, but varies across layers. However, in retinas with diabetic retinopathy, large spikes of parameter modulation interrupt the constancy within layers, exactly where pathologies are visible. We argue that these results give hope for improvement in statistical pathology-detection methods even when the disease is in its early stages. PMID:20304733

  16. Parallel information processing channels created in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, several parallel channels originate that extract different attributes from the visual scene. This review describes how these channels arise and what their functions are. Following the introduction four sections deal with these channels. The first discusses the “ON” and “OFF” channels that have arisen for the purpose of rapidly processing images in the visual scene that become visible by virtue of either light increment or light decrement; the ON channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light increment and the OFF channel processes images that become visible by virtue of light decrement. The second section examines the midget and parasol channels. The midget channel processes fine detail, wavelength information, and stereoscopic depth cues; the parasol channel plays a central role in processing motion and flicker as well as motion parallax cues for depth perception. Both these channels have ON and OFF subdivisions. The third section describes the accessory optic system that receives input from the retinal ganglion cells of Dogiel; these cells play a central role, in concert with the vestibular system, in stabilizing images on the retina to prevent the blurring of images that would otherwise occur when an organism is in motion. The last section provides a brief overview of several additional channels that originate in the retina. PMID:20876118

  17. Retino-cortical information transmission achievable with a retina implant.

    PubMed

    Eger, Marcus; Wilms, Marcus; Eckhorn, Reinhard; Schanze, Thomas; Hesse, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Blind subjects with photoreceptor degeneration perceive phosphenes when their intact retinal ganglion cells are stimulated electrically. Is this approach suitable for transmitting enough information to the visual cortex for partially restoring vision? We stimulated the retina of anesthetized cats electrically and visually while recording the responses in the visual cortex. Transmission of retino-cortical information T was quantified by information theory. T was 20-160 bit/s (per stimulation and recording site) with random electrical or visual impulse stimulation at rates between 20 and 40 s-1. While increasing spatial density of independent electrical stimulation channels T did not saturate with 7 electrodes/mm2 retina. With seven electrodes up to 500 bit/s was transmitted to 15 cortical recording sites. Electrical stimulation basically employs temporal stimulus patterns. They are intimately linked with intensity/contrast information coded by the spike density of retinal ganglion cells. From the cortical information spread we estimated the spatial resolution as 0.5mm cortex corresponding to 0.5-1.0 degrees visual angle. If the human cortex can receive and decode the information transmitted by a retina implant, our quantitative results measured in cats suggest that visuo-motor coordination and object recognition in many in- and out-door situations will be possible.

  18. Multiple visual pigments in a photoreceptor of the salamander retina

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Although a given retina typically contains several visual pigments, each formed from a retinal chromophore bound to a specific opsin protein, single photoreceptor cells have been thought to express only one type of opsin. This design maximizes a cell's sensitivity to a particular wavelength band and facilitates wavelength discrimination in retinas that process color. We report electrophysiological evidence that the ultraviolet-sensitive cone of salamander violates this rule. This cell contains three different functional opsins. The three opsins could combine with the two different chromophores present in salamander retina to form six visual pigments. Whereas rods and other cones of salamander use both chromophores, they appear to express only one type of opsin per cell. In visual pigment absorption spectra, the bandwidth at half-maximal sensitivity increases as the pigment's wavelength maximum decreases. However, the bandwidth of the UV-absorbing pigment deviates from this trend; it is narrow like that of a red-absorbing pigment. In addition, the UV-absorbing pigment has a high apparent photosensitivity when compared with that of red- and blue-absorbing pigments and rhodopsin. These properties suggest that the mechanisms responsible for spectrally tuning visual pigments separate two absorption bands as the wavelength of maximal sensitivity shifts from UV to long wavelengths. PMID:8817382

  19. Photoreceptor types and distributions in the retinae of insectivores.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Künzle, H; Vogel, P

    2000-01-01

    The retinae of insectivores have been rarely studied, and their photoreceptor arrangements and expression patterns of visual pigments are largely unknown. We have determined the presence and distribution of cones in three species of shrews (common shrew Sorex araneus, greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula, dark forest shrew Crocidura poensis; Soricidae) and in the lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi (Tenrecidae). Special cone types were identified and quantified in flattened whole retinae by antisera/antibodies recognizing the middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/L-)cone opsin and the short-wavelength-sensitive (S-)cone opsin, respectively. A combination of immunocytochemistry with conventional histology was used to assess rod densities and cone/rod ratios. In all four species the rods dominate at densities of about 230,000-260,000/mm2. M/L- and S-cones are present, comprising between 2% of the photoreceptors in the nocturnal Echinops telfairi and 13% in Sorex araneus that has equal diurnal and nocturnal activity phases. This suggests dichromatic color vision like in many other mammals. A striking feature in all four species are dramatically higher S-cone proportions in ventral than in dorsal retina (0.5% vs. 2.5-12% in Sorex, 5-15% vs. 30-45% in Crocidura poensis, 3-12% vs. 20-50% in Crocidura russula, 10-30% vs. 40-70% in Echinops). The functional and comparative aspects of these structural findings are discussed.

  20. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M.; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J.; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sweet, Ian R.; Hurley, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5′-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. PMID:26677218

  1. Estimating the location and size of retinal injections from orthogonal images of an intact retina.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, J J Johannes; Savier, Elise; Sterratt, David C; Reber, Michaël; Eglen, Stephen J

    2015-11-21

    To study the mapping from the retina to the brain, typically a small region of the retina is injected with a dye, which then propagates to the retina's target structures. To determine the location of the injection, usually the retina is dissected out of the eye, flattened and then imaged, causing tears and stretching of the retina. The location of the injection is then estimated from the image of the flattened retina. Here we propose a new method that avoids dissection of the retina. We have developed IntactEye, a software package that uses two orthogonal images of the intact retina to locate focal injections of a dye. The two images are taken while the retina is still inside the eye. This bypasses the dissection step, avoiding unnecessary damage to the retina, and speeds up data acquisition. By using the native spherical coordinates of the eye, we avoid distortions caused by interpreting a curved structure in a flat coordinate system. Our method compares well to the projection method and to the Retistruct package, which both use the flattened retina as a starting point. We have tested the method also on synthetic data, where the injection location is known. Our method has been designed for analysing mouse retinas, where there are no visible landmarks for discerning retinal orientation, but can also be applied to retinas from other species. IntactEye allows the user to precisely specify the location and size of a retinal injection from two orthogonal images taken of the eye. We are solving the abstract problem of locating a point on a spherical object from two orthogonal images, which might have applications outside the field of neuroscience.

  2. Simulation and performance of an artificial retina for 40 MHz track reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Abba, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Citterio, M.; Caponio, F.; Cusimano, A.; Geraci, A.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Neri, N.; Punzi, G.; Piucci, A.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.

    2015-03-05

    We present the results of a detailed simulation of the artificial retina pattern-recognition algorithm, designed to reconstruct events with hundreds of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon detectors at LHCb with LHC crossing frequency of 40 MHz. Performances of the artificial retina algorithm are assessed using the official Monte Carlo samples of the LHCb experiment. We found performances for the retina pattern-recognition algorithm comparable with the full LHCb reconstruction algorithm.

  3. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas.

  4. Thermofusion of the retina with the RPE to seal tears during retinal detachment repair.

    PubMed

    Heriot, Wilson J

    2016-04-01

    To develop an animal model to test the hypothesis that immediate adhesion of the retina to the choroid (retinopexy) can be created by elimination of the water separating the retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) prior to photocoagulation. The retina and RPE are hydrophobic lipoprotein structures separated intraoperatively by a thin layer of fluid despite surgical drainage. If the RPE and retina are contacting, heating should create a unified local coagulum and achieve instantaneous fusing of the retina and RPE, thus sealing the subretinal space around the retinal tear. The surgical technique and histological findings in a rabbit model of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) are reported here. Nine Dutch-belted, pigmented rabbits underwent vitrectomy with lensectomy, creation of localised retinal detachment by subretinal injection of balanced salt solution (BSS), enlargement of the hole and fluid-gas exchange to "re-attach" the retina. Dehydration of the retina surrounding the hole was achieved by an airstream from a flute needle. A laser (810 nm) was applied in long pulses to achieve a mild retinal reaction around the hole in the dehydrated adjacent retina. The BSS irrigation was resumed. Eyes were then enucleated and the treated retina examined histologically. The dehydrated and lasered retinal tear margin demonstrated fusion of the retina with the RPE/choroid. The non-dehydrated adjacent areas showed thermal tissue changes in the retina, RPE/choroid and adjacent sclera but remained separated by persistent subretinal fluid and no fusion or unified coagulum developed. Immediate laser-induced thermal fusion of the retina with the RPE at the margin of a retinal tear can be achieved by removing the subretinal fluid prior to photocoagulation. The integrated coagulum seals the tear margin preventing further fluid entering the subretinal space, thus correcting the cause of RRD. This method may facilitate RRD repair without buckling or internal tamponade.

  5. DNA repair synthesis in the rat retina following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, L.M.; Jose, J.G.; Pitts, D.G.

    1985-03-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to study the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the retina of albino rats following in vivo exposure to 300-nm radiation. Relative to background labeling in unexposed eyes, there was 8-20 times as much label per unit area in the outer nuclear layer, inner nuclear layer, and ganglion cells of 300-nm exposed retinas. The photoreceptor inner segments also showed thymidine labeling in both control and exposed retinas.

  6. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor 1A expression in the retina of the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2015-06-01

    The dual development of the retina of lampreys is exceptional among vertebrates and offers an interesting EvoDevo (evolutionary developmental biology) model for understanding the origin and evolution of the vertebrate retina. Only a single type of photoreceptor, ganglion cell and bipolar cell are present in the early-differentiated central retina of lamprey prolarvae. A lateral retina appears later in medium-sized larvae (about 3 years after hatching in the sea lamprey), growing and remaining largely neuroblastic until metamorphosis. In this lateral retina, only ganglion cells and optic fibers differentiate in larvae, whereas differentiation of amacrine, horizontal, photoreceptor and bipolar cells mainly takes place during metamorphosis, which gives rise to the adult retina. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter found in the retina of vertebrates whose synthesis is mediated by the rate-limiting enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). TPH is also the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathways of melatonin in photoreceptor cells. The serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) is a major determinant of the activity of both serotonergic cells and their targets due to its pre- and post-synaptic location. Here, we report the developmental pattern of expression of tph and 5-ht1a transcripts in the sea lamprey retina by means of in situ hybridization. In larvae, strong tph mRNA signal was observed in photoreceptors and putative ganglion cells of the central retina, and in some neuroblasts of the lateral retina. In adults, strong tph expression was observed in bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells and in photoreceptors. In the prolarval (central) retina, all the differentiated retinal cells expressed 5-ht1a transcripts, which were not observed in undifferentiated cells. In larvae, photoreceptors, bipolar cells and ganglion cells in the central retina, and neuroblasts in the lateral retina, showed 5-ht1a expression. In the adult retina, expression of 5-ht1a transcript

  7. Dual illumination for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    A dual illumination system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The system is designed to acquire cornea and retina imaging with dual illumination with limited optics and using a single spectrometer. The beam propagation for cornea and retina imaging in dual illumination enables to acquire the images of different segments. This approach will reduce the imaging time for separate corneal and retinal imaging. The in vivo imaging of both the cornea and retina of a health volunteer shows the feasibility of the system for clinical applications

  8. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  9. Seeing double: visual physiology of double-retina eye ontogeny in stomatopod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Feller, Kathryn D; Cohen, Jonathan H; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    Stomatopod eye development is unusual among crustaceans. Just prior to metamorphosis, an adult retina and associated neuro-processing structures emerge adjacent to the existing material in the larval compound eye. Depending on the species, the duration of this double-retina eye can range from a few hours to several days. Although this developmental process occurs in all stomatopod species observed to date, the retinal physiology and extent to which each retina contributes to the animal's visual sensitivity during this transition phase is unknown. We investigated the visual physiology of stomatopod double retinas using microspectrophotometry and electroretinogram recordings from different developmental stages of the Western Atlantic species Squilla empusa. Though microspectrophotometry data were inconclusive, we found robust ERG responses in both larval and adult retinas at all sampled time points indicating that the adult retina responds to light from the very onset of its emergence. We also found evidence of an increase in the response dynamics with ontogeny as well as an increase in sensitivity of retinal tissue during the double-retina phase relative to single retinas. These data provide an initial investigation into the ontogeny of vision during stomatopod double-retina eye development.

  10. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum.

    PubMed

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-07-16

    Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth.

  11. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum

    PubMed Central

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Background Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Results Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. Conclusion These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth. PMID:17634100

  12. Single Cell Imaging of the Chick Retina with Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Headington, Kenneth; Choi, Stacey S.; Nickla, Debora; Doble, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The chick eye is extensively used as a model in the study of myopia and its progression; however, analysis of the photoreceptor mosaic has required the use of excised retina due to the uncorrected optical aberrations in the lens and cornea. This study implemented high resolution adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging to visualize the chick cone mosaic in vivo. Methods The New England College of Optometry (NECO) AO fundus camera was modified to allow high resolution in vivo imaging on 2 six-week-old White Leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) – labeled chick A and chick B. Multiple, adjacent images, each with a 2.5° field of view, were taken and subsequently montaged together. This process was repeated at varying retinal locations measured from the tip of the pecten. Automated software was used to determine the cone spacing and density at each location. Voronoi analysis was applied to determine the packing arrangement of the cones. Results In both chicks, cone photoreceptors were clearly visible at all retinal locations imaged. Cone densities measured at 36° nasal-12° superior retina from the pecten tip for chick A and 40° nasal-12° superior retina for chick B were 21,714±543 and 26,105±653 cones/mm2 respectively. For chick B, a further 11 locations immediately surrounding the pecten were imaged, with cone densities ranging from 20,980±524 to 25,148±629 cones/mm2. Conclusion In vivo analysis of the cone density and its packing characteristics are now possible in the chick eye through AO imaging, which has important implications for future studies of myopia and ocular disease research. PMID:21950701

  13. Inflamed In Vitro Retina: Cytotoxic Neuroinflammation and Galectin-3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patrik Maximilian; Zalis, Marina Castro; Abdshill, Hodan; Deierborg, Tomas; Johansson, Fredrik; Englund-Johansson, Ulrica

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease progression in retinal neurodegeneration is strongly correlated to immune cell activation, which may have either a neuroprotective or neurotoxic effect. Increased knowledge about the immune response profile and retinal neurodegeneration may lead to candidate targets for treatments. Therefore, we have used the explanted retina as a model to explore the immune response and expression of the immune modulator galectin-3 (Gal-3), induced by the cultivation per se and after additional immune stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how this correlates with retinal neurotoxicity. Methods Post-natal mouse retinas were cultured in a defined medium. One group was stimulated with LPS (100 ng/ml, 24 h). Retinal architecture, apoptotic cell death, and micro- and macroglial activity were studied at the time of cultivation (0 days in vitro (DIV)) and at 3, 4 and 7 DIV using morphological staining, biochemical- and immunohistochemical techniques. Results Our results show that sustained activation of macro- and microglia, characterized by no detectable cytokine release and limited expression of Gal-3, is not further inducing apoptosis additional to the axotomy-induced apoptosis in innermost nuclear layer. An elevated immune response was detected after LPS stimulation, as demonstrated primarily by release of immune mediators (i.e. interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-6, KC/GRO (also known as CLCX1) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)), increased numbers of microglia displaying morphologies of late activation stages as well as Gal-3 expression. This was accompanied with increased apoptosis in the two additional nuclear layers, and damage to retinal gross architecture. Conclusion We demonstrate that an immune response characterized by sustained and increased release of cytokines, along with an increase in Gal-3 expression, is accompanied by significant increased neurotoxicity in the explanted retina. Further investigations using the current setting may lead to

  14. Measuring In Vivo Free Radical Production by the Outer Retina

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Bredell, Bryce X.; Davis, Christopher; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Excessive and continuously produced free radicals in the outer retina are implicated in retinal aging and the pathogenesis of sight-threatening retinopathies, yet measuring outer retinal oxidative stress in vivo remains a challenge. Here, we test the hypothesis that continuously produced paramagnetic free radicals from the outer retina can be measured in vivo using high-resolution (22-μm axial resolution) 1/T1magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without and with a confirmatory quench (quench-assisted MRI). Methods Low-dose sodium iodate–treated and diabetic C57Bl6/J mice (and their controls), and rod-dominated (129S6) or cone-only R91W;Nrl−/− mice were studied. In dark-adapted groups, 1/T1 was mapped transretinally in vivo without or with (1) the antioxidant combination of methylene blue (MB) and α-lipoic acid (LPA), or (2) light exposure; in subgroups, retinal superoxide production was measured ex vivo (lucigenin). Results In the sodium iodate model, retinal superoxide production and outer retina-specific 1/T1 values were both significantly greater than normal and corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. Nondiabetic mice at two ages and 1.2-month diabetic mice (before the appearance of oxidative stress) had similar transretinal 1/T1 profiles. By 2.3 months of diabetes, only outer retinal 1/T1 values were significantly greater than normal and were corrected to baseline with MB+LPA therapy. In mice with healthy photoreceptors, a light quench caused 1/T1 of rods, but not cones, to significantly decrease from their values in the dark. Conclusions Quench-assisted MRI is a feasible method for noninvasively measuring normal and pathologic production of free radicals in photoreceptors/RPE in vivo. PMID:26670830

  15. Neurokinin 1 receptor expression in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Casini, G; Rickman, D W; Sternini, C; Brecha, N C

    1997-12-22

    Tachykinin (TK) peptides influence neuronal activity in the inner retina of mammals. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cellular localization of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1), whose preferred ligand is the TK peptide substance P (SP), in the rat retina. These studies used a polyclonal antiserum directed to the C-terminus of rat NK1. The majority of NK1-immunoreactive (IR) cells were located in the proximal inner nuclear layer (INL), and very rarely they were found in the distal INL. Some small and large NK1-IR somata were present in the ganglion cell layer. NK1-IR processes were densely distributed across the inner plexiform layer (IPL) with a maximum density over lamina 2 of the IPL. Immunoreactive processes also crossed the INL and ramified in the outer plexiform layer where they formed a sparse meshwork. NK1-IR processes were rarely observed in the optic nerve fiber layer. Double-label immunofluorescence studies with different histochemical markers for bipolar cells indicated that NK1 immunoreactivity was not present in bipolar cells. Together, these observations indicate that NK1 immunoreactivity is predominantly expressed by amacrine, displaced amacrine, interplexiform, and some ganglion cells. Double-label immunofluorescence experiments were also performed to characterize NK1-containing amacrine cells. Sixty-one percent of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-IR cells, 71% of the large tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR cells, and 100% of the small TH-IR cells contained NK1 immunoreactivity. In addition, most (91%) of the NK1-IR cells had GABA immunoreactivity. In contrast, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-, TK-, choline acetyltransferase-, and parvalbumin-IR amacrine tells did not express NK1 immunoreactivity. Overall, the present findings suggest that SP acts directly upon several cell populations, including GABA-containing amacrine cells and ganglion cells, to influence visual information processing in the inner retina.

  16. Neurokinin 1 Receptor Expression in the Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Sternini, Catia; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Tachykinin (TK) peptides influence neuronal activity in the inner retina of mammals. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cellular localization of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1), whose preferred ligand is the TK peptide substance P (SP), in the rat retina. These studies used a polyclonal antiserum directed to the C-terminus of rat NK1. The majority of NK1-immunoreactive (IR) cells were located in the proximal inner nuclear layer (INL), and very rarely they were found in the distal INL. Some small and large NK1-IR somata were present in the ganglion cell layer. NK1-IR processes were densely distributed across the inner plexiform layer (IPL) with a maximum density over lamina 2 of the IPL. Immunoreactive processes also crossed the INL and ramified in the outer plexiform layer where they formed a sparse meshwork. NK1-IR processes were rarely observed in the optic nerve fiber layer. Double-label immunofluorescence studies with different histochemical markers for bipolar cells indicated that NK1 immunoreactivity was not present in bipolar cells. Together, these observations indicate that NK1 immunoreactivity is predominantly expressed by amacrine, displaced amacrine, interplexiform, and some ganglion cells. Double-label immunofluorescence experiments were also performed to characterize NK1-containing amacrine cells. Sixty-one percent of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-IR cells, 71% of the large tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR cells, and 100% of the small TH-IR cells contained NK1 immunoreactivity. In addition, most (91%) of the NK1-IR cells had GABA immunoreactivity. In contrast, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-, TK-, choline acetyltransferase-, and parvalbumin-IR amacrine cells did not express NK1 immunoreactivity. Overall, the present findings suggest that SP acts directly upon several cell populations, including GABA-containing amacrine cells and ganglion cells, to influence visual information processing in the inner retina. J. Comp. Neurol. 389:496

  17. Twelve chromatically opponent ganglion cell types in turtle retina.

    PubMed

    Rocha, F A F; Saito, C A; Silveira, L C L; de Souza, J M; Ventura, D F

    2008-01-01

    The turtle retina has been extensively used for the study of chromatic processing mechanisms. Color opponency has been previously investigated with trichromatic paradigms, but behavioral studies show that the turtle has an ultraviolet (UV) channel and a tetrachromatic visual system. Our laboratory has been working in the characterization of neuronal responses in the retina of vertebrates using stimuli in the UV-visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the present investigation, we recorded color-opponent responses from turtle amacrine and ganglion cells to UV and visible stimuli and extended our previous results that UV color-opponency is present at the level of the inner nuclear layer. We recorded from 181 neurons, 36 of which were spectrally opponent. Among these, there were 10 amacrine (5%), and 26 ganglion cells (15%). Morphological identification of color-opponent neurons was possible for two ganglion cell classes (G17 and G22) and two amacrine cell classes (A22 and A23b). There was a variety of cell response types and a potential for complex processing of chromatic stimuli, with intensity- and wavelength-dependent response components. Ten types of color opponency were found in ganglion cells and by adding previous results from our laboratory, 12 types of opponent responses have been found. The majority of the ganglion cells were R+UVBG- and RG+UVB-color-opponents but there were other less frequent types of chromatic opponency. This study confirms the participation of a UV channel in the processing of color opponency in the turtle inner retina and shows that the turtle visual system has the retinal mechanisms to allow many possible chromatic combinations.

  18. Automated retina identification based on multiscale elastic registration.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Isabel N; Moura, Susana; Neves, Júlio S; Pinto, Luís; Kumar, Sunil; Oliveira, Carlos M; Ramos, João D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose a novel method for identifying individuals based on retinal fundus image matching. The method is based on the image registration of retina blood vessels, since it is known that the retina vasculature of an individual is a signature, i.e., a distinctive pattern of the individual. The proposed image registration consists of a multiscale affine registration followed by a multiscale elastic registration. The major advantage of this particular two-step image registration procedure is that it is able to account for both rigid and non-rigid deformations either inherent to the retina tissues or as a result of the imaging process itself. Afterwards a decision identification measure, relying on a suitable normalized function, is defined to decide whether or not the pair of images belongs to the same individual. The method is tested on a data set of 21721 real pairs generated from a total of 946 retinal fundus images of 339 different individuals, consisting of patients followed in the context of different retinal diseases and also healthy patients. The evaluation of its performance reveals that it achieves a very low false rejection rate (FRR) at zero FAR (the false acceptance rate), equal to 0.084, as well as a low equal error rate (EER), equal to 0.053. Moreover, the tests performed by using only the multiscale affine registration, and discarding the multiscale elastic registration, clearly show the advantage of the proposed approach. The outcome of this study also indicates that the proposed method is reliable and competitive with other existing retinal identification methods, and forecasts its future appropriateness and applicability in real-life applications.

  19. Cellular origin of intrinsic optical signals in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Naderian, A; Bussières, L; Thomas, S; Lesage, F; Casanova, C

    2017-08-01

    Optical imaging of retinal intrinsic signals is a relatively new method that provides spatiotemporal patterns of retinal activity through activity-dependent changes in light reflectance of the retina. The exact physiological mechanisms at the origin of retinal intrinsic signals are poorly understood and there are significant inter-species differences in their characteristics and cellular origins. In this study, we re-examined this issue through pharmacological dissection of retinal intrinsic signals in the rabbit with simultaneous ERG recordings. Retinal intrinsic signals faithfully reflected retinal activity as their amplitude was strongly associated with stimulation intensity (r(2)=0.85). Further, a strong linear relation was found using linear regression (r(2)=0.98) between retinal intrinsic signal amplitude and the ERG b wave, which suggests common cellular origins. Intravitreal injections of pharmacological agents were performed to isolate the activity of the retina's major cell types. Retinal intrinsic signals were abolished when the photoreceptors' activity was isolated with aspartate, indicative that they are not at the origin of this signal. A small but significant decrease in intrinsic response (20%) was observed when ganglion and amacrine cells' activity was inhibited by TTX injections. The remaining intrinsic responses were abolished in a dose-dependent manner through the inhibition of ON-bipolar cells by APB. Our results indicate that, in rabbits, retinal intrinsic signals reflect stimulation intensity and originate from the inner retina with a major contribution of bipolar cells and a minor one from ganglion or amacrine cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal order of bipolar cell genesis in the neural retina

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Eric M; Chen, C-M Amy; Cepko, Constance L

    2008-01-01

    Background Retinal bipolar cells comprise a diverse group of neurons. Cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells are so named for their connections with cone and rod photoreceptors, respectively. Morphological criteria have been established that distinguish nine types of cone bipolar cells and one type of rod bipolar cell in mouse and rat. While anatomical and physiological aspects of bipolar types have been actively studied, little is known about the sequence of events that leads to bipolar cell type specification and the potential relationship this process may have with synapse formation in the outer plexiform layer. In this study, we have examined the birth order of rod and cone bipolar cells in the developing mouse and rat in vivo. Results Using retroviral lineage analysis with the histochemical marker alkaline phosphatase, the percentage of cone and rod bipolar cells born on postnatal day 0 (P0), P4, and P6 were determined, based upon the well characterized morphology of these cells in the adult rat retina. In this in vivo experiment, we have demonstrated that cone bipolar genesis clearly precedes rod bipolar genesis. In addition, in the postnatal mouse retina, using a combination of tritiated-thymidine birthdating and immunohistochemistry to distinguish bipolar types, we have similarly found that cone bipolar genesis precedes rod bipolar genesis. The tritiated-thymidine birthdating studies also included quantification of the birth of all postnatally generated retinal cell types in the mouse. Conclusion Using two independent in vivo methodologies in rat and mouse retina, we have demonstrated that there are distinct waves of genesis of the two major bipolar cell types, with cone bipolar genesis preceding rod bipolar genesis. These waves of bipolar genesis correspond to the order of genesis of the presynaptic photoreceptor cell types. PMID:18215319

  1. Noninvasive optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    This dissertation develops laser Raman and fluorescence based spectroscopy for the noninvasive detection of medically important pigments in the human retina. Large-scale epidemiological studies have recently shown that the pigments lutein and zeaxanthin, located in the ˜1 mm diameter macular area of the retina, protect the eye from phototoxic blue light and/or oxidative damage. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) can detect and monitor macular pigments in intact human eyes quantitatively by recording the Raman scattered light originating from the highly specific stretching vibrations of the pigment molecules' conjugated carbon backbone. This dissertation develops RRS from a spatially averaged measuring approach to spatially resolved imaging. For this purpose, a filter-based Raman imaging setup with speckle-free illumination was constructed that permits detection of macular pigments at physiological concentrations with eye-safe laser excitation levels. Subsequently, RRS images would be obtained from the living human retina. The images demonstrate quantitative as well as micron-scale, spatially resolved RRS detection of the whole macular pigment distribution. The RRS images reveal important physiological details of a subject's macular pigment distribution such as the peaked pigment concentration in the center of the macula, and the rapidly dropping pigment concentration towards the periphery of the macula. As an alternative to direct RRS imaging of macular pigments, this dissertation explores an indirect imaging approach of macular pigments, based on excitation spectroscopy of lipofuscin. A dual-wavelength laser apparatus was constructed that excites the lipofuscin fluorescence at wavelengths inside and outside the spectral range of macular pigment absorption, and that allows one to image the fluorescence intensities in a large section of the retina centered on the macula. Measuring the lipofuscin fluorescence intensities inside and outside the macula area at the two

  2. Retina Image Screening and Analysis Software Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Aykac, Deniz

    2009-04-01

    The software allows physicians or researchers to ground-truth images of retinas, identifying key physiological features and lesions that are indicative of disease. The software features methods to automatically detect the physiological features and lesions. The software contains code to measure the quality of images received from a telemedicine network; create and populate a database for a telemedicine network; review and report the diagnosis of a set of images; and also contains components to transmit images from a Zeiss camera to the network through SFTP.

  3. Choline Accumulation by Photoreceptor Cells of the Rabbit Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masland, Richard H.; Mills, John W.

    1980-03-01

    Photoreceptor cells of the rabbit retina accumulate choline from the extracellular environment by an overall process that has a high affinity for choline. These cells do not synthesize acetylcholine; instead, the choline taken up is incorporated into phosphorylcholine and eventually phospholipid. A mechanism for efficient choline accumulation is presumably concomitant to the photoreceptor cell's synthesis of large amounts of membrane for outer segment membrane renewal. Its existence in the photoreceptor cell supports previous evidence that high-affinity choline uptake is not confined to neurons that release acetylcholine, but may be present wherever large amounts of choline are required.

  4. Dendrites of rod bipolar cells sprout in normal aging retina.

    PubMed

    Liets, Lauren C; Eliasieh, Kasra; van der List, Deborah A; Chalupa, Leo M

    2006-08-08

    The aging nervous system is known to manifest a variety of degenerative and regressive events. Here we report the unexpected growth of dendrites in the retinas of normal old mice. The dendrites of many rod bipolar cells in aging mice were observed to extend well beyond their normal strata within the outer plexiform layer to innervate the outer nuclear layer where they appeared to form contacts with the spherules of rod photoreceptors. Such dendritic sprouting increased with age and was evident at all retinal eccentricities. These results provide evidence of retinal plasticity associated with normal aging.

  5. First Results of an "Artificial Retina" Processor Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenci, Riccardo; Bedeschi, Franco; Marino, Pietro; Morello, Michael J.; Ninci, Daniele; Piucci, Alessio; Punzi, Giovanni; Ristori, Luciano; Spinella, Franco; Stracka, Simone; Tonelli, Diego; Walsh, John

    2016-11-01

    We report on the performance of a specialized processor capable of reconstructing charged particle tracks in a realistic LHC silicon tracker detector, at the same speed of the readout and with sub-microsecond latency. The processor is based on an innovative pattern-recognition algorithm, called "artificial retina algorithm", inspired from the vision system of mammals. A prototype of the processor has been designed, simulated, and implemented on Tel62 boards equipped with high-bandwidth Altera Stratix III FPGA devices. The prototype is the first step towards a real-time track reconstruction device aimed at processing complex events of high-luminosity LHC experiments at 40 MHz crossing rate.

  6. [Ketamine-induced ultrastructural changes in the retina].

    PubMed

    Magdolina, A

    1978-10-01

    Alterations of the retina caused by ketamin were studied in experiment. After a 60-minutes monoanaesthesia with ketamin ultrastructural changes were observed on the inner members of receptor cells, in the three nuclear layers and in the layer of nerve fibres. Severe damage to the structure of the Müller's glial cells providing nutrition to neural-elements was also revealed. Three days after the anaesthesia beside the regression of these alterations, glycogen deposits could be seen in the Müller's cells. This phenomenon and some side effects caused by ketamin can be explained by increased utilization of oxygen and relative hypoxia.

  7. Light-evoked oxygen responses in the isolated toad retina.

    PubMed

    Haugh-Scheidt, L M; Griff, E R; Linsenmeier, R A

    1995-07-01

    Transient changes in retinal oxygen in response to light stimuli were studied to further understand the light-evoked change in oxygen consumption. Double-barreled microelectrodes, which measured oxygen and local voltage simultaneously, were positioned near the photoreceptor inner segments of the toad neural retina-retinal pigment epithelium-choroid preparation. Light-evoked oxygen responses were measured in a normal [Na+] solution, and in a test solution with lowered extracellular [Na+] to inhibit Na+/K+ pumping. Under the normal [Na+] condition, retinal oxygen tension increased in response to light indicating that oxygen utilization had decreased. When the Na+ concentration was lowered in the retina, the oxygen tension decreased in response to light, indicating an increase in oxygen utilization which was smaller than the Na+/K+ pump effect and therefore masked under normal conditions. The increase in oxygen utilization in lowered [Na+] was suppressed by adding 0.7 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, suggesting that the response was largely due to hydrolysis and subsequent resynthesis of cyclic GMP. Results of fitting the light-evoked responses to exponential functions suggested that the decrease in oxygen consumption caused by slowing of the photoreceptor Na+/K+ ATPase had a time constant between 130 and 180 sec and that the increase in oxygen utilization from increased cyclic GMP synthesis was faster.

  8. The slow P III response of the isolated frog retina.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, I; Ando, H

    1978-01-01

    The slow PIII response of the electroretinogram (ERG) was studied in the isolated, aspartate-treated bullfrog retina. The slow PIII response reflected mainly rod activity in its time course and spectral response curve, and the ratio of the peak amplitude of the fast PIII response to the slow one remained almost constant within a scotopic range when rhodopsin was kept at a constant concentration. Reducing Na+ or K+ concentration in the extracellular fluid or decreasing the rhodopsin content in the retina, however, caused different influences on the fast and slow PIII responses, and, in particular, the reduction in amplitude of the slow PIII response was more marked than that of the fast PIII response. Under these circumstances, the log of the amplitude of the slow PIII response was in linear proportion to the amplitude of the fast PIII response. In addition, the amplitude reduction of the fast PIII response was not accompanied by a decrease in peak latency but that of the slow PIII response was. An explanation on the production of the slow PIII response was attempted with reference to other results related to the slow PIII response, ionic mechanism of the electrical activity of photoreceptor cells and their Na-K pump activity.

  9. Raman detection of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2000-04-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel, non- invasive, in-vivo optical technique to measure the concentration of carotenoid pigment in the human retina. Using argon laser excitation we are able to measure two strong carotenoid resonance Raman signals at 1159 and 1525 wave numbers, respectively. The required laser power levels are within the limits given by safety standards for ocular exposure. Of the approximately ten carotenoid pigment found in normal human serum, the species lutein and zeaxanthin are concentrated in high amounts in the cells of the human macula, which is an approximately 5 mm diameter area of the retina in which the visual acuity is highest. These carotenoids give the macula a characteristic yellow coloration, and it is speculated that these molecules function as filter to attenuate photochemical damage and/or image degradation under bright UV/blue light exposures. In addition, they are thought to act as free-radical scavenging antioxidants. Studies have shown that there may be a link between macular degenerative diseases, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the US, and the presence or absence of the carotenoids. We describe an instrument capable of measuring the macular carotenoids in human subjects in a non-invasive, rapid and quantitative way.

  10. Amino acid neurotransmitters in the retina: a functional overview.

    PubMed

    Wu, S M; Maple, B R

    1998-05-01

    Physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses in the tiger salamander retina were studied. We used immunocytochemical and autoradiographic methods to study localizations of these neurotransmitters and their uptake transporters; and electrophysiological methods (intracellular, extracellular and whole cell patch electrode recordings) to study the light responses, miniature postsynaptic currents and neurotransmitter-induced postsynaptic currents in various retinal neurons. Our results are consistent with the following scheme: Glutamate is used by the photoreceptor and bipolar cell output synapses and the release of glutamate is largely mediated by calcium-dependent vesicular processes. The postsynaptic glutamate receptors in DBCs are L-AP4 receptors, in HBCs, HCs and ganglion cells are the kainate/AMPA and NMDA receptors. Subpopulations of HCs make GABAergic synapses on cones and gate chloride condunctance through GABAA receptors. GABAergic HCs do not make feedforward synapses on bipolar cell dendrites and the neurotransmitter identity of the HCs making feedforward synapses is unknown. Subpopulations of amacrine cells make GABAergic synapses on bipolar cell synaptic terminals, other amacrine cells and ganglion cells and GABA gates chloride conductances in theses cells. Glycinergic amacrine cells make synapses on bipolar cell synaptic terminals, other amacrine cells and ganglion cells and glycine opens postsynaptic chloride channels. Glycinergic interplexiform cells make synapses on bipolar cells in the outer retina and glycine released from these cells open chloride channels in bipolar cell dendrites.

  11. Diverse types of ganglion cell photoreceptors in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrea; Schmidt, Tiffany M; Kofuji, Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Photoreceptors carry out the first step in vision by capturing light and transducing it into electrical signals. Rod and cone photoreceptors efficiently translate photon capture into electrical signals by light activation of opsin-type photopigments. Until recently, the central dogma was that, for mammals, all phototransduction occurred in rods and cones. However, the recent discovery of a novel photoreceptor type in the inner retina has fundamentally challenged this view. These retinal ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and mediate a broad range of physiological responses such as photoentrainment of the circadian clock, light regulation of sleep, pupillary light reflex, and light suppression of melatonin secretion. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells express melanopsin, a novel opsin-based signaling mechanism reminiscent of that found in invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells convey environmental irradiance information directly to brain centers such as the hypothalamus, preoptic nucleus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. Initial studies suggested that these melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors were an anatomically and functionally homogeneous population. However, over the past decade or so, it has become apparent that these photoreceptors are distinguishable as individual subtypes on the basis of their morphology, molecular markers, functional properties, and efferent projections. These results have provided a novel classification scheme with five melanopsin photoreceptor subtypes in the mammalian retina, each presumably with differential input and output properties. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the structural and functional diversity of melanopsin photoreceptor subtypes and current controversies in the field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DIVERSE TYPES OF GANGLION CELL PHOTORECEPTORS IN THE MAMMALIAN RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Andrea; Schmidt, Tiffany M.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Photoreceptors carry out the first step in vision by capturing light and transducing it into electrical signals. Rod and cone photoreceptors efficiently translate photon capture into electrical signals by light activation of opsin-type photopigments. Until recently, the central dogma was that, for mammals, all phototransduction occurred in rods and cones. However, the recent discovery of a novel photoreceptor type in the inner retina has fundamentally challenged this view. These retinal ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and mediate a broad range of physiological responses such as photoentrainment of the circadian clock, light regulation of sleep, pupillary light reflex, and light suppression of melatonin secretion. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells express melanopsin, a novel opsin-based signaling mechanism reminiscent of that found in invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells convey environmental irradiance information directly to brain centers such as the hypothalamus, preoptic nucleus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. Initial studies suggested that these melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors were an anatomically and functionally homogeneous population. However, over the past decade or so, it has become apparent that these photoreceptors are distinguishable as individual subtypes on the basis of their morphology, molecular markers, functional properties, and efferent projections. These results have provided a novel classification scheme with five melanopsin photoreceptor subtypes in the mammalian retina, each presumably with differential input and output properties. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the structural and functional diversity of melanopsin photoreceptor subtypes and current controversies in the field. PMID:22480975

  13. Retinal scanning display: light sources moving over the retina.

    PubMed

    de Wit, G C

    1999-01-01

    A retinal scanning display is a new kind of display that directly uses the retina as a projection screen. This differs from, for example, a TV which first creates an image on a screen outside the eye. Although a retinal scanning display needs no screen, the principle of creating an image is similar to that of a TV. Where the TV uses an electron beam to create (scan) a raster pattern on a screen, a retinal scanning display uses a beam of light to scan a raster pattern on the retina. The way to get from an equally illuminated raster pattern to an image is to modulate the intensity of the beam as it scans. Since the eye does not look at a physical screen, people often wonder what the image of a retinal scanning display will look like. Upon seeing the image, the general response is: 'It looks just like a normal display'. In fact it is a normal display, but one that has many advantages compared to other kind of displays, such as: possibility of high brightness, large color gamut, possibility of high-resolution and good image quality.

  14. Event-based 3D reconstruction from neuromorphic retinas.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, João; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Benosman, Ryad

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a novel N-ocular 3D reconstruction algorithm for event-based vision data from bio-inspired artificial retina sensors. Artificial retinas capture visual information asynchronously and encode it into streams of asynchronous spike-like pulse signals carrying information on, e.g., temporal contrast events in the scene. The precise time of the occurrence of these visual features are implicitly encoded in the spike timings. Due to the high temporal resolution of the asynchronous visual information acquisition, the output of these sensors is ideally suited for dynamic 3D reconstruction. The presented technique takes full benefit of the event-driven operation, i.e. events are processed individually at the moment they arrive. This strategy allows us to preserve the original dynamics of the scene, hence allowing for more robust 3D reconstructions. As opposed to existing techniques, this algorithm is based on geometric and time constraints alone, making it particularly simple to implement and largely linear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacological Analysis of Intrinsic Neuronal Oscillations in rd10 Retina

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sonia; Haselier, Christine; Mataruga, Anja; Thumann, Gabriele; Walter, Peter; Müller, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the widely used mouse model of retinal degeneration, rd1, the loss of photoreceptors leads to rhythmic electrical activity of around 10–16 Hz in the remaining retinal network. Recent studies suggest that this oscillation is formed within the electrically coupled network of AII amacrine cells and ON-bipolar cells. A second mouse model, rd10, displays a delayed onset and slower progression of degeneration, making this mouse strain a better model for human retinitis pigmentosa. In rd10, oscillations occur at a frequency of 3–7 Hz, raising the question whether oscillations have the same origin in the two mouse models. As rd10 is increasingly being used as a model to develop experimental therapies, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the spontaneous rhythmic activity. To study the properties of oscillations in rd10 retina we combined multi electrode recordings with pharmacological manipulation of the retinal network. Oscillations were abolished by blockers for ionotropic glutamate receptors and gap junctions. Frequency and amplitude of oscillations were modulated strongly by blockers of inhibitory receptors and to a lesser extent by blockers of HCN channels. In summary, although we found certain differences in the pharmacological modulation of rhythmic activity in rd10 compared to rd1, the overall pattern looked similar. This suggests that the generation of rhythmic activity may underlie similar mechanisms in rd1 and rd10 retina. PMID:24918437

  16. Distribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome in the squid retina

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The cephalopod retina contains two kinds of photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. For many years retinochrome has been thought to be localized in the inner segments of the visual cells, whereas rhodopsin is in the outer segments. However, it is now clear that retinochrome can be extracted also from fragments of outer segments. In the dark- adapted retina of Loligo pealei retinochrome is distributed half-and- half in the inner and outer segments. Todarodes pacificus contains much more retinochrome than Loligo, and it is more abundant in the outer than in the inner segments. The outer segments of Loligo contain retinochrome and metarhodopsin in addition to rhodopsin, whether squids are kept in the dark or in the light. But there is extremely little metarhodopsin (about 3% of rhodopsin) even in light-adapted eyes. The inner segments contain only retinochrome, and much less in the light than in the dark. On the other hand, retinochrome in the outer segments increases markedly during light adaptation. These facts suggest the possibility that some retinochrome moves forward from the inner to the outer segments during light adaptation and there reacts with metarhodopsin to promote regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:6620

  17. Cell-replacement therapy and neural repair in the retina.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Christian W; Wohl, Stefanie G; Isenmann, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    Visual impairment severely affects the quality of life of patients and their families and is also associated with a deep economic impact. The most common pathologies responsible for visual impairment and legally defined blindness in developed countries include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. These conditions share common pathophysiological features: dysfunction and loss of retinal neurons. To date, two main approaches are being taken to develop putative therapeutic strategies: neuroprotection and cell replacement. Cell replacement is a novel therapeutic approach to restore visual capabilities to the degenerated adult neural retina and represents an emerging field of regenerative neurotherapy. The discovery of a population of proliferative cells in the mammalian retina has raised the possibility of harnessing endogenous retinal stem cells to elicit retinal repair. Furthermore, the development of suitable protocols for the reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent state further increases the therapeutic potential of stem-cell-based technologies for the treatment of major retinal diseases. Stem-cell transplantation in animal models has been most effectively used for the replacement of photoreceptors, although this therapeutic approach is also being used for inner retinal pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of cell-replacement approaches for the treatment of currently incurable degenerative retinal diseases.

  18. Functional organization of ganglion cells in the salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Segev, Ronen; Puchalla, Jason; Berry, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Recently, we reported a novel technique for recording all of the ganglion cells in a retinal patch and showed that their receptive fields cover visual space roughly 60 times over in the tiger salamander. Here, we carry this analysis further and divide the population of ganglion cells into functional classes using quantitative clustering algorithms that combine several response characteristics. Using only the receptive field to classify ganglion cells revealed six cell types, in agreement with anatomical studies. Adding other response measures served to blur the distinctions between these cell types rather than resolve further classes. Only the biphasic off type had receptive fields that tiled the retina. Even when we attempted to split these classes more finely, ganglion cells with almost identical functional properties were found to have strongly overlapping spatial receptive fields. A territorial spatial organization, where ganglion cell receptive fields tend to avoid those of other cells of the same type, was only found for the biphasic off cell. We further studied the functional segregation of the ganglion cell population by computing the amount of visual information shared between pairs of cells under natural movie stimulation. This analysis revealed an extensive mixing of visual information among cells of different functional type. Together, our results indicate that the salamander retina uses a population code in which every point in visual space is represented by multiple neurons with subtly different visual sensitivities.

  19. Sector mapping method for 3D detached retina visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi-Ran; Zhao, Yong; Zhong, Jie; Li, Ke; Lu, Cui-Xin; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A new sphere-mapping algorithm called sector mapping is introduced to map sector images to the sphere of an eyeball. The proposed sector-mapping algorithm is evaluated and compared with the plane-mapping algorithm adopted in previous work. A simulation that maps an image of concentric circles to the sphere of the eyeball and an analysis of the difference in distance between neighboring points in a plane and sector were used to compare the two mapping algorithms. A three-dimensional model of a whole retina with clear retinal detachment was generated using the Visualization Toolkit software. A comparison of the mapping results shows that the central part of the retina near the optic disc is stretched and its edges are compressed when the plane-mapping algorithm is used. A better mapping result is obtained by the sector-mapping algorithm than by the plane-mapping algorithm in both the simulation results and real clinical retinal detachment three-dimensional reconstruction.

  20. Vsx2 in the zebrafish retina: restricted lineages through derepression

    PubMed Central

    Vitorino, Marta; Jusuf, Patricia R; Maurus, Daniel; Kimura, Yukiko; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Harris, William A

    2009-01-01

    Background The neurons in the vertebrate retina arise from multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). It is not clear, however, which progenitors are multipotent or why they are multipotent. Results In this study we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Vsx2 is initially expressed throughout the retinal epithelium, but later it is downregulated in all but a minor population of bipolar cells and all Müller glia. The Vsx2-negative daughters of Vsx2-positive RPCs divide and give rise to all other cell types in the retina. Vsx2 is a repressor whose targets include transcription factors such as Vsx1, which is expressed in the progenitors of distinct non-Vsx2 bipolars, and the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ath5, which restricts the fate of progenitors to retinal ganglion cells, horizontal cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors fates. Foxn4, expressed in the progenitors of amacrine and horizontal cells, is also negatively regulated by Vsx2. Conclusion Our data thus suggest Vsx2-positive RPCs are fully multipotent retinal progenitors and that when Vsx2 is downregulated, Vsx2-negative progenitors escape Vsx2 repression and so are able to express factors that restrict lineage potential. PMID:19344499

  1. Foveal relocation by redistribution of the neurosensory retina

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D.; Lois, N.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To describe a new surgical technique for foveal relocation, and to report the outcome in nine patients treated with this procedure.
METHODS—Nine consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVMs) secondary to age related macular degeneration underwent foveal relocation surgery by redistribution of the neurosensory retina (RNR). The technique involved induction of a retinal detachment via a single retinotomy, relocation of the fovea by "sweeping" the retinal tissue with a retinal brush, and stabilisation of the retina in its new location using perfluorocarbon liquid peroperatively and silicone oil postoperatively.
RESULTS—In eight of nine eyes successful relocation of the fovea was achieved; in one eye the CNVM remained in a subfoveal location postoperatively. Visual acuity improved in two eyes, remained unchanged in three, and decreased in four eyes after a median follow up of 4 months (range 2.5-6 months). Complications included rupture of a foveal cyst with the development of a macular hole in one eye and epimacular membrane formation in another eye. In two eyes, macular retinal vessel closure occurred at the time of laser photocoagulation; one of these eyes later developed cystoid macular oedema and the other an epiretinal membrane. Recurrence of the CNVM was observed in one eye, but was controlled with further laser treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—Foveal relocation by RNR appears to be feasible, obviating the need for extensive retinotomies or scleral shortening.

 PMID:10729290

  2. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients. PMID:27389181

  3. A Retina Inspired Model for Enhancing Visibility of Hazy Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian retina seems far smarter than scientists have believed so far. Inspired by the visual processing mechanisms in the retina, from the layer of photoreceptors to the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), we propose a computational model for haze removal from a single input image, which is an important issue in the field of image enhancement. In particular, the bipolar cells serve to roughly remove the low-frequency of haze, and the amacrine cells modulate the output of cone bipolar cells to compensate the loss of details by increasing the image contrast. Then the RGCs with disinhibitory receptive field surround refine the local haze removal as well as the image detail enhancement. Results on a variety of real-world and synthetic hazy images show that the proposed model yields results comparative to or even better than the state-of-the-art methods, having the advantage of simultaneous dehazing and enhancing of single hazy image with simple and straightforward implementation. PMID:26733857

  4. TRP channel gene expression in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Jared C; Wensel, Theodore G

    2011-12-08

    In order to identify candidate cation channels important for retinal physiology, 28 TRP channel genes were surveyed for expression in the mouse retina. Transcripts for all TRP channels were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing. Northern blotting revealed that mRNAs for 12 TRP channel genes are enriched in the retina. The strongest signals were observed for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPM1, TRPM3, and TRPML1, and clear signals were obtained for TRPC4, TRPM7, TRPP2, TRPV2, and TRPV4. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence revealed widespread expression throughout multiple retinal layers for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPML1, PKD1, and TRPP2. Striking localization of enhanced mRNA expression was observed for TRPC1 in the photoreceptor inner segment layer, for TRPM1 in the inner nuclear layer (INL), for TRPM3 in the INL, and for TRPML1 in the outer plexiform and nuclear layers. Strong immunofluorescence signal in cone outer segments was observed for TRPM7 and TRPP2. TRPC5 immunostaining was largely confined to INL cells immediately adjacent to the inner plexiform layer. TRPV2 antibodies stained photoreceptor axons in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of TRPM1 splice variants was strong in the ciliary body, whereas TRPM3 was strongly expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium.

  5. Real-time simulation of the retina allowing visualization of each processing stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeters, Jeffrey L.; Werblin, Frank S.

    1991-08-01

    The retina computes to let us see, but can we see the retina compute? Until now, the answer has been no, because the unconscious nature of the processing hides it from our view. Here the authors describe a method of seeing computations performed throughout the retina. This is achieved by using neurophysiological data to construct a model of the retina, and using a special-purpose image processing computer (PIPE) to implement the model in real time. Processing in the model is organized into stages corresponding to computations performed by each retinal cell type. The final stage is the transient (change detecting) ganglion cell. A CCD camera forms the input image, and the activity of a selected retinal cell type is the output which is displayed on a TV monitor. By changing the retina cell driving the monitor, the progressive transformations of the image by the retina can be observed. These simulations demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of temporal and spatial variations in the patterns of activity generated by the retina which are fed into the brain. The dynamical aspects make these patterns very different from those generated by the common DOG (Difference of Gaussian) model of receptive field. Because the retina is so successful in biological vision systems, the processing described here may be useful in machine vision.

  6. A Comparison of Some Organizational Characteristics of the Mouse Central Retina and the Human Macula

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Juyea; Yee, Claudine; Williams, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have greatly assisted our understanding of retinal degenerations. However, the mouse retina does not have a macula, leading to the question of whether the mouse is a relevant model for macular degeneration. In the present study, a quantitative comparison between the organization of the central mouse retina and the human macula was made, focusing on some structural characteristics that have been suggested to be important in predisposing the macula to stresses leading to degeneration: photoreceptor density, phagocytic load on the RPE, and the relative thinness of Bruch’s membrane. Light and electron microscopy measurements from retinas of two strains of mice, together with published data on human retinas, were used for calculations and subsequent comparisons. As in the human retina, the central region of the mouse retina possesses a higher photoreceptor cell density and a thinner Bruch’s membrane than in the periphery; however, the magnitudes of these periphery to center gradients are larger in the human. Of potentially greater relevance is the actual photoreceptor cell density, which is much greater in the mouse central retina than in the human macula, underlying a higher phagocytic load for the mouse RPE. Moreover, at eccentricities that correspond to the peripheral half of the human macula, the rod to cone ratio is similar between mouse and human. Hence, with respect to photoreceptor density and phagocytic load of the RPE, the central mouse retina models at least the more peripheral part of the macula, where macular degeneration is often first evident. PMID:25923208

  7. Diabetes alters osmotic swelling characteristics and membrane conductance of glial cells in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wurm, Antje; Uckermann, Ortrud; vom Hagen, Franziska; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Bringmann, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    The development of edema in the diabetic retina may be caused by vascular leakage and glial cell swelling. To determine whether diabetic retinopathy alters the swelling characteristics of retinal glial cells and changes the properties of the glial membrane K+ conductance, isolated retinas and glial cells of rats were investigated at 4 and 6 months of chemical diabetes. After 6 months of hyperglycemia, application of a hypotonic solution to retinal slices induced swelling of glial cell bodies, a response not observed in control retinas. The osmotic glial cell swelling was blocked by inhibitors of phospholipase A2 or cyclooxygenase and by a thiol-reducing agent. Glial cells from diabetic retinas displayed a decrease of K+ currents that was associated with an altered subcellular distribution of the K+ conductance and a loss of perivascular Kir4.1 protein. The observation that swelling of cells in control retinas was inducible with K+ channel-blocking Ba2+ ions suggests a relationship between decreased K+ inward currents and osmotic cell swelling in diabetic retinas. The data show that glial cells in diabetic retinas are more sensitive to osmotic stress, which is associated with a decrease of K+ currents, than cells in control retinas. It is suggested that these alterations may be implicated in the development of diabetic retinal edema.

  8. CDC42 Is Required for Tissue Lamination and Cell Survival in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Heynen, Severin Reinhard; Meneau, Isabelle; Caprara, Christian; Samardzija, Marijana; Imsand, Cornelia; Levine, Edward M.; Grimm, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The small GTPase CDC42 has pleiotropic functions during development and in the adult. These functions include intra- as well as intercellular tasks such as organization of the cytoskeleton and, at least in epithelial cells, formation of adherens junctions. To investigate CDC42 in the neuronal retina, we generated retina-specific Cdc42-knockdown mice (Cdc42-KD) and analyzed the ensuing consequences for the developing and postnatal retina. Lack of CDC42 affected organization of the developing retina as early as E17.5, prevented correct tissue lamination, and resulted in progressive retinal degeneration and severely reduced retinal function of the postnatal retina. Despite the disorganization of the retina, formation of the primary vascular plexus was not strongly affected. However, both deeper vascular plexi developed abnormally with no clear layering of the vessels. Retinas of Cdc42-KD mice showed increased expression of pro-survival, but also of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory genes and exhibited prolonged Müller glia hypertrophy. Thus, functional CDC42 is important for correct tissue organization already during retinal development. Its absence leads to severe destabilization of the postnatal retina with strong degeneration and loss of retinal function. PMID:23372671

  9. Aging leads to elevation of O-GlcNAcylation and disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis in retina.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Feng, Zhihui; Zou, Xuan; Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Liu, Jiankang

    2014-01-01

    Retina is particularly susceptible to aging as oxidative damage accumulates within retina, leading to age-related retinal dysfunction or even visual loss. However, the underlying mechanisms still remain obscure and effective therapeutic strategy is urgently in need. Here, we quested for the answer particularly focusing on mitochondrial homeostasis and O-GlcNAcylation in rat retina. By comparing expression of electron transfer chain complexes and key factors in mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in retinas of aged and young Sprague-Dawley rats, we found that mitochondrial Complex I, II, IV and V were increased in aged retina with decreased mtTFA and Mfn2. Also, we noticed that p38 and JNK of MAPK signaling were substantially more activated in aged retina, suggesting stress induction. In addition, we found that pan-O-GlcNAcylation was remarkably stronger with lower OGA expression in aged retina. To further elucidate the roles of Mfn2 and O-GlcNAcylation, we employed ARPE-19 cells and found that ATP production, oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced and ROS level was increased by Mfn2 knockdown, while treating with PUGNAc or UDP-GlcNAc heightened oxygen consumption and reduced ROS. Our results suggest disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis may increase oxidative stress; yet enhanced O-GlcNAcylation might defend against oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial respiration in aged retina.

  10. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  11. THE BIOSYNTHESIS AND CONTENT OF GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID IN THE GOLDFISH RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Dominic M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Goldfish retinas incubated with L-glutamate-14C (UL) were found to synthesize γ-aminobutyric acid-14C (GABA-14C) The accumulation of newly synthesized GABA was enhanced by physiological stimulation of the retina with flashing light; and this increase was directly proportional to the logarithm of the light intensity. The total GABA content was also higher in light-stimulated than in dark-adapted retinas, although the glutamate content remained unchanged No differences were found in the cell-free activities of glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4 1.1 15) and GABA-glutamate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.19) extracted from light-stimulated and dark-adapted retinas. These findings, together with other physiological and morphologcal evidence, suggest that GABA plays a functional role in synaptic transmission in the goldfish retina PMID:4339278

  12. Effects of Aging and Anatomic Location on Gene Expression in Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Fields, Mark A.; Hoshino, Risa; Priore, Lucian V. Del

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression in human neural retina. Methods: Macular and peripheral neural retina RNA was isolated from human donor eyes for DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Results: Total RNA integrity from human donors was preserved. Hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrates that the gene expression profiles of young, old, macula, and peripheral retina cluster into four distinct groups. Genes which are highly expressed in macular, peripheral, young, or old retina were identified, including inhibitors of Wnt Signaling Pathway (DKK1, FZD10, and SFRP2) which are preferably expressed in the periphery. Conclusion: The transcriptome of the human retina is affected by age and topographic location. Wnt pathway inhibitors in the periphery may maintain peripheral retinal cells in an undifferentiated state. Understanding the effects of age and topographic location on gene expression may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for age-related eye diseases. PMID:22666212

  13. Resistivity profiles of wild-type, rd1, and rd10 mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Boshuo Wang; Weiland, James D

    2015-08-01

    Electrical impedance of the retina is a critical factor in retinal prostheses, determining the intraretinal current flow and potential distribution of electrical stimulation. Previous resistivity measurements in retina were limited to healthy retina, and didn't include mouse models, a common and important animal model in retinal research. This experimental study measured the resistivity profiles of wild-type, rd1, and rd10 mice, providing basis for computational simulations and predictive modeling studies. The peak resistance frequency method has been utilized to measure the resistivity profiles of the retina cross section, and the results show agreement with previous studies in retina of normal rats and embryonic chicks. Retinal degeneration affects the width of the profile, which is in agreement with histological measurements. Degeneration also results in lower peak resistivity. The results indicate that, on the mesoscopic scale, resistivity is dominated by spatial factors, while influence of remodeling on the cellular level is not apparent under such scale.

  14. Distribution of Cones in Human and Monkey Retina: Individual Variability and Radial Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Christine A.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Packer, Orin; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Kalina, Robert E.

    1987-05-01

    The distribution of photoreceptors is known for only one complete human retina and for the cardinal meridians only in the macaque monkey retina. Cones can be mapped in computer-reconstructed whole mounts of human and monkey retina. A 2.9-fold range in maximum cone density in the foveas of young adult human eyes may contribute to individual differences in acuity. Cone distribution is radially asymmetrical about the fovea in both species, as previously described for the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and for lines of visual isosensitivity. Cone density was greater in the nasal than in the temporal peripheral retina, and this nasotemporal asymmetry was more pronounced in monkey than in human retina.

  15. Oxygen supply and consumption in the retina: implications for studies of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2010-02-01

    A disrupted oxygen environment in the retina of severely premature neonates is thought to be a key factor in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This review describes our understanding of intraretinal oxygen distribution and consumption in a range of animal models, including species with naturally avascular retinas and models of induced occlusion of the retinal vasculature. The influence of graded systemic hyperoxia on retinal oxygenation is also discussed along with modulation of retinal oxygen metabolism. The differences in retinal oxygenation between developing and mature retinas are also described. Comparisons are made with studies in the monkey retina in order to assess possible similarities in behaviour between rat and human retinas. Pathogenesis mechanism and possible intervention strategies during the diseased processes in ROP are proposed based on our current knowledge.

  16. ENERGETICS TRANSFER IN THE PHOTODYNAMIC REACTIONS. I. PHOTODYNAMIC SENSITIVITY OF THE RETINA. II. PHOTODYNAMIC ACTION AND CANCER. III. PHOTOCHEMICAL SYNTHESIS OF AMINO ACIDS IN ABIOGENIC CONDITIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHOTOSENSITIVITY(BIOLOGICAL), *CANCER, * AMINO ACIDS , RETINA, PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS, RETINA, PATHOLOGY, RESPIRATION, GLYCOLYSIS, FISHES, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, FORMALDEHYDE, CATALYSTS, LIGHT, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), CHEMORECEPTORS, OXYGEN, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION, MICE, ITALY.

  17. Function and Circuitry of VIP+ Interneurons in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia J.H.; Borghuis, Bart G.; Rahmani, Pouyan; Zeng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Visual processing in the retina depends on coordinated signaling by interneurons. Photoreceptor signals are relayed to ∼20 ganglion cell types through a dozen excitatory bipolar interneurons, each responsive to light increments (ON) or decrements (OFF). ON and OFF bipolar cell pathways become tuned through specific connections with inhibitory interneurons: horizontal and amacrine cells. A major obstacle for understanding retinal circuitry is the unknown function of most of the ∼30–40 amacrine cell types, each of which synapses onto a subset of bipolar cell terminals, ganglion cell dendrites, and other amacrine cells. Here, we used a transgenic mouse line in which vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons express Cre recombinase. Targeted whole-cell recordings of fluorescently labeled VIP+ cells revealed three predominant types: wide-field bistratified and narrow-field monostratified cells with somas in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and medium-field monostratified cells with somas in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Bistratified INL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by both ON and OFF pathways with little spatial tuning. Narrow-field INL cells integrated excitation driven by the ON pathway and inhibition driven by both pathways, with pronounced hyperpolarizations at light offset. Monostratified GCL cells integrated excitation and inhibition driven by the ON pathway and showed center-surround spatial tuning. Optogenetic experiments showed that, collectively, VIP+ cells made strong connections with OFF δ, ON-OFF direction-selective, and W3 ganglion cells but weak, inconsistent connections with ON and OFF α cells. Revealing VIP+ cell morphologies, receptive fields and synaptic connections advances our understanding of their role in visual processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The retina is a model system for understanding nervous system function. At the first stage, rod and cone photoreceptors encode light and

  18. Advances in color science: from retina to behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Field, Greg D.; Horwitz, Gregory D.; Johnson, Elizabeth N.; Koida, Kowa; Mancuso, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Color has become a premier model system for understanding how information is processed by neural circuits, and for investigating the relationships among genes, neural circuits and perception. Both the physical stimulus for color and the perceptual output experienced as color are quite well characterized, but the neural mechanisms that underlie the transformation from stimulus to perception are incompletely understood. The past several years have seen important scientific and technical advances that are changing our understanding of these mechanisms. Here, and in the accompanying minisymposium, we review the latest findings and hypotheses regarding color computations in the retina, primary visual cortex and higher-order visual areas, focusing on non-human primates, a model of human color vision. PMID:21068298

  19. Resonant imaging of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Emakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.

    2002-06-01

    We have generated high spatial resolution images showing the distribution of carotenoid macular pigments in the human retina using Raman spectroscopy. A low level of macular pigments is associated with an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Using excised human eyecups and resonant excitation of the pigment molecules with narrow bandwidth blue light from a mercury arc lamp, we record Raman images originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids comprising human macular pigments. Our Raman images reveal significant differences among subjects, both in regard to absolute levels as well as spatial distribution within the macula. Since the light levels used to obtain these images are well below established safety limits, this technique holds promise for developing a rapid screening diagnostic in large populations at risk for vision loss from age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Wavefront optimized nonlinear microscopy of ex vivo human retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Bueno, Juan M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    A multiphoton microscope incorporating a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor to control the ultrafast laser beam's wavefront aberrations has been developed. This instrument allowed us to investigate the impact of the laser beam aberrations on two-photon autofluorescence imaging of human retinal tissues. We demonstrated that nonlinear microscopy images are improved when laser beam aberrations are minimized by realigning the laser system cavity while wavefront controlling. Nonlinear signals from several human retinal anatomical features have been detected for the first time, without the need of fixation or staining procedures. Beyond the improved image quality, this approach reduces the required excitation power levels, minimizing the side effects of phototoxicity within the imaged sample. In particular, this may be important to study the physiology and function of the healthy and diseased retina.

  1. Gene Delivery to the Retina: From Mouse to Man

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jean; Chung, Daniel C.; Maguire, Albert

    2013-01-01

    With the recent progress in identifying disease-causing genes in humans and in animal models, there are more and more opportunities for using retinal gene transfer to learn more about retinal physiology and also to develop therapies for blinding disorders. Success in preclinical studies for one form of inherited blindness have led to testing in human clinical trials. This paves the way to consider a number of other retinal diseases as ultimate gene therapy targets in human studies. The information presented here is designed to assist scientists and clinicians to use gene transfer to probe the biology of the retina and/or to move appropriate gene-based treatment studies from the bench to the clinic. PMID:22365778

  2. In vivo two-photon imaging of the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Robin; Yin, Lu; Geng, Ying; Merigan, William H.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Though in vivo two-photon imaging has been demonstrated in non-human primates, improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) would greatly improve its scientific utility. In this study, extrinsic fluorophores, expressed in otherwise transparent retinal ganglion cells, were imaged in the living mouse eye using a two-photon fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. We recorded two orders of magnitude greater signal levels from extrinsically labeled cells relative to previous work done in two-photon autofluorescence imaging of primates. Features as small as single dendrites in various layers of the retina could be resolved and predictions are made about the feasibility of measuring functional response from cells. In the future, two-photon imaging in the intact eye may allow us to monitor the function of retinal cell classes with infrared light that minimally excites the visual response. PMID:24009992

  3. Visual system based on artificial retina for motion detection.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Díaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo; del Pino, Begoña

    2009-06-01

    We present a bioinspired model for detecting spatiotemporal features based on artificial retina response models. Event-driven processing is implemented using four kinds of cells encoding image contrast and temporal information. We have evaluated how the accuracy of motion processing depends on local contrast by using a multiscale and rank-order coding scheme to select the most important cues from retinal inputs. We have also developed some alternatives by integrating temporal feature results and obtained a new improved bioinspired matching algorithm with high stability, low error and low cost. Finally, we define a dynamic and versatile multimodal attention operator with which the system is driven to focus on different target features such as motion, colors, and textures.

  4. Neuronal cell types and connectivity: lessons from the retina.

    PubMed

    Seung, H Sebastian; Sümbül, Uygar

    2014-09-17

    We describe recent progress toward defining neuronal cell types in the mouse retina and attempt to extract lessons that may be generally useful in the mammalian brain. Achieving a comprehensive catalog of retinal cell types now appears within reach, because researchers have achieved consensus concerning two fundamental challenges. The first is accuracy-defining pure cell types rather than settling for neuronal classes that are mixtures of types. The second is completeness-developing methods guaranteed to eventually identify all cell types, as well as criteria for determining when all types have been found. Case studies illustrate how these two challenges are handled by combining state-of-the-art molecular, anatomical, and physiological techniques. Progress is also being made in observing and modeling connectivity between cell types. Scaling up to larger brain regions, such as the cortex, will require not only technical advances but also careful consideration of the challenges of accuracy and completeness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuronal cell types and connectivity: lessons from the retina

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H. Sebastian; Sümbül, Uygar

    2014-01-01

    We describe recent progress towards defining neuronal cell types in the mouse retina, and attempt to extract lessons that may be generally useful in the mammalian brain. Achieving a comprehensive catalog of retinal cell types now appears within reach, because researchers have achieved consensus concerning two fundamental challenges. The first is accuracy—defining pure cell types rather than settling for neuronal classes that are mixtures of types. The second is completeness—developing methods guaranteed to eventually identify all cell types, as well as criteria for determining when all types have been found. Case studies illustrate how these two challenges are handled by combining state-of-the-art molecular, anatomical and physiological techniques. Progress is also being made in observing and modeling connectivity between cell types. Scaling up to larger brain regions, such as the cortex, will require not only technical advances but careful consideration of the challenges of accuracy and completeness. PMID:25233310

  6. Analysis of the retina in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Malicki, J; Pooranachandran, N; Nikolaev, A; Fang, X; Avanesov, A

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is remarkably conserved in evolution. Its relative simplicity and well-defined architecture make it particularly suitable for developmental and functional analysis of neuronal networks in the vertebrate central nervous system. The zebrafish model is at the forefront of these studies. It makes it possible to apply a wide variety of parallel embryological, genetic, and imaging tools to study the eye. Here we discuss experimental approaches that range from cell lineage analysis to the imaging of synaptic calcium currents and atomic force microscopy. These methods are currently used in zebrafish to model morphogenetic events during early development of the eye primordium, cell fate decisions during retinal neurogenesis, and the differentiation and function of the many fine structural features that underlie the detection and processing of light stimuli in the eye.

  7. FDTD simulation of electromagnetic wave scattering from retina cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Samer S; Ramahi, Omar; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2007-01-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method was developed to model changes in the light scattering properties of retinal photoreceptors resulting from the functional response of living retina to external light stimulation. Physiological processes such as membrane hyper-polarization and conformation changes of rhodopsin in the photoreceptors outer segment (OS) were simulated by varying the optical properties of the cell organelles. The FDTD code was validated by comparing the results from a 2D simulation of light scattering from an infinite cylinder to the Mie analytical solution for the same geometry. Results from the FDTD simulations show that hyper-polarization of the outer cell membrane is the least likely cause for the observed increase in light scattering in photoreceptors. Other computational data suggests that the experimentally observed changes in reflectivity are most likely related to cell dynamics and to cell volume changes.

  8. Parkinson's Disease, Lights and Melanocytes: Looking Beyond the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Gregory L.; Moore, Cleo; Armstrong, Stuart Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    Critical analysis of recent research suggesting that light pollution causes Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals that such a hypothesis is unsustainable in the context of therapeutic use of light in treating various neuropsychiatric conditions. Reinterpretation of their findings suggests that retinal damage caused by prolonged light exposure may have contributed to the observed enhancement of experimental PD. To test this hypothesis further, forty-two Sprague Dawley rats received microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-2, 4, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), paraquat or rotenone into the vitreal mass in doses so minute that the effects could not be attributed to diffusion into brain. Significant changes in five motor parameters consistent with symptoms of experimental PD were observed. These findings support the interpretation that the retina is involved in the control of motor function and in the aetiology of PD. PMID:24473093

  9. The developing and evolving retina: using time to organize form.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L

    2008-02-04

    Evolutionary and other functional accounts of the retina and its normal development highlight different aspects of control of its growth and form than genomic and mechanistic accounts. Discussing examples from opsin expression, developmental regulation of the eye's size and optical quality, regulation of eye size with respect to brain and body size, and the development of the fovea, these different aspects of control are contrasted. Contributions of mouse models, particularly with regard to relative timing of events in different species are reviewed, introducing a Web-based utility for exploration of timing issues (www.translatingtime.net). Variation at the individual level, in early experience, and also across species is an essential source of information to understand normal development and its pathologies.

  10. Tgfbi/Bigh3 silencing activates ERK in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Bustamante, Mauro; Tasinato, Andrea; Hummler, Edith; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2015-11-01

    BIGH3 is a secreted protein, part of the extracellular matrix where it interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can play opposing roles in cancer, acting as either tumor suppressor or promoter, and its mutations lead to different forms of corneal dystrophy. Although many studies have been carried out, little is known about the physiological role of BIGH3. Using the cre-loxP system, we generated a mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing did not result in any apparent phenotype modifications, the mice remained viable and fertile. We were able to determine the presence of BIGH3 in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In the absence of BIGH3, a transient decrease in the apoptotic process involved in retina maturation was observed, leading to a transient increase in the INL thickness at P15. This phenomenon was accompanied by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway.

  11. Advances in color science: from retina to behavior.

    PubMed

    Conway, Bevil R; Chatterjee, Soumya; Field, Greg D; Horwitz, Gregory D; Johnson, Elizabeth N; Koida, Kowa; Mancuso, Katherine

    2010-11-10

    Color has become a premier model system for understanding how information is processed by neural circuits, and for investigating the relationships among genes, neural circuits, and perception. Both the physical stimulus for color and the perceptual output experienced as color are quite well characterized, but the neural mechanisms that underlie the transformation from stimulus to perception are incompletely understood. The past several years have seen important scientific and technical advances that are changing our understanding of these mechanisms. Here, and in the accompanying minisymposium, we review the latest findings and hypotheses regarding color computations in the retina, primary visual cortex, and higher-order visual areas, focusing on non-human primates, a model of human color vision.

  12. Naturally Occurring Animal Models with Outer Retina Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Wolfgang; Frederick, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring and laboratory generated animal models serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human retinal degenerations, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), cone dystrophies (CD) and macular degeneration (MD). Much progress has been made in elucidating gene defects underlying disease, in understanding mechanisms leading to disease, and in designing molecules for translational research and gene-based therapy to interfere with the progression of disease. Key to this progress has been study of naturally occurring murine and canine retinal degeneration mutants. This article will review the history, phenotypes and gene defects of select animal models with outer retina (photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium) degeneration phenotypes. PMID:19375447

  13. Salvaging ruins: reverting blind retinas into functional visual sensors.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Marion; Swietek, Natalia; Münch, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Blindness is one of the most devastating conditions affecting the quality of life. Hereditary degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, are characterized by the progressive loss of photoreceptors, leading to complete blindness. No treatment is known, the current state-of-the-art of restoring vision are implanted electrode arrays. As a recently discovered alternative, optical neuromodulators, such as channelrhodopsin, allow new strategies for treating these diseases by imparting light-sensitivity onto the remaining retinal neurons after photoreceptor cell death. Retinal degeneration is a heterogeneous set of diseases with diverse secondary effects on the retinal circuitry. Successful treatment strategies have to take into account this diversity, as only the existing retinal hardware can serve as substrate for optogenetic intervention. The goal is to salvage the retinal ruins and to revert the leftover tissue into a functional visual sensor that operates as optimally as possible. Here, we discuss three different successful approaches that have been applied to degenerated mouse retina.

  14. Electrophysiological responses of the mouse retina to 12C ions.

    PubMed

    Sannita, Walter G; Peachey, Neal S; Strettoi, Enrica; Ball, Sherry L; Belli, Francesco; Bidoli, Vittorio; Carozzo, Simone; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pignatelli, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Adele; Saturno, Moreno; Schardt, Dieter; Vazquez, Marcelo; Zaconte, Veronica; Narici, Livio

    2007-04-18

    Phosphenes ("light flashes") have been reported by most astronauts on space missions and by healthy subjects whose eyes were exposed to ionizing radiation in early experiments in particle accelerators. The conditions of occurrence suggested retinal effects of heavy ions. To develop an in vivo animal model, we irradiated the eyes of anesthetized wild-type mice with repeated bursts of 12C ions delivered under controlled conditions in accelerator. 12C ions evoked electrophysiological retinal mass responses and activated the visual system as indicated by responses recorded from the visual cortex. No retinal immunohistological damage was detected. Mice proved a suitable animal model to study radiation-induced phosphenes in vivo and our findings are consistent with an origin of phosphenes in radiation activating the retina.

  15. Light path-length distributions within the retina.

    PubMed

    Rodmell, Paul I; Crowe, John A; Gorman, Alastair; Harvey, Andrew R; Muyo, Gonzalo; Mordant, David J; McNaught, Andy I; Morgan, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation through the retina has been developed to understand the path-length distributions within the retinal vessel. For full-field illumination, the path-length distribution within the vessel comprises directly backscattered light and light that has passed once or twice through the vessel. The origins of these light path-length distributions can be better understood by investigating different combinations of single-point illumination and detection positions. Perhaps the most significant observation is that illumination at the edges of the vessel, rather than over the whole field of view, and detection directly above the vessel capture only the light that has taken a single pass through the vessel. This path-length distribution is tightly constrained around the diameter of the vessel and can potentially provide enhancements for oxygen saturation imaging. The method could be practically implemented using an offset-pinhole confocal imaging system or structured light illumination.

  16. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  17. Haemopoietic phagocytes in the early differentiating avian retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cuadros, M A; García-Martín, M; Martin, C; Ríos, A

    1991-01-01

    The existence of specialised phagocytic cells is described in regions of the retinal neuroepithelium undergoing intense cell death during early differentiation of the avian embryo retina (2.5-5 days of incubation). These results were obtained using routine techniques for light microscopy, acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunocytochemical staining with antibodies MB-1 and QH-1, both specific for quail endothelial cells and all blood cells except mature erythrocytes. Specialised phagocytes were distinguishable from neuroepithelial cells on the basis of morphological criteria: in the former, the nucleus was not oval in shape and was not oriented perpendicular to basement membrane neuroepithelium. The cytoplasm of the specialised phagocytes was often filled with dead cell fragments. In contrast to neuroepithelial cells, the specialised phagocytes showed acid phosphatase activity and were labelled with both MB-1 and QH-1 antibodies in normal quail embryos and chick----quail yolk sac chimeras. Moreover, some acid phosphatase positive and MB-1/QH-1 positive cells also appeared in the presumptive vitreous body, at the edges of the optic cup and in the surrounding mesenchyme. As the vitreal cells and the specialised phagocytes of the neural retina were immunolabelled in chick----quail yolk sac chimeras, we conclude that they are derived from haemopoietic cells in the yolk sac. Some images suggest that these cells enter the vitreous body from the surrounding mesenchyme and traverse the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium in the optic disc region to give rise to the specialised phagocytes of the retinal neuroepithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:1769889

  18. Axonal Synapses Utilize Multiple Synaptic Ribbons in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tae-Hyung; Lee, U-Young; Jeong, Eojin; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Moon, Jung-Il; Massey, Stephen C.; Kim, In-Beom

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, bipolar cells and ganglion cells which stratify in sublamina a of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) show OFF responses to light stimuli while those that stratify in sublamina b show ON responses. This functional relationship between anatomy and physiology is a key principle of retinal organization. However, there are at least three types of retinal neurons, including intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and dopaminergic amacrine cells, which violate this principle. These cell types have light-driven ON responses, but their dendrites mainly stratify in sublamina a of the IPL, the OFF sublayer. Recent anatomical studies suggested that certain ON cone bipolar cells make axonal or ectopic synapses as they descend through sublamina a, thus providing ON input to cells which stratify in the OFF sublayer. Using immunoelectron microscopy with 3-dimensional reconstruction, we have identified axonal synapses of ON cone bipolar cells in the rabbit retina. Ten calbindin ON cone bipolar axons made en passant ribbon synapses onto amacrine or ganglion dendrites in sublamina a of the IPL. Compared to the ribbon synapses made by bipolar terminals, these axonal ribbon synapses were characterized by a broad postsynaptic element that appeared as a monad and by the presence of multiple short synaptic ribbons. These findings confirm that certain ON cone bipolar cells can provide ON input to amacrine and ganglion cells whose dendrites stratify in the OFF sublayer via axonal synapses. The monadic synapse with multiple ribbons may be a diagnostic feature of the ON cone bipolar axonal synapse in sublamina a. The presence of multiple ribbons and a broad postsynaptic density suggest these structures may be very efficient synapses. We also identified axonal inputs to ipRGCs with the architecture described above. PMID:23284975

  19. Structure-Function Correlation of the Human Central Retina

    PubMed Central

    Charbel Issa, Peter; Troeger, Eric; Finger, Robert; Holz, Frank G.; Wilke, Robert; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.

    2010-01-01

    Background The impact of retinal pathology detected by high-resolution imaging on vision remains largely unexplored. Therefore, the aim of the study was to achieve high-resolution structure-function correlation of the human macula in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain high-resolution tomographic and topographic images of the macula spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO), respectively, were used. Functional mapping of the macula was obtained by using fundus-controlled microperimetry. Custom software allowed for co-registration of the fundus mapped microperimetry coordinates with both SD-OCT and cSLO datasets. The method was applied in a cross-sectional observational study of retinal diseases and in a clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of intravitreal ranibizumab in macular telangietasia type 2. There was a significant relationship between outer retinal thickness and retinal sensitivity (p<0.001) and neurodegeneration leaving less than about 50 µm of parafoveal outer retinal thickness completely abolished light sensitivity. In contrast, functional preservation was found if neurodegeneration spared the photoreceptors, but caused quite extensive disruption of the inner retina. Longitudinal data revealed that small lesions affecting the photoreceptor layer typically precede functional detection but later cause severe loss of light sensitivity. Ranibizumab was shown to be ineffective to prevent such functional loss in macular telangietasia type 2. Conclusions/Significance Since there is a general need for efficient monitoring of the effectiveness of therapy in neurodegenerative diseases of the retina and since SD-OCT imaging is becoming more widely available, surrogate endpoints derived from such structure-function correlation may become highly relevant in future clinical trials. PMID:20877651

  20. A novel intrinsic electroretinogram response in isolated mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Takao, Motoharu; Fukuda, Yumi; Morita, Takeshi

    2017-08-15

    Since the discovery of intrinsic photosensitive retinal ganglion cell (ipRGC) was reported in 2002, many features specific to this cell type have been described. However, scare information is available on the retinographic components directly reflecting ipRGC activity. In this study, we identified the electroretinogram (microERG) that reflects the photoresponses by ipRGCs in ex vivo preparations of the mouse retina, in which classical photoreceptors (cones and rods) were ablated mechanically and photochemically. MicroERG consisted of three components: a large transient ON response, a small and lazy hump 19s after the onset of the light, and a large transient OFF response. A complete microERG recording required at least 30s of light exposure. MicroERG showed the highest spectral photosensitivity at 478nm. This wavelength corresponds to the peak wavelength in the ipRGCs' photosensitive curve. The psychophysical test using a blue light-emitting diode (LED) light (470nm) revealed that the absolute threshold illuminance for microERG was greater than 12.26 log photons/s/cm(2) in both ON and OFF responses, whereas microERG was not adapted for dark. The amplitude of microERG increased linearly with irradiance. The sensitivity of temporal frequency was high in microERG (at least 100Hz), as suggested by the study on melatonin suppression by flickering light in human subjects (Zelter et al., 2014). Melatonin secretion was suppressed by light via ipRGCs and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These properties of the photoresponse indicate that microERG may reflect the functions of ipRGC as a luminance detector in the mouse retina. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear targeted delivery of macromolecules to retina and cornea.

    PubMed

    Binder, Christina; Read, Sarah Parker; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2011-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can deliver molecules into cells by binding and penetrating the plasma membrane. However, the majority of CPPs get trapped in endosomes, resulting in degradation of the cargo molecule and inefficient delivery to the nucleus. The present study investigates the potential use of a nucleolin binding peptide (NBP) for the delivery of macromolecules including fluorophores, recombinant protein and DNA to the nuclei of ocular tissues in vivo. Fluorescent dyes covalently linked to NBP or NBP-green fluorescent protein fusion protein were injected intravitreally or subretinally or topically applied to the cornea. Frozen sections were prepared for quantification of transduction. Delivery of plasmid DNA was studied using luciferase and LacZ DNA compacted with pegylated NBP. Levels of luciferase were quantified, and LacZ expression was localized in ocular tissues. We found that NBP-directed fluorophores exhibited retinal and corneal transduction. Subretinal injection transduced cell types throughout the retina, including photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium and neuronal cells. Intravitreal injection transduced neuronal cells in the retina, as well as cells in the cornea. Topically applied NBP lead to transduction of the superficial epithelial layer of the cornea. NBP localized to the nucleus upon exogenous application in vivo. Pegylated NBP nanoparticles significantly improved delivery and expression of transgenes over DNA alone without any measureable toxicity. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that NBP can deliver small and large molecules into retinal and corneal cells and plasmid DNA into retinal cells and hence may be useful for the delivery of therapeutics to the eye. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Specific sphingolipid content decrease in Cerkl knockdown mouse retinas

    PubMed Central

    Garanto, Alejandro; Mandal, Nawajes A.; Egido-Gabás, Meritxell; Marfany, Gemma; Fabriàs, Gemma; Anderson, Robert E.; Casas, Josefina; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SPLs) are finely tuned structural compounds and bioactive molecules involved in membrane fluidity and cellular homeostasis. The core sphingolipid, ceramide (CER), and its derivatives, regulate several crucial processes in neuronal cells, among them cell differentiation, cell–cell interactions, membrane conductance, synaptic transmission, and apoptosis. Mutations in Ceramide Kinase-Like (CERKL) cause autosomal recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone Rod Dystrophy. The presence of a conserved lipid kinase domain and the overall similarity with CERK suggested that CERKL might play a role in the SPL metabolism as a CER kinase. Unfortunately, CERKL function and substrate(s), as well as its contribution to the retinal etiopathology, remain as yet unknown. In this work we aimed to characterize the mouse retinal sphingolipidome by UPLC-TOF to first, thoroughly investigate the SPL composition of the murine retina, compare it to our Cerkl −/− model, and finally assess new possible CERKL substrates by phosphorus quantification and protein-lipid overlay. Our results showed a consistent and notable decrease of the retinal SPL content (mainly ranging from 30% to 60%) in the Cerkl −/− compared to WT retinas, which was particularly evident in the glucosyl/galactosyl ceramide species (Glc/GalCer) whereas the phospholipids and neutral lipids remained unaltered. Moreover, evidence in favor of CERKL binding to GlcCer, GalCer and sphingomyelin has been gathered. Altogether, these results highlight the involvement of CERKL in the SPL metabolism, question its role as a kinase, and open new scenarios concerning its function. PMID:23501591

  3. Dynamic range of safe electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterwick, Alexander F.; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2006-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses represent a potentially effective approach for restoring some degree of sight in blind patients with retinal degeneration. However, levels of safe electrical stimulation and the underlying mechanisms of cellular damage are largely unknown. We measured the threshold of cellular damage as a function of pulse duration, electrode size, and number of pulses to determine the safe range of stimulation. Measurements were performed in-vitro on embryonic chicken retina with saline-filled glass pipettes for stimulation electrodes. Cellular damage was detected using Propidium Iodide fluorescent staining. Electrode size varied from 115μm to 1mm, pulse duration from 6μs to 6ms, and number of pulses from 1 to 7,500. The threshold current density was independent of electrode sizes exceeding 400μm. With smaller electrodes the current density was scaling reciprocal to the square of the pipette diameter, i.e. acting as a point source so that the damage threshold was determined by the total current in this regime. The damage threshold current measured with large electrodes (1mm) scaled with pulse duration as t -0.5, which is characteristic of electroporation. For repeated electrical pulsed exposure on the retina the threshold current density varied between 0.059 A/cm2 at 6ms to 1.3 A/cm2 at 6μs. The dynamic range of safe stimulation, i.e. the ratio of damage threshold to stimulation threshold was found to be duration-dependent, and varied from 10 to 100 at pulse durations varying between 10μs to 10ms. Maximal dynamic range of 100 was observed near 1ms pulse durations.

  4. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  5. Goalpha labels ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M

    2003-06-23

    By using double-label immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, we studied rod and cone synaptic contacts, photoreceptor-bipolar cell convergence, and patterns of axon terminal ramification of ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina. An antibody to recoverin, a calcium-binding protein found in photoreceptors and other retinal neurons in various vertebrates, differentially labeled rods and cones by lightly staining rod cell bodies, axons, and synaptic pedicles and heavily staining cone cell bodies and pedicles. An antibody to G(oalpha) labeled most ON bipolar cells, with axon terminals ramified mainly in strata 6-9 and a minor band in stratum 3 of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Stratum 10 of the IPL was G(oalpha) negative, and previous studies showed that axon terminals of rod-dominated ON bipolar cells are monostratified in that stratum. The axonal morphology of G(oalpha)-positive cells resembled that of the cone-dominated (DBC(C)) or mixed rod and cone ON (DBC(M)) bipolar cells. The G(oalpha)-positive dendritic processes made close contact with all cone pedicles and superficial contact with some rod pedicles, consistent with the idea that G(oalpha) subunits are present in DBC(C)s and DBC(M)s. The size and density of these cells were analyzed, and their spatial distributions were determined. To our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize photoreceptor inputs and axon terminal morphology of a population of ON bipolar cell with the use of a G(oalpha) antibody as an immunomarker in the salamander retina. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina

    PubMed Central

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:28562601

  7. Light distributions on the retina: relevance to macular pigment photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Gibert, Jorge C; Mukherjee, Anirbaan

    2012-01-01

    Light exposure has been implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to measure cumulative light distribution on the retina to determine whether it peaked in the macula. An eye-tracker recorded the subject's field of view and pupil size, and superimposed the gaze position. Fifteen naïve subjects formed a test group; 5 formed a control group. In phase 1, all subjects viewed a sequence of photographic images. In phase 2, the naïve subjects observed a video; in phase 3, they performed computer tasks; in phase 4, the subjects walked around freely. In phase 1, control subjects were instructed to gaze at bright features in the field of view and, in a second test, at dark features. Test group subjects were allowed to gaze freely for all phases. Using the subject's gaze coordinates, we calculated the cumulative light distribution on the retina. As expected for control subjects, cumulative retinal light distributions peaked and dipped in the fovea when they gazed at bright or dark features respectively in the field of view. The light distribution maps obtained from the test group showed a consistent tendency to peak in the macula in phase 3, a variable tendency in phase 4, but little tendency in phases 1 and 2. We conclude that a tendency for light to peak in the macula is a characteristic of some individuals and of certain tasks. In these situations, risk of AMD could be increased but, at the same time, mitigated by the presence of macular carotenoids.

  8. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive amacrine cells of macaque retina

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kathryn E.; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of authors have observed amacrine cells containing high levels of immunoreactive parvalbumin in primate retinas. The experiments described here were designed to identify these cells morphologically, to determine their neurotransmitter, to record their light responses, and to describe the other cells that they contact. Macaque retinas were fixed in paraformaldehyde and labeled with antibodies to parvalbumin and one or two other markers, and this double- and triple-labeled material was analyzed by confocal microscopy. In their morphology and dendritic stratification patterns, the parvalbumin-positive cells closely resembled the knotty type 2 amacrine cells described using the Golgi method in macaques. They contained immunoreactive glycine transporter, but not immunoreactive γ-aminobutyric acid, and therefore, they use glycine as their neurotransmitter. Their spatial density was relatively high, roughly half that of AII amacrine cells. They contacted lobular dendrites of AII cells, and they are expected to be presynaptic to AII cells based on earlier ultrastructural studies. They also made extensive contacts with axon terminals of OFF midget bipolar cells whose polarity cannot be predicted with certainty. A macaque amacrine cell of the same morphological type depolarized at the onset of increments in light intensity, and it was well coupled to other amacrine cells. Previously, we described amacrine cells like these that contacted OFF parasol ganglion cells and OFF starburst amacrine cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that one function of these amacrine cells is to inhibit the transmission of signals from rods to OFF bipolar cells via AII amacrine cells. Another function may be inhibition of the OFF pathway following increments in light intensity. PMID:19435546

  9. Retina verification system based on biometric graph matching.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Seyed Mehdi; Arakala, Arathi; Davis, Stephen A; Horadam, Kathy J

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an automatic retina verification framework based on the biometric graph matching (BGM) algorithm. The retinal vasculature is extracted using a family of matched filters in the frequency domain and morphological operators. Then, retinal templates are defined as formal spatial graphs derived from the retinal vasculature. The BGM algorithm, a noisy graph matching algorithm, robust to translation, non-linear distortion, and small rotations, is used to compare retinal templates. The BGM algorithm uses graph topology to define three distance measures between a pair of graphs, two of which are new. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used to distinguish between genuine and imposter comparisons. Using single as well as multiple graph measures, the classifier achieves complete separation on a training set of images from the VARIA database (60% of the data), equaling the state-of-the-art for retina verification. Because the available data set is small, kernel density estimation (KDE) of the genuine and imposter score distributions of the training set are used to measure performance of the BGM algorithm. In the one dimensional case, the KDE model is validated with the testing set. A 0 EER on testing shows that the KDE model is a good fit for the empirical distribution. For the multiple graph measures, a novel combination of the SVM boundary and the KDE model is used to obtain a fair comparison with the KDE model for the single measure. A clear benefit in using multiple graph measures over a single measure to distinguish genuine and imposter comparisons is demonstrated by a drop in theoretical error of between 60% and more than two orders of magnitude.

  10. Membrane currents of spiking cells isolated from turtle retina.

    PubMed

    Lasater, E M; Witkovsky, P

    1990-05-01

    We examined the membrane properties of spiking neurons isolated from the turtle (Pseudemys scripta) retina. The cells were maintained in culture for 1-7 days and were studied with the whole cell patch clamp technique. We utilized cells whose perikaryal diameters were greater than 15 microns since Kolb (1982) reported that ganglion cell perikarya in Pseudemys retina are 13-25 microns, whereas amacrine perikarya are less than 14 microns in diameter. We identified 5 currents in the studied cells: (1) a transient sodium current (INa) blocked by TTX, (2) a sustained calcium current (ICa) blocked by cobalt and enhanced by Bay-K 8644, (3) a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)), (4) an A-type transient potassium current (IA) somewhat more sensitive to 4-AP than TEA, (5) a sustained potassium current (IK) more sensitive to TEA than 4-AP. The estimated average input resistance of the cells at -70 mV was 720 +/- 440 M omega. When all active currents were blocked, the membrane resistance between -130 and +20 mV was 2.5 G omega. When examined under current clamp, some cells produced multiple spikes to depolarizing steps of 0.1-0.3 nA, whereas other cells produced only a single spike irrespective of the strength of the current pulse. Most single spikers had an outward current that rose to a peak relatively slowly, whereas multiple spikers tend to have a more rapidly activating outward current. Under current clamp, 4-AP slowed the repolarization phase of the spike thus broadening it, but did not always abolish the ability to produce multiple spikes. TEA induced a depolarized plateau following the initial spike which precluded further spikes. It thus appears that the spiking patterns of the retinal cells are shaped primarily by the kinetics of INa, IK and IA and to a lesser extent by IK(Ca).

  11. Dopamine neurones form a discrete plexus with melanopsin cells in normal and degenerating retina.

    PubMed

    Vugler, Anthony A; Redgrave, Peter; Semo, Ma'ayan; Lawrence, Jean; Greenwood, John; Coffey, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    In addition to rods and cones of the outer retina, a third class of photoreceptive cell has recently been described in the inner retina of mammals. These intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) have been shown to relay luminance information to the mammalian brain. In addition to their intrinsic photosensitivity, the function of ipRGCs may also be modulated by signals from within the retina itself. Such signals may emanate from classical photoreceptors in the outer retina or from the circadian activity of adjacent inner retinal neurones. Prime candidates for the latter are the retinal dopamine neurones which ramify at the border of the inner plexiform and inner nuclear layers. In order to investigate the nature of any interaction between dopamine and ipRGC populations in normal retina and to assess the impact of outer retinal degeneration on this interrelationship, we examined the retinae of normal and RCS dystrophic rats. We report a direct interaction between the dendrites of ipRGCs and dopaminergic neurones which is conserved across species. Triple immunolabelling using synaptic markers provides evidence for the unidirectionality of information transfer between the two cell types, with processes of ipRGCs being directly adjacent to sites of dopamine release. This fundamental architectural feature of the mammalian retina appears resistant to degeneration of classical photoreceptors and may provide the anatomical substrate by which dopamine cells influence the physiology of central circadian targets in the brain.

  12. Local Activation of Dendritic Cells Alters the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Disease In the Retina1

    PubMed Central

    Heuss, Neal D.; Lehmann, Ute; Norbury, Christopher C.; McPherson, Scott W.; Gregerson, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the identities, properties, functions and origins of local antigen presenting cells (APC) in CNS tissues is growing. We recently reported that dendritic cells (DC) distinct from microglia were present in quiescent retina, and rapidly responded to injured neurons. In this study, the disease-promoting and regulatory contributions of these APC in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) were examined. Local delivery of purified, exogenous DC or monocytes from bone marrow substantially increased the incidence and severity of EAU induced by adoptive transfer of activated, autoreactive CD4 or CD8 T cells that was limited to the manipulated eye. In vitro assays of antigen presenting cell activity of DC from quiescent retina showed that they promoted generation of Foxp3+ T cells, and inhibited activation of naive T cells by splenic DC and antigen. Conversely, in vitro assays of DC purified from injured retina revealed an enhanced ability to activate T cells, and reduced induction of Foxp3+ T cells. These findings were supported by the observation that in situ activation of DC prior to adoptive transfer of β-galactosidase-specific T cells dramatically increased severity and incidence of EAU. Recruitment of T cells into retina by local delivery of antigen in vivo showed that quiescent retina promoted development of parenchymal Foxp3+ T cells, but assays of pre-injured retina did not. Together, these results demonstrated that local conditions in the retina determined APC function, and affected the pathogenesis of EAU by both CD4 and CD8 T cells. PMID:22219322

  13. Insulin Stimulated-Glucose Transporter Glut 4 Is Expressed in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Peña-Rangel, Ma. Teresa; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro; Salceda, Rocío

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a very metabolically active tissue whose energy demands are normally met through the uptake of glucose and oxygen. Glucose metabolism in this tissue relies upon adequate glucose delivery from the systemic circulation. Therefore, glucose transport depends on the expression of glucose transporters. Here, we show retinal expression of the Glut 4 glucose transporter in frog and rat retinas. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization studies showed Glut 4 expression in the three nuclear layers of the retina: the photoreceptor, inner nuclear and ganglionar cell layers. In the rat retina immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis revealed a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa. 14C-glucose accumulation by isolated rat retinas was significantly enhanced by physiological concentrations of insulin, an effect blocked by inhibitors of phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), a key enzyme in the insulin-signaling pathway in other tissues. Also, we observed an increase in 3H-cytochalasin binding sites in the presence of insulin, suggesting an increase in transporter recruitment at the cell surface. Besides, insulin induced phosphorylation of Akt, an effect also blocked by PI3K inhibition. Expression of Glut 4 was not modified in retinas of a type 1 diabetic rat model. To our knowledge, our results provide the first evidence of Glut4 expression in the retina, suggesting it as an insulin- responsive tissue. PMID:23285235

  14. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    SciTech Connect

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina.

  15. Protein kinase A activation of glucocorticoid-mediated signaling in the developing retina.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Li, Y C; Young, A P

    1993-01-01

    This report establishes that increasing the activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) potentiates glucocorticoid-mediated signaling in embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5) chicken retina. Expression of a glutamine synthetase-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion gene is not induced by treatment with glucocorticoid hormone in transfected E5.5 retina. However, treatment of the retina with forskolin, an activator of adenyl cyclase, or cotransfection with an expression vector encoding PKA is sufficient to render the fusion gene hormonally responsive. Similar results are obtained after forskolin treatment of E5.5 retina that have been transfected with a plasmid that contains the CAT reporter gene under transcriptional control by the thymidine kinase promoter and a 46-nucleotide enhancer with two glucocorticoid response elements (GREs). In contrast, forskolin augments but is not required to achieve glucocorticoid-inducible CAT gene expression in E5.5 retina transfected with a plasmid that contains the reporter driven by a minimal promoter with six juxtaposed GREs. Based on these results, we postulate that E5.5 retina contain glucocorticoid receptors whose signal transduction properties are enhanced by PKA. Unlike the transiently expressed glutamine synthetase fusion gene, however, activation of PKA does not render the endogenous glutamine synthetase gene glucocorticoid-inducible. Thus, its expression appears to be subject to an additional level of control in the developing retina. PMID:8097880

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates the dopaminergic network in the rat retina after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Myoung-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lim, Eun-Jin; Kim, In-Beom; Oh, Su-Ja; Moon, Jung-I L; Chun, Myung-Hoon

    2005-11-01

    Dopaminergic cells in the retina express the receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is the neurotrophic factor that influences the plasticity of synapses in the central nervous system. We sought to determine whether BDNF influences the network of dopaminergic amacrine cells in the axotomized rat retina, by immunocytochemistry with an anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) antiserum. In the control retina, we found two types of TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells, type I and type II, in the inner nuclear layer adjacent to the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The type I amacrine cell varicosities formed ring-like structures in contact with AII amacrine cell somata in stratum 1 of the IPL. In the axotomized retinas, TH-labeled processes formed loose networks of fibers, unlike the dense networks in the control retina, and the ring-like structures were disrupted. In the axotomized retinas treated with BDNF, strong TH-immunoreactive varicosities were present in stratum 1 of the IPL and formed ring-like structures. Our data suggest that BDNF affects the expression of TH immunoreactivity in the axotomized rat retina and may therefore influence the retinal dopaminergic system.

  17. Deep Sequencing of the Human Retinae Reveals the Expression of Odorant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jovancevic, Nikolina; Wunderlich, Kirsten A.; Haering, Claudia; Flegel, Caroline; Maßberg, Désirée; Weinrich, Markus; Weber, Lea; Tebbe, Lars; Kampik, Anselm; Gisselmann, Günter; Wolfrum, Uwe; Hatt, Hanns; Gelis, Lian

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) occurs in various tissues. These findings have served as a basis for functional studies that demonstrate the potential of ORs as drug targets for a clinical application. To the best of our knowledge, this report describes the first evaluation of the mRNA expression of ORs and the localization of OR proteins in the human retina that set a stage for subsequent functional analyses. RNA-Sequencing datasets of three individual neural retinae were generated using Next-generation sequencing and were compared to previously published but reanalyzed datasets of the peripheral and the macular human retina and to reference tissues. The protein localization of several ORs was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The transcriptome analyses detected an average of 14 OR transcripts in the neural retina, of which OR6B3 is one of the most highly expressed ORs. Immunohistochemical stainings of retina sections localized OR2W3 to the photosensitive outer segment membranes of cones, whereas OR6B3 was found in various cell types. OR5P3 and OR10AD1 were detected at the base of the photoreceptor connecting cilium, and OR10AD1 was also localized to the nuclear envelope of all of the nuclei of the retina. The cell type-specific expression of the ORs in the retina suggests that there are unique biological functions for those receptors. PMID:28174521

  18. Normal retina releases a diffusible factor stimulating cone survival in the retinal degeneration mouse.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Said, S; Deudon-Combe, A; Hicks, D; Simonutti, M; Forster, V; Fintz, A C; Léveillard, T; Dreyfus, H; Sahel, J A

    1998-07-07

    The role of cellular interactions in the mechanism of secondary cone photoreceptor degeneration in inherited retinal degenerations in which the mutation specifically affects rod photoreceptors was studied. We developed an organ culture model of whole retinas from 5-week-old mice carrying the retinal degeneration mutation, which at this age contain few remaining rods and numerous surviving cones cocultured with primary cultures of mixed cells from postnatal day 8 normal-sighted mice (C57BL/6) retinas or retinal explants from normal (C57BL/6) or dystrophic (C3H/He) 5-week-old mice. After 7 days, the numbers of residual cone photoreceptors were quantified after specific peanut lectin or anti-arrestin antibody labeling by using an unbiased stereological approach. Examination of organ cultured retinas revealed significantly greater numbers of surviving cones (15-20%) if cultured in the presence of retinas containing normal rods as compared with controls or cocultures with rod-deprived retinas. These data indicate the existence of a diffusible trophic factor released from retinas containing rod cells and acting on retinas in which only cones are present. Because cones are responsible for high acuity and color vision, such data could have important implications not only for eventual therapeutic approaches to human retinal degenerations but also to define interactions between retinal photoreceptor types.

  19. Real time simulation of the retina allowing visualization of each processing stage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeters, J.L.; Werblin, F.

    1990-03-01

    Our retina computes to let us see, but can we see our retina compute? Until now, the answer has been `no` because the unconscious nature of the processing hides it from our view. Here we overcome the barrier of our closeness and describe what (to our knowledge) is the first method of seeing computations performed throughout the retina. This is achieved by using neurophysical data to construct a model of the retina, and using a special purpose image processing computer (PIPE) to implement the model in real time. Processing in the model is organized into stages corresponding to computations performed by each retinal cell type. The final stage is the formation of the transient (change detecting) ganglion cell response. A CCD camera forms the input image and the activity of any retinal cell type layer is the output which is displayed on a TV monitor. By changing the retina cell type driving the monitor, the progressive transformations of the image occurring in each stage of retina processing can be observed. The simulations demonstrate several phenomena including the slight blurring of the image caused by coupling between receptors, the relatively slow response to change and further blurring of the image by horizontal cells, the enhancement of moving edges by the bipolar cells, the separation of information flow into On and Off components, change detection in amacrine cells and the lateral inhibition to ganglion cells. Because the retina is the first stage of all biological vision systems, this processing may be useful for machine vision.

  20. Real time simulation of the retina allowing visualization of each processing stage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeters, J.L. ); Werblin, F. )

    1990-03-01

    Our retina computes to let us see, but can we see our retina compute Until now, the answer has been no' because the unconscious nature of the processing hides it from our view. Here we overcome the barrier of our closeness and describe what (to our knowledge) is the first method of seeing computations performed throughout the retina. This is achieved by using neurophysical data to construct a model of the retina, and using a special purpose image processing computer (PIPE) to implement the model in real time. Processing in the model is organized into stages corresponding to computations performed by each retinal cell type. The final stage is the formation of the transient (change detecting) ganglion cell response. A CCD camera forms the input image and the activity of any retinal cell type layer is the output which is displayed on a TV monitor. By changing the retina cell type driving the monitor, the progressive transformations of the image occurring in each stage of retina processing can be observed. The simulations demonstrate several phenomena including the slight blurring of the image caused by coupling between receptors, the relatively slow response to change and further blurring of the image by horizontal cells, the enhancement of moving edges by the bipolar cells, the separation of information flow into On and Off components, change detection in amacrine cells and the lateral inhibition to ganglion cells. Because the retina is the first stage of all biological vision systems, this processing may be useful for machine vision.

  1. Increased frequency of anti-retina antibodies in asymptomatic patients with chronic t. gondii infection

    PubMed Central

    Cursino, Sylvia Regina Temer; da Costa, Thaís Boccia; Yamamoto, Joyce Hisae; Meireles, Luciana Regina; Silva, Maria Antonieta Longo Galvão; de Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To search for anti-retina antibodies that serve as markers for eye disease in uveitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stored sera from patients with uveitis, ocular toxoplasmosis (n = 30) and non-infectious, immune-mediated uveitis (n = 50) and from asymptomatic individuals who were positive (n = 250) and negative (n = 250) for anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were tested. Serum anti-retina IgG was detected by an optimized ELISA using a solid-phase whole human retina extract, bovine S-antigen or interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein. RESULTS: Uveitis patients showed a higher mean reactivity to whole human retina extract, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein and S-antigen in comparison to the asymptomatic population. These findings were independent of the uveitis origin and allowed the determination of the lower anti-retina antibody cut-off for the three antigens. Asymptomatic anti-Toxoplasma serum-positive individuals showed a higher frequency of anti-human whole retina extract antibodies in comparison to asymptomatic anti-Toxoplasma serum-negative patients. The bovine S-antigen and interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein ELISAs also showed a higher mean reactivity in the uveitis groups compared to the asymptomatic group, but the observed reactivities were lower and overlapped without discrimination. CONCLUSION: We detected higher levels of anti-retina antibodies in uveitis patients and in a small fraction of asymptomatic patients with chronic toxoplasmosis. The presence of anti-retina antibodies in sera might be a marker of eye disease in asymptomatic patients, especially when whole human retina extract is used in a solid-phase ELISA. PMID:21120306

  2. Distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J M; Elfarissi, H; De Velasco, B; Ochoa, G H; Miller, A M; Clark, Y M; Matsumoto, B; Robles, L J

    2000-01-01

    Cephalopod retinas exhibit several responses to light and dark adaptation, including rhabdom size changes, photopigment movements, and pigment granule migration. Light- and dark-directed rearrangements of microfilament and microtubule cytoskeletal transport pathways could drive these changes. Recently, we localized actin-binding proteins in light-/dark-adapted octopus rhabdoms and suggested that actin cytoskeletal rearrangements bring about the formation and degradation of rhabdomere microvilli subsets. To determine if the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins control the other light/dark changes, we used immunoblotting and immunocytochemical procedures to map the distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in dorsal and ventral halves of light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Immunoblots detected alpha- and beta-tubulin, dynein intermediate chain, and kinesin heavy chain in extracts of whole retinas. Epifluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that the tubulin proteins were distributed throughout the retina with more immunoreactivity in retinas exposed to light. Kinesin localization was heavy in the pigment layer of light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas but was less prominent in the dorsal region. Dynein distribution also varied in dorsal and ventral retinas with more immunoreactivity in light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas and confocal microscopy emphasized the granular nature of this labeling. We suggest that light may regulate the distribution of microtubule cytoskeletal proteins in the octopus retina and that position, dorsal versus ventral, also influences the distribution of motor proteins. The microtubule cytoskeleton is most likely involved in pigment granule migration in the light and dark and with the movement of transport vesicles from the photoreceptor inner segments to the rhabdoms.

  3. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    PubMed

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  4. Stem/progenitor cells: a potential source of retina-specific cells for retinal repair.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yong-Yan; Feng, Dong-Fu; Pan, Dong-Chao

    2009-11-01

    Retinal injury generally results in permanent visual disturbance or even blindness. Any effort to restore vision in such condition would require replacement of the highly specialized retinal cells. Stem/progenitor cells have been proposed as a potential source of new retina-specific cells to replace those lost due to retina injury. Evidence to date suggests that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for retina injury. A wide range of stem/progenitor cells from various sources is currently being investigated for the treatment of retinal injury. This article reviews the recent achievements about stem/progenitor cell source for retinal repair.

  5. Mass spectrometric identification and quantification of 5-methoxytryptophol in quail retina

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.W.; Chan, S.F.; Lee, P.P.; Pang, S.F. )

    1989-12-29

    The occurrence of 5-methoxytryptophol (5-MTL) in the quail retina was investigated by capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/selected ion monitoring using a deuterated internal standard. Based on ion intensity ratios in the mass spectra of pentafluoropropionyl and heptafluorobutyryl derivatives of 5-MTL and deuterated 5-MTL, 5-MTL was unequivocally identified in the quail retina. Similar to the circadian rhythm of retinal melatonin, retinal 5-MTL also exhibited a diurnal variation with high levels at mid-dark. However, no significant correlation between the diurnal levels of 5-MTL and melatonin was observed in the quail retina at mid-light or mid-dark.

  6. Dopaminergic modulation and rod contribution in the generation of oscillatory potentials in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Perry, B; George, J S

    2007-02-01

    The roles of rod and cone input and of dopamine in the generation of oscillatory potentials were studied in tiger salamander retina. Under scotopic conditions, oscillations were elicited with a green, but not a red stimulus. With mesopic background illumination, both stimuli caused oscillations. Addition of quinpirole to a mesopic retina eliminated oscillations while SKF-38393 had no effect. Similarly, addition of sulpiride to a light-adapted retina elicited oscillatory activity, but SCH 22390 had no effect. These results suggest that oscillatory potentials are elicited through activation of the rod pathway and are modulated by dopamine through D2-receptors.

  7. Semiconductor Nanorod–Carbon Nanotube Biomimetic Films for Wire-Free Photostimulation of Blind Retinas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications. PMID:25350365

  8. Dual-path handheld system for cornea and retina imaging using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    A dual-path handheld system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The handheld sample arm is designed to acquire two images simultaneously. Both eyes of a person can be imaged at the same time to obtain the images of the cornea of one eye and the retina of the other eye. Cornea, retina, and optic disc images are acquired with the proposed sample arm. Experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of this system for imaging of different eye segments. This system reduces the time required for imaging of the two eyes and is cost effective.

  9. Evaluation of Electrical Stimulus Current Applied to Retina Cells for Retinal Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motonami, Keita; Watanabe, Taiichiro; Deguchi, Jun; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Sato, Manami; Kurino, Hiroyuki; Tamai, Makoto; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2006-04-01

    We have proposed a novel multilayer stacked retinal prosthesis chip based on three-dimensional integration technology. Implantable stimulus electrode arrays in polyimide flexible cables were fabricated for the electrical stimulation of the retina. To evaluate optimal retinal stimulus current, electrically evoked potential (EEP) was recorded in animal experiments using Japanese white rabbits. The EEP waveform was compared with visually evoked potential (VEP) waveform. The amplitude of the recorded EEP increased with stimulus current. The EEP waveform shows a similar behavior to the VEP waveform, indicating that the electrical stimulation of the retina can be exploited for the blind to perceive incident light to the retina.

  10. Calpain protease causes hypoxia-induced proteolysis in cultured human retina.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Mitsuyoshi; Hammond, Katherine B; Nakajima, Emi; Shearer, Thomas R

    2014-04-01

    Calpain proteases are known to be involved in retinal cell death in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to test for calpain activation in human retinas cultured under hypoxic conditions. Calpain activation was detected by immunoblotting for calpain substrates in human and monkey retinas cultured in gas generating pouches to reduce oxygen. Hypoxia caused activation of calpains as measured by accumulation of the calpain-specific 145 kDa α-spectrin breakdown product. Opsin-1 (photoreceptor marker) and vimentin (Müller cell marker) were degraded. Calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 ameliorated these changes. Results were similar to comparative data from cultured monkey retinas. In cultured human retina, hypoxia caused activation of calpain and subsequent proteolysis of critical substrates. The efficacy of SNJ-1945 in ameliorating these changes indicated that it might be useful to test as a drug for protecting against pathologic proteolysis of photoreceptor and Müller cells.

  11. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Kirsten H.; Echevarria, Franklin D.; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M.; Edd, Jon F.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  12. The retina rapidly incorporates ingested C20-D3-vitamin A in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Doina M.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Blaner, William S.; Romanov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine how the retina uses vitamin A for vision, we studied the flux of oral vitamin A into and out of the swine retina. Methods We administered labeled vitamin A to swine daily for 30 days and measured the percent of the labeled vitamin A to native unlabeled vitamin A in the retinal epithelium, neuroretina, plasma, liver, lung, and kidney. Results We show that during normal vitamin A homeostasis, the retina rapidly assimilates newly ingested dietary vitamin A, which replaces native vitamin A. Retinal vitamin A is turned over faster than previously thought. Provitamin A carotenoids do not significantly contribute to retinal vitamin A pools when consuming diets adequate in vitamin A. Conclusions Fast vitamin A turnover in the retina has direct implications for emerging therapies to prevent major forms of blindness based on controlling the concentrations of retinal vitamin A. PMID:23914132

  13. Starburst amacrine cells express parvalbumin but not calbindin and calretinin in rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Shil; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2013-11-13

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) are important components in calcium-mediated cellular signal transduction. Among the many CBPs, at least three EF-hand CBPs, calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV), have been extensively studied in the retina. In the present study, we investigated the expression patterns of these three CBPs in cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs), which are the most important element for direction selectivity in the rabbit retina. Double-label immunocytochemical analysis of vibratome sections and single-cell injection after immunocytochemical analysis on whole mounts were carried out in rabbit retinas. We found that all SACs in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer contained PV. However, none of the SACs in the inner nuclear layer or ganglion cell layer contained either CB or CR. These results suggest that PV, but not CR or CB, may act as a calcium-buffering protein in the SACs of the rabbit retina.

  14. Intrinsic circadian clock of the mammalian retina: importance for retinal processing of visual information

    PubMed Central

    Signorovitch, James; Raviola, Elio; Pawlyk, Basil; Li, Tiansen; Weitz, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian clocks are widely distributed in mammalian tissues, but little is known about the physiological functions of clocks outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain. The retina has an intrinsic circadian clock, but its importance for vision is unknown. Here we show that mice lacking Bmal1, a gene required for clock function, had abnormal retinal transcriptional responses to light and defective inner retinal electrical responses to light, but normal photoreceptor responses to light and retinas that appeared structurally normal by light and electron microscopy. We generated mice with a retina-specific genetic deletion of Bmal1, and they had defects of retinal visual physiology essentially identical to those of mice lacking Bmal1 in all tissues and lacked a circadian rhythm of inner retinal electrical responses to light. Our findings indicate that the intrinsic circadian clock of the retina regulates retinal visual processing in vivo. PMID:17719549

  15. Müller glia provide essential tensile strength to the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Ryan B.; Randlett, Owen; Oswald, Julia; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the cellular basis of tissue integrity in a vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) tissue, we eliminated Müller glial cells (MG) from the zebrafish retina. For well over a century, glial cells have been ascribed a mechanical role in the support of neural tissues, yet this idea has not been specifically tested in vivo. We report here that retinas devoid of MG rip apart, a defect known as retinoschisis. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that retinas without MG have decreased resistance to tensile stress and are softer than controls. Laser ablation of MG processes showed that these cells are under tension in the tissue. Thus, we propose that MG act like springs that hold the neural retina together, finally confirming an active mechanical role of glial cells in the CNS. PMID:26416961

  16. Potential for neural regeneration after neurotoxic injury in the adult mammalian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Sotaro; Akagi, Tadamichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Akita, Joe; Mandai, Michiko; Honda, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masayo

    2004-09-01

    It has long been believed that the retina of mature mammals is incapable of regeneration. In this study, using the N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity model of adult rat retina, we observed that some Müller glial cells were stimulated to proliferate in response to a toxic injury and produce bipolar cells and rod photoreceptors. Although these newly produced neurons were limited in number, retinoic acid treatment promoted the number of regenerated bipolar cells. Moreover, misexpression of basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox genes promoted the induction of amacrine, horizontal, and rod photoreceptor specific phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that retinal neurons regenerated even in adult mammalian retina after toxic injury. Furthermore, we could partially control the fate of the regenerated neurons with extrinsic factors or intrinsic genes. The Müller glial cells constitute a potential source for the regeneration of adult mammalian retina and can be a target for drug delivery and gene therapy in retinal degenerative diseases.

  17. Identification of a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor structural subunit expressed in goldfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A new non-alpha (n alpha) member of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene family designated GFn alpha-2 has been identified in goldfish retina by cDNA cloning. This cDNA clone encodes a protein with structural features common to all nAChR subunits sequenced to date; however, unlike all known alpha-subunits of the receptor, it lacks the cysteine residues believed to be involved in acetylcholine binding. Northern blot analysis shows multiple transcripts hybridizing to the GFn alpha-2 cDNA in goldfish retina but undetectable levels of hybridizable RNA in brain, muscle, or liver. S1 nuclease protection experiments indicate that multiple mRNAs are expressed in retina with regions identical or very similar to the GFn alpha-2 sequence. In situ hybridization shows that the gene encoding GFn alpha-2 is expressed predominantly in the ganglion cell layer of the retina. PMID:2465296

  18. Spatio-temporal Features of Neurogenesis in the Retina of Medaka, Oryzias latipes

    PubMed Central

    Kitambi, Satish S.; Malicki, Jarema J.

    2010-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is very well conserved in evolution. Its structure and functional features are very similar in phyla as different as primates and teleost fish. Here we describe the spatio-temporal characteristics of neurogenesis in the retina of a teleost, medaka, and compare them to other species, primarily the zebrafish. Several intriguing differences are observed between medaka and zebrafish. For example, photoreceptor differentiation in the medaka retina starts independently in two different areas, and at more advanced stages of differentiation, medaka and zebrafish retinae display obviously different patterns of the photoreceptor cell mosaic. Medaka and zebrafish evolutionary lineages are thought to have separated from each other 110 million years ago, and so the differences between these species are not unexpected, and may be exploited to gain insight into the architecture of developmental pathways. Importantly, this work highlights the benefits of using multiple teleost models in parallel to understand a developmental process. PMID:19035349

  19. Ubiquitous presence of gluconeogenic regulatory enzyme, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, within layers of rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Mamczur, Piotr; Mazurek, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    To shed some light on gluconeogenesis in mammalian retina, we have focused on fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a regulatory enzyme of the process. The abundance of the enzyme within the layers of the rat retina suggests that, in mammals in contrast to amphibia, gluconeogenesis is not restricted to one specific cell of the retina. We propose that FBPase, in addition to its gluconeogenic role, participates in the protection of the retina against reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the nuclear localization of FBPase and of its binding partner, aldolase, in the retinal cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67 indicates that these two gluconeogenic enzymes are involved in non-enzymatic nuclear processes. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00441-010-1008-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20614135

  20. Illumination-invariant face recognition with a contrast sensitive silicon retina

    SciTech Connect

    Buhmann, J.M.; Lades, M.; Eeckman, F.

    1993-11-29

    Changes in lighting conditions strongly effect the performance and reliability of computer vision systems. We report face recognition results under drastically changing lighting conditions for a computer vision system which concurrently uses a contrast sensitive silicon retina and a conventional, gain controlled CCD camera. For both input devices the face recognition system employs an elastic matching algorithm with wavelet based features to classify unknown faces. To assess the effect of analog on-chip preprocessing by the silicon retina the CCD images have been digitally preprocessed with a bandpass filter to adjust the power spectrum. The silicon retina with its ability to adjust sensitivity increases the recognition rate up to 50 percent. These comparative experiments demonstrate that preprocessing with an analog VLSI silicon retina generates image data enriched with object-constant features.

  1. Study of the effects of lead and light on the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Talsma, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is one of the mechanisms by which lead may produce toxic effects. Since the retina possesses characteristics which may cause it to be susceptible to lipid peroxidation, the effects of lead on the rabbit retina were investigated. Changes were found in several indicators of lipid peroxidation including malonaldehyde levels and extractable fluorescence. Histologic and ultrastructural evaluations showed accumulation of lipofuscin and disruption of retinal architecture. The effect of concurrent constant light was also tested and was found to be a modification of the effects produced by lead, probably mediated through a disruption of normal retinal physiology. A decrease in catalase activity was seen in the retinas of lead-exposed animals. Concurrent constant light treatment added to this inhibition. These findings suggest that lead can produce peroxidation effects in the eye and that the retina may be highly susceptible to peroxidated damage.

  2. Propiedades biomecánicas de la membrana limitante interna tras recibir tratamiento intravítreo con ocriplasmina.

    PubMed

    Vielmuth, Franziska; Schumann, Ricarda G; Spindler, Volker; Wolf, Armin; Scheler, Renate; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Henrich, Paul B; Haritoglou, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar la rigidez de la membrana limitante interna (MLI) humana y evaluar los posibles cambios de las propiedades mecánicas tras administrar una inyección intravítrea de ocriplasmina para tratar la tracción vitreomacular. Métodos: Este estudio se compone de una serie de casos intervencionales y comparativos de 12 muestras de MLI extraídas mediante cirugía y obtenidas de forma consecutiva de 9 ojos de 9 pacientes después de someterse sin éxito a vitreólisis farmacológica con ocriplasmina. Durante el mismo periodo de tiempo, 16 muestras de otros 13 ojos sin tratamiento con ocriplasmina se obtuvieron mediante vitrectomía y sirvieron como controles. Todos los pacientes presentaron agujeros maculares o tracción vitreomacular y se sometieron a vitrectomía con disección de la MLI tanto con tinción con azul brillante (AB) como sin ella. Todas las muestras se analizaron con un microscopio de fuerza atómica con imágenes de las regiones de 25 × 25 μm. En todas las muestras, se analizaron tanto la parte de la retina como la del vítreo de la MLI. Resultados: La microscopia de fuerza atómica no reveló diferencias significativas en cuanto a elasticidad de las muestras de MLI extraídas de ojos con o sin tratamiento con ocriplasmina. Las áreas onduladas de la parte de la retina presentaron una mayor rigidez que la parte del vítreo de la MLI. La cartografía topográfica tanto de la parte del vítreo como de la retina de la MLI no mostró ninguna alteración aparente de la morfología en ojos tratados con ocriplasmina en comparación con los ojos no tratados. La tinción con azul brillante conllevó un aumento de la rigidez tisular. Conclusiones: Las inyecciones intravítreas de ocriplasmina no varían las propiedades biomecánicas de la MLI humana. No existen pruebas de un posible efecto enzimático que interfiera con la rigidez de esta membrana basal. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Electrooptical model of the first retina layers of a visual analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Riabinin, A. D.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Chibalashvili, Y. L.; Shkvar, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    An electrooptical principle of converting and transmitting optical signals is proposed and used as the basis for constructing a model of the upper layers of the retina of the visual analyzer of animals. An evaluation of multichannel fibrous optical systems, in which the conversion of optical signals is based on the electrooptical principle, to model the upper retina layers is presented. The symbolic circuit of the model and its algorithm are discussed.

  4. Simultaneous Exposure Using 532 and 860 nm Lasers for Visible Lesion Thresholds in the Rhesus Retina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). 20100715260 Paper - SIMULTANEOUS EXPOSURE USING 532 AND 860 nm LASERS FOR VISIBLE LESION...THRESHOLDS IN1 THE RHESUS RETINA William Roach,* Robert Thomas,* Gavin Buffington,T Garrett Polhamus,* John Notabartolo,* Cheryl DiCarlo,* Kevin Stockton...is not as well focused at the retina —a situation difficult to address. To add confidence to the experimental results obtained, a theoretical

  5. Transcriptome networks in the mouse retina: An exon level BXD RI database

    PubMed Central

    King, Rebecca; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in gene expression provide diverse retina phenotypes and may also contribute to susceptibility to injury and disease. The present study defines the transcriptome of the retina in the BXD RI strain set, using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array to investigate all exons of traditional protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs. These data are presented in a highly interactive database on the GeneNetwork website. Methods In the Normal Retina Database, the mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas was quantified using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array. This database consists of data from male and female mice. The data set includes a total of 52 BXD RI strains, the parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and a reciprocal cross. Results In combination with GeneNetwork, the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Normal Retina Database provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. Protein-coding and non-coding RNAs can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in the genomic sequence. Using this resource, we extracted transcriptome signatures for retinal cells and defined genetic networks associated with the maintenance of the normal retina. Furthermore, we examined differentially expressed exons within a single gene. Conclusions The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among the BXD RI strains makes it possible to identify expression networks that underline differences in retina structure and function. Ultimately, we will use this database to define changes that occur following blast injury to the retina. PMID:26604663

  6. Foveal regions of bird retinas correlate with the aster of the inner nuclear layer.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, O; Bravo, H; Smith, R L

    1989-03-01

    A radiate specialization, the aster, has been found in whole-mount retinas of birds and is associated to each one of the temporal and nasal fovea, with the one related to the convexiclivate nasal fovea more evident. This radial arrangement extends uniformly in all directions from the foveal pit. Transverse sections of the retina show that this structure is formed by bands of cells and bundles of fibers from the inner nuclear layer.

  7. Gene transfer to the retina of rat by liposome eye drops.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Masuda, I; Yasuda, T; Matsuo, N

    1996-02-27

    Gene delivery to the intraocular tissues of the retina is hampered by complicated surgical interventions to administer the gene. Here we showed that instillation as eye drops of an expression plasmid vector for beta-galactosidase gene carried by the specific kinds of liposomes could transfer the gene to the retinal ganglion cells of rat, without causing any inflammation. This non-surgical, convenient way for gene delivery to the retina would facilitate the development of treatment for various intraocular diseases.

  8. Otx2 ChIP-seq Reveals Unique and Redundant Functions in the Mature Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fant, Bruno; Lamonerie, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During mouse retinal development and into adulthood, the transcription factor Otx2 is expressed in pigment epithelium, photoreceptors and bipolar cells. In the mature retina, Otx2 ablation causes photoreceptor degeneration through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism involving Otx2 function in the supporting RPE. Surprisingly, photoreceptor survival does not require Otx2 expression in the neural retina, where the related Crx homeobox gene, a major regulator of photoreceptor development, is also expressed. To get a deeper view of mouse Otx2 activities in the neural retina, we performed chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) on Otx2. Using two independent ChIP-seq assays, we identified consistent sets of Otx2-bound cis-regulatory elements. Comparison with our previous RPE-specific Otx2 ChIP-seq data shows that Otx2 occupies different functional domains of the genome in RPE cells and in neural retina cells and regulates mostly different sets of genes. To assess the potential redundancy of Otx2 and Crx, we compared our data with Crx ChIP-seq data. While Crx genome occupancy markedly differs from Otx2 genome occupancy in the RPE, it largely overlaps that of Otx2 in the neural retina. Thus, in accordance with its essential role in the RPE and its non-essential role in the neural retina, Otx2 regulates different gene sets in the RPE and the neural retina, and shares an important part of its repertoire with Crx in the neural retina. Overall, this study provides a better understanding of gene-regulatory networks controlling photoreceptor homeostasis and disease. PMID:24558479

  9. Optimal Prediction in the Retina and Natural Motion Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Jared M.; Palmer, Stephanie E.

    2016-03-01

    Almost all behaviors involve making predictions. Whether an organism is trying to catch prey, avoid predators, or simply move through a complex environment, the organism uses the data it collects through its senses to guide its actions by extracting from these data information about the future state of the world. A key aspect of the prediction problem is that not all features of the past sensory input have predictive power, and representing all features of the external sensory world is prohibitively costly both due to space and metabolic constraints. This leads to the hypothesis that neural systems are optimized for prediction. Here we describe theoretical and computational efforts to define and quantify the efficient representation of the predictive information by the brain. Another important feature of the prediction problem is that the physics of the world is diverse enough to contain a wide range of possible statistical ensembles, yet not all inputs are probable. Thus, the brain might not be a generalized predictive machine; it might have evolved to specifically solve the prediction problems most common in the natural environment. This paper summarizes recent results on predictive coding and optimal predictive information in the retina and suggests approaches for quantifying prediction in response to natural motion. Basic statistics of natural movies reveal that general patterns of spatiotemporal correlation are present across a wide range of scenes, though individual differences in motion type may be important for optimal processing of motion in a given ecological niche.

  10. Mapping a Complete Neural Population in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Amodei, Dario; Deshmukh, Nikhil; Sadeghi, Kolia; Soo, Frederick; Holy, Timothy E.; Berry, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Recording simultaneously from essentially all of the relevant neurons in a local circuit is crucial to understand how they collectively represent information. Here we show that the combination of a large, dense multielectrode array and a novel, mostly automated spike-sorting algorithm allowed us to record simultaneously from a highly overlapping population of >200 ganglion cells in the salamander retina. By combining these methods with labeling and imaging, we showed that up to 95% of the ganglion cells over the area of the array were recorded. By measuring the coverage of visual space by the receptive fields of the recorded cells, we concluded that our technique captured a neural population that forms an essentially complete representation of a region of visual space. This completeness allowed us to determine the spatial layout of different cell types as well as identify a novel group of ganglion cells that responded reliably to a set of naturalistic and artificial stimuli but had no measurable receptive field. Thus, our method allows unprecedented access to the complete neural representation of visual information, a crucial step for the understanding of population coding in sensory systems. PMID:23100409

  11. Variety of horizontal cell gap junctions in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Kim, Hong-Lim; Pan, Feng; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Massey, Stephen C; Kim, In-Beom

    2012-02-29

    In the rabbit retina, there are two types of horizontal cell (HC). The axonless A-type HCs form a coupled network via connexin 50 (Cx50) gap junctions in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). The axon-bearing B-type HCs form two independently coupled networks; the dendritic network via gap junctions consisted of unknown Cx and the axon terminal network via Cx57. The present study was conducted to examine the localization and morphological features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions in rabbit HCs at cellular and subcellular levels. The results showed that each gap junction composed of Cx50 or Cx57 showed distinct features. The larger Cx50 gap junctions were located more proximally than the smaller Cx50 gap junctions. Both Cx50 plaques formed symmetrical homotypic gap junctions, but some small ones had an asymmetrical appearance, suggesting the presence of heterotypic gap junctions or hemichannels. In contrast, Cx57 gap junctions were found in the more distal part of the OPL but never on the axon terminal endings entering the rod spherules, and they were exclusively homotypic. Interestingly, about half of the Cx57 gap junctions appeared to be invaginated. These distinct features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions show the variety of HC gap junctions and may provide insights into the function of different types of HCs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  13. Network Analysis and Visualization of Mouse Retina Connectivity Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The largest available cellular level connectivity map, of a 0.1 mm sample of the mouse retina Inner Plexiform Layer, was analysed using network models and visualized using spectral graph layouts and observed cell coordinates. This allows key nodes in the network to be identified with retinal neurons. Their strongest synaptic links can trace pathways in the network, elucidating possible circuits. Modular decomposition of the network, by sampling signal flows over nodes and links using the InfoMap method, shows discrete modules of cone bipolar cells that form a tiled mosaic in the retinal plane. The highest flow nodes, calculated by InfoMap, proved to be the most useful landmarks for elucidating possible circuits. Their dominant links to high flow amacrine cells reveal possible circuits linking bipolar through to ganglion cells and show an Off-On discrimination between the Left-Right sections of the sample. Circuits suggested by this analysis confirm known roles for some cells and point to roles for others. PMID:27414405

  14. Optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for selective retina treatment.

    PubMed

    Schuele, Georg; Elsner, Hanno; Framme, Carsten; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    The selective retina treatment (SRT) targets retinal diseases associated with disorders in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Due to the ophthalmoscopic invisibility of the laser-induced RPE effects, we investigate a noninvasive optoacoustic real-time dosimetry system. In vitro porcine RPE is irradiated with a Nd:YLF laser (527 nm, 1.7-micros pulse duration, 5 to 40 microJ, 30 pulses, 100-Hz repetition rate). Generated acoustic transients are measured with a piezoelectric transducer. During 27 patient treatments, the acoustic transients are measured with a transducer embedded in an ophthalmic contact lens. After treatment, RPE damage is visualized by fluorescein angiographic leakage. Below the RPE damage threshold, the optoacoustic transients show no pulse-to-pulse fluctuations within a laser pulse train. Above threshold, fluctuations of the individual transients among each other are observed. If optoacoustic pulse-to-pulse fluctuations are present, RPE leakage is observed in fluorescein angiography. In 96% of the irradiated areas, RPE leakage correlated with the optoacoustic defined threshold value. A noninvasive optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for SRT is developed and proved in vitro and during patient treatment. It detects the ophthalmoscopically invisible laser-induced damage of RPE cells and overcomes practical limitations of SRT for use in private practice.

  15. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 machine learning classifiers for glaucoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, K A; Wollstein, G; Danks, D; Sung, K R; Ishikawa, H; Kagemann, L; Gabriele, M L; Schuman, J S

    2010-01-01

    Aims To assess performance of classifiers trained on Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT3) parameters for discriminating between healthy and glaucomatous eyes. Methods Classifiers were trained using HRT3 parameters from 60 healthy subjects and 140 glaucomatous subjects. The classifiers were trained on all 95 variables and smaller sets created with backward elimination. Seven types of classifiers, including Support Vector Machines with radial basis (SVM-radial), and Recursive Partitioning and Regression Trees (RPART), were trained on the parameters. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated for classifiers, individual parameters and HRT3 glaucoma probability scores (GPS). Classifier AUCs and leave-one-out accuracy were compared with the highest individual parameter and GPS AUCs and accuracies. Results The highest AUC and accuracy for an individual parameter were 0.848 and 0.79, for vertical cup/disc ratio (vC/D). For GPS, global GPS performed best with AUC 0.829 and accuracy 0.78. SVM-radial with all parameters showed significant improvement over global GPS and vC/ D with AUC 0.916 and accuracy 0.85. RPART with all parameters provided significant improvement over global GPS with AUC 0.899 and significant improvement over global GPS and vC/D with accuracy 0.875. Conclusions Machine learning classifiers of HRT3 data provide significant enhancement over current methods for detection of glaucoma. PMID:18523087

  16. Stimulation of the retina with a multielectrode extraocular visual prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Vivek; Morley, John W; Coroneo, Minas T

    2005-08-01

    An extraocular approach to developing a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using electrodes placed on the outer surface of the eye is suggested. Experiments were carried out to determine the feasibility of this approach, and evaluate electrode configurations and parameters for stimulation. In anaesthetized cats, a 21-electrode extraocular retinal prosthesis (ERP) array was sutured to the sclera over the lateral surface of the eye. Electrically evoked potentials (EEP) were recorded at the visual cortex bilaterally in response to retinal stimulation with the electrode array. Bipolar stimulation of the ERP array electrodes in horizontal and vertical configurations and at different interelectrode separations was investigated with biphasic constant-current pulses. Electrical stimulation of the lateral retina with an ERP elicited EEP that were higher in the ipsilateral visual cortex. The threshold for bipolar retinal stimulation was 500 microA. EEP amplitude increased with increases in stimulus pulse duration and current intensity. Retinal stimulation was slightly more effective with electrodes in a vertical as opposed to horizontal orientation. A larger interelectrode separation resulted in a higher EEP amplitude. Retinal stimulation with a prototype ERP array is demonstrated. The thresholds for retinal excitation are below safe charge-density limits for chronic neural stimulation. Ipsilateral localization of the EEP suggests that localized retinal stimulation is occurring. An ERP is a new approach to retinal prosthesis research, and might lead to the development of a low-resolution visual prosthesis for blind patients.

  17. Review: Zinc’s functional significance in the vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    This review covers a broad range of topics related to the actions of zinc on the cells of the vertebrate retina. Much of this review relies on studies in which zinc was applied exogenously, and therefore the results, albeit highly suggestive, lack physiologic significance. This view stems from the fact that the concentrations of zinc used in these studies may not be encountered under the normal circumstances of life. This caveat is due to the lack of a zinc-specific probe with which to measure the concentrations of Zn2+ that may be released from neurons or act upon them. However, a great deal of relevant information has been garnered from studies in which Zn2+ was chelated, and the effects of its removal compared with findings obtained in its presence. For a more complete discussion of the consequences of depletion or excess in the body’s trace elements, the reader is referred to a recent review by Ugarte et al. in which they provide a detailed account of the interactions, toxicity, and metabolic activity of the essential trace elements iron, zinc, and copper in retinal physiology and disease. In addition, Smart et al. have published a splendid review on the modulation by zinc of inhibitory and excitatory amino acid receptor ion channels. PMID:25324679

  18. Electrophysiological fingerprints of OFF bipolar cells in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Alex H.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) divide photoreceptor output into different channels for the parallel extraction of temporal and chromatic stimulus properties. In rodents, five types of OFF BCs have been differentiated, based on morphological and functional criteria, but their electrophysiological characterization remains incomplete. This study analyzed OFF BCs with the patch clamp technique in acute slices of rat retina. Their specific voltage-dependent currents and glutamate responses are shown to represent individual fingerprints which define the signal processing and filtering properties of each cell type and allow their unequivocal identification. Two additions to the rat BC repertoire are presented: OFF BC-2′, a variation of BC-2 with wider axonal arbours and prominent Na+ currents, is described for the first time in rodents, and OFF BC-3b, previously identified in mouse, is electrophysiologically characterized in rat. Moreover, the glutamate responses of rat OFF BCs are shown to be differentially sensitive to AMPA- and kainate-receptor blockers and to modulation by nitric oxide (NO) through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. These results contribute to our understanding of the diversity and function of bipolar cells in mammals. PMID:27457753

  19. Ischemic Tolerance Protects the Rat Retina from Glaucomatous Damage

    PubMed Central

    Belforte, Nicolás; Sande, Pablo H.; de Zavalía, Nuria; Fernandez, Diego C.; Silberman, Dafne M.; Chianelli, Mónica S.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of acquired blindness which may involve an ischemic-like insult to retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve head. We investigated the effect of a weekly application of brief ischemia pulses (ischemic conditioning) on the rat retinal damage induced by experimental glaucoma. Glaucoma was induced by weekly injections of chondroitin sulfate (CS) in the rat eye anterior chamber. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mmHg for 5 min; this maneuver started after 6 weekly injections of vehicle or CS and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. Glaucoma was evaluated in terms of: i) intraocular pressure (IOP), ii) retinal function (electroretinogram (ERG)), iii) visual pathway function (visual evoked potentials, (VEPs)) iv) histology of the retina and optic nerve head. Retinal thiobarbituric acid substances levels were assessed as an index of lipid peroxidation. Ischemic conditioning significantly preserved ERG, VEPs, as well as retinal and optic nerve head structure from glaucomatous damage, without changes in IOP. Moreover, ischemia pulses abrogated the increase in lipid peroxidation induced by experimental glaucoma. These results indicate that induction of ischemic tolerance could constitute a fertile avenue for the development of new therapeutic strategies in glaucoma treatment. PMID:21887313

  20. Spare the rods and spoil the retina: revisited.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, S; Arden, G

    2016-02-01

    Visual function improves with oxygen inhalation in people with diabetes even in the absence of visible retinopathy. Rods consume the most oxygen in the retina due to the high metabolic activity required to maintain the dark current. Therefore, Arden hypothesized that in diabetes where oxygen supply may also be affected due to the changes in retinal vasculature, prevention of dark adaptation may be a viable option to prevent or decrease the rate of progression of diabetic retinopathy. Animal experiments have proven that the absence of rods decreases the development of retinal neovascularisation. The same principle applies to panretinal photocoagulation, an established treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Recently, a few clinical studies have also shown that preventing dark adaptation by suppressing rods with 500-nm light source at night decreases the rate of progression of early diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in the short-term. We await the results of a large two-year multi-centre trial (CLEOPATRA trial) to evaluate the long-term effects of decreasing dark adaptation by applying a 500nm light source as a mask over eyes with non-central diabetic macular oedema.

  1. Feedback synaptic interaction in the dragonfly ocellar retina

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The intracellular response of the ocellar nerve dendrite, the second order neuron in the retina of the dragonfly ocellus, has been modified by application of various drugs and a model developed to explain certain features of that response. Curare blocked the response completely. Both picrotoxin and bicuculline eliminated the "off" overshoot. Bicuculline also decreased the size of response and the sensitivity. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), however, increased the size of response. The evidence indicates the possibility that the receptor transmitter is acetylcholine and is inhibitory to the ocellar nerve dendrite whereas the feedback transmitter from the ocellar nerve dendrite may be GABA and is facilitory to receptor transmitter release. The model of synaptic feedback interaction developed to be consistent with these results has certain important features. It suggests that the feedback transmitter is released in the dark to increase input sensitivity from receptors in response to dim light. This implies that the dark potential of the ocellar nerve dendrite may be determined by a dynamic equilibrium established by synaptic interaction between it and the receptor terminals. Such a system is also well suited to signalling phasic information about changes in level of illumination over a wide range of intensities, a characteristic which appears to be a significant feature of the dragonfly median ocellar response. PMID:205624

  2. Mouse Embryonic Retina Delivers Information Controlling Cortical Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Ciro; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development [1]. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded [2], the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs) during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal). Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system. PMID:21170332

  3. Machine Visual Motion Detection Modeled On Vertebrate Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, M. R.; Nguyen, H. G.; Kaomea, P. K.

    1988-12-01

    Real-time motion analysis would be very useful for autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) navigation, target tracking, homing, and obstacle avoidance. The perception of motion is well developed in animals from insects to man, providing solutions to similar problems. We have therefore applied a model of the motion analysis subnetwork in the vertebrate retina to visual navigation in the AUV. The model is currently implemented in the C programming language as a discrete- time serial approximation of a continuous-time parallel process. Running on an IBM-PC/AT with digitized video camera images, the system can detect and describe motion in a 16 by 16 receptor field at the rate of 4 updates per second. The system responds accurately with direction and speed information to images moving across the visual field at velocities less than 8 degrees of visual angle per second at signal-to-noise ratios greater than 3. The architecture is parallel and its sparse connections do not require long-term modifications. The model is thus appropriate for implementation in VLSI optoelectronics.

  4. Alert Response to Motion Onset in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eric Y.; Marre, Olivier; Fisher, Clark; Schwartz, Greg; Levy, Joshua; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that motion onset is very effective at capturing attention and is more salient than smooth motion. Here, we find that this salience ranking is present already in the firing rate of retinal ganglion cells. By stimulating the retina with a bar that appears, stays still, and then starts moving, we demonstrate that a subset of salamander retinal ganglion cells, fast OFF cells, responds significantly more strongly to motion onset than to smooth motion. We refer to this phenomenon as an alert response to motion onset. We develop a computational model that predicts the time-varying firing rate of ganglion cells responding to the appearance, onset, and smooth motion of a bar. This model, termed the adaptive cascade model, consists of a ganglion cell that receives input from a layer of bipolar cells, represented by individual rectified subunits. Additionally, both the bipolar and ganglion cells have separate contrast gain control mechanisms. This model captured the responses to our different motion stimuli over a wide range of contrasts, speeds, and locations. The alert response to motion onset, together with its computational model, introduces a new mechanism of sophisticated motion processing that occurs early in the visual system. PMID:23283327

  5. Microcystic macular edema detection in retina OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Emily K.; Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Howard S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging tool that is particularly useful for exploring retinal abnormalities in ophthalmological diseases. Recently, it has been used to track changes in the eye associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) where certain tissue layer thicknesses have been associated with disease progression. A small percentage of MS patients also exhibit what has been called microcystic macular edema (MME), where uid collections that are thought to be pseudocysts appear in the inner nuclear layer. Very little is known about the cause of this condition so it is important to be able to identify precisely where these pseudocysts occur within the retina. This identi cation would be an important rst step towards furthering our understanding. In this work, we present a detection algorithm to nd these pseudocysts and to report on their spatial distribution. Our approach uses a random forest classi er trained on manual segmentation data to classify each voxel as pseudocyst or not. Despite having a small sample size of ve subjects, the algorithm correctly identi es 84.6% of pseudocysts as compared to manual delineation. Finally, using our method, we show that the spatial distribution of pseudocysts within the macula are generally contained within an annulus around the fovea.

  6. Multiscan time-domain optical coherence tomography for retina imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carla Carmelo; Rogers, John; Pedro, Justin; Rosen, Richard; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2007-04-01

    A versatile time-domain optical coherence tomography system is presented that can generate cross-sectional images by using either transverse priority or depth priority scanning. This is made possible by using a transmissive scanning delay line compatible with balance detection operating at a speed similar to that of the transverse scanner used to scan the beam across the target. In vivo images from the retina are generated and shown using the same system switched to either transverse or depth priority scanning regime, by using the scanning delay line either in slow or fast scanning modes, respectively. A comparative analysis of different scanning regimes depending on image size to fit different areas to be imaged is presented. Safety thresholds due to the different continuous irradiation time per transverse pixel in different scanning regimes are also considered. We present the maximum exposure level for a variety of scanning procedures, employing either A scanning (depth priority) or T scanning (transverse priority) when generating cross-sectional images, en face images, or collecting 3D volumes.

  7. Photodetection and computer analysis of a human eye retina image influenced by glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhacek, Frantisek; Pospisil, Jaroslav

    2003-07-01

    This paper deals with some present methods of the photodetection of a human eye retina image and the following computer analysis of the obtained image dates. There are considered the detection and the computer quantitative evaluations of characteristic symptoms of glaucoma on the human eye retina. These symptoms and their numerical parameters, that are usually used, are shortly described. The main part of this paper describes the methods of the creation and the computer analysis of a three-dimensional map of the blind spot of the human eye retina (papila) and the adjacent area of the retina. The changes important for diagnostics of the above mentioned three-dimensional map are then detected through the computer analysis. Specially, the methods of scanning laser tomography and stereophotographic measurement of the mentioned part of retina are considered. Some concrete results ascertained by the mentioned methods are also shown. Lastly, our suggestions of methods of analyzing two-dimensional images of retina obtained by the colour fundus camera are shown.

  8. Histology of retina overlying bacterial subretinal abscess and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, John B; Warden, Scott M; Farrell, Gault M; Baker, Meghan; Mukai, Shizuo

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the state of the retina overlying a subretinal abscess and its contents by histopathologic analysis and electron microscopy (EM) and to determine implications for treatment. Case report of a patient with a subretinal abscess secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection who underwent pars plana vitrectomy, PPL, endolaser, retinectomy, abscess drainage, and retinal biopsy. The retinal biopsy was analyzed histologically using special stains, and EM of the abscess contents was performed. Postoperatively, the retina remained attached, and the patient regained visual acuity of 20/60. Culture of the vitrectomy specimen yielded K. pneumoniae. Retinal biopsy revealed a partially intact inner retina with destruction of the outer retinal layers in the setting of acute inflammation. Results of gram, Grocott-Gomori methenamine-silver nitrate, and acid-fast staining of the retinal biopsy specimen were negative. EM of the abscess contents revealed cellular debris with scattered inflammatory cells but no bacteria. This case demonstrates that aggressive surgical management of a subretinal abscess due to K. pneumoniae in an eye can result in useful vision. Management included retinectomy of the retina overlying the abscess that revealed photoreceptor destruction with intraretinal inflammation. Drainage of a subretinal abscess without removal of the overlying retina may limit treatment effectiveness and spare retina that is not functional.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of galectin-3 in the pig retina during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihoon; Moon, Changjong; Ahn, Meejung; Joo, Hong-Gu; Jin, Jae-Kwang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The differential level and localization of galectin-3 protein were examined in the retinas of two-day-old pigs and six-month-old pigs. Methods The retinas sampled from two-day-old and six-month-old pigs were analyzed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results western blot analysis detected galectin-3 in both age groups, although the levels were significantly higher in six-month-old pigs. Immunohistochemical staining showed that galectin-3 was localized in the retinas of both two-day-old pigs and six-month-old pigs; the galectin-3 immunostaining was more intense in the six-month-old pig retina, as shown in the western blot analysis. Galectin-3 was expressed in glial cells, particularly in glutamine synthetase-positive Müller cells and their processes, across all retina layers in both age groups; however, it was not found in ganglion cells of the ganglion cell layer or neuronal cells of the inner and outer nuclear cell layers in either age group. Conclusions This is the first demonstration that galectin-3 is detected in the retinas of two-day-old pigs and that the expression in Müller cells increases with postnatal development. PMID:19816601

  10. The ciliary margin zone of the mammalian retina generates retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Wang, Qing; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Herrera, Eloisa; Mason, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live-imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. As Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2−/− mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2+ cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. PMID:28009286

  11. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase expression in the transient ischemic rat retina: neuroprotection of betaxolol.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun Woo; Park, Chang Hwan; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Yoo, Ji Myong; Song, Joon Kyung; Choi, Wan Sung

    2002-09-27

    Betaxolol is a beta-adrenergic blocker but its neuroprotective action is generally thought to be due to its calcium channel blocking properties. In this study, we investigated neuronal cell damage and changes in the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity in the ischemic retina and its relationship to the neuroprotection of betaxolol treatment after ischemic injury. Using the retina after ischemia, the expression of nNOS was studied by immunocytochemistry. In control retinas, two types of amacrine cells and a class of displaced amacrine cells were nNOS-labeled. After ischemia/reperfusion, the number of nNOS immunoreactive cells increased in both the ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear layer compared to the control retinas. However, when experiments were carried out on animals that had been treated with betaxolol twice daily after ischemia/reperfusion, the number of nNOS immunoreactive cells decreased compared to the untreated ischemic retinas. These results suggest that an increase in nNOS expression could be associated with the degenerative changes in the ischemic retina, and that betaxolol treatment appears to play a role in protecting retinal tissue from ischemic damage. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. Identification and localization of myosin superfamily members in fish retina and retinal pigmented epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Sohlberg, Lorraine; Dosé, Andréa; Breckler, Jennifer; Hillman, David W; Burnside, Beth

    2009-03-10

    Myosins are cytoskeletal motors critical for generating the forces necessary for establishing cell structure and mediating actin-dependent cell motility. In each cell type a multitude of myosins are expressed, each myosin contributing to aspects of morphogenesis, transport, or motility occurring in that cell type. To examine the roles of myosins in individual retinal cell types, we first used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening to identify myosins expressed in retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), followed by immunohistochemistry to examine the cellular and subcellular localizations of seven of these expressed myosins. In the myosin PCR screen of cDNA from striped bass retina and striped bass RPE, we amplified 17 distinct myosins from eight myosin classes from retinal cDNA and 11 distinct myosins from seven myosin classes from RPE cDNA. By using antibodies specific for myosins IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, VI, VIIA, and IXB, we examined the localization patterns of these myosins in retinas and RPE of fish, and in isolated inner/outer segment fragments of green sunfish photoreceptors. Each of the myosins exhibited unique expression patterns in fish retina. Individual cell types expressed multiple myosin family members, some of which colocalized within a particular cell type. Because much is known about the functions and properties of these myosins from studies in other systems, their cellular and subcellular localization patterns in the retina help us understand which roles they might play in the vertebrate retina and RPE.

  14. Defects in the outer limiting membrane are associated with rosette development in the Nrl-/- retina.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2012-01-01

    The neural retinal leucine zipper (Nrl) knockout mouse is a widely used model to study cone photoreceptor development, physiology, and molecular biology in the absence of rods. In the Nrl(-/-) retina, rods are converted into functional cone-like cells. The Nrl(-/-) retina is characterized by large undulations of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) commonly known as rosettes. Here we explore the mechanism of rosette development in the Nrl(-/-) retina. We report that rosettes first appear at postnatal day (P)8, and that the structure of nascent rosettes is morphologically distinct from what is seen in the adult retina. The lumen of these nascent rosettes contains a population of aberrant cells protruding into the subretinal space that induce infolding of the ONL. Morphologically adult rosettes do not contain any cell bodies and are first detected at P15. The cells found in nascent rosettes are photoreceptors in origin but lack inner and outer segments. We show that the adherens junctions between photoreceptors and Müller glia which comprise the retinal outer limiting membrane (OLM) are not uniformly formed in the Nrl(-/-) retina and thus allow protrusion of a population of developing photoreceptors into the subretinal space where their maturation becomes delayed. These data suggest that the rosettes of the Nrl(-/-) retina arise due to defects in the OLM and delayed maturation of a subset of photoreceptors, and that rods may play an important role in the proper formation of the OLM.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well-preserved among these species. However, expression of NAPE-PLD is circumscribed to the photoreceptor layer only in monkeys. In contrast, CB2R expression is variable across these species; in mice, CB2R is found in retinal neurons but not in glial cells; in tree shrews, CB2R is expressed in Müller cell processes of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina of these mammals and suggest a distinctive role of eCBs in visual processing. PMID:26977322

  16. A Comparative Analysis of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina of Mice, Tree Shrews, and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Elkrief, Laurent; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed in various parts of the central nervous system, including the retina. The localization of the key eCB receptors, particularly CB1R and CB2R, has been recently reported in rodent and primate retinas with striking interspecies differences. Little is known about the distribution of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these eCBs. We therefore examined the expression and localization of the main components of the eCB system in the retina of mice, tree shrews, and monkeys. We found that CB1R and FAAH distributions are well-preserved among these species. However, expression of NAPE-PLD is circumscribed to the photoreceptor layer only in monkeys. In contrast, CB2R expression is variable across these species; in mice, CB2R is found in retinal neurons but not in glial cells; in tree shrews, CB2R is expressed in Müller cell processes of the outer retina and in retinal neurons of the inner retina; in monkeys, CB2R is restricted to Müller cells. Finally, the expression patterns of MAGL and DAGLα are differently expressed across species. Overall, these results provide evidence that the eCB system is differently expressed in the retina of these mammals and suggest a distinctive role of eCBs in visual processing.

  17. Imaging the response of the retina to electrical stimulation with genetically encoded calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Andrew C; Behrend, Matthew R; Lee, Nan Sook; Klein, Ronald L; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Chow, Robert H

    2013-04-01

    Epiretinal implants for the blind are designed to stimulate surviving retinal neurons, thus bypassing the diseased photoreceptor layer. Single-unit or multielectrode recordings from isolated animal retina are commonly used to inform the design of these implants. However, such electrical recordings provide limited information about the spatial patterns of retinal activation. Calcium imaging overcomes this limitation, as imaging enables high spatial resolution mapping of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity as well as simultaneous recording from hundreds of RGCs. Prior experiments in amphibian retina have demonstrated proof of principle, yet experiments in mammalian retina have been hindered by the inability to load calcium indicators into mature mammalian RGCs. Here, we report a method for labeling the majority of ganglion cells in adult rat retina with genetically encoded calcium indicators, specifically GCaMP3 and GCaMP5G. Intravitreal injection of an adeno-associated viral vector targets ∼85% of ganglion cells with high specificity. Because of the large fluorescence signals provided by the GCaMP sensors, we can now for the first time visualize the response of the retina to electrical stimulation in real-time. Imaging transduced retinas mounted on multielectrode arrays reveals how stimulus pulse shape can dramatically affect the spatial extent of RGC activation, which has clear implications in prosthetic applications. Our method can be easily adapted to work with other fluorescent indicator proteins in both wild-type and transgenic mammals.

  18. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  19. Divergent distribution in vascular and avascular mammalian retinae links neuroglobin to cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Bentmann, Anke; Schmidt, Marc; Reuss, Stefan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2005-05-27

    The visual function of the vertebrate retina relies on sufficient supply with oxygen. Neuroglobin is a respiratory protein thought to play an essential role in oxygen homeostasis of neuronal cells. For further understanding of its function, we compared the distribution of neuroglobin and mitochondria in both vascular and avascular mammalian retinae. In the vascular retinae of mouse and rat, oxygen is supplied by the outer choroidal, deep retinal, and inner capillaries. We show that in this type of retina, mitochondria are concentrated in the inner segments of photoreceptor cells, the outer and the inner plexiform layers, and the ganglion cell layer. These are the same regions in which oxygen consumption takes place and in which neuroglobin is present at high levels. In the avascular retina of guinea pig the deep retinal and inner capillaries are absent. Therefore, only the inner segments of the photoreceptors adjacent to choroidal capillaries display an oxidative metabolism. We demonstrate that in the retina of guinea pigs both neuroglobin and mitochondria are restricted to this layer. Our results clearly demonstrate an association of neuroglobin and mitochondria, thus supporting the hypothesis that neuroglobin is a respiratory protein that supplies oxygen to the respiratory chain.

  20. Hazardous effects of fried potato chips on the development of retina in albino rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Sakr, Saber A; Badawy, Gamal M; Afify, Hanaa S

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the hazardous effects of fried potato chips upon the retina of two developmental stages of the albino rats aged 7 and 14 days from parturition. PREGNANT RATS WERE ARRANGED INTO TWO GROUPS: control pregnant rats and consequently their delivered newborns until reaching 7 and 14 days old from parturition and fried potato chips group in which pregnant rats at the 6th day of gestation maintained on diet formed of fried potato chips supplied from the market mixed with standard diet at a concentration of 50% per each till 7 and 14 post-partum. Three fold integrated approaches were adopted, namely, histological, ultrastructural and proteomic analysis. Histological examination of the retina of the experimental offsprings revealed many histopathological changes, including massive degeneration, vacuolization and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer, as well as general reduction in retinal size. At the ultrastructural level, the retina of experimental offsprings exhibited number of deformities, including ill differentiated and degenerated nuclear layer, malformed and vacuolated pigment epithelium with vesiculated and fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, degenerated outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as swollen choriocapillaris and loss of neuronal cells. Proteomic analysis of retina of the two experimental developmental stages showed variations in the expressed proteins as a result of intoxication which illustrated the adverse toxic effects of fried potato chips upon the retina. It can be concluded that the effect of fried potato chips on the development of retina in rats may be due to the presence of acrylamide or its metabolite.

  1. Analysis of pre- and postsynaptic factors of the serotonin system in rabbit retina

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    [3H]Serotonin is accumulated by a specific set of amacrine cells in the rabbit retina. These cells also accumulate the neurotoxin, 5,7- dihydroxytryptamine, and show signs of necrosis within 4 h of in vivo exposure to the drug. Biochemical analysis of [3H]serotonin uptake reveal a sodium- and temperature-dependent, high affinity uptake system with a Km of 0.94 microM and Vmax of 1.08 pmol/mg protein/min. [3H]Tryptophan is also accumulated in rabbit retinal homogenates by a high affinity process. Accumulated [3H]serotonin is released in response to potassium-induced depolarization of intact, isolated retinas. In vitro binding studies of rabbit retinal homogenate membranes demonstrate specific sets of binding sites with characteristics of the postsynaptic serotonin receptor. These data strongly suggest that rabbit retina contains virtually all of the molecular components required for a functional serotonergic neurotransmitter system. The only significant difference between the serotonin system in rabbit retina and that in the well-established serotonin transmitter systems in nonmammalin retinas and in brains of most species is the relatively low concentration of endogenous serotonin in rabbit retinas, as demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography, histofluorescence, or immunocytochemistry. PMID:3965480

  2. Cholesterol in mouse retina originates primarily from in situ de novo biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joseph B; Mast, Natalia; Bederman, Ilya R; Li, Yong; Brunengraber, Henri; Björkhem, Ingemar; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-02-01

    The retina, a thin tissue in the back of the eye, has two apparent sources of cholesterol: in situ biosynthesis and cholesterol available from the systemic circulation. The quantitative contributions of these two cholesterol sources to the retinal cholesterol pool are unknown and have been determined in the present work. A new methodology was used. Mice were given separately deuterium-labeled drinking water and chow containing 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol. In the retina, the rate of total cholesterol input was 21 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day, of which 15 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was provided by local biosynthesis and 6 μg of cholesterol/g retina • day was uptaken from the systemic circulation. Thus, local cholesterol biosynthesis accounts for the majority (72%) of retinal cholesterol input. We also quantified cholesterol input to mouse brain, the organ sharing important similarities with the retina. The rate of total cerebral cholesterol input was 121 μg of cholesterol/g brain • day with local biosynthesis providing 97% of total cholesterol input. Our work addresses a long-standing question in eye research and adds new knowledge to the potential use of statins (drugs that inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis) as therapeutics for age-related macular degeneration, a common blinding disease.

  3. Comparison of proteomic profiles in the zebrafish retina during experimental degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eastlake, Karen; Heywood, Wendy E.; Tracey-White, Dhani; Aquino, Erika; Bliss, Emily; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Mills, Kevin; Khaw, Peng T.; Moosajee, Mariya; Limb, G. Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish spontaneously regenerate the retina after injury. Although the gene expression profile has been extensively studied in this species during regeneration, this does not reflect protein function. To further understand the regenerative process in the zebrafish, we compared the proteomic profile of the retina during injury and upon regeneration. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and label-free quantitative proteomics (quadrupole time of flight LC-MS/MS), we analysed the retina of adult longfin wildtype zebrafish at 0, 3 and 18 days after Ouabain injection. Gene ontology analysis indicates reduced metabolic processing, and increase in fibrin clot formation, with significant upregulation of fibrinogen gamma polypeptide, apolipoproteins A-Ib and A-II, galectin-1, and vitellogenin-6 during degeneration when compared to normal retina. In addition, cytoskeleton and membrane transport proteins were considerably altered during regeneration, with the highest fold upregulation observed for tubulin beta 2 A, histone H2B and brain type fatty acid binding protein. Key proteins identified in this study may play an important role in the regeneration of the zebrafish retina and investigations on the potential regulation of these proteins may lead to the design of protocols to promote endogenous regeneration of the mammalian retina following retinal degenerative disease. PMID:28300160

  4. ConSCRIPT

    PubMed Central

    Mottarella, Scott E.; Rosa, Mario; Bangura, Abdul; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Craig, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Structural Biology Extensible Visualization Scripting Language (SBEVSL) project is to allow users who are experts in one scripting language to use that language in a second molecular visualization environment without requiring the user to learn a new scripting language. ConSCRIPT, the first SBEVSL release, is a plug-in for PyMOL that accepts RasMol scripting commands either as premade scripts or as line-by-line entries from PyMOL's own command line. The plug-in is available for download at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sbevsl/files in the ConSCRIPT folder. PMID:21567873

  5. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  6. Estimación de la incerteza cinemática de los espectros obtenidos con REOSC (CAsLeo), Flamingos-2 y PHOENIX (Gemini) para observaciones de gas ionizado en galaxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, G.; Díaz, R. J.; Güunthardt, G.; Agüuero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Gimeno, G.

    The determination of the radial velocity curves of ionized gas in galaxies requires knowing the value of the internal kinematic uncertainly along the slit for the used spectrographs. We present preliminary results of the study of the variation of the measured radial velocity of both the telluric and comparison emission lines in the spatial direction. This was done for the spectrographs REOSC, Flamingos-2 (F2) and Phoenix. In particular we are interested in using this data to homogenize the rotation curves of nearby galaxies in large-scale ranges. These results will be also useful as references for those works that measure radial velocities of extended objects using only one emission line of ionized gas. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  7. Generating 3D anatomically detailed models of the retina from OCT data sets: implications for computational modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalbaf, Farzaneh; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Turuwhenua, Jason; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prosthesis has been proposed to restore vision for those suffering from the retinal pathologies that mainly affect the photoreceptors layer but keep the inner retina intact. Prior to costly risky experimental studies computational modelling of the retina will help to optimize the device parameters and enhance the outcomes. Here, we developed an anatomically detailed computational model of the retina based on OCT data sets. The consecutive OCT images of individual were subsequently segmented to provide a 3D representation of retina in the form of finite elements. Thereafter, the electrical properties of the retina were modelled by implementing partial differential equation on the 3D mesh. Different electrode configurations, that is bipolar and hexapolar configurations, were implemented and the results were compared with the previous computational and experimental studies. Furthermore, the possible effects of the curvature of retinal layers on the current steering through the retina were proposed and linked to the clinical observations.

  8. [Radiation preconditioning of mouse retina results in tolerance to MNU-induced degeneration and stimulates retinal recovery].

    PubMed

    Tronov, V A; Vinogradova, Yu V; Poplinskaya, V A; Nekrasova, E I; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous studies have revealed a non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxic effect of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non-cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In the present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate the adaptive response of the retina to proton irradiation and implication of glial Muller cells in this response. In this paper, we have shown that the recovery of the retina after exposure to genotoxic agents is associated with an increased efficiency of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptors.

  9. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  10. Transplantation of cultured adult porcine full-thickness retina.

    PubMed

    Engelsberg, Karl; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    In this study we wanted to examine how an adult neuroretina from an animal with an eye similar to the human one survives in vitro. We also wanted to investigate how the culture process affects the adult retina when used in a transplantation paradigm. Full-thickness neuroretinal sheets from adult porcine eyes were dissected into pieces measuring 3 mm in diameter. These were kept in culture for 1-3 days. After this time, the explants were fixed or transplanted subretinally to adult pigs, which were killed after 72-74 days. Transplanted eyes, as well as tissue kept in culture only, were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Explants kept 1 day in vitro (DIV) displayed the normal morphology. In these specimens, single pyknotic cells were evident in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and ganglion cell layer, but were more frequent in the inner nuclear layer (INL). After longer times in vitro, severe degenerative changes appeared. Transplanted explants kept 1 DIV prior to transplantation exhibited normal retinal lamination in two out of four specimens. Transducin and recoverin labeling revealed photoreceptors with inner segments in these grafts. Rod bipolar cells displayed a normal morphology. Vertically arranged Müller cells were also seen in the laminated grafts. Two of the three transplants kept 2 DIV displayed minimal lamination. Eyes with transplants kept 3 DIV prior to transplantation displayed degenerated grafts in all eyes. This study shows that adult porcine neuroretinal explants kept in culture for 1 day display a normal morphology in their major part. Additionally, 1-day explants can survive transplantation with retained morphology even after several months. This indicates the possibility of storing adult donor tissue between harvest and transplantation. The culture system may also be used in the future as a tool for manipulating retinal donor tissue prior to transplantation.

  11. In vivo imaging of microscopic structures in the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Wolfe, Robert; Gray, Daniel C.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dubra, Alfredo; Flannery, John G.; Williams, David R.; Porter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ability to resolve single retinal cells in rodents in vivo has applications in rodent models of the visual system and retinal disease. We have characterized the performance of a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (fAOSLO) that provides cellular and subcellular imaging of rat retina in vivo. Methods Green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in retinal ganglion cells of normal Sprague Dawley rats via intravitreal injections of adeno-associated viral vectors. Simultaneous reflectance and fluorescence retinal images were acquired using the fAOSLO. fAOSLO resolution was characterized by comparing in vivo images with subsequent imaging of retinal sections from the same eyes using confocal microscopy. Results Retinal capillaries and eGFP-labeled ganglion cell bodies, dendrites, and axons were clearly resolved in vivo with adaptive optics (AO). AO correction reduced the total root mean square wavefront error, on average, from 0.30 μm to 0.05 μm (1.7-mm pupil). The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the average in vivo line-spread function (LSF) was ∼1.84 μm, approximately 82% greater than the FWHM of the diffraction-limited LSF. Conclusions With perfect aberration compensation, the in vivo resolution in the rat eye could be ∼2× greater than that in the human eye due to its large numerical aperture (∼0.43). While the fAOSLO corrects a substantial fraction of the rat eye's aberrations, direct measurements of retinal image quality reveal some blur beyond that expected from diffraction. Nonetheless, subcellular features can be resolved, offering promise for using AO to investigate the rodent eye in vivo with high resolution. PMID:19578019

  12. The 11-cis Retinal Origins of Lipofuscin in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Adler, Leopold; Boyer, Nicholas P; Chen, Chunhe; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Lipofuscin is a fluorescent mixture of partially digested proteins and lipids that accumulates with age in the lysosomal compartment of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye. Because it has been found to have significant cytotoxic potential, lipofuscin is thought to play a role in retinal degeneration diseases including age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration. The only known components of lipofuscin are bis-retinoids, the condensation products of two molecules of retinal. The bulk of lipofuscin is thought to originate in the rod photoreceptor outer segments as a by-product of reactions involving the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. 11-cis retinal flows from the RPE into the rod outer segments, where it combines with opsin to form rhodopsin; all-trans retinal is released into the rod outer segments by photoactivated rhodopsin following its excitation by light. Both 11-cis and all-trans retinal can generate lipofuscin-like fluorophores and bis-retinoids when added to rod outer segment membranes. The levels of lipofuscin precursor fluorophores present in the outer segments of dark-adapted rods are similar in cyclic-light- and dark-reared mice, as are the levels of accumulated lipofuscin in the RPE. Because the retinol dehydrogenase enzyme present in rod outer segments can reduce all-trans but not 11-cis retinal, lipofuscin precursors are more likely to form from 11-cis than all-trans retinal, even under cyclic light conditions. Thus, 11-cis retinal may be the primary source of lipofuscin in the retina. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrical responses of rods in the retina of Bufo marinus

    PubMed Central

    Cervetto, L.; Pasino, E.; Torre, V.

    1977-01-01

    1. Intracellular responses to flashes and steps of light have been recorded from the outer segment and the cell body of rods in the retina of the Bufo marinus. The identification of the origin of recorded responses has been confirmed by intracellular marking. 2. Responses to flashes delivered in darkness or superimposed on a background were analysed. Responses recorded from outer segments conform to the principle of `spectral univariance'. The shape of the response is not affected by enlarging the spot diameter from 150 to 1000 μm. 3. The membrane potential measured in darkness at the outer segments varied from -15 to -25 mV. Injection of steady hyperpolarizing currents increases the size of the response to light; depolarizing currents reduce the response. The mean value of the input resistance is 97 ± 30 MΩ in darkness and increases by 20-30% during illumination. 4. The responses obtained from the cell body of rods have the same shape, time course and spectral sensitivity of those recorded at the outer segment. Injection of steady current at the cell body produces different effects than at the outer segment: hyperpolarizing currents reduce the amplitude of the response to light; depolarizing currents increase the response. 5. The experimental data are fitted according to a model similar to that used to describe the responses of turtle cones (Baylor & Hodgkin, 1974; Baylor, Hodgkin & Lamb, 1974a, b). 6. The model reproduces the electrical responses of the rod outer segment to a variety of stimuli: (a) brief flashes and steps of light in dark adapted conditions; (b) bright flashes superimposed on background illuminations; (c) pairs of flashes delivered at different time intervals. Responses to hyperpolarizing steps of current are also reproduced by the model. ImagesABCD PMID:406383

  14. Endocannabinoids in the Retina: From Marijuana to Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Yazulla, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), produces numerous beneficial effects, including analgesia, appetite stimulation and nausea reduction, in addition to its psychotropic effects. THC mimics the action of endogenous fatty acid derivatives, referred to as endocannabinoids. The effects of THC and the endocannabinoids are mediated largely by metabotropic receptors that are distributed throughout the nervous and peripheral organ systems. There is great interest in endocannabinoids for their role in neuroplasticity as well as for therapeutic use in numerous conditions, including pain, stroke, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, fertility, neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and inflammatory diseases, among others. However, there has been relatively far less research on this topic in the eye and retina compared with the brain and other organ systems. The purpose of this review is to introduce the “cannabinergic” field to the retinal community. All of the fundamental work on cannabinoids has been performed in non-retinal preparations, necessitating extensive dependence on this literature for background. Happily, the retinal cannabinoid system has much in common with other regions of the central nervous system. For example, there is general agreement that cannabinoids suppress dopamine release and presynaptically reduce transmitter release from cones and bipolar cells. How these effects relate to light and dark adaptation, receptive field formation, temporal properties of ganglion cells or visual perception are unknown. The presence of multiple endocannabinoids, degradative enzymes with their bioactive metabolites, and receptors provides a broad spectrum of opportunities for basic research and to identify targets for therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:18725316

  15. Adenovirus Vectors Targeting Distinct Cell Types in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5ΔRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5ΔRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  16. AGE-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN NEURONS OF THE MOUSE RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Melanie A.; Zhang, Yifeng; Meister, Markus; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral consequences of age-related alterations in neural function are well documented, but less is known about their cellular bases. To characterize such changes, we analyzed 14 molecularly identified subsets of mouse retinal projection neurons [retinal ganglion cells or (RGCs)] and interneurons (amacrine, bipolar, and horizontal cells). The retina thinned but expanded with age, maintaining its volume. There was minimal decline in the number of RGCs, interneurons or photoreceptors, but the diameter of RGC dendritic arbors decreased with age. Together, the increased retinal area and decreased dendritic area may lead to gaps in RGC coverage of the visual field. Axonal arbors of RGCs in the superior colliculus also atrophied with age, suggesting that the relay of visual information to central targets may decline over time. On the other hand, the laminar restriction of RGC dendrites and the interneuronal processes that synapse on them were not detectably disturbed, and RGC subtypes exhibited distinct electrophysiological responses to complex visual stimuli. Other neuronal types aged in different ways: amacrine cell arbors did not remodel detectably, whereas horizontal cell processes sprouted into the photoreceptor layer. Bipolar cells showed arbor-specific alterations: their dendrites sprouted but their axons remained stable. In summary, retinal neurons exhibited numerous age-related quantitative alterations (decreased areas of dendritic and axonal arbors and decreased density of cells and synapses) whereas their qualitative features (molecular identity, laminar specificity, and feature detection) were largely preserved. Together, these data reveal selective age-related alterations in neural circuitry, some of which could underlie declines in visual acuity. PMID:22049445

  17. Glycinergic synaptic inputs to bipolar cells in the salamander retina

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Bruce R; Wu, Samuel M

    1998-01-01

    Glycine activated strychnine-sensitive chloride conductances at both the dendrites and the axonal telodendria of most bipolar cells in the salamander retina. The chloride equilibrium potential of bipolar cells was found to be negative to -50 mV, indicating that glycinergic synapses on bipolar cells are inhibitory. Some bipolar cells exhibited discrete, strychnine-sensitive, chloride-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). These were elicited by focal application of glutamate at the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Glycinergic synapses were localized using simultaneous focal application of calcium to retinal slices bathed in calcium-free media. Both dendritic and telodendritic glycinergic IPSCs were observed. The decay of the telodendritic IPSCs was well fitted by a single exponential with a time constant of 17.7 ± 8.7 ms. Similar kinetics were observed for dendritic IPSCs in some cells, but in one class of on-centre bipolar cell the decay of the dendritic IPSCs was better fitted by a sum of two exponentials with time constants 9.9 ± 4.3 and 51.3 ± 24.3 ms. The dendritic IPSCs were best driven by application of glutamate at the distal IPL (the off sublamina), while the telodendritic IPSCs were driven best by application near the telodendria. These results suggest that bipolar cell dendrites receive inhibitory glycinergic inputs from interplexiform cells that are excited by off-centre bipolar cells, whereas bipolar cell telodendria receive glycinergic amacrine cell inputs that are antagonistic to the photoreceptor inputs. Both inputs could be elicited in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but the dendritic IPSCs were sometimes abolished by TTX, suggesting that sodium-dependent spikes play an important role in the transmission of interplexiform cell signals to the outer plexiform layer. PMID:9503334

  18. The developmental regulation of CD81 in the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christina; Wang, XiangDi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The tetraspanin CD81 is expressed in Müller glial cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). CD81 and other members of the tetraspanin family link extracellular interactions of cells into intracellular cascades. This study examined the developmental expression of CD81 and protein-protein interactions linking CD81 to intracellular proteins. Methods We used synthetic peptides of the C-terminal intracellular domains of CD81 to probe fusion proteins of PDZ domains blotted to nitrocellulose membranes, then confirmed the relationships between the PDZ proteins using immunoprecipitation methods. Colocalization of the associated proteins was analyzed across development, using double-label immunohistochemical methods in the retina of Sprague-Dawley rats. Results The C-terminal intracellular sequences of CD81 bound to three putative PDZ domains that potentially represented domains on Sap97 and EBP50. In immunoprecipitation experiments using RPE cells, CD81 coprecipitated with both proteins, EBP50 and Sap97. Like CD81, EBP50 and Sap97 are expressed at low levels immediately after birth and upregulated during the first two postnatal weeks, reaching almost adult levels at postnatal day 20. In the RPE layer, synapse-associated protein 97 (Sap97) and CD81 were associated with the basolateral surface of the cells; ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) localizing with CD81 was found on microvilli at the inner surface of RPE cells. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that CD81 is associated with the final stages of RPE cell maturation, establishing key molecular interactions linking the cell membrane proteins into macromolecular complexes containing PDZ protein scaffolds. PMID:17327823

  19. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells transdifferentiate in vitro and integrate into the retina in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Guan, Liping; Huang, Bing; Li, Weihua; Su, Qiao; Yu, Minbin; Xu, Xiaoping; Luo, Ting; Lin, Shaochun; Sun, Xuerong; Chen, Mengfei; Chen, Xigu

    2011-06-01

    Adult peripheral blood-derived cells are able to differentiate into a variety of cell types, including nerve cells, liver-like cells and epithelial cells. However, their differentiation into retina-like cells is controversial. In the present study, transdifferentiation potential of human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells into retina-like cells and integration into the retina of mice were investigated. Freshly isolated adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells were divided into two groups: cells in group I were cultured in neural stem cell medium, and cells in group II were exposed to conditioned medium from rat retinal tissue culture. After 5 days, several distinct cell morphologies were observed, including standard mononuclear, neurons with one or two axons and elongated glial-like cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of neural stem cell, neuron and retina cell markers demonstrated that cells in both groups were nestin-, MAP2 (microtubule-associated protein)- and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive. Flow cytometry results suggested a significant increase in nestin-, MAP2- and CD16-positive cells in group I and nestin-, GFAP-, MAP2-, vimentin- and rhodopsin-positive cells in group II. To determine survival, migration and integration in vivo, cell suspensions (containing group I or group II cells) were injected into the vitreous or the peritoneum. Tissue specimens were obtained and immunostained 4 weeks after transplantation. We found that cells delivered by intravitreal injection integrated into the retina. Labelled cells were not detected in the retina of mice receiving differentiated cells by intraperitoneal injection, but cells (groups I and II) were detected in the liver and spleen. Our findings revealed that human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells could be induced to transdifferentiate into neural precursor cells and retinal progenitor cells in vitro, and the differentiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells can migrate and integrate

  20. Analysis of MTHFR, CBS, Glutathione, Taurine, and Hydrogen Sulfide Levels in Retinas of Hyperhomocysteinemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xuezhi; Navneet, Soumya; Wang, Jing; Roon, Penny; Chen, Wei; Xian, Ming; Smith, Sylvia B

    2017-04-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is implicated in certain retinal neurovascular diseases, although whether it is causative remains uncertain. In isolated ganglion cells (GCs), mild Hhcy induces profound death, whereas retinal phenotypes in Hhcy mice caused by mutations in remethylation (methylene tetrahydrofolatereductase [Mthfr+/-]) or transsulfuration pathways (cystathionine β-synthase [Cbs+/-]) demonstrate mild GC loss and mild vasculopathy. The current work investigated compensation in vivo of one pathway for the other, and, because the transsulfuration pathway yields cysteine necessary for formation of glutathione (GSH), taurine, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), they were analyzed also. Retinas isolated from wild-type (WT), Mthfr+/-, and Cbs+/- mice (12 and 22 weeks) were analyzed for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and cystathionase (CTH) RNA/protein levels. Retinas were evaluated for levels of reduced:oxidized GSH (GSH:GSSG), Slc7a11 (xCT), taurine, taurine transporter (TAUT), and H2S. Aside from decreased CBS RNA/protein levels in Cbs+/- retinas, there were minimal alterations in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways in the two mutant mice strains. Glutathione and taurine levels in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- retinas were similar to WT, which may be due to robust levels of xCT and TAUT in mutant retinas. Interestingly, levels of H2S were markedly increased in retinas of Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mice compared with WT. Ganglion cell loss and vasculopathy observed in Mthfr+/- and Cbs+/- mouse retinas may be milder than expected, not because of compensatory increases of enzymes in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways, but because downstream transsulfuration pathway products GSH, taurine, and H2S are maintained at robust levels. Elevation of H2S is particularly intriguing owing to neuroprotective properties reported for this gasotransmitter.

  1. Quantification of Oxygen Consumption in Retina Ex Vivo Demonstrates Limited Reserve Capacity of Photoreceptor Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kooragayala, Keshav; Gotoh, Norimoto; Cogliati, Tiziana; Nellissery, Jacob; Kaden, Talia R.; French, Stephanie; Balaban, Robert; Li, Wei; Covian, Raul; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cell death in neurodegeneration occurs at the convergence of diverse metabolic pathways. In the retina, a common underlying mechanism involves mitochondrial dysfunction since photoreceptor homeostasis and survival are highly susceptible to altered aerobic energy metabolism. We sought to develop an assay to directly measure oxygen consumption in intact retina with the goal of identifying alterations in respiration during photoreceptor dysfunction and degeneration. Methods Circular punches of freshly isolated mouse retina, adjacent to the optic nerve head, were used in the microplate-based Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer to measure oxygen consumption. Tissue integrity was evaluated by propidium iodide staining and live imaging. Different substrates were tested for mitochondrial respiration. Basal and maximal respiration were expressed as oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and respectively measured in Ames' medium before and after the addition of mitochondrial uncoupler, BAM15. Results We show that glucose is an essential substrate for retinal mitochondria. At baseline, mitochondria respiration in the intact wild-type retina was close to maximal, with limited reserve capacity. Similar OCR and limited mitochondrial reserve capacity was also observed in cone-only Nrl−/− retina. However, the retina of Pde6brd1/rd1, Cep290rd16/rd16 and Rpgrip1−/− mice, all with dysfunctional or no photoreceptors, had reduced OCR and higher mitochondrial reserve capacity. Conclusions We have optimized a method to directly measure oxygen consumption in acutely isolated, ex vivo mouse retina and demonstrate that photoreceptors have low mitochondrial reserve capacity. Our data provide a plausible explanation for the high vulnerability of photoreceptors to altered energy homeostasis caused by mutations or metabolic challenges. PMID:26747773

  2. Treadmill exercise ameliorates apoptotic cell death in the retinas of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Chang-Ju; Sung, Yun-Hee; Kim, Jae-Deung

    2013-06-01

    Apoptotic neuronal cell death in the retina is a hallmark of diabetic retinopathy. Exercise has been recommended for the alleviation of symptoms in patients with diabetes. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on apoptosis in the retinas of diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The rats in the exercise groups ran on a treadmill for 30 min/day, 5 times a week, over the course of 6 weeks. In this study, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick‑end labeling (TUNEL) assay, immunohistochemistry staining of caspase‑3 and western blot analysis for Bax, Bcl‑2 and phosphorylated protein kinase B (p‑Akt) in the retinas of diabetic rats were performed. The results demonstrated that the number of TUNEL‑ and caspase‑3‑positive cells was increased in the retinas of diabetic rats, whereas treadmill exercise decreased these numbers. In addition, the expression of the pro‑apoptotic protein Bax and the anti‑apoptotic protein Bcl‑2 was enhanced in the retinas of diabetic rats. Treadmill exercise suppressed Bax and enhanced Bcl‑2 levels. The expression of the cell survival factor, p‑Akt, was decreased in the retinas of diabetic rats and treadmill exercise increased the expression of p‑Akt. The results of the present study demonstrated that treadmill exercise ameliorated diabetes‑induced apoptosis in retinal cells by enhancing p‑Akt levels in the retina. Treadmill exercise represents an effective strategy to delay or prevent the onset of ocular complications in diabetic patients.

  3. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Contartese, Daniela S.; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B.; Loidl, Cesar F.; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  4. Purinergic receptor activation inhibits osmotic glial cell swelling in the diabetic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Antje; Iandiev, Ianors; Hollborn, Margrit; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zimmermann, Herbert; Bringmann, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, triamcinolone acetonide, is used clinically for the rapid resolution of diabetic macular edema. Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. Triamcinolone inhibits the swelling of retinal glial cells of diabetic rats. Here, we determined whether the effect of triamcinolone is mediated by a receptor-dependent mechanism. Hyperglycemia was induced in rats with streptozotocin injection. After 6-10 months, the swelling properties of glial cells in retinal slices upon hypotonic challenge were determined. Nucleotide-degrading ecto-enzymes were immunostained in retinal slices and glial cells. Hypotonic challenge did not change the size of glial cell bodies from control retinas but induced swelling of cells from diabetic animals. Triamcinolone inhibited glial cell swelling; this effect was prevented by a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters, inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A activation, and inhibitors of potassium and chloride channels. In diabetic (but not control) retinas, the effect of triamcinolone apparently involves extracellular nucleotide degradation. Glial cells from diabetic retinas displayed immunolabeling against nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) which was not observed in control retinas. The mRNA expression for NTPDase1 was significantly increased in the retina of diabetic rats. It is suggested that triamcinolone induces the release and formation of endogenous adenosine that subsequently activates A1 receptors resulting in ion efflux through potassium and chloride channels and prevention of osmotic swelling. Whereas adenosine is liberated via facilitated transport in control retinas, an extracellular formation of adenosine contributes to the effect of triamcinolone in diabetic retinas.

  5. Evidence for a functional adrenomedullin signaling pathway in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan; Giove, Thomas J.; Pong, Winnie W.; Blute, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a small, secreted peptide often associated with vasodilation. However, ADM can also function as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, and studies suggest ADM is upregulated in the eye in several ocular diseases. However, no studies to date have described an ADM signaling pathway in the retina. Methods PCR, immunocytochemistry, nitric oxide imaging, western blots, and a nitrite assay were used to determine the localization of the components of the ADM signaling pathway in the mouse retina. Results We used reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to show that ADM and its primary receptor, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor, along with its associated receptor activity modifying proteins 2 and 3 are expressed in the retina. Using immunocytochemistry, we detected ADM staining throughout the retina in the photoreceptor outer segments, the outer nuclear layer, Müller and amacrine cell somata in the inner nuclear layer, and some somata in the ganglion cell layer. We found that calcitonin-receptor-like receptor and receptor activity modifying protein 2 had localization patterns similar to ADM, especially in somata in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. Finally, we showed that the ADM receptor was functional in the retina. Stimulation of isolated retinas with ADM increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate– and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–like immunoreactivity, as well as nitric oxide production. Conclusions These results are the first to show that ADM and functional ADM receptors are present in the retina. Since ADM is increased in eyes with ocular pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, and uveitis, the ADM signaling pathway may provide a new target for ameliorating these retinal pathologies. PMID:22690112

  6. Requirement for Microglia for the Maintenance of Synaptic Function and Integrity in the Mature Retina

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Zhang, Jun; Fariss, Robert N.; Ma, Wenxin; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Wang, Minhua; Qian, Hao hua; Badea, Tudor C.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Gan, Wen-Biao; Roger, Jerome E.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the principal resident immune cell of the CNS, exert significant influence on neurons during development and in pathological situations. However, if and how microglia contribute to normal neuronal function in the mature uninjured CNS is not well understood. We used the model of the adult mouse retina, a part of the CNS amenable to structural and functional analysis, to investigate the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina in a sustained manner using genetic methods. We discovered that microglia are not acutely required for the maintenance of adult retinal architecture, the survival of retinal neurons, or the laminar organization of their dendritic and axonal compartments. However, sustained microglial depletion results in the degeneration of photoreceptor synapses in the outer plexiform layer, leading to a progressive functional deterioration in retinal light responses. Our results demonstrate that microglia are constitutively required for the maintenance of synaptic structure in the adult retina and for synaptic transmission underlying normal visual function. Our findings on constitutive microglial function are relevant in understanding microglial contributions to pathology and in the consideration of therapeutic interventions that reduce or perturb constitutive microglial function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglia, the principal resident immune cell population in the CNS, has been implicated in diseases in the brain and retina. However, how they contribute to the everyday function of the CNS is unclear. Using the model of the adult mouse retina, we examined the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina. We found that in the absence of microglia, retinal neurons did not undergo overt cell death or become structurally disorganized in their processes. However, connections between neurons called synapses begin to break down, leading to a decreased ability of the retina to transmit light responses

  7. Circadian modulation of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in crayfish eyestalk and retina.

    PubMed

    Fanjul-Moles, Maria Luisa; Escamilla-Chimal, Elsa Guadalupe; Salceda, Rocio; Giulianini, Piero G; Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggested the retina could be a putative locus of daily crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) secretion, as it possesses its own metabolic machinery and is independent of the well-known CHH eyestalk locus responsible for the circadian secretion of this peptide. However, it has been proposed that hemolymph glucose and lactate concentrations play a dual role in the regulation of CHH in crayfish. To elucidate the temporal relationship between these two different CHH production loci and to examine their relationship with glucose regulation, we investigated the expression of CHH daily and circadian rhythms in the eyestalk and retina of crayfish using biochemical methods and time series analysis. We wanted to determine whether (1) putative retina and eyestalk CHH rhythmic expressions are correlated and if the oscillations of the two metabolic products of lactate and glucose in the blood due to CHH action on the target tissue correlate, and (2) retina CHH (RCHH) and the possible retinal substrate glycogen and its product glucose are temporally correlated. We found a negative correlation between daily and circadian changes of relative CHH abundance in the retina and eyestalk. This correlation and the cross-correlation values found between eyestalk CHH and hemolymph and glucose confirm that CHH produced by the X-organ sinus gland complex is under the previously proposed dual feedback control system over the 24 h time period. However, the presence of both glycogen and glucose in the retina, the cross-correlation values found between these parameters and hemolymph lactate and glucose, as well as RCHH and hemolymph and retina metabolic markers suggest RCHH is not under the same temporal metabolic control as eyestalk CHH. Nonetheless, their expression may be linked to common rhythms-generating processes.

  8. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B; Loidl, Cesar F; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina.

  9. Connexin36 Expression in the Mammalian Retina: A Multiple-Species Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Kovács-Öller, Tamás; Debertin, Gábor; Balogh, Márton; Ganczer, Alma; Orbán, József; Nyitrai, Miklós; Balogh, Lajos; Kántor, Orsolya; Völgyi, Béla

    2017-01-01

    Much knowledge about interconnection of human retinal neurons is inferred from results on animal models. Likewise, there is a lack of information on human retinal electrical synapses/gap junctions (GJ). Connexin36 (Cx36) forms GJs in both the inner and outer plexiform layers (IPL and OPL) in most species including humans. However, a comparison of Cx36 GJ distribution in retinas of humans and popular animal models has not been presented. To this end a multiple-species comparison was performed in retinas of 12 mammals including humans to survey the Cx36 distribution. Areas of retinal specializations were avoided (e.g., fovea, visual streak, area centralis), thus observed Cx36 distribution differences were not attributed to these species-specific architecture of central retinal areas. Cx36 was expressed in both synaptic layers in all examined retinas. Cx36 plaques displayed an inhomogenous IPL distribution favoring the ON sublamina, however, this feature was more pronounced in the human, swine and guinea pig while it was less obvious in the rabbit, squirrel monkey, and ferret retinas. In contrast to the relative conservative Cx36 distribution in the IPL, the labels in the OPL varied considerably among mammals. In general, OPL plaques were rare and rather small in rod dominant carnivores and rodents, whereas the human and the cone rich guinea pig retinas displayed robust Cx36 labels. This survey presented that the human retina displayed two characteristic features, a pronounced ON dominance of Cx36 plaques in the IPL and prevalent Cx36 plaque conglomerates in the OPL. While many species showed either of these features, only the guinea pig retina shared both. The observed similarities and subtle differences in Cx36 plaque distribution across mammals do not correspond to evolutionary distances but may reflect accomodation to lifestyles of examined species. PMID:28337128

  10. Retinal growth in foveated teleosts: nasotemporal asymmetry keeps the fovea in temporal retina.

    PubMed

    Easter, S S

    1992-06-01

    Fish retinas continue to grow throughout life by adding neurons at the margin, with the result that cells born at a peripheral site are steadily displaced toward the center of the enlarging retina. This presents a functional problem for fish with specialized temporal areas such as a fovea--how to reconcile continual growth with the maintenance of a temporal location for the fovea. One possibility is that the retina grows asymmetrically, with most new retina added nasally, relatively little temporally. I have tested this hypothesis by evaluating retinal growth in marine teleosts from 15 families, both foveated and unfoveated. The pattern of growth was revealed by exploiting the fact that each new generation of ganglion cells sends its axons into the optic nerve as a cohort; small grains of the carbocyanine dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine were applied to various sites in the cross section of the optic nerves of adults, and the retrogradely labeled cell bodies in the retina were visualized in whole-mounts. The labeled cells lay in annuli, each one a generation of ganglion cells. Representatives of seven of the families showed clearly asymmetric growth: the labeled annuli were close together on the temporal side and more distant nasally, the embryonic fissure curved from its ventral origin toward the temporal side, and in six of these families, labeled fibers from temporal retina skirted the fovea. Members of the other eight families, without specialized areas, had more symmetric retinal growth: labeled annuli were equally spaced on all sides, the embryonic fissure was vertical, and there were no skirting fibers. The following hypothesis is supported: the retina grows asymmetrically, and maintains the area for acute vision oriented toward the anterior field.

  11. Oxytocin Expression and Function in the Posterior Retina: A Novel Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halbach, Patrick; Pillers, De-Ann M.; York, Nathaniel; Asuma, Matti P.; Chiu, Michelle A.; Luo, Wenxiang; Tokarz, Sara; Bird, Ian M.; Pattnaik, Bikash R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Oxytocin (OXT) is recognized as an ubiquitously acting nonapeptide hormone that is involved in processes ranging from parturition to neural development. Its effects are mediated by cell signaling that occurs as a result of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) activation. We sought to determine whether the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is also expressed within the retina. Methods. Immunohistochemistry using cell-specific markers was used to localize OXT within the rhesus retina. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of OXTR in both human and rhesus retina. Single-cell RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine the expression of OXTR in cultured human fetal RPE (hfRPE) cells. Human fetal RPE cells loaded with FURA-2 AM were studied by ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to assess transient mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Results. Oxytocin was expressed in the cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix of the rhesus retina. Oxytocin mRNA and protein were expressed in the human and rhesus RPE. Oxytocin mRNA and protein expression were observed in cultured hfRPE cells, and exposure of these cells to 100 nM OXT induced a transient 79 ± 1.5 nM increase of [Ca2+]i. Conclusions. Oxytocin and OXTR are present in the posterior retina, and OXT induces an increase in hfRPE [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that the OXT-OXTR signaling pathway is active in the retina. We propose that OXT activation of the OXTR occurs in the posterior retina and that this may serve as a paracrine signaling pathway that contributes to communication between the cone photoreceptor and the RPE. PMID:25593022

  12. Immunocytochemical identification of serotonin-synthesizing neurons in the vertebrate retina: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, M; Zhu, B; Gábriel, R; Straznicky, C

    1993-02-01

    Serotonin-synthesizing neurons in the retinas of goldfish, axolotl, turtle, chick, rabbit and cat were identified using double labelling with anti-serotonin and anti-phenylalanine hydroxylase antibodies. The latter antibody recognizes tryptophan 5-hydroxylase, one of the synthesizing enzymes for serotonin. Neurons labelled by both markers were considered to be serotonin-synthesizing neurons, while those only with serotonin-immunoreactivity were assumed to be serotonin-accumulating neurons. In the goldfish and chick retinas, all serotonin-immunoreactive amacrine cells (S1) were positive for phenylalanine hydroxylase. In the axolotl and turtle retinas, all the S1 amacrine cells, and only 52.8% and 40.5% of S2 amacrine cells were double-labelled. Although serotonin-immunoreactive bipolar cells were observed in the turtle and chick retinas, the synthesizing enzyme for serotonin could not be detected in these cells. In the rabbit and cat retinas, tryptophan hydroxylase could not be revealed in any cell type with immunocytochemistry. In control experiments SLI neurons in the raphe nuclei of the brain stem always exhibited PH-LI in all species examined, including mammals, indicating that our anti-PH antibody is able to recognize tryptophan hydroxylase across vertebrate classes. These results indicate that the majority of serotonin-immunoreactive amacrine cells are able to synthesize serotonin and are the source of endogenous serotonin in the non-mammalian retina, while some serotonin-immunoreactive amacrine and bipolar cells possibly only accumulate serotonin. We also suggest that serotonin may not be a primary neurotransmitter in the serotonin-accumulating bipolar and amacrine cells of the non-mammalian retina.

  13. Optical imaging of retina in response to grating stimuli in cats.

    PubMed

    Hirohara, Y; Mihashi, T; Kanda, H; Morimoto, T; Miyoshi, T; Wolffsohn, J S; Fujikado, T

    2013-04-01

    We examined the intrinsic signals in response to grating stimuli in order to determine whether the light-evoked intrinsic signals of the retina are due to changes in the photoreceptor activities induced by the image projected on to the retina or are due to neural activities of the inner retina. The retinas of the left eye of 12 cats under general anesthesia were examined by a functional imaging fundus camera. Near infrared light was used to monitor the reflectance changes (RCs) of the retina. Vertical grating were used to stimulate the retina at 4 Hz. The spatial frequencies of the gratings were 0.05, 0.11, 0.22, 0.43, 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46 cycles/degree (cpd). Ten images were averaged and used to analyze the RCs to obtain the peak value (PV) of a two dimensional fast Fourier transfer of the RCs. The wavefront aberrations (WA) were measured with a compact wavefront aberrometer and the spatial modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye was calculated. The retinal reflectance image had a grating pattern. The PV of the spatial sensitivity curve was highest at low spatial frequencies (0.05 and 0.11 cpd), and the sensitivity decreased steeply with an increase in the spatial frequency. RCs were not detectable at 3.46 cpd. The MTF decreased gradually with increases in the spatial frequencies and was 0.68 at 3.46 cpd. The reflectance pattern of the retinal intrinsic signal elicited by grating stimuli of different spatial frequencies was different from that of the MTF. This suggests that the intrinsic signal represents not only the response of the photoreceptors but also other neuronal or vascular changes in the retina.

  14. Temperature increase in human cadaver retina during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Mikula, Eric; Kurtz, Ronald M; Juhasz, Tibor

    2010-04-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for ophthalmic surgery, including use in creating corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. During normal operation, approximately 50% to 60% of laser energy may pass beyond the cornea, with potential effects on the retina. As a model for retinal laser exposure during femtosecond corneal surgery, we measured the temperature rise in human cadaver retinas during direct illumination by the laser. The temperature increase induced by a 150-kHz iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser (Abbott Medical Optics) in human cadaver retinas was measured in situ using an infrared thermal imaging camera. To model the geometry of the eye during the surgery, an approximate 11x11-mm excised section of human cadaver retina was placed 17 mm behind the focus of the laser beam. The temperature field was observed in 10 cadaver retina samples at energy levels ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 microJ (corresponding approximately to surgical energies of 0.8 to 3.2 microJ per pulse). Maximal temperature increases up to 1.15 degrees C (corresponding to 3.2 microJ and 52-second illumination) were observed in the cadaver retina sections with little variation in temperature profiles between specimens for the same laser energy illumination. The commercial iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser operating with pulse energies at approximately the lower limit of the range evaluated in this study would be expected to result in a 0.2 degrees C temperature increase and do not therefore present a safety hazard to the retina. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Optical imaging of the retina in response to the electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikado, Takashi; Okawa, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Hirohara, Yoko; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Tano, Yasuo

    2008-02-01

    Purposes: To determine if reflectance changes of the retina can be detected following electrical stimulation to the retina using a newly developed optical-imaging fundus camera. Methods: Eyes of cats were examined after pupil dilation. Retina was stimulated either focally by a ball-type electrode (BE) placed on the fenestrated sclera or diffusely using a ring-type electrode (RE) placed on the corneoscleral limbus. Electrical stimulation by biphasic pulse trains was applied for 4 seconds. Fundus images with near-infrared (800-880 nm) light were obtained between 2 seconds before and 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation (ES). A two-dimensional map of the reflectance changes (RCs) was constructed. The effect of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) was also investigated on RCs by ES using RE. Results: RCs were observed around the retinal locus where the stimulating electrodes were positioned (BE) or in the retina of the posterior pole (RE), in which the latency was about 0.5 to 1.0 sec and the peak time about 2 to 5 sec after the onset of ES. The intensity of the RCs increased with the increase of the stimulus current in both cases. RCs were completely suppressed after the injection of TTX. Conclusions: The functional changes of the retina either by focal or diffuse electrical stimulation were successfully detected by optical imaging of the retina. The contribution of retinal ganglion cells on RCs by ES was confirmed by TTX experiment. This method may be applied to the objective evaluation of the artificial retina.

  16. Analysis of MTHFR, CBS, Glutathione, Taurine, and Hydrogen Sulfide Levels in Retinas of Hyperhomocysteinemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xuezhi; Navneet, Soumya; Wang, Jing; Roon, Penny; Chen, Wei; Xian, Ming; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) is implicated in certain retinal neurovascular diseases, although whether it is causative remains uncertain. In isolated ganglion cells (GCs), mild Hhcy induces profound death, whereas retinal phenotypes in Hhcy mice caused by mutations in remethylation (methylene tetrahydrofolatereductase [Mthfr+/−]) or transsulfuration pathways (cystathionine β-synthase [Cbs+/−]) demonstrate mild GC loss and mild vasculopathy. The current work investigated compensation in vivo of one pathway for the other, and, because the transsulfuration pathway yields cysteine necessary for formation of glutathione (GSH), taurine, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), they were analyzed also. Methods Retinas isolated from wild-type (WT), Mthfr+/−, and Cbs+/− mice (12 and 22 weeks) were analyzed for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and cystathionase (CTH) RNA/protein levels. Retinas were evaluated for levels of reduced:oxidized GSH (GSH:GSSG), Slc7a11 (xCT), taurine, taurine transporter (TAUT), and H2S. Results Aside from decreased CBS RNA/protein levels in Cbs+/− retinas, there were minimal alterations in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways in the two mutant mice strains. Glutathione and taurine levels in Mthfr+/− and Cbs+/− retinas were similar to WT, which may be due to robust levels of xCT and TAUT in mutant retinas. Interestingly, levels of H2S were markedly increased in retinas of Mthfr+/− and Cbs+/− mice compared with WT. Conclusions Ganglion cell loss and vasculopathy observed in Mthfr+/− and Cbs+/− mouse retinas may be milder than expected, not because of compensatory increases of enzymes in remethylation/transsulfuration pathways, but because downstream transsulfuration pathway products GSH, taurine, and H2S are maintained at robust levels. Elevation of H2S is particularly intriguing owing to neuroprotective properties reported for this gasotransmitter. PMID:28384716

  17. Lamina-specific anatomic magnetic resonance imaging of the human retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nateras, Oscar San Emeterio; Peng, Qi; Kuranov, Roman V; Harrison, Joseph M; Milner, Thomas E; Duong, Timothy Q

    2011-09-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human retina faces two major challenges: eye movement and hardware limitation that could preclude human retinal MRI with adequate spatiotemporal resolution. This study investigated eye-fixation stability and high-resolution anatomic MRI of the human retina on a 3-Tesla (T) MRI scanner. Comparison was made with optical coherence tomography (OCT) on the same subjects. Eye-fixation stability of protocols used in MRI was evaluated on four normal volunteers using an eye tracker. High-resolution MRI (100 × 200 × 2000 μm) protocol was developed on a 3-T scanner. Subjects were instructed to maintain stable eye fixation on a target with cued blinks every 8 seconds during MRI. OCT imaging of the retina was performed. Retinal layer thicknesses measured with MRI and OCT were analyzed for matching regions of the same eyes close to the optic nerve head. The temporal SDs of the horizontal and vertical displacements were 78 ± 51 and 130 ± 51 μm (±SD, n = 4), respectively. MRI detected three layers within the human retina, consistent with MRI findings in rodent, feline, and baboon retinas. The hyperintense layer 1 closest to the vitreous likely consisted of nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner nuclear layer; the hypointense layer 2, the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments; and the hyperintense layer 3, the choroid. The MRI retina/choroid thickness was 711 ± 37 μm, 19% (P < 0.05) thicker than OCT thickness (579 ± 34 μm). This study reports high-resolution MRI of lamina-specific structures in the human retina. These initial results are encouraging. Further improvement in spatiotemporal resolution is warranted.

  18. Lamina-Specific Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Nateras, Oscar San Emeterio; Peng, Qi; Kuranov, Roman V.; Harrison, Joseph M.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human retina faces two major challenges: eye movement and hardware limitation that could preclude human retinal MRI with adequate spatiotemporal resolution. This study investigated eye-fixation stability and high-resolution anatomic MRI of the human retina on a 3-Tesla (T) MRI scanner. Comparison was made with optical coherence tomography (OCT) on the same subjects. Methods. Eye-fixation stability of protocols used in MRI was evaluated on four normal volunteers using an eye tracker. High-resolution MRI (100 × 200 × 2000 μm) protocol was developed on a 3-T scanner. Subjects were instructed to maintain stable eye fixation on a target with cued blinks every 8 seconds during MRI. OCT imaging of the retina was performed. Retinal layer thicknesses measured with MRI and OCT were analyzed for matching regions of the same eyes close to the optic nerve head. Results. The temporal SDs of the horizontal and vertical displacements were 78 ± 51 and 130 ± 51 μm (±SD, n = 4), respectively. MRI detected three layers within the human retina, consistent with MRI findings in rodent, feline, and baboon retinas. The hyperintense layer 1 closest to the vitreous likely consisted of nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner nuclear layer; the hypointense layer 2, the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments; and the hyperintense layer 3, the choroid. The MRI retina/choroid thickness was 711 ± 37 μm, 19% (P < 0.05) thicker than OCT thickness (579 ± 34 μm). Conclusions. This study reports high-resolution MRI of lamina-specific structures in the human retina. These initial results are encouraging. Further improvement in spatiotemporal resolution is warranted. PMID:21828153

  19. RETINA-specific expression of Kcnv2 is controlled by cone-rod homeobox (Crx) and neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl).

    PubMed

    Aslanidis, Alexander; Karlstetter, Marcus; Walczak, Yana; Jägle, Herbert; Langmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response (CDSRR) is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to progressive retinal degeneration with a distinct electroretinogram (ERG) phenotype. CDSRR patients show reduced sensitivity to dim light, augmented response to suprathreshold light and reduced response to flicker. The disorder is caused by mutations in the KCNV2 gene, which encodes the Kv11.1 subunit of a voltage-gated potassium channel. Here, we studied the retina-specific expression and cis-regulatory activity of the murine Kcnv2 gene using electroporation of explanted retinas. Using qRT-PCR profiling of early postnatal retinas, we showed that Kcnv2 expression increased towards P14, which marks the beginning of visual activity in mice. In vivo electroporation of GFP-Kcnv2 expressing plasmids revealed that Kv11.1 localizes to the inner segment membranes of adult P21 photoreceptors. Using bioinformatic prediction and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we identified two Crx binding sites (CBS) and one Nrl binding site (NBS) in the Kcnv2 promoter. Reporter electroporation of the wild type promoter region induced strong DsRed expression, indicating high regulatory activity, whereas shRNA-mediated knockdown of Crx and Nrl resulted in reduced Kcnv2 promoter activity and low endogenous Kcnv2 mRNA expression in the retina. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CBS and NBS demonstrated that CBS2 is crucial for Kcnv2 promoter activity. We conclude that nucleotide changes in evolutionary conserved CBS could impact retina-specific expression levels of Kcnv2.

  20. CX3CL1 (Fractalkine) Protein Expression in Normal and Degenerating Mouse Retina: In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zieger, Marina; Ahnelt, Peter K.; Uhrin, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate fractalkine (CX3CL1) protein expression in wild type (wt) retina and its alterations during retinal degeneration in mouse model (rd10) of retinitis pigmentosa. Forms of retinal protein CX3CL1, total protein and mRNA levels of CX3CL1 were analyzed at postnatal days (P) 5, 10, 14, 22, 30, 45, and 60 by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Cellular sources of CX3CL1 were investigated by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISH) and using transgenic (CX3CL1cherry) mice. The immunoblots revealed that in both, wt and rd10 retinas, a membrane integrated ∼100 kDa CX3CL1 form and a cleaved ∼85 kDa CX3CL1 form were present at P5. At P10, accumulation of another presumably intra-neuronal ∼95 kDa form and a decrease in the ∼85-kDa form were observed. From P14, a ∼95 kDa form became principal in wt retina, while in rd10 retinas a soluble ∼85 kDa form increased at P45 and P60. In comparison, retinas of rd10 mice had significantly lower levels of total CX3CL1 protein (from P10 onwards) and lower CX3CL1 mRNA levels (from P14), even before the onset of primary rod degeneration. ISH and mCherry reporter fluorescence showed neurons in the inner retina layers as principal sites of CX3CL1 synthesis both in wt and rd10 retinas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CX3CL1 has a distinctive course of expression and functional regulation in rd10 retina starting at P10. The biological activity of CX3CL1 is regulated by conversion of a membrane integrated to a soluble form during neurogenesis and in response to pathologic changes in the adult retinal milieu. Viable mature neurons in the inner retina likely exhibit a dynamic intracellular storage depot of CX3CL1. PMID:25191897

  1. Genetic and immunohistochemical analysis of HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas

    PubMed Central

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R.; Wang, XiaoFei; Li, Huiling; Lau, Yin H. Chan; Williams, Robert W.; Jablonski, Monica M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor degenerative diseases are among the leading causes of vision loss. Although the causative genetic mutations are often known, mechanisms leading to photoreceptor degeneration remain poorly defined. We have previously demonstrated that the photoreceptor membrane-associated protein XAP-1 antigen is a product of the HSPA5 gene. In this study, we used systems genetic methods, statistical modeling, and immunostaining to identify and analyze candidate genes that modulate Hspa5 expression in the retina. Methods Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to map the genomic region that regulates Hspa5 in the cross between C57BL/6J X DBA/2J mice (BXD) genetic reference panel. The stepwise refinement of candidate genes was based on expression QTL mapping, gene expression correlation analyses (direct and partial), and analysis of regional sequence variants. The subcellular localization of candidate proteins and HSPA5 in mouse and human retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Differences in the localization of extracellular HSPA5 were assessed between healthy human donor and atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) donor eyes. Results In the eyes of healthy mice, extracellular HSPA5 was confined to the area around the cone photoreceptor outer segments. Mapping variation in Hspa5 mRNA expression levels in the retina revealed a statistically significant trans-acting expression QTL (eQTL) on Chromosome 2 (Chr 2) and a suggestive locus on Chr 15. Sulf2 on Chr 2 was the strongest candidate gene based on partial correlation analysis, Pearson correlation with Hspa5, expression levels in the retina, a missense variant in exon 14, and its reported function in the extracellular matrix and interphotoreceptor matrix. SULF2 is localized to the rod and cone photoreceptors in both human and mouse retinas. In human retinas with no pathology, extracellular HSPA5 was localized around many cones within the macular area. In contrast, fewer HSPA5

  2. Ischemic injury leads to extracellular matrix alterations in retina and optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Renner, Marina; Wiemann, Susanne; Shakoor, Daniel A.; Stute, Gesa; Dick, H. Burkhard; Faissner, Andreas; Joachim, Stephanie C.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia occurs in a variety of eye diseases. Restrained blood flow induces retinal damage, which leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration and vision loss. Previous studies indicate that extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents play an important role in complex tissues, such as retina and optic nerve. They have great impact on de- and regeneration processes and represent major candidates of central nervous system glial scar formation. Nevertheless, the importance of the ECM during ischemic retina and optic nerve neurodegeneration is not fully understood yet. In this study, we analyzed remodeling of the extracellular glycoproteins fibronectin, laminin, tenascin-C and tenascin-R and the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) aggrecan, brevican and phosphacan/RPTPβ/ζ in retinae and optic nerves of an ischemia/reperfusion rat model via quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. A variety of ECM constituents were dysregulated in the retina and optic nerve after ischemia. Regarding fibronectin, significantly elevated mRNA and protein levels were observed in the retina following ischemia, while laminin and tenascin-C showed enhanced immunoreactivity in the optic nerve after ischemia. Interestingly, CSPGs displayed significantly increased expression levels in the optic nerve. Our study demonstrates a dynamic expression of ECM molecules following retinal ischemia, which strengthens their regulatory role during neurodegeneration. PMID:28262779

  3. Comparative intrinsic optical signal imaging of wild-type and mutant mouse retinas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Zhang, Youwen; Lu, Rong-Wen; Li, Yi-Chao; Pittler, Steven J; Kraft, Timothy W; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2012-03-26

    Functional measurement is important for retinal study and disease diagnosis. Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) response, tightly correlated with functional stimulation, has been previously detected in normal retinas. In this paper, comparative IOS imaging of wild-type (WT) and rod-degenerated mutant mouse retinas is reported. Both 2-month and 1-year-old mice were measured. In 2-month-old mutant mice, time course and peak value of the stimulus-evoked IOS were significantly delayed (relative to stimulus onset) and reduced, respectively, compared to age matched WT mice. In 1-year-old mutant mice, stimulus-evoked IOS was totally absent. However, enhanced spontaneous IOS responses, which might reflect inner neural remodeling in diseased retina, were observed in both 2-month and 1-year-old mutant retinas. Our experiments demonstrate the potential of using IOS imaging for noninvasive and high resolution identification of disease-associated retinal dysfunctions. Moreover, high spatiotemporal resolution IOS imaging may also lead to advanced understanding of disease-associated neural remodeling in the retina.

  4. Comparative intrinsic optical signal imaging of wild-type and mutant mouse retinas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Zhang, Youwen; Lu, Rong-Wen; Li, Yi-Chao; Pittler, Steven J.; Kraft, Timothy W.; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Functional measurement is important for retinal study and disease diagnosis. Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) response, tightly correlated with functional stimulation, has been previously detected in normal retinas. In this paper, comparative IOS imaging of wild-type (WT) and rod-degenerated mutant mouse retinas is reported. Both 2-month and 1-year-old mice were measured. In 2-month-old mutant mice, time course and peak value of the stimulus-evoked IOS were significantly delayed (relative to stimulus onset) and reduced, respectively, compared to age matched WT mice. In 1-year-old mutant mice, stimulus-evoked IOS was totally absent. However, enhanced spontaneous IOS responses, which might reflect inner neural remodeling in diseased retina, were observed in both 2-month and 1-year-old mutant retinas. Our experiments demonstrate the potential of using IOS imaging for noninvasive and high resolution identification of disease-associated retinal dysfunctions. Moreover, high spatiotemporal resolution IOS imaging may also lead to advanced understanding of disease-associated neural remodeling in the retina. PMID:22453443

  5. Stage-dependent requirement of neuroretinal Pax6 for lens and retina development.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Lucie; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2014-03-01

    The physical contact of optic vesicle with head surface ectoderm is an initial event triggering eye morphogenesis. This interaction leads to lens specification followed by coordinated invagination of the lens placode and optic vesicle, resulting in formation of the lens, retina and retinal pigmented epithelium. Although the role of Pax6 in early lens development has been well documented, its role in optic vesicle neuroepithelium and early retinal progenitors is poorly understood. Here we show that conditional inactivation of Pax6 at distinct time points of mouse neuroretina development has a different impact on early eye morphogenesis. When Pax6 is eliminated in the retina at E10.5 using an mRx-Cre transgene, after a sufficient contact between the optic vesicle and surface ectoderm has occurred, the lens develops normally but the pool of retinal progenitor cells gradually fails to expand. Furthermore, a normal differentiation program is not initiated, leading to almost complete disappearance of the retina after birth. By contrast, when Pax6 was inactivated at the onset of contact between the optic vesicle and surface ectoderm in Pax6(Sey/flox) embryos, expression of lens-specific genes was not initiated and neither the lens nor the retina formed. Our data show that Pax6 in the optic vesicle is important not only for proper retina development, but also for lens formation in a non-cell-autonomous manner.

  6. Long-term glial reactivity in rat retinas ipsilateral and contralateral to experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Nakanishi, Yoriko; Yamada, Yuko; Negi, Akira

    2005-07-01

    Although glaucoma is known to alter glial reactivity, the long-term effect of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) on glial change has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to examine how chronically elevated IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) in unilateral eyes affect reactivities of astrocytes and Müller cells of rats in the treated as well as contralateral eyes over time. EVC in unilateral eyes of Sprague-Dawley rats were performed to produce chronically elevated IOP. Flat mounted retina preparations were made at several points until 6 months, which were subjected to immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Retinal homogenates were one- or two-dimensionally electrophoresed, followed by GFAP immunoblotting. EVC significantly increased IOPs up to 27.8 from 13.1 mmHg, which gradually decreased over time. In flat mounted retinas, astrocytes lost but Müller cells gained GFAP immunoreactivity at 3 days after cauterization. The glial changes were partially reversed over time but last even after IOP normalization. In the contralateral eyes, similar glial changes gradually appeared at 1 month after EVC and thereafter. Immunoblotting demonstrated not only molecular size shifts but also alteration of isoelectric focusing of GFAP both in treated and contralateral retina as compared with age-matched control retina. EVC led to opposite reactions in astrocytes and Müller cells in terms of GFAP immunoreactivity. Late-onset glial reactivity also occurred in the contralateral retina.

  7. [Comparative assessment of antioxidant activity of para-aminobenzoic acid and emoxipin in retina].

    PubMed

    Akberova, S I; Musaev Galbinur, P I; Magomedov, N M; Babaev, Kh F; Gakhramanov, Kh M; Stroeva, O G

    1998-01-01

    Effect of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) in rat and guinea pig retina exposed to hypoxic hypoxia is studied. PABA was injected intraperitoneally and parabulbarly before and after hypoxic exposure. Antioxidant activities of PABA and emoxipin were compared. An intraperitoneal injection of PABA in a dose of 10 mg/kg 24 h before hypoxia virtually completely prevented accumulation of lipid peroxides and preserved catalase activity in the retina. Parabulbar injection of 0.01% PABA solution 1 h before hypoxia prevented LPO intensification, stabilized catalase activity in hypoxia, and protected the retina starting from the moment immediately after hypoxic exposure. The efficacy of 0.01% PABA is comparable with that of 1% emoxipin, and a 0.01% solution of emoxipin is less effective than PABA in the same concentration. PABA exerts an antioxidant effect after hypoxia by decreasing the abnormally high level of lipid peroxides and reducing catalase activity in the retina after parabulbar injection of the drug. All the studied concentrations of the drug (from 0.007 to 0.08%) are active, but the optimal dose for the retina is 0.04%. By its efficacy this concentration is equivalent to 1% emoxipin.

  8. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  9. The relative distribution of retinal and choroidal blood in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Sisak, I; Blumenthal, E Z

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented to explain the relative distribution of retinal and choroidal blood to the human retina. According to this model the retina between the inner limiting membrane and the outer limiting membrane is metabolically controlled and nourished by the retinal vasculature, through Muller cells. The retina between the outer limiting membrane and Bruch's membrane is nourished by the choroidal vasculature, through the retinal pigment epithelium. Muller cells have the ability of metabolic uptake from the interphotoreceptor space as demonstrated in pathological situations suchs as central retinal artery occlusion, when both the Muller cell and the photoreceptor nuclei survive. This demonstrates an overlap existing between the two distributions. Neural elements in the retina depend on Muller cells and RPE for metabolic support. It is only reasonable to expect that the cleavage plane between the two blood supplies is the outer limiting membrane, the outer limit of the Muller cell. In this model both the photoreceptor nuclei (the outer nuclear layer) and the foveal retina are assumed to be supplied by retinal. and not choroidal, vasculature. One consequence is that after long standing retinal detachment the photoreceptor outer segments degenerate (since they become deprived of choroidal blood supply) but the outer nuclear layer, nourished by the Muller cell, continues to survive.

  10. Endothelin-2 signaling in the neural retina promotes the endothelial tip cell state and inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rattner, Amir; Yu, Huimin; Williams, John; Smallwood, Philip M.; Nathans, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin signaling is required for neural crest migration and homeostatic regulation of blood pressure. Here, we report that constitutive overexpression of Endothelin-2 (Edn2) in the mouse retina perturbs vascular development by inhibiting endothelial cell migration across the retinal surface and subsequent endothelial cell invasion into the retina. Developing endothelial cells exist in one of two states: tip cells at the growing front and stalk cells in the vascular plexus behind the front. This division of endothelial cell states is one of the central organizing principles of angiogenesis. In the developing retina, Edn2 overexpression leads to overproduction of endothelial tip cells by both morphologic and molecular criteria. Spatially localized overexpression of Edn2 produces a correspondingly localized endothelial response. Edn2 overexpression in the early embryo inhibits vascular development at midgestation, but Edn2 overexpression in developing skin and brain has no discernible effect on vascular structure. Inhibition of retinal angiogenesis by Edn2 requires expression of Endothelin receptor A but not Endothelin receptor B in the neural retina. Taken together, these observations imply that the neural retina responds to Edn2 by synthesizing one or more factors that promote the endothelial tip cell state and inhibit angiogenesis. The response to Edn2 is sufficiently potent that it overrides the activities of other homeostatic regulators of angiogenesis, such as Vegf. PMID:24043815

  11. New developments in eye models with retina tissue phantoms for ophthalmic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, T. Scott; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2012-03-01

    We document our latest work in developing eye models with solid-state retinal tissue phantoms designed for demonstrating, validating and comparing ophthalmic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instruments. Eye models with retina tissue phantoms can serve a variety of purposes, including demonstrating OCT functionality and performance in both the clinic and exhibit hall, validating retina layer thickness measurements from different commercial OCT instruments and as an aide for the R&D engineer and field service technician in the development and repair of instruments, respectively. The ideal eye model for OCT, the optical cross-sectional imaging modality, would have a volumetric morphology and scattering and absorption properties similar to that of normal human retina. These include a multi-layered structure of equivalent thickness to nominal human retina layers, a foveal pit that can be used to orient the image, and a RPE/OS and choroid like layers to demonstrate the depth penetration of the OCT system. A solid state tissue phantom relieves the user of constant cleaning and maintenance associated with the more common water bath model eyes. Novel processes12 have been developed to create retinal layers model that closely mimic the reflectance and scattering coefficients of the real layers of the retina, as imaged by spectral bandwidth of OCT.

  12. Automatic detection of retina disease: robustness to image quality and localization of anatomy structure.

    PubMed

    Karnowski, T P; Aykac, D; Giancardo, L; Li, Y; Nichols, T; Tobin, K W; Chaum, E

    2011-01-01

    The automated detection of diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases in images of the retina has great promise as a low-cost method for broad-based screening. Many systems in the literature which perform automated detection include a quality estimation step and physiological feature detection, including the vascular tree and the optic nerve / macula location. In this work, we study the robustness of an automated disease detection method with respect to the accuracy of the optic nerve location and the quality of the images obtained as judged by a quality estimation algorithm. The detection algorithm features microaneurysm and exudate detection followed by feature extraction on the detected population to describe the overall retina image. Labeled images of retinas ground-truthed to disease states are used to train a supervised learning algorithm to identify the disease state of the retina image and exam set. Under the restrictions of high confidence optic nerve detections and good quality imagery, the system achieves a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 78.7% with area-under-curve of 95.3%. Analysis of the effect of constraining quality and the distinction between mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, normal retina images, and more severe disease states is included.

  13. HB-EGF is necessary and sufficient for Müller glia dedifferentiation and retina regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-02-14

    Müller glia (MG) dedifferentiation into a cycling population of multipotent progenitors is crucial to zebrafish retina regeneration. The mechanisms underlying MG dedifferentiation are unknown. Here we report that heparin-binding epidermal-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is rapidly induced in MG residing at the injury site and that pro-HB-EGF ectodomain shedding is necessary for retina regeneration. Remarkably, HB-EGF stimulates the formation of multipotent MG-derived progenitors in the uninjured retina. We show that HB-EGF mediates its effects via an EGFR/MAPK signal transduction cascade that regulates the expression of regeneration-associated genes, like ascl1a and pax6(b). We also uncover an HB-EGF/Ascl1a/Notch/hb-egf(a)-signaling loop that helps define the zone of injury-responsive MG. Finally, we show that HB-EGF acts upstream of the Wnt/β-catenin-signaling cascade that controls progenitor proliferation. These data provide a link between extracellular signaling and regeneration-associated gene expression in the injured retina and suggest strategies for stimulating retina regeneration in mammals.

  14. Response of microglial cells after a cryolesion in the peripheral proliferative retina of tench.

    PubMed

    Jimeno, D; Velasco, A; Lillo, C; Lara, J M; Aijón, J

    1999-01-16

    We studied the glial response after inducing a lesion in the zone of the peripheral retina of tench, where there is proliferative neuroepithelium. In the retina and optic nerve, the microglial response was analysed with tomato lectin and the macroglial response with antibodies against GFAP and S-100. In lesioned retinas, there was a temporal-spatial distribution pattern of microglia. One day after lesion, primitive ramified cells appeared in the nerve fibre layer. These cells appeared progressively from the vitreal to the scleral layers until day 7 when cells appeared in all layers, with the exception of the outer plexiform layer. From this point, labelling decreased. In the optic nerve, 3 days after lesion, an increase in the number of microglial cells was observed, first in the nerve folds and from day 15 in specific areas of the optic nerve. In the central retina, in the optic nerve head and within the optic nerve itself, the appearance of microglial cells, after the lesion, near the blood vessels, could indicate a vascular origin of microglia, as has been proposed by many authors. However, we cannot discount the idea that some of the reactive microglial cells arise by proliferation of the microglia existing in the normal state. Using GFAP and S-100 antibodies, no important changes in the retina were observed, however in the optic nerve there was response to the lesion. Thus, the macroglial cells appeared to be involved in reorganisation of the optic nerve axons after lesion. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Layer-Specific Functional and Anatomical MRI of the Retina with Passband Balanced SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2011-01-01

    The retina consists of multiple cellular and synaptic layers and is nourished by two distinct (retinal and choroidal) circulations bounding the retina, separated by an avascular layer. High spatiotemporal resolution, layer-specific MRI of the retina remains challenging due to magnetic inhomogeneity-induced artifacts. This study reports passband balanced-steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) MRI at 45×45×500μm and 1.6s temporal resolution to image the mouse retina, overcoming geometric distortion and signal dropout while maintaining rapid acquisition and high signal-to-noise ratio. bSSFP images revealed multiple alternating dark-bright-dark-bright retinal layers. Hypoxic (10%O2) inhalation decreased bSSFP signals in the two layers bounding the retina, corresponding to the retinal and choroidal vasculatures. The layer in between showed no substantial response and was assigned the avascular photoreceptor layers. Choroidal responses (−25.9±6.4%, mean±SD, n=6) were significantly (P<0.05) larger than retinal vascular responses (−11.6±2.4%). bSSFP offers very high spatiotemporal resolution and could have important applications in imaging layer-specific changes in retinal diseases. PMID:21604296

  16. Fgf Signaling is Required for Photoreceptor Maintenance in the Adult Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hochmann, Sarah; Kaslin, Jan; Hans, Stefan; Weber, Anke; Machate, Anja; Geffarth, Michaela; Funk, Richard H. W.; Brand, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) are secreted signaling molecules that have mitogenic, patterning, neurotrophic and angiogenic properties. Their importance during embryonic development in patterning and morphogenesis of the vertebrate eye is well known, but less is known about the role of Fgfs in the adult vertebrate retina. To address Fgf function in adult retina, we determined the spatial distribution of components of the Fgf signaling pathway in the adult zebrafish retina. We detected differential expression of Fgf receptors, ligands and downstream Fgf targets within specific retinal layers. Furthermore, we blocked Fgf signaling in the retina, by expressing a dominant negative variant of Fgf receptor 1 conditionally in transgenic animals. After blocking Fgf signaling we observe a fast and progressive photoreceptor degeneration and disorganization of retinal tissue, coupled with cell death in the outer nuclear layer. Following the degeneration of photoreceptors, a profound regeneration response is triggered that starts with proliferation in the inner nuclear layer. Ultimately, rod and cone photoreceptors are regenerated completely. Our study reveals the requirement of Fgf signaling to maintain photoreceptors and for proliferation during regeneration in the adult zebrafish retina. PMID:22291943

  17. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  18. Expression of thromboxane synthase and the thromboxane-prostanoid receptor in the mouse and rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Wright, William S.; McElhatten, Robert M.; Harris, Norman R.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental models of the diabetic retina have suggested a pathological role for thromboxane. To date however, little information is available as to the cellular locations of retinal thromboxane synthase (TxS), or its receptor, even in non-diabetic controls. In this study, C57BL/6 mice and Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes, or with buffer for non-diabetic controls. Four weeks following the injection, eyes were enucleated and labeled for TxS and the thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptor. Immunofluorescent intensity was quantified in the ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layers, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, outer nuclear layer, and photoreceptor inner segment. Even in control mice and rats, all layers of the retina showed immunoreactivity for TxS and the TP receptor: however, the pattern of expression demonstrated an inverse relationship, with the highest TxS staining in the inner retina, and the highest TP receptor staining in the outer retina (more specifically, in the photoreceptor inner segment). Four weeks of hyperglycemia did not increase the retinal levels of TxS or TP receptor; however, TP receptor intensities in the outer retina of diabetic rats were highly variable (mostly high but some low), with no values from the photoreceptor inner segment in the same range as obtained from controls. PMID:19523949

  19. Effects of bevacizumab (Avastin®) on the electroretinogram of isolated rat retina.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cluzel, Jacques; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Doly, Michel

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effects of bevacizumab (Avastin®) on the electroretinogram (ERG) in rats using a model of isolated perfused retina ERG recording. Retinas were isolated from rat eyes and placed in a chamber continuously perfused with a nutrient solution. The ERG was recorded every 3 min. Once the ERG b-wave amplitude was at a steady state, bevacizumab was added at concentrations of 0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml to the perfusion medium for 3 h. We observed no effect on ERG amplitudes or kinetics when bevacizumab was added to the perfusion medium. In addition, we found no significant differences in the survival curves of the b-wave and PIII wave during the application of bevacizumab between bevacizumab-exposed retinas and control retinas. We demonstrate that bevacizumab has no in vitro toxic effects on the ERG of isolated perfused rat retina. Our study supports the retinal safety of bevacizumab with respect to retinal function. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Light-/dark-induced changes in rhabdom structure in the retina of Octopus bimaculoides.

    PubMed

    Torres, S C; Camacho, J L; Matsumoto, B; Kuramoto, R T; Robles, L J

    1997-10-01

    We examined rhabdom structure and the distribution of filamentous actin in the photoreceptor outer segments of the retina of Octopus bimaculoides. Animals were dark- or light-adapted, fixed, embedded and sectioned for light and electron microscopy. Statistical analyses were used to compare relative cross-sectional areas of rhabdom microvilli and core cytoplasm within and between the two lighting conditions. Dark-/light-adapted rhabdoms were also prepared for confocal laser scanning microscopy and labeled with fluorescence-tagged phalloidin. Results show differences in the morphology of dark- and light-adapted octopus rhabdoms with the cross-sectional areas of the rhabdoms increasing in dark-adapted retinas and diminishing in the light. Comparisons between the lighting conditions show that an avillar portion of the photoreceptor outer segment membrane, prominent in the light-adapted retina, is recruited to form new rhabdomere microvilli in dark-adapted eyes. Filamentous actin was associated with the avillar membrane in light-adapted retinas, which may indicate that actin and other microvillus core proteins remain linked to the avillar membrane to support rapid microvillus formation in the dark. Photopigment redistributions also occur in light- and dark-adapted retinas, and this study suggests that these changes must be coordinated with the simultaneous breakdown and reformation of the rhabdomere microvilli.

  1. The distribution of visual objects on the retina: connecting eye movements and cone distributions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alex; Garcia, Raquel; Zhaoping, Li

    2003-12-29

    Experimental data on the accuracy and frequency of saccades are incorporated into a model of the visual world and eye movements to determine the spatial distribution of visual objects on the retina. Visual scenes are represented as sequences of discrete small objects whose positions are initially uniformly distributed and then moved toward the center of the retina by eye movements. We then use this model to investigate whether the distribution of cones in the retina maximizes the information transferred about object position. Assuming for simplicity that a single cone is activated by the object, the rate of information transfer is maximized at the receptor stage if the probability that a target lies at a position on the retina is proportional to the local cone density. Although qualitatively it is easy to understand why the cone density is higher at the fovea, by linking the cone density with eye movements through information sampling theory, we provide an explanation for its quantitative variation across the retina. The human cone distribution and the object distribution in our model visual world are shown to have the same general form and are in close agreement between 5- and 30-deg eccentricity.

  2. Somatostatin mediates nitric oxide production by activating sst(2) receptors in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, A; Mouratidou, M; Schulz, S; Thermos, K

    2002-10-01

    Somatostatin and its receptors (ssts) are found in the retina. Recent evidence suggested the involvement of sst(2A) and sst(2B) receptors in the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) (). In this study, we investigated further the localization of sst(1), sst(3)-sst(5), and the possible involvement of all subtypes, present in the rat retina, in the regulation of NO production. Polyclonal antibodies raised against sst(1), sst(3-5) were applied to 10-14 micro m cryostat sections of rat retinas fixed in paraformaldehyde. NADPH-diaphorase reactivity was assessed histochemically. The levels of NO in rat retinal explants were assessed by the production of its stable metabolites NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). sst(1) immunofluorescence was detected mainly in the retinal pigment epithelium, blood vessels of the inner retina, where it was colocalized with NADPH-diaphorase, and in processes of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). sst(4) immunohistochemistry was found in ganglion cell bodies, where it was colocalized with NADPH-diaphorase, processes of the IPL and ganglion cell layer, and optic nerve fibers. sst(3) or sst(5) immunostain was not detected. Somatostatin increased NO production and this effect was mimicked only by the sst(2) specific analog L-779976. The sst(2) antagonist CYN-154806 blocked the L-779976 increase of NO production. These results present conclusive evidence that somatostatin's role in the retina involves the regulation of NO by an sst(2) mechanism.

  3. Fgf signaling is required for photoreceptor maintenance in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Hochmann, Sarah; Kaslin, Jan; Hans, Stefan; Weber, Anke; Machate, Anja; Geffarth, Michaela; Funk, Richard H W; Brand, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) are secreted signaling molecules that have mitogenic, patterning, neurotrophic and angiogenic properties. Their importance during embryonic development in patterning and morphogenesis of the vertebrate eye is well known, but less is known about the role of Fgfs in the adult vertebrate retina. To address Fgf function in adult retina, we determined the spatial distribution of components of the Fgf signaling pathway in the adult zebrafish retina. We detected differential expression of Fgf receptors, ligands and downstream Fgf targets within specific retinal layers. Furthermore, we blocked Fgf signaling in the retina, by expressing a dominant negative variant of Fgf receptor 1 conditionally in transgenic animals. After blocking Fgf signaling we observe a fast and progressive photoreceptor degeneration and disorganization of retinal tissue, coupled with cell death in the outer nuclear layer. Following the degeneration of photoreceptors, a profound regeneration response is triggered that starts with proliferation in the inner nuclear layer. Ultimately, rod and cone photoreceptors are regenerated completely. Our study reveals the requirement of Fgf signaling to maintain photoreceptors and for proliferation during regeneration in the adult zebrafish retina.

  4. Cell birth and death in the developing retina of the Brazilian opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Donald S; Hoffelen, Samantha Van; Greenlee, M Heather W; Harper, Matthew M; Au, Daniel T

    2008-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cytogenesis and apoptosis in the developing retina of the Brazilian opossum, Monodelphis domestica. Monodelphis is a small pouchless marsupial whose young undergo a protracted period of postnatal development. Moreover, the Monodelphis retina represents a unique in vivo compartment for investigating cellular interactions that occur during early neural development and is an important system to study plasticity of neural stem cells following transplantation. Using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of newly generated cells, double-labeling immunohistochemistry and TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells we have performed a detailed analysis of cell birth and death in the Monodelphis retina from fetal development through early postnatal life. Pregnant opossums or pups received a single injection of BrdU between gestational day 12 and postnatal day 35 (35PN), eyes were collected two hours after injection or on day 15, 30, or 60 of postnatal life. BrdU-labeled cells were visualized immunohistochemically. Cells were classified according to their morphology, location and immunoreactivity for cell-type specific antibodies. Cell genesis in the opossum retina begins at E13 and was near completion by 25PN. Apoptotic retinal cells were identified using the TUNEL technique for labeling of fragmented DNA. Apoptosis covered a relatively broad period of postnatal development, beginning around 10PN, peaking at 30PN, and concluding before 60PN. These results demonstrate that the retina of Monodelphis, a polyprotodont marsupial, is generated in a similar pattern to the wallaby, a diprotodont marsupial, and to eutherian species.

  5. Identification of Novel Regulators of atonal Expression in the Developing Drosophila Retina

    PubMed Central

    Melicharek, David; Shah, Arpit; DiStefano, Ginnene; Gangemi, Andrew J.; Orapallo, Andrew; Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D.; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Atonal is a Drosophila proneural protein required for the proper formation of the R8 photoreceptor cell, the founding photoreceptor cell in the developing retina. Proper expression and refinement of the Atonal protein is essential for the proper formation of the Drosophila adult eye. In vertebrates, expression of transcription factors orthologous to Drosophila Atonal (MATH5/Atoh7, XATH5, and ATH5) and their progressive restriction are also involved in specifying the retinal ganglion cell, the founding neural cell type in the mammalian retina. Thus, identifying factors that are involved in regulating the expression of Atonal during development are important to fully understand how retinal neurogenesis is accomplished. We have performed a chemical mutagenesis screen for autosomal dominant enhancers of a loss-of-function atonal eye phenotype. We report here the identification of five genes required for proper Atonal expression, three of which are novel regulators of Atonal expression in the Drosophila retina. We characterize the role of the daughterless, kismet, and roughened eye genes on atonal transcriptional regulation in the developing retina and show that each gene regulates atonal transcription differently within the context of retinal development. Our results provide additional insights into the regulation of Atonal expression in the developing Drosophila retina. PMID:18832354

  6. Light regulates the expression of the BDNF/TrkB system in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, C; Bonnin-Arias, C; Guerrera, M C; Calavia, M G; Chamorro, E; Montalbano, G; López-Velasco, S; López-Muñiz, A; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2013-01-01

    The retina of the adult zebrafish express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its signaling receptor TrkB. This functional system is involved in the biology of the vertebrate retina and its expression is regulated by light. This study was designed to investigate the effects of cyclic (12 h light/12 h darkness) or continuous (24 h) exposure during 10 days to white light, white-blue light, and blue light, as well as of darkness, on the expression of BDNF and TrkB in the retina. BDNF and TrkB were assessed in the retina of adult zebrafish using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Exposure to white, white-blue, and blue light causes a decrease of BDNF mRNA and of BDNF immunostaining, independently of the pattern of light exposition. Conversely, in the same experimental conditions, the expression of TrkB mRNA was upregulated and TrkB immunostaining increased. Exposition to darkness diminished BDNF and TrkB mRNAs, and abolished the immunostaining for BDNF but not modified that for TrkB. These results demonstrate the regulation of BDNF and TrkB by light in the retina of adult zebrafish and might contribute to explain some aspects of the complex pathophysiology of light-induced retinopathies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Wnt Signaling in Form Deprivation Myopia of the Mice Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mingming; Zhang, Zhengwei; Du, Ergang; Zheng, Wenjing; Gu, Qing; Xu, Xun; Ke, Bilian

    2014-01-01

    Background The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation, axonal outgrowth, cellular maintenance in retinas. Here we test the hypothesis that elements of the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in the regulation of eye growth and prevention of myopia, in the mouse form-deprivation myopia model. Methodology/Principal Findings (1) One hundred twenty-five C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into form-deprivation myopia and control groups. Form-deprivation myopia (FDM) was induced by suturing the right eyelid, while the control group received no treatment. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment, eyes were assessed in vivo by cycloplegic retinoscopic refraction and axial length measurement by photography or A-scan ultrasonography. Levels of retinal Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were evaluated using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. (2) Another 96 mice were divided into three groups: control, drugs-only, and drugs+FDM (by diffuser). Experimentally treated eyes in the last two groups received intravitreal injections of vehicle or the proteins, DKK-1 (Wnt-pathway antagonist) or Norrin (Wnt-pathway agonist), once every three days, for 4 injections total. Axial length and retinoscopic refraction were measured on the 14th day of form deprivation. Following form-deprivation for 1, 2, and 4 weeks, FDM eyes had a relatively myopic refractive error, compared with contralateral eyes. There were no significant differences in refractive error between right and left eye in control group. The amounts of Wnt2b, Fzd5 and β-catenin mRNA and protein were significantly greater in form-deprived myopia eyes than in control eyes.DKK-1 (antagonist) reduced the myopic shift in refractive error and increase in axial elongation, whereas Norrin had the opposite effect in FDM eyes. Conclusions/Significance Our studies provide the first evidence that the Wnt2b signaling pathway may play a role in the development and

  8. The Con Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the format of the Con Test, an Australian television game show which followed the same general rules and game play as the UK show PokerFace. At the end of each round a contestant needs to decide whether or not he or she should fold. A contestant needs to know how likely it is that he or she is in last place.…

  9. Comparative study of Pax2 expression in glial cells in the retina and optic nerve of birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Jennifer; Moose, Holly E; El-Hodiri, Heithem M; Fischer, Andy J

    2010-06-15

    Little is known about the expression of Pax2 in mature retina or optic nerve. Here we probed for the expression of Pax2 in late stages of embryonic development and in mature chick retina. We find two distinct Pax2 isoforms expressed by cells within the retina and optic nerve. Surprisingly, Müller glia in central regions of the retina express Pax2, and levels of expression are decreased with increasing distance from the nerve head. In Müller glia, the expression levels of Pax2 are increased by acute retinal damage or treatment with growth factors. At the optic nerve, Pax2 is expressed by peripapillary glia, at the junction of the neural retina and optic nerve head and by glia within the optic nerve. In addition, we assayed for Pax2 expression in glial cells in mammalian retinas. In mammalian retinas, unlike the case in chick retina, the Müller glia do not express Pax2. Pax2-expressing cells are found in the optic nerve and astrocytes within the mouse retina. By comparison, Pax2-positive cells are not found within the guinea pig retina; Pax2-expressing glia are confined to the optic nerve. In dog and monkey (Macaca fascicularis), Pax2 is expressed by astrocytes that are scattered across inner retinal layers and by numerous glia within the optic nerve. Interestingly, Pax2-positive glial cells are found at the peripheral edge of the dog retina, but only in older animals. We conclude that the expression of Pax2 in the vertebrate eye is restricted to retinal astrocytes, peripapillary glia, and glia within the optic nerve.

  10. Detection of the temporal arcade in fundus images of the retina using the Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Faraz; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the vascular architecture of the retina can help in monitoring the effects of retinopathy on the visual system. Retinopathy affects the blood vessels in the retina through modification of the shape, width, tortuosity, and the angle of insertion of the temporal arcade. Monitoring the openness of the temporal arcade and changes with treatment can facilitate improved diagnosis and optimized treatment. We propose methods for the detection and parametric modeling of the temporal arcade, including gradient operators and Gabor functions to detect retinal vessels, and the Hough transform to detect parabolic forms. Results obtained with 40 images of the retina indicate accurate to acceptable results for 24 images and partial fits of the parabolic models for 11 images.

  11. Detection of blood vessels in fundus images of the retina using Gabor wavelets.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Faraz; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Oloumi, Foad; Eshghzadeh-Zanjani, Peyman; Ayres, Fabio J

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of the effects of diabetes, hypertension, and premature birth on the visual system can be assisted by quantitative analysis of the vascular architecture of the retina. The application of image analysis techniques in ophthalmology becomes possible after the desired features have been detected through the use of an appropriate method. We propose image processing techniques for the detection of blood vessels in the retina. The methods include the design of a bank of directionally sensitive Gabor filters for several values of the scale and elongation parameters. Forty images of the retina from the DRIVE database were used to evaluate the performance of the methods. High efficiency in the detection of blood vessels with the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of up to 0.96 was achieved.

  12. Flow of energy in the outer retina in darkness and in light

    PubMed Central

    Linton, Jonathan D.; Holzhausen, Lars C.; Babai, Norbert; Song, Hongman; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu J.; Stearns, George W.; Lindsay, Ken; Wei, Junhua; Chertov, Andrei O.; Peters, Theo A.; Caffe, Romeo; Pluk, Helma; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Fong, Kimberly; Bolton, Laura; Kuok, Denise L. T.; Sweet, Ian R.; Bartoletti, Theodore M.; Radu, Roxana A.; Travis, Gabriel H.; Zagotta, Willam N.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen; Parker, Ed; Van der Zee, Catharina E. E. M.; Sampath, Alapakkam P.; Sokolov, Maxim; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Hurley, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Structural features of neurons create challenges for effective production and distribution of essential metabolic energy. We investigated how metabolic energy is distributed between cellular compartments in photoreceptors. In avascular retinas, aerobic production of energy occurs only in mitochondria that are located centrally within the photoreceptor. Our findings indicate that metabolic energy flows from these central mitochondria as phosphocreatine toward the photoreceptor’s synaptic terminal in darkness. In light, it flows in the opposite direction as ATP toward the outer segment. Consistent with this model, inhibition of creatine kinase in avascular retinas blocks synaptic transmission without influencing outer segment activity. Our findings also reveal how vascularization of neuronal tissue can influence the strategies neurons use for energy management. In vascularized retinas, mitochondria in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptors make neurotransmission less dependent on creatine kinase. Thus, vasculature of the tissue and the intracellular distribution of mitochondria can play key roles in setting the strategy for energy distribution in neurons. PMID:20445106

  13. A robust face recognition algorithm under varying illumination using adaptive retina modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yuen Kiat; Yap, Vooi Voon; Nisar, Humaira

    2013-10-01

    Variation in illumination has a drastic effect on the appearance of a face image. This may hinder the automatic face recognition process. This paper presents a novel approach for face recognition under varying lighting conditions. The proposed algorithm uses adaptive retina modeling based illumination normalization. In the proposed approach, retina modeling is employed along with histogram remapping following normal distribution. Retina modeling is an approach that combines two adaptive nonlinear equations and a difference of Gaussians filter. Two databases: extended Yale B database and CMU PIE database are used to verify the proposed algorithm. For face recognition Gabor Kernel Fisher Analysis method is used. Experimental results show that the recognition rate for the face images with different illumination conditions has improved by the proposed approach. Average recognition rate for Extended Yale B database is 99.16%. Whereas, the recognition rate for CMU-PIE database is 99.64%.

  14. Differential gene expression in mouse retina related to regional differences in vulnerability to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Krisztina; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In the C57BL/6J mouse retina, hyperoxia-induced degeneration of photoreceptors shows strong regional variation, beginning at a locus ~0.5 mm inferior to the optic disc. To identify gene expression differences that might underlie this variability in vulnerability, we have used microarray techniques to describe regional (superior-inferior) variations in gene expression in the retina. Methods Young adult C57BL/6J mice raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h at 5 lx and 12 h in darkness) were exposed to hyperoxia (75% oxygen for two weeks). Retinas were collected from hyperoxia-exposed and control animals without fixation and divided into superior and inferior halves. RNA was extracted from each sample, purified, and hybridized to Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix). The consistency of the microarray results was assessed using quantitative PCR for selected genes. Expression data were analyzed to identify genes and ncRNAs whose differential expression between the superior and inferior retina could be associated with relative vulnerability to hyperoxia. Results In control retinas, only two genes showed a fold difference in expression >2 between the superior and inferior retina; another 25 showed a fold difference of 1.5–2.0. Of these 27, the functions of six genes, including ventral anterior homeobox containing gene 2 (Vax2) and T-box 5 (Tbox5), are related to parameters of anatomic development and the functions of five are related to sensory perception. Among the latter, short-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1sw) was more strongly expressed in the inferior retina and medium-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1mw) in the superior retina. This is consistent with known differences in S- and M-cone distribution, confirming our separation of retinal regions. The highest fold difference was reported for membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), a member from the metallothionein group of cytoprotective proteins. To identify genes whose regulation by hyperoxia was

  15. [Role of immunological factors in peripheral vitreo-chorioretinal dystrophies and macular ruptures of the retina].

    PubMed

    Balashova, L M; Saksonova, E O; Zaĭtseva, N S; Slepova, O S; Teplinskaia, L E; Il'nitskiĭ, V V; Grishin, V L

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of clinical and immunological examinations of patients with peripheral vitreo-chorioretinal dystrophies (PVCRD) and macular ruptures of the retina. No antibodies to S-AG were detected in the lacrimal fluid in 87.5% of patients with PVCRD without retinal defects. In patients with PVCRD with retinal defects antibodies to S-AG were detected in 70% of cases. These antibodies were absent in the patients with macular ruptures of the retina. In none of the patients were these antibodies detected in the blood serum. The levels of circulating immune complexes were normal in the patients PVCRD and increased in those with macular ruptures of the retina. These data permit a hypothesis on the development of local autoimmune reactions in PVCRD patients in response to the appearance of AG of the injured tissues.

  16. Sobre la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M Dominik

    2017-07-11

    Las mutaciones en un gran número de genes provocan degeneración de la retina y ceguera sin que exista actualmente cura alguna. En las últimas décadas, la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina ha evolucionado y se ha convertido en un nuevo y prometedor paradigma terapéutico para estas enfermedades poco comunes. Este artículo refleja las ideas y los conceptos que parten de la ciencia básica hacia la aplicabilidad de la terapia génica en el ámbito clínico. Se describen los avances y las reflexiones actuales sobre la eficacia de los ensayos clínicos en la actualidad y se discuten los posibles obstáculos y soluciones de cara al futuro de la terapia génica para enfermedades de la retina. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Cell death may regulate visual functionality in the retina of adults of the dipteran Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Elena; Barni, Sergio; Pisu, Maria Bonaria; Vaccarone, Rita; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2002-01-14

    The white eye mutation in the medfly Ceratitis capitata, like the homologous mutation in Drosophila melanogaster, was shown to impair visual function. Light and electron microscopy, combined with the DNA-end labelling histochemistry (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) technique), were used to investigate whether programmed cell death may contribute to the morpho-functional differences between the retina of adults from the white eye and wild type strains. Several photoreceptor nuclei in mature white eye flies appeared smaller and showed intensely Toluidine Blue-stained chromatin masses. At the ultrastructural level, they showed different stages of degeneration, resembling apoptotic figures. Positive TUNEL labelling in the white eye retina indicates that apoptosis may be a candidate mechanism for retinal cell degeneration in adult flies, where visual functionality is altered, to achieve the proper cell number. Apoptosis also appears to occur in the wild type retina in early adult life during normal tissue development.

  18. Nitric oxide signaling in the retina: what have we learned in two decades?

    PubMed

    Vielma, Alex H; Retamal, Mauricio A; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2012-01-09

    Two decades after its first detection in the retina, nitric oxide (NO) continues to puzzle visual neuroscientists. While its liberation by photoreceptors remains controversial, recent evidence supports three subtypes of amacrine cells as main sources of NO in the inner retina. NO synthesis was shown to depend on light stimulation, and mounting evidence suggests that NO is a regulator of visual adaptation at different signal processing levels. NO modulates light responses in all retinal neuron classes, and specific ion conductances are activated by NO in rods, cones, bipolar and ganglion cells. Light-dependent gap junction coupling in the inner and outer plexiform layers is also affected by NO. The vast majority of these effects were shown to be mediated by activation of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase and resultant cGMP elevation. This review analyzes the current state of knowledge on physiological NO signaling in the retina.

  19. Microspectrophotometry of single rhabdoms in the retina of the honeybee drone (Apis mellifera male)

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The relative absorption spectra of the bistable photopigment of single rhabdoms from the dorsal region of the retina of the honeybee drone were obtained using slices of retina fixed in glutaraldehyde; less accurate measurements on unfixed tissue gave difference spectra that were similar to those for fixed retinae. The method used was based on measurements of absorbance changes during saturating adaptations of the visual pigment to different monochromatic lights. It is similar to previous methods based on measurements of difference spectra amplitudes, but is simpler to use and more accurate. The predominant pigment has states that absorb maximally at 446 (rhodopsin) and 505 nm (metarhodopsin). In addition, there is a small amount of another pigment whose two states absorb maximally at approximately 340 (UV) and 460 nm. PMID:6644268

  20. Wiring patterns in the mouse retina: collecting evidence across the connectome, physiology and light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Felice A; Wong, Rachel O L

    2014-01-01

    The visual system has often been thought of as a parallel processor because distinct regions of the brain process different features of visual information. However, increasing evidence for convergence and divergence of circuit connections, even at the level of the retina where visual information is first processed, chips away at a model of dedicated and distinct pathways for parallel information flow. Instead, our current understanding is that parallel channels may emerge, not from exclusive microcircuits for each channel, but from unique combinations of microcircuits. This review depicts diagrammatically the current knowledge and remaining puzzles about the retinal circuit with a focus on the mouse retina. Advances in techniques for labelling cells and genetic manipulations have popularized the use of transgenic mice. We summarize evidence gained from serial electron microscopy, electrophysiology and light microscopy to illustrate the wiring patterns in mouse retina. We emphasize the need to explore proposed retinal connectivity using multiple methods to verify circuits both structurally and functionally. PMID:25172948

  1. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses.

  2. The mouse retina in 3D: quantification of vascular growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Milde, Florian; Lauw, Stephanie; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2013-12-01

    The mouse retina has become a prominent model for studying angiogenesis. The easy access and well-known developmental progression have significantly propelled our ability to examine and manipulate blood vessels in vivo. Nonetheless, most studies have restricted their evaluations to the superficial plexus (an upper vascular layer in contact with the vitreous). Here we present experimental data and quantification for the developmental progression of the full retina including the intermediate and deeper plexus that sprouts from the superficial layer. We analyze the origin and advancement of vertical sprouting and present the progression of vascular perfusion within the tissue. Furthermore, we introduce the use of Minkowsky functionals to quantify remodeling in the superficial and deeper plexus. The work expands information on the retina towards a 3D structure. This is of particular interest, as recent data have demonstrated differential effects of gene deletion on the upper and deeper plexus, highlighting the concept of distinct operational pathways during sprouting angiogenesis.

  3. Genistein Treatment Confers Protection against Gliopathy and Vasculopathy of the Diabetic Retina in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elgayar, Sanaa A M; Eltony, Sohair A; Sayed, Abdelrahman A; Abdel-Rouf, Maha M

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy remains an important complication of diabetes. This work was carried out to evaluate the protective effects of genistein from diabetic retinopathy in rat. Fifteen adult male albino rats were divided into two groups; Group I: control (n = 5) and Group II: streptozotocin induced diabetic group (n = 10), which is equally divided into two subgroups; IIa (diabetic vehicle control) and IIb (diabetic genistein-treated). Specimens were taken from the retina 12 weeks post induction, processed and examined using light, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural techniques. Blood samples were assayed for the levels of glucose. In comparison with the diabetic non-treated group, the histological changes in macro and microglial glial cells reactivity and retinal blood capillaries were improved in genistein-treated groups. In addition, GFAP and iNOS expressions in the retina and the blood glucose level were reduced. Genistein ameliorates the histological changes of diabetic retinopathy reaching healing features, which resemble that of a normal retina.

  4. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  5. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  6. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Rutin in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Ahmad, Rehan; Abuohashish, Hatem M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease of the eye. Increased oxidative stress has been considered the central factor in damaging neural retina in diabetes. Flavonoids, being powerful antioxidants, play protective roles in several oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a potential flavonoid, rutin, in the diabetic rat retina. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by single injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg). In age-matched control (non-diabetic) and 1 week of diabetic rats, rutin (100 mg/kg/day) was orally administered and continued for 5 weeks. In another group of diabetic rats, only saline was supplemented. After treatments, retinas from all the groups were isolated and analyzed for potential neurotrophic factors and apoptotic and oxidative stress markers using biochemical and immunoblotting techniques. Our results indicate that rutin possesses antidiabetic activity, as blood glucose level decreased and insulin level increased in diabetic rats. In the diabetic retina, rutin supplementation enhanced the reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and glutathione (GSH) (P < 0.05), and reduced the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) (P < 0.05). In addition, rutin treatment showed antiapoptotic activity by decreasing the level of caspase-3 and increasing the level of Bcl-2 in the diabetic retina. These results suggest the effectiveness of rutin in ameliorating the levels of neuroprotective factors in diabetic retina. Therefore, rutin might be a potential flavonoid that can prevent the retinal damage and subsequently the development of diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Gene expression and protein distribution of orexins and orexin receptors in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Xu, G Z; Wang, L; Jiang, S X; Yang, X L; Zhong, Y M

    2011-08-25

    Orexins, composed of orexin A and orexin B, are identified as endogenous ligands of two orphan G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). Orexins are implicated in regulating wake/sleep states, feeding behaviors, etc. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactive (RT-PCR) analysis and immunofluorescence double labeling, we investigated the distributions of orexin A, orexin B, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of mRNAs of prepro-orexin, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. Immunostaining for orexin A and orexin B was observed in many cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. In the outer retina, horizontal cells, labeled by calbindin, and bipolar cells, labeled by homeobox protein Chx10, were orexin A- and orexin B-positive. In the inner retina, two orexins were both found in GABAergic amacrine cells (ACs), including dopaminergic and cholinergic ones, stained by tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase respectively. Glycinergic ACs, including AII ACs, also expressed orexins. Weak to moderate labeling for orexin A and orexin B was diffusely distributed in the inner plexiform layer. Additionally, orexins were expressed in almost all ganglion cells (GCs) retrogradely labeled by cholera toxin B subunit. Specifically, double-labeling experiments demonstrated that melanopsin-positive GCs (intrinsically photosensitive retinal GCs, ipRGCs) were labeled by two orexins. Morever, OX1R immunoreactivity was observed in most of GCs and all dopaminergic ACs, as well as in both outer and inner plexiform layers. In contrast, no obvious OX2R immunostaining was detectable in the rat retina. These results suggest that orexins may modulate the function of neurons, especially in the inner retina. We further hypothesize that the orexin signaling via ipRGCs may be involved in setting the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock.

  9. Morphometric changes in C57BL/6 mice retina infected by Toxoplasma gondii ME 49 strain.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ana Cristina Higino; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Campos, Wesley Ribeiro; Neto, Miguel Houri; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cezar; Oréfice, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the morphometric implications in C57BL/6 mouse retina infected by Toxoplasma gondii, ME 49 strain. Twenty C57BL/6 female mice were divided into group 1 (n=8, intraperitoneally infected with 30 cysts of T. gondii ME 49 strain) and group 2 (n=12 non-infected controls). The eyes were enucleated on the 60th day after infection, fixed and processed for light microscopy. Changes in retinal thickness and in the perimeter/area ratio (P/A) of the retinal layers were analyzed by digital morphometry. We considered that P/A was the measurement of retinal architecture distortion induced by toxoplasmosis. This study considered the ganglion cells and nerve fiber layers as a monolayer, thus six layers of retina were evaluated: photoreceptors (PRL), outer nuclear (ONL), outer plexiform (OPL), inner nuclear (INL), inner plexiform (IPL) and ganglion cells/nerve fiber monolayer (GNL). Histological analysis of infected mouse retina showed inflammatory infiltrate, necrosis, glial reaction and distortion of the retina architecture. It also presented increased thickness (167.8±24.9μm versus 121.1±15.4μm, in controls) and increased retinal thickness within the retinitis foci (187.7±16.6μm versus 147.9±12.2μm out of the retinitis foci). A statistically significant difference in P/A was observed between infected and uninfected mouse retinas. The same was observed in PRL, OPL, INL and GNL. Retinal morphometry may be used to demonstrate differences between infected and uninfected mouse retinas.

  10. Expression of calcium transporters in the retina of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum).

    PubMed

    Krizaj, David; Liu, Xiaorong; Copenhagen, David R

    2004-08-02

    Changes in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, modulate the flow of visual signals across all stages of processing in the retina, yet the identities of Ca2+ transporters responsible for these changes are still largely unknown. In the current study, the distribution of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ transporters in the retina of tiger salamander, a model system for physiological studies of retinal function, was determined. Plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs), responsible for high-affinity Ca2+ extrusion, were highly expressed in the salamander retina. PMCA isoforms 1, 2, and 4 were localized to photoreceptors, whereas the inner retina expressed all four isoforms. PMCA3 was expressed in a sparse population of amacrine and ganglion neurons, whereas PMCA2 was expressed in most amacrine and ganglion cells. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, a high-capacity Ca2+ extrusion system, were expressed in the outer plexiform layer and in a subset of inner nuclear and ganglion layer cells. Intracellular Ca2+ store transporters were also represented prominently. SERCA2a, a splice variant of the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic Ca2+ ATPase, was found mostly in photoreceptors, whereas SERCA2b was found in the majority of retinal neurons and in glial cells. The predominant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ channels in the salamander retina are represented by the isoform 2 of the IP3 receptor family and the isoform 2 of the ryanodine receptor family. These results indicate that Ca2+ transporters in the salamander retina are expressed in a cell type-specific manner.

  11. Immunolocalisation pattern of complex I-V in ageing human retina: Correlation with mitochondrial ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2016-11-01

    Earlier studies reported accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in ageing and age-related macular degeneration. To know about the mitochondrial status with age, we examined immunoreactivity (IR) to markers of mitochondria (anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1) and complex I-V (that mediate oxidative phosphorylation, OXPHOS) in donor human retinas (age: 19-94years; N=26; right eyes). In all samples, at all ages, IR to anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1 was prominent in photoreceptor cells. Between second and seventh decade of life, strong IR to complex I-V was present in photoreceptors over macular to peripheral retina. With progressive ageing, the photoreceptors showed a decrease in complex I-IR (subunit NDUFB4) at eighth decade, and a weak or absence of IR in 10 retinas between ninth and tenth decade. Patchy IR to complex III and complex IV was detected at different ages. IR to ND1 (complex I) and complex II and V remained unaltered with ageing. Nitrosative stress (evaluated by IR to a nitro-tyrosine antibody) was found in photoreceptors. Superoxide dismutase-2 was found upregulated in photoreceptors with ageing. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was examined in two young retinas with intact complex IR and six aged retinas whose counterparts showed weak to absence of IR. Observations revealed irregular, photoreceptor inner segment mitochondria in aged maculae and mid-peripheral retina between eighth and ninth decade; many cones possessed autophagosomes with damaged mitochondria, indicating age-related alterations. A trend in age-dependent reduction of complex I-IR was evident in aged photoreceptors, whereas patchy complex IV-IR (subunits I and II) was age-independent, suggesting that the former is prone to damage with ageing perhaps due to oxidative stress. These changes in OXPHOS system may influence the energy budget of human photoreceptors, affecting their viability.

  12. Expression and Distribution of Mesencephalic Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Retina and Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Li, Ting-Ting; Wu, Ji-Hong; Wu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), otherwise named Arginine-Rich, Mutated in Early-stage Tumors (ARMET), is a secretory endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) protein that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. To date, little is known about the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and optic nerve (ON). Therefore, we studied the expression and distribution of MANF in the ON and retina by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. Results from rat and mouse were highly consistent in the retina. MANF was detected in both tissues in rat, wherein it was principally localized to the ganglion cell layer (GCL), followed by the inner nuclear layer (INL). The MANF protein levels in the rat retina were 3.33-fold higher than in the rat ON. Additionally, MANF was robustly expressed by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the human retina. In human ON, MANF was partially co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that it was not restricted to astrocytes. In vitro studies confirmed that MANF could be robustly expressed in RGCs and was found principally within the cytoplasm. Hypoxia can stimulate up-regulation by of MANF expression over time, suggesting that MANF may play a vital role in the functional regulation of RGCs both in health and disease. We believe that the present study improves our understanding of the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and ON and could help in further analysis of its interact and correlate with the relevant ophthalmic diseases. PMID:28154531

  13. Dynamic Coupling of Pattern Formation and Morphogenesis in the Developing Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W.; Brand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566

  14. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W; Brand, Michael

    2009-10-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation.

  15. Light-induced retinal degeneration causes a transient downregulation of melanopsin in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Di Pierdomenico, Johnny; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Villegas Pérez, María P

    2017-08-01

    In this work we study the effects of an acute light-induced retinal degeneration on the population of melanopsin positive retinal ganglion cells (m(+)RGCs) and the expression of the melanopsin protein in the retina. The m(+)RGCs may be more resistant than other RGCs to lesion, but the effects of an acute light exposure in this population are unknown. Albino rats were exposed to white light (3000 lux) continuously for 48 h and processed 0, 3, 7 or 30 days after light exposure (ALE). Whole-mounted retinas were immunodetected with antibodies against melanopsin, Brn3a, and rhodopsin to study the populations of m(+)RGC, Brn3a(+)RGC and rods (which are the most abundant photoreceptors in the rat retina). Three days ALE there was substantial rod loss in an arciform area of the superior retina and with time this loss expanded in the form of rings all throughout the retina. Light exposure did not affect the number of Brn3a(+)RGCs but diminished the numbers of m(+)RGCs. Immediately ALE there was a significant decrease in the mean number of immunodetected m(+)RGCs that was more marked in the superior retina. Later, the number of m(+)RGCs increased progressively and reached normal values one month ALE. Western blot analysis showed that melanopsin expression down-regulates shortly ALE and recovers thereafter, in accordance with the anatomical data. This study demonstrates that there is a transient downregulation of melanopsin expression in the RGCs during the first month ALE. Further studies would be needed to clarify the long-term effect of light exposure on the m(+)RGC population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential distribution of glycine transporters in Müller cells and neurons in amphibian retinas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng; Li, Baoqin; Jursky, Frantisek; Shen, Wen

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian retinas are commonly used for electrophysiological studies on neural function and transduction because they share the same general properties as higher vertebrate retinas. Glycinergic synapses have been well described in amphibian retinas. However, the role of glycine transporters in the synapses is largely unknown. We studied the distribution and function of glycine transporters in the retinas from tiger salamanders, mudpuppies, and leopard frogs by immunofluorescence labeling and whole-cell recording methods. Our results indicated that GlyT1- and GlyT2-like transporters were present in Müller cells and neurons, respectively. GlyT1 labeling was present in Müller glial cells and co-localized with Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a Müller cell marker, whereas the GlyT2 immunoreactivity was present in the somas of amacrine cells (ACs) and processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Because the axon processes of glycinergic interplexiform cells (IPCs) are the only source of glycine input in the OPL, GlyT2 staining revealed a spatial pattern of the axon processes of IPCs in the OPL. The function of GlyT2 in the IPCs was studied in tiger salamander retinal horizontal cells (HCs) by whole-cell gramicidin perforated recording. The results demonstrated that inhibition of GlyT2 by a specific inhibitor, amoxapine, increased a tonic glycine input to HCs. Thus, the GlyT2 transporter is responsible for uptake of synaptic glycine in the outer retina. We also compared the distribution of glycine transporters in other amphibian species: salamander, mudpuppy, and frog. The results are consistent with the general pattern that GlyT1-like transporters are present in Müller cells and GlyT2-like transporters in neurons in amphibian retinas.

  17. Expression of Calcium Transporters in the Retina of the Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)

    PubMed Central

    KRIŽAJ, DAVID; LIU, XIAORONG; COPENHAGEN, DAVID R.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, modulate the flow of visual signals across all stages of processing in the retina, yet the identities of Ca2+ transporters responsible for these changes are still largely unknown. In the current study, the distribution of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ transporters in the retina of tiger salamander, a model system for physiological studies of retinal function, was determined. Plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs), responsible for high-affinity Ca2+ extrusion, were highly expressed in the salamander retina. PMCA isoforms 1, 2, and 4 were localized to photoreceptors, whereas the inner retina expressed all four isoforms. PMCA3 was expressed in a sparse population of amacrine and ganglion neurons, whereas PMCA2 was expressed in most amacrine and ganglion cells. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, a high-capacity Ca2+ extrusion system, were expressed in the outer plexiform layer and in a subset of inner nuclear and ganglion layer cells. Intracellular Ca2+ store transporters were also represented prominently. SERCA2a, a splice variant of the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic Ca2+ ATPase, was found mostly in photoreceptors, whereas SERCA2b was found in the majority of retinal neurons and in glial cells. The predominant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ channels in the salamander retina are represented by the isoform 2 of the IP3 receptor family and the isoform 2 of the ryanodine receptor family. These results indicate that Ca2+ transporters in the salamander retina are expressed in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:15236230

  18. Proteomics Analysis of Molecular Risk Factors in the Ocular Hypertensive Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangjun; Hondur, Gözde; Li, Ming; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Tezel, Gülgün

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To better understand ocular hypertension–induced early molecular alterations that may determine the initiation of neurodegeneration in human glaucoma, this study analyzed retinal proteomic alterations in the ocular hypertensive human retina. Methods Retina samples were obtained from six human donors with ocular hypertension (without glaucomatous injury) and six age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Retinal proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography and linear ion trap mass spectrometry) using oxygen isotope labeling for relative quantification of protein expression. Proteomics data were validated by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of selected proteins. Results Out of over 2000 retinal proteins quantified, hundreds exhibited over 2-fold increased or decreased expression in ocular hypertensive samples relative to normotensive controls. Bioinformatics linked the proteomics datasets to various pathways important for maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the ocular hypertensive retina. Upregulated proteins included various heat shock proteins, ubiquitin proteasome pathway components, antioxidants, and DNA repair enzymes, while many proteins involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation exhibited downregulation in the ocular hypertensive retina. Despite the altered protein expression reflecting intrinsic adaptive/protective responses against mitochondrial energy failure, oxidative stress, and unfolded proteins, no alterations suggestive of an ongoing cell death process or neuroinflammation were detectable. Conclusions This study provides information about ocular hypertension–related molecular risk factors for glaucoma development. Molecular alterations detected in the ocular hypertensive human retina as opposed to previously detected alterations in human donor retinas with clinically manifest glaucoma suggest that proteome alterations determine the individual threshold to tolerate the ocular

  19. Layer-Specific Manganese-Enhanced MRI of the Retina in Light and Dark Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    De La Garza, Bryan H.; Li, Guang; Shih, Yen-Yu I.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To employ functional manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to image layer-specific changes in calcium-dependent activities in the rat retina during light versus dark adaptation. Methods. Functional MEMRI at 20 × 20 × 700 μm was used to study light and dark adaptation in the same animals (N = 10) in which one eye was covered and the fellow eye was not. The activity encoding of the light and dark adaptation was achieved in awake conditions and imaged under anesthesia. T1-weighted MRI at 11.7 tesla (T) was performed using two identical radiofrequency transceiver coils to allow interleaved MRI acquisitions of the two eyes. An intravascular contrast agent was also used to verify layer assignments. Results. MEMRI detected contrasts among the inner retina, outer retina, and choroid. Independent confirmation of the vascular layers and boundaries between layers was documented with an intravascular contrast agent. The retinal layer thicknesses agreed with published data. The outer retina had lower MEMRI activity in light compared with dark adaption (P < 0.001), consistent with the increased metabolic demand associated with the “dark current.” The inner retina had higher MEMRI activity in light compared with dark adaption (P < 0.05). The choroid MEMRI activity was not statistically different between light and dark adaptation (P > 0.05). Conclusions. This study demonstrated a high-resolution MEMRI protocol to image functional activities among different layers of the retinas in awake animals during light and dark adaptation. This approach could have potential applications in animal models of retinal dysfunction. PMID:22669725

  20. Receptive field properties of rod-driven horizontal cells in the skate retina

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The large receptive fields of retinal horizontal cells result primarily from extensive intercellular coupling via gap (electrical) junctions; thus, the extent of the receptive field provides an index of the degree to which the cells are electrically coupled. For rod-driven horizontal cells in the dark-adapted skate retina, a space constant of 1.18 +/- 0.15 mm (SD) was obtained from measurements with a moving slit stimulus, and a comparable value (1.43 +/- 0.55 mm) was obtained with variation in spot diameter. These values, and the extensive spread of a fluorescent dye (Lucifer Yellow) from the site of injection to neighboring cells, indicate that the horizontal cells of the all-rod retina of skate are well coupled electrically. Neither the receptive field properties nor the gap-junctional features of skate horizontal cells were influenced by the adaptive state of the retina: (a) the receptive field organization was unaffected by light adaptation, (b) similar dye coupling was seen in both dark- and light-adapted retinae, and (c) no significant differences were found in the gap-junctional particle densities measured in dark- and light-adapted retinas, i.e., 3,184 +/- 286/microns 2 (n = 8) and 3,073 +/- 494/microns 2 (n = 11), respectively. Moreover, the receptive fields of skate horizontal cells were not altered by either dopamine, glycine, GABA, or the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. We conclude that the rod-driven horizontal cells of the skate retina are tightly coupled to one another, and that the coupling is not affected by photic and pharmacological conditions that are known to modulate intercellular coupling between cone-driven horizontal cells in other species. PMID:1359000

  1. Hazardous effects of fried potato chips on the development of retina in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Sakr, Saber A; Badawy, Gamal M; Afify, Hanaa S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hazardous effects of fried potato chips upon the retina of two developmental stages of the albino rats aged 7 and 14 days from parturition. Methods Pregnant rats were arranged into two groups: control pregnant rats and consequently their delivered newborns until reaching 7 and 14 days old from parturition and fried potato chips group in which pregnant rats at the 6th day of gestation maintained on diet formed of fried potato chips supplied from the market mixed with standard diet at a concentration of 50% per each till 7 and 14 post-partum. Three fold integrated approaches were adopted, namely, histological, ultrastructural and proteomic analysis. Results Histological examination of the retina of the experimental offsprings revealed many histopathological changes, including massive degeneration, vacuolization and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer, as well as general reduction in retinal size. At the ultrastructural level, the retina of experimental offsprings exhibited number of deformities, including ill differentiated and degenerated nuclear layer, malformed and vacuolated pigment epithelium with vesiculated and fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, degenerated outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as swollen choriocapillaris and loss of neuronal cells. Proteomic analysis of retina of the two experimental developmental stages showed variations in the expressed proteins as a result of intoxication which illustrated the adverse toxic effects of fried potato chips upon the retina. Conclusions It can be concluded that the effect of fried potato chips on the development of retina in rats may be due to the presence of acrylamide or its metabolite. PMID:23569770

  2. Topographical characterization of cone photoreceptors and the area centralis of the canine retina

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, Freya M.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Williamson, Helen; Williams, David L.; Luthert, Philip J.; Ali, Robin R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The canine is an important large animal model of human retinal genetic disorders. Studies of ganglion cell distribution in the canine retina have identified a visual streak of high density superior to the optic disc with a temporal area of peak density known as the area centralis. The topography of cone photoreceptors in the canine retina has not been characterized in detail, and in contrast to the macula in humans, the position of the area centralis in dogs is not apparent on clinical funduscopic examination. The purpose of this study was to define the location of the area centralis in the dog and to characterize in detail the topography of rod and cone photoreceptors within the area centralis. This will facilitate the investigation and treatment of retinal disease in the canine. Methods We used peanut agglutinin, which labels cone matrix sheaths and antibodies against long/medium wavelength (L/M)- and short wavelength (S)-cone opsins, to stain retinal cryosections and flatmounts from beagle dogs. Retinas were imaged using differential interference contrast imaging, fluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Within the area centralis, rod and cone size and density were quantified, and the proportion of cones expressing each cone opsin subtype was calculated. Using a grid pattern of sampling in 9 retinal flatmounts, we investigated the distribution of cones throughout the retina to predict the location of the area centralis. Results We identified the area centralis as the site of maximal density of rod and cone photoreceptor cells, which have a smaller inner segment cross-sectional area in this region. L/M opsin was expressed by the majority of cones in the retina, both within the area centralis and in the peripheral retina. Using the mean of cone density distribution from 9 retinas, we calculated that the area centralis is likely to be centered at a point 1.5 mm temporal and 0.6 mm superior to the optic disc. For clinical funduscopic examination, this

  3. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  4. Doppler variance imaging for three-dimensional retina and choroid angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of Doppler variance (standard deviation) imaging for 3-D in vivo angiography in the human eye. In addition to the regular optical Doppler tomography velocity and structural images, we use the variance of blood flow velocity to map the retina and choroid vessels. Variance imaging is subject to bulk motion artifacts as in phase-resolved Doppler imaging, and a histogram-based method is proposed for bulk-motion correction in variance imaging. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for 3-D vasculature imaging of human retina and choroid.

  5. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  6. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis)

    PubMed Central

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J.; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A.; Akinola, Oluwole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  7. Pea3 expression is regulated by FGF signaling in developing retina

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn Leigh; McGuire, Chris; Reh, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    FGF signaling has been implicated as an important regulator of retinal development. As a first step in characterizing potential downstream targets of FGF signaling in the retina, we have analyzed expression of Pea3, a member of the Pea3 class of Ets-domain transcription factors, in the developing eye. We find that Pea3 is expressed in the developing retina, and its transcription is regulated by FGF receptor activation. In addition, FGF signaling activates Cath5, a gene necessary for retinal ganglion cell differentiation. These results suggest that FGF signaling via MAPK up-regulates transcription factors that in turn control retinal ganglion cell differentiation. PMID:16273524

  8. Joint Encoding of Object Motion and Motion Direction in the Salamander Retina.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Norma Krystyna; Gollisch, Tim

    2016-11-30

    The processing of motion in visual scenes is important for detecting and tracking moving objects as well as for monitoring self-motion through the induced optic flow. Specialized neural circuits have been identified in the vertebrate retina for detecting motion direction or for distinguishing between object motion and self-motion, although little is known about how information about these distinct features of visual motion is combined. The salamander retina, which is a widely used model system for analyzing retinal function, contains object-motion-sensitive (OMS) ganglion cells, which strongly respond to local motion signals but are suppressed by global image motion. Yet, direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells have been conspicuously absent from characterizations of the salamander retina, despite their ubiquity in other model systems. We here show that the retina of axolotl salamanders contains at least two distinct classes of DS ganglion cells. For one of these classes, the cells display a strong preference for local over global motion in addition to their direction selectivity (OMS-DS cells) and thereby combine sensitivity to two distinct motion features. The OMS-DS cells are further distinct from standard (non-OMS) DS cells by their smaller receptive fields and different organization of preferred motion directions. Our results suggest that the two classes of DS cells specialize to encode motion direction of local and global motion stimuli, respectively, even for complex composite motion scenes. Furthermore, although the salamander DS cells are OFF-type, there is a strong analogy to the systems of ON and ON-OFF DS cells in the mammalian retina. The retina contains specialized cells for motion processing. Among the retinal ganglion cells, which form the output neurons of the retina, some are known to report the direction of a moving stimulus (direction-selective cells), and others distinguish the motion of an object from a moving background. But little is known

  9. Surgical treatment in combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Rueda-Rueda, T; Llerena-Manzorro, L; Molina-Socola, F E; Contreras-Díaz, M; Szewc, M; Vital-Berral, C; Alfaro-Juárez, A; Medina-Tapia, A; López-Herrero, F; González-García, L; Muñoz-Morales, A

    2017-03-01

    The case is presented of a 39 year-old man with a combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium, who experienced progressive visual loss and worsening of metamorphopsia. The patient underwent vitrectomy and epiretinal component peeling, with improvement in visual acuity, metamorphopsia, and retinal architecture, assessed by optical coherence tomography. Selected patients with combined hamartomas of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium may benefit from surgical management. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The protective role of squalene in alcohol damage in the chick embryo retina.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Dorado, Manuel E; Prada, Francisco A; Martínez, Juan J; Quesada, Adela; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2005-04-01

    The developing CNS, and in particular the visual system, is very sensitive to the effects of alcohol. Alcohol causes lipid peroxidation. Squalene, the major olive oil hydrocarbon, is a quencher of singlet oxygen and prevents the corresponding lipid peroxidation. We presumed that squalene can protect against the alcohol-induced damage already observed during the development of the chick retina. Alcohol+squalene was administered directly into the yolk sac of the egg of White Leghorn chicks at day 6 of incubation. The lipid composition of the retina was analyzed in embryos at E7, E11, E15 and E18. The proportions of phospholipids, free and esterified cholesterol, diacylglycerides and free fatty acids were estimated using the Iatroscan TLC/FID procedure. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to determine the fatty acid composition. The morphological study was carried out at E11 using semithin sections, and by means of immunohistochemical techniques at E19. Comparing the results obtained in control embryos, the administration of alcohol+squalene reduces the effects of alcohol on the total lipid composition of the retina during development. The effects were, in fact, of less magnitude than in embryos treated only with alcohol. The major phospholipid species of alcohol+squalene-treated embryos exhibited total recuperation at E15. As far as fatty acids are concerned, no significant changes were observed with regard to control embryos during development. From a morphological point of view, the retinas of alcohol+squalene-treated embryos show at E11 fewer cellular alterations than the retinas of alcohol-treated embryos. In this respect, the retinas of alcohol+squalene-treated embryos exhibited: a columnar cell arrangement similar to that observed in control retinas; few pycnotic cells and very few alterations in ganglion cell layers and in the optic nerve fibers layer. At E19 the recuperation of the expression of myelin oligodendrocyte specific protein (MOSP) in

  11. Pharmacological Protection of the Retina against Damaging Laser Exposures: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    because of its gelatinous nature in the rabbit, it could be gently removed without tearing the retina. Four or five radial cuts, each about 1-2 mm...Component mq/L uM L-glutamine 73 500 taurine 0.75 6 choline Cl 0.6 4.3 myo-inositol 27 150 Na pyruvate 22 200 ascorbate 18 100 glucose 1800 10,000...32,36,37). This difference could be due to a protective effect conferred by melanosomes in the retina, since the other natural anti-oxidant

  12. Analysis of the optical field on the human retina from wavefront aberration data.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio; Marcos, Susana

    2008-09-01

    Wave aberrations in the human eye are usually known with respect to the ideal spherical wavefront in the exit pupil. Using Kirchhoff's diffraction theory, we have derived a diffraction integral to compute the optical field on the retina from the wave aberration data. We have proposed a numerical algorithm based on the Stamnes-Spjelkavik-Pedersen (SSP) method to solve that integral. We have shown which approximations are admissible to reduce the complexity of the diffraction integral. In addition, we have compared our results with those of the conventional procedure used to compute intensities on the retina. We have found significant differences between our results and the conventional ones.

  13. Design and realization of retina-like three-dimensional imaging based on a MOEMS mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie; Hao, Qun; Xia, Wenze; Peng, Yuxin; Cheng, Yang; Mu, Jiaxing; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    To balance conflicts for high-resolution, large-field-of-view and real-time imaging, a retina-like imaging method based on time-of flight (TOF) is proposed. Mathematical models of 3D imaging based on MOEMS are developed. Based on this method, we perform simulations of retina-like scanning properties, including compression of redundant information and rotation and scaling invariance. To validate the theory, we develop a prototype and conduct relevant experiments. The preliminary results agree well with the simulations.

  14. Dynamic molecular monitoring of retina inflammation by in vivo Raman spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Marro, Monica; Taubes, Alice; Abernathy, Alice; Balint, Stephan; Moreno, Beatriz; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Petrov, Dmitri; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Retinal tissue is damaged during inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis. We assessed molecular changes in inflamed murine retinal cultures by Raman spectroscopy. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was able to classify retina cultures as inflamed with high accuracy. Using Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) analysis, we deconvolved 6 molecular components suffering dynamic changes along inflammatory process. Those include the increase of immune mediators (Lipoxygenase, iNOS and TNFα), changes in molecules involved in energy production (Cytochrome C, phenylalanine and NADH/NAD+) and decrease of Phosphatidylcholine. Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis allows monitoring the evolution of retina inflammation.

  15. Formación estelar en NGC 6357: viendo a través del polvo con Gemini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, G.; Morrell, N.; Barbá, R.

    Presentamos aquí los primeros resultados de fotometría JHKs obtenidos con Flamingos I en el telescopio Gemini Sur. El mosaico comprendido por tres posiciones adyacentes tomadas a lo largo de varios semestres nos permite caracterizar la población estelar en la zona que presenta una interacción más importante entre las estrellas masivas y la nube molecular que les dió origen. Los diagramas color-magnitud nos permiten identificar numerosas fuentes con exceso infrarrojo, la mayoría de ellas imposible de detectarse en el rango óptico debido a la fuerte absorción del polvo presente en la región. Es altamente probable que la mayoría de estas fuentes con exceso sean protoestrellas, aunque es necesario realizar espectroscopía infrarroja de las mismas para confirmar su naturaleza.

  16. Raman spectroscopy reveals spectroscopic changes in histologically normal retinas in a mouse model of alpha-synucleinopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The retina is an extension of the nervous system and is accessible for in vivo assessments. We have previously demonstrated changes in retinal function and pathology associated with scrapie, TME and BSE. The purpose of this work was to determine the utility of the retina to identify early CNS change...

  17. Effects of X radiation on the retina of the albino rabbit as viewed with the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.C.; Barsa-Newton, M.C.; Wardly, J.

    1980-02-01

    The eyes of albino rabbits were exposed in vivo to 7000 rad of X radiation, and the retinas were examined with a scanning electron microscope 24 and 72 h after irradiation. The rods and cones of the retina were observed to show the most severe damage.

  18. Comparative analysis of the expression of neural stem cell-associated genes during neocortex and retina development in human.

    PubMed

    Verdiev, B I; Milyushina, L A; Podgornyi, O V; Poltavtseva, R A; Zinov'eva, R D; Sukhikh, G T; Aleksandrova, M A

    2013-02-01

    We compared the expression of Sox2, Oct4, Nanog, Pax6, Prox1 genes associated with plasticity of neural stem and progenitor cells during human neocortex and retina development and in cell cultures. At the analyzed stages of neurogenesis, Pax6 gene is expressed in the neocortex and retina at constant levels, the expression is by one order of magnitude higher in the retina. The dynamics of Sox2 and Pax6 expression in the neocortex was similar. The expression of Oct4 and Nanog genes during neurogenesis in the neocortex and human fetal retina reflects the existence of a high-plasticity cell pool. The dynamics of βIII-tubulin expression indicates that the retina develops more rapidly than the neocortex. Our experiments showed that genetically determined cell potencies typical of native cells are realized in primary cultures without specific stimulation.

  19. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  20. The retina in forensic medicine: applications of ophthalmic endoscopy: the first 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Davis, Neil L; Wetli, Charles V; Shakin, Jeffrey L

    2006-03-01

    The retina reflects a variety of diseases in the living patient. However, the retina is not routinely examined in deceased persons, and therefore it is unknown if routine retinal examination would be a useful adjunct to the forensic autopsy. To examine this issue, the retinae of routine medical examiner cases were examined utilizing an ophthalmic endoscope. The results of the first 100 examinations are reported. Specific attention was given to changes that reflected the postmortem interval, the development of petechiae as related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the association of retinal hemorrhages to subconjunctival hemorrhages. The procedure was helpful in cases of suspected shaken baby syndrome, exsanguination, and carbon monoxide poisoning and in cases with sudden increased intracranial pressure (Terson syndrome). It appears that lividity patterns exist in the retina, and this may be potentially useful in determining body position after death. Some natural disease processes, such as hypertension, were also identified. Finally, the utility of the ophthalmic endoscope as a means of circumventing the problem of corneal clouding is discussed, and ideas for further research using this technology are presented.

  1. Isolation and characterization of flat cells, a subpopulation of the embryonic chick retina.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1984-01-01

    When the embryonic neutral retina is dissociated into single cells which are maintained in stationary culture, the neuronal cells associate on the surfaces of a second population which we refer to as flat cells. The flat cells appear in the culture in significant numbers after 2 days and are required for neuronal cell attachment. We have been able to isolate pure flat cells from early cultures of mixed retina cells and have identified several antigens which support the concept that these cells are related to the glia. The cells have been tested by immunofluorescence for glial fibrillary acidic protein and have been found positive. Cell surfaces were labeled by transfer of tritiated galactose from UDP-galactose to endogenous acceptors in the presence of exogenous galactosyl transferase. After SDS-PAGE and fluorography, the surface glycoproteins of flat cells were seen to be significantly different from those of the original retina, and from chick fibroblasts. Immunoelectron microscope studies of detergent-extracted flat cells have demonstrated a complex network of intermediate filaments and actin fibers. We conclude that the flat cells are derived from the glia subpopulation of the retina and have adapted to the tissue culture environment by assuming this configuration. The unique surface properties of flat cells may be related to their role as an intermediate substrate between the neuronal cells and the tissue culture dish.

  2. BMP signaling mediates stem/progenitor cell-induced retina regeneration.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Tracy; Gutierrez, Christian; Aycinena, Juan-Carlos; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2007-12-18

    We identified a mechanism whereby retina regeneration in the embryonic chick can be induced by the contribution of stem/progenitor cells. We show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is sufficient and necessary to induce retina regeneration and that its action can be divided into two phases. By 3 days after postretinectomy (d PR), the BMP pathway directs proliferation and regeneration through the activation of Smad (canonical BMP pathway) and the up-regulation of FGF signaling by the MAPK pathway. By 7d PR, it induces apoptosis by activating p38 (a noncanonical BMP pathway) and down-regulating FGF signaling (by both MAPK and AKT pathways). Apoptosis at this later stage can be prevented, and BMP-induced regeneration can be further induced by inhibition of p38. These results unravel a mechanism for stem/progenitor cell-mediated retina regeneration, where BMP activation establishes a cross-talk with the FGF pathway and selectively activates the canonical and noncanonical BMP pathways. Retina stem/progenitor cells exist in other species, including humans. Thus, our findings provide insights on how retinal stem cells can be activated for possible regenerative therapies.

  3. Lgr5⁺ amacrine cells possess regenerative potential in the retina of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengfei; Tian, Shenghe; Glasgow, Nathan G; Gibson, Gregory; Yang, Xiaoling; Shiber, Christen E; Funderburgh, James; Watkins, Simon; Johnson, Jon W; Schuman, Joel S; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-08-01

    Current knowledge indicates that the adult mammalian retina lacks regenerative capacity. Here, we show that the adult stem cell marker, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), is expressed in the retina of adult mice. Lgr5(+) cells are generated at late stages of retinal development and exhibit properties of differentiated amacrine interneurons (amacrine cells). Nevertheless, Lgr5(+) amacrine cells contribute to regeneration of new retinal cells in the adult stage. The generation of new retinal cells, including retinal neurons and Müller glia from Lgr5(+) amacrine cells, begins in early adulthood and continues as the animal ages. Together, these findings suggest that the mammalian retina is not devoid of regeneration as previously thought. It is rather dynamic, and Lgr5(+) amacrine cells function as an endogenous regenerative source. The identification of such cells in the mammalian retina may provide new insights into neuronal regeneration and point to therapeutic opportunities for age-related retinal degenerative diseases.

  4. Recruitment of stem cells into the injured retina after laser injury.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tajinder; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Gupta, Amod; Anand, Akshay

    2012-02-10

    Retinal degeneration is a devastating complication of diabetes and other disorders. Stem cell therapy for retinal degeneration has shown encouraging results but functional regeneration has not been yet achieved. Our study was undertaken to evaluate the localization of stem cells delivered to the retina by intravenous versus intravitreal infusion, because stem cell localization is a key factor in ultimate in vivo function. We used lineage-negative bone marrow-derived stem cells in a model wherein retina of mice was induced by precise and reproducible laser injury. Lin(-ve) bone marrow cells (BMCs) were labeled with a tracking dye and their homing capacity was analyzed at time points after infusion. We found that Lin(-ve) BMCs get incorporated into laser-injured retina when transplanted through either the intravitreal or intravenous route. The intravenous route resulted in optimal localization of donor cells at the site of injury. These cells incorporated into injured retina in a dose-dependent manner. The data presented in this study reflect the importance of dose and route for stem cell-based treatment designed to result in retinal regeneration.

  5. Simultaneous ex vivo functional testing of two retinas by in vivo electroretinogram system.

    PubMed

    Vinberg, Frans; Kefalov, Vladimir

    2015-05-06

    An In vivo electroretinogram (ERG) signal is composed of several overlapping components originating from different retinal cell types, as well as noise from extra-retinal sources. Ex vivo ERG provides an efficient method to dissect the function of retinal cells directly from an intact isolated retina of animals or donor eyes. In addition, ex vivo ERG can be used to test the efficacy and safety of potential therapeutic agents on retina tissue from animals or humans. We show here how commercially available in vivo ERG systems can be used to conduct ex vivo ERG recordings from isolated mouse retinas. We combine the light stimulation, electronic and heating units of a standard in vivo system with custom-designed specimen holder, gravity-controlled perfusion system and electromagnetic noise shielding to record low-noise ex vivo ERG signals simultaneously from two retinas with the acquisition software included in commercial in vivo systems. Further, we demonstrate how to use this method in combination with pharmacological treatments that remove specific ERG components in order to dissect the function of certain retinal cell types.

  6. Materials for the Plastic Retina: Network Blends for Arrays of Polymer Grid Triodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-19

    sheet resistance uniformity and long-term stability. Additionally, we have synthesized several varieties of conducting polymer systems, including new PANI derivatives and Mends. The ultimate goal of this effort was...UNIAX under a joint BMDO/DARPA program). For the Plastic Retina, or the Thin Film Analog Image Processor (TAIP), a sheet resistance greater than

  7. Expression and Function of the Endocannabinoid System in the Retina and the Visual Brain

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important retrograde modulators of synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system. Cannabinoid receptors are seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors favoring Gi/o protein. They are known to play an important role in various processes, including metabolic regulation, craving, pain, anxiety, and immune function. In the last decade, there has been a growing interest for endocannabinoids in the retina and their role in visual processing. The purpose of this review is to characterize the expression and physiological functions of the endocannabinoid system in the visual system, from the retina to the primary visual cortex, with a main interest regarding the retina, which is the best-described area in this system so far. It will show that the endocannabinoid system is widely present in the retina, mostly in the through pathway where it can modulate neurotransmitter release and ion channel activity, although some evidence also indicates possible mechanisms via amacrine, horizontal, and Müller cells. The presence of multiple endocannabinoid ligands, synthesizing and catabolizing enzymes, and receptors highlights various pharmacological targets for novel therapeutic application to retinal diseases. PMID:26839718

  8. Investigation of alterations in multifractality in optical coherence tomographic images of in vivo human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Nandan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Chhablani, Jay; Richhariya, Ashutosh; Divakar Rao, Kompalli; Sahoo, Naba Kishore

    2016-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables us to monitor alterations in the thickness of the retinal layer as disease progresses in the human retina. However, subtle morphological changes in the retinal layers due to early disease progression often may not lead to detectable alterations in the thickness. OCT images encode depth-dependent backscattered intensity distribution arising due to the depth distributions of the refractive index from tissue microstructures. Here, such depth-resolved refractive index variations of different retinal layers were analyzed using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, a special class of multiresoluti