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Sample records for retinal vessel abnormalities

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor over-expression in retinal progenitors results in abnormal retinal vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Niklasson, Mia; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Hallböök, Finn; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) plays an important role in development of the central nervous system, including the retina. Excessive PDGF signaling is associated with proliferative retinal disorders. We reported previously that transgenic mice in which PDGF-B was over-expressed under control of the nestin enhancer, nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ, exhibited enhanced apoptosis in the developing corpus striatum. These animals display enlarged lateral ventricles after birth as well as behavioral aberrations as adults. Here, we report that in contrast to the relatively mild central nervous system phenotype, development of the retina is severely disturbed in nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ mice. In transgenic retinas all nuclear layers were disorganized and photoreceptor segments failed to develop properly. Since astrocyte precursor cells did not populate the retina, retinal vascular progenitors could not form a network of vessels. With time, randomly distributed vessels resembling capillaries formed, but there were no large trunk vessels and the intraocular pressure was reduced. In addition, we observed a delayed regression of the hyaloid vasculature. The prolonged presence of this structure may contribute to the other abnormalities observed in the retina, including the defective lamination.

  2. Carotid Atherosclerosis, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure, and Retinal Vessel Diameters: The Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing Yan; Yang, Xuan; Li, Yang; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Wang, An Xin; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Liang; Wu, Shou Ling; Wei, Wen Bin; Zhao, Xing Quan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess relationships between carotid artery atherosclerosis and retinal arteriolar and venular diameters. Methods The community-based longitudinal Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community Study (APAC) included a sub-population of the Kailuan study which consisted of 101,510 employees and retirees of a coal mining industry. Based on the Chinese National Census 2010 and excluding individuals with history of cerebrovascular ischemic events, 4004 individuals were included into the APAC. All participants underwent a detailed clinical examination including blood laboratory tests and carotid artery duplex ultrasound examination. The cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) was estimated using the formula: CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44xBody Mass Index[kg/m2]+0.16xDiastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]–0.18 x Age[Years]–1.91. Results In multivariable analysis (goodness of fit r2:0.12), thicker retinal arteries were associated with a thinner common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) (P = 0.002; standardized regression coefficient beta:-0.06; non-standardized regression coefficient B:-6.92;95% confidence interval (CI):-11.2,-2.61) after adjusting for thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (P<0.001;beta:0.18;B:0.35;95%CI:0.28,0.42), lower diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001;beta:-0.16;B:-0.17;95%CI:-0.21,-0.3), younger age (P<0.001;beta:-0.08; B:-0.16;95%;CI:-0.25,-0.08), and less abdominal circumference (P = 0.003;beta:-0.06;B:-0.11;95%CI:-0.18,-0.03). Thicker retinal vein diameter was associated (r = 0.40) with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001;beta:0.09;B:0.78;95%CI:0.47,1.08) after adjusting for wider retinal arteries (P<0.001;beta:0.27;B:0.36;95%CI:0.31,0.41), thicker retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (P = 0.03;beta:0.22;B:0.56;95%CI:0.46,0.65) and male gender (P<0.001;beta:-0.08;B:-3.98;95%CI:-5.88,2.09). Conclusions Thinner retinal artery diameter was significantly, however weakly, associated with increased common carotid artery IMT. It suggests that retinal

  3. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  4. Recent Advancements in Retinal Vessel Segmentation.

    PubMed

    L Srinidhi, Chetan; Aparna, P; Rajan, Jeny

    2017-04-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation is a key step towards the accurate visualization, diagnosis, early treatment and surgery planning of ocular diseases. For the last two decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated in developing automated methods for segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images. Despite the fact, segmentation of retinal vessels still remains a challenging task due to the presence of abnormalities, varying size and shape of the vessels, non-uniform illumination and anatomical variability between subjects. In this paper, we carry out a systematic review of the most recent advancements in retinal vessel segmentation methods published in last five years. The objectives of this study are as follows: first, we discuss the most crucial preprocessing steps that are involved in accurate segmentation of vessels. Second, we review most recent state-of-the-art retinal vessel segmentation techniques which are classified into different categories based on their main principle. Third, we quantitatively analyse these methods in terms of its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under the curve and discuss newly introduced performance metrics in current literature. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the existing segmentation techniques. Finally, we provide an insight into active problems and possible future directions towards building successful computer-aided diagnostic system.

  5. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  6. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection using morphological component analysis.

    PubMed

    Imani, Elaheh; Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza

    2015-03-01

    Detection and quantitative measurement of variations in the retinal blood vessels can help diagnose several diseases including diabetic retinopathy. Intrinsic characteristics of abnormal retinal images make blood vessel detection difficult. The major problem with traditional vessel segmentation algorithms is producing false positive vessels in the presence of diabetic retinopathy lesions. To overcome this problem, a novel scheme for extracting retinal blood vessels based on morphological component analysis (MCA) algorithm is presented in this paper. MCA was developed based on sparse representation of signals. This algorithm assumes that each signal is a linear combination of several morphologically distinct components. In the proposed method, the MCA algorithm with appropriate transforms is adopted to separate vessels and lesions from each other. Afterwards, the Morlet Wavelet Transform is applied to enhance the retinal vessels. The final vessel map is obtained by adaptive thresholding. The performance of the proposed method is measured on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. An accuracy of 0.9523 and 0.9590 has been respectively achieved on the DRIVE and STARE datasets, which are not only greater than most methods, but are also superior to the second human observer's performance. The results show that the proposed method can achieve improved detection in abnormal retinal images and decrease false positive vessels in pathological regions compared to other methods. Also, the robustness of the method in the presence of noise is shown via experimental result.

  7. Retinal blood vessels extraction using probabilistic modelling.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Djibril; Wang, Chuang; Li, Yongmin; Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Liu, Xiaohui; Serag, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of retinal blood vessels plays an important role in detecting and treating retinal diseases. In this review, we present an automated method to segment blood vessels of fundus retinal image. The proposed method could be used to support a non-intrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology for early detection of retinal diseases, treatment evaluation or clinical study. This study combines the bias correction and an adaptive histogram equalisation to enhance the appearance of the blood vessels. Then the blood vessels are extracted using probabilistic modelling that is optimised by the expectation maximisation algorithm. The method is evaluated on fundus retinal images of STARE and DRIVE datasets. The experimental results are compared with some recently published methods of retinal blood vessels segmentation. The experimental results show that our method achieved the best overall performance and it is comparable to the performance of human experts.

  8. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  9. Retinal vessel oximetry: toward absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Lompado, Arthur; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2000-06-01

    Accurately measuring the oxygen saturation of blood within retinal arteries and veins has proven to be a deceptively difficult task. Despite the excellent optical accessibility of the vessels and a wide range of reported instrumentation, we are unaware of any measurement technique that has proven to be calibrated across wide ranges of vessel diameter and fundus pigmentation. We present an overview of our retinal oximetry technique, present the results of an in vitro calibration experiment, and present preliminary human data.

  10. Handheld four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Larry C.; Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2000-06-01

    Several techniques for measuring the oxygen saturation of blood in retinal vessels have been reported. One interesting application of retinal vessel oximetry is the identification of occult blood loss in trauma victims. However, all the devices described to date are too bulky and cumbersome to be used in a trauma bay or in the field. We present a design for a handheld instrument that performs four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry. This device is comparable in size and weight to a commercially available camcorder, and is suitable for use in the trauma bay. The compact size of this device could also extend its applications beyond traditional clinical settings, as it could be used by primary care physicians and home health care workers for the screening and monitoring of ophthalmic diseases. Principles of operation and preliminary data from the device will be described.

  11. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  12. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Wendeson S; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D C; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  14. Tracing retinal vessel trees by transductive inference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structural study of retinal blood vessels provides an early indication of diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and hypertensive retinopathy. These studies require accurate tracing of retinal vessel tree structure from fundus images in an automated manner. However, the existing work encounters great difficulties when dealing with the crossover issue commonly-seen in vessel networks. Results In this paper, we consider a novel graph-based approach to address this tracing with crossover problem: After initial steps of segmentation and skeleton extraction, its graph representation can be established, where each segment in the skeleton map becomes a node, and a direct contact between two adjacent segments is translated to an undirected edge of the two corresponding nodes. The segments in the skeleton map touching the optical disk area are considered as root nodes. This determines the number of trees to-be-found in the vessel network, which is always equal to the number of root nodes. Based on this undirected graph representation, the tracing problem is further connected to the well-studied transductive inference in machine learning, where the goal becomes that of properly propagating the tree labels from those known root nodes to the rest of the graph, such that the graph is partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. This connection enables us to address the tracing problem by exploiting established development in transductive inference. Empirical experiments on public available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. Conclusions We provide a novel and systematic approach to trace retinal vessel trees with the present of crossovers by solving a transductive learning problem on induced undirected graphs. PMID:24438151

  15. Multimodal Retinal Vessel Analysis in CADASIL Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ewering, Carina; Osada, Nani; Clemens, Christoph R.; Kadas, Ella M.; Eter, Nicole; Paul, Friedemann; Marziniak, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To further elucidate retinal findings and retinal vessel changes in Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) patients by means of high resolution retinal imaging. Methods 28 eyes of fourteen CADASIL patients and an equal number of control subjects underwent confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) measurements, fluorescein and indocyanine angiography. Three vessel measurement techniques were applied: RNFL thickness, a semiautomatic software tool based on cSLO images and manual vessel outlining based on SD-OCT. Results Mean age of patients was 56.2±11.6 years. Arteriovenous nicking was present in 22 (78.6%) eyes and venous dilation in 24 (85.7%) eyes. Retinal volume and choroidal volume were 8.77±0.46 mm3 and 8.83±2.24 mm3. RNFL measurements showed a global increase of 105.2 µm (Control group: 98.4 µm; p = 0.015). Based on semi-automatic cSLO measurements, maximum diameters of arteries and veins were 102.5 µm (106.0 µm; p = 0.21) and 128.6 µm (124.4 µm; p = 0.27) respectively. Manual SD-OCT measurements revealed significantly increased mean arterial 138.7 µm (125.4 µm; p<0.001) and venous 160.0 µm (146.9; p = 0.003) outer diameters as well as mean arterial 27.4 µm (19.2 µm; p<0.001) and venous 18.3 µm (15.7 µm; p<0.001) wall thicknesses in CADASIL patients. Conclusions The findings reflect current knowledge on pathophysiologic changes in vessel morphology in CADASIL patients. SD-OCT may serve as a complementary tool to diagnose and follow-up patients suffering from cerebral small-vessel diseases. PMID:25372785

  16. Retinal imaging analysis based on vessel detection.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Arshad; Hazim Alkawaz, Mohammed; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2017-03-13

    With an increase in the advancement of digital imaging and computing power, computationally intelligent technologies are in high demand to be used in ophthalmology cure and treatment. In current research, Retina Image Analysis (RIA) is developed for optometrist at Eye Care Center in Management and Science University. This research aims to analyze the retina through vessel detection. The RIA assists in the analysis of the retinal images and specialists are served with various options like saving, processing and analyzing retinal images through its advanced interface layout. Additionally, RIA assists in the selection process of vessel segment; processing these vessels by calculating its diameter, standard deviation, length, and displaying detected vessel on the retina. The Agile Unified Process is adopted as the methodology in developing this research. To conclude, Retina Image Analysis might help the optometrist to get better understanding in analyzing the patient's retina. Finally, the Retina Image Analysis procedure is developed using MATLAB (R2011b). Promising results are attained that are comparable in the state of art.

  17. Detection and measurement of retinal blood vessel pulsatile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Frost, Shaun; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. Pulsatile properties caused by cardiac rhythm, such as spontaneous venous pulsation (SVP) and pulsatile motion of small arterioles, can be visualized by dynamic retinal imaging techniques and provide clinical significance. In this paper, we aim at vessel pulsatile motion detection and measurement. We proposed a novel approach for pulsatile motion measurement of retinal blood vessels by applying retinal image registration, blood vessel detection and blood vessel motion detection and measurement on infrared retinal image sequences. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on 8 image sequences with 240 images. A preliminary result has demonstrated the good performance of the method for blood vessel pulsatile motion observation and measurement.

  18. Automated Method for Identification and Artery-Venous Classification of Vessel Trees in Retinal Vessel Networks

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak S.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Garvin, Mona K.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV) classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44 correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42. PMID:24533066

  19. Blood vessel segmentation methodologies in retinal images--a survey.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Remagnino, P; Hoppe, A; Uyyanonvara, B; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Barman, S A

    2012-10-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation algorithms are a fundamental component of automatic retinal disease screening systems. This work examines the blood vessel segmentation methodologies in two dimensional retinal images acquired from a fundus camera and a survey of techniques is presented. The aim of this paper is to review, analyze and categorize the retinal vessel extraction algorithms, techniques and methodologies, giving a brief description, highlighting the key points and the performance measures. We intend to give the reader a framework for the existing research; to introduce the range of retinal vessel segmentation algorithms; to discuss the current trends and future directions and summarize the open problems. The performance of algorithms is compared and analyzed on two publicly available databases (DRIVE and STARE) of retinal images using a number of measures which include accuracy, true positive rate, false positive rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.

  20. Application of morphological bit planes in retinal blood vessel extraction.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Basit, A; Barman, S A

    2013-04-01

    The appearance of the retinal blood vessels is an important diagnostic indicator of various clinical disorders of the eye and the body. Retinal blood vessels have been shown to provide evidence in terms of change in diameter, branching angles, or tortuosity, as a result of ophthalmic disease. This paper reports the development for an automated method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images. A unique combination of methods for retinal blood vessel skeleton detection and multidirectional morphological bit plane slicing is presented to extract the blood vessels from the color retinal images. The skeleton of main vessels is extracted by the application of directional differential operators and then evaluation of combination of derivative signs and average derivative values. Mathematical morphology has been materialized as a proficient technique for quantifying the retinal vasculature in ocular fundus images. A multidirectional top-hat operator with rotating structuring elements is used to emphasize the vessels in a particular direction, and information is extracted using bit plane slicing. An iterative region growing method is applied to integrate the main skeleton and the images resulting from bit plane slicing of vessel direction-dependent morphological filters. The approach is tested on two publicly available databases DRIVE and STARE. Average accuracy achieved by the proposed method is 0.9423 for both the databases with significant values of sensitivity and specificity also; the algorithm outperforms the second human observer in terms of precision of segmented vessel tree.

  1. Dietary Compound Chrysin Inhibits Retinal Neovascularization with Abnormal Capillaries in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Antika, Lucia Dwi; Kim, Dong Yeon; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) develops in a significant proportion of patients with chronic diabetes, characterized by retinal macular edema and abnormal retinal vessel outgrowth leading to vision loss. Chrysin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid found in herb and honeycomb, has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer properties. This study sought to determine the protective effects of chrysin on retinal neovascularization with abnormal vessels and blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown in 33 mM glucose-exposed human retinal endothelial cells and in db/db mouse eyes. High glucose caused retinal endothelial apoptotic injury, which was inhibited by submicromolar chrysin. This compound diminished the enhanced induction of HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) in high glucose-exposed retinal endothelial cells. Consistently, oral administration of 10 mg/kg chrysin reduced the induction of these proteins in db/db mouse eye tissues. In addition, chrysin restored the decrement of VE-cadherin and ZO-1 junction proteins and PECAM-1 in hyperglycemia-stimulated retinal endothelial cells and diabetic mouse retina, possibly maintaining tight cell-cell interactions of endothelial cells and pericytes. Anti-apoptotic chrysin reduced the up-regulation of Ang-1, Ang-2, and Tie-2 crucial to retinal capillary occlusion and BRB permeability. Furthermore, orally treating chrysin inhibited acellular capillary formation, neovascularization, and vascular leakage observed in diabetic retinas. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, that chrysin had a capability to encumber diabetes-associated retinal neovascularization with microvascular abnormalities and BRB breakdown. PMID:27918469

  2. Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images Using Multi-scale Line Operator and K-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, Vahid Mohammadi; Osareh, Alireza; Shadgar, Bita

    2014-04-01

    Detecting blood vessels is a vital task in retinal image analysis. The task is more challenging with the presence of bright and dark lesions in retinal images. Here, a method is proposed to detect vessels in both normal and abnormal retinal fundus images based on their linear features. First, the negative impact of bright lesions is reduced by using K-means segmentation in a perceptive space. Then, a multi-scale line operator is utilized to detect vessels while ignoring some of the dark lesions, which have intensity structures different from the line-shaped vessels in the retina. The proposed algorithm is tested on two publicly available STARE and DRIVE databases. The performance of the method is measured by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the segmentation accuracy. The proposed method achieves 0.9483 and 0.9387 localization accuracy against STARE and DRIVE respectively.

  3. Automated blood vessel extraction using local features on retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Samo, Kazuki; Tajima, Mikiya; Ogohara, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    An automated blood vessel extraction using high-order local autocorrelation (HLAC) on retinal images is presented. Although many blood vessel extraction methods based on contrast have been proposed, a technique based on the relation of neighbor pixels has not been published. HLAC features are shift-invariant; therefore, we applied HLAC features to retinal images. However, HLAC features are weak to turned image, thus a method was improved by the addition of HLAC features to a polar transformed image. The blood vessels were classified using an artificial neural network (ANN) with HLAC features using 105 mask patterns as input. To improve performance, the second ANN (ANN2) was constructed by using the green component of the color retinal image and the four output values of ANN, Gabor filter, double-ring filter and black-top-hat transformation. The retinal images used in this study were obtained from the "Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction" (DRIVE) database. The ANN using HLAC output apparent white values in the blood vessel regions and could also extract blood vessels with low contrast. The outputs were evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The AUC of ANN2 was 0.960 as a result of our study. The result can be used for the quantitative analysis of the blood vessels.

  4. Regional variation in human retinal vessel oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, A M; Patel, S R; Flanagan, J G; Hudson, C

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate regional differences in oxygen saturation of blood in first degree retinal vessels using a novel non-flash hyperspectral retinal camera (Photon etc Inc). Nine healthy individuals (mean age 24.4 ± 3.6 yrs, 5 males) were imaged at 548, 569, 586, 600, 605 and 610 nm wavelengths. Optical density values were extracted with the aid of Image-J software for blood oxygen saturation (SO2) determination. Arteriolar and venular SO2 were measured at three locations (ranging 1-3 optic nerve head radii) from the disc margin along the vessels in the superior and inferior temporal quadrants. Retinal SO2 was significantly higher in the superior temporal arteriole and venule as compared to the inferior temporal vessels (p = 0.033 and p = 0.032 for arterioles and venules, respectively). SO2 was not significantly different between the three measurement sites for any of the given vessels imaged (p > 0.05). In conclusion, greater SO2 values were found in the superior temporal first degree retinal arterioles and venules in young healthy individuals than in the equivalent inferior vessels. However, there were no detectable differences in retinal SO2 along each of the major vessels, a finding that is consistent with the concept of these vessels not contributing primarily to gas exchange. Moreover, the SO2 was consistently higher in the arterioles than in the equivalent venules (p < 0.0001).

  5. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls.

  6. Segmentation of Retinal Blood Vessels Based on Cake Filter

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xi-Rong; Ge, Xin; She, Li-Huang; Zhang, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels is significant to diagnosis and evaluation of ocular diseases like glaucoma and systemic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The retinal blood vessel segmentation for small and low contrast vessels is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, a new method based on cake filter is proposed. Firstly, a quadrature filter band called cake filter band is made up in Fourier field. Then the real component fusion is used to separate the blood vessel from the background. Finally, the blood vessel network is got by a self-adaption threshold. The experiments implemented on the STARE database indicate that the new method has a better performance than the traditional ones on the small vessels extraction, average accuracy rate, and true and false positive rate. PMID:26636095

  7. Segmentation of Retinal Blood Vessels Based on Cake Filter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xi-Rong; Ge, Xin; She, Li-Huang; Zhang, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels is significant to diagnosis and evaluation of ocular diseases like glaucoma and systemic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The retinal blood vessel segmentation for small and low contrast vessels is still a challenging problem. To solve this problem, a new method based on cake filter is proposed. Firstly, a quadrature filter band called cake filter band is made up in Fourier field. Then the real component fusion is used to separate the blood vessel from the background. Finally, the blood vessel network is got by a self-adaption threshold. The experiments implemented on the STARE database indicate that the new method has a better performance than the traditional ones on the small vessels extraction, average accuracy rate, and true and false positive rate.

  8. Automated spectroscopic imaging of oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Sueda, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Enaida, H.; Okada, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    2009-02-01

    A new automatic visualization procedure for the oxygen saturation imaging from multi-spectral imaging of human retinal vessels has been proposed. Two-wavelength retinal fundus images at 545 and 560 nm, which were oxygen insensitive and oxygen sensitive, respectively, were captured by CCD cameras simultaneously through a beam splitter and interference filters. We applied a morphological processing technique to presume a distribution of incident light including the vessel parts and an optical density (OD) image of each wavelength image. And the OD ratio (OD560/OD545) image was calculated as a relative indicator of oxygen saturation. Furthermore, processing of line convergence index filter was adopted to identify the retinal vessels. Clear difference between retinal arteries and veins was observed in the automated imaging method. In addition, the decrease of oxygen saturation in the retinal artery without breathing could be monitored by the ODR. This method is possible to be applied to real-time monitoring for oxygen saturation of retinal vessels.

  9. [Segmentation of retinal blood vessels based on centerline extraction].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Shen, Jianxin; Liao, Wenhe; Wang, Yuliang

    2012-02-01

    The precise estimation of blood vessel centerline and width is a prerequisite condition for the quantitative and visualized diagnosis of blood vessel disease in fundus images. In this paper, a retinal blood vessel segmentation algorithm based on centerline extraction is proposed. According to the characteristics of the fundus image and retinal blood vessels, the image is convoluted with the masks of discrete Gaussian partial derivative kernels. The centerline is determined by differential geometric properties of the blood vessels and the width is also calculated. The precision of our method can reach sub-pixel level with a fast computation speed. The experiments on several kinds of fundus images showed that the method worked quickly and accurately.

  10. Robust Retinal Blood Vessel Segmentation Based on Reinforcement Local Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Ma, Zhenshen; Liu, Chao; Han, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Retinal blood vessels segmentation plays an important role for retinal image analysis. In this paper, we propose robust retinal blood vessel segmentation method based on reinforcement local descriptions. A novel line set based feature is firstly developed to capture local shape information of vessels by employing the length prior of vessels, which is robust to intensity variety. After that, local intensity feature is calculated for each pixel, and then morphological gradient feature is extracted for enhancing the local edge of smaller vessel. At last, line set based feature, local intensity feature, and morphological gradient feature are combined to obtain the reinforcement local descriptions. Compared with existing local descriptions, proposed reinforcement local description contains more local information of local shape, intensity, and edge of vessels, which is more robust. After feature extraction, SVM is trained for blood vessel segmentation. In addition, we also develop a postprocessing method based on morphological reconstruction to connect some discontinuous vessels and further obtain more accurate segmentation result. Experimental results on two public databases (DRIVE and STARE) demonstrate that proposed reinforcement local descriptions outperform the state-of-the-art method. PMID:28194407

  11. Robust Retinal Blood Vessel Segmentation Based on Reinforcement Local Descriptions.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Ma, Zhenshen; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Guang; Han, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Retinal blood vessels segmentation plays an important role for retinal image analysis. In this paper, we propose robust retinal blood vessel segmentation method based on reinforcement local descriptions. A novel line set based feature is firstly developed to capture local shape information of vessels by employing the length prior of vessels, which is robust to intensity variety. After that, local intensity feature is calculated for each pixel, and then morphological gradient feature is extracted for enhancing the local edge of smaller vessel. At last, line set based feature, local intensity feature, and morphological gradient feature are combined to obtain the reinforcement local descriptions. Compared with existing local descriptions, proposed reinforcement local description contains more local information of local shape, intensity, and edge of vessels, which is more robust. After feature extraction, SVM is trained for blood vessel segmentation. In addition, we also develop a postprocessing method based on morphological reconstruction to connect some discontinuous vessels and further obtain more accurate segmentation result. Experimental results on two public databases (DRIVE and STARE) demonstrate that proposed reinforcement local descriptions outperform the state-of-the-art method.

  12. Systemic abnormalities associated with retinal vein occlusion in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Sinawat, Suthasinee; Bunyavee, Chavisa; Ratanapakorn, Tanapat; Sinawat, Supat; Laovirojjanakul, Wipada; Yospaiboon, Yosanan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To study the systemic abnormalities associated with retinal vein occlusion in patients aged ≤50 years with a particular emphasis on atherosclerotic diseases and thrombophilic disorders. Methods Medical charts of patients, aged ≤50 years whose diagnoses were retinal vein occlusions during the period 1995–2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the number of systemic abnormalities associated with these patients. Secondary outcomes included types of retinal vein occlusion and sites of occlusion. Results Atherosclerotic diseases were the most common systemic abnormalities associated with retinal vein occlusion and accounted for 55.1% of the patients in the study. Hypertension in 27.55%, diabetes mellitus in 16.33%, and 5.1% with dyslipidemia were noted. The number of thrombophilic disorders seemed to be less than expected and were noted in only 5.1%. Other systemic abnormalities included viral hepatitis infection, systemic lupus erythematosus, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Oral contraceptives were used by some patients. Conclusion Atherosclerotic diseases remained the most commonly associated systemic diseases in the majority of these patients. Approach to these patients should include a screening for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and lipid abnormalities. Thrombophilia should also be considered where no obvious atherosclerotic diseases are found or if the patient is <40 years old, a history of thrombosis or a family history of thrombosis is possible. PMID:28260858

  13. Microvascular network topology of the human retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Brab, M; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Reim, M; Schmid-Schönbein, H

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of blood flow in the human retinal vessels requires a detailed picture of the microvascular network topology. In order to lay the foundation for a quantitative microcirculatory network analysis of the human retina, a novel technique for tissue preparation and network characterization was developed. After injection of hydrogen peroxide into the human bulb, the microvasculature was filled with oxygen produced by endothelial catalase and visualized after embedding in a mixture of cedar oil and gum damar. The vessel topology was documented in the form of photomicrographs, which permitted complete reconstruction of the microvasculature on transparent overlays. By considering the complete capillary system it was possible to divide the retinal network into dichotomous, asymmetric arteriolar and venular trees. The Strahler ordering method, which considers both dichotomous and side branching configurations, was selected and applied to analyze the retinal vascular trees, using the capillaries as the zero order reference vessels. The number of vessel segments was found to be an approximate logarithmic function of the order number, in accordance with Horton's law. Vessel lengths within each order were found to be log-normal distributed, and median lengths for different orders could be approximated by a 2nd degree polynomial curve. Diameters within each order could be approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the mean values for different orders could be expressed by an exponential curve. These data provide the basis for conductance, pressure and flow computations within the retinal microvessels.

  14. Instrument for the measurement of retinal vessel oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan J.; Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1999-06-01

    Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood los and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. We have developed an Eye Oximeter (EOX), that noninvasively measures the oxygen saturation of the blood in individual large retinal vessels using scanning lasers. 1D vessel extinction profiles are obtained at four wavelengths (629, 678, 821 and 899 nm), and the vessel transmittances computed. The oxygen saturation of blood within the vessel is then calculated from the transmittance data. We have performed an in vitro experiment on human blood which demonstrates the calibration of the EOX measurements and validates our oximetry equations. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation was measured in a human subject and found to be 65%O2Sat and 101 - 102%O2Sat in the veins and arteries on the optic disk. Irregularities in the background measured away from the optic disk resulted in a large variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the disk.

  15. Photochemical Thrombosis Of Retinal And Choroidal Vessels Using Rose Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mary Lou; Winward, Kirk; Watson, Brant D.; Hernandez, Eleut

    1989-09-01

    Rose bengal is an effective photosensitizing agent which interacts with argon green light to induce photochemical thrombosis of irradiated vessels. We used focal, low energy irradiation to occlude retinal and choroidal vessels in both albino and pigmented rabbits. Immediately after intravenous injection of rose bengal at concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/kg, irradiation was performed via a slit lamp-delivered argon green laser (514.5 nm) with the aid of fundus contact lens. In 11 eyes, arteries were treated with 50-100 interrupted bursts of 75u spot size at 0.2 sec and 40-100 mW (9 retinal vessels for 1-12 days and variable closure of the surrounding capillaris. Eight eyes were treated with continuous irradiation 2-5 minutes at 7.5-40 mW, 75u spot size (35 retinal and choroidal vessels, serous elevation of the retina, and disc neovascularization. In eight eyes choroidal vessels were irradiated with 10-20 mW, 15-60 sec, 500u spot size (31 retinal edema at 24 hours and permanent closure of choroidal vessels. There was minimal damage to surrounding tissue. Control eyes in all three groups irradiated utilizing the same parameters, but without rose bengal, demonstrated no evidence of thermal injury.

  16. Multiresolution retinal vessel tracker based on directional smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Bichler, Simon; Schmid, K.; Maurino, M.; Porta, Massimo; Bek, Toke; Ege, B.; Larsen, Ole V.; Hejlesen, Ok

    2002-04-01

    To support ophthalmologists in their routine and enable the quantitative assessment of vascular changes in color fundus photographs a multi-resolution approach was developed which segments the vessel tree efficiently and precisely in digital images of the retina. The algorithm starts at seed points, found in a preprocessing step and then follows the vessel, iteratively adjusting the direction of the search, and finding the center line of the vessels. As an addition, vessel branches and crossings are detected and stored in detailed lists. Every iteration of the Directional Smoothing Based (DSB) tracking process starts at a given point in the middle of a vessel. First rectangular windows for several directions in a neighborhood of this point are smoothed in the assumed direction of the vessel. The window, that results in the best contrast is then said to have the true direction of the vessel. The center point is moved into that direction 1/8th of the vessel width, and the algorithm continues with the next iteration. The vessel branch and crossing detection uses a list with unique vessel segment IDs and branch point IDs. During the tracking, when another vessel is crossed, the tracking is stopped. The newly traced vessel segment is stored in the vessel segment list, and the vessel, that had been traced before is broken up at the crossing- or branch point, and is stored as two different vessel segments. This approach has several advantages: - With directional smoothing, noise is eliminated, while the edges of the vessels are kept. - DSB works on high resolution images (3000 x 2000 pixel) as well as on low-resolution images (900 x 600 pixel), because a large area of the vessel is used to find the vessel direction - For the detection of venous beading the vessel width is measured for every step of the traced vessel. - With the lists of branch- and crossing points, we get a network of connected vessel segments, that can be used for further processing the retinal vessel

  17. Retinal vessel caliber and lifelong neuropsychological functioning: retinal imaging as an investigative tool for cognitive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E; Wong, Tien Y; Meier, Madeline H; Houts, Renate M; Ding, Jie; Cheung, Carol Y; Ikram, M Kamran; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-07-01

    Why do more intelligent people live healthier and longer lives? One possibility is that intelligence tests assess health of the brain, but psychological science has lacked technology to evaluate this hypothesis. Digital retinal imaging, a new, noninvasive method to visualize microcirculation in the eye, may reflect vascular conditions in the brain. We studied the association between retinal vessel caliber and neuropsychological functioning in the representative Dunedin birth cohort. Wider venular caliber was associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning at midlife, independently of potentially confounding factors. This association was not limited to any specific test domain and extended to informants' reports of cohort members' cognitive difficulties in everyday life. Moreover, wider venular caliber was associated with lower childhood IQ tested 25 years earlier. The findings indicate that retinal venular caliber may be an indicator of neuropsychological health years before the onset of dementing diseases and suggest that digital retinal imaging may be a useful investigative tool for psychological science.

  18. Automatic classification of retinal vessels into arteries and veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    Separating the retinal vascular tree into arteries and veins is important for quantifying vessel changes that preferentially affect either the veins or the arteries. For example the ratio of arterial to venous diameter, the retinal a/v ratio, is well established to be predictive of stroke and other cardiovascular events in adults, as well as the staging of retinopathy of prematurity in premature infants. This work presents a supervised, automatic method that can determine whether a vessel is an artery or a vein based on intensity and derivative information. After thinning of the vessel segmentation, vessel crossing and bifurcation points are removed leaving a set of vessel segments containing centerline pixels. A set of features is extracted from each centerline pixel and using these each is assigned a soft label indicating the likelihood that it is part of a vein. As all centerline pixels in a connected segment should be the same type we average the soft labels and assign this average label to each centerline pixel in the segment. We train and test the algorithm using the data (40 color fundus photographs) from the DRIVE database1 with an enhanced reference standard. In the enhanced reference standard a fellowship trained retinal specialist (MDA) labeled all vessels for which it was possible to visually determine whether it was a vein or an artery. After applying the proposed method to the 20 images of the DRIVE test set we obtained an area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.88 for correctly assigning centerline pixels to either the vein or artery classes.

  19. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mervyn G.; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P.; McLean, Rebecca J.; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T.; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus. PMID:24688117

  20. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  1. Thickness dependent tortuosity estimation for retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Azegrouz, Hind; Trucco, Emanuele; Dhillon, Baljean; MacGillivray, Thomas; MacCormick, I J

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for the automated estimation of vessel tortuosity in retinal images. We introduce a new tortuosity metric that takes into account vessel thickness, yielding estimates plausibly closer to intuition and medical judgement than those from previous metrics. We also propose an algorithm identifying automatically a vasculature segment connecting two points specified manually. Starting from a binary image of the vasculature, the algorithm computes a skeletal (medial axis) representation on which all terminal and branching points are located. This is then converted to a graph representation including connectivity as well as thickness information for all vessels. Target segments for tortuosity estimation are identified automatically from end points selected manually using a shortest-path algorithm. Results are presented and compared with those provided by clinical classification on 50 vessels from DRIVE images. An overall agreement with clinical judgement of 92.4% is achieved, superior to that of comparison measures.

  2. Bayesian method with spatial constraint for retinal vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Adel, Mouloud; Bourennane, Salah

    2013-01-01

    A Bayesian method with spatial constraint is proposed for vessel segmentation in retinal images. The proposed model makes the assumption that the posterior probability of each pixel is dependent on posterior probabilities of their neighboring pixels. An energy function is defined for the proposed model. By applying the modified level set approach to minimize the proposed energy function, we can identify blood vessels in the retinal image. Evaluation of the developed method is done on real retinal images which are from the DRIVE database and the STARE database. The performance is analyzed and compared to other published methods using a number of measures which include accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. The proposed approach is proved to be effective on these two databases. The average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity on the DRIVE database are 0.9529, 0.7513, and 0.9792, respectively, and for the STARE database 0.9476, 0.7147, and 0.9735, respectively. The performance is better than that of other vessel segmentation methods.

  3. A Morphological Hessian Based Approach for Retinal Blood Vessels Segmentation and Denoising Using Region Based Otsu Thresholding

    PubMed Central

    BahadarKhan, Khan; A Khaliq, Amir; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) harm retinal blood vessels in the eye causing visual deficiency. The appearance and structure of blood vessels in retinal images play an essential part in the diagnoses of an eye sicknesses. We proposed a less computational unsupervised automated technique with promising results for detection of retinal vasculature by using morphological hessian based approach and region based Otsu thresholding. Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and morphological filters have been used for enhancement and to remove low frequency noise or geometrical objects, respectively. The hessian matrix and eigenvalues approach used has been in a modified form at two different scales to extract wide and thin vessel enhanced images separately. Otsu thresholding has been further applied in a novel way to classify vessel and non-vessel pixels from both enhanced images. Finally, postprocessing steps has been used to eliminate the unwanted region/segment, non-vessel pixels, disease abnormalities and noise, to obtain a final segmented image. The proposed technique has been analyzed on the openly accessible DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction) and STARE (STructured Analysis of the REtina) databases along with the ground truth data that has been precisely marked by the experts. PMID:27441646

  4. A Morphological Hessian Based Approach for Retinal Blood Vessels Segmentation and Denoising Using Region Based Otsu Thresholding.

    PubMed

    BahadarKhan, Khan; A Khaliq, Amir; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) harm retinal blood vessels in the eye causing visual deficiency. The appearance and structure of blood vessels in retinal images play an essential part in the diagnoses of an eye sicknesses. We proposed a less computational unsupervised automated technique with promising results for detection of retinal vasculature by using morphological hessian based approach and region based Otsu thresholding. Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and morphological filters have been used for enhancement and to remove low frequency noise or geometrical objects, respectively. The hessian matrix and eigenvalues approach used has been in a modified form at two different scales to extract wide and thin vessel enhanced images separately. Otsu thresholding has been further applied in a novel way to classify vessel and non-vessel pixels from both enhanced images. Finally, postprocessing steps has been used to eliminate the unwanted region/segment, non-vessel pixels, disease abnormalities and noise, to obtain a final segmented image. The proposed technique has been analyzed on the openly accessible DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction) and STARE (STructured Analysis of the REtina) databases along with the ground truth data that has been precisely marked by the experts.

  5. Retinal vessel oximetry-calibration, compensation for vessel diameter and fundus pigmentation, and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Martin; Vilser, Walthard; Riemer, Thomas; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the hemoglobin oxygenation in retinal vessels and to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of the measurement. Using a fundus camera equipped with a special dual wavelength transmission filter and a color charge-coupled device camera, two monochromatic fundus images at 548 and 610 nm were recorded simultaneously. The optical densities of retinal vessels for both wavelengths and their ratio, which is known to be proportional to the oxygen saturation, were calculated. From 50-deg images, the used semiautomatic vessel recognition and tracking algorithm recognized and measured vessels of 100 microm or more in diameter. On average, arterial and venous oxygen saturations were measured at 98+/-10.1% and 65+/-11.7%, respectively. For measurements in the same vessel segments from the five images per subject, standard deviations of 2.52% and 3.25% oxygen saturation were found in arteries and veins, respectively. Respiration of 100% oxygen increased the mean arterial and venous oxygen saturation by 2% and 7% respectively. A simple system for noninvasive optical oximetry, consisting of a special filter in a fundus camera and software, was introduced. It is able to measure the oxygen saturation in retinal branch vessels with reproducibility and sensitivity suitable for clinical investigations.

  6. Performance comparison of publicly available retinal blood vessel segmentation methods.

    PubMed

    Vostatek, Pavel; Claridge, Ela; Uusitalo, Hannu; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Fält, Pauli; Lensu, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    Retinal blood vessel structure is an important indicator of many retinal and systemic diseases, which has motivated the development of various image segmentation methods for the blood vessels. In this study, two supervised and three unsupervised segmentation methods with a publicly available implementation are reviewed and quantitatively compared with each other on five public databases with ground truth segmentation of the vessels. Each method is tested under consistent conditions with two types of preprocessing, and the parameters of the methods are optimized for each database. Additionally, possibility to predict the parameters of the methods by the linear regression model is tested for each database. Resolution of the input images and amount of the vessel pixels in the ground truth are used as predictors. The results show the positive influence of preprocessing on the performance of the unsupervised methods. The methods show similar performance for segmentation accuracy, with the best performance achieved by the method by Azzopardi et al. (Acc 94.0) on ARIADB, the method by Soares et al. (Acc 94.6, 94.7) on CHASEDB1 and DRIVE, and the method by Nguyen et al. (Acc 95.8, 95.5) on HRF and STARE. The method by Soares et al. performed better with regard to the area under the ROC curve. Qualitative differences between the methods are discussed. Finally, it was possible to predict the parameter settings that give performance close to the optimized performance of each method.

  7. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  8. Cauchy based matched filter for retinal vessels detection.

    PubMed

    Zolfagharnasab, Hooshiar; Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel matched filter based on a new kernel function with Cauchy distribution is introduced to improve the accuracy of the automatic retinal vessel detection compared with other available matched filter-based methods, most notably, the methods built on Gaussian distribution function. Several experiments are conducted to pick the best values of the parameters for the new designed filter, including both Cauchy function parameters as well as the matched filter parameters such as the threshold value. Moreover, the thresholding phase is enhanced with a two-step procedure. Experimental results employed on DRIVE retinal images database confirms that the proposed method has higher accuracy compared with other available matched filter-based methods.

  9. Novel algorithm by low complexity filter on retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, Samad

    2011-10-01

    This article shows a new method to detect blood vessels in the retina by digital images. Retinal vessel segmentation is important for detection of side effect of diabetic disease, because diabetes can form new capillaries which are very brittle. The research has been done in two phases: preprocessing and processing. Preprocessing phase consists to apply a new filter that produces a suitable output. It shows vessels in dark color on white background and make a good difference between vessels and background. The complexity is very low and extra images are eliminated. The second phase is processing and used the method is called Bayesian. It is a built-in in supervision classification method. This method uses of mean and variance of intensity of pixels for calculate of probability. Finally Pixels of image are divided into two classes: vessels and background. Used images are related to the DRIVE database. After performing this operation, the calculation gives 95 percent of efficiency average. The method also was performed from an external sample DRIVE database which has retinopathy, and perfect result was obtained

  10. A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope for retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lompado, Arthur

    Measurement of a person's blood oxygen saturation has long been recognized as a useful metric for the characterizing ailments ranging from chronic respiratory disorders to acute, potentially life threatening, traumas. The ubiquity of oxygen saturation monitors in the medical field, including portable pulse oximeters and laboratory based CO-oximeters, is a testament to the importance of this technique. The work presented here documents the design, fabrication and development of a unique type of oxygen saturation monitor, a confocal scanning retinal vessel oximeter, with the potential to expand the usefulness of the present devices. A large part of the knowledge base required to construct the instrument comes from the consideration of light scattering by red blood cells in a blood vessel. Therefore, a substantial portion of this work is devoted to the process of light scattering by whole human blood and its effects on the development of a more accurate oximeter. This light scattering effect has been both measured and modeled stochastically to determine its contribution to the measured oximeter signal. It is shown that, although well accepted in the published literature, the model only correlates marginally to the measurements due to inherent limitations imposed by the model assumptions. Nonetheless, enough material has been learned about the scattering to allow development of a mathematical model for the interaction of light with blood in a vessel, and this knowledge has been applied to the data reduction of the present oximeter. This data reduction technique has been tested in a controlled experiment employing a model eye with a blood filled mock retinal vessel. It will be shown that the presently developed technique exhibited strong correlation between the known blood oxygen saturation and that calculated by the new system.

  11. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation in healthy subjects and early branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Yan; You, Bing; Wang, Qian; Chan, Szy Yann; Jonas, Jost B.; Wei, Wen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To measure the retinal oxygen saturation in healthy subjects and early branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in Chinese population. METHODS The retinal vessel oxygen saturation of the healthy subjects and BRVO patients were measured by a noninvasive retinal oximeter (Oxymap ehf., Reykjavik, Iceland). RESULTS The study included 22 patients with unilateral BRVO (mean age: 55.1±8.8y) in the study group and 91 healthy participants (mean age: 37.5±14.0y) in the control group. In the healthy individuals, mean arterial and venous oxygen saturation were significantly (P<0.001) higher in the superior nasal quadrant (98.5%±10.1% and 57.3%±8.7%, respectively) than in the inferior nasal quadrant (94.2%±9.0% and 54.1%±9.6%, respectively), followed by the superior temporal quadrant (89.1%±10.1% and 51.9%±8.9%, respectively) and the inferior temporal quadrant (86.4%±9.4% and 46.6%±9.6%, respectively). In patients with ischemic BRVO, arterial oxymetric values were significantly higher and venous measurements significantly lower for the affected vessel (107.5%±9.7% and 46.4%±14.2%, respectively) than the unaffected vessel in the same eye (99.2%±12.2% and 55.5%±7.9%, respectively) and as compared to the vessel in the unaffected fellow eye (93.1%±6.9% and 55.7%±6.8%) (P=0.005 and P=0.02, respectively). In the patients with non-ischemic BRVO, mean venous oxygen saturation was lower in the affected vein (39.8%±12.2%) than in the unaffected vessels of the same eye (50.8%±10.5%) and in the fellow eye (58.21%±5.7%) (P=0.03). Mean arterial oxygen saturation did not differ significantly (P=0.42) between all three groups. CONCLUSION In patients with BRVO, the venous oxygen saturation in the affected vessels is decreased potentially due to decreased blood velocity and flow. Interestingly, the arterial oxygen saturation in eyes with ischemic BRVO is increased in the affected arteries. PMID:28251087

  12. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  13. A novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on matched filtering and gradient vector flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-10-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in the study and diagnosis of retinal diseases (age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy for example). Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire high-resolution retinal images with modern retinal imaging technologies, non-uniform illumination, the low contrast of thin vessels and the background noises all make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on gradient vector flow and matched filtering to segment retinal vessels with different likelihood. Firstly, we use isotropic Gaussian kernel and adaptive histogram equalization to smooth and enhance the retinal images respectively. Secondly, a multi-scale matched filtering method is adopted to extract the retinal vessels. Then, the gradient vector flow algorithm is introduced to locate the edge of the retinal vessels. Finally, we combine the results of matched filtering method and gradient vector flow algorithm to extract the vessels at different likelihood levels. The experiments demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient and the intensities of vessel images exactly represent the likelihood of the vessels.

  14. Improvement of retinal blood vessel detection by spur removal and Gaussian matched filtering compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. In this paper, we proposed approaches for improving the quality of blood vessel detection based on our initial blood vessel detection methods. A blood vessel spur pruning method has been developed for removing the blood vessel spurs both on vessel medial lines and binary vessel masks, which are caused by artifacts and side-effect of Gaussian matched vessel enhancement. A Gaussian matched filtering compensation method has been developed for removing incorrect vessel branches in the areas of low illumination. The proposed approaches were applied and tested on the color fundus images from one publicly available database and our diabetic retinopathy screening dataset. A preliminary result has demonstrated the robustness and good performance of the proposed approaches and their potential application for improving retinal blood vessel detection.

  15. Blood vessel classification into arteries and veins in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondermann, Claudia; Kondermann, Daniel; Yan, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase dramatically in coming years; already today it accounts for a major proportion of the health care budget in many countries. Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), a micro vascular complication very often seen in diabetes patients, is the most common cause of visual loss in working age population of developed countries today. Since the possibility of slowing or even stopping the progress of this disease depends on the early detection of DR, an automatic analysis of fundus images would be of great help to the ophthalmologist due to the small size of the symptoms and the large number of patients. An important symptom for DR are abnormally wide veins leading to an unusually low ratio of the average diameter of arteries to veins (AVR). There are also other diseases like high blood pressure or diseases of the pancreas with one symptom being an abnormal AVR value. To determine it, a classification of vessels as arteries or veins is indispensable. As to our knowledge despite the importance there have only been two approaches to vessel classification yet. Therefore we propose an improved method. We compare two feature extraction methods and two classification methods based on support vector machines and neural networks. Given a hand-segmentation of vessels our approach achieves 95.32% correctly classified vessel pixels. This value decreases by 10% on average, if the result of a segmentation algorithm is used as basis for the classification.

  16. Automatic identification of vessel crossovers in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L.; Barreira, N.; Penedo, M. G.; Cancela, B.

    2015-02-01

    Crossovers and bifurcations are interest points of the retinal vascular tree useful to diagnose diseases. Specifically, detecting these interest points and identifying which of them are crossings will give us the opportunity to search for arteriovenous nicking, this is, an alteration of the vessel tree where an artery is crossed by a vein and the former compresses the later. These formations are a clear indicative of hypertension, among other medical problems. There are several studies that have attempted to define an accurate and reliable method to detect and classify these relevant points. In this article, we propose a new method to identify crossovers. Our approach is based on segmenting the vascular tree and analyzing the surrounding area of each interest point. The minimal path between vessel points in this area is computed in order to identify the connected vessel segments and, as a result, to distinguish between bifurcations and crossovers. Our method was tested using retinographies from public databases DRIVE and VICAVR, obtaining an accuracy of 90%.

  17. A boosted optimal linear learner for retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, E.; Grisan, E.

    2014-03-01

    Ocular fundus images provide important information about retinal degeneration, which may be related to acute pathologies or to early signs of systemic diseases. An automatic and quantitative assessment of vessel morphological features, such as diameters and tortuosity, can improve clinical diagnosis and evaluation of retinopathy. At variance with available methods, we propose a data-driven approach, in which the system learns a set of optimal discriminative convolution kernels (linear learner). The set is progressively built based on an ADA-boost sample weighting scheme, providing seamless integration between linear learner estimation and classification. In order to capture the vessel appearance changes at different scales, the kernels are estimated on a pyramidal decomposition of the training samples. The set is employed as a rotating bank of matched filters, whose response is used by the boosted linear classifier to provide a classification of each image pixel into the two classes of interest (vessel/background). We tested the approach fundus images available from the DRIVE dataset. We show that the segmentation performance yields an accuracy of 0.94.

  18. Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy with subfoveal neurosensory detachment and congenital tortuosity of retinal vessels: case report.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Tapas Ranjan; Kesarwani, Siddharth; Jalali, Subhadra

    2011-06-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with reduction and distortion of vision in both the eyes. The best-corrected vision was 20/20 parts, N6 in either eye. The external and slit lamp examination of both the eyes was unremarkable. The fundus examination showed multiple intraretinal crystalline deposits at the posterior pole, extending up to midperiphery, tortuous retinal blood vessels with S-shaped deflections, and absent foveal reflex in both the eyes. There were no corneal crystals, and the color vision was defective in both the eyes. Fundus autofluorescence and fundus fluorescein angiogram (FFA) were suggestive of geographic areas of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choriocapillary (CC) loss. OCT revealed subfoveal neurosensory detachment. Flash ERG and EOG were normal except for a slight decrease in amplitude and delay in latency of pattern ERG waveforms. The Humphrey's visual field showed paracentral scotoma with reduction in the amplitude of waveforms from the corresponding area in the multifocal ERG in both the eyes. Systemic evaluation for crystalline retinopathy was unremarkable. He was diagnosed to be a case of Bietti crystalline retinopathy (local/regional variant). The subfoveal neurosensory detachment could represent early RPE dysfunction caused by these crystals and could account for the mild visual disturbance in both the eyes. Retinal vascular tortuosity and neurosensory detachment seen in this case is the first time to be reported in literature.

  19. [Depth of retinal vessels and electroretinogram changes in stage 3 and 4 cicatricial retinopathy of prematurity].

    PubMed

    Katargina, L A; Riabtsev, D I; Kogoleva, L V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study on retinal vessels in stage 3 and 4 cicatricial retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by means of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). The study comprised 29 children (40 eyes) aged from 6 month to 12 years with stage 3 and 4 cicatricial ROP, of which 17 children (21 eyes) under 6 and 12 children (19 eyes) over 6 years of age. SD OCT was used to approach the depth of retinal vessels and the caliber of the first-order vessels. Only in 8 eyes (20%) proper retinal vessels were located in the ganglion cell layer. In 12 eyes (30%) the vessels occurred in the nerve fiber layer and in other 20 eyes (50%) they appeared to have extraretinal growth. Thus, physiological depth of retinal vessels (i.e. in the ganglion cell layer) was seen in only 20% of cases. A relationship between the degree of retinal vascular system displacement and the presence of extraretinal tissue was established (p < 0.01). No correlation was found between gestational age and birth weight and the location of retinal vessels (p > 0.05). Location of retinal vessels can serve as a severity criterion, an important test to reveal preclinical negative changes, and a risk factor for late complications (tractional retinoschisis, detachment and tears). A tendency to smaller diameter of retinal vessels and higher artheriovenous index in children with ROP in comparison with healthy full-term children of the same age might indicate a decrease of retinal blood filling which might later cause development of retinal dystrophies.

  20. Automated detection and classification of major retinal vessels for determination of diameter ratio of arteries and veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Hatanaka, Yuji; Iwase, Tatsuhiko; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities of retinal vasculatures can indicate health conditions in the body, such as the high blood pressure and diabetes. Providing automatically determined width ratio of arteries and veins (A/V ratio) on retinal fundus images may help physicians in the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy, which may cause blindness. The purpose of this study was to detect major retinal vessels and classify them into arteries and veins for the determination of A/V ratio. Images used in this study were obtained from DRIVE database, which consists of 20 cases each for training and testing vessel detection algorithms. Starting with the reference standard of vasculature segmentation provided in the database, major arteries and veins each in the upper and lower temporal regions were manually selected for establishing the gold standard. We applied the black top-hat transformation and double-ring filter to detect retinal blood vessels. From the extracted vessels, large vessels extending from the optic disc to temporal regions were selected as target vessels for calculation of A/V ratio. Image features were extracted from the vessel segments from quarter-disc to one disc diameter from the edge of optic discs. The target segments in the training cases were classified into arteries and veins by using the linear discriminant analysis, and the selected parameters were applied to those in the test cases. Out of 40 pairs, 30 pairs (75%) of arteries and veins in the 20 test cases were correctly classified. The result can be used for the automated calculation of A/V ratio.

  1. Segmentation of retinal blood vessels using a novel clustering algorithm (RACAL) with a partial supervision strategy.

    PubMed

    Salem, Sameh A; Salem, Nancy M; Nandi, Asoke K

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, segmentation of blood vessels from colour retinal images using a novel clustering algorithm with a partial supervision strategy is proposed. The proposed clustering algorithm, which is a RAdius based Clustering ALgorithm (RACAL), uses a distance based principle to map the distributions of the data by utilising the premise that clusters are determined by a distance parameter, without having to specify the number of clusters. Additionally, the proposed clustering algorithm is enhanced with a partial supervision strategy and it is demonstrated that it is able to segment blood vessels of small diameters and low contrasts. Results are compared with those from the KNN classifier and show that the proposed RACAL performs better than the KNN in case of abnormal images as it succeeds in segmenting small and low contrast blood vessels, while it achieves comparable results for normal images. For automation process, RACAL can be used as a classifier and results show that it performs better than the KNN classifier in both normal and abnormal images.

  2. Protective Effect of Tang Wang One Decoction on the Retinal Vessels of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xinyun; Yang, Shufei; Qin, Yali; Yang, Chao; Deng, Tingting; Luo, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to determine the influence of Tang Wang One Decoction (TWOD) on the retinal vessels of diabetic rats. Methods. The hemorheology of diabetic rats was observed. Morphological studies of retinal vessels were conducted using optical microscopy and electron microscopy. Immunological histochemistry assay was used to measure the expression levels of MMP-9, occludin, and claudin-5. Results. Obvious pathological damage was observed in the retinal vessels of diabetic rats. TWOD positively affected the hemorheology and morphology of retinal vessels. The decoction also decreased the expression of MMP-9 and increased the expression of occludin and claudin-5. Conclusions. The results suggest that the retinal protective effects of TWOD might be related to downregulation of MMP-9 and upregulation of occludin and claudin-5. PMID:28367226

  3. Imaging polarimetry and retinal blood vessel quantification at the epiretinal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Cheney, Michael C.; Usui, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Takuya

    2007-05-01

    We evaluated a polarimetry method to enhance retinal blood vessels masked by the epiretinal membrane. Depolarized light images were computed by removing the polarization retaining light reaching the instrument and were compared with parallel polarized light images, average reflectance images, and the corresponding images at 514 nm. Contrasts were computed for retinal vessel profiles for arteries and veins. Contrasts were higher in the 514 nm images in normal eyes but higher in the depolarized light image in the eyes with epiretinal membranes. Depolarized light images were useful for examining the retinal vasculature in the presence of retinal disease.

  4. Learning fully-connected CRFs for blood vessel segmentation in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Orlando, José Ignacio; Blaschko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for blood vessel segmentation in fundus images based on a discriminatively trained, fully connected conditional random field model. Retinal image analysis is greatly aided by blood vessel segmentation as the vessel structure may be considered both a key source of signal, e.g. in the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy, or a nuisance, e.g. in the analysis of pigment epithelium or choroid related abnormalities. Blood vessel segmentation in fundus images has been considered extensively in the literature, but remains a challenge largely due to the desired structures being thin and elongated, a setting that performs particularly poorly using standard segmentation priors such as a Potts model or total variation. In this work, we overcome this difficulty using a discriminatively trained conditional random field model with more expressive potentials. In particular, we employ recent results enabling extremely fast inference in a fully connected model. We find that this rich but computationally efficient model family, combined with principled discriminative training based on a structured output support vector machine yields a fully automated system that achieves results statistically indistinguishable from an expert human annotator. Implementation details are available at http://pages.saclay.inria.fr/ matthew.blaschko/projects/retina/.

  5. Retinal hyperaemia-related blood vessel artifacts are relevant to automated OCT layer segmentation.

    PubMed

    Balk, L J; Mayer, M; Uitdehaag, B M J; Petzold, A

    2014-03-01

    A frequently observed local measurement artifact with spectral domain OCT is caused by the void signal of the retinal vasculature. This study investigated the effect of suppression of blood vessel artifacts with and without retinal hyperaemia. Spectral domain OCT scans, centred on the optic nerve head, were performed in 46 healthy subjects (92 eyes). Baseline scans were made during rest, while for the follow-up scan, 23 subjects (50 %) performed strenuous physical exercise. Systemic and retinal hyperaemia were quantified. Quantification of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness was performed with and without suppression of retinal blood vessel artifacts. The potential systematic effect on RNFL thickness measurements was analysed using Bland-Altman plots. At baseline (no retinal hyperaemia), there was a systematic difference in RNFL thickness (3.4 μm, limits of agreement -0.9 to 7.7) with higher values if blood vessel artifacts were not suppressed. There was significant retinal hyperaemia in the exercise group (p < 0.0001). Baseline thickness increased from 93.18 to 93.83 μm (p < 0.05) in the exercise group using the algorithm with blood vessel artifact suppression, but no significant changes were observed using the algorithm without blood vessel artifact suppression. Retinal hyperaemia leads to blood vessel artifacts which are relevant to the precision of OCT layer segmentation algorithms. The two algorithms investigated in this study can not be used interchangeably. The algorithm with blood vessel artifact suppression was more sensitive in detecting small changes in RNFL thickness. This may be relevant for the use of OCT in a range of neurodegenerative diseases were only a small degree of retinal layer atrophy have been found so far.

  6. Measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels with adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-11-01

    We have used an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope to assess oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels. Images of the vessels with a diameter smaller than 50 μm are recorded at oxygen sensitive and isosbestic wavelengths (680 and 796 nm, respectively). The vessel optical densities (ODs) are determined by a computer algorithm. Then, OD ratios (ODRs), which are inversely proportional to oxygen saturation, are calculated. The results show that arterial ODRs are significantly smaller than venous ODRs, indicating that oxygen saturation in the artery is higher than that in the vein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first noninvasive measurement of oxygen saturation in small retinal vessels.

  7. Retinal vessel extraction by matched filter with first-order derivative of Gaussian.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bob; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Karray, Fakhri

    2010-04-01

    Accurate extraction of retinal blood vessels is an important task in computer aided diagnosis of retinopathy. The matched filter (MF) is a simple yet effective method for vessel extraction. However, a MF will respond not only to vessels but also to non-vessel edges. This will lead to frequent false vessel detection. In this paper we propose a novel extension of the MF approach, namely the MF-FDOG, to detect retinal blood vessels. The proposed MF-FDOG is composed of the original MF, which is a zero-mean Gaussian function, and the first-order derivative of Gaussian (FDOG). The vessels are detected by thresholding the retinal image's response to the MF, while the threshold is adjusted by the image's response to the FDOG. The proposed MF-FDOG method is very simple; however, it reduces significantly the false detections produced by the original MF and detects many fine vessels that are missed by the MF. It achieves competitive vessel detection results as compared with those state-of-the-art schemes but with much lower complexity. In addition, it performs well at extracting vessels from pathological retinal images.

  8. A mutagenesis-derived Lrp5 mouse mutant with abnormal retinal vasculature and low bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Jeremy R.; Earp, Sarah E.; Bell, Brent A.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Godfrey, Dana A.; Rao, Sujata; Anand-Apte, Bela; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is caused by mutations in the genes encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP5) or its interacting partners, namely frizzled class receptor 4 (FZD4) and norrin cystine knot growth factor (NDP). Mouse models for Lrp5, Fzd4, and Ndp have proven to be important for understanding the retinal pathophysiology underlying FEVR and systemic abnormalities related to defective Wnt signaling. Here, we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm111B, which was identified by electroretinogram (ERG) screening of mice generated in the Jackson Laboratory Translational Vision Research Models (TVRM) mutagenesis program. Methods ERGs were used to examine outer retinal physiology. The retinal vasculature was examined by in vivo retinal imaging, as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. The tvrm111B locus was identified by genetic mapping of mice generated in a cross to DBA/2J, and subsequent sequencing analysis. Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR of retinal RNA. Bone mineral density (BMD) was examined by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The tvrm111B allele is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Genetic mapping of the decreased ERG b-wave phenotype of tvrm111B mice localized the mutation to a region on chromosome 19 that included Lrp5. Sequencing of Lrp5 identified the insertion of a cytosine (c.4724_4725insC), which is predicted to cause a frameshift that disrupts the last three of five conserved PPPSPxS motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of LRP5, culminating in a premature termination. In addition to a reduced ERG b-wave, Lrp5tvrm111B homozygotes have low BMD and abnormal features of the retinal vasculature that have been reported previously in Lrp5 mutant mice, including persistent hyaloid vessels, leakage on fluorescein angiography, and an absence of the deep retinal capillary bed. Conclusions The phenotype of the Lrp5tvrm111B mutant includes abnormalities of the retinal

  9. Retinal vessel segmentation in colour fundus images using Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhang; Zou, Beiji; Zhao, Rongchang; Cui, Jinkai; Duan, Xuanchu; Chen, Zailiang; Liang, Yixiong

    2017-01-01

    Attributes of the retinal vessel play important role in systemic conditions and ophthalmic diagnosis. In this paper, a supervised method based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is proposed to segment retinal vessel. Firstly, a set of 39-D discriminative feature vectors, consisting of local features, morphological features, phase congruency, Hessian and divergence of vector fields, is extracted for each pixel of the fundus image. Then a matrix is constructed for pixel of the training set based on the feature vector and the manual labels, and acts as the input of the ELM classifier. The output of classifier is the binary retinal vascular segmentation. Finally, an optimization processing is implemented to remove the region less than 30 pixels which is isolated from the retinal vascilar. The experimental results testing on the public Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction (DRIVE) database demonstrate that the proposed method is much faster than the other methods in segmenting the retinal vessels. Meanwhile the average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity are 0.9607, 0.7140 and 0.9868, respectively. Moreover the proposed method exhibits high speed and robustness on a new Retinal Images for Screening (RIS) database. Therefore it has potential applications for real-time computer-aided diagnosis and disease screening.

  10. An ensemble classification-based approach applied to retinal blood vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Fraz, Muhammad Moazam; Remagnino, Paolo; Hoppe, Andreas; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Owen, Christopher G; Barman, Sarah A

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a new supervised method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal photographs. This method uses an ensemble system of bagged and boosted decision trees and utilizes a feature vector based on the orientation analysis of gradient vector field, morphological transformation, line strength measures, and Gabor filter responses. The feature vector encodes information to handle the healthy as well as the pathological retinal image. The method is evaluated on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE databases, frequently used for this purpose and also on a new public retinal vessel reference dataset CHASE_DB1 which is a subset of retinal images of multiethnic children from the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE) dataset. The performance of the ensemble system is evaluated in detail and the incurred accuracy, speed, robustness, and simplicity make the algorithm a suitable tool for automated retinal image analysis.

  11. Ray tracing model for the estimation of power spectral properties in laser Doppler velocimetry of retinal vessels and its potential application to retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrig, Benno L.; Follonier, Lysianne

    2005-12-01

    A new model based on ray tracing was developed to estimate power spectral properties in laser Doppler velocimetry of retinal vessels and to predict the effects of laser beam size and eccentricity as well as absorption of laser light by oxygenated and reduced hemoglobin. We describe the model and show that it correctly converges to the traditional rectangular shape of the Doppler shift power spectrum, given the same assumptions, and that reduced beam size and eccentric alignment cause marked alterations in this shape. The changes in the detected total power of the Doppler-shifted light due to light scattering and absorption by blood can also be quantified with this model and may be used to determine the oxygen saturation in retinal arteries and veins. The potential of this approach is that it uses direct measurements of Doppler signals originating from moving red blood cells. This may open new avenues for retinal vessel oximetry.

  12. Automated characterization of blood vessels as arteries and veins in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Mirsharif, Qazaleh; Tajeripour, Farshad; Pourreza, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    In recent years researchers have found that alternations in arterial or venular tree of the retinal vasculature are associated with several public health problems such as diabetic retinopathy which is also the leading cause of blindness in the world. A prerequisite for automated assessment of subtle changes in arteries and veins, is to accurately separate those vessels from each other. This is a difficult task due to high similarity between arteries and veins in addition to variation of color and non-uniform illumination inter and intra retinal images. In this paper a novel structural and automated method is presented for artery/vein classification of blood vessels in retinal images. The proposed method consists of three main steps. In the first step, several image enhancement techniques are employed to improve the images. Then a specific feature extraction process is applied to separate major arteries from veins. Indeed, vessels are divided to smaller segments and feature extraction and vessel classification are applied to each small vessel segment instead of each vessel point. Finally, a post processing step is added to improve the results obtained from the previous step using structural characteristics of the retinal vascular network. In the last stage, vessel features at intersection and bifurcation points are processed for detection of arterial and venular sub trees. Ultimately vessel labels are revised by publishing the dominant label through each identified connected tree of arteries or veins. Evaluation of the proposed approach against two different datasets of retinal images including DRIVE database demonstrates the good performance and robustness of the method. The proposed method may be used for determination of arteriolar to venular diameter ratio in retinal images. Also the proposed method potentially allows for further investigation of labels of thinner arteries and veins which might be found by tracing them back to the major vessels.

  13. Automated method for the identification and analysis of vascular tree structures in retinal vessel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak S.; Garvin, Mona K.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2011-03-01

    Structural analysis of retinal vessel network has so far served in the diagnosis of retinopathies and systemic diseases. The retinopathies are known to affect the morphologic properties of retinal vessels such as course, shape, caliber, and tortuosity. Whether the arteries and the veins respond to these changes together or in tandem has always been a topic of discussion. However the diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity have been diagnosed with the morphologic changes specific either to arteries or to veins. Thus a method describing the separation of retinal vessel trees imaged in a two dimensional color fundus image may assist in artery-vein classification and quantitative assessment of morphologic changes particular to arteries or veins. We propose a method based on mathematical morphology and graph search to identify and label the retinal vessel trees, which provides a structural mapping of vessel network in terms of each individual primary vessel, its branches and spatial positions of branching and cross-over points. The method was evaluated on a dataset of 15 fundus images resulting into an accuracy of 92.87 % correctly assigned vessel pixels when compared with the manual labeling of separated vessel trees. Accordingly, the structural mapping method performs well and we are currently investigating its potential in evaluating the characteristic properties specific to arteries or veins.

  14. Automatic Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images for Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Siva Sundhara Raja, D.; Vasuki, S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. DR is mainly caused due to the damage of retinal blood vessels in the diabetic patients. It is essential to detect and segment the retinal blood vessels for DR detection and diagnosis, which prevents earlier vision loss in diabetic patients. The computer aided automatic detection and segmentation of blood vessels through the elimination of optic disc (OD) region in retina are proposed in this paper. The OD region is segmented using anisotropic diffusion filter and subsequentially the retinal blood vessels are detected using mathematical binary morphological operations. The proposed methodology is tested on two different publicly available datasets and achieved 93.99% sensitivity, 98.37% specificity, 98.08% accuracy in DRIVE dataset and 93.6% sensitivity, 98.96% specificity, and 95.94% accuracy in STARE dataset, respectively. PMID:25810749

  15. Automatic detection of blood vessels in retinal images for diabetic retinopathy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Raja, D Siva Sundhara; Vasuki, S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. DR is mainly caused due to the damage of retinal blood vessels in the diabetic patients. It is essential to detect and segment the retinal blood vessels for DR detection and diagnosis, which prevents earlier vision loss in diabetic patients. The computer aided automatic detection and segmentation of blood vessels through the elimination of optic disc (OD) region in retina are proposed in this paper. The OD region is segmented using anisotropic diffusion filter and subsequentially the retinal blood vessels are detected using mathematical binary morphological operations. The proposed methodology is tested on two different publicly available datasets and achieved 93.99% sensitivity, 98.37% specificity, 98.08% accuracy in DRIVE dataset and 93.6% sensitivity, 98.96% specificity, and 95.94% accuracy in STARE dataset, respectively.

  16. Retinal vessel extraction by means of motion contrast, matched filter and combined corner-edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2014-05-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in understanding of the retinal function and diagnosis of many diseases. Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire diffraction-limited resolution retinal images at microscopic cellular level, noises and other structures still make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, a new vessel extraction method is introduced. First, we use motion contrast method to trace the motion of the blood components and get the main vessel contour. Second, an improved matched filter method is applied to extract the vessel contour while the single-side edges are eliminated. Then, the combined corner/edge detector is adopted to eliminate the elongated fragments caused by the motion artifacts. Finally, we use mathematical morphology method to dilate the edges of vessels acquired in last step and obtain the exact contour of the vessels. The contrast of the vessels is significantly enhanced and the noises as well as other structures are effectively eliminated.

  17. An improved retinal vessel segmentation method based on high level features for pathological images.

    PubMed

    Ganjee, Razieh; Azmi, Reza; Gholizadeh, Behrouz

    2014-09-01

    Most of the retinal blood vessel segmentation approaches use low level features, resulting in segmenting non-vessel structures together with vessel structures in pathological retinal images. In this paper, a new segmentation method based on high level features is proposed which can process the structure of vessel and non-vessel independently. In this method, segmentation is done in two steps. First, using low level features segmentation is accomplished. Second, using high level features, the non-vessel components are removed. For evaluation, STARE database is used which is publicly available in this field. The results show that the proposed method has 0.9536 accuracy and 0.0191 false positive average on all images of the database and 0.9542 accuracy and 0.0236 false positive average on pathological images. Therefore, the proposed approach shows acceptable accuracy on all images compared to other state of the art methods, and the least false positive average on pathological images.

  18. Inner retinal abnormalities in a mouse model of Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Vincenzo; Cepko, Constance Louise; Strettoi, Enrica

    2004-02-09

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe form in the world of genetic retinal dystrophy causing blindness. An animal model of LCA was recently created in which the cone-rod homeobox (crx) gene was disrupted using homologous recombination. Crx-/- mice display abnormal development of photoreceptors followed by their degeneration. We analyzed the morphology of inner retinal cells in crx-/- mice in order to evaluate the effects of abnormal photoreceptor development and death upon other retinal neurons. The identification of a time window during which inner retinal cells are still viable could be very important in view of the possibilities that photoreceptor transplantation or gene therapy might be used to restore vision in LCA. We used a combination of immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy techniques to screen the crx-/- inner retina and verify its morphological integrity after photoreceptor degeneration. We found significant morphological alterations in second-order neurons in crx-/- animals. The appearance of mutant retinas after photoreceptor death is indistinguishable from that of the retinal degeneration (rd/rd) mouse, a different genetic model of a retinal disease characterized by photoreceptor degeneration. However, at early stages of photoreceptor degeneration the morphology of retinal cells in the crx-/- mutant is considerably well preserved. It is likely that different genetic mechanisms that cause abnormal photoreceptor development and/or degeneration lead to a common pathway that determines second-order neuron modifications. The severity of modifications is linked to the timing of onset of the degeneration and appears to increase with time.

  19. Dual-wavelength retinal image registration based on vessel segmentation and optic disc detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yong-li; Dai, Yun; Gao, Chun-ming; Du, Rui

    2016-09-01

    The dual-wavelength retinal image registration is one of the critical steps in the spectrophotometric measurements of oxygen saturation in the retinal vasculature. The dual-wavelength images (570 nm and 600 nm) are simultaneously captured by dual-wavelength retinal oximeter based on commercial fundus camera. The retinal oxygen saturation is finally measured after vessel segmentation, image registration and calculation of optical density ratio of the two images. Because the dual-wavelength images are acquired from different optical path, it is necessary to go through image registration before they are used to analyze the oxygen saturation. This paper presents a new approach to dual-wavelength retinal image registration based on vessel segmentation and optic disc detection. Firstly, the multi-scale segmentation algorithm based on the Hessian matrix is used to realize vessel segmentation. Secondly, after optic disc is detected by convergence index filter and the center of the optic disc is obtained by centriod algorithm, the translational difference between the images can be determined. The center of the optic disc is used as the center of rotation, and the registration based on mutual information can be achieved using contour and gray information of vessels through segmented image. So the rotational difference between the images can be determined too. The result shows that the algorithm can provide an accurate registration for the dual-wavelength retinal image.

  20. Outer retinal abnormalities associated with inner retinal pathology in nonglaucomatous and glaucomatous optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Werner, J S; Keltner, J L; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S

    2011-01-01

    Inner and outer retinal morphology were quantified in vivo for 6 nonglaucomatous and 10 glaucomatous optic neuropathy patients. Custom, ultrahigh-resolution imaging modalities were used to evaluate segmented retinal layer thickness in 3D volumes (Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography), cone photoreceptor density (adaptive optics fundus camera), and the length of inner and outer segments of cone photoreceptors (adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography). Quantitative comparisons were made with age-matched controls, or by comparing affected and nonaffected retinal areas defined by changes in visual fields. The integrity of outer retinal layers on optical coherence tomography B-scans and density of cone photoreceptors were correlated with visual field sensitivity at corresponding retinal locations following reductions in inner retinal thickness. The photoreceptor outer segments were shorter and exhibited greater variability in retinal areas associated with visual field losses compared with normal or less affected areas of the same patient's visual field. These results demonstrate that nonglaucomatous and glaucomatous optic neuropathies are associated with outer retinal changes following long-term inner retinal pathology. PMID:21293495

  1. Evaluation of Retinal Vessel Morphology in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hidding, Ute; Keserü, Matthias; Keserü, Diana; Hassenstein, Andrea; Stemplewitz, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The retina has been found affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is unclear if this is due to neurodegeneration of local dopamine-dependent retinal cells, a result of central nervous degeneration including the optic nerve or retinal small vessel disease. This study aimed to detect changes of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Methods We examined 49 PD patients and 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with a circular scan centred at the optic disc. Vessels within the retinal nerve fibre layer were identified by an automated algorithm and thereafter manually labelled as artery or vein. Layer segmentation, vessel lumen and direct surrounding tissue were marked automatically with a grey value and the contrast between both values in relation to the surrounding tissue was calculated. The differences in these grey value ratios among subjects were determined and used as an indicator for differences in vessel morphology. Furthermore, the diameters of the veins and arteries were measured and then compared between the groups. Results The contrast of retinal veins was significantly lower in PD patients compared to controls, which indicates changes in vessel morphology in PD. The contrast of arteries was not significantly different. Disease duration, disease stage according to Hoehn and Yahr or age did not influence the grey value ratios in PD patients. Vessel diameter in either veins or arteries did not differ between subject groups. The contrast of retinal veins contralateral to the clinically predominant and first affected side was significantly lower compared to the ipsilateral side. Conclusion Our data show a potential difference of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Vascular changes in the retina of PD patients might contribute to vision-related complaints in PD. PMID:27525728

  2. A new seeded region growing technique for retinal blood vessels extraction.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Atefeh Sadat; Sabzpoushan, Seyed Hojat

    2014-07-01

    Distribution of retinal blood vessels (RBVs) in retinal images has an important role in the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart disease. Therefore, detection of the exact location of RBVs is very important for Ophthalmologists. One of the frequently used techniques for extraction of these vessels is region growing-based Segmentation. In this paper, we propose a new region growing (RG) technique for RBVs extraction, called cellular automata-based segmentation. RG techniques often require manually seed point selection, that is, human intervention. However, due to the complex structure of vessels in retinal images, manual tracking of them is very difficult. Therefore, to make our proposed technique full automatic, we use an automatic seed point selection method. The proposed RG technique was tested on Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction database for three different initial seed sets and evaluated against the manual segmentation of retinal images available at this database. Three quantitative criteria including accuracy, true positive rate and false positive rate, were considered to evaluate this method. The visual scrutiny of the segmentation results and the quantitative criteria show that, using cellular automata for extracting the blood vessels is promising. However, the important point at here is that the correct initial seeds have an effective role on the final results of segmentation.

  3. Fpga based hardware synthesis for automatic segmentation of retinal blood vessels in diabetic retinopathy images.

    PubMed

    Sivakamasundari, J; Kavitha, G; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a disorder that affects the structure of retinal blood vessels due to long-standing diabetes mellitus. Real-Time mass screening system for DR is vital for timely diagnosis and periodic screening to prevent the patient from severe visual loss. Human retinal fundus images are widely used for an automated segmentation of blood vessel and diagnosis of various blood vessel disorders. In this work, an attempt has been made to perform hardware synthesis of Kirsch template based edge detection for segmentation of blood vessels. This method is implemented using LabVIEW software and is synthesized in field programmable gate array board to yield results in real-time application. The segmentation of blood vessels using Kirsch based edge detection is compared with other edge detection methods such as Sobel, Prewitt and Canny. The texture features such as energy, entropy, contrast, mean, homogeneity and structural feature namely ratio of vessel to vessel free area are obtained from the segmented images. The performance of segmentation is analysed in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. It is observed from the results that the Kirsch based edge detection technique segmented the edges of blood vessels better than other edge detection techniques. The ratio of vessel to vessel free area classified the normal and DR affected retinal images more significantly than other texture based features. FPGA based hardware synthesis of Kirsch edge detection method is able to differentiate normal and diseased images with high specificity (93%). This automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels system could be used in computer-assisted diagnosis for diabetic retinopathy screening in real-time application.

  4. Abnormalities in glutamate metabolism and excitotoxicity in the retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In the physiological condition, glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive glutamate can be toxic to retinal neurons by overstimulation of the glutamate receptors. Glutamate excess is primarily attributed to perturbation in the homeostasis of the glutamate metabolism. Major pathway of glutamate metabolism consists of glutamate uptake by glutamate transporters followed by enzymatic conversion of glutamate to nontoxic glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Glutamate metabolism requires energy supply, and the energy loss inhibits the functions of both glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase. In this review, we describe the present knowledge concerning the retinal glutamate metabolism under the physiological and pathological conditions.

  5. Retinal vessel segmentation: an efficient graph cut approach with retinex and local phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yitian; Liu, Yonghuai; Wu, Xiangqian; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Our application concerns the automated detection of vessels in retinal images to improve understanding of the disease mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of retinal and a number of systemic diseases. We propose a new framework for segmenting retinal vasculatures with much improved accuracy and efficiency. The proposed framework consists of three technical components: Retinex-based image inhomogeneity correction, local phase-based vessel enhancement and graph cut-based active contour segmentation. These procedures are applied in the following order. Underpinned by the Retinex theory, the inhomogeneity correction step aims to address challenges presented by the image intensity inhomogeneities, and the relatively low contrast of thin vessels compared to the background. The local phase enhancement technique is employed to enhance vessels for its superiority in preserving the vessel edges. The graph cut-based active contour method is used for its efficiency and effectiveness in segmenting the vessels from the enhanced images using the local phase filter. We have demonstrated its performance by applying it to four public retinal image datasets (3 datasets of color fundus photography and 1 of fluorescein angiography). Statistical analysis demonstrates that each component of the framework can provide the level of performance expected. The proposed framework is compared with widely used unsupervised and supervised methods, showing that the overall framework outperforms its competitors. For example, the achieved sensitivity (0:744), specificity (0:978) and accuracy (0:953) for the DRIVE dataset are very close to those of the manual annotations obtained by the second observer.

  6. An approach to localize the retinal blood vessels using bit planes and centerline detection.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Barman, S A; Remagnino, P; Hoppe, A; Basit, A; Uyyanonvara, B; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G

    2012-11-01

    The change in morphology, diameter, branching pattern or tortuosity of retinal blood vessels is an important indicator of various clinical disorders of the eye and the body. This paper reports an automated method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images. A unique combination of techniques for vessel centerlines detection and morphological bit plane slicing is presented to extract the blood vessel tree from the retinal images. The centerlines are extracted by using the first order derivative of a Gaussian filter in four orientations and then evaluation of derivative signs and average derivative values is performed. Mathematical morphology has emerged as a proficient technique for quantifying the blood vessels in the retina. The shape and orientation map of blood vessels is obtained by applying a multidirectional morphological top-hat operator with a linear structuring element followed by bit plane slicing of the vessel enhanced grayscale image. The centerlines are combined with these maps to obtain the segmented vessel tree. The methodology is tested on three publicly available databases DRIVE, STARE and MESSIDOR. The results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is comparable with state of the art techniques in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Real-Time Retinal Vessel Mapping and Localization for Intraocular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Brian C; Riviere, Cameron N

    2013-01-01

    Computer-aided intraocular surgery requires precise, real-time knowledge of the vasculature during retinal procedures such as laser photocoagulation or vessel cannulation. Because vitreoretinal surgeons manipulate retinal structures on the back of the eye through ports in the sclera, voluntary and involuntary tool motion rotates the eye in the socket and causes movement to the microscope view of the retina. The dynamic nature of the surgical workspace during intraocular surgery makes mapping, tracking, and localizing vasculature in real time a challenge. We present an approach that both maps and localizes retinal vessels by temporally fusing and registering individual-frame vessel detections. On video of porcine and human retina, we demonstrate real-time performance, rapid convergence, and robustness to variable illumination and tool occlusion.

  8. Comparison of Common Retinal Vessel Caliber Measurement Software and a Conversion Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yip, WanFen; Tham, Yih Chung; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong Li; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheung, Carol Yim-lui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare three commonly used retinal vessel caliber measurement software systems, and propose an algorithm for conversion between measurement systems. Methods We used 120 retinal photographs to evaluate the agreement between three commonly used software (Retinal Analysis [RA], Integrative Vessel Analysis [IVAN], and Singapore I Vessel Assessment [SIVA]). Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate agreement of retinal arteriolar (central retinal artery equivalent, CRAE) and venular (central retinal vein equivalent, CRVE) calibers. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the associations between systemic factors and retinal vessel calibers, and Z-test was used to compare the strength of the correlation coefficients across the three software systems. An algorithm was created to convert measurements, with paired t-test performed to evaluate the differences between SIVA-measured retinal calibers and SIVA-approximates converted from RA- and IVAN-measurements using the algorithm. Results Differences between SIVA- and RA-measured calibers (CRAE: mean difference [MD] = −21.8 μm, 95% limits of agreement [LOA], −47.3 to 3.7 μm; CRVE: MD = −7.7 μm, 95% LOA, −28.0 to 12.6 μm), SIVA- and IVAN-measured calibers (CRAE: MD = −6.7 μm, 95% LOA, −23.8 to 10.4 μm; CRVE: MD = −18.2 μm 95% LOA, −36.7 to 0.4 μm) were large. However, the strength of correlations between systemic factors with SIVA-measured retinal calibers was not significantly different to that measured using RA and IVAN (P ≥ 0.332). SIVA-approximates converted from RA and IVAN measurements using the proposed algorithm was not significantly different from SIVA-measured calibers (P ≥ 0.20). Conclusion Absolute measurements of retinal vessel calibers vary between three common software systems but associations with systemic factors were similar. Translational Relevance The proposed algorithm allowed conversions of RA and IVAN measurements to SIVA-approximates. This conversion is important

  9. Progressive Retinal Structure Abnormalities in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Santiesteban, Carlos E.; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Martinez, Jose; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Hedges, Thomas R.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Objective measures of disease progression that can be used as end-points in clinical trials of multiple system atrophy are necessary. We studied retinal thickness in patients with multiple system atrophy, and assessed changes over time to determine its usefulness as imaging biomarker of disease progression. Methods Cross sectional study including 24 patients with multiple system atrophy, 20 patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and 35 controls; followed by a longitudinal study of 13 multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients. Patients were evaluated with high definition-optical coherence tomography and the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at consecutive follow-up visits for up to 26 months. Results MSA subjects had normal visual acuity and color discrimination. Compared to controls, retinal nerve fiber layer (p=0.008 and p=0.001) and ganglion cell complex (p=0.013 and p=0.001) thicknesses were reduced in multiple system atrophy and in PD. No significant differences between MSA and PD were found. Over time, in patients with MSA, there was a significant reduction of the retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thicknesses, with estimated annual average losses of 3.7 μm and 1.8 μm respectively. Conclusions Visually asymptomatic MSA patients exhibit progressive reductions in the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer and, to a lesser extent, in the macular ganglion cell complex, which can be quantified by high-definition optical coherence tomography. Specific patterns of retinal nerve fiber damage could be a useful imaging biomarker of disease progression in future clinical trials. PMID:26359930

  10. An efficient algorithm for retinal blood vessel segmentation using h-maxima transform and multilevel thresholding.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Marwan D; Eswaran, C

    2012-01-01

    Retinal blood vessel detection and analysis play vital roles in early diagnosis and prevention of several diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. This paper presents an automated algorithm for retinal blood vessel segmentation. The proposed algorithm takes advantage of powerful image processing techniques such as contrast enhancement, filtration and thresholding for more efficient segmentation. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, experiments were conducted on 40 images collected from DRIVE database. The results show that the proposed algorithm yields an accuracy rate of 96.5%, which is higher than the results achieved by other known algorithms.

  11. Late Postoperative Evaluation of Retinal and Choroidal Thickness and Retinal Vessel Caliber after Surgical Repair of Corneal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Pekel, Gökhan; Acer, Semra; Cesur, Nihal; Yağcı, Ramazan; Nevin Çetin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the late period retinal and choroidal alterations in the posterior pole of eyes that underwent primary suturing due to traumatic corneal perforation. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional case series included 21 eyes of 21 patients. The fellow eyes served as the control group. Macular thickness, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements were performed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results: The mean RNFL thickness was 102.1±10.9 µm in the perforated eyes and 99.5±8.5 µm in the fellow eyes (p=0.29). The mean central macular thickness was 300.1±25.6 µm in the perforated eyes and 295.6±23.2 µm in the fellow eyes (p=0.62). The choroidal thickness and retinal vascular caliber measurements were also similar between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Operated traumatic corneal perforations do not cause significant posterior pole retinal and choroidal SD-OCT thickness changes in the late postoperative period. PMID:27800241

  12. Minimizing the influence of fundus pigmentation on retinal vessel oximetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Lompado, Arthur; Woodruff, Jacob B.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2001-06-01

    The goal of making calibrated oxygen saturation measurements of blood in retinal arteries and veins via a noninvasive spectroscopic technique has nearly been realized. Semi-continuous advancement in the field of retinal vessel oximetry over the last three decades has resulted in several technologies that seem poised for commercialization. In this paper, we present our instrumentation and technique for making well-calibrated saturation measurements of the blood in retinal vessels. The Eye Oximeter (EOX) is a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope capable of acquiring multi-spectral images. Analysis of these spectral vessel images allows spectroscopic determination of the oxygen saturation of blood within each vessel. The primary emphasis of this paper is to illustrate the effect of fundus pigmentation on these oximetric measurements. We show that decreasing fundus reflectivity is mathematically similar to decreasing the vessel thickness. The apparent decreased vessel thickness is a direct consequence of scattering by red blood cells. We present in vitro and in vivo measurements that demonstrate an instrument calibration that is nearly independent of vessel diameter and fundus reflectivity.

  13. Retinal vessels caliber changes after strabismus surgery: results of 6mo follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-Peng; Fu, Jing; Zhou, Jin-Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Zhen; Wang, Wen-Ying; Liu, Ning-Pu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of strabismus surgery on retinal vessels calibers with digital color fundus photographs. METHODS Two hundred consecutive strabismus patients underwent surgery, and 118 patients (female/male, 55/63) who finished 6-month follow-up were finally included in this study. Optic disc-centered digital color fundus photographs of both eyes of all patients were taken prior to surgery and 6mo post surgery. The retinal vascular caliber of 116 operated eyes were measured using the computer program IVAN. The operated eyes were divided into 3 groups according to the surgical methods, recession of one muscle, one muscle recession and one muscle folding, one muscle resection and one muscle recession. The effect of number of altered muscles on retinal vessels was analyzed using statistic software SPSS 16.0. RESULTS The mean age was 12.4±8.6y. Averaged central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE) of all patients was 120.31±23.02 µm preoperatively, and 122.87±15.93 µm six months after surgery. Averaged central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE) was 171.11±31.73 µm preoperatively and 175.02±21.00 µm postoperatively. There was no significant difference of averaged CRAE (P=0.22) or CRVE (P=0.19) before and after operation. Averaged arteriole to venule ratio (AVR) was 0.71±0.07 before surgery and 0.70±0.07 after surgery. Comparison of preoperative and postoperative retinal vessels calibers among different surgical groups did not show significant differences. Also, there was no advantage of rectus muscle folding to muscle resection. CONCLUSION Up to 6mo after strabismus surgery, the retinal vascular calibers were not altered. No more than two muscles in one surgery are safe for retinal perfusion. PMID:27672600

  14. Fast Retinal Vessel Detection and Measurement Using Wavelets and Edge Location Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Bankhead, Peter; Scholfield, C. Norman

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between changes in retinal vessel morphology and the onset and progression of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been the subject of several large scale clinical studies. However, the difficulty of quantifying changes in retinal vessels in a sufficiently fast, accurate and repeatable manner has restricted the application of the insights gleaned from these studies to clinical practice. This paper presents a novel algorithm for the efficient detection and measurement of retinal vessels, which is general enough that it can be applied to both low and high resolution fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms upon the adjustment of only a few intuitive parameters. Firstly, we describe the simple vessel segmentation strategy, formulated in the language of wavelets, that is used for fast vessel detection. When validated using a publicly available database of retinal images, this segmentation achieves a true positive rate of 70.27%, false positive rate of 2.83%, and accuracy score of 0.9371. Vessel edges are then more precisely localised using image profiles computed perpendicularly across a spline fit of each detected vessel centreline, so that both local and global changes in vessel diameter can be readily quantified. Using a second image database, we show that the diameters output by our algorithm display good agreement with the manual measurements made by three independent observers. We conclude that the improved speed and generality offered by our algorithm are achieved without sacrificing accuracy. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB along with a graphical user interface, and we have made the source code freely available. PMID:22427837

  15. Automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Pilch, Matthäus; Wenner, Yaroslava; Strohmayr, Elisabeth; Preising, Markus; Friedburg, Christoph; Meyer Zu Bexten, Erdmuthe; Lorenz, Birgit; Stieger, Knut

    2012-07-01

    The correct segmentation of blood vessels in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images may be an important requirement for the analysis of intra-retinal layer thickness in human retinal diseases. We developed a shape model based procedure for the automatic segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral domain (SD)-OCT scans acquired with the Spectralis OCT system. The segmentation procedure is based on a statistical shape model that has been created through manual segmentation of vessels in a training phase. The actual segmentation procedure is performed after the approximate vessel position has been defined by a shadowgraph that assigns the lateral vessel positions. The active shape model method is subsequently used to segment blood vessel contours in axial direction. The automated segmentation results were validated against the manual segmentation of the same vessels by three expert readers. Manual and automated segmentations of 168 blood vessels from 34 B-scans were analyzed with respect to the deviations in the mean Euclidean distance and surface area. The mean Euclidean distance between the automatically and manually segmented contours (on average 4.0 pixels respectively 20 µm against all three experts) was within the range of the manually marked contours among the three readers (approximately 3.8 pixels respectively 18 µm for all experts). The area deviations between the automated and manual segmentation also lie within the range of the area deviations among the 3 clinical experts. Intra reader variability for the experts was between 0.9 and 0.94. We conclude that the automated segmentation approach is able to segment blood vessels with comparable accuracy as expert readers and will provide a useful tool in vessel analysis of whole C-scans, and in particular in multicenter trials.

  16. Retinal oximetry measures systemic hypoxia in central nervous system vessels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bragason, David; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Vacchiano, Charles; Gislason, Thorarinn; Kristjansdottir, Jona Valgerdur; Kristjansdottir, Gudrun; Stefánsson, Einar

    2017-01-01

    Background Determination of the blood oxyhemoglobin saturation in the retinal vessels of the eye can be achieved through spectrophotometric retinal oximetry which provides access to the state of oxyhemoglobin saturation in the central nervous system circulation. The purpose of this study was to test the capability of the Oxymap T1 oximeter to detect systemic hypoxemia and the effect of supplemental oxygen on retinal vessel oxyhemoglobin saturation. Methods Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in retinal arterioles and venules was measured in 11 subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on long term oxygen therapy. Measurements were made with and without their daily supplemental oxygen. Eleven healthy age and gender matched subjects were measured during ambient air breathing for comparison of oxyhemoglobin saturation in retinal arterioles and venules. Retinal arteriolar oxyhemoglobin saturation in COPD subjects inspiring ambient air was compared with finger pulse oximetry and blood samples from radial artery. Results COPD subjects had significantly lower oxyhemoglobin saturation during ambient air breathing than healthy controls in both retinal arterioles (87.2%±4.9% vs. 93.4%±4.3%, p = 0.02; n = 11) and venules (45.0%±10.3% vs. 55.2%±5.5%, p = 0.01). Administration of their prescribed supplemental oxygen increased oxyhemoglobin saturation in retinal arterioles (87.2%±4.9% to 89.5%±6.0%, p = 0.02) but not in venules (45.0%±10.3% to 46.7%±12.8%, p = 0.3). Retinal oximetry values were slightly lower than radial artery blood values (mean percentage points difference = -5.0±5.4, 95% CI: -15.68 to 5.67) and finger pulse oximetry values (-3.1±5.5, 95% CI: -14.05 to 7.84). Conclusions The noninvasive Oxymap T1 retinal oximetry detects hypoxemia in central nervous system vessels in patients with severe COPD compared with healthy controls. The instrument is sensitive to changes in oxygen breathing but displays slightly lower measures than finger

  17. Adaptive thresholding technique for retinal vessel segmentation based on GLCM-energy information.

    PubMed

    Mapayi, Temitope; Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Although retinal vessel segmentation has been extensively researched, a robust and time efficient segmentation method is highly needed. This paper presents a local adaptive thresholding technique based on gray level cooccurrence matrix- (GLCM-) energy information for retinal vessel segmentation. Different thresholds were computed using GLCM-energy information. An experimental evaluation on DRIVE database using the grayscale intensity and Green Channel of the retinal image demonstrates the high performance of the proposed local adaptive thresholding technique. The maximum average accuracy rates of 0.9511 and 0.9510 with maximum average sensitivity rates of 0.7650 and 0.7641 were achieved on DRIVE and STARE databases, respectively. When compared to the widely previously used techniques on the databases, the proposed adaptive thresholding technique is time efficient with a higher average sensitivity and average accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity.

  18. Application of a modified regularization procedure for estimating oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Isa; Ansari, Rashid; Samil Yetik, I.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorescence lifetime measurement based on a frequency domain approach is used to estimate oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels. The classical least squares (LS) estimation was initially used to determine oxygen tension indirectly from intermediate variables. A spatial regularized least squares (RLS) method was later proposed to reduce the high variance of oxygen tension estimated by LS method. In this paper, we provide a solution using a modified RLS (MRLS) approach that utilizes prior knowledge about retinal vessels oxygenation based on expected oxygen tension values in retinal arteries and veins. The performance of MRLS method was evaluated in simulated and experimental data by determining the bias, variance, and mean absolute error (MAE) of oxygen tension measurements and comparing these parameters with those derived with the use of LS and RLS methods.

  19. A new tool to connect blood vessels in fundus retinal images.

    PubMed

    Caliva, Francesco; Aletti, Matteo; Al-Diri, Bashir; Hunter, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel tool that allows a user to reconstruct the retinal vascular network from fundus images. The retinal vasculature consists of trees of arteries and veins. Common segmentation algorithms are not able to completely segment out the blood vessels in fundus images. This failure results in a set of disconnected or broken up vascular segments. Reconstructing the whole network has crucial importance because it can offer insight into global features not considered so far, including retinal fluid dynamics. This tool uses implicit neural cost functions to join vessel segments. Results have shown that the quality of the segmentation affects the outcome of connectivity algorithms and by enhancing the segmentation the connectivity can be improved.

  20. Rotation invariant eigenvessels and auto-context for retinal vessel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montuoro, Alessio; Simader, Christian; Langs, Georg; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Retinal vessels are one of the few anatomical landmarks that are clearly visible in various imaging modalities of the eye. As they are also relatively invariant to disease progression, retinal vessel segmentation allows cross-modal and temporal registration enabling exact diagnosing for various eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy or age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Due to the clinical significance of retinal vessels many different approaches for segmentation have been published in the literature. In contrast to other segmentation approaches our method is not specifically tailored to the task of retinal vessel segmentation. Instead we utilize a more general image classification approach and show that this can achieve comparable results. In the proposed method we utilize the concepts of eigenfaces and auto-context. Eigenfaces have been described quite extensively in the literature and their performance is well known. They are however quite sensitive to translation and rotation. The former was addressed by computing the eigenvessels in local image windows of different scales, the latter by estimating and correcting the local orientation. Auto-context aims to incorporate automatically generated context information into the training phase of classification approaches. It has been shown to improve the performance of spinal cord segmentation4 and 3D brain image segmentation. The proposed method achieves an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of Az = 0.941 on the DRIVE data set, being comparable to current state-of-the-art approaches.

  1. The effect of simulated cataract light scatter on retinal vessel oximetry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunni R; Hudson, Chris; Flanagan, John G; Heitmar, Rebekka

    2013-11-01

    To assess the impact of light scatter, similar to that introduced by cataract on retinal vessel blood oxygen saturation measurements using poly-bead solutions of varying concentrations. Eight healthy, young, non-smoking individuals were enrolled for this study. All subjects underwent digital blood pressure measurements, assessment of non-contact intraocular pressure, pupil dilation and retinal vessel oximetry using dual wavelength photography (Oximetry Module, Imedos Systems, Germany). To simulate light scatter, cells comprising a plastic collar and two plano lenses were filled with solutions of differing concentrations (0.001, 0.002 and 0.004%) of polystyrene microspheres (Polysciences Inc., USA). The adopted light scatter model showed an artifactual increase in venous optical density ratio (p = 0.036), with the 0.004% condition producing significantly higher venous optical density ratio values when compared to images without a cell in place. Spectrophotometric analysis, and thus retinal vessel oximetry of the retinal vessels, is altered by artificial light scatter.

  2. [Treatment of obstruction of retinal vessels (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Babel, J

    1977-02-01

    The treatment of retinal thrombosis is an unresolved problem, mainly because of the numerous factors which participate in their formation; modifications in the walls of veins and arteries, external compressions, changes in the blood count--particularly of the platelets--slowing down of the blood flow, increase in blood viscosity etc. No drug provides constant results. Some widely employed drugs such as vasodilators may be useless or even contra-indicated. Emphasis is placed on anti-coagulants, fibrinolytics, antiaggregating agents and methods of lowering blood viscosity. Their action is difficult to test objectively. Some do appear to be useful, especially in cases of central vein thrombosis. Thrombi of branches of the central vein are apparently inacessible to medical therapy, but occasionally improvement is seen after laser coagulation. This seems to apply also to hemorrhagic glaucoma secondary to retinal obstruction.

  3. Multispectral confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope for retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lompado, Arthur; Smith, Matthew H.; Hillman, Lloyd W.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2000-03-01

    Scanning laser microscopy is a widely used technique in ophthalmoscopy for providing high-resolution real time images of the retina. We describe a scanning laser ophthalmoscope that acquires retinal images at four wavelengths for the purpose of measuring the oxygen saturation of blood in retinal arteries and veins. Images at all four wavelengths are obtained across a single video frame using a temporal interlacing technique. An extraction procedure then permits analysis of four monochromatic images. A technique for calculating oxygen saturation from a multi-spectral image set is presented, along with preliminary measurements. The choice of wavelengths dramatically affects the oxygen saturation calculation accuracy and we present an optimized wavelength set and the calculated oxygen saturation results. The potential applications for this technology range from the diagnosis of various ophthalmic diseases to the detection of blood loss in trauma victims.

  4. Knockdown of Zebrafish Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance Results in Incomplete Retinal Lamination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruei-Feng; Liu, Chia-Yang; Hu, Fung Rong; Huang, Chang-Jen; Wang, I-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity during eye development determines the normal retinal lamination and differentiation of photoreceptor cells in the retina. In vertebrates, blood vessel epicardial substance (Bves) is known to play an important role in the formation and maintenance of the tight junctions essential for epithelial cell polarity. In the current study, we generated a transgenic zebrafish Bves (zbves) promoter-EGFP zebrafish line to investigate the expression pattern of Bves in the retina and to study the role of zbves in retinal lamination. Immunostaining with different specific antibodies from retinal cells and transmission electron microscopy were used to identify the morphological defects in normal and Bves knockdown zebrafish. In normal zebrafish, Bves is located at the apical junctions of embryonic retinal neuroepithelia during retinogenesis; later, it is strongly expressed around inner plexiform layer (IPL) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, a loss of normal retinal lamination and cellular polarity was found with undifferentiated photoreceptor cells in Bves knockdown zebrafish. Herein, our results indicated that disruption of Bves will result in a loss of normal retinal lamination. PMID:24741362

  5. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiayu; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Hu, Qiao; Bakall, Benjamin; Tlucek, Paul S; Bertelsen, Geir; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  6. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  7. Automated three-dimensional choroidal vessel segmentation of 3D 1060 nm OCT retinal data

    PubMed Central

    Kajić, Vedran; Esmaeelpour, Marieh; Glittenberg, Carl; Kraus, Martin F.; Honegger, Joachim; Othara, Richu; Binder, Susanne; Fujimoto, James G.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A fully automated, robust vessel segmentation algorithm has been developed for choroidal OCT, employing multiscale 3D edge filtering and projection of “probability cones” to determine the vessel “core”, even in the tomograms with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Based on the ideal vessel response after registration and multiscale filtering, with computed depth related SNR, the vessel core estimate is dilated to quantify the full vessel diameter. As a consequence, various statistics can be computed using the 3D choroidal vessel information, such as ratios of inner (smaller) to outer (larger) choroidal vessels or the absolute/relative volume of choroid vessels. Choroidal vessel quantification can be displayed in various forms, focused and averaged within a special region of interest, or analyzed as the function of image depth. In this way, the proposed algorithm enables unique visualization of choroidal watershed zones, as well as the vessel size reduction when investigating the choroid from the sclera towards the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an automatic choroidal vessel segmentation algorithm is successfully applied to 1060 nm 3D OCT of healthy and diseased eyes. PMID:23304653

  8. Automated identification of retinal vessels using a multiscale directional contrast quantification (MDCQ) strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Yi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Wang, Ningli E-mail: puj@upmc.edu; Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Zheng, Bin; Pu, Jiantao E-mail: puj@upmc.edu

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: A novel algorithm is presented to automatically identify the retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs. Methods: The proposed algorithm quantifies the contrast of each pixel in retinal images at multiple scales and fuses the resulting consequent contrast images in a progressive manner by leveraging their spatial difference and continuity. The multiscale strategy is to deal with the variety of retinal vessels in width, intensity, resolution, and orientation; and the progressive fusion is to combine consequent images and meanwhile avoid a sudden fusion of image noise and/or artifacts in space. To quantitatively assess the performance of the algorithm, we tested it on three publicly available databases, namely, DRIVE, STARE, and HRF. The agreement between the computer results and the manual delineation in these databases were quantified by computing their overlapping in both area and length (centerline). The measures include sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Results: For the DRIVE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels in area and length were around 90% and 70%, respectively, the accuracy in pixel classification was around 99%, and the precisions in terms of both area and length were around 94%. For the STARE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 90% in area and 70% in length, and the accuracy in pixel classification was around 97%. For the HRF database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 92% in area and 83% in length for the healthy subgroup, around 92% in area and 75% in length for the glaucomatous subgroup, around 91% in area and 73% in length for the diabetic retinopathy subgroup. For all three subgroups, the accuracy was around 98%. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate that the developed algorithm is capable of identifying retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs in a relatively reliable manner.

  9. Retinal vessel extraction using Lattice Neural Networks with Dendritic Processing.

    PubMed

    Vega, Roberto; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Falcon-Morales, Luis E; Sossa, Humberto; Guevara, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Retinal images can be used to detect and follow up several important chronic diseases. The classification of retinal images requires an experienced ophthalmologist. This has been a bottleneck to implement routine screenings performed by general physicians. It has been proposed to create automated systems that can perform such task with little intervention from humans, with partial success. In this work, we report advances in such endeavor, by using a Lattice Neural Network with Dendritic Processing (LNNDP). We report results using several metrics, and compare against well known methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Multilayer Perceptrons (MLP). Our proposal shows better performance than other approaches reported in the literature. An additional advantage is that unlike those other tools, LNNDP requires no parameters, and it automatically constructs its structure to solve a particular problem. The proposed methodology requires four steps: (1) Pre-processing, (2) Feature computation, (3) Classification and (4) Post-processing. The Hotelling T(2) control chart was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector, from 7 that were used before to 5 in this work. The experiments were run on images of DRIVE and STARE databases. The results show that on average, F1-Score is better in LNNDP, compared with SVM and MLP implementations. Same improvement is observed for MCC and the accuracy.

  10. Multimodal retinal vessel segmentation from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus photography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K

    2012-10-01

    Segmenting retinal vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes is particularly challenging due to the projected neural canal opening (NCO) and relatively low visibility in the ONH center. Color fundus photographs provide a relatively high vessel contrast in the region inside the NCO, but have not been previously used to aid the SD-OCT vessel segmentation process. Thus, in this paper, we present two approaches for the segmentation of retinal vessels in SD-OCT volumes that each take advantage of complimentary information from fundus photographs. In the first approach (referred to as the registered-fundus vessel segmentation approach), vessels are first segmented on the fundus photograph directly (using a k-NN pixel classifier) and this vessel segmentation result is mapped to the SD-OCT volume through the registration of the fundus photograph to the SD-OCT volume. In the second approach (referred to as the multimodal vessel segmentation approach), after fundus-to-SD-OCT registration, vessels are simultaneously segmented with a k -NN classifier using features from both modalities. Three-dimensional structural information from the intraretinal layers and neural canal opening obtained through graph-theoretic segmentation approaches of the SD-OCT volume are used in combination with Gaussian filter banks and Gabor wavelets to generate the features. The approach is trained on 15 and tested on 19 randomly chosen independent image pairs of SD-OCT volumes and fundus images from 34 subjects with glaucoma. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the present registered-fundus and multimodal vessel segmentation approaches [area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively] both perform significantly better than the two previous OCT-based approaches (AUC of 0.78 and 0.83, p < 0.05). The multimodal approach overall performs significantly better than the other three approaches (p < 0.05).

  11. Retinal Vessel Analysis (RVA) in the Context of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Clusmann, Hans; Fuest, Matthias; Mueller, Marguerite; Brockmann, Marc Alexander; Vilser, Walthard; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hoellig, Anke; Seiz, Marcel; Thomé, Claudius; Kotliar, Konstantin; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Timely detection of impending delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is essential to improve outcome, but poses a diagnostic challenge. Retinal vessels as an embryological part of the intracranial vasculature are easily accessible for analysis and may hold the key to a new and non-invasive monitoring technique. This investigation aims to determine the feasibility of standardized retinal vessel analysis (RVA) in the context of SAH. Methods In a prospective pilot study, we performed RVA in six patients awake and cooperative with SAH in the acute phase (day 2–14) and eight patients at the time of follow-up (mean 4.6±1.7months after SAH), and included 33 age-matched healthy controls. Data was acquired using a manoeuvrable Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (Imedos Systems UG, Jena) for examination of retinal vessel dimension and neurovascular coupling. Results Image quality was satisfactory in the majority of cases (93.3%). In the acute phase after SAH, retinal arteries were significantly dilated when compared to the control group (124.2±4.3MU vs 110.9±11.4MU, p<0.01), a difference that persisted to a lesser extent in the later stage of the disease (122.7±17.2MU, p<0.05). Testing for neurovascular coupling showed a trend towards impaired primary vasodilation and secondary vasoconstriction (p = 0.08, p = 0.09 resp.) initially and partial recovery at the time of follow-up, indicating a relative improvement in a time-dependent fashion. Conclusion RVA is technically feasible in patients with SAH and can detect fluctuations in vessel diameter and autoregulation even in less severely affected patients. Preliminary data suggests potential for RVA as a new and non-invasive tool for advanced SAH monitoring, but clinical relevance and prognostic value will have to be determined in a larger cohort. PMID:27388619

  12. Segmentation of the blood vessels and optic disk in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Kaba, Djibril; Li, Yongmin; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-11-01

    Retinal image analysis is increasingly prominent as a nonintrusive diagnosis method in modern ophthalmology. In this paper, we present a novel method to segment blood vessels and optic disk in the fundus retinal images. The method could be used to support nonintrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology since the morphology of the blood vessel and the optic disk is an important indicator for diseases like diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and hypertension. Our method takes as first step the extraction of the retina vascular tree using the graph cut technique. The blood vessel information is then used to estimate the location of the optic disk. The optic disk segmentation is performed using two alternative methods. The Markov random field (MRF) image reconstruction method segments the optic disk by removing vessels from the optic disk region, and the compensation factor method segments the optic disk using the prior local intensity knowledge of the vessels. The proposed method is tested on three public datasets, DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and STARE. The results and comparison with alternative methods show that our method achieved exceptional performance in segmenting the blood vessel and optic disk.

  13. Segmenting Retinal Blood Vessels With Deep Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liskowski, Pawel; Krawiec, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    The condition of the vascular network of human eye is an important diagnostic factor in ophthalmology. Its segmentation in fundus imaging is a nontrivial task due to variable size of vessels, relatively low contrast, and potential presence of pathologies like microaneurysms and hemorrhages. Many algorithms, both unsupervised and supervised, have been proposed for this purpose in the past. We propose a supervised segmentation technique that uses a deep neural network trained on a large (up to 400[Formula: see text]000) sample of examples preprocessed with global contrast normalization, zero-phase whitening, and augmented using geometric transformations and gamma corrections. Several variants of the method are considered, including structured prediction, where a network classifies multiple pixels simultaneously. When applied to standard benchmarks of fundus imaging, the DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE databases, the networks significantly outperform the previous algorithms on the area under ROC curve measure (up to > 0.99) and accuracy of classification (up to > 0.97 ). The method is also resistant to the phenomenon of central vessel reflex, sensitive in detection of fine vessels ( sensitivity > 0.87 ), and fares well on pathological cases.

  14. An enhanced segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images using contourlet.

    PubMed

    Rezatofighi, S H; Roodaki, A; Ahmadi Noubari, H

    2008-01-01

    Retinal images acquired using a fundus camera often contain low grey, low level contrast and are of low dynamic range. This may seriously affect the automatic segmentation stage and subsequent results; hence, it is necessary to carry-out preprocessing to improve image contrast results before segmentation. Here we present a new multi-scale method for retinal image contrast enhancement using Contourlet transform. In this paper, a combination of feature extraction approach which utilizes Local Binary Pattern (LBP), morphological method and spatial image processing is proposed for segmenting the retinal blood vessels in optic fundus images. Furthermore, performance of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) is investigated in the classification section. The performance of the proposed algorithm is tested on the publicly available DRIVE database. The results are numerically assessed for different proposed algorithms.

  15. Automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels and identification of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Cree, Michael J; Leandro, Jorge J G; Soares, João V B; Cesar, Roberto M; Luckie, A

    2007-05-01

    Proliferative diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. However, early recognition allows appropriate, timely intervention. Fluorescein-labeled retinal blood vessels of 27 digital images were automatically segmented using the Gabor wavelet transform and classified using traditional features such as area, perimeter, and an additional five morphological features based on the derivatives-of-Gaussian wavelet-derived data. Discriminant analysis indicated that traditional features do not detect early proliferative retinopathy. The best single feature for discrimination was the wavelet curvature with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76. Linear discriminant analysis with a selection of six features achieved an AUC of 0.90 (0.73-0.97, 95% confidence interval). The wavelet method was able to segment retinal blood vessels and classify the images according to the presence or absence of proliferative retinopathy.

  16. Improvement of a retinal blood vessel segmentation method using the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, M; Hughes, Alun D; Thom, Simon A; Parker, Kim H

    2007-01-01

    We describe an improved implementation of a segmentation method for retinal blood vessels based on a multi-scale approach and region growing employing modules from the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK). We present the results of segmentation of retinal blood vessels using this improved method and compare these with results obtained using the original implementation in Matlab, as well as with expert manual segmentations obtained from a public database. We show that the ITK implementation achieves high quality segmentations with markedly improved computational efficiency. The ITK version has greater segmentation accuracy, from 0.94 to 0.96, than the Matlab version due to a decrease in FPR values and it is between 8 and 12 times faster than the original version. Furthermore, the ITK implementation is able to segment high-resolution images in an acceptable timescale.

  17. Segmentation of retinal blood vessels by combining the detection of centerlines and morphological reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ana Maria; Campilho, Aurélio

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents an automated method for the segmentation of the vascular network in retinal images. The algorithm starts with the extraction of vessel centerlines, which are used as guidelines for the subsequent vessel filling phase. For this purpose, the outputs of four directional differential operators are processed in order to select connected sets of candidate points to be further classified as centerline pixels using vessel derived features. The final segmentation is obtained using an iterative region growing method that integrates the contents of several binary images resulting from vessel width dependent morphological filters. Our approach was tested on two publicly available databases and its results are compared with recently published methods. The results demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms other solutions and approximates the average accuracy of a human observer without a significant degradation of sensitivity and specificity.

  18. The active transport of fluorescein by the retinal vessels and the retina

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Vaz, J. G.; Maurice, D. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The movement of fluorescein across the retinal surface of the rabbit's eye was estimated by measuring the concentration gradient of the dye in the vitreous body. These measurements were made in vivo by means of a slit-lamp fluorophotometer, or were taken from frozen sections of enucleated eyes. 2. In the normal eye, fluorescein does not pass from the blood to the vitreous body across any part of the retina. When injected into the vitreous body it passes rapidly out across the entire retinal surface, even against a very large concentration gradient. 3. A variety of metabolic and competitive inhibitors, effective in blocking organic anion transport in the kidney and liver, tend to abolish this unidirectional movement of fluorescein across the retina. 4. The region occupied by the retinal vessels is more sensitive to inhibition than other areas of the retina. Occlusion of the vessels by diathermy prevents the exchange of fluorescein in this region. 5. It appears, then, that there is an active transport of organic anions out of the vitreous body, both by the retinal capillaries and by the retina itself. The latter system is probably located in the pigment epithelium and seems to be carried forward to the rear surface of the iris. 6. Since the walls of the retinal vessels of the rabbit are freely in contact with the vitreous body, the active transport must take place across the capillary endothelial cells themselves. These vessels have structural and permeability characteristics found only in the central nervous system and it is to be presumed that the anion transport system is shared by the capillaries of the brain. 7. The function of the transport in the retina may be to protect the nervous tissue from toxic materials by preventing their entry from the blood or by removing products of metabolism conjugated as organic anions. Alternatively, the mechanism may be concerned in maintaining the normal adhesion of the retina to the choroid, since retinal detachment was

  19. Segmentation of blood vessels from red-free and fluorescein retinal images.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, M Elena; Hughes, Alun D; Thom, Simon A; Bharath, Anil A; Parker, Kim H

    2007-02-01

    The morphology of the retinal blood vessels can be an important indicator for diseases like diabetes, hypertension and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Thus, the measurement of changes in morphology of arterioles and venules can be of diagnostic value. Here we present a method to automatically segment retinal blood vessels based upon multiscale feature extraction. This method overcomes the problem of variations in contrast inherent in these images by using the first and second spatial derivatives of the intensity image that gives information about vessel topology. This approach also enables the detection of blood vessels of different widths, lengths and orientations. The local maxima over scales of the magnitude of the gradient and the maximum principal curvature of the Hessian tensor are used in a multiple pass region growing procedure. The growth progressively segments the blood vessels using feature information together with spatial information. The algorithm is tested on red-free and fluorescein retinal images, taken from two local and two public databases. Comparison with first public database yields values of 75.05% true positive rate (TPR) and 4.38% false positive rate (FPR). Second database values are of 72.46% TPR and 3.45% FPR. Our results on both public databases were comparable in performance with other authors. However, we conclude that these values are not sensitive enough so as to evaluate the performance of vessel geometry detection. Therefore we propose a new approach that uses measurements of vessel diameters and branching angles as a validation criterion to compare our segmented images with those hand segmented from public databases. Comparisons made between both hand segmented images from public databases showed a large inter-subject variability on geometric values. A last evaluation was made comparing vessel geometric values obtained from our segmented images between red-free and fluorescein paired images with the latter as the "ground truth

  20. The effect of oxygen saturation targeting on retinal blood vessel growth using retinal image data from the BOOST-II UK Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moreton, R B R; Fleck, B W; Fielder, A R; Williams, C A; Butler, L; Wilson, C; Cocker, K; Juszczak, E; King, A; Stenson, B; Brocklehurst, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disorder of developing retinal blood vessels in preterm infants. The purpose of this nested study was to investigate the effects of higher (91–95%) and lower (85–89%) oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting on retinal blood vessel growth in preterm infants. Methods Retinal blood vessel growth in the higher (91–95%) and lower (85–89%) oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting groups was compared. Suitable RetCam (Clarity, Pleasanton, CA, USA) images collected in the BOOST-II UK trial were used. The distances between the centre of the optic disc and the ROP ridge in the temporal and nasal retina were measured in pixel units. Results Images from 38 infants were studied, 20 from the higher SpO2 target group and 18 from the lower SpO2 target group. On average, temporal blood vessels extended further from the optic disc than nasal blood vessels, mean (standard deviation (SD)) 463.39 (55.05) pixels compared with 360.13 (44.47) pixels, respectively, P<0.0001. Temporal blood vessels extended less far from the optic disc in the higher SpO2 target group than in the lower SpO2 target group: mean (SD) 449.83 (56.16) pixels compared with 480.02 (49.94), respectively, P=0.055. Nasal retinal blood vessel measurements were broadly similar in the higher and lower SpO2 target groups; mean (SD) 353.96 (41.95) compared with 370.00 (48.82) pixels, respectively, P=0.38. Conclusions Relatively high oxygen saturation targeting (91–95%) was associated with a trend (P=0.055) towards reduced retinal blood vessel growth in this study of preterm infants. PMID:26795413

  1. Retinal image analysis aimed at blood vessel tree segmentation and early detection of neural-layer deterioration.

    PubMed

    Jan, J; Odstrcilik, J; Gazarek, J; Kolar, R

    2012-09-01

    An automatic method of segmenting the retinal vessel tree and estimating status of retinal neural fibre layer (NFL) from high resolution fundus camera images is presented. First, reliable blood vessel segmentation, using 2D directional matched filtering, enables to remove areas occluded by blood vessels thus leaving remaining retinal area available to the following NFL detection. The local existence of rather faint and hardly visible NFL is detected by combining several newly designed local textural features, sensitive to subtle NFL characteristics, into feature vectors submitted to a trained neural-network classifier. Obtained binary retinal maps of NFL distribution show a good agreement with both medical expert evaluations and quantitative results obtained by optical coherence tomography.

  2. Fast vessel segmentation in retinal images using multi-scale enhancement and second-order local entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Barriga, S.; Agurto, C.; Zamora, G.; Bauman, W.; Soliz, P.

    2012-03-01

    Retinal vasculature is one of the most important anatomical structures in digital retinal photographs. Accurate segmentation of retinal blood vessels is an essential task in automated analysis of retinopathy. This paper presents a new and effective vessel segmentation algorithm that features computational simplicity and fast implementation. This method uses morphological pre-processing to decrease the disturbance of bright structures and lesions before vessel extraction. Next, a vessel probability map is generated by computing the eigenvalues of the second derivatives of Gaussian filtered image at multiple scales. Then, the second order local entropy thresholding is applied to segment the vessel map. Lastly, a rule-based decision step, which measures the geometric shape difference between vessels and lesions is applied to reduce false positives. The algorithm is evaluated on the low-resolution DRIVE and STARE databases and the publicly available high-resolution image database from Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany). The proposed method achieved comparable performance to state of the art unsupervised vessel segmentation methods with a competitive faster speed on the DRIVE and STARE databases. For the high resolution fundus image database, the proposed algorithm outperforms an existing approach both on performance and speed. The efficiency and robustness make the blood vessel segmentation method described here suitable for broad application in automated analysis of retinal images.

  3. Segmentation of vessels in retinal images based on directional height statistics.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Istvan; Hajdu, Andras

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a fast and simple, yet accurate method for the segmentation of retinal blood vessels. Many diseases of the eye result in the distortions of the vessels. The precise location of the major optic veins may be used for the localization of other anatomical parts, such as the macula and the optic disc. Also, many microaneurysm detection methods consider an additional vessel segmentation step. The proposed method realizes the recognition of vessels through considering cross-sections of the image at different orientations. Peaks on the profiles are localized and their heights are measured. This way, a set of height values are assigned to every pixel of the image. Simple statistics are calculated for every pixel, and combined to construct a vessel score map. We apply a simple thresholding procedure and postprocessing step to obtain a binary vessel mask. The method has been tested on the publicly available DRIVE database, and it proved to be competitive with the state-of-the-art.

  4. Changes in retinal vessel diameters in migraine patients during attack-free period

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Metin; Sevim, Duygu Gulmez; Gultekin, Murat; Baydemir, Recep; Karaca, Cagatay; Oner, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the retinal vessel diameters in patients with migraine by optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 124 eyes of 62 patients with a diagnosis of unilateral migraine during attack-free period and 42 age- and sex-matched control subjects were included. Migraine patients were divided into the ≤2 migraine attacks per month group and the ≥5 migraine attacks per month group. All subjects underwent complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations before measurements. Retinal vessel diameters and choroidal thickness were examined with the Spectralis OCT. RESULTS The mean diameters of the arteries in the eyes on the headache side of control group, ≥5 migraine attacks per month and ≤2 migraine attacks per month group at 480 µm from the optic disk (Raster 3) were 119.54±46.69, 136.68±25.93 and 119.34±31.75 µm respectively with a steady decline to 105.57±32.15, 118.18±31.87 and 108.05±38.77 µm at 1440 µm (Raster 7), the last measurement point, respectively. The retinal artery diameter measurements were significantly increased in ≥5 migraine attacks per month patients at four out of five measured points compared to control group (P<0.05). There were no statistical differences at any of the points of vein measurements. The choroidal thickness measurements were significantly decreased in ≥5 migraine attacks per month patients at all measured points compared to control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The retinal artery diameter is found to increase significantly and the choroidal thickness is found to decrease in the eyes on the headache side in ≥5 migraine attacks per month patients compared to control group. PMID:28393037

  5. Effect of Axial Eye Length on Retinal Vessel Parameters in 6 to 12-Year-Old Malay Girls

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Evelyn Li Min; Li, Ling-Jun; Wan-Hazabbah, Wan Hitam; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shatriah, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Retinal vessel analysis is affected by both systemic and ocular factors. Malays are the major ethnicity in South East Asia. Data on the retinal microvasculature in Malays is limited, especially among children. We aim to evaluate the influence of ocular biometry on retinal vessel parameters in young Malay girls. Methods This was a cross-sectional, hospital-based study involving 86 Malay girls aged 6 to 12 years old in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from 2015–2016. Ocular examination, refraction, biometry, retinal photography, and anthropometric measurements were performed. The central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE), central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE) and overall fractal dimension (Df) were measured using validated computer-based methods (Singapore I vessel analyzer, SIVA version 3.0, Singapore). The associations of ocular biometry and CRAE, CRVE and Df were analyzed using multivariable analysis. Results The mean CRAE, CRVE and Df in Malay girls were 171.40 (14.40) um, 248.02 (16.95) um and 1.42 (0.05) respectively. Each 1 mm increase in axial length was associated with a reduction of 4.25 um in the CRAE (p = 0.03) and a reduction of 0.02 in the Df (p = 0.02), after adjustment for age, blood pressure and body mass index. No association was observed between axial length and CRVE. Anterior chamber depth and corneal curvature had no association with CRAE, CRVE or Df. Conclusion Axial length affects retinal vessel measurements. Narrower retinal arterioles and reduced retinal fractal dimension were observed in Malay girls with longer axial lengths. PMID:28107389

  6. Robust Retinal Vessel Segmentation via Locally Adaptive Derivative Frames in Orientation Scores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiong; Dashtbozorg, Behdad; Bekkers, Erik; Pluim, Josien P W; Duits, Remco; Ter Haar Romeny, Bart M

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a robust and fully automatic filter-based approach for retinal vessel segmentation. We propose new filters based on 3D rotating frames in so-called orientation scores, which are functions on the Lie-group domain of positions and orientations [Formula: see text]. By means of a wavelet-type transform, a 2D image is lifted to a 3D orientation score, where elongated structures are disentangled into their corresponding orientation planes. In the lifted domain [Formula: see text], vessels are enhanced by means of multi-scale second-order Gaussian derivatives perpendicular to the line structures. More precisely, we use a left-invariant rotating derivative (LID) frame, and a locally adaptive derivative (LAD) frame. The LAD is adaptive to the local line structures and is found by eigensystem analysis of the left-invariant Hessian matrix (computed with the LID). After multi-scale filtering via the LID or LAD in the orientation score domain, the results are projected back to the 2D image plane giving us the enhanced vessels. Then a binary segmentation is obtained through thresholding. The proposed methods are validated on six retinal image datasets with different image types, on which competitive segmentation performances are achieved. In particular, the proposed algorithm of applying the LAD filter on orientation scores (LAD-OS) outperforms most of the state-of-the-art methods. The LAD-OS is capable of dealing with typically difficult cases like crossings, central arterial reflex, closely parallel and tiny vessels. The high computational speed of the proposed methods allows processing of large datasets in a screening setting.

  7. A quantum mechanics-based algorithm for vessel segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssry, Akram; El-Rafei, Ahmed; Elramly, Salwa

    2016-06-01

    Blood vessel segmentation is an important step in retinal image analysis. It is one of the steps required for computer-aided detection of ophthalmic diseases. In this paper, a novel quantum mechanics-based algorithm for retinal vessel segmentation is presented. The algorithm consists of three major steps. The first step is the preprocessing of the images to prepare the images for further processing. The second step is feature extraction where a set of four features is generated at each image pixel. These features are then combined using a nonlinear transformation for dimensionality reduction. The final step is applying a recently proposed quantum mechanics-based framework for image processing. In this step, pixels are mapped to quantum systems that are allowed to evolve from an initial state to a final state governed by Schrödinger's equation. The evolution is controlled by the Hamiltonian operator which is a function of the extracted features at each pixel. A measurement step is consequently performed to determine whether the pixel belongs to vessel or non-vessel classes. Many functional forms of the Hamiltonian are proposed, and the best performing form was selected. The algorithm is tested on the publicly available DRIVE database. The average results for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are 80.29, 97.34, and 95.83 %, respectively. These results are compared to some recently published techniques showing the superior performance of the proposed method. Finally, the implementation of the algorithm on a quantum computer and the challenges facing this implementation are introduced.

  8. Middle Cerebral Artery, Ophthalmic Artery, and Multibranch Retinal Vessel Occlusion After Cosmetic Autologous Fat Transfer to Forehead.

    PubMed

    Roshandel, Danial; Soheilian, Masoud; Pakravan, Mohammad; Aghayan, Sara; Peyman, Gholam A

    2015-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with left hemiparesis and sudden loss of visual acuity in her right eye presented a few hours after cosmetic injection of autologous fat to her forehead. Right eye visual acuity was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed widespread retinal whitening and multibranch retinal vessel occlusion. Fluorescein angiography showed markedly delayed choroidal and retinal filling together with occlusion of multiple branches of retinal arteries and veins. On magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, multiple lesions compatible with recent infarction were detected. The authors diagnosed multibranch retinal artery and vein occlusion in the right ophthalmic and middle cerebral arteries due to fat emboli. This case emphasizes the need to reevaluate the safety of such aesthetic procedures, particularly in the facial zone to prevent devastating complications.

  9. Lymphatic Vessel Abnormalities Arising from Disorders of Ras Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; King, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases in man have been described in which abnormalities in the development and function of the lymphatic vascular (LV) system are prominent features. The genes that are mutated in these diseases are varied and include genes that encode lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth factor receptors and their ligands and transcription factors that control LEC fate and function. In addition, an increasing number of genes have been identified that encode components of the Ras signal transduction pathway that conveys signals from cell surface receptors to regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. Gene targeting studies performed in mice have confirmed that the LV system is particularly susceptible to perturbations in the Ras pathway. PMID:24183794

  10. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels Before and After 70-Day Bed Rest: A Retrospective Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunandan, Sneha; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions. Impairments include decreased near visual acuity, posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, optic disc edema and cotton wool spots. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal blood vessels that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated by NASAs innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software for two studies: (1) head-down tilt in human subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest, and (2) U.S. crew members before and after ISS missions. VESGEN analysis in previous research supported by the US National Institutes of Health identified surprising new opportunities to regenerate retinal vessels during early-stage, potentially reversible progression of the visually impairing and blinding disease, diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Three-dimensional reconstruction of blood vessels extracted from retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, M Elena; Espinosa-Romero, Arturo

    2012-05-07

    We present a 3D reconstruction of retinal blood vessel trees using two views of fundus images. The problem is addressed by using well known computer vision techniques which consider: 1) The recovery of camera-eyeball model parameters by an auto-calibration method. The camera parameters are found via the solution of simplified Kruppa equations, based on correspondences found by a LMedS optimisation correlation between pairs of eight different views. 2) The extraction of blood vessels and skeletons from two fundus images. 3) The matching of corresponding points of the two skeleton trees. The trees are previously labelled during the analysis of 2D binary images. Finally, 4) the lineal triangulation of matched correspondence points and the surface modelling via generalised cylinders using diameter measurements extracted from the 2D binary images. The method is nearly automatic and it is tested with 2 sets of 10 fundus retinal images, each one taken from different subjects. Results of 3D vein and artery trees reconstructions are shown.

  12. Does Physical Fitness Buffer the Relationship between Psychosocial Stress, Retinal Vessel Diameters, and Blood Pressure among Primary Schoolchildren?

    PubMed Central

    Endes, Katharina; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Brand, Serge; Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Pühse, Uwe; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Strong evidence exists showing that psychosocial stress plays an important part in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Because physical inactivity is associated with less favourable retinal vessel diameter and blood pressure profiles, this study explores whether physical fitness is able to buffer the negative effects of psychosocial stress on retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure in young children. Methods. 325 primary schoolchildren (51% girls, Mage = 7.28 years) took part in this cross-sectional research project. Retinal arteriolar diameters, retinal venular diameters, arteriolar to venular ratio, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed in all children. Interactions terms between physical fitness (performance in the 20 m shuttle run test) and four indicators of psychosocial stress (parental reports of critical life events, family, peer and school stress) were tested in a series of hierarchical regression analyses. Results. Critical life events and family, peer, and school-related stress were only weakly associated with retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure. No support was found for a stress-buffering effect of physical fitness. Conclusion. More research is needed with different age groups to find out if and from what age physical fitness can protect against arteriolar vessel narrowing and the occurrence of other cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:27795958

  13. Selective Stimulation of Penumbral Cones Reveals Perception in the Shadow of Retinal Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Spitschan, Manuel; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In 1819, Johann Purkinje described how a moving light source that displaces the shadow of the retinal blood vessels to adjacent cones can produce the entopic percept of a branching tree. Here, we describe a novel method for producing a similar percept. We used a device that mixes 56 narrowband primaries under computer control, in conjunction with the method of silent substitution, to present observers with a spectral modulation that selectively targeted penumbral cones in the shadow of the retinal blood vessels. Such a modulation elicits a clear Purkinje-tree percept. We show that the percept is specific to penumbral L and M cone stimulation and is not produced by selective penumbral S cone stimulation. The Purkinje-tree percept was strongest at 16 Hz and fell off at lower (8 Hz) and higher (32 Hz) temporal frequencies. Selective stimulation of open-field cones that are not in shadow, with penumbral cones silenced, also produced the percept, but it was not seen when penumbral and open-field cones were modulated together. This indicates the need for spatial contrast between penumbral and open-field cones to create the Purkinje-tree percept. Our observation provides a new means for studying the response of retinally stabilized images and demonstrates that penumbral cones can support spatial vision. Further, the result illustrates a way in which silent substitution techniques can fail to be silent. We show that inadvertent penumbral cone stimulation can accompany melanopsin-directed modulations that are designed only to silence open-field cones. This in turn can result in visual responses that might be mistaken as melanopsin-driven. PMID:25897842

  14. Selective stimulation of penumbral cones reveals perception in the shadow of retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Spitschan, Manuel; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Brainard, David H

    2015-01-01

    In 1819, Johann Purkinje described how a moving light source that displaces the shadow of the retinal blood vessels to adjacent cones can produce the entopic percept of a branching tree. Here, we describe a novel method for producing a similar percept. We used a device that mixes 56 narrowband primaries under computer control, in conjunction with the method of silent substitution, to present observers with a spectral modulation that selectively targeted penumbral cones in the shadow of the retinal blood vessels. Such a modulation elicits a clear Purkinje-tree percept. We show that the percept is specific to penumbral L and M cone stimulation and is not produced by selective penumbral S cone stimulation. The Purkinje-tree percept was strongest at 16 Hz and fell off at lower (8 Hz) and higher (32 Hz) temporal frequencies. Selective stimulation of open-field cones that are not in shadow, with penumbral cones silenced, also produced the percept, but it was not seen when penumbral and open-field cones were modulated together. This indicates the need for spatial contrast between penumbral and open-field cones to create the Purkinje-tree percept. Our observation provides a new means for studying the response of retinally stabilized images and demonstrates that penumbral cones can support spatial vision. Further, the result illustrates a way in which silent substitution techniques can fail to be silent. We show that inadvertent penumbral cone stimulation can accompany melanopsin-directed modulations that are designed only to silence open-field cones. This in turn can result in visual responses that might be mistaken as melanopsin-driven.

  15. Segmentation of retinal vessels by means of directional response vector similarity and region growing.

    PubMed

    Lázár, István; Hajdu, András

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel retinal vessel segmentation method. Opposed to the general approach in similar directional methods, where only the maximal or summed responses of a pixel are used, here, the directional responses of a pixel are considered as a vector. The segmentation method is a unique region growing procedure which combines a hysteresis thresholding scheme with the response vector similarity of adjacent pixels. A vessel score map is constructed as the combination of the statistical measures of the response vectors and its local maxima to provide the seeds for the region growing procedure. A nearest neighbor classifier based on a rotation invariant response vector similarity measure is used to filter the seed points. Many techniques in the literature that capture the Gaussian-like cross-section of vessels suffer from the drawback of giving false high responses to the steep intensity transitions at the boundary of the optic disc and bright lesions. To overcome this issue, we also propose a symmetry constrained multiscale matched filtering technique. The proposed vessel segmentation method has been tested on three publicly available image sets, where its performance proved to be competitive with the state-of-the-art and comparable to the accuracy of a human observer, as well.

  16. Improved automated optic cup segmentation based on detection of blood vessel bends in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Nagahata, Yuuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Ogohara, Kazunori; Sawada, Akira; Ishida, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of permanent blindness. Retinal imaging is useful for early detection of glaucoma. In order to evaluate the presence of glaucoma, ophthalmologists may determine the cup and disc areas and diagnose glaucoma using a vertical optic cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio and a rim-to-disc (R/D) ratio. Previously we proposed a method to determine cup edge by analyzing a vertical profile of pixel values, but this method provided a cup edge smaller than that of an ophthalmologist. This paper describes an improved method using the locations of the blood vessel bends. The blood vessels were detected by a concentration feature determined from the density gradient. The blood vessel bends were detected by tracking the blood vessels from the disc edge to the primary cup edge, which was determined by our previous method. Lastly, the vertical C/D ratio and the R/D ratio were calculated. Using forty-four images, including 32 glaucoma images, the AUCs of both the vertical C/D ratio and R/D ratio by this proposed method were 0.966 and 0.936, respectively.

  17. IL-1β is upregulated in the diabetic retina and retinal vessels: cell-specific effect of high glucose and IL-1β autostimulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Biarnés Costa, Montserrat; Gerhardinger, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Many molecular and cellular abnormalities detected in the diabetic retina support a role for IL-1β-driven neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. IL-1β is well known for its role in the induction and, through autostimulation, amplification of neuroinflammation. Upregulation of IL-1β has been consistently detected in the diabetic retina; however, the mechanisms and cellular source of IL-1β overexpression are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose and IL-1β itself on IL-1β expression in microglial, macroglial (astrocytes and Müller cells) and retinal vascular endothelial cells; and to study the effect of diabetes on the expression of IL-1β in isolated retinal vessels and on the temporal pattern of IL-1β upregulation and glial reactivity in the retina of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. IL-1β was quantified by RealTime RT-PCR and ELISA, glial fibrillar acidic protein, α2-macroglobulin, and ceruloplasmin by immunoblotting. We found that high glucose induced a 3-fold increase of IL-1β expression in retinal endothelial cells but not in macroglia and microglia. IL-1β induced its own synthesis in endothelial and macroglial cells but not in microglia. In retinal endothelial cells, the high glucose-induced IL-1β overexpression was prevented by calphostin C, a protein kinase C inhibitor. The retinal vessels of diabetic rats showed increased IL-1β expression as compared to non-diabetic rats. Retinal expression of IL-1β increased early after the induction of diabetes, continued to increase with progression of the disease, and was temporally associated with upregulation of markers of glial activation. These findings point to hyperglycemia as the trigger and to the endothelium as the origin of the initial retinal upregulation of IL-1β in diabetes; and to IL-1β itself, via autostimulation in endothelial and macroglial cells, as the mechanism of sustained IL-1β overexpression. Interrupting the

  18. Deep neural ensemble for retinal vessel segmentation in fundus images towards achieving label-free angiography.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, A; Roy, Abhijit Guha; Sheet, Debdoot; Biswas, Prabir Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Automated segmentation of retinal blood vessels in label-free fundus images entails a pivotal role in computed aided diagnosis of ophthalmic pathologies, viz., diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The challenge remains active in medical image analysis research due to varied distribution of blood vessels, which manifest variations in their dimensions of physical appearance against a noisy background. In this paper we formulate the segmentation challenge as a classification task. Specifically, we employ unsupervised hierarchical feature learning using ensemble of two level of sparsely trained denoised stacked autoencoder. First level training with bootstrap samples ensures decoupling and second level ensemble formed by different network architectures ensures architectural revision. We show that ensemble training of auto-encoders fosters diversity in learning dictionary of visual kernels for vessel segmentation. SoftMax classifier is used for fine tuning each member autoencoder and multiple strategies are explored for 2-level fusion of ensemble members. On DRIVE dataset, we achieve maximum average accuracy of 95.33% with an impressively low standard deviation of 0.003 and Kappa agreement coefficient of 0.708. Comparison with other major algorithms substantiates the high efficacy of our model.

  19. Novel non-contact retina camera for the rat and its application to dynamic retinal vessel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Dietmar; Strohmaier, Clemens; Seifert, Bernd U.; Riemer, Thomas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Haueisen, Jens; Vilser, Walthard

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel non-invasive and non-contact system for reflex-free retinal imaging and dynamic retinal vessel analysis in the rat. Theoretical analysis was performed prior to development of the new optical design, taking into account the optical properties of the rat eye and its specific illumination and imaging requirements. A novel optical model of the rat eye was developed for use with standard optical design software, facilitating both sequential and non-sequential modes. A retinal camera for the rat was constructed using standard optical and mechanical components. The addition of a customized illumination unit and existing standard software enabled dynamic vessel analysis. Seven-minute in-vivo vessel diameter recordings performed on 9 Brown-Norway rats showed stable readings. On average, the coefficient of variation was (1.1 ± 0.19) % for the arteries and (0.6 ± 0.08) % for the veins. The slope of the linear regression analysis was (0.56 ± 0.26) % for the arteries and (0.15 ± 0.27) % for the veins. In conclusion, the device can be used in basic studies of retinal vessel behavior. PMID:22076270

  20. A new imaging technique for retinal vessel oximetry: principles and first clinical results in patients with retinal arterial occlusion and diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M.; Riemer, T.; Vilser, W.; Gehlert, S.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    The oxygen saturation of blood inside retinal vessels is an essential measure for the estimation of oxygen supply to the tissue as well as its oxygen consumption. In the current approach, the blood oxygenation is measured by a dual-wavelength technique. Using a fundus camera, equipped with a special dual wavelength transmission filter and a color CCD camera, two monochromatic fundus images at 548 nm and 610 nm were recorded simultaneously. The optical densities of retinal vessels for both wavelengths and their ratio, which is known to be proportional to the oxygen saturation, were calculated. From a health control population, mean arterial and venous oxygen saturations were measured of 98+/-10.1% and 65+/-11.7% with reproducibility of 2.52% and 3.25% respectively. In 10 patients with arterial occlusion, a reduction of the arterial oxygen saturation to 78 +/-17% (mean +/- standard deviation, branch arterial occlusion) and 91+/-11% (central arterial occlusion) respectively was found in the occluded vessel. After 5 days on pentoxifilin therapy, the arterial saturation increased to an average of 93+/-12% or 103 +/-6% respectively. In 70 eyes of 42 patients suffering from diabetic retinopathy, an increase of the venous oxygen saturation with the severity of the retinopathy was found (mild nonproliferative retinopathy: 68.4+/-8.2%, moderate non-proliferative retinopathy: 70.5+/-6.8%, severe non-proliferative retinopathy: 72.4+/-7.6%, proliferative retinopathy 75.7+/-8.3%) due to vessel shunting and diabetic changes of the permeability of vessel walls. These first clinical results demonstrate the ability of an accurate measurement of retinal vessel oxygenation with a very simple setup just requiring a special filter in the illumination path of a fundus camera and dedicated software.

  1. Characterization of retinal blood vessel by laser speckle correlation time constant (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Lai, Wan-Huseh; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Laser speckle imaging is an optical metrology technique for examining various forms of object motion in fields from material engineering to bio-medical. As highly coherent illumination encounters the rough surface or scattering medium, due to the multiple interference, the randomly distributed black and white spots formed and are known as speckles. By analyzing speckle images, surface information or scattering medium motion could be recovered. In this study, an optical system for acquiring speckle images from rabbit retina is built for characterizing the blood vessel properties with speckle correlation time constant. As laser illuminates onto the rabbit retina, speckles are formed due to the moving red blood cells inside the retinal blood vessel. The intensity of speckles fluctuate along time and are recorded with high speed CMOS at frame rate 150 frames per second. Speckle correlation time constant describe the relation between frames as the decay rate. Two approaches are used for the processing of image sequences for correlation time constant, one is utilizing asymptotic equation from speckle contrast result, and another is correlation based approach. To determine the performance of our system and algorithms, we compare two regions on the retina with different properties, one region contains faster blood flow while another with slower blood flow. Both approaches shows distinct differences in the value of correlation time constant of two regions.

  2. Retinal detachment in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome: Color vision abnormality as the first and predominant manifestation.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Hiroyuki; Makino, Shinji; Takahashi, Hironori; Sorita, Mari; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2015-11-01

    Serous retinal detachment is sometimes caused by hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and its associated conditions, in which the predominant eye symptoms are blurred vision, distorted vision, and reduced visual acuity. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of a puerperal woman with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome in whom color vision abnormality was the first and predominant manifestation of serous retinal detachment. At 32 weeks of gestation, the 34-year-old Japanese woman underwent cesarean section due to HELLP syndrome. She complained of color vision abnormality on day 1 post-partum and ophthalmological examination revealed serous retinal detachment of both eyes. The visual acuity was preserved. With supportive therapy, her color vision abnormality gradually ameliorated and retinal detachment completely resolved on day 34 post-partum without any sequelae. Obstetricians should be aware that color vision abnormality can be the first and predominant symptom of HELLP-related serous retinal detachment.

  3. Germ-line mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 gene: Correlations with disease severity and retinal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.M.; Kaiser-Kupfer, M.; Eldridge, R.

    1996-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) features bilateral vestibular schwannomas, other benign neural tumors, and cataracts. Patients in some families develop many tumors at an early age and have rapid clinical progression, whereas in other families, patients may not have symptoms until much later and vestibular schwannomas may be the only tumors. The NF2 gene has been cloned from chromosome 22q; most identified germ-line mutations result in a truncated protein and severe NF2. To look for additional mutations and clinical correlations, we used SSCP analysis to screen DNA from 32 unrelated patients. We identified 20 different mutations in 21 patients (66%): 10 nonsense mutations, 2 frameshifts, 7 splice-site mutations, and 1 large in-frame deletion. Clinical information on 47 patients from the 21 families included ages at onset and at diagnosis, numbers of meningiomas, spinal and skin tumors, and presence of cataracts and retinal abnormalities. We compared clinical findings in patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations to those with splice-site mutations. When each patient was considered as an independent random event, the two groups differed (P {le} .05) for nearly every variable. Patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations were younger at onset and at diagnosis and had a higher frequency and mean number of tumors, supporting the correlation between nonsense and frameshift mutations and severe NF2. When each family was considered as an independent random event, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed only for mean ages at onset and at diagnosis. A larger data set is needed to resolve these discrepancies. We observed retinal hamartomas and/or epiretinal membranes in nine patients from five families with four different nonsense mutations. This finding, which may represent a new genotype-phenotype correlation, merits further study. 58 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Automated Detection of Vessel Abnormalities on Fluorescein Angiogram in Malarial Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J C; Parry, David G; Beare, Nicholas A V; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-06-08

    The detection and assessment of intravascular filling defects is important, because they may represent a process central to cerebral malaria pathogenesis: neurovascular sequestration. We have developed and validated a framework that can automatically detect intravascular filling defects in fluorescein angiogram images. It first employs a state-of-the-art segmentation approach to extract the vessels from images and then divide them into individual segments by geometrical analysis. A feature vector based on the intensity and shape of saliency maps is generated to represent the level of abnormality of each vessel segment. An AdaBoost classifier with weighted cost coefficient is trained to classify the vessel segments into normal and abnormal categories. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we apply this framework to 6,358 vessel segments in images from 10 patients with malarial retinopathy. The test sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under curve (AUC) are 74.7%, 73.5%, 74.1% and 74.2% respectively when compared to the reference standard of human expert manual annotations. This performance is comparable to the agreement that we find between human observers of intravascular filling defects. Our method will be a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy.

  5. Automated Detection of Vessel Abnormalities on Fluorescein Angiogram in Malarial Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Parry, David G.; Beare, Nicholas A. V.; Harding, Simon P.; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    The detection and assessment of intravascular filling defects is important, because they may represent a process central to cerebral malaria pathogenesis: neurovascular sequestration. We have developed and validated a framework that can automatically detect intravascular filling defects in fluorescein angiogram images. It first employs a state-of-the-art segmentation approach to extract the vessels from images and then divide them into individual segments by geometrical analysis. A feature vector based on the intensity and shape of saliency maps is generated to represent the level of abnormality of each vessel segment. An AdaBoost classifier with weighted cost coefficient is trained to classify the vessel segments into normal and abnormal categories. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we apply this framework to 6,358 vessel segments in images from 10 patients with malarial retinopathy. The test sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under curve (AUC) are 74.7%, 73.5%, 74.1% and 74.2% respectively when compared to the reference standard of human expert manual annotations. This performance is comparable to the agreement that we find between human observers of intravascular filling defects. Our method will be a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy. PMID:26053690

  6. Retinal Vessel Density in Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Optic Atrophy after Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ling-Yuh; Sun, Ming-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) retinal vasculature measurements between normal and optic atrophy after nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) subjects. Design. This prospective observational study was conducted between July 2015 and August 2016 at the ophthalmology outpatient department of a referral center in Taiwan. Peripapillary (4.5 × 4.5 mm) and parafoveal (6 × 6 mm) OCT-A scans were acquired. Measurements of the peripapillary region were obtained in two areas: (1) circumpapillary vessel density (cpVD) and (2) whole enface image vessel density (wiVD). Results. 13 participants with optic atrophy after NAION had lower peripapillary vessel density than the 18 age-matched participants in the healthy control (HC) group (p < 0.001 for both cpVD and wiVD). However, the parafoveal vessel density was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.49). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the HC and NAION eyes were 0.992 for cpVD and 0.970 for wiVD. cpVD and wiVD were significantly correlated with the average retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusion. Peripapillary retinal perfusion is significantly decreased in optic atrophy after NAION. OCT-A may aid in the understanding of structure-function-perfusion relationships in NAION. PMID:28316838

  7. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Cederlund, Maria L; Cottell, David C; Bill, Brent R; Ekker, Stephen C; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant M; Hyde, David R; Vihtelic, Thomas S; Kennedy, Breandan N

    2007-01-01

    Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO), subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease. PMID:17937808

  8. The matricellular protein cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/Cyr61) enhances physiological adaptation of retinal vessels and reduces pathological neovascularization associated with ischemic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Adeel; Pokeza, Nataliya; Shaw, Lynn; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Lazzaro, Douglas; Chintala, Hemabindu; Rosenbaum, Daniel; Grant, Maria B; Chaqour, Brahim

    2011-03-18

    Retinal vascular damages are the cardinal hallmarks of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of vision impairment and blindness in childhood. Both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis are disrupted in the hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration phase, and recapitulated, although aberrantly, in the subsequent ischemia-induced neovessel formation phase of ROP. Yet, whereas the histopathological features of ROP are well characterized, many key modulators with a therapeutic potential remain unknown. The CCN1 protein also known as cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61) is a dynamically expressed, matricellular protein required for proper angiogenesis and vasculogenesis during development. The expression of CCN1 becomes abnormally reduced during the hyperoxic and ischemic phases of ROP modeled in the mouse eye with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Lentivirus-mediated re-expression of CCN1 enhanced physiological adaptation of the retinal vasculature to hyperoxia and reduced pathological angiogenesis following ischemia. Remarkably, injection into the vitreous of OIR mice of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) engineered to express CCN1 harnessed ischemia-induced neovessel outgrowth without adversely affecting the physiological adaptation of retinal vessels to hyperoxia. In vitro exposure of HSCs to recombinant CCN1 induced integrin-dependent cell adhesion, migration, and expression of specific endothelial cell markers as well as many components of the Wnt signaling pathway including Wnt ligands, their receptors, inhibitors, and downstream targets. CCN1-induced Wnt signaling mediated, at least in part, adhesion and endothelial differentiation of cultured HSCs, and inhibition of Wnt signaling interfered with normalization of the retinal vasculature induced by CCN1-primed HSCs in OIR mice. These newly identified functions of CCN1 suggest its possible therapeutic utility in ischemic retinopathy.

  9. Evidence of Flicker-Induced Functional Hyperaemia in the Smallest Vessels of the Human Retinal Blood Supply

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Bang V.

    2016-01-01

    Regional changes in blood flow are initiated within neural tissue to help fuel local differences in neural activity. Classically, this response was thought to arise only in larger arterioles and venules. However, recently, it has been proposed that a) the smallest vessels of the circulation make a comparable contribution, and b) the response should be localised intermittently along such vessels, due to the known distribution of contractile mural cells. To assess these hypotheses in human neural tissue in vivo, we imaged the retinal microvasculature (diameters 3–28 μm) non-invasively, using adaptive optics, before and after delivery of focal (360 μm) patches of flickering visible light. Our results demonstrated a definite average response in 35% of all vessel segments analysed. In these responding vessels, the magnitude of proportional dilation (mean ± SEM for pre-capillary arterioles 13 ± 5%, capillaries 31 ± 8%, and post-capillary venules 10 ± 3%) is generally far greater than the magnitudes we and others have measured in the larger retinal vessels, supporting proposition a) above. The dilations observed in venules were unexpected based on previous animal work, and may be attributed either to differences in stimulus or species. Response heterogeneity across the network was high; responses were also heterogeneous along individual vessels (45% of vessel segments showed demonstrable locality in their response). These observations support proposition b) above. We also observed a definite average constriction across 7% of vessel segments (mean ± SEM constriction for capillaries -16 ± 3.2%, and post-capillary venules -18 ± 12%), which paints a picture of dynamic redistribution of flow throughout the smallest vessel networks in the retina in response to local, stimulus-driven metabolic demand. PMID:27617960

  10. Mutations of the XLRS1 gene cause abnormalities of photoreceptor as well as inner retinal responses of the ERG.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, K; George, N; Moore, A; Trump, D

    1999-01-01

    Intensity-series rod and cone ERGs were recorded in 19 patients with XLRS and 26 control eyes. All patients were examined by one ophthalmologist and diagnosed on the basis of fundus appearance and evidence of the disease in other males in the same family. Mutations in the XLRS1 gene have been identified in 15 of the patients. Dark-adapted ERGs were significantly different from controls for all test conditions and for both a-wave and b-wave responses. Abnormalities were detectable in all patients but there was considerable variation in the severity of abnormality. One third of the patients had the dark-adapted 'negative-wave' response typically associated with inner retinal disorder, but about one third showed only mild depression of the b-wave while the remainder had abnormally low a-waves in addition to depressed b-waves. Light-adapted responses were also affected and both a-wave and b-wave responses differed significantly from controls, but the 'negative-wave' response was not seen in any patient. The severity of the ERG abnormality did not correlate with the classification of fundus appearance or patient age suggesting that retinal function is relatively stable throughout life. The severity of ERG abnormalities did not correlate with the type of mutation and responses could differ between affected males within the same family. These results indicate considerable heterogeneity of ERG response without clinical, age or genetic correlate. The abnormal a-wave responses indicate that photoreceptor as well as inner retinal layer function may be affected in XLRS, at least in some patients.

  11. Longitudinal change of small-vessel disease-related brain abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Seiler, Stephan; Loitfelder, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the longitudinal change of cerebral small-vessel disease–related magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities increases our pathophysiologic understanding of cerebral microangiopathy. The change of specific lesion types may also serve as secondary surrogate endpoint in clinical trials. A surrogate endpoint needs to progress fast enough to allow monitoring of treatment effects within a reasonable time period, and change of the brain abnormality needs to be correlated with clinical change. Confluent white matter lesions show fast progression and correlations with cognitive decline. Thus, the change of confluent white matter lesions may be used as a surrogate marker in proof-of-concept trials with small patient numbers needed to show treatment effects on lesion progression. Nonetheless if the expected change in cognitive performance resulting from treatment effects on lesion progression is used as outcome, the sample size needed to show small to moderate treatment effects becomes very large. Lacunes may also fulfill the prerequisites of a surrogate marker, but in the general population the incidence of lacunes over short observational periods is small. For other small-vessel disease–related brain abnormalities including microbleeds and microstructural changes in normal-appearing white matter longitudinal change and correlations with clinical decline is not yet fully determined.

  12. Calibration-free measurement of the oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Leistritz, Lutz; Hammer, Martin; Scibor, Mateusz; Bartsch, Ulrich; Strobel, Juergen

    1995-05-01

    of a piglet measured by reflectometry with the oxygen saturation of the left ventricular and the venous blood measured by a laboratory hemoximeter. First results of the measurement of the oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels are demonstrated.

  13. Macular Cone Abnormalities in Retinitis Pigmentosa with Preserved Central Vision Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Yukiko; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Takayama, Kohei; Uji, Akihito; Oishi, Akio; Ogino, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess macular photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with preserved central vision using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods Fourteen eyes of 14 patients with RP (best-corrected visual acuity 20/20 or better) and 12 eyes of 12 volunteers underwent a full ophthalmologic examination, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and imaging with a prototype AO-SLO system. Cone density and spatial organization of the cone mosaic were assessed using AO-SLO images. Results In 3 eyes with RP and preserved central vision, cones formed a mostly regular mosaic pattern with small patchy dark areas, and in 10 eyes, the cone mosaic patterns were less regular, and large dark regions with missing cones were apparent. Only one eye with RP demonstrated a normal, regular cone mosaic pattern. In eyes with RP, cone density was significantly lower at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea compared to normal eyes (P<0.001 and 0.021, respectively). At 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea, a decreased number of cones had 6 neighbors in eyes with RP (P = 0.002 for both). Greater decrease in cone density was related to disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment (IS) ellipsoid band on SD-OCT images (P = 0.044); however, dark regions were seen on AO-SLO even in areas of continuous IS ellipsoid on SD-OCT. Decreased cone density correlated thinner outer nuclear layer (P = 0.029) and thinner inner segment and outer segment thickness (P = 0.011) on SD-OCT. Conclusions Cone density is decreased and the regularity of the cone mosaic spatial arrangement is disrupted in eyes with RP, even when visual acuity and foveal sensitivity are good. AO-SLO imaging is a sensitive quantitative tool for detecting photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with RP. PMID:24260224

  14. A multi-scale tensor voting approach for small retinal vessel segmentation in high resolution fundus images.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidis, Argyrios; Hurtut, Thomas; Tahar, Houssem Ben; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting the retinal vessels from fundus images is a prerequisite for many CAD systems for the automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy lesions. So far, research efforts have concentrated mainly on the accurate localization of the large to medium diameter vessels. However, failure to detect the smallest vessels at the segmentation step can lead to false positive lesion detection counts in a subsequent lesion analysis stage. In this study, a new hybrid method for the segmentation of the smallest vessels is proposed. Line detection and perceptual organization techniques are combined in a multi-scale scheme. Small vessels are reconstructed from the perceptual-based approach via tracking and pixel painting. The segmentation was validated in a high resolution fundus image database including healthy and diabetic subjects using pixel-based as well as perceptual-based measures. The proposed method achieves 85.06% sensitivity rate, while the original multi-scale line detection method achieves 81.06% sensitivity rate for the corresponding images (p<0.05). The improvement in the sensitivity rate for the database is 6.47% when only the smallest vessels are considered (p<0.05). For the perceptual-based measure, the proposed method improves the detection of the vasculature by 7.8% against the original multi-scale line detection method (p<0.05).

  15. Automated detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on fundus images: false positive reduction based on vessel likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Ishida, Kyoko; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of glaucoma is important to slow down or cease progression of the disease and for preventing total blindness. We have previously proposed an automated scheme for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD), which is one of the early signs of glaucoma observed on retinal fundus images. In this study, a new multi-step detection scheme was included to improve detection of subtle and narrow NFLDs. In addition, new features were added to distinguish between NFLDs and blood vessels, which are frequent sites of false positives (FPs). The result was evaluated with a new test dataset consisted of 261 cases, including 130 cases with NFLDs. Using the proposed method, the initial detection rate was improved from 82% to 98%. At the sensitivity of 80%, the number of FPs per image was reduced from 4.25 to 1.36. The result indicates the potential usefulness of the proposed method for early detection of glaucoma.

  16. Inter-eye comparison of retinal oximetry and vessel caliber between eyes with asymmetrical glaucoma severity in different glaucoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Clarissa Shu Ming; Lee, Yi Fang; Ong, Charles; Yap, Zhu Li; Tsai, Andrew; Mohla, Aditi; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Aung, Tin; Perera, Shamira A

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare retinal vessel oxygenation and vessel caliber in primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG), primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), and normal controls, as well as between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity. Methods This was a prospective, cross-sectional study. The 159 subjects (PACG, n=39; POAG, n=41; NTG, n=41; normal controls, n=38) underwent retinal oxygen saturation measurements using the Oxymap T1 Retinal Oximeter, optical coherence tomography, and Humphrey visual field testing. Retinal oxygen saturation and vessel diameter were compared between the glaucoma groups and normal controls, as well as between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity. Kruskal–Wallis test was performed for comparison among different subtypes of glaucoma. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the inter-eye differences. Results Compared to normal controls, arteriolar oxygen saturation was increased in PACG eyes (P=0.048) but not in POAG or NTG eyes. There were no significant differences in oxygen saturation in venules or arteriovenous (AV) difference in all three glaucoma groups. Venular diameter was significantly reduced in all glaucoma groups compared to normal controls (P<0.001), but no such change was observed in arteriolar diameter (P=0.10). When comparing between eyes of asymmetrical glaucoma severity, arteriolar oxygen saturation (P=0.03) and AV difference (P=0.04) were significantly higher, while arteriolar diameter was significantly lower (P=0.001) in the worse eye in PACG group. There were no significant differences in oximetric parameters or vessel calibers between the worse and the better eyes in POAG and NTG groups. Conclusion Eyes with PACG showed increased arteriolar oxygen saturation and increased AV difference. This was not observed in POAG and NTG eyes. Arteriolar diameter in PACG and venular diameter in all three glaucoma groups were reduced. The difference observed in PACG eyes may be due to an increased

  17. Retinal vessel density from optical coherence tomography angiography to differentiate early glaucoma, pre-perimetric glaucoma and normal eyes

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Handan; Huang, Alex S.; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Sirinivas R.; Chopra, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    also could be differentiated from normal eyes using OCTA-derived retinal vessel density measurements. PMID:28152070

  18. Dietary Wolfberry Ameliorates Retinal Structure Abnormalities in db/db Mice at the Early Stage of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yunong; Jiang, Yu; Willard, Lloyd; Ortiz, Edlin; Wark, Logan; Medeiros, Denis; Lin, Dingbo

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-linked oxidative stress and/or consequent endoplasmic reticulum stress are the causative factors of pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Dietary bioactive components which mitigate oxidative stress may serve as potential chemopreventative agents to prevent or slow down the disease progression. Wolfberry is a traditional Asian fruit consumed for years to prevent aging eye diseases in Asian countries. Here we report that dietary wolfberry ameliorated mouse retinal abnormality at the early stage of type 2 diabetes in db/db mice. Male mice at 6 weeks of age were fed the control diet with or without 1 % (kCal) wolfberry for 8 weeks. Dietary wolfberry restored the thickness of the whole retina, in particular the inner nuclear layer and photoreceptor layer, and the integrity of retinal pigment epithelia (RPE), and the ganglion cell number in db/db mice. Western blotting of whole retinal cell lysates revealed that addition of wolfberry lowered expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarkers BiP, PERK, ATF6, and caspase-12; and restored AMPK, thioredoxin, Mn SOD, and FOXO3α activities. To determine if our observations were due to the high contents of zeaxanthin and lutein in wolfberry additional studies using these carotenoids were conducted. Using the human adult diploid RPE cell line ARPE-19 we demonstrated that both zeaxanthin and lutein could mimic wolfberry preventive effect on activation of AMPK, thioredoxin, Mn SOD, FOXO3α activities, normalize cellular reactive oxygen species, and attenuate ER stress in ARPE-19 cells exposed to a high glucose challenge. The zeaxanthin preventive effect was abolished by siRNA knockdown of AMPKα. These results suggested that AMPK activation appeared to play a key role in upregulated expression of thioredoxin and Mn SOD, and mitigation of cellular oxidative stress and/or ER stress by wolfberry and zeaxanthin and/or lutein. Taken together, dietary wolfberry on retinal protection in diabetic mice is, at least

  19. A new supervised method for blood vessel segmentation in retinal images by using gray-level and moment invariants-based features.

    PubMed

    Marin, Diego; Aquino, Arturo; Gegundez-Arias, Manuel Emilio; Bravo, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new supervised method for blood vessel detection in digital retinal images. This method uses a neural network (NN) scheme for pixel classification and computes a 7-D vector composed of gray-level and moment invariants-based features for pixel representation. The method was evaluated on the publicly available DRIVE and STARE databases, widely used for this purpose, since they contain retinal images where the vascular structure has been precisely marked by experts. Method performance on both sets of test images is better than other existing solutions in literature. The method proves especially accurate for vessel detection in STARE images. Its application to this database (even when the NN was trained on the DRIVE database) outperforms all analyzed segmentation approaches. Its effectiveness and robustness with different image conditions, together with its simplicity and fast implementation, make this blood vessel segmentation proposal suitable for retinal image computer analyses such as automated screening for early diabetic retinopathy detection.

  20. Retinal Vessel Diameters and Their Relationship with Cardiovascular Risk and All-Cause Mortality in the Inter99 Eye Study: A 15-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Inger Christine; Glümer, Charlotte; Faerch, Kristine; Kessel, Line; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe associations between retinal vessel diameters and cardiovascular risk markers and mortality. Methods. The present study included 908 persons aged 30 to 60 years. Vessel diameters were expressed as central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE) and central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE). Multiple linear regression analyses and Cox regression models were used. Results. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that narrower CRAE was associated with higher systolic blood pressure, age, and higher HDL cholesterol, whereas wider CRAE and CRVE were associated with smoking. Narrower CRVE was associated with higher HDL cholesterol. In an age-adjusted model, associations between wider CRVE and risk of ischemic heart disease were found (P < 0.001). Wider CRVE was associated with all-cause mortality (HR = 2.02, P = 0.033) in a model adjusted for age, gender, and blood pressure. However, the association was not statistically significant after additional adjustment for smoking. Conclusions. The associations between retinal vessel diameters and known cardiovascular risk factors were confirmed. All-cause mortality was not associated with retinal vessel diameters when adjusting for relevant confounders. PMID:28053777

  1. An Automated Approach for Localizing Retinal Blood Vessels in Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Robert; Shafin, Rahman; Boelefahr, Sebastian; Klemm, Maren

    In this work, we present a rules-based method for localizing retinal blood vessels in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) images and evaluate its feasibility. A total of 31 healthy participants (17 female; mean age: 64.0 ± 8.2 years) were studied using manual and automatic segmentation. High-resolution peripapillary scan acquisition cSLO images were acquired. The automated segmentation method consisted of image pre-processing for gray-level homogenization and blood vessel enhancement (morphological opening operation, Gaussian filter, morphological Top-Hat transformation), binary thresholding (entropy-based thresholding operation), and removal of falsely detected isolated vessel pixels. The proposed algorithm was first tested on the publically available dataset DRIVE, which contains color fundus photographs, and compared to performance results from the literature. Good results were obtained. Monochromatic cSLO images segmented using the proposed method were compared to those manually segmented by two independent observers. For the algorithm, a sensitivity of 0.7542, specificity of 0.8607, and accuracy of 0.8508 were obtained. For the two independent observers, a sensitivity of 0.6579, specificity of 0.9699, and accuracy of 0.9401 were obtained. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize vessels in monochromatic cSLO images of the retina using a rules-based approach. The performance results are inferior to those obtained using fundus photography, which could be due to the nature of the technology.

  2. Retinal blood vessel segmentation with neural network by using gray-level co-occurrence matrix-based features.

    PubMed

    Rahebi, Javad; Hardalaç, Fırat

    2014-08-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of extracting retina vessels with supervised approach. Since the green channel in the retina image has the best contrast between vessel and non-vessel, this channel is used to separate vessels. In our approach we are proposing a technique of using gray-level co-occurrence matrix method for composition of the retinal images. It is based on fact that the co-occurrence matrix of retina image describes the transition of intensities between neighbour pixels, indicating spatial structural information of retina image. So, we first extract the features vector based on specified characteristics of the gray-level co-occurrence matrix and then we use these features vector to train a neural network approach for the classification method which makes our proposed approach more effective. Obtained results from the experiments in DRIVE and STARE database shows the advantage of the proposed method in contrast to current methods. This advantage is evaluated by the criteria of sensitivity, specificity, area under ROC and accuracy. The result of such a conversion as the input vector of a multilayer perceptron neural network will be trained and tested. Although in recent years different methods have been presented in this respect, but results of simulation shows that the proposed algorithm has a very high efficiency than the other researches.

  3. Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) deficiency leads to abnormal microglia behavior and disturbed retinal function

    SciTech Connect

    Dannhausen, Katharina; Karlstetter, Marcus; Caramoy, Albert; Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert; Liebisch, Gerhard; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Langmann, Thomas

    2015-08-21

    Mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) coding gene sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) cause Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A and B. Sphingomyelin storage in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system cause hepatosplenomegaly and severe neurodegeneration in the brain of NPD patients. However, the effects of aSMase deficiency on retinal structure and microglial behavior have not been addressed in detail yet. Here, we demonstrate that retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice did not display overt neuronal degeneration but showed significantly reduced scotopic and photopic responses in electroretinography. In vivo fundus imaging of aSMase{sup −/−} mice showed many hyperreflective spots and staining for the retinal microglia marker Iba1 revealed massive proliferation of retinal microglia that had significantly enlarged somata. Nile red staining detected prominent phospholipid inclusions in microglia and lipid analysis showed significantly increased sphingomyelin levels in retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, the aSMase-deficient mouse is the first example in which microglial lipid inclusions are directly related to a loss of retinal function. - Highlights: • aSMase-deficient mice show impaired retinal function and reactive microgliosis. • aSMase-deficient microglia express pro-inflammatory transcripts. • aSMase-deficient microglia proliferate and have increased cell body size. • In vivo imaging shows hyperreflective spots in the fundus of aSMase-deficient mice. • aSMase-deficient microglia accumulate sphingolipid-rich intracellular deposits.

  4. An unknown combination of infantile spasms, retinal lesions, facial dysmorphism and limb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Plomp, A S; Reardon, W; Benton, S; Taylor, D; Larcher, V F; Sundrum, R; Winter, R M

    2000-07-01

    A female patient is presented with infantile spasms, punched-out retinal lesions, facial dysmorphism, short upper arms, short thumbs, left lower limb hypoplasia with foot deformity, a hemivertebra, atrial septal defect, growth retardation and severe developmental delay. There is some similarity to patients with Aicardi syndrome (AS), but the retinal lesions in our patient are different and she does not have agenesis of the corpus callosum, one of the diagnostic features of AS. She might represent an atypical form of this syndrome with additional features, usually not present in AS. As there is no diagnostic test for AS yet, this diagnosis cannot be confirmed nor rejected with certainty. However, it might be more likely that our patient has another, possibly unique, condition.

  5. The influence of red blood cell scattering in optical pathways of retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Serge Emile

    The ability to measure the oxygen saturation, oximetry, of retinal blood both non-invasively and in-vivo has been a goal of eye research for years. Retinal oximetry can in principle be achieved from the measurement of the reflectance spectrum of the ocular fundus. Oximetry calculations are however complicated by the scattering of red blood cells, the different pathways of light through blood and the ocular tissues that light interacts with before exiting the eye. The goal of this thesis was to investigate the influence of red blood cell scattering for different light paths relevant to retinal oximetry. Results of in-vitro whole blood experiments found calculated oxygen saturation differences between blood samples measured under different retinal light paths, and these differences did not depend on the absorbance path length. We also showed that the calculated oxygen saturation value determined by a multiple linear regression Beer-Lambert absorbance model depended on the wavelength range chosen for analysis. The wavelength dependency on the calculated oxygen saturation value is due in part to the correlation that exists between the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin extinction coefficient spectra and to errors in the assumptions built into the Beer-Lambert absorbance model. A wavelength region with low correlation between the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin extinction coefficients was found that is hypothesized to be a good range to calculate oxygen saturation using a multiple linear regression approach.

  6. Dual beam Doppler FD-OCT system with integrated Dynamic Vessel Analyzer and rotatable beams to measure total retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Werkmeister, René M.; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-03-01

    We present a method capable of measuring the total retinal blood flow in arteries and veins based on dual beam Fourierdomain Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with a fundus camera based Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Incorporating a Dynamic vessel analyzer into the system not only gives a live image of the fundus - it also allows determining the vessels' diameter precisely during the OCT measurement, which is necessary for the determination of the blood flow. While dual beam systems with fixed detection plane allow only vessels with certain orientations to be measured, the detection plane of our system can be rotated by 90°. This ensures that the blood's velocity can be measured in all vessels around the optic nerve head. The results of the total blood flow measurements are in the same range as previously published data. Additionally, the high degree of conformity between the measured venous and arterial flow corroborated the system's validity. For larger vessels, the logarithmic values of vessel diameter and blood flow were found to be related linearly with a regression coefficient of around 3, which is in accordance with Murray's law. For smaller vessels (diameter below 60 μm), the values diverge from the linear dependence. The high sensitivity and the good agreement with published data suggest a high potential for examining the retinal blood flow in patients with ocular diseases.

  7. DR HAGIS-a fundus image database for the automatic extraction of retinal surface vessels from diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sven; Russell, Greg; Nourrit, Vincent; McLoughlin, Niall

    2017-01-01

    A database of retinal fundus images, the DR HAGIS database, is presented. This database consists of 39 high-resolution color fundus images obtained from a diabetic retinopathy screening program in the UK. The NHS screening program uses service providers that employ different fundus and digital cameras. This results in a range of different image sizes and resolutions. Furthermore, patients enrolled in such programs often display other comorbidities in addition to diabetes. Therefore, in an effort to replicate the normal range of images examined by grading experts during screening, the DR HAGIS database consists of images of varying image sizes and resolutions and four comorbidity subgroups: collectively defined as the diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, age-related macular degeneration, and Glaucoma image set (DR HAGIS). For each image, the vasculature has been manually segmented to provide a realistic set of images on which to test automatic vessel extraction algorithms. Modified versions of two previously published vessel extraction algorithms were applied to this database to provide some baseline measurements. A method based purely on the intensity of images pixels resulted in a mean segmentation accuracy of 95.83% ([Formula: see text]), whereas an algorithm based on Gabor filters generated an accuracy of 95.71% ([Formula: see text]).

  8. The association of socio-economic factors with physical fitness and activity behaviours, spinal posture and retinal vessel parameters in first graders in urban Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Katharina; Faude, Oliver; Donath, Lars; Bean-Eisenhut, Salome; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic status during childhood has been shown to be a strong predictor of adult health outcome. Therefore, we examined associations of parental educational level, household income and migrant background with physical fitness, spinal flexibility, spinal posture as well as retinal vessel diameters in children of an urban Swiss region. A total of 358 first graders of the Swiss canton Basel-Stadt (age: 7.3, SD: 0.4) were examined. Physical fitness (20 m shuttle run test, 20 m sprint, jumping sidewards and balancing backwards), spinal flexibility and spinal posture (MediMouse®, Idiag, Fehraltdorf, Switzerland) and retinal microcirculation (Static Retinal Vessel Analyzer, Imedos Systems UG, Jena, Germany) were assessed. Parental education, household income, migrant background and activity behaviour were evaluated with a questionnaire. Parental education was associated with child aerobic fitness (P = 0.03) and screen time (P < 0.001). Household income was associated with jumping sidewards (P = 0.009), balancing backwards (P = 0.03) and sports club participation (P = 0.02). Migrant background was associated with BMI (P = 0.001), body fat (P = 0.03), aerobic fitness (P = 0.007), time spent playing outdoors (P < 0.001) and screen time (P < 0.001). For spinal flexibility and retinal vessel diameter, no associations were found (0.06 < P < 0.8). Low parental education, low household income and a migrant background are associated with poor physical fitness, higher BMI and body fat percentage and low-activity behaviour.

  9. The association between retinal vasculature changes and stroke: a literature review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Qun; Wu, Huan; Shi, Li-Li; Yu, Li-Yuan; Wang, Li-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Lan; Geng, Jin-Song; Shi, Jian; Jiang, Kui; Dong, Jian-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between retinal vasculature changes and stroke. METHODS MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant human studies to September 2015 that investigated the association between retinal vasculature changes and the prevalence or incidence of stroke; the studies were independently examined for their qualities. Data on clinical characteristics and calculated summary odds ratios (ORs) were extracted for associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, including stroke subtypes where possible, and adjusted for key variables. RESULTS Nine cases were included in the study comprising 20 659 patients, 1178 of whom were stroke patients. The retinal microvascular morphological markers used were hemorrhage, microaneurysm, vessel caliber, arteriovenous nicking, and fractal dimension. OR of retinal arteriole narrowing and retinal arteriovenous nicking and stroke was 1.42 and 1.91, respectively, indicating that a small-caliber retinal arteriole and retinal arteriovenous nicking were associated with stroke. OR of retinal hemorrhage and retinal microaneurysm and stroke was 3.21 and 3.83, respectively, indicating that retinal microvascular lesions were highly associated with stroke. Results also showed that retinal fractal dimension reduction was associated with stroke (OR: 2.28 for arteriole network, OR: 1.80 for venular network). CONCLUSION Retinal vasculature changes have a specific relationship to stroke, which is promising evidence for the prediction of stroke using computerized retinal vessel analysis. PMID:28149786

  10. Absence of DJ-1 causes age-related retinal abnormalities in association with increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Vera L; Bell, Brent A; Rayborn, Mary E; Samuels, Ivy S; King, Anna; Hollyfield, Joe G; Xie, Chengsong; Cai, Huaibin

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress alters physiological function in most biological tissues and can lead to cell death. In the retina, oxidative stress initiates a cascade of events leading to focal loss of RPE and photoreceptors, which is thought to be a major contributing factor to geographic atrophy. Despite these implications, the molecular regulation of RPE oxidative stress under normal and pathological conditions remains largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in regulating RPE and photoreceptors oxidative stress response is greatly needed. To this end we evaluated photoreceptor and RPE changes in mice deficient in DJ-1, a protein that is thought to be important in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) and age-matched wild-type mice were examined. In both group of aged mice, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) showed the presence of a few autofluorescent foci. The 18 month-old DJ-1 KO retinas were also characterized by a noticeable increase in RPE fluorescence to wild-type. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging demonstrated that all retinal layers were present in the eyes of both DJ-1 KO groups. ERG comparisons showed that older DJ-1 KO mice had reduced sensitivity under dark- and light-adapted conditions compared to age-matched control. Histologically, the RPE contained prominent vacuoles in young DJ-1 KO group with the appearance of enlarged irregularly shaped RPE cells in the older group. These were also evident in OCT and in whole mount RPE/choroid preparations labeled with phalloidin. Photoreceptors in the older DJ-1 KO mice displayed decreased immunoreactivity to rhodopsin and localized reduction in cone markers compared to the wild-type control group. Lower levels of activated Nrf2 were evident in retina/RPE lysates in both young and old DJ-1 KO mouse groups compared to wild-type control levels. Conversely, higher levels of protein carbonyl derivatives and i

  11. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Healthy and Abnormal Regions of Retinal Nerve Fiber Bundles of Patients With Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Monica F.; Chui, Toco Y. P.; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B.; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To better understand the nature of glaucomatous damage of the macula, especially the structural changes seen between relatively healthy and clearly abnormal (AB) retinal regions, using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). Methods. Adaptive optics SLO images and optical coherence tomography (OCT) vertical line scans were obtained on one eye of seven glaucoma patients, with relatively deep local arcuate defects on the 10-2 visual field test in one (six eyes) or both hemifields (one eye). Based on the OCT images, the retinal nerve fiber (RNF) layer was divided into two regions: (1) within normal limits (WNL), relative RNF layer thickness within mean control values ±2 SD; and (2) AB, relative thickness less than −2 SD value. Results. As seen on AO-SLO, the pattern of AB RNF bundles near the border of the WNL and AB regions differed across eyes. There were normal-appearing bundles in the WNL region of all eyes and AB-appearing bundles near the border with the AB region. This region with AB bundles ranged in extent from a few bundles to the entire AB region in the case of one eye. All other eyes had a large AB region without bundles. However, in two of these eyes, a few bundles were seen within this region of otherwise missing bundles. Conclusions. The AO-SLO images revealed details of glaucomatous damage that are difficult, if not impossible, to see with current OCT technology. Adaptive optics SLO may prove useful in following progression in clinical trials, or in disease management, if AO-SLO becomes widely available and easy to use. PMID:25574048

  12. Oximetry of retinal capillaries by multicomponent analysis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Shirai, Tomohiro; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-08-01

    Retinal oximetry of capillaries was performed for early detection of retinal vascular abnormalities, which are caused predominantly by complications of systemic circulatory diseases. As the conventional method for determining absorbance is not applicable to capillaries, multicomponent analysis was used to estimate the absorbance spectra of the retinal blood vessels. In this analysis, the capillary spectrum was classified as intermediate between those of the retinal arteries and veins, enabling relative estimation of oxygen saturation in the capillaries. This method could be useful for early recognition of disturbances in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, a spectroscopic ophthalmoscope system based on the proposed method was developed to examine the human retina. A clinical trial of this system demonstrated that oximetry of the retinal capillaries may be an improvement over the present diagnosis for patients of malignant hypertension.

  13. Optomap ultrawide field imaging identifies additional retinal abnormalities in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Liam D; Au, Stephanie; Chong, N Victor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity grading between Optomap ultrawide field scanning laser ophthalmoscope (UWFSLO) 200° images and an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) seven-standard field view. Methods Optomap UWFSLO images (total: 266) were retrospectively selected for evidence of DR from a database of eye clinic attendees. The Optomap UWFSLO images were graded for DR severity by two masked assessors. An ETDRS seven-field mask was overlaid on the Optomap UWFSLO images, and the DR grade was assessed for the region inside the mask. Any interassessor discrepancies were adjudicated by a senior retinal specialist. Kappa agreement levels were used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty images (19%) (P<0.001) were assigned a higher DR level in the Optomap UWFSLO view compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, which resulted in 40 images (15%) (P<0.001) receiving a higher DR severity grade. DR severity grades in the ETDRS seven-field view compared with the Optomap UWFSLO view were identical in 85% (226) of the images and within one severity level in 100% (266) of the images. Agreement between the two views was substantial: unweighted κ was 0.74±0.04 (95% confidence interval: 0.67–0.81) and weighted κ was 0.80±0.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.86). Conclusion Compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, a significant minority of patients are diagnosed with more severe DR when using the Optomap UWFSLO view. The clinical significance of additional peripheral lesions requires evaluation in future prospective studies using large cohorts. PMID:25848202

  14. High glucose‐induced changes in hyaloid‐retinal vessels during early ocular development of zebrafish: a short‐term animal model of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung‐Hyun; Kim, Young Sook; Lee, Yu‐Ri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although a variety of animal models have been used to test drug candidates and examine the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, time‐saving and inexpensive models are still needed to evaluate the increasing number of therapeutic approaches. Experimental Approach We developed a model for diabetic retinopathy using the early stage of transgenic zebrafish (flk:EGFP) by treating embryos with 130 mM glucose, from 3‐6 days post fertilisation (high‐glucose model). On day 6, lenses from zebrafish larvae were isolated and treated with 3% trypsin, and changes in hyaloid‐retinal vessels were analysed using fluorescent stereomicroscopy. In addition, expression of tight junction proteins (such as zonula occludens‐1), effects of hyperosmolar solutions and of hypoxia, and Vegf expression were assessed by RT –PCR. NO production was assessed with a fluorescent substrate. Effects of inhibitors of the VEGF receptor, NO synthesis and a VEGF antibody (ranibizumab) were also measured. Key Results In this high‐glucose model, dilation of hyaloid‐retinal vessels, on day 6, was accompanied by morphological lesions with disruption of tight junction proteins, overproduction of Vegf mRNA and increased NO production. Treatment of this high‐glucose model with an inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase or an inhibitor of NO synthase or ranibizumab decreased dilation of hyaloid‐retinal vessels. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggest that short‐term exposure of zebrafish larvae to high‐glucose conditions could be used for screening and drug discovery for diabetic retinopathy and particularly for disorders of retinal vessels related to disruption of tight junction proteins and excessive VEGF and NO production. PMID:26276677

  15. Assessing blood vessel abnormality via extracting scattering coefficients from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Andersen, Claus B.; Frosz, Michael H.; Thrane, Lars; Hansen, Peter R.; Jorgensen, Thomas M.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2003-10-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the industrialized world. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution intravascular imaging technology with a potential for in vivo plaque characterization. Although structural remodeling of the arterial vessel wall during plaque development can change tissue optical scattering properties, very limited evidence is available on the exact optical scattering properties of plaques. The scattering coefficient, μs, and the anisotropy factor, g, can be derived from OCT images by fitting a theoretical model to individual depth-scans. The aim of the current study was to use this method to examine by OCT the scattering properties of human arteries with different stages of atherosclerotic lesion development. Methods: Normal (n=4), lipid-rich (n=4), and fibrous (n=3) aortic blocks as classified by parallel histopathologic examination were obtained within 24 hours of death and imaged by OCT. The intima was located in the OCT images, and then further split into 115 blocks (41 normal, 40 lipid-rich, and 34 fibrous) of adjacent OCT depth-scans transversely spanning ~200-300 μm. Scattering signals from each block were averaged and fit to the theoretical model. From these fittings, μs and g were extracted. Results and Discussion: The optical scattering properties of normal aortic intima were quite different from lipid-rich and fibrous lesions, respectively. We discovered that the normal intima was generally highly forward scattering, i.e., with 0.917vessels were much less so. Furthermore, normal vessels usually had 15<μs<39 mm-1, whereas lipid-rich blocks had μs<15mm-1. Fibrous blocks displayed large variations in μs, reflecting a histopathology with varying amounts of collagen, lipids, and elastin. Based on our findings, we defined a criteria of μs and g for normal intimas, using the above values of μs and g as cutoffs. Our "normal" criteria

  16. Proanthocyanidins from Spenceria ramalana and their effects on AGE formation in vitro and hyaloid-retinal vessel dilation in larval zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Yu, Song Yi; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Yu-Ri; Lee, Yun Mi; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Sun, Hang; Kim, Jin Sook

    2013-10-25

    Three new A-type proanthocyanidins (1-3), ent-epiafzelechin-(2α→O→7,4α→8)-ent-afzelechin 3'-O-β-D-glycopyranoside (1), ent-epiafzelechin-(2α→O→7,4α→8)-ent-epiafzelechin-(2α→O→7,4α→8)-ent-afzelechin (2), and ent-epiafzelechin-(2α→O→7,4α→8)-ent-epicatechin-(2α→O→7,4α→8)-ent-afzelechin (3), and three known compounds (4-6) were isolated from the whole plant of Spenceria ramalana. The structures of the new proanthocyanidins were established by spectroscopic and chemical studies. The inhibitory effects of compounds 1-6 on the formation of advanced glycation end products were examined in vitro. Compounds 3 and 6 showed the strongest inhibition, with IC50 values of 17.4 ± 0.5 and 14.1 ± 1.6 μM, respectively. The effects of these isolates on the dilation of hyaloid-retinal vessels induced by high glucose (HG) in larval zebrafish were also investigated. Compound 3 reduced the dilation of HG-induced hyaloid-retinal vessels most effectively. This compound reduced the diameters of HG-induced hyaloid-retinal vessels by about 157.7% and 164.1% at 10 and 20 μM, respectively, versus the HG-treated control group.

  17. Modulation of Abnormal Metabolic Brain Networks by Experimental Therapies in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson Disease: An Application to Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Implantation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Flores, Joseph; Cornfeldt, Michael; Mitrovic, Branka; Eidelberg, David; Doudet, Doris J

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal covariance pattern of regional metabolism associated with Parkinson disease (PD) is modulated by dopaminergic pharmacotherapy. Using high-resolution (18)F-FDG PET and network analysis, we previously derived and validated a parkinsonism-related metabolic pattern (PRP) in nonhuman primate models of PD. It is currently not known whether this network is modulated by experimental therapeutics. In this study, we examined changes in network activity by striatal implantation of human levodopa-producing retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells in parkinsonian macaques and evaluated the reproducibility of network activity in a small test-retest study.

  18. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels in Human Subjects Undergoing Head-Down Tilt During 70-Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyas, Ruchi J.; Murray, Matthew C.; Predovic, Marina; Lim, Shiyin; Askin, Kayleigh N.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Mason, Sara Stroble; Zanello, Susana B.; Young, Millenia; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions [1]. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within blood vessels of the retina that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated for two studies in 30deg infrared (IR) Heidelberg Spectralis(Registered Trademark) images with NASA's innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software [2,3]. The retrospective studies include: (1) before, during and after (pre, mid and post) 6º head-down tilt (HDT) in human subjects during 70 days of bed rest, and (2) before and after missions to the International Space Station (ISS) by U.S. crew members. Results for both studies are almost complete. A preliminary example for HDT is described below.

  19. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  20. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets.

  1. Retinal microvascular plasticity in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Y; Hartley, L; Smith, R

    2017-01-31

    Dilation and abnormal tortuosity of retinal vessels are the hallmarks of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in premature infants. The stages of ROP are defined by vessel appearance at the interface between the vascular and avascular retinal areas. Deregulated signaling pathways involving hypoxia-inducible factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in the pathogenesis of ROP. VEGF-antagonists are increasingly being used as 'off-label medication' to treat this condition, with some success. We present Baby SM (female), who was born prematurely at 24 weeks gestation in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit, and with a birth weight of 640 g. On screening at 35 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA), she was noted to have ROP, which became severe by 37 weeks PMA. She received one dose of intravitreal VEGF antagonist (Bevacizumab), resulting in a decrease in vessel tortuosity and dilation. However, repeat imaging at 4 weeks showed a re-emergence of vessel tortuosity. We believe the observed changes demonstrate an inherent retinal microvascular plasticity in premature neonates. With improved survival of extremely premature neonates and the availability of retinal imaging technology, we are now able to observe this plasticity.

  2. Hybrid Features and Mediods Classification based Robust Segmentation of Blood Vessels.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Amna; Akram, M Usman; Khalid, Shehzad; Waheed, Zahra; Khan, Muazzam A; Shaukat, Arslan

    2015-10-01

    Retinal blood vessels are the source to provide oxygen and nutrition to retina and any change in the normal structure may lead to different retinal abnormalities. Automated detection of vascular structure is very important while designing a computer aided diagnostic system for retinal diseases. Most popular methods for vessel segmentation are based on matched filters and Gabor wavelets which give good response against blood vessels. One major drawback in these techniques is that they also give strong response for lesion (exudates, hemorrhages) boundaries which give rise to false vessels. These false vessels may lead to incorrect detection of vascular changes. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid feature set along with new classification technique for accurate detection of blood vessels. The main motivation is to lower the false positives especially from retinal images with severe disease level. A novel region based hybrid feature set is presented for proper discrimination between true and false vessels. A new modified m-mediods based classification is also presented which uses most discriminating features to categorize vessel regions into true and false vessels. The evaluation of proposed system is done thoroughly on publicly available databases along with a locally gathered database with images of advanced level of retinal diseases. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed system as compared to existing state of the art techniques.

  3. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease.

  4. Automated segmentation of 3-D spectral OCT retinal blood vessels by neural canal opening false positive suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoft, Michael D; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for automatically segmenting the blood vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes, with a focus on the ability to segment the vessels in the region near the neural canal opening (NCO). The algorithm first pre-segments the NCO using a graph-theoretic approach. Oriented Gabor wavelets rotated around the center of the NCO are applied to extract features in a 2-D vessel-aimed projection image. Corresponding oriented NCO-based templates are utilized to help suppress the false positive tendency near the NCO boundary. The vessels are identified in a vessel-aimed projection image using a pixel classification algorithm. Based on the 2-D vessel profiles, 3-D vessel segmentation is performed by a triangular-mesh-based graph search approach in the SD-OCT volume. The segmentation method is trained on 5 and is tested on 10 randomly chosen independent ONH-centered SD-OCT volumes from 15 subjects with glaucoma. Using ROC analysis, for the 2-D vessel segmentation, we demonstrate an improvement over the closest previous work with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81 (0.72 for previously reported approach) for the region around the NCO and 0.84 for the region outside the NCO (0.81 for previously reported approach).

  5. Deep neural network and random forest hybrid architecture for learning to detect retinal vessels in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Maji, Debapriya; Santara, Anirban; Ghosh, Sambuddha; Sheet, Debdoot; Mitra, Pabitra

    2015-08-01

    Vision impairment due to pathological damage of the retina can largely be prevented through periodic screening using fundus color imaging. However the challenge with large-scale screening is the inability to exhaustively detect fine blood vessels crucial to disease diagnosis. In this work we present a computational imaging framework using deep and ensemble learning based hybrid architecture for reliable detection of blood vessels in fundus color images. A deep neural network (DNN) is used for unsupervised learning of vesselness dictionaries using sparse trained denoising auto-encoders (DAE), followed by supervised learning of the DNN response using a random forest for detecting vessels in color fundus images. In experimental evaluation with the DRIVE database, we achieve the objective of vessel detection with max. avg. accuracy of 0.9327 and area under ROC curve of 0.9195.

  6. Detection and measurement of retinal vessels in fundus images using amplitude modified second-order Gaussian filter.

    PubMed

    Gang, Luo; Chutatape, Opas; Krishnan, Shankar M

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, the fitness of estimating vessel profiles with Gaussian function is evaluated and an amplitude-modified second-order Gaussian filter is proposed for the detection and measurement of vessels. Mathematical analysis is given and supported by a simulation and experiments to demonstrate that the vessel width can be measured in linear relationship with the "spreading factor" of the matched filter when the magnitude coefficient of the filter is suitably assigned. The absolute value of vessel diameter can be determined simply by using a precalibrated line, which is typically required since images are always system dependent. The experiment shows that the inclusion of the width measurement in the detection process can improve the performance of matched filter and result in a significant increase in success rate of detection.

  7. Tight junctional abnormality in multiple sclerosis white matter affects all calibres of vessel and is associated with blood-brain barrier leakage and active demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kirk, John; Plumb, Jonnie; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; McQuaid, Stephen

    2003-10-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability in multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with lesion pathogenesis and has been linked to pathology in microvascular tight junctions (TJs). This study quantifies the uneven distribution of TJ pathology and its association with BBB leakage. Frozen sections from plaque and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in 14 cases were studied together with white matter from six neurological and five normal controls. Using single and double immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the TJ-associated protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was examined across lesion types and tissue categories, and in relation to fibrinogen leakage. Confocal image data sets were analysed for 2198 MS and 1062 control vessels. Significant differences in the incidence of TJ abnormalities were detected between the different lesion types in MS and between MS and control white matter. These were frequent in oil-red O (ORO)(+) active plaques, affecting 42% of vessel segments, but less frequent in ORO(-) inactive plaques (23%), NAWM (13%), and normal (3.7%) and neurological controls (8%). A similar pattern was found irrespective of the vessel size, supporting a causal role for diffusible inflammatory mediators. In both NAWM and inactive lesions, dual labelling showed that vessels with the most TJ abnormality also showed most fibrinogen leakage. This was even more pronounced in active lesions, where 41% of vessels in the highest grade for TJ alteration showed severe leakage. It is concluded that disruption of TJs in MS, affecting both paracellular and transcellular paths, contributes to BBB leakage. TJ abnormality and BBB leakage in inactive lesions suggests either failure of TJ repair or a continuing pathological process. In NAWM, it suggests either pre-lesional change or secondary damage. Clinically inapparent TJ pathology has prognostic implications and should be considered when planning disease-modifying therapy.

  8. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  9. Calpain inhibitors reduce retinal hypoxia in ischemic retinopathy by improving neovascular architecture and functional perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Mien V; Smith, Lois E H; Senger, Donald R

    2011-04-01

    In ischemic retinopathies, underlying hypoxia drives abnormal neovascularization that damages retina and causes blindness. The abnormal neovasculature is tortuous and leaky and fails to alleviate hypoxia, resulting in more pathological neovascularization and retinal damage. With an established model of ischemic retinopathy we found that calpain inhibitors, when administered in moderation, reduced architectural abnormalities, reduced vascular leakage, and most importantly reduced retinal hypoxia. Mechanistically, these calpain inhibitors improved stability and organization of the actin cytoskeleton in retinal endothelial cells undergoing capillary morphogenesis in vitro, and they similarly improved organization of actin cables within new blood vessels in vivo. Hypoxia induced calpain activity in retinal endothelial cells and severely disrupted the actin cytoskeleton, whereas calpain inhibitors preserved actin cables under hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that hyper-activation of calpains by hypoxia contributes to disruption of the retinal endothelial cell cytoskeleton, resulting in formation of neovessels that are defective both architecturally and functionally. Modest suppression of calpain activity with calpain inhibitors restores cytoskeletal architecture and promotes formation of a functional neovasculature, thereby reducing underlying hypoxia. In sharp contrast to "anti-angiogenesis" strategies that cannot restore normoxia and may aggravate hypoxia, the therapeutic strategy described here does not inhibit neovascularization. Instead, by improving the function of neovascularization to reduce underlying hypoxia, moderate calpain inhibition offers a method for alleviating retinal ischemia, thereby suggesting a new treatment paradigm based on improvement rather than inhibition of new blood vessel growth.

  10. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  11. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  12. Increased vascular density and vitreo-retinal membranes accompany vascularization of the pigment epithelium in the dystrophic rat retina.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, R B; Roque, R S; Solomon, S W

    1989-09-01

    Observations of vascularization of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and formation of vitreo-retinal membranes (VRMs) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with inherited retinal dystrophy suggest that vascular proliferation occurs in this model. To test this hypothesis, we studied the progression of vascular changes in RCS and age-matched control rats using quantitative light microscope morphometry and electron microscopy. At 2 weeks, prior to photoreceptor degeneration, the dystrophic retina is comparable with the control. By 2 months, extensive degeneration of photoreceptor cells results in significant thinning of the dystrophic retina as compared with the control. Signs of vascular degeneration are evident at the electron microscope level--"ghost" vessels consisting of acellular basal lamina surrounded by amorphous electron-dense material; degenerating endothelial cells and pericytes; and abnormal deposits of extracellular matrix (ECM) material around blood vessels. Vascular degeneration is accompanied by glial changes in the form of necrotic perivascular glial processes and abnormal ECM deposits among the altered Muller cell processes. At 2-4 months in the dystrophic retina, numbers of vessel profiles in dystrophic retinas are decreased as compared with controls. However, vascular degeneration is overshadowed by the formation of numerous capillary tufts within the RPE layer, which together with retinal thinning results in increased vessel density. Between 4-12 months, the retinal thickness diminishes further, vascularization of the RPE increases, vitreo-retinal membranes are formed, and vascular density increases. In summary, following an initial period of vascular degeneration, vascularization of the RPE is accompanied by an increase in retinal vessel density and by the formation of vitreo-retinal membranes.

  13. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  14. Automatic arteriovenous crossing phenomenon detection on retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Arteriolosclerosis is one cause of acquired blindness. Retinal fundus image examination is useful for early detection of arteriolosclerosis. In order to diagnose the presence of arteriolosclerosis, the physicians find the silver-wire arteries, the copper-wire arteries and arteriovenous crossing phenomenon on retinal fundus images. The focus of this study was to develop the automated detection method of the arteriovenous crossing phenomenon on the retinal images. The blood vessel regions were detected by using a double ring filter, and the crossing sections of artery and vein were detected by using a ring filter. The center of that ring was an interest point, and that point was determined as a crossing section when there were over four blood vessel segments on that ring. And two blood vessels gone through on the ring were classified into artery and vein by using the pixel values on red and blue component image. Finally, V2-to-V1 ratio was measured for recognition of abnormalities. V1 was the venous diameter far from the blood vessel crossing section, and V2 was the venous diameter near from the blood vessel crossing section. The crossing section with V2-to-V1 ratio over 0.8 was experimentally determined as abnormality. Twenty four images, including 27 abnormalities and 54 normal crossing sections, were used for preliminary evaluation of the proposed method. The proposed method was detected 73% of crossing sections when the 2.8 sections per image were mis-detected. And, 59% of abnormalities were detected by measurement of V1-to-V2 ratio when the 1.7 sections per image were mis-detected.

  15. Automatic Retinal Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, G. H.; Karlsson, R. A.; Hardarson, S. H.; Mura, M. Dalla; Eysteinsson, T.; Beach, J. M.; Stefansson, E.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automating the evaluation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the retina. This method should prove useful for monitoring ischemic retinal diseases and the effect of treatment. In order to obtain saturation values automatically, spectral images must be registered in pairs, the vessels of the retina located and measurement points must be selected. The registration algorithm is based on a data driven approach that circumvents many of the problems that have plagued previous methods. The vessels are extracted using an algorithm based on morphological profiles and supervised classifiers. Measurement points on retinal arterioles and venules as well as reference points on the adjacent fundus are automatically selected. Oxygen saturation values along vessels are averaged to arrive at a more accurate estimate of the retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The system yields reproducible results as well as being sensitive to changes in oxygen saturation.

  16. Vessel segmentation and microaneurysm detection using discriminative dictionary learning and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Javidi, Malihe; Pourreza, Hamid-Reza; Harati, Ahad

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major cause of visual impairment, and the analysis of retinal image can assist patients to take action earlier when it is more likely to be effective. The accurate segmentation of blood vessels in the retinal image can diagnose DR directly. In this paper, a novel scheme for blood vessel segmentation based on discriminative dictionary learning (DDL) and sparse representation has been proposed. The proposed system yields a strong representation which contains the semantic concept of the image. To extract blood vessel, two separate dictionaries, for vessel and non-vessel, capable of providing reconstructive and discriminative information of the retinal image are learned. In the test step, an unseen retinal image is divided into overlapping patches and classified to vessel and non-vessel patches. Then, a voting scheme is applied to generate the binary vessel map. The proposed vessel segmentation method can achieve the accuracy of 95% and a sensitivity of 75% in the same range of specificity 97% on two public datasets. The results show that the proposed method can achieve comparable results to existing methods and decrease false positive vessels in abnormal retinal images with pathological regions. Microaneurysm (MA) is the earliest sign of DR that appears as a small red dot on the surface of the retina. Despite several attempts to develop automated MA detection systems, it is still a challenging problem. In this paper, a method for MA detection, which is similar to our vessel segmentation approach, is proposed. In our method, a candidate detection algorithm based on the Morlet wavelet is applied to identify all possible MA candidates. In the next step, two discriminative dictionaries with the ability to distinguish MA from non-MA object are learned. These dictionaries are then used to classify the detected candidate objects. The evaluations indicate that the proposed MA detection method achieves higher average sensitivity about 2

  17. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  18. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  19. Absence of abnormal vessels in the subarachnoid space on conventional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy R; Eskey, Clifford J; Mamourian, Alexander C

    2012-05-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is an uncommon condition that can be difficult to diagnose. This often results in misdiagnosis and treatment delay. Although conventional MRI plays an important role in the initial screening for the disease, the typical MRI findings may be absent. In this article, the authors present a series of 4 cases involving patients with angiographically proven spinal DAVFs who demonstrated cord T2 prolongation on conventional MRI but without abnormal subarachnoid flow voids or enhancement. These cases suggest that spinal DAVF cannot be excluded in symptomatic patients with cord edema based on conventional MRI findings alone. Dynamic Gd-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) was successful in demonstrating abnormal spinal vasculature in all 4 cases. This limited experience provides support for the role of spinal MRA in patients with abnormal cord signal and symptoms suggestive of DAVF even when typical MRI findings of a DAVF are absent.

  20. Rescue of retinal degeneration by intravitreally injected adult bone marrow–derived lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Atsushi; Dorrell, Michael Ian; Kinder, Karen; Moreno, Stacey K.; Nusinowitz, Steven; Banin, Eyal; Heckenlively, John; Friedlander, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations afflict 1 in 3,500 individuals and are a heterogeneous group of diseases that result in profound vision loss, usually the result of retinal neuronal apoptosis. Atrophic changes in the retinal vasculature are also observed in many of these degenerations. While it is thought that this atrophy is secondary to diminished metabolic demand in the face of retinal degeneration, the precise relationship between the retinal neuronal and vascular degeneration is not clear. In this study we demonstrate that whenever a fraction of mouse or human adult bone marrow–derived stem cells (lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells [Lin– HSCs]) containing endothelial precursors stabilizes and rescues retinal blood vessels that would ordinarily completely degenerate, a dramatic neurotrophic rescue effect is also observed. Retinal nuclear layers are preserved in 2 mouse models of retinal degeneration, rd1 and rd10, and detectable, albeit severely abnormal, electroretinogram recordings are observed in rescued mice at times when they are never observed in control-treated or untreated eyes. The normal mouse retina consists predominantly of rods, but the rescued cells after treatment with Lin– HSCs are nearly all cones. Microarray analysis of rescued retinas demonstrates significant upregulation of many antiapoptotic genes, including small heat shock proteins and transcription factors. These results suggest a new paradigm for thinking about the relationship between vasculature and associated retinal neuronal tissue as well as a potential treatment for delaying the progression of vision loss associated with retinal degeneration regardless of the underlying genetic defect. PMID:15372100

  1. Retinal vascular tree reconstruction with anatomical realism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Shun; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Chih-Hsiangng; Sofka, Michal; Chen, Shih-Jen; Lin, Wei-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of automatically extracting vessel segments and constructing retinal vascular trees with anatomical realism, this paper presents and analyses an algorithm that combines vessel segmentation and grouping of the extracted vessel segments. The proposed method aims to restore the topology of the vascular trees with anatomical realism for clinical studies and diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases, which manifest abnormalities in either venous and/or arterial vascular systems. Vessel segments are grouped using extended Kalman filter which takes into account continuities in curvature, width, and intensity changes at the bifurcation or crossover point. At a junction, the proposed method applies the minimum-cost matching algorithm to resolve the conflict in grouping due to error in tracing. The system was trained with 20 images from the DRIVE dataset, and tested using the remaining 20 images. The dataset contained a mixture of normal and pathological images. In addition, six pathological fluorescein angiogram sequences were also included in this study. The results were compared against the groundtruth images provided by a physician, achieving average success rates of 88.79% and 90.09%, respectively.

  2. The Blood-Retinal Barrier in the Management of Retinal Disease: EURETINA Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Vaz, José

    2017-01-01

    Retinal diseases are the main causes of blindness in the Western world. Diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration continue to increase in prevalence and as main causes of vision loss. Intravitreal anti-VEGF and steroid injections have raised new expectations for their successful treatment. These agents act by stabilizing the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Our group defined the BRB by identifying for the first time the tight junctions that unite retinal endothelial cells and are the basis for the inner BRB, an observation later confirmed in retinal pigment epithelial cells and in brain vessels. A major role of active transport processes was also identified. Today, the BRB is understood to play a fundamental role in retinal function in both health and disease. Retinal edema, an ubiquitous manifestation of retinal disease, is directly associated with breakdown of the BRB and with vision loss. In its most common form (i.e., vasogenic edema), due to breakdown of the BRB, Starling's law of capillary filtration may be used to interpret the mechanisms of fluid accumulation in the retina. The main factors involved in the development of retinal edema are BRB permeability, capillary hydrostatic pressure, tissue hydrostatic pressure, tissue osmotic pressure, and plasma osmotic pressure. In the clinical environment, breakdown of the BRB has been identified by fluorescein angiography and vitreous fluorometry, requiring the intravenous administration of fluorescein. An OCT-based method, OCT-Leakage, recently introduced by our group is capable of noninvasively identifying and quantifying sites of alteration of the BRB by mapping areas of lower-than-normal optical reflectivity, thus reflecting changes in the retinal extracellular fluid. We found good correspondence between the location of increased areas of low optical reflectivity identified by OCT-Leakage and the main sites of leakage on fluorescein angiography. Furthermore, with OCT-Leakage the areas of abnormal

  3. Clinicopathologic correlation of retinal to choroidal venous collaterals of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Green, W R; Talamo, J H; Hoyt, W F; Johnson, R N; McDonald, H R

    1991-08-01

    An optic nerve meningioma developed in an elderly woman and was followed for 13 years until her death. The optic nerve was initially normal. Over time it became swollen and then atrophic and developed retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals. Five hundred serial sections were prepared through the optic nerve and for approximately 1.5 mm superiorly and inferiorly to the optic nerve to trace the course of the collaterals that were seen ophthalmoscopically and angiographically in the optic nerve head. This clinicopathologic study shows clearly that the abnormal channels are, in fact, retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals (bypass channels). Four collaterals extended around the end of Bruch's membrane at the optic nerve head. Two more collaterals extended through the retinal pigment epithelium to become continuous with a subretinal pigment epithelial neovascular membrane, the vessels of which connected with the choroidal vessels through a defect in Bruch's membrane.

  4. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  5. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Beach, James

    2014-09-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry.

  6. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma.

    PubMed

    Shields, J A; Joffe, L; Guibor, P

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  7. Retina-specific activation of a sustained hypoxia-like response leads to severe retinal degeneration and loss of vision.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christina; Caprara, Christian; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Beck, Susanne; Huber, Gesine; Samardzija, Marijana; Seeliger, Mathias; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Loss of vision and blindness in human patients is often caused by the degeneration of neuronal cells in the retina. In mouse models, photoreceptors can be protected from death by hypoxic preconditioning. Preconditioning in low oxygen stabilizes and activates hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIFs), which play a major role in the hypoxic response of tissues including the retina. We show that a tissue-specific knockdown of von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL) activated HIF transcription factors in normoxic conditions in the retina. Sustained activation of HIF1 and HIF2 was accompanied by persisting embryonic vasculatures in the posterior eye and the iris. Embryonic vessels persisted into adulthood and led to a severely abnormal mature vessel system with vessels penetrating the photoreceptor layer in adult mice. The sustained hypoxia-like response also activated the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-controlled endogenous molecular cell survival pathway. However, this was not sufficient to protect the retina against massive cell death in all retinal layers of adult mice. Caspases 1, 3 and 8 were upregulated during the degeneration as were several VHL target genes connected to the extracellular matrix. Misregulation of these genes may influence retinal structure and may therefore facilitate growth of vessels into the photoreceptor layer. Thus, an early and sustained activation of a hypoxia-like response in retinal cells leads to abnormal vasculature and severe retinal degeneration in the adult mouse retina.

  8. Retinal pseudoangiitis after intravitreal triamcinolone

    PubMed Central

    García-Campos, Jose Manuel; García-Basterra, Ignacio; Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a fundus image similar to frosted retinal angiitis after undergoing pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal triamcinolone injection. The patient with diabetic retinopathy was referred to our hospital with vision loss in her right eye secondary to vitreous haemorrhage. After pars plana vitrectomy and injection of triamcinolone acetonide a funduscopy examination revealed deposits of triamcinolone along the retinal vessels simulating a frosted retinal angiitis. Triamcinolone deposits along blood vessels could be the result of the reabsorption process of these crystals by the perivascular macrophages. Further studies are needed. PMID:25678611

  9. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High-resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using 2D blood vessel templates. An overview of the robotic laser system design is followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept and, finally, specifications for a real-time system are provided.

  10. Moderate GSK-3β inhibition improves neovascular architecture, reduces vascular leakage, and reduces retinal hypoxia in a model of ischemic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Mien V; Smith, Lois E H; Senger, Donald R

    2010-09-01

    In ischemic retinopathies, unrelieved hypoxia induces the formation of architecturally abnormal, leaky blood vessels that damage retina and ultimately can cause blindness. Because these newly formed blood vessels are functionally defective, they fail to alleviate underlying hypoxia, resulting in more pathological neovascularization and more damage to retina. With an established model of ischemic retinopathy, we investigated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) as a means for improving the architecture and functionality of pathological blood vessels in retina. In vitro, hypoxia increased GSK-3β activity in retinal endothelial cells, reduced β-catenin, and correspondingly impaired integrity of cell/cell junctions. Conversely, GSK-3β inhibitors restored β-catenin, improved cell/cell junctions, and enhanced the formation of capillary cords in three-dimensional collagen matrix. In vivo, GSK-3β inhibitors, at appropriately moderate doses, strongly reduced abnormal vascular tufts, reduced abnormal vascular leakage, and improved vascular coverage and perfusion during the proliferative phase of ischemia-driven retinal neovascularization. Most importantly, these improvements in neovasculature were accompanied by marked reduction in retinal hypoxia, relative to controls. Thus, GSK-3β inhibitors offer a promising strategy for alleviating retinal hypoxia by correcting key vascular defects typically associated with ischemia-driven neovascularization.

  11. Longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using MDCT in COPD: do the CT measurements of airway wall thickness and small pulmonary vessels change in parallel with emphysematous progression?

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Shin; Kawata, Naoko; Tada, Yuji; Ikari, Jun; Matsuura, Yukiko; Matsuoka, Shin; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) facilitate acquiring important clinical information for managing patients with COPD. MDCT can detect the loss of lung tissue associated with emphysema as a low-attenuation area (LAA) and the thickness of airways as the wall area percentage (WA%). The percentage of small pulmonary vessels <5 mm2 (% cross-sectional area [CSA] <5) has been recently recognized as a parameter for expressing pulmonary perfusion. We aimed to analyze the longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using these CT parameters and analyze the effect of exacerbation and smoking cessation on structural changes in COPD patients. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs), an MDCT, and a COPD assessment test (CAT) in 58 patients with COPD at the time of their enrollment at the hospital and 2 years later. We analyzed the change in clinical parameters including CT indices and examined the effect of exacerbations and smoking cessation on the structural changes. Results The CAT score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) did not significantly change during the follow-up period. The parameters of emphysematous changes significantly increased. On the other hand, the WA% at the distal airways significantly decreased or tended to decrease, and the %CSA <5 slightly but significantly increased over the same period, especially in ex-smokers. The parameters of emphysematous change were greater in patients with exacerbations and continued to progress even after smoking cessation. In contrast, the WA% and %CSA <5 did not change in proportion to emphysema progression. Conclusion The WA% at the distal bronchi and the %CSA <5 did not change in parallel with parameters of LAA over the same period. We propose that airway disease and vascular remodeling may be reversible to some extent by smoking cessation and appropriate treatment. Optimal management may have a greater effect on pulmonary vascularity and airway disease

  12. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  13. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001029.htm Retinitis pigmentosa To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retinitis pigmentosa is an eye disease in which there is ...

  14. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... men more than women and whites more than African Americans. A retinal detachment is also more likely to occur in people who Are extremely nearsighted Have had a retinal detachment in the other eye Have a family history of retinal detachment Have had cataract surgery Have ...

  15. Adaptive Optics Reveals Photoreceptor Abnormalities in Diabetic Macular Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nesper, Peter L.; Scarinci, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic macular ischemia (DMI) is a phenotype of diabetic retinopathy (DR) associated with chronic hypoxia of retinal tissue. The goal of this prospective observational study was to report evidence of photoreceptor abnormalities using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) in eyes with DR in the setting of deep capillary plexus (DCP) non-perfusion. Eleven eyes from 11 patients (6 women, age 31–68), diagnosed with DR without macular edema, underwent optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and AOSLO imaging. One patient without OCTA imaging underwent fluorescein angiography to characterize the enlargement of the foveal avascular zone. The parameters studied included photoreceptor heterogeneity packing index (HPi) on AOSLO, as well as DCP non-perfusion and vessel density on OCTA. Using AOSLO, OCTA and spectral domain (SD)-OCT, we observed that photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO and SD-OCT were found in eyes with non-perfusion of the DCP on OCTA. All eight eyes with DCP non-flow on OCTA showed photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO. Six of the eight eyes also had outer retinal abnormalities on SD-OCT. Three eyes with DR and robust capillary perfusion of the DCP had normal photoreceptors on SD-OCT and AOSLO. Compared to eyes with DR without DCP non-flow, the eight eyes with DCP non-flow had significantly lower HPi (P = 0.013) and parafoveal DCP vessel density (P = 0.016). We found a significant correlation between cone HPi and parafoveal DCP vessel density (r = 0.681, P = 0.030). Using a novel approach with AOSLO and OCTA, this study shows an association between capillary non-perfusion of the DCP and abnormalities in the photoreceptor layer in eyes with DR. This observation is important in confirming the significant contribution of the DCP to oxygen requirements of photoreceptors in DMI, while highlighting the ability of AOSLO to detect subtle photoreceptor changes not always visible on SD-OCT. PMID:28068435

  16. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  17. Misfolded Proteins and Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan H.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations associated with retinal degeneration lead to the production of misfolded proteins by cells of the retina. Emerging evidence suggests that these abnormal proteins cause cell death by activating the Unfolded Protein Response, a set of conserved intracellular signaling pathways that detect protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum and control protective and proapoptotic signal transduction pathways. Here, we review the misfolded proteins associated with select types of retinitis pigmentosa, Stargadt-like macular degeneration, and Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy and discuss the role that endoplasmic reticulum stress and UPR signaling play in their pathogenesis. Last, we review new therapies for these diseases based on preventing protein misfolding in the retina. PMID:20238009

  18. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms ... Pigmentosa Additional Resources for Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to ...

  19. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  20. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  1. Preliminary Study on Retinal Vascular and Oxygen-related Changes after Long-term Silicone Oil and Foldable Capsular Vitreous Body Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Yuan, Yongguang; Zong, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Mai, Shuyi; Li, Yujie; Qian, Xiaobing; Liu, Yaqin; Gao, Qianying

    2014-01-01

    Silicone oil has been the only long-term vitreous substitute used in the treatment of retinal detachment since 1962 by Cibis. Nevertheless, its effects on retinal vascular morphology and oxygen supply to the retina are ambiguous in current research. We previously invented a foldable capsular vitreous body (FCVB) to use as a new vitreous substitute in the treatment of severe retinal detachment, but its effects on the retinal vessel were unknown. Therefore, in this study, a standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed on the right eye of each rabbit and then silicone oil and FCVB were injected into the vitreous cavity as vitreous substitutes. After 180 days of retention, the retinal vascular morphology did not display any distinct abnormalities, and hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) did not vary markedly during the observation period in silicone oil tamponade- and FCVB-implanted eyes. This study may suggest that silicone oil and FCVB tamponade in rabbit eyes did not cause retinal vascular pathologic changes or retinal hypoxia for 180 days. PMID:24920425

  2. Preliminary study on retinal vascular and oxygen-related changes after long-term silicone oil and foldable capsular vitreous body tamponade.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yuan, Yongguang; Zong, Yao; Huang, Zhen; Mai, Shuyi; Li, Yujie; Qian, Xiaobing; Liu, Yaqin; Gao, Qianying

    2014-06-12

    Silicone oil has been the only long-term vitreous substitute used in the treatment of retinal detachment since 1962 by Cibis. Nevertheless, its effects on retinal vascular morphology and oxygen supply to the retina are ambiguous in current research. We previously invented a foldable capsular vitreous body (FCVB) to use as a new vitreous substitute in the treatment of severe retinal detachment, but its effects on the retinal vessel were unknown. Therefore, in this study, a standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed on the right eye of each rabbit and then silicone oil and FCVB were injected into the vitreous cavity as vitreous substitutes. After 180 days of retention, the retinal vascular morphology did not display any distinct abnormalities, and hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) did not vary markedly during the observation period in silicone oil tamponade- and FCVB-implanted eyes. This study may suggest that silicone oil and FCVB tamponade in rabbit eyes did not cause retinal vascular pathologic changes or retinal hypoxia for 180 days.

  3. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  4. The bacterial toxin CNF1 as a tool to induce retinal degeneration reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guadagni, Viviana; Cerri, Chiara; Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Fiorentini, Carla; Caleo, Matteo; Strettoi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of inherited pathologies characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. In rodent models of RP, expression of defective genes and retinal degeneration usually manifest during the first weeks of postnatal life, making it difficult to distinguish consequences of primary genetic defects from abnormalities in retinal development. Moreover, mouse eyes are small and not always adequate to test pharmacological and surgical treatments. An inducible paradigm of retinal degeneration potentially extensible to large animals is therefore desirable. Starting from the serendipitous observation that intraocular injections of a Rho GTPase activator, the bacterial toxin Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), lead to retinal degeneration, we implemented an inducible model recapitulating most of the key features of Retinitis Pigmentosa. The model also unmasks an intrinsic vulnerability of photoreceptors to the mechanism of CNF1 action, indicating still unexplored molecular pathways potentially leading to the death of these cells in inherited forms of retinal degeneration. PMID:27775019

  5. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  6. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  7. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  8. Relationship Between Retinal Perfusion and Retinal Thickness in Healthy Subjects: An Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian; Gu, Ruiping; Zong, Yuan; Xu, Huan; Wang, Xiaolei; Sun, Xinghuai; Jiang, Chunhui; Xie, Bing; Jia, Yali; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between retinal perfusion and retinal thickness in the peripapillary and macular areas of healthy subjects. Methods Using spectral-domain optic coherence tomography and split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm, retinal perfusion and retinal thicknesses in the macular and peripapillary areas were measured in healthy volunteers, and correlations among these variables were analyzed. Results Overall, 64 subjects (121 eyes) including 28 males and 36 females with a mean ± SD age of 38 ± 13 years participated. Linear mixed-models showed that vessel area density was significantly correlated with the inner retinal thickness (from the inner limiting membrane to the outer border of the inner nucleus layer; P < 0.05), but not with the thickness of the full retina (P > 0.05) in the parafoveal area. The area of the foveal capillary-free zone was negatively correlated with the inner and full foveal thicknesses (all P < 0.001). In the peripapillary area, the vessel area density was positively correlated with the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (P < 0.001). Conclusions In healthy subjects, retinal perfusion in small vessels was closely correlated with the thickness of the inner retinal layers in both the macular and peripapillary areas. PMID:27409474

  9. Serial evaluation of retinal vascular changes in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity in zone I

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, T R; Das, T; Rath, S; Pradhan, L; Sutar, S; Panda, K G; Modi, R; Jalali, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the serial changes in retinal vasculature in infants treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in zone I. Methods Retrospective analysis of serial changes in retinal vasculature after IVB in the seven eyes of four babies with APROP in zone I. Results The initial regression, following IVB, was dramatic with reduction in vessel caliber and marked thinning and invisibility of the bridging shunts. Resurgent vascular development was very slow radially though there was continued abnormal vascular growth circumferentially. Common findings in all eyes were tangled vasculature and fine saw-toothed shunts. The variable findings were (1) new closely packed multilayered bridging shunts, long arching mature looking vessels, and finally a ridge at the periphery (n=3 eyes) at 52 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA); (2) status quo at the stage of saw-toothed shunt and ridge in both eyes for a long time (n=2 eyes); and (3) multiple retinal hemorrhages within the vascularized retina and thick preretinal hemorrhage overlying the saw-toothed shunts and ridge that persisted for another 3 weeks and regressed 2 weeks after laser (n=1). The eyes that received bevacizumab alone (3) did not show any abnormal vascularization at 56 weeks of PMA or beyond. Conclusions The retinal vascularization following IVB was different than normal in terms of its time, speed, and morphology; few of these changes are first to be reported in the literature (Medline search) and warrants further studies. PMID:26584796

  10. Sulfur Mustard Exposure and Non-Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Shoeibi, Nasser; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Abrishami, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred with a complaint of visual loss in his left eye and his best corrected visual acuity was 20/80. Slit lamp examination showed arborizing conjunctival vessels and dry eye. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed a non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Cardiovascular, rheumatologic, and hematologic work up showed no abnormal findings. An ascertained history of exposure to sulfur mustard during the Iran-Iraq war was documented in his medical history. Four sessions of intravitreal bevacizumab injections were done as needed. After two-year follow-up, visual acuity in his left eye improved to 20/25 and macular edema was resolved without any need for further interventions. We conclude that sulfur mustard gas exposure may be considered as a predisposing factor for central retinal vein occlusion, as was found in our patient (an Iranian war veteran) by excluding all yet known etiologies and predisposing factors. PMID:26722147

  11. Plasmalogens in the retina: from occurrence in retinal cell membranes to potential involvement in pathophysiology of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sarah; Mazzocco, Julie; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel; Acar, Niyazi

    2014-12-01

    Plasmalogens (Pls) represent a specific subclass of glycerophospholipids characterized by the presence of a vinyl-ether bond at the sn-1 position of glycerol. Pls are quantitatively important in membranes of neuronal tissues, including the brain and the retina, where they can represent until almost two-third of ethanolamine glycerophospholipids. They are considered as reservoirs of polyunsaturated fatty acids as several studies have shown that arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids are preferentially esterified on Pls when compared to other glycerophospholipids. Reduced levels of Pls were observed in a number of neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. In a mouse model of Pls deficiency, "glaucoma-like" optic nerve abnormalities were observed as well as developmental defects in the eye. These included microphthalmia, dysgenesis of the anterior segment of the eye, and abnormalities in retinal vessel architecture. Several data from animal and in vitro studies suggest that Pls may be involved in the regulation of retinal vascular development through the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids by a calcium-independent phospholipase A2.

  12. Computerized analysis of narrow-field ROP images for the assessment of vessel caliber and tortuosity.

    PubMed

    Fiorin, Diego; Ruggeri, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disease involving abnormal development of retinal vasculature in premature infants, which might eventually lead to retinal detachment and visual loss. The quantitative assessment of vessel morphological features, such as width and tortuosity, can improve the clinical diagnosis and evaluation of ROP. We propose here a computerized system for the vascular analysis of narrow-field premature infant images. It is based on the manual drafting of the vessel axis, followed by automatic Canny filter edge extraction and automatic caliber and tortuosity estimation. We implemented this method as a web-based tool, ROPnet, which allows the quantitative assessment of vessel width and tortuosity simply using a web browser. To test the accuracy of the estimated parameters, fifteen narrow-field (30°) retinal images were acquired in infants with a non-contact fundus camera and analyzed with ROPnet. We compared the results with the corresponding ground-truth values derived from manual analysis. Average widths and tortuosities estimated with ROPnet vs. manual ones showed a correlation coefficient of 0.96 and 0.90, respectively.

  13. Retinal oximeter for the blue-green oximetry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Sieluzycka, Katarzyna B.; Hendryx, Jennifer K.; Ririe, Tyson J.; Deluca, Lawrence; Chipman, Russell A.

    2011-10-01

    Retinal oximetry offers potential for noninvasive assessment of central venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO2) via the retinal vessels but requires a calibrated accuracy of +/-3% saturation in order to be clinically useful. Prior oximeter designs have been hampered by poor saturation calibration accuracy. We demonstrate that the blue-green oximetry (BGO) technique can provide accuracy within +/-3% in swine when multiply scattered light from blood within a retinal vessel is isolated. A noninvasive on-axis scanning retinal oximeter (ROx-3) is constructed that generates a multiwavelength image in the range required for BGO. A field stop in the detection pathway is used in conjunction with an anticonfocal bisecting wire to remove specular vessel reflections and isolate multiply backscattered light from the blood column within a retinal vessel. This design is tested on an enucleated swine eye vessel and a retinal vein in a human volunteer with retinal SO2 measurements of ~1 and ~65%, respectively. These saturations, calculated using the calibration line from earlier work, are internally consistent with a standard error of the mean of +/-2% SO2. The absolute measures are well within the expected saturation range for the site (-1 and 63%). This is the first demonstration of noninvasive on-axis BGO retinal oximetry.

  14. Retinal oximeter for the blue-green oximetry technique.

    PubMed

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Sieluzycka, Katarzyna B; Hendryx, Jennifer K; Ririe, Tyson J; Deluca, Lawrence; Chipman, Russell A

    2011-10-01

    Retinal oximetry offers potential for noninvasive assessment of central venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO(2)) via the retinal vessels but requires a calibrated accuracy of ±3% saturation in order to be clinically useful. Prior oximeter designs have been hampered by poor saturation calibration accuracy. We demonstrate that the blue-green oximetry (BGO) technique can provide accuracy within ±3% in swine when multiply scattered light from blood within a retinal vessel is isolated. A noninvasive on-axis scanning retinal oximeter (ROx-3) is constructed that generates a multiwavelength image in the range required for BGO. A field stop in the detection pathway is used in conjunction with an anticonfocal bisecting wire to remove specular vessel reflections and isolate multiply backscattered light from the blood column within a retinal vessel. This design is tested on an enucleated swine eye vessel and a retinal vein in a human volunteer with retinal SO(2) measurements of ∼1 and ∼65%, respectively. These saturations, calculated using the calibration line from earlier work, are internally consistent with a standard error of the mean of ±2% SO(2). The absolute measures are well within the expected saturation range for the site (-1 and 63%). This is the first demonstration of noninvasive on-axis BGO retinal oximetry.

  15. Mutations in Lama1 disrupt retinal vascular development and inner limiting membrane formation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Malia M; Mammadova-Bach, Elmina; Alpy, Fabien; Klein, Annick; Hicks, Wanda L; Roux, Michel; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Smith, Richard S; Orend, Gertraud; Wu, Jiang; Peachey, Neal S; Naggert, Jürgen K; Lefebvre, Olivier; Nishina, Patsy M

    2010-03-05

    The Neuromutagenesis Facility at the Jackson Laboratory generated a mouse model of retinal vasculopathy, nmf223, which is characterized clinically by vitreal fibroplasia and vessel tortuosity. nmf223 homozygotes also have reduced electroretinogram responses, which are coupled histologically with a thinning of the inner nuclear layer. The nmf223 locus was mapped to chromosome 17, and a missense mutation was identified in Lama1 that leads to the substitution of cysteine for a tyrosine at amino acid 265 of laminin alpha1, a basement membrane protein. Despite normal localization of laminin alpha1 and other components of the inner limiting membrane, a reduced integrity of this structure was suggested by ectopic cells and blood vessels within the vitreous. Immunohistochemical characterization of nmf223 homozygous retinas demonstrated the abnormal migration of retinal astrocytes into the vitreous along with the persistence of hyaloid vasculature. The Y265C mutation significantly reduced laminin N-terminal domain (LN) interactions in a bacterial two-hybrid system. Therefore, this mutation could affect interactions between laminin alpha1 and other laminin chains. To expand upon these findings, a Lama1 null mutant, Lama1(tm1.1Olf), was generated that exhibits a similar but more severe retinal phenotype than that seen in nmf223 homozygotes. The increased severity of the Lama1 null mutant phenotype is probably due to the complete loss of the inner limiting membrane in these mice. This first report of viable Lama1 mouse mutants emphasizes the importance of this gene in retinal development. The data presented herein suggest that hypomorphic mutations in human LAMA1 could lead to retinal disease.

  16. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  17. Retine revisited.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D E

    2002-10-01

    Retine, so named by Albert Szent-Györgyi, an inhibitor of the growth of transplanted malignant tumours in animals, is present in all mammalian tissues and in urine. Its inhibitory activity was extensively investigated by Szent-Györgyi, but its exact chemical identity was not determined. Details of the reported physical and chemical properties of retine and its ubiquitous occurrence identify it as being identical to a complex mixture of lipid 2,4-diketones of similar ubiquitous occurrence. This lipid mixture has been extensively studied, and individual members have been synthesized.

  18. Ghrelin Modulates Physiologic and Pathologic Retinal Angiogenesis through GHSR-1a

    PubMed Central

    Zaniolo, Karine; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Shao, Zhuo; Stahl, Andreas; Zhu, Tang; Tremblay, Sophie; Picard, Emilie; Madaan, Ankush; Blais, Martine; Lachapelle, Pierre; Mancini, Joseph; Hardy, Pierre; Smith, Lois E. H.; Ong, Huy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Vascular degeneration and the ensuing abnormal vascular proliferation are central to proliferative retinopathies. Given the metabolic discordance associated with these diseases, the authors explored the role of ghrelin and its growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a) in proliferative retinopathy. Methods. In a rat model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), the contribution of ghrelin and GHSR-1a was investigated using the stable ghrelin analogs [Dap3]-ghrelin and GHRP6 and the GSHR-1a antagonists JMV-2959 and [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6. Plasma and retinal levels of ghrelin were analyzed by ELISA, whereas retinal expression and localization of GHSR-1a were examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The angiogenic and vasoprotective properties of ghrelin and its receptor were further confirmed in aortic explants and in models of vaso-obliteration. Results. Ghrelin is produced locally in the retina, whereas GHSR-1a is abundantly expressed in retinal endothelial cells. Ghrelin levels decrease during the vaso-obliterative phase and rise during the proliferative phase of OIR. Intravitreal delivery of [Dap3]-ghrelin during OIR significantly reduces retinal vessel loss when administered during the hyperoxic phase. Conversely, during the neovascular phase, ghrelin promotes pathologic angiogenesis through the activation of GHSR-1a. These angiogenic effects were confirmed ex vivo in aortic explants. Conclusions. New roles were disclosed for the ghrelin-GHSR-1a pathway in the preservation of retinal vasculature during the vaso-obliterative phase of OIR and during the angiogenic phase of OIR. These findings suggest that the ghrelin-GHSR-1a pathway can exert opposing effects on retinal vasculature, depending on the phase of retinopathy, and thus holds therapeutic potential for proliferative retinopathies. PMID:21642627

  19. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-06-01

    Laser induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using two-dimensional blood vessel templates. The frame grabber is hosted on a 486 PC. The PC performs correction signal calculations using an exhaustive search on selected image portions. An X and Y laser correction signal is derived from the landmark tracking information and provided to a pair of galvanometer steered mirrors via a data acquisition and control subsystem. This subsystem also responds to patient inputs and the system monitoring lesion growth. This paper begins with an overview of the robotic laser system design followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept. The paper concludes with specifications for a real time system.

  20. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Gipponi, Stefano; Scaroni, Niccolò; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Forbice, Eliana; Rao, Renata; Liberini, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disorder and its pathogenesis remains still unclear. Several hypotheses about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine have been proposed, but the issue is still far from being fully clarified. Neurovascular system remains one of the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine and it could be possible that hypoperfusion might involve other areas besides brain, including the retina. This is, for example, of particular interest in a form of migraine, the retinal migraine, which has been associated with hypoperfusion and vasoconstriction of the retinal vasculature. Although vasoconstriction of cerebral and retinal blood vessels is a transient phenomenon, the chronic nature of the migraine might cause permanent structural abnormalities of the brain and also of the retina. On this basis, a few studies have evaluated whether retina is involved in migraine patients: Tan et al. have not found differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness between migraine patients and healthy subjects, while Martinez et al. have shown that RNFL in the temporal retinic quadrant of migraineurs is thinner than in normal people. The aim of our study was to analyze if there are differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between migraine patients and normal subjects by studying 24 consecutive migraine patients who presented at the Headache Center of our Neurological Department. Migraine diagnosis has been made according to the International Classification of Headache disorder (ICHD-II). Patients have been recruited according to strict inclusion criteria; then patients have undergone a complete ophthalmological examination at the Ophthalmological Department. All patients and controls who met the ophthalmological criteria have been examined with ocular coherence tomography spectral domain (OCT-SD) after pupillary dilation. OCT-SD is an optical system designed to acquire the retinal layer images simultaneously with fundus

  1. Intrasession and Between-Visit Variability of Sector Peripapillary Angioflow Vessel Density Values Measured with the Angiovue Optical Coherence Tomograph in Different Retinal Layers in Ocular Hypertension and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Holló, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate intrasession and between-visit reproducibility of sector peripapillary angioflow vessel-density (PAFD, %) values in the optic nerve head (ONH) and radial peripapillary capillaries (RPC) layers, respectively, and to analyze the influence of the corresponding sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) on the results. Methods High quality images acquired with the Angiovue/RTVue-XR Avanti optical coherence tomograph (Optovue Inc., Fremont, USA) on 1 eye of 18 stable glaucoma and ocular hypertension patients were analyzed using the Optovue 2015.100.0.33 software version. Three images were acquired in one visit and 1 image 3 months later. Results PAFD image quality for all images necessary to calculate reproducibility was sufficient to analysis only in 18 of the 83 participants (21.7%) who were successfully imaged for RNFLT. Intrasession coefficient of variation (CV) ranged between 2.30 and 3.89%, and 3.51 and 5.12% for the peripapillary sectors in the ONH and RPC layers, respectively. The corresponding between-visit CV values ranged between 3.05 and 4.26%, and 4.99 and 6.90%, respectively. Intrasession SD did not correlate with the corresponding RNFLT in any sector in either layer (P≥0.170). In the ONH layer sector PAFD values did not correlate with the corresponding RNFLT values (P≥0.100). In contrast, in the RPC layer a significant positive correlation between the corresponding sector PAFD and RNFLT values was found for all but one peripapillary sectors (Pearson-r range: 0.652 to 0.771, P≤0.0046). Conclusion Though in several patients routine use of PAFD measurement may be limited by suboptimal image quality, in the successfully imaged cases (21.7% of the study eyes in the current investigation) reproducibility of sector PAFD values seems to be sufficient for clinical research. In stable patients intrasession variability explains most of the between-visit variability. Sector PAFD variability is independent from sector RNFLT, a marker

  2. Retinal vascular caliber and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, F.J.; Schrijvers, E.M.C.; Ikram, M.K.; Koudstaal, P.J.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Retinal vessels provide a unique opportunity to study both systemic and cerebrovascular disease. Smaller retinal arteriolar calibers are strongly related to hypertension, whereas larger retinal venular calibers are more related to inflammation, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebrovascular disease. Whether retinal vessel calibers are related to dementia remains unclear. Methods: We investigated whether retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are associated with risk of dementia, and its subtypes Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia, in the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. Digitized retinal images were available in 5,553 participants aged 55 years or over and dementia-free at baseline (1990–1993). Participants were re-examined in 1993–1994, 1997–1999, and 2002–2004 and were continuously monitored for development of dementia. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.6 years, 655 participants developed dementia. AD was diagnosed in 519 and vascular dementia in 73 participants. Larger venular calibers were associated with an increased risk of dementia, in particular vascular dementia (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio per SD increase: 1.31; 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.64), but not AD. The association remained significant after adjustment for stroke and cardiovascular risk factors. Smaller arteriolar calibers were also associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia, yet only when adjusted for venular calibers. Conclusions: Retinal venular widening is associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia. Our findings are in line with previous observations in stroke and cerebral small-vessel disease and suggest that the association between larger retinal venular calibers and dementia may reflect cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent ischemia. PMID:21288987

  3. 3D Reconstruction of the Retinal Arterial Tree Using Subject-Specific Fundus Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wood, N. B.; Xu, X. Y.; Witt, N.; Hughes, A. D.; Samcg, Thom

    Systemic diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, are associated with changes in the retinal microvasculature. Although a number of studies have been performed on the quantitative assessment of the geometrical patterns of the retinal vasculature, previous work has been confined to 2 dimensional (2D) analyses. In this paper, we present an approach to obtain a 3D reconstruction of the retinal arteries from a pair of 2D retinal images acquired in vivo. A simple essential matrix based self-calibration approach was employed for the "fundus camera-eye" system. Vessel segmentation was performed using a semi-automatic approach and correspondence between points from different images was calculated. The results of 3D reconstruction show the centreline of retinal vessels and their 3D curvature clearly. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the retinal vessels is feasible and may be useful in future studies of the retinal vasculature in disease.

  4. Optic Disc Boundary and Vessel Origin Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Kuchinka, Sam N; Parhi, Keshab K

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel classification-based optic disc (OD) segmentation algorithm that detects the OD boundary and the location of vessel origin (VO) pixel. First, the green plane of each fundus image is resized and morphologically reconstructed using a circular structuring element. Bright regions are then extracted from the morphologically reconstructed image that lie in close vicinity of the major blood vessels. Next, the bright regions are classified as bright probable OD regions and non-OD regions using six region-based features and a Gaussian mixture model classifier. The classified bright probable OD region with maximum Vessel-Sum and Solidity is detected as the best candidate region for the OD. Other bright probable OD regions within 1-disc diameter from the centroid of the best candidate OD region are then detected as remaining candidate regions for the OD. A convex hull containing all the candidate OD regions is then estimated, and a best-fit ellipse across the convex hull becomes the segmented OD boundary. Finally, the centroid of major blood vessels within the segmented OD boundary is detected as the VO pixel location. The proposed algorithm has low computation time complexity and it is robust to variations in image illumination, imaging angles, and retinal abnormalities. This algorithm achieves 98.8%-100% OD segmentation success and OD segmentation overlap score in the range of 72%-84% on images from the six public datasets of DRIVE, DIARETDB1, DIARETDB0, CHASE_DB1, MESSIDOR, and STARE in less than 2.14 s per image. Thus, the proposed algorithm can be used for automated detection of retinal pathologies, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and maculopathy.

  5. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  6. Quantitative television fluoroangiography - the optical measurement of dye concentrations and estimation of retinal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.; Thomas, A.L. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The development of a system for the measurement of dye concentrations from single retinal vessels during retinal fluorescein angiography is presented and discussed. The system uses a fundus camera modified for TV viewing. Video gating techniques define the areas of the retina to be studied, and video peak detection yields dye concentrations from retinal vessels. The time course of dye concentration is presented and blood flow into the retina is estimated by a time of transit technique.

  7. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) Regulates NOTCH Signaling during Early Retinal Development.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Joseph A; Ronchetti, Adam; Sidjanin, D J

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 and ADAM17 are two closely related members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of membrane-bound sheddases, which proteolytically cleave surface membrane proteins. Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 have been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of NOTCH receptors and as such regulators of NOTCH signaling. During retinal development, NOTCH signaling facilitates retinal neurogenesis by maintaining progenitor cells in a proliferative state and by mediating retinal cell fates. However, the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in the retina are not well defined. In this study, we set out to clarify the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 during early retinal development. The retinal phenotype of conditionally abated Adam17 retinae (Adam17 CKO) did not differ from the controls whereas conditionally ablated Adam10 retinae (Adam10 CKO) exhibited abnormal morphogenesis characterized by the formation of rosettes and a loss of retinal laminae phenotypically similar to morphological abnormalities identified in mice with retinal NOTCH signaling deficiency. Additionally, Adam10 CKO retinae exhibited abnormal neurogenesis characterized by fewer proliferating progenitor cells and greater differentiation of early photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, constitutive activation of the NOTCH1-intracellular domain (N1-ICD) rescued Adam10 CKO abnormal neurogenesis, as well as abnormal retinal morphology by maintaining retinal cells in the progenitor state. Collectively these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence that ADAM10, and not ADAM17, is indispensable for proper retinal development as a regulator of NOTCH signaling.

  8. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) Regulates NOTCH Signaling during Early Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Joseph A.; Ronchetti, Adam; Sidjanin, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 and ADAM17 are two closely related members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of membrane-bound sheddases, which proteolytically cleave surface membrane proteins. Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 have been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of NOTCH receptors and as such regulators of NOTCH signaling. During retinal development, NOTCH signaling facilitates retinal neurogenesis by maintaining progenitor cells in a proliferative state and by mediating retinal cell fates. However, the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in the retina are not well defined. In this study, we set out to clarify the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 during early retinal development. The retinal phenotype of conditionally abated Adam17 retinae (Adam17 CKO) did not differ from the controls whereas conditionally ablated Adam10 retinae (Adam10 CKO) exhibited abnormal morphogenesis characterized by the formation of rosettes and a loss of retinal laminae phenotypically similar to morphological abnormalities identified in mice with retinal NOTCH signaling deficiency. Additionally, Adam10 CKO retinae exhibited abnormal neurogenesis characterized by fewer proliferating progenitor cells and greater differentiation of early photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, constitutive activation of the NOTCH1-intracellular domain (N1-ICD) rescued Adam10 CKO abnormal neurogenesis, as well as abnormal retinal morphology by maintaining retinal cells in the progenitor state. Collectively these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence that ADAM10, and not ADAM17, is indispensable for proper retinal development as a regulator of NOTCH signaling. PMID:27224017

  9. [Role and place of ophthalmological methods in the diagnosis of lesions of the main vessels of the brain].

    PubMed

    Bishele, N A; Nesterov, A P; Lavrent'ev, A V; Abramov, I S

    1998-01-01

    The study was aimed at detecting changes in visual functions and organ of vision in patients with involvement of the main vessels of the head and injuries to this vessels in patients with expressed ischemic diseases of the organ of vision. Twenty-four patients with occlusive disorders of the carotid arteries and 22 with retinal and ocular nerve diseases with the ischemic component were examined. The share of carotid artery abnormalities in the second group was 27.3%. Total efficacy of ophthalmological methods of diagnosis in the group with carotid artery involvement was 89.4%, this demonstrating high efficacy of ophthalmological methods for the diagnosis of involvement of the main cerebral vessels. Static quantitative perimetry proved to be the most effective method. It permits reliable detection of the slightest changes and assess the efficacy of surgical treatment.

  10. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7 sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO.

  11. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO2 have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7 sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO2 using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO2 measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO2 measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO2.

  12. Use of retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence as an addition to absorption in retinal scanning for biometric purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agopov, Mikael; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We built a device sensitive to the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer for biometric purposes. A circle of 20° diameter on the retina was scanned around the optic disk with a spot of light from a 785 nm laser diode. The nonbirefringent blood vessels indenting or displacing the retinal nerve fiber layer were seen as “blips” in the measured birefringence-derived signal. For comparison, the reflection-absorption signature of the blood vessel pattern in the scanned circle was also measured. The birefringence-derived signal proved to add useful information to the reflectance-absorption signature for retinal biometric scanning.

  13. Use of retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence as an addition to absorption in retinal scanning for biometric purposes.

    PubMed

    Agopov, Mikael; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2008-03-10

    We built a device sensitive to the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer for biometric purposes. A circle of 20 degrees diameter on the retina was scanned around the optic disk with a spot of light from a 785 nm laser diode. The nonbirefringent blood vessels indenting or displacing the retinal nerve fiber layer were seen as "blips" in the measured birefringence-derived signal. For comparison, the reflection-absorption signature of the blood vessel pattern in the scanned circle was also measured. The birefringence-derived signal proved to add useful information to the reflectance-absorption signature for retinal biometric scanning.

  14. A dynamic opto-physiological model to effectively interpret retinal microvascular circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Harnani; Hu, Sijung; Dwyer, Vincent M.

    2015-03-01

    The demand of non-invasive ocular screening is rapidly growing due to an increase of age related eye diseases worldwide. An indeed in-depth understanding of optical properties is required to elucidate nature of retinal tissue. The research aims to investigate an effective biomedical engineering approach to allow process region of interests (ROIs) in eyes to reveal physiological status. A dynamic opto-physiological model (DOPM) representing retinal microvascular circulation underlying a diffusion approximation to solve radiative transport theorem (RTT) has being developed to interpret patho-physiological phenomena. DOPM is being applied in imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to extract PPG signals from a series of 2D matrix images to access blood perfusion and oxygen saturation distributions. A variation of microvascular circulation could be mapped for an effectively diagnostic screening. The work presents mathematical modelling based ten layers of ocular tissue tested with four set of controlled parameters demontrated detection ratio between normal tissue damage or abnormal tissue and significant change of AC signal amplitude in these tissues. The result shows signicant change of AC signal amplitude in abnormal tissue. The preliminary results show extractable PPG signals from eye fundus video; experimented at five ROIs: whole fundus, optical disk, main vein vessel, lesion area and affected area. The outcome shows optical disk region gave a better performance compared to whole fundus region and main vein vessel. The robustness, miniaturization and artefact reduction capability of DOPM to discriminate oxygenation levels in retina could offer a new insight to access retinal patho-physiological status.

  15. Oximetry: recent insights into retinal vasopathies and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Boeckaert, J; Vandewalle, E; Stalmans, I

    2012-01-01

    This review will highlight a new technology and recent insights into measuring retinal oxygen saturation in several ophthalmic diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that disturbances in retinal blood flow and oxygenation are related to several retinopathies and glaucoma, which can severely impair vision. The retinal oximeter may allow researchers and physicians to gain deeper insights into retinal physiology and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal health and function. There are two commercially available systems to measure retinal oxygen saturation: the Oxymap retinal oximeter (Reykjavik, Iceland) and the Imedos Systems UG (Jena, Germany). In this review we will focus on the results obtained with Oxymap. Direct and non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation have potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and retinopathy of prematurity. Despite several limitations, oxygen saturation assessment in the retinal vessels is a significant advancement in the understanding of ocular diseases. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to validate the use of oximetry in retinal vasopathies and glaucoma.

  16. Automated retinal image analysis over the internet.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ling; Madore, Benjamin; Leotta, Matthew J; Sofka, Michal; Yang, Gehua; Majerovics, Anna; Tanenbaum, Howard L; Stewart, Charles V; Roysam, Badrinath

    2008-07-01

    Retinal clinicians and researchers make extensive use of images, and the current emphasis is on digital imaging of the retinal fundus. The goal of this paper is to introduce a system, known as retinal image vessel extraction and registration system, which provides the community of retinal clinicians, researchers, and study directors an integrated suite of advanced digital retinal image analysis tools over the Internet. The capabilities include vasculature tracing and morphometry, joint (simultaneous) montaging of multiple retinal fields, cross-modality registration (color/red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms), and generation of flicker animations for visualization of changes from longitudinal image sequences. Each capability has been carefully validated in our previous research work. The integrated Internet-based system can enable significant advances in retina-related clinical diagnosis, visualization of the complete fundus at full resolution from multiple low-angle views, analysis of longitudinal changes, research on the retinal vasculature, and objective, quantitative computer-assisted scoring of clinical trials imagery. It could pave the way for future screening services from optometry facilities.

  17. Electroretinographic effects of retinal dragging and retinal folds in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Yukari; Katagiri, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yoko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Nishina, Sachiko; Kondo, Mineo; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the retinal function of retinal dragging (Rdrag) and radial retinal folds (Rfolds) in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) using full-field electroretinography (ERG). Seventeen eyes of nine patients with FEVR who had Rdrag or Rfolds were retrospectively studied. Eyes were classified into four groups according to the severity of the retinal alterations: Group 1, without Rdrag or Rfolds (5 eyes); Group 2, with Rdrag (4 eyes); Group 3, with Rfolds (6 eyes); and Group 4, with Rfolds in which all major retinal vessels were involved (2 eyes). The amplitudes of all ERG components and the implicit times of the photopic a- and b-waves and 30-Hz flicker responses were decreased or prolonged as the severity of the retinal alterations increased (P < 0.01). The photopic negative response was most severely affected and nearly undetectable in all eyes in Groups 3 and 4, although the other ERG components were detectable in all eyes in Group 3 and one eye in Group 4. These results suggest the decrease of retinal functions was correlated with the degree of severity of Rdrag and Rfolds in eyes with FEVR. In addition, the function of the retinal ganglion cells appears to be more severely affected compared with the others. PMID:27456314

  18. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  19. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  20. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-12-17

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker-induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown.

  1. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker–induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  2. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD. PMID:27990367

  3. Regulation of human retinal blood flow by endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Polak, Kaija; Luksch, Alexandra; Frank, Barbara; Jandrasits, Kerstin; Polska, Elzbieta; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-05-01

    There is evidence from in vitro and animal studies that endothelin is a major regulator of retinal blood flow. We set out to characterize the role of the endothelin-system in the blood flow control of the human retina. Two studies in healthy subjects were performed. The study design was randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, balanced, two-way crossover in protocol A and three way-way crossover in protocol B. In protocol A 18 healthy male subjects received intravenous endothelin-1 (ET-1) in a dose of 2.5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) for 30 min or placebo on two different study days and retinal vessel diameters were measured. In protocol B 12 healthy male subjects received ET-1 in stepwise increasing doses of 0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) (each infusion step over 20 min) in co-infusion with the specific ET(A)-receptor antagonist BQ123 (60 microg min (-1)) or placebo or BQ123 alone investigating retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocity and retinal blood flow. Measurements of retinal vessel size were done with the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. Measurements of blood velocities were done with bi-directional laser Doppler velocimetry. From these measurements retinal blood flow was calculated. In protocol A exogenous ET-1 tended to decrease retinal arterial diameter, but this effect was not significant versus placebo. No effect on retinal venous diameter was seen. In protocol B retinal venous blood velocity and retinal blood flow was significantly reduced after administration of exogenous ET-1. These effects were significantly blunted when BQ-123 was co-administered. By contrast, BQ-123 alone had no effect on retinal hemodynamic parameters. Concluding, BQ123 antagonizes the effects of exogenously administered ET-1 on retinal blood flow in healthy subjects. In addition, the results of the present study are compatible with the hypothesis that ET-1 exerts its vasoconstrictor effects in the retina mainly on the microvessels.

  4. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer. PMID:20059246

  5. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  6. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  7. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S.; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J.; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain–containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate–specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow. PMID:22622036

  8. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology☆

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started. PMID:24843304

  9. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started.

  10. Notch Signaling Functions in Retinal Pericyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F.; Primo, Vincent; Graham, Mark; James, Alexandra; Manent, Jan; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pericytes, the vascular cells that constitute the outer layer of capillaries, have been shown to have a crucial role in vascular development and stability. Loss of pericytes precedes endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular degeneration in small-vessel diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Despite their clinical relevance, the cellular pathways controlling survival of retinal pericytes remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, we investigated the role of Notch signaling, a master regulator of cell fate decisions, in retinal pericyte survival. Methods. A coculture system of ligand-dependent Notch signaling was developed using primary cultured retinal pericytes and a mesenchymal cell line derived from an inducible mouse model expressing the Delta-like 1 Notch ligand. This model was used to examine the effect of Notch activity on pericyte survival using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a light-induced cell death assay. The effect of Notch gain- and loss-of-function was analyzed in monocultures of retinal pericytes using antibody arrays to interrogate the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Results. Primary cultured retinal pericytes differentially expressed key molecules of the Notch pathway and displayed strong expression of canonical Notch/RBPJK (recombination signal-binding protein 1 for J-kappa) downstream targets. A gene expression screen using gain- and loss-of-function approaches identified genes relevant to cell survival as downstream targets of Notch activity in retinal pericytes. Ligand-mediated Notch activity protected retinal pericytes from light-induced cell death. Conclusions. Our results have identified signature genes downstream of Notch activity in retinal pericytes and suggest that tight regulation of Notch signaling is crucial for pericyte survival. PMID:25015359

  11. Retinal blood flow during hyperoxia in humans revisited: concerted results using different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Dorner, Guido; Polak, Kaija; Findl, Oliver; Mayrl, Gabriele Fuchsjäger; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2002-07-01

    Retinal vasculature shows pronounced vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia, which appears to be related to the constant oxygen demand of the retina. However, the exact amount of blood flow reduction and the exact time course of this phenomenon are still a matter of debate. We set out to investigate the retinal response to hyperoxia using innovative techniques for the assessment of retinal hemodynamics. In a total of 48 healthy volunteers we studied the effect of 100% O(2) breathing on retinal blood flow using two methods. Red blood cell movement in larger retinal veins was quantified with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement. Retinal white blood cell movement was quantified with the blue field entoptic technique. The time course of retinal vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia was assessed by continuous vessel size determination using the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. The response to hyperoxia as measured with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and vessel size measurement was almost twice as high as that observed with the blue field technique. Vasoconstriction in response to 100% O(2) breathing occurred within the first 5 min and no counterregulatory or adaptive mechanisms were observed. Based on these results we hypothesize that hyperoxia-induced vasoconstriction differentially affects red and white blood cell movement in the human retina. This hypothesis is based on the complex interactions between red and white blood cells in microcirculation, which have been described in detail for other vascular beds.

  12. Acute necrotizing retinal vasculitis as onset of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Monov, Simeon; Hristova, Ruska; Dacheva, Rositza; Toncheva, Reni; Shumnalieva, Russka; Shoumnalieva-Ivanova, Viara; Monova, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and deposition of immune complexes in tissues and organs. SLE can involve any region of the visual system. Although ocular manifestations are not part of the classification criteria for SLE, they can be observed in up to one-third of the patients with SLE. They are rarely reported at the time of disease onset. Retinal vasculitis is usually associated with active generalized disease. Due to its low frequency, we report a case of acute necrotizing retinal vasculitis as onset of SLE. Patient concerns and diagnosis: A 25-year-old white female was referred to the rheumatology clinic with gradually and rapid deterioration of the vision due to abnormal vessel permeability in the right fundus with edema along the vessels, occlusion of arterial branches in the middle periphery with leakage of the dye in these areas and indentical but less prominent changes with cotton wool spots in the papillomacular area and extensive hemorrhages in the left eye. The onset of malar rash, arthralgias and positive antinuclear, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-ribosomal P and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies with decreased C4 complement levels, as well as the positive lupus-band test confirmed the diagnosis of SLE. Interventions: Aggressive immunomodulating therapy with high-dose methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and cyclophosphamide was used for suppression of the disease activity followed by azathioprine as maintaince therapy. Outcomes: Substantial improvement and partial resorption of the vasculitic changes, including central retinal artery and vein, was achieved prominently in the left eye. The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and written informed consent was obtained from the patient. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary

  13. Diagnostic imaging in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Katome, Takashi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive inherited retinal disease, and patients with RP have reduced visual function caused by a degeneration of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). At the end stage of RP, the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the fovea reduces central vision, and RP is one of the main causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. Therefore, morphological and functional assessments of the photoreceptors in the macula area can be useful in estimating the residual retinal function in RP patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well-established method of examining the retinal architecture in situ. The photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction is observed as a distinct, highly reflective line by OCT. The presence of the IS/OS junction in the OCT images is essential for normal visual function. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) results from the accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE cells and has been used to investigate RPE and retinal function. More than one-half of RP patients have an abnormally high density parafoveal FAF ring (AF ring). The AF ring represents the border between functional and dysfunctional retina. In this review, we shall summarize recent progress on diagnostic imaging in eyes with RP.

  14. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  15. Fundus spectroscopy and studies in retinal oximetry using intravitreal illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, David Alan

    This dissertation documents the development of a new illumination technique for use in the studies of retinal oximetry and fundus spectroscopy. Intravitreal illumination is a technique where the back of the eye is illuminated trans-sclerally using a scanning monochromator coupled into a fiber optic illuminator. Retinal oximetry is the process of measuring the oxygen saturation of blood contained in retinal vessels by quantitative measurement of the characteristic color shift seen as blood oxygen saturation changes from oxygenated blood (reddish) to deoxygenated blood (bluish). Retinal oximetry was first attempted in 1963 but due to a variety of problems with accuracy and difficulty of measurement, has not matured to the point of clinical acceptability or commercial viability. Accurate retinal oximetry relies in part on an adequate understanding of the spectral reflectance characteristics of the fundus. The use of intravitreal illumination allows new investigations into the spectral reflectance properties of the fundus. The results of much research in fundus reflectance and retinal oximetry is detailed in this document, providing new insight into both of these related fields of study. Intravitreal illumination has been used to study retinal vessel oximetry and fundus reflectometry resulting in several important findings that are presented in this document. Studies on enucleated swine eyes have provided new insight into the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the fundus. Research on live swine has shown accurate measurement of retinal vessel oxygen saturation and provided the first in vivo spectral transmittance measurement of the sensory retina. A secondary discovery during this research suggests that vitrectomy alters the retinal vasculature, an finding that should spawn new research in its own right.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Retinal Oximetry in a Healthy Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Yukiko; Ono, Aoi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish the normative database of retinal oximetry using Oxymap T1 in a healthy Japanese population, and study the reproducibility of the measurements in Japanese. Methods We measured oxygen saturation in the major retinal vessels with Oxymap T1 in 252 eyes of 252 healthy Japanese subjects. Fundus images acquired using Oxymap T1 were processed using built-in Oxymap Analyzer software. Reproducibility of retinal oximetry was investigated using 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. Results The mean retinal oxygen saturation of 4 quadrants in healthy Japanese was 97.0 ± 6.9% in arteries and 52.8 ± 8.3% in veins. The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was 44.2 ± 9.2%. Both arterial and venous oxygen saturation were significantly lower in the temporal side of the retina, especially in the temporal-inferior vessels. However, the arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was limited in the 4 quadrants. Interphotograph, intervisit, and interevaluator intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.936–0.979, 0.809–0.837, and 0.732–0.947, respectively. In the major retinal arteries, oxygen saturation increased with age (r = 0.18, p<0.01), at a rate of 0.67% per 10 years. However, venous oxygen saturation showed no correlation with age. Conclusions This study provides the normative database for the Japanese population. The arterial saturation value appears to be higher than other previous studies. Mean retinal oximetry in 4 quadrants with Oxymap T1 has high reproducibility. PMID:27434373

  18. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  19. Classification of left and right eye retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ngan Meng; Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon W. K.; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Shijian; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Retinal image analysis is used by clinicians to diagnose and identify, if any, pathologies present in a patient's eye. The developments and applications of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in medical imaging have been rapidly increasing over the years. In this paper, we propose a system to classify left and right eye retinal images automatically. This paper describes our two-pronged approach to classify left and right retinal images by using the position of the central retinal vessel within the optic disc, and by the location of the macula with respect to the optic nerve head. We present a framework to automatically identify the locations of the key anatomical structures of the eye- macula, optic disc, central retinal vessels within the optic disc and the ISNT regions. A SVM model for left and right eye retinal image classification is trained based on the features from the detection and segmentation. An advantage of this is that other image processing algorithms can be focused on regions where diseases or pathologies and more likely to occur, thereby increasing the efficiency and accuracy of the retinal CAD system/pathology detection. We have tested our system on 102 retinal images, consisting of 51 left and right images each and achieved and accuracy of 94.1176%. The high experimental accuracy and robustness of this system demonstrates that there is potential for this system to be integrated and applied with other retinal CAD system, such as ARGALI, for a priori information in automatic mass screening and diagnosis of retinal diseases.

  20. Protective effect of Aster tataricus extract on retinal damage on the virtue of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect in diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Kejun; Hu, Zhitao

    2017-03-02

    Effect of Aster tataricus (AT) was estimated on the retinal injury in diabetic rats by its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce diabetes at a dose of 60mg/kg, i.p. and blood glucose was estimated to confirm the diabetic rats. All the animals were separated in to 5 different groups (n=10) such as control, diabetic retinopathy (DR) receives saline solution, and AT treated group receives AT (100, 200 and 400mg/kg) for the duration of 8 week. After treatment protocol period blood glucose and HbA1c% was estimated in the blood sample of diabetic rats. Retinal tissue was isolated for the fundus photography and retinal vessel diameter, retinal vascular permeability and leukocytosis were estimated. Moreover in the retinal tissue homogenate oxidative stress parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH) and catalase (CAT) and concentration of cytokines (TNFα, IL10) was estimated. Result of the study suggested that root extract of AT contain rich amount of polyphenol in it which significantly reduces the body weight and concentration of glucose in blood in diabetic rats. Fundus photography suggested that AT extract attenuates the structure and functional abnormalities that develops due to diabetes. Retinal leukocytosis and vascular permeability was significantly decreases in AT treated group than DR group. There was significant increase in the activity of GSH, CAT and SOD in AT treated group than DR group. Moreover AT also attenuates the altered concentration of TNFα, IL10 and NF-κB in the retina of STZ induced diabetic rat. Thus present study concludes that root extract of AT effectively manages the diabetic retinopathy by controlling the blood glucose and also by attenuating the altered oxidative stresss and inflammatory mediators such as TNFα, IL10 and NF-κB in the retina of STZ induced diabetic rat.

  1. Interactive Retinal Blood Flow Analysis of the Macular Region

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R.; Smiddy, William E.; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy which is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI-3005, Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo even in the capillaries. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV as well as BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) data from commercially available devices were registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s) which other currently available devices targeting the retinal microcirculation are not yet capable of. Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software were 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% in the RFI built-in software to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). PMID:26569349

  2. Visible-light optical coherence tomography for retinal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2013-06-01

    We applied a visible-light spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) for in vivo retinal oximetry. To extract hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO(2)) in individual retinal vessels, we established a comprehensive analytical model to describe optical absorption, optical scattering, and blood cell packing factor in the whole blood and fit the acquired vis-OCT signals from the bottom of each imaged vessel. We found that averaged sO(2) values in arterial and venous bloods were 95% and 72%, respectively.

  3. Integration of retinal image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  4. Quantitative analysis of retinal changes in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giansanti, Roberto; Boemi, Massimo; Fumelli, Paolo; Passerini, Giorgio; Zingaretti, Primo

    1995-05-01

    Arterial hypertension is a high prevalence disease in Western countries and it is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular accidents. Retinal vessel changes are common findings in patients suffering from long-standing hypertensive disease. Morphological evaluations of the fundus oculi represent a fundamental tool for the clinical approach to the patient with hypertension. A qualitative analysis of the retinal lesions is usually performed and this implies severe limitations both in the classification of the different degrees of the pathology and in the follow-up of the disease. A diagnostic system based on a quantitative analysis of the retinal changes could overcome these problems. Our computerized approach was intended for this scope. The paper concentrates on the results and the implications of a computerized approach to the automatic extraction of numerical indexes describing morphological details of the fundus oculi. A previously developed image processing and recognition system, documented elsewhere and briefly described here, was successfully tested in pre-clinical experiments and applied in the evaluation of normal as well as of pathological fundus. The software system was developed to extract indexes such as caliber and path of vessels, local tortuosity of arteries and arterioles, positions and angles of crossings between two vessels. The reliability of the results, justified by their low variability, makes feasible the standardization of quantitative parameters to be used both in the diagnosis and in the prognosis of hypertension, and also allows prospective studies based upon them.

  5. Relationship between target organ damage and blood pressure, retinal vessel calibre, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in patients with hypertension: a case–control study protocol (LOD-Hipertensión)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Target organ damage (TOD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The study objectives were to analyse the relationship of TOD to blood pressure, size of retinal arteries and veins, oxidative stress and different polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in participants with hypertension. Methods and analysis A case–control study to analyse the relationship between clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters and presence of cardiac, vascular and renal TOD in 486 patients with hypertension. Participants with TOD will be considered as cases, and those without TOD will be enrolled as controls. This will be a collaborative study conducted by the groups of Primary Care, Cardiovascular and Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases of the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica of Salamanca (IBSAL). Assessment of cardiac, renal and vascular TOD. Measurement of peripheral and central blood pressure, size of eye fundus arteries and veins, and oxidative stress, and polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted after approval is obtained from the Ethics Committee of Hospital Clínico Universitario of Salamanca. All study participants will sign an informed consent to agree to participate in the study, and another consent to agree on the genetic study, in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the WHO standards for observational studies. The results of this study will allow for an understanding of the relationship of the different TODs with blood pressure, retinal artery and vein diameters, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. Trial registration number Clinical Trials. gov Identifier: NCT02022618. PMID:24699462

  6. Nitric oxide regulates retinal vascular tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Dorner, Guido T; Garhofer, Gerhard; Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Polak, Kaija; Riva, Charles E; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of basal nitric oxide (NO) on retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, we set out to elucidate the role of NO in flicker-induced retinal vasodilation in humans. Twelve healthy young subjects were studied in a three-way crossover design. Subjects received an intravenous infusion of either placebo or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 3 or 6 mg/kg over 5 min), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Thereafter, diffuse luminance flicker was consecutively performed for 16, 32, and 64 s at a frequency of 8 Hz. The effect of L-NMMA on retinal arterial and venous diameter was assessed under resting conditions and during the hyperemic flicker response. Retinal vessel diameter was measured with a Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. L-NMMA significantly reduced arterial diameter (3 mg/kg: -2%; 6 mg/kg: -4%, P < 0.001) and venous diameter (3 mg/kg: -5%; 6 mg/kg: -8%, P < 0.001). After placebo infusion, flicker induced a significant increase in retinal vessel diameter (P < 0.001). At a flicker duration of 64 s, arterial diameter increased by 4% and venous diameter increased by 3%. L-NMMA did not abolish these hyperemic responses but blunted venous vasodilation (P = 0.017) and arterial vasodilation (P = 0.02) in response to flicker stimulation. Our data indicate that NO contributes to basal retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, NO appears to play a role in flicker-induced vasodilation of the human retinal vasculature.

  7. Retinal microstructure in patients with EFEMP1 retinal dystrophy evaluated by Fourier domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Gerth, C; Zawadzki, RJ; Werner, JS; Héon, E

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate retinal microstructure of patients affected with malattia leventinese (MLVT) and mutation in the EFEMP1 gene using high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Patients diagnosed with MLVT received a comprehensive eye exam, full-field and multifocal electroretinogram testing and imaging with a high-resolution Fourier domain OCT (Fd-OCT, UC Davis Medical Center, Davis, USA; axial resolution: 4.5 μm, acquisition speed: 9 frames s−1, 1000 A scans s−1) combined with a flexible scanning head (Bioptigen Inc. Durham, NC, USA). Results Two related patients aged 30 and 60 years, with MLVT and identified c.R345W mutation in the EFEMP1 gene, were tested. Mother and daughter showed a variable phenotype with reduced vision function in the younger patient, whereas the mother had a ‘form frustre’. Fd-OCT revealed extensive or focal sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deposits, separation of RPE and Bruch's membrane, and disruption of the photoreceptor outer and inner segment layers. No outer retinal changes were visible outside areas with sub-RPE deposits. Conclusion Retinal structure in EFEMP1 retinal dystrophy is reflected by morphological changes within the RPE/Bruch's membrane complex with accumulation of sub-RPE material associated with disrupted photoreceptor integrity. The pattern of microstructural retinal abnormalities is similar but with a different extent in patients with variable phenotypes. PMID:18791549

  8. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  10. Visible-light OCT to quantify retinal oxygen metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Wenzhong; Soetikno, Brian T.

    2016-03-01

    We explored, both numerically and experimentally, whether OCT can be a good candidate to accurately measure retinal oxygen metabolism. We first used statistical methods to numerically simulate photon transport in the retina to mimic OCT working under different spectral ranges. Then we analyze accuracy of OCT oximetry subject to parameter variations such as vessel size, pigmentation, and oxygenation. We further developed an experimental OCT system based on the spectral range identified by our simulation work. We applied the newly developed OCT to measure both retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and retinal retinal flow. After obtaining the retinal sO2 and blood velocity, we further measured retinal vessel diameter and calculated the retinal oxygen metabolism rate (MRO2). To test the capability of our OCT, we imaged wild-type Long-Evans rats ventilated with both normal air and air mixtures with various oxygen concentrations. Our simulation suggested that OCT working within visible spectral range is able to provide accurate measurement of retinal MRO2 using inverse Fourier transform spectral reconstruction. We called this newly developed technology vis-OCT, and showed that vis-OCT was able to measure the sO2 value in every single major retinal vessel around the optical disk as well as in micro retinal vessels. When breathing normal air, the averaged sO2 in arterial and venous blood in Long-Evans rats was measured to be 95% and 72%, respectively. When we challenge the rats using air mixtures with different oxygen concentrations, vis-OCT measurement followed analytical models of retinal oxygen diffusion and pulse oximeter well.

  11. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  12. Retinal Changes in an ATP-Induced Model of Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Felix P; Vessey, Kirstan A; Luu, Chi D; Guymer, Robyn H; Shepherd, Robert K; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). At 30 h (n = 3) or 12 weeks (n = 3) post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labeled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 h and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration.

  13. Retinal Changes in an ATP-Induced Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, Felix P.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Luu, Chi D.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). At 30 h (n = 3) or 12 weeks (n = 3) post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labeled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 h and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:27199678

  14. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001).

  15. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  16. Retinal image analysis: concepts, applications and potential.

    PubMed

    Patton, Niall; Aslam, Tariq M; MacGillivray, Thomas; Deary, Ian J; Dhillon, Baljean; Eikelboom, Robert H; Yogesan, Kanagasingam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-01-01

    As digital imaging and computing power increasingly develop, so too does the potential to use these technologies in ophthalmology. Image processing, analysis and computer vision techniques are increasing in prominence in all fields of medical science, and are especially pertinent to modern ophthalmology, as it is heavily dependent on visually oriented signs. The retinal microvasculature is unique in that it is the only part of the human circulation that can be directly visualised non-invasively in vivo, readily photographed and subject to digital image analysis. Exciting developments in image processing relevant to ophthalmology over the past 15 years includes the progress being made towards developing automated diagnostic systems for conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity. These diagnostic systems offer the potential to be used in large-scale screening programs, with the potential for significant resource savings, as well as being free from observer bias and fatigue. In addition, quantitative measurements of retinal vascular topography using digital image analysis from retinal photography have been used as research tools to better understand the relationship between the retinal microvasculature and cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, advances in electronic media transmission increase the relevance of using image processing in 'teleophthalmology' as an aid in clinical decision-making, with particular relevance to large rural-based communities. In this review, we outline the principles upon which retinal digital image analysis is based. We discuss current techniques used to automatically detect landmark features of the fundus, such as the optic disc, fovea and blood vessels. We review the use of image analysis in the automated diagnosis of pathology (with particular reference to diabetic retinopathy). We also review its role in defining and performing quantitative measurements of vascular topography

  17. Vitamin D and retinal microvascular damage

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Unal; Ikram, M Arfan; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Klaver, Caroline C W; Ikram, M Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D has been linked to various cardiovascular risk factors including indices of large-vessel disease. However, it remains unclear whether vitamin D is also associated with microvascular damage. In a community-dwelling population, we studied associations between vitamin D serum levels and retinal microvascular damage defined as retinopathy signs, narrower arterioles, and wider venules. From the population-based Rotterdam Study, we included 5675 participants (age ≥45 years) with vitamin D data and gradable retinal photographs. Serum levels of vitamin D were measured using an antibody-based assay. Retinal exudates, microaneurysms, cotton wool spots, and dot/blot hemorrhages were graded on fundus photographs by experienced graders in the whole sample; retinal vascular calibers, that is, arteriolar and venular diameters, were semiautomatically measured in a subsample (n = 2973). We examined the cross-sectional association between vitamin D and retinal microvascular damage using logistic and linear regression models, adjusting for age, sex, and cardiovascular risk factors. We found that persons with lower vitamin D levels were more likely to have retinopathy (adjusted odds ratio per standard deviation (SD) decrease of vitamin D = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): = 1.12–1.49). Furthermore, lower vitamin D levels were associated with wider venular calibers (adjusted mean difference per SD decrease in vitamin D = 1.35; 95% CI = 0.64–2.06). This association was strongest among men (P for interaction = 0.023). Lower levels of vitamin D are associated with retinal microvascular damage, suggesting that the link with cardiovascular risk may partly run through changes in the microvasculature. PMID:27930528

  18. Bone marrow–derived stem cells preserve cone vision in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lois E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a heritable group of blinding diseases resulting from loss of photoreceptors, primarily rods and secondarily cones, that mediate central vision. Loss of retinal vasculature is a presumed metabolic consequence of photoreceptor degeneration. A new study shows that autologous bone marrow–derived lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells, which incorporate into the degenerating blood vessels in two murine models of retinitis pigmentosa, rd1 and rd10, prevent cone loss. The use of autologous bone marrow might avoid problems with rejection while preserving central cone vision in a wide variety of genetically disparate retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:15372096

  19. Retinal architecture and mfERG

    PubMed Central

    Schnurman, Zane S.; Frohman, Teresa C.; Beh, Shin C.; Conger, Darrel; Conger, Amy; Saidha, Shiv; Galetta, Steven; Calabresi, Peter A.; Green, Ari J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel neurophysiologic signature of the retinal ganglion cell and to elucidate its relationship to abnormalities in validated structural and functional measures of the visual system. Methods: We used multifocal electroretinogram–generated optic nerve head component (ONHC) responses from normal subjects (n = 18), patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) (n = 18), and those with glaucoma (n = 3). We then characterized the relationship between ONHC response abnormalities and performance on low-contrast visual acuity, multifocal visual-evoked potential–induced cortical responses, and average and quadrant retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses, as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results: Compared with the eyes of normal subjects, the eyes of patients with MS exhibited an increased number of abnormal or absent ONHC responses (p < 0.0001). For every 7-letter reduction in low-contrast letter acuity, there were corresponding 4.6 abnormal ONHC responses at 2.5% contrast (p < 0.0001) and 6.6 abnormalities at the 1.25% contrast level (p < 0.0001). Regarding average RNFL thickness, for each 10-μm thickness reduction, we correspondingly observed 6.8 abnormal ONHC responses (p = 0.0002). The most robust association was between RNFL thinning in the temporal quadrant and ONHC response abnormalities (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Further characterization of ONHC abnormalities (those that are reversible and irreversible) may contribute to the development of novel neurotherapeutic strategies aimed at achieving neuroprotective, and perhaps even neurorestorative, effects in disorders that target the CNS in general, and MS in particular. PMID:24789865

  20. Decision Support System for Detection of Papilledema through Fundus Retinal Images.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Shahzad; Akram, Muhammad Usman; Sharif, Muhammad; Tariq, Anam; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah

    2017-04-01

    A condition in which the optic nerve inside the eye is swelled due to increased intracranial pressure is known as papilledema. The abnormalities due to papilledema such as opacification of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL), dilated optic disc capillaries, blurred disc margins, absence of venous pulsations, elevation of optic disc, obscuration of optic disc vessels, dilation of optic disc veins, optic disc splinter hemorrhages, cotton wool spots and hard exudates may result in complete vision loss. The ophthalmologists detect papilledema by means of an ophthalmoscope, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and ultrasound. Rapid development of computer aided diagnostic systems has revolutionized the world. There is a need to develop such type of system that automatically detects the papilledema. In this paper, an automated system is presented that detects and grades the papilledema through analysis of fundus retinal images. The proposed system extracts 23 features from which six textural features are extracted from Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM), eight features from optic disc margin obscuration, three color based features and seven vascular features are extracted. A feature vector consisting of these features is used for classification of normal and papilledema images using Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel. The variations in retinal blood vessels, color properties, texture deviation of optic disc and its peripapillary region, and fluctuation of obscured disc margin are effectively identified and used by the proposed system for the detection and grading of papilledema. A dataset of 160 fundus retinal images is used which is taken from publicly available STARE database and local dataset collected from Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) Pakistan. The proposed system shows an average accuracy of 92.86% for classification of papilledema and normal images. It also shows an average accuracy of 97

  1. Automated retinal image quality assessment on the UK Biobank dataset for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Welikala, R A; Fraz, M M; Foster, P J; Whincup, P H; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Strachan, D P; Barman, S A

    2016-04-01

    Morphological changes in the retinal vascular network are associated with future risk of many systemic and vascular diseases. However, uncertainty over the presence and nature of some of these associations exists. Analysis of data from large population based studies will help to resolve these uncertainties. The QUARTZ (QUantitative Analysis of Retinal vessel Topology and siZe) retinal image analysis system allows automated processing of large numbers of retinal images. However, an image quality assessment module is needed to achieve full automation. In this paper, we propose such an algorithm, which uses the segmented vessel map to determine the suitability of retinal images for use in the creation of vessel morphometric data suitable for epidemiological studies. This includes an effective 3-dimensional feature set and support vector machine classification. A random subset of 800 retinal images from UK Biobank (a large prospective study of 500,000 middle aged adults; where 68,151 underwent retinal imaging) was used to examine the performance of the image quality algorithm. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95.33% and a specificity of 91.13% for the detection of inadequate images. The strong performance of this image quality algorithm will make rapid automated analysis of vascular morphometry feasible on the entire UK Biobank dataset (and other large retinal datasets), with minimal operator involvement, and at low cost.

  2. A Study of Low Level Laser Retinal Damage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-15

    Hartridge, H. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London B232, 519, (1947) 15. Kornerup , T. "An Investigation, in Successively Variable Monochromatic Light, of Vessels of...Photography of Retinal Lesions" Supp Invest Ophthal and Via Sci., April 1979, p.51 2) Kornerup , T., "An Investigation, in Successively Variable Monochromatic

  3. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  4. Preliminary investigation of multispectral retinal tissue oximetry mapping using a hyperspectral retinal camera.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Michèle; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Jafari, Reza; Kulasekara, Susith; Rose, Kalpana; Trussart, Rachel; Arbour, Jean Daniel; Hudson, Chris; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Oximetry measurement of principal retinal vessels represents a first step towards understanding retinal metabolism, but the technique could be significantly enhanced by spectral imaging of the fundus outside of main vessels. In this study, a recently developed Hyperspectral Retinal Camera was used to measure relative oximetric (SatO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) maps of the retina, outside of large vessels, in healthy volunteers at baseline (N = 7) and during systemic hypoxia (N = 11), as well as in patients with glaucoma (N = 2). Images of the retina, on a field of view of ∼30°, were acquired between 500 and 600 nm with 2 and 5 nm steps, in under 3 s. The reflectance spectrum from each pixel was fitted to a model having oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin as the main absorbers and scattering modeled by a power law, yielding estimates of relative SatO2 and HbT over the fundus. Average optic nerve head (ONH) saturation over 8 eyes was 68 ± 5%. During systemic hypoxia, mean ONH saturation decreased by 12.5% on average. Upon further development and validation, the relative SatO2 and HbT maps of microvasculature obtained with this imaging system could ultimately contribute to the diagnostic and management of diseases affecting the ONH and retina.

  5. Automated construction of arterial and venous trees in retinal images

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiao; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. While many approaches exist to segment retinal vessels in fundus photographs, only a limited number focus on the construction and disambiguation of arterial and venous trees. Previous approaches are local and/or greedy in nature, making them susceptible to errors or limiting their applicability to large vessels. We propose a more global framework to generate arteriovenous trees in retinal images, given a vessel segmentation. In particular, our approach consists of three stages. The first stage is to generate an overconnected vessel network, named the vessel potential connectivity map (VPCM), consisting of vessel segments and the potential connectivity between them. The second stage is to disambiguate the VPCM into multiple anatomical trees, using a graph-based metaheuristic algorithm. The third stage is to classify these trees into arterial or venous (A/V) trees. We evaluated our approach with a ground truth built based on a public database, showing a pixel-wise classification accuracy of 88.15% using a manual vessel segmentation as input, and 86.11% using an automatic vessel segmentation as input. PMID:26636114

  6. A new fluorescent imaging procedure in vivo for evaluation of the retinal microcirculation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Kiryu, J; Nishiwaki, H; Ogura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We investigated a new method for in vivo evaluation of the retinal microcirculation in rats using a cell-permeant fluorescent dye, acridine orange (AO), which stains cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). AO, which binds and interacts with DNA and RNA, and thus stains cell nuclei and cytoplasm, was administered intravenously to rats. Fluorescein angiography was performed after administration of the AO, and fundus images were recorded on S-VHS videotape by means of an SLO. Argon laser was used as an exciter of the dye. The retinal vessels were stained with the dye, rendering the retinal microvasculature clearly visible. Cell nuclei and vessel walls were observed as greater fluorescence and lesser fluorescence, respectively. Leukocytes were also observed as highly fluorescent dots moving through the vessels. The results suggest that SLO visualization of AO uptake by cells may be a useful procedure for the evaluation of retinal microcirculation in vivo in rats.

  7. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment.

  8. [Vision engineering--photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses: Okayama University model].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko

    2007-04-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells by genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells still remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The replacement of dead photoreceptor cells with something artificial is the basic concept of retinal prostheses. The remaining retinal neurons can be stimulated by either electric current or electric potential. Photodiode array and electrode array are two main ways to stimulate retinal neurons as retinal prostheses. These retinal prostheses have problems such as low sensitivity and requiring outer electric sources (batteries). To overcome the problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses which absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. The prototype, photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could generate intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking retinal tissues and also in cultured retinal neurons. The photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film in a large size, corresponding to wide visual field, can be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. After the production control and the quality control have been established, clinical trials of the photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses would be planned in concordance with the Drugs and Medical Devices Law to prove the safety and the efficacy.

  9. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  10. Connexin43 mimetic peptide reduces vascular leak and retinal ganglion cell death following retinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Kerr, Nathan M; Zhang, Jie; Eady, Elizabeth K; O'Carroll, Simon J; Nicholson, Louise F B; Johnson, Cameron S; Green, Colin R

    2012-02-01

    Connexin43 gap junction protein is expressed in astrocytes and the vascular endothelium in the central nervous system. It is upregulated following central nervous system injury and is recognized as playing an important role in modulating the extent of damage. Studies that have transiently blocked connexin43 in spinal cord injury and central nervous system epileptic models have reported neuronal rescue. The purpose of this study was to investigate neuronal rescue following retinal ischaemia-reperfusion by transiently blocking connexin43 activity using a connexin43 mimetic peptide. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of transiently blocking connexin43 on vascular permeability as this is known to increase following central nervous system ischaemia. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to 60 min of retinal ischaemia. Treatment groups consisted of no treatment, connexin43 mimetic peptide and scrambled peptide. Retinas were then evaluated at 1-2, 4, 8 and 24 h, and 7 and 21 days post-ischaemia. Evans blue dye leak from retinal blood vessels was used to assess vascular leakage. Blood vessel integrity was examined using isolectin-B4 labelling. Connexin43 levels and astrocyte activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein) were assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Retinal whole mounts and retinal ganglion cell counts were used to quantify neurodegeneration. An in vitro cell culture model of endothelial cell ischaemia was used to assess the effect of connexin43 mimetic peptide on endothelial cell survival and connexin43 hemichannel opening using propidium iodide dye uptake. We found that retinal ischaemia-reperfusion induced significant vascular leakage and disruption at 1-2, 4 and 24 h following injury with a peak at 4 h. Connexin43 immunoreactivity was significantly increased at 1-2, 4, 8 and 24 h post ischaemia-reperfusion injury co-localizing with activated astrocytes, Muller cells and vascular endothelial cells. Connexin43 mimetic peptide

  11. Peripheral retinal ischemia in a young Indian woman with neurofibromatosis type 1☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Anisha; Ghosh, Basudeb; Gupta, Anika; Goel, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease characterized by café-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, axillary freckling, Lisch nodules of iris, gliomas and various systemic vascular ischemic manifestations mainly in the aorta, brain and kidney. Retinal vascular manifestations in patients with NF-1 are usually representative of retinal capillary hemangiomatosis. Few cases of NF-1 with retinal vascular occlusive disease have been described. We describe a young Indian woman with NF-1 with unilateral peripheral retinal ischemia but no vascular abnormality at the posterior pole. PMID:26949362

  12. Supervised retinal biometrics in different lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che; Kumar, Dinesh K; Sugavaneswaran, Lakshmi; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    Retinal image has been considered for number of health and biometrics applications. However, the reliability of these has not been investigated thoroughly. The variation observed in retina scans taken at different times is attributable to differences in illumination and positioning of the camera. It causes some missing bifurcations and crossovers from the retinal vessels. Exhaustive selection of optimal parameters is needed to construct the best similarity metrics equation to overcome the incomplete landmarks. In this paper, we extracted multiple features from the retina scans and employs supervised classification to overcome the shortcomings of the current techniques. The experimental results of 60 retina scans with different lightning conditions demonstrate the efficacy of this technique. The results were compared with the existing methods.

  13. Retinal tear: an unusual complication of ocular toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Kilavuzoglu, Ayse Ebru; Altiparmak, Ugur Emrah; Cosar, Cemile Banu; Ozkiris, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is aimed to report on a 16-year-old patient with acquired ocular toxoplasmosis complicated by a retinal tear. Methods Retrospective medical chart review Results A 16-year-old Caucasian female presented with vision loss in her right eye. In addition to a white active lesion between the fovea and the optic nerve head, marked vitreous opacification was noted. She was diagnosed with ocular toxoplasmosis. The patient was treated with oral azithromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. One month later, retinochoroiditis resolved and vitreous cleared. Three months after onset, patient presented with floaters in the right eye and a retinal tear was located at the temporal region of the retina. Prophylactic argon laser treatment that encircled the retinal tear was performed. No other abnormalities were noted during 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Retinal tear associated with ocular toxoplasmosis is rare; however, a retinal tear can occur due to vitreoretinal traction following post-inflammatory structural alteration of the vitreous. Retinal tears may be seen during the healing phase, when the inflammation turns into tightening of vitreous substance. Careful retinal examination in cases of ocular toxoplasmosis is warranted, especially in patients with severe vitreous inflammation. PMID:28352754

  14. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics.

  15. The development of blood-retinal barrier during the interaction of astrocytes with vascular wall cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huanling; Wang, Tianshi; Deng, Jiexin; Liu, Ding; Li, Xiaofei; Deng, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are intimately involved in the formation and development of retinal vessels. Astrocyte dysfunction is a major cause of blood-retinal barrier injury and other retinal vascular diseases. In this study, the development of the retinal vascular system and the formation of the blood-retinal barrier in mice were investigated using immunofluorescence staining, gelatin-ink perfusion, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the retinal vascular system of mice develops from the optic disc after birth, and radiates out gradually to cover the entire retina, taking the papilla optica as the center. First, the superficial vasculature is formed on the inner retinal layer; then, the vasculature extends into the inner and outer edges of the retinal inner nuclear layer, forming the deep vasculature that is parallel to the superficial vasculature. The blood-retinal barrier is mainly composed of endothelium, basal lamina and the end-feet of astrocytes, which become mature during mouse development. Initially, the naive endothelial cells were immature with few organelles and many microvilli. The basal lamina was uniform in thickness, and the glial end-feet surrounded the outer basal lamina incompletely. In the end, the blood-retinal barrier matures with smooth endothelia connected through tight junctions, relatively thin and even basal lamina, and relatively thin glial cell end-feet. These findings indicate that the development of the vasculature in the retina follows the rules of “center to periphery” and “superficial layer to deep layers”. Its development and maturation are spatially and temporally consistent with the functional performance of retinal neurons and photosensitivity. The blood-retinal barrier gradually becomes mature via the process of interactions between astrocytes and blood vessel cells. PMID:25206758

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Low-Dose Statins in the Retinal Ultrastructure of Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Navarro, Judith; Aldea, Pilar; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J; Ramírez, Ana I; Rojas, Blanca; Gallego, Beatriz I; Triviño, Alberto; Tejerina, Teresa; Ramírez, José M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pleiotropic effects to statins, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative retinal changes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after a low-dosage statin treatment. For this purpose, New Zealand rabbits were split into three groups: control (G0; n = 10), fed a standard diet; hypercholesterolemic (G1; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months; and statins (G2; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months, together with the administration of statin (pravastatin or fluvastatin sodium) at a dose of 2 mg / kg / day each diet. The retinas were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (glial fibrillary acidic protein). The retinal thickness of nuclear and plexiform layers were quantified in semi-thin sections. The results revealed that the low-statin-treated rabbits in comparison with the hypercholesterolemic group showed: i) a more preserved structure in all retinal layers; ii) a significant reduction in retinal thickness; iii) a decrease in cell death in the nuclear-and ganglion-cell layers; iv) a reduction of hydropic degeneration in the plexiform and nerve-fiber layers; v) a preservation of astrocytes and of the retinal area occupied by them; and vi) a better-preserved retinal vascular structure. Our findings indicate that low doses of statins can prevent retinal degeneration, acting on retinal macroglia, neurons and retinal vessels, despite that hypercholesterolemia remained unchanged. Thus, the pleiotropic effects of the statins may help safeguard the retinal ultrastructure.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Low-Dose Statins in the Retinal Ultrastructure of Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J; Ramírez, Ana I; Rojas, Blanca; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Tejerina, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pleiotropic effects to statins, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative retinal changes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after a low-dosage statin treatment. For this purpose, New Zealand rabbits were split into three groups: control (G0; n = 10), fed a standard diet; hypercholesterolemic (G1; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months; and statins (G2; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months, together with the administration of statin (pravastatin or fluvastatin sodium) at a dose of 2 mg / kg / day each diet. The retinas were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (glial fibrillary acidic protein). The retinal thickness of nuclear and plexiform layers were quantified in semi-thin sections. The results revealed that the low-statin-treated rabbits in comparison with the hypercholesterolemic group showed: i) a more preserved structure in all retinal layers; ii) a significant reduction in retinal thickness; iii) a decrease in cell death in the nuclear-and ganglion-cell layers; iv) a reduction of hydropic degeneration in the plexiform and nerve-fiber layers; v) a preservation of astrocytes and of the retinal area occupied by them; and vi) a better-preserved retinal vascular structure. Our findings indicate that low doses of statins can prevent retinal degeneration, acting on retinal macroglia, neurons and retinal vessels, despite that hypercholesterolemia remained unchanged. Thus, the pleiotropic effects of the statins may help safeguard the retinal ultrastructure. PMID:27144842

  18. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

  19. Monte Carlo Investigation of Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) oximetry explores the possibility to measure retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation level (sO2). We investigated the accuracy of OCT retinal oximetry using Monte Carlo simulation in a commonly used four-layer retinal model. After we determined the appropriate number of simulated photon packets, we studied the effects of blood vessel diameter, signal sampling position, physiological sO2 level, and the blood packing factor on the accuracy of sO2 estimation in OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results showed that a packing factor between 0.2 and 0.4 yields a reasonably accurate estimation of sO2 within a 5% error tolerance, which is independent of vessel diameter and sampling position, when visible-light illumination is used in OCT. We further explored the optimal optical spectral range for OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results suggest that visible spectral range around 560 nm is better suited than near-infrared spectral range around 800 nm for OCT oximetry to warrant accurate measurements.

  20. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  1. Retinal dysplasia of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Ian R; Layer, Noelle; de Alba Campomanes, Alejandra G

    2014-03-04

    Retinal dysplasia occurs in the setting of sporadic and syndromic holoprosencephaly, which often has associated ocular malformations. The pathology of this dysplasia, which includes rosettes, has been previously described. However, its funduscopic findings have not been well documented. The authors present the fundus images of a patient with severe holoprosencephaly with retinal dysplasia and bilateral optic nerve colobomas that resulted in death 2 weeks after birth.

  2. Hypertension is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar calibre in persons with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, S B; Mitchell, P; Plant, A J H; Chiha, J; Phan, K; Liew, G; Thiagalingam, A; Kovoor, P; Burlutsky, G; Gopinath, B

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate independent associations between hypertension and retinal vessel calibre in a high cardiovascular risk cohort and to determine whether these associations also exist in patients without coronary artery disease (CAD). The Australian Heart Eye Study is an observational study that surveyed 1680 participants presenting to a tertiary referral hospital for the evaluation of potential CAD by coronary angiography. Hypertension was defined as systolic >140 mm Hg, diastolic >90 mm Hg or treated (use of antihypertensive medications). Retinal arteriolar and venular calibres were measured from retinal photographs. CAD was quantified using severity (Gensini) and extent scores. Subanalyses were performed for people with and without CAD and for men and women. A total of 1114 participants had complete data on hypertension, coronary vessel evaluation and retinal vessel measurements and were included in cross-sectional analyses. Among persons with CAD, those with hypertension (compared with without) had narrower retinal arteriolar calibre (mean arteriolar calibre difference 2.1 μm, P=0.02), adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status and fellow vessel calibre. This association was also present among persons without CAD (mean difference 5.0 μm, P=0.04). Stratification by sex indicated that women with hypertension had marginally narrower retinal arterioles compared with normotensive women (multivariable-adjusted P=0.04). No significant association between hypertension and retinal arteriolar calibre was observed in men (P=0.13). No significant differences in retinal venular calibre were observed (P>0.05). In conclusion, in both subjects with and without CAD, hypertension was independently associated with narrower retinal arterioles.

  3. Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Retinal Microvascular Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Richard A.; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert Vernon; Li, Xiaohui; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Brody, Jennifer A.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Mcknight, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin; Kifley, Annette; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Li, Xiang; Ikram, M. Arfan; Klaver, Caroline C.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Mutlu, Unal; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Mitchell, Paul; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that retinal microvascular diameters are associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular conditions. The shared genetic effects of these associations are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the genetic factors that mediate retinal vessel size. Methods and Results This study extends previous genome-wide association study results using 24,000+ multi-ethnic participants from 7 discovery and 5,000+ subjects of European ancestry from 2 replication cohorts. Using the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, we investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants collectively across genes with summary measures of retinal vessel diameters, referred to as the central retinal venule equivalent (CRVE) and the central retinal arteriole equivalent (CRAE). We report 4 new loci associated with CRVE, one of which is also associated with CRAE. The 4 SNPs are rs7926971 in TEAD1 (p=3.1×10−11, minor allele frequency (MAF)=0.43), rs201259422 in TSPAN10 (p=4.4×10−9, MAF=0.27), rs5442 in GNB3 (p=7.0×10−10, MAF=0.05) and rs1800407 in OCA2 (p=3.4×10−8, MAF=0.05). The latter SNP, rs1800407, was also associated with CRAE (p=6.5×10−12). Results from the gene-based burden tests were null. In phenotype look-ups, SNP rs201255422 was associated with both systolic (p=0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p=8.3×10−04). Conclusions Our study expands the understanding of genetic factors influencing the size of the retinal microvasculature. These findings may also provide insight into the relationship between retinal and systemic microvascular disease. PMID:26567291

  4. Retinal oximetry in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Gottfredsdottir, Maria Soffia; Harris, Alon; Stefánsson, Einar

    2011-08-16

    PURPOSE. To determine whether retinal vessel oxygen saturation is affected in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients. METHODS. Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with POAG was measured in retinal vessels with a spectrophotometric retinal oximeter in darkness, and visual fields were obtained. Oxygen tension (Po(2)) was calculated from oxygen saturation values. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation and Student's t-test. RESULTS. Mean oxygen saturation in venules was higher in persons with poor visual fields (68% ± 4%, mean ± SD) than in those with good visual fields (62% ± 3%; P = 0.0018). The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was lower in persons with poor visual fields (30% ± 4%, n = 9) than in those with good visual fields (37% ± 4%; P = 0.0003; n = 12). No correlation was found between saturation in retinal arterioles and visual field mean defect (n = 31; r = -0.16; P = 0.38). Oxygen saturation in retinal venules correlated positively with worsening visual field mean defect (r = 0.43; P = 0.015). Arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation decreased significantly as the visual field mean defect worsened (r = -0.55; P = 0.0013). Mean Po(2) in venules was 38 ± 3 mm Hg. It was significantly higher in persons with poor visual field fields (40 ± 3 mm Hg) than in those with good visual fields (36 ± 2 mm Hg; P = 0.0016). CONCLUSIONS. Deeper glaucomatous visual field defects are associated with increased oxygen saturation in venules and decreased arteriovenous difference in retinal oxygen saturation. The data suggest that oxygen metabolism is affected in the glaucomatous retina, possibly related to tissue atrophy.

  5. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  6. β-catenin is essential for lamination but not neurogenesis in mouse retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xueyao; Sun, Hongxia; Klein, William H.; Mu, Xiuqian

    2007-01-01

    During vertebrate retinal development, the seven retinal cell types differentiate sequentially from a single population of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) and organize themselves into a distinct laminar structure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether β-catenin, which functions both as a nuclear effector for the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and as a regulator of cell adhesion, is required for retinal neurogenesis or lamination. We used the Cre-loxP system to either eliminate β-catenin or to express a constitutively active form during retinal neurogenesis. Eliminating β-catenin did not affect cell differentiation, but did result in the loss of the radial arrangement of RPCs and caused abnormal migration of differentiated neurons. As a result, the laminar structure was massively disrupted in β-catenin-null retinas, although all retinal cell types still formed. In contrast to other neural tissues, eliminating β-catenin did not significantly reduce the proliferation rate of RPCs; likewise, activating β-catenin ectopically in RPCs did not result in overproliferation, but loss of neural retinal identity. These results indicate that β-catenin is essential during retinal neurogenesis as a regulator of cell adhesion but not as a nuclear effector of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. The results further imply that retinal lamination and retinal cell differentiation are genetically separable processes. PMID:16959241

  7. Comparison of non-mydriatic retinal photography with ophthalmoscopy in 2159 patients: mobile retinal camera study.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R; Lovelock, L; Tunbridge, W M; Alberti, K G; Brackenridge, R G; Stephenson, P; Young, E

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether non-mydriatic Polaroid retinal photography was comparable to ophthalmoscopy with mydriasis in routine clinic screening for early, treatable diabetic retinopathy. DESIGN--Prospective study of ophthalmoscopic findings according to retinal camera screening and ophthalmoscopy and outcome of referral to ophthalmologist. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinics of three teaching hospitals and three district general hospitals. PATIENTS--2159 Adults selected randomly from the diabetic clinics, excluding only those registered as blind or those in wheelchairs and unable to enter the screening vehicle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Numbers of patients and eyes correctly identified by each technique as requiring referral with potentially treatable retinopathy (new vessel formation and maculopathy) and congruence in numbers of microaneurysms, haemorrhages, and exudates reported. RESULTS--Camera screening missed two cases of new vessel formation and did not identify a further 12 but indicated a need for referral. Ophthalmoscopy missed five cases of new vessel formation and indicated a need for referral in another four for other reasons. Maculopathy was reported in 147 eyes with camera screening alone and 95 eyes by ophthalmoscopy only (chi 2 = 11.2; p less than 0.001), in 66 and 29 of which respectively maculopathy was subsequently confirmed. Overall, 38 eyes received laser treatment for maculopathy after detection by camera screening compared with 17 after ophthalmoscopic detection (chi 2 = 8.0; p less than 0.01). Camera screening underestimated numbers of microaneurysms (chi 2 = 12.9; p less than 0.001) and haemorrhages (chi 2 = 7.4; p less than 0.01) and ophthalmoscopy underestimated hard exudates (chi 2 = 48.2; p less than 0.001). CONCLUSIONS--Non-mydriatic Polaroid retinal photography is at least as good as ophthalmoscopy with mydriasis in routine diabetic clinics in identifying new vessel formation and absence of retinopathy and is significantly better

  8. Thrombospondin-2 Expression During Retinal Vascular Development and Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Ping; Palenski, Tammy L.; Wang, Shoujian; Gurel, Zafer; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Sorenson, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) expression and its impact on postnatal retinal vascular development and retinal neovascularization. Methods: The TSP2-deficient (TSP2−/−) mice and a line of TSP2 reporter mice were used to assess the expression of TSP2 during postnatal retinal vascular development and neovascularization. The postnatal retinal vascularization was evaluated using immunostaining of wholemount retinas prepared at different postnatal days by collagen IV staining and/or TSP2 promoter driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The organization of astrocytes was evaluated by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining. Retinal vascular densities were determined using trypsin digestion preparation of wholemount retinas at 3- and 6-weeks of age. Retinal neovascularization was assessed during the oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR). Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was assessed using laser-induced CNV. Results: Using the TSP2-GFP reporter mice, we observed significant expression of TSP2 mRNA in retinas of postnatal day 5 (P5) mice, which increased by P7 and remained high up to P42. Similar results were observed in retinal wholemount preparations, and western blotting for GFP with the highest level of GFP was observed at P21. In contrast to high level of mRNA at P42, the GFP fluorescence or protein level was dramatically downregulated. The primary retinal vasculature developed at a faster rate in TSP2−/− mice compared with TSP2+/+ mice up to P5. However, the developing retinal vasculature in TSP2+/+ mice caught up with that of TSP2−/− mice after P7. No significant differences in retinal vascular density were observed at 3- or 6-weeks of age. TSP2−/− mice also exhibited a similar sensitivity to the hyperoxia-mediated vessel obliteration and similar level of neovascularization during OIR as TSP2+/+ mice. Lack of TSP2 expression minimally affected laser-induced CNV compared with TSP2+/+ mice. Conclusions

  9. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  10. RI in central retinal artery as assessed by CDI does not correspond to retinal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Polska, E; Kircher, K; Ehrlich, P; Vecsei, P V; Schmetterer, L

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ultrasound Doppler measurements of resistive index (RI) in the central retinal artery and retinal vascular resistance (R) assessed with laser Doppler velocimetry, vessel size measurement, and calculation of ocular perfusion pressure (PP) in healthy subjects. An increase in vascular resistance was induced by inhalation of 100% O(2). During hyperoxia no significant changes in PP were observed. Mean flow velocity in main retinal veins was reduced by -27.5 +/- 2.0%. The average decrease in diameter was -11.5 +/- 1.0%. R, which was calculated as the ratio of PP to flow rate, increased by 97.6 +/- 7.7%. RI increased as well, but the effect was much smaller (6.6 +/- 2.2%). In addition, a negative correlation was found between baseline values of R and RI (r = -0.83). During hyperoxia R and RI were not associated. In conclusion, our data indicate that RI as assessed with color Doppler imaging in the central retinal artery is not an adequate measure of R.

  11. Advanced glycation end products induce moesin phosphorylation in murine retinal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingjun; Li, Qiaoqin; Du, Jing; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Huang, Xuliang; Guo, Xiaohua; Huang, Qiaobing

    2012-02-01

    Increase in vascular permeability is the most important pathological event during the development of diabetic retinopathy. Deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) plays a crucial role in the process of diabetes. This study was to investigate the role of moesin and its underlying signal transduction in retinal vascular hyper-permeability induced by AGE-modified mouse serum albumin (AGE-MSA). Female C57BL/6 mice were used to produce an AGE-treated model by intraperitoneal administration of AGE-MSA for seven consecutive days. The inner blood-retinal barrier was quantified by Evans blue leakage assay. Endothelial F-actin cytoskeleton in retinal vasculature was visualized by fluorescence probe staining. The expression and phosphorylation of moesin in retinal vessels were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting. Further studies were performed to explore the effects of Rho kinase (ROCK) and p38 MAPK pathway on the involvement of moesin in AGE-induced retinal vascular hyper-permeability response. Treatment with AGE-MSA significantly increased the permeability of the retinal microvessels and induced the disorganization of F-actin in retinal vascular endothelial cells. The threonine (T558) phosphorylation of moesin in retinal vessels was enhanced remarkably after AGE administration. The phosphorylation of moesin was attenuated by inhibitions of ROCK and p38 MAPK, while this treatment also prevented the dysfunction of inner blood-retinal barrier and the reorganization of F-actin in retinal vascular endothelial cells. These results demonstrate that moesin is involved in AGE-induced retinal vascular endothelial dysfunction and the phosphorylation of moesin is triggered via ROCK and p38 MAPK activation.

  12. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  13. Retinal Structure and Function in Eyes with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Satoshi; Nishina, Sachiko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Mikami, Masashi; Nakayama, Yuri; Tanaka, Michiko; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated retinal structure and function in eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH). Twenty-nine eyes of 18 patients with ONH and 21 eyes of 21 control patients were analyzed. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), full-field electroretinography (FF-ERG), and focal macular ERG (FM-ERG) were performed. SD-OCT analysis of the macular region showed significant ganglion cells complex (GCC) thinning nasally and temporally (P < 0.05), but the thickness from the inner nuclear layer (INL) to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) became thinner only nasally (P < 0.05). SD-OCT analysis of the circumpapillary region showed significant thinning in the retinal nerve fiber layer and from the INL to the RPE (P < 0.05). The horizontal SD-OCT images showed variable foveal abnormalities. FF-ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes (P < 0.05) and preserved implicit time in the photopic negative response. The amplitudes and implicit times of the other FF-ERG components did not differ significantly. FM-ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes (P < 0.05) but preserved implicit times in all components. The current study showed the change of retinal structure and function in eyes with ONH compared with those with control, representing by decreased retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, foveal abnormalities, and preserved peripheral retina except for the RGCs and their axons. PMID:28205530

  14. Molecular Pathogenesis of Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campochiaro, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    There are two major types of ocular neovascularization that affect the retina, retinal neovascularization (NV) and subretinal or choroidal NV. Retinal NV occurs in a group of diseases referred to as ischemic retinopathies in which damage to retinal vessels results in retinal ischemia. Most prevalent of these are diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusions. Subretinal and choroidal NV occur in diseases of the outer retina and Bruch’s membrane, the most prevalent of which is age-related macular degeneration. Numerous studies in mouse models have helped to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV. There is considerable overlap because the precipitating event in each is stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) which leads to upregulation of several hypoxia-regulated gene products, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin 2, vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), and several others. Stimulation of VEGF signaling and suppression of Tie2 by angiopoietin 2 and VE-PTP are critical for sprouting of retinal, subretinal, and choroidal NV, with perturbation of Bruch’s membrane also needed for the latter. Additional HIF-1-regulated gene products cause further stimulation of the NV. It is difficult to model macular edema in animals and therefore proof-of-concept clinical trials were done and demonstrated that VEGF plays a central role and that suppression of Tie2 is also important. Neutralization of VEGF is currently the first line therapy for all of the above disease processes, but new treatments directed at some of the other molecular targets, particularly stabilization of Tie2, are likely to provide additional benefit for subretinal/choroidal NV and macular edema. In addition, the chronicity of these diseases as well as the implication of VEGF as a cause of retinal nonperfusion and progression of background diabetic retinopathy make sustained delivery approaches for

  15. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  16. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  17. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited.

  18. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  19. Mouse Slc9a8 Mutants Exhibit Retinal Defects Due to Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jadeja, Shalini; Barnard, Alun R.; McKie, Lisa; Cross, Sally H.; White, Jacqueline K.; Robertson, Morag; Budd, Peter S.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Jackson, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As part of a large scale systematic screen to determine the effects of gene knockout mutations in mice, a retinal phenotype was found in mice lacking the Slc9a8 gene, encoding the sodium/hydrogen ion exchange protein NHE8. We aimed to characterize the mutant phenotype and the role of sodium/hydrogen ion exchange in retinal function. Methods. Detailed histology characterized the pathological consequences of Slc9a8 mutation, and retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG). A conditional allele was used to identify the cells in which NHE8 function is critical for retinal function, and mutant cells analyzed for the effect of the mutation on endosomes. Results. Histology of mutant retinas reveals a separation of photoreceptors from the RPE and infiltration by macrophages. There is a small reduction in photoreceptor length and a mislocalization of visual pigments. The ERG testing reveals a deficit in rod and cone pathway function. The RPE shows abnormal morphology, and mutation of Slc9a8 in only RPE cells recapitulates the mutant phenotype. The NHE8 protein localizes to endosomes, and mutant cells have much smaller recycling endosomes. Conclusions. The NHE8 protein is required in the RPE to maintain correct regulation of endosomal volume and/or pH which is essential for the cellular integrity and subsequent function of RPE. PMID:25736793

  20. Targeting Inflammation in Emerging Therapies for Genetic Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A.; Bashar, Abu E.; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.; Moritz, Orson L.; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Genetic retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and monogenic diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa account for some of the commonest causes of blindness in the developed world. Diverse genetic abnormalities and environmental causes have been implicated in triggering multiple pathological mechanisms such as oxidative stress, lipofuscin deposits, neovascularisation, and programmed cell death. In recent years, inflammation has also been highlighted although whether inflammatory mediators play a central role in pathogenesis or a more minor secondary role has yet to be established. Despite this, numerous interventional studies, particularly targeting the complement system, are underway with the promise of novel therapeutic strategies for these important blinding conditions. PMID:23509666

  1. Retinoids and Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular understanding of the retinoid cycle in mammalian retina stems from painstaking biochemical reconstitution studies supported by natural or engineered animal models with known genetic lesions and studies of humans with specific genetic blinding diseases. Structural and membrane biology have been used to detect critical retinal enzymes and proteins and their substrates and ligands, placing them in a cellular context. These studies have been supplemented by analytical chemistry methods that have identified small molecules by their spectral characteristics, often in conjunction with the evaluation of models of animal retinal disease. It is from this background that rational therapeutic interventions to correct genetic defects or environmental insults are identified. Thus, most presently accepted modulators of the retinoid cycle already have demonstrated promising results in animal models of retinal degeneration. These encouraging signs indicate that some human blinding diseases can be alleviated by pharmacological interventions. PMID:27917399

  2. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  3. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes.

  4. Age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2) in a novel mouse model due to a nonsense mutation in the Mdm1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo; Mandal, Md Nawajes A; Chavali, Venkata R M; Hawes, Norman L; Khan, Naheed W; Hurd, Ronald E; Smith, Richard S; Davisson, Muriel L; Kopplin, Laura; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Iyengar, Sudha K; Heckenlively, John R; Ayyagari, Radha

    2008-12-15

    We observed that a naturally occurring mouse strain developed age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2). These mice had normal fundi, electroretinograms (ERGs) and retinal histology at 6 months of age; vessel attenuation, RPE atrophy and pigmentary abnormalities at 14 months, which progressed to complete loss of photoreceptors and extinguished ERG by 22 months. Genetic analysis revealed that the retinal degeneration in arrd2 segregates in an autosomal recessive manner and the disease gene localizes to mouse chromosome 10. A positional candidate cloning approach detected a nonsense mutation in the mouse double minute-1 gene (Mdm1), which results in the truncation of the putative protein from 718 amino acids to 398. We have identified a novel transcript of the Mdm1 gene, which is the predominant transcript in the retina. The Mdm1 transcript is localized to the nuclear layers of neural retina. Expression of Mdm1 in the retina increases steadily from post-natal day 30 to 1 year, and a high level of Mdm1 are subsequently maintained. The Mdm1 transcript was found to be significantly depleted in the retina of arrd2 mice and the transcript was observed to degrade by nonsense-mediated decay. These results indicate that the depletion of the Mdm1 transcript may underlie the mechanism leading to late-onset progressive retinal degeneration in arrd2 mice. Analysis of a cohort of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) wherein the susceptibility locus maps to chromosome 12q, a region bearing the human ortholog to MDM1, did not reveal association between human MDM1 and AMD.

  5. Usher syndrome: hearing loss, retinal degeneration and associated abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Pranav; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), clinically and genetically heterogeneous, is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. USH is classified into three types, based on the hearing and vestibular symptoms observed in patients. Sixteen loci have been reported to be involved in the occurrence of USH and atypical USH. Among them, twelve have been identified as causative genes and one as a modifier gene. Studies on the proteins encoded by these USH genes suggest that USH proteins interact among one another and function in multiprotein complexes in vivo. Although their exact functions remain enigmatic in the retina, USH proteins are required for the development, maintenance and function of hair bundles, which are the primary mechanosensitive structure of inner ear hair cells. Despite the unavailability of a cure, progress has been made to develop effective treatments for this disease. In this review, we focus on the most recent discoveries in the field with an emphasis on USH genes, protein complexes and functions in various tissues as well as progress toward therapeutic development for USH. PMID:25481835

  6. Retinal Image Denoising via Bilateral Filter with a Spatial Kernel of Optimally Oriented Line Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunlong; Zhao, Yanna; Ren, Yanju; Gee, James

    2017-01-01

    Filtering belongs to the most fundamental operations of retinal image processing and for which the value of the filtered image at a given location is a function of the values in a local window centered at this location. However, preserving thin retinal vessels during the filtering process is challenging due to vessels' small area and weak contrast compared to background, caused by the limited resolution of imaging and less blood flow in the vessel. In this paper, we present a novel retinal image denoising approach which is able to preserve the details of retinal vessels while effectively eliminating image noise. Specifically, our approach is carried out by determining an optimal spatial kernel for the bilateral filter, which is represented by a line spread function with an orientation and scale adjusted adaptively to the local vessel structure. Moreover, this approach can also be served as a preprocessing tool for improving the accuracy of the vessel detection technique. Experimental results show the superiority of our approach over state-of-the-art image denoising techniques such as the bilateral filter. PMID:28261320

  7. Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Thomas C

    2016-12-30

    As our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited retinal disease has expanded, gene therapy has advanced into clinical development. When the gene mutations associated with inherited retinal dystrophies were identified, it became possible to create animal models in which individual gene were altered to match the human mutations. The retina of these animals were then characterized to assess whether the mutated genes produced retinal phenotypes characteristic of disease-affected patients. Following the identification of a subpopulation of patients with the affected gene and the development of techniques for the viral gene transduction of retinal cells, it has become possible to deliver a copy of the normal gene into the retinal sites of the mutated genes. When this was performed in animal models of monogenic diseases, at an early stage of retinal degeneration when the affected cells remained viable, successful gene augmentation corrected the structural and functional lesions characteristic of the specific diseases in the areas of the retina that were successfully transduced. These studies provided the essential proof-of-concept needed to advance monogenic gene therapies into clinic development; these therapies include treatments for: Leber's congenital amaurosis type 2, caused by mutations to RPE65, retinoid isomerohydrolase; choroideremia, caused by mutations to REP1, Rab escort protein 1; autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, caused by mutations to ABCA4, the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding transporter; Usher 1B disease caused by mutations to MYO7A, myosin heavy chain 7; X-linked juvenile retinoschisis caused by mutations to RS1, retinoschisin; autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations to MERTK, the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase MER; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by mutations to ND4, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) subunit 4 and achromatopsia, caused by

  8. Cilio-retinal arterial circulation in central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that an occlusion of the central retinal artery is an essential prerequisite for haemorrhage formation after central retinal vein obstruction has been investigated by examining the fundus changes in patients with a cilio-retinal arterial circulation; the findings are at variance with the 'combined occlusion hypothesis'. Comparisons were made between the pathological features in two retinal capillary beds with independent sources of arterial supply--namely, the central retinal and cilio-retinal arteries--but with an obstructed venous drainage channel common to both--namely, the central retinal vein. The importance of intraluminal pressure changes (as distinct from perfusion changes) in the causation of haemorrhages and oedema after venous occlusion is stressed, and the role of arterial disease in the pathogenesis of venous occlusions is distinguished from its role in determining the sequelae of such occlusions. Images PMID:1203235

  9. Automated retinal robotic laser system instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-05-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering have also become involved with this research due to similar interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designed this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. An initial CALOSOS prototype design is provided. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. The use of high speed non-standard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed local bus frame grabbers hosted on personal computers are being investigated. A review of system testing in vivo to date is provided in SPIE Conference proceedings 2374-49 (Novel Applications of Lasers and Pulsed Power, Dual-Use Applications of Lasers: Medical session).

  10. Bio-medical imaging: Localization of main structures in retinal fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basit, A.; Egerton, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Retinal fundus images have three main structures, the optic disk, fovea and blood vessels. By examining fundus images, an ophthalmologist can diagnose various clinical disorders of the eye and the body, typically indicated by changes in the diameter, area, branching angles and tortuosity of the three ma in retinal structures. Knowledge of the optic disk position is an important diagnostic index fo r many diseases related to the retina. In this paper, localization of optic disc is discussed. Optic disk detection is based on morphological operationsand smoothing filters. Blood vessels are extracted using the green component of a colour retinal image with the help of a median filter. Maximum intensity values are validated with blood vessels to localize the optic disk location. The proposed method has shown significant improvements in results.

  11. Automated detection of retinal whitening in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V.; Agurto, C.; Barriga, S.; Nemeth, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Lewallen, S.; Harding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication associated with malarial infection. Malaria affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and claims 600,000 lives annually, 75% of whom are African children under five years of age. Because most of these mortalities are caused by the high incidence of CM misdiagnosis, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic to confirm the presence of CM. The retinal lesions associated with malarial retinopathy (MR) such as retinal whitening, vessel discoloration, and hemorrhages, are highly specific to CM, and their detection can improve the accuracy of CM diagnosis. This paper will focus on development of an automated method for the detection of retinal whitening which is a unique sign of MR that manifests due to retinal ischemia resulting from CM. We propose to detect the whitening region in retinal color images based on multiple color and textural features. First, we preprocess the image using color and textural features of the CMYK and CIE-XYZ color spaces to minimize camera reflex. Next, we utilize color features of the HSL, CMYK, and CIE-XYZ channels, along with the structural features of difference of Gaussians. A watershed segmentation algorithm is used to assign each image region a probability of being inside the whitening, based on extracted features. The algorithm was applied to a dataset of 54 images (40 with whitening and 14 controls) that resulted in an image-based (binary) classification with an AUC of 0.80. This provides 88% sensitivity at a specificity of 65%. For a clinical application that requires a high specificity setting, the algorithm can be tuned to a specificity of 89% at a sensitivity of 82%. This is the first published method for retinal whitening detection and combining it with the detection methods for vessel discoloration and hemorrhages can further improve the detection accuracy for malarial retinopathy.

  12. Infrared imaging of sub-retinal structures in the human ocular fundus.

    PubMed

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Weiter, J J; Delori, F C

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of infrared light with the human ocular fundus, particularly sub-retinal structures, was studied in vivo. Visible and infra-red wavelengths and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope were used to acquire digital images of the human fundus. The contrast and reflectance of selected retinal and sub-retinal features were computed for a series of wavelengths or modes of imaging. Near infrared light provides better visibility than visible light for sub-retinal features. Sub-retinal deposits appear light and thickened; the optic nerve head, retinal vessels, and choroidal vessels appear dark. Contrast and visibility of features increases with increasing wavelength from 795 to 895 nm. Optimizing the mode of imaging improves the visibility of some structures. This new quantitative basis for near infrared imaging techniques can be applied to a wide range of imaging modalities for the study of pathophysiology and treatment in diseases affecting the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane, such as age-related macular degeneration.

  13. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  14. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  15. Automated quantification of retinal arteriovenous nicking from colour fundus images.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T V; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Park, Laurence A F; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Wang, Jie J; Mitchell, Paul; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri

    2013-01-01

    Retinal arteriovenous nicking (AV nicking) is the phenomenon where the venule is compressed or decreases in its caliber at both sides of an arteriovenous crossing. Recent research suggests that retinal AVN is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases such as stroke. In this article, we propose a computer method for assessing the severity level of AV nicking of an artery-vein (AV) crossing in color retinal images. The vascular network is first extracted using a method based on multi-scale line detection. A trimming process is then performed to isolate the main vessels from unnecessary structures such as small branches or imaging artefact. Individual segments of each vessel are then identified and the vein is recognized through an artery-vein identification process. A vessel width measurement method is devised to measure the venular caliber along its two segments. The vessel width measurements of each venular segment is then analyzed and assessed separately and the final AVN index of a crossover is computed as the most severity of its two segments. The proposed technique was validated on 69 AV crossover points of varying AV nicking levels extracted from retinal images of the Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES). The results show that the computed AVN values are highly correlated with the manual grading with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.70. This has demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method and the feasibility to develop a computer method for automatic AV nicking detection. The quantitative measurements provided by the system may help to establish a more reliable link between AV nicking and known systemic and eye diseases, which deserves further examination and exploration.

  16. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective.

    PubMed

    MacCormick, Ian J C; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a 'window' to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study.

  17. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian JC; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a ‘window’ to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study. PMID:26174843

  18. ADIPOR1 is mutated in syndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mingchu; Eblimit, Aiden; Wang, Jing; Li, Jianli; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Xia; Xiao, Ningna; Li, Yumei; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Lewis, Richard A.; Chen, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Despite the numerous genes associated with RP already identified, the genetic basis remains unknown in a substantial number of patients and families. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing to investigate the molecular basis of a syndromic RP case which cannot be solved by mutations in known disease-causing genes. After applying a series of variant filtering strategies, we identified an apparently homozygous frameshift mutation, c.31delC (p.Q11Rfs*24) in the ADIPOR1 gene. The reported phenotypes of Adipor1-null mice contain retinal dystrophy, obesity and behavioral abnormalities, which highly mimic those in the syndromic RP patient. We further confirmed ADIPOR1 retina expression by immunohistochemistry. Our results established ADIPOR1 as a novel disease-causing gene for syndromic RP and highlight the importance of fatty acid transport in the retina. PMID:26662040

  19. PREFERRED RETINAL LOCUS IN MACULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SANTOS, RODRIGO A. V.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; BARILE, GAETANO R.; SEIPLE, WILLIAM

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Methods Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull’s eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Results Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Conclusion Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function. PMID:18628727

  20. Intrinsic circadian clock of the mammalian retina: importance for retinal processing of visual information

    PubMed Central

    Signorovitch, James; Raviola, Elio; Pawlyk, Basil; Li, Tiansen; Weitz, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian clocks are widely distributed in mammalian tissues, but little is known about the physiological functions of clocks outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain. The retina has an intrinsic circadian clock, but its importance for vision is unknown. Here we show that mice lacking Bmal1, a gene required for clock function, had abnormal retinal transcriptional responses to light and defective inner retinal electrical responses to light, but normal photoreceptor responses to light and retinas that appeared structurally normal by light and electron microscopy. We generated mice with a retina-specific genetic deletion of Bmal1, and they had defects of retinal visual physiology essentially identical to those of mice lacking Bmal1 in all tissues and lacked a circadian rhythm of inner retinal electrical responses to light. Our findings indicate that the intrinsic circadian clock of the retina regulates retinal visual processing in vivo. PMID:17719549

  1. Force-Sensing Microneedle for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed

    Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter; Handa, James; Taylor, Russell H; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-11-01

    Retinal vein cannulation (RVC) is a challenging procedure proposed for drug delivery into the very small retinal veins. The available glass cannulas for this procedure are both hard to visualize and fragile thereby limiting the feasibility of both robot-assisted and manual RVC approaches. In this study, we develop and test a new force-sensing RVC instrument that can be easily integrated with the existing manual and robotic devices. The tool enables (1) the measurement of the forces required for puncturing retinal veins in vivo and (2) an assistive method to inform the operator of the needle piercing the vessel wall. The fiber Bragg grating based sensor can be inserted into the eye through a small (∅ 0.9 mm) opening and provides a quantitative assessment at the tool tip with a resolution smaller than 0.25 mN. Assessment of forces during vessel penetration in the chorioallantoic membranes of chicken embryos have revealed a consistent sharp drop in tool tip force upon vessel puncture that has been used as a signature to provide auditory feedback to the user to stop needle advancement and begin drug delivery.

  2. Force-Sensing Microneedle for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter; Handa, James; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation (RVC) is a challenging procedure proposed for drug delivery into the very small retinal veins. The available glass cannulas for this procedure are both hard to visualize and fragile thereby limiting the feasibility of both robot-assisted and manual RVC approaches. In this study, we develop and test a new force-sensing RVC instrument that can be easily integrated with the existing manual and robotic devices. The tool enables (1) the measurement of the forces required for puncturing retinal veins in vivo and (2) an assistive method to inform the operator of the needle piercing the vessel wall. The fiber Bragg grating based sensor can be inserted into the eye through a small (∅ 0.9 mm) opening and provides a quantitative assessment at the tool tip with a resolution smaller than 0.25 mN. Assessment of forces during vessel penetration in the chorioallantoic membranes of chicken embryos have revealed a consistent sharp drop in tool tip force upon vessel puncture that has been used as a signature to provide auditory feedback to the user to stop needle advancement and begin drug delivery. PMID:25580178

  3. Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors dilates retinal arterioles by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Someya, Eriko; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio; Nakahara, Tsutomu

    2017-03-21

    Opioids contribute to the regulation of cerebral vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of herkinorin, a non-opioid μ-opioid receptor agonist derived from salvinorin A, on blood vessels in the rat retina and to investigate the mechanism underlying the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilatory response. Ocular fundus images were captured using an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal arterioles in the fundus images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Herkinorin increased the retinal arteriolar diameter without significantly changing mean blood pressure and heart rate. The retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin was almost completely prevented following treatment with naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonselective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. In addition, N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, diminished the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Seven days after an intravitreal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid, loss of inner retinal neurons and abolishment of the retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin were observed. These results suggest that herkinorin dilates rat retinal arterioles through stimulation of retinal μ-opioid receptors. The μ-opioid receptor-mediated retinal vasodilator response is likely mediated by NO generated by neuronal NO synthase. Retinal neurons play an important role in the retinal vasodilator mechanism involving μ-opioid receptors in rats.

  4. Hyperoxia-Induced Proliferative Retinopathy: Early Interruption of Retinal Vascular Development with Severe and Irreversible Neurovascular Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lajko, Michelle; Cardona, Herminio J.; Taylor, Joann M.; Shah, Ronil S.; Farrow, Kathryn N.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a major cause of neonatal morbidity in premature infants, occurring as a result of arrested lung development combined with multiple postnatal insults. Infants with BPD exposed to supplemental oxygen are at risk of retinopathy of prematurity as well. Thus, we studied the effects of hyperoxia on the retinal vasculature in a murine model of BPD. The retinal phenotype of this model, which we termed hyperoxia-induced proliferative retinopathy (HIPR), shows severe disruption of retinal vasculature and loss of vascular patterning, disorganized intra-retinal angiogenesis, inflammation and retinal detachment. Neonatal mice were subjected to 75% oxygen exposure from postnatal day (P)0 to P14 to model BPD, then allowed to recover in room air for 1 (P15), 7 (P21), or 14 days (P28). We quantified retinal thickness, protein levels of HIF-1α, NOX2, and VEGF, and examined the cellular locations of these proteins by immunohistochemistry. We examined the retinal blood vessel integrity and inflammatory markers, including macrophages (F4/80) and lymphocytes (CD45R). Compared to controls, normal retinal vascular development was severely disrupted and replaced by a disorganized sheet of intra-retinal angiogenesis in the HIPR mice. At all time-points, HIPR showed persistent hyaloidal vasculature and a significantly thinner central retina compared to controls. HIF-1α protein levels were increased at P15, while VEGF levels continued to increase until P21. Intra-retinal fibrinogen was observed at P21 followed by sub-retinal deposition in at P28. Inflammatory lymphocytes and macrophages were observed at P21 and P28, respectively. This model presents a severe phenotype of disrupted retinal vascular development, intra-retinal angiogenesis inflammation and retinal detachment. PMID:27861592

  5. Pleiotrophin is a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In a recent report by Zhang et al., pleiotrophin (PTN) was demonstrated to enhance glioma growth by promoting vascular abnormalization. PTN stimulates glioma vessels through anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk)-mediated perivascular deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Targeting of Alk or VEGF signaling normalizes tumor vessels in PTN-expressing tumors.

  6. Deletion of Aldose Reductase from Mice Inhibits Diabetes-Induced Retinal Capillary Degeneration and Superoxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Petrash, J. Mark; Sheibani, Nader; Kern, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacologic inhibition of aldose reductase (AR) previously has been studied with respect to diabetic retinopathy with mixed results. Since drugs can have off-target effects, we studied the effects of AR deletion on the development and molecular abnormalities that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Since recent data suggests an important role for leukocytes in the development of the retinopathy, we determined also if AR in leukocytes contributes to leukocyte-mediated death of retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Methods Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) and AR deficient (AR−/−) mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin. Mice were sacrificed at 2 and 10 months of diabetes to evaluate retinal vascular histopathology, to quantify retinal superoxide production and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina, and to assess the number of retinal endothelial cells killed by blood leukocytes in a co-culture system. Results Diabetes in WT mice developed the expected degeneration of retinal capillaries, and increased generation of superoxide by the retina. Leukocytes from diabetic WT mice also killed more retinal endothelial cells than did leukocytes from nondiabetic animals (p<0.0001). Deletion of AR largely (P<0.05) inhibited the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries, as well as the increase in superoxide production by retina. AR-deficiency significantly inhibited the diabetes-induced increase in expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in retina, but had no significant effect on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), phosphorylated p38 MAPK, or killing of retinal endothelial cells by leukocytes. Conclusions AR contributes to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetic mice. Deletion of the enzyme inhibits the diabetes-induced increase in expression of iNOS and of superoxide production, but does not correct a variety of other pro-inflammatory abnormalities associated with the development of

  7. Probabilistic graphical modeling of speckle statistics in laser speckle contrast imaging for noninvasive and label-free retinal angiography.

    PubMed

    Basak, Kausik; Dey, Goutam; Sheet, Debdoot; Mahadevappa, Manjunatha; Mandal, Mahitosh; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a noninvasive and label-free approach for retinal angiography using Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). Retinal vessel structure is segmented using a Hidden Markov Random Field (HMRF) based model. Prior to that, k-means clustering is used to obtain initial parameter set and labels for HMRF. Final parameter set for HMRF is estimated using expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm and final labeling is achieved using maximum aposteriori (MAP) algorithm. Clique energy for HMRF is computed from eigenvalue analysis of structure tensor for each pixel. This helps to get connectivity in the direction of strongest tangents in its neighborhood, facilitating the tracking of fine vessels in retinal vascular network. Quantitative evaluation shows an average vessel segmentation accuracy of 96.41% in normal condition with substantial improvement in tracking capability of fine vessels. Changes in blood flow can be tracked and observed at segmented output; particularly applicable for the study of different pathological conditions.

  8. Color Doppler imaging of the retrobulbar vessels in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pauk-Domańska, Magdalena; Walasik-Szemplińska, Dorota

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by elevated blood glucose level due to impaired insulin secretion and activity. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to functional disorders of numerous organs and to their damage. Vascular lesions belong to the most common late complications of diabetes. Microangiopathic lesions can be found in the eyeball, kidneys and nervous system. Macroangiopathy is associated with coronary and peripheral vessels. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microangiopathic complication characterized by closure of slight retinal blood vessels and their permeability. Despite intensive research, the pathomechanism that leads to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood. The examinations used in assessing diabetic retinopathy usually involve imaging of the vessels in the eyeball and the retina. Therefore, the examinations include: fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of the retina, B-mode ultrasound imaging, perimetry and digital retinal photography. There are many papers that discuss the correlations between retrobulbar circulation alterations and progression of diabetic retinopathy based on Doppler sonography. Color Doppler imaging is a non-invasive method enabling measurements of blood flow velocities in small vessels of the eyeball. The most frequently assessed vessels include: the ophthalmic artery, which is the first branch of the internal carotid artery, as well as the central retinal vein and artery, and the posterior ciliary arteries. The analysis of hemodynamic alterations in the retrobulbar vessels may deliver important information concerning circulation in diabetes and help to answer the question whether there is a relation between the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the changes observed in blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball. This paper presents the overview of literature regarding studies on blood flow in the vessels of the eyeball in patients with diabetic

  9. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2005-04-05

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease.

  10. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease. PMID:15784735

  11. Vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC mediated by HMOX1 rescues retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Zhao, Chen; Kumar, Anil; Lee, Chunsik; Chen, Mingquan; Huang, Lijuan; Wang, Jing; Ren, Xiangrong; Jiang, Yida; Chen, Wei; Wang, Bin; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhong, Zheng; Huang, Zijing; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Bing; Ding, Hao; Ju, Rong; Tang, Zhongshu; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai; Li, Xuri; Liu, Xialin

    2014-10-14

    Blood vessel degeneration is critically involved in nearly all types of degenerative diseases. Therefore strategies to enhance blood vessel protection and survival are highly needed. In this study, using different animal models and cultured cells, we show that PDGF-CC is a potent vascular protective and survival factor. PDGF-CC deficiency by genetic deletion exacerbated blood vessel regression/degeneration in various animal models. Importantly, treatment with PDGF-CC protein not only increased the survival of retinal blood vessels in a model of oxygen-induced blood vessel regression but also markedly rescued retinal and blood vessel degeneration in a disease model of retinitis pigmentosa. Mechanistically, we revealed that heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) activity is critically required for the vascular protective/survival effect of PDGF-CC, because blockade of HMOX1 completely abolished the protective effect of PDGF-CC in vitro and in vivo. We further found that both PDGF receptors, PDGFR-β and PDGFR-α, are required for the vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC. Thus our data show that PDGF-CC plays a pivotal role in maintaining blood vessel survival and may be of therapeutic value in treating various types of degenerative diseases.

  12. An adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope for imaging murine retinal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Clemens; Biss, David P.; Tajouri, Nadja; Jakobs, Tatjana C.; Lin, Charles P.

    2010-02-01

    In vivo retinal imaging is an outstanding tool to observe biological processes unfold in real-time. The ability to image microstructure in vivo can greatly enhance our understanding of function in retinal microanatomy under normal conditions and in disease. Transgenic mice are frequently used for mouse models of retinal diseases. However, commercially available retinal imaging instruments lack the optical resolution and spectral flexibility necessary to visualize detail comprehensively. We developed an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) specifically for mouse eyes. Our SLO is a sensor-less adaptive optics system (no Shack Hartmann sensor) that employs a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm to modulate a deformable mirror, ultimately aiming to correct wavefront aberrations by optimizing confocal image sharpness. The resulting resolution allows detailed observation of retinal microstructure. The AO-SLO can resolve retinal microglia and their moving processes, demonstrating that microglia processes are highly motile, constantly probing their immediate environment. Similarly, retinal ganglion cells are imaged along with their axons and sprouting dendrites. Retinal blood vessels are imaged both using evans blue fluorescence and backscattering contrast.

  13. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Venkata R M; Khan, Naheed W; Cukras, Catherine A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-05-15

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5(+/-)) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5(+/-) mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies.

  14. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Khan, Naheed W.; Cukras, Catherine A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M.; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-01-01

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5+/−) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5+/−mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies. PMID:21349921

  15. Quantitative retinal blood flow mapping from fluorescein videoangiography using tracer kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Guthrie, Micah; Hones, Logan; Sinha, Lagnojita; St Lawrence, Keith; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J

    2015-05-15

    Abnormal retinal blood flow (RBF) has been associated with numerous retinal pathologies, yet existing methods for measuring RBF predominantly provide only relative measures of blood flow and are unable to quantify volumetric blood flow, which could allow direct patient to patient comparison. This work presents a methodology based on linear systems theory and an image-based arterial input function to quantitatively map volumetric blood flow from standard fluorescein videoangiography data, and is therefore directly translatable to the clinic. Application of the approach to fluorescein retinal videoangiography in rats (4 control, 4 diabetic) demonstrated significantly higher RBF in 4-5 week diabetic rats as expected from the literature.

  16. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis and unusual retinitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Liu, J J; Li, M T

    2013-11-01

    In this report we discuss a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who developed herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) infection presenting with encephalitis as well as necrotic and non-necrotic retinitis. The patient presented with typical clinical symptoms and radiologic abnormalities consistent with HSV-1 encephalitis and HSV-1 retinitis in patients with HIV infection, but lacked cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and had bilateral retinitis with poor visual acuity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature.

  17. Safety, efficacy, and quality control of a photoelectric dye-based retinal prosthesis (Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis) as a medical device.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Takarabe, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells as a result of genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The basic concept of retinal prostheses is to replace dead photoreceptor cells with artificial devices to stimulate the remaining neurons with electric currents or potentials. Photodiode arrays and digital camera-type electrode arrays are the two main approaches for retinal prostheses to stimulate retinal neurons, but these arrays have the problems of poor biocompatibility, low sensitivity, and low output of electric currents, and hence have a requirement for external electric sources (batteries). To overcome these problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses that absorb light and convert photon energy to generate electric potentials. The prototype, using a photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could induce intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking embryonic retinal tissues and cultured retinal neurons. The subretinal implantation of the prototype in the eyes of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats led to vision recovery as proved by a behavior test. The photoelectric dye that was chosen for the prototype did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. The surface potentials of the photoelectric dye-coupled film showed a rapid on-and-off response to illumination with a threshold for light intensity as measured by a Kelvin probe system. Photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film of large size, corresponding to a large visual field, could be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. Clinical studies of photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses in patients with retinitis pigmentosa who lose sight will be planned after the manufacturing

  18. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  19. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  20. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  1. Intrachoroidal Neovascularization in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schwesinger, Catherine; Yee, Charles; Rohan, Richard M.; Joussen, Antonia M.; Fernandez, Antonio; Meyer, Tobias N.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Ma, Joseph J. K.; Redmond, T. Michael; Liu, Suyan; Adamis, Anthony P.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is a frequent and poorly treatable cause of vision loss in elderly Caucasians. This choroidal neovascularization has been associated with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In current animal models choroidal neovascularization is induced by subretinal injection of growth factors or vectors encoding growth factors such as VEGF, or by disruption of the Bruch’s membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex with laser treatment. We wished to establish a transgenic murine model of age-related macular degeneration, in which the overexpression of VEGF by the retinal pigment epithelium induces choroidal neovascularization. A construct consisting of a tissue-specific murine retinal pigment epithelium promoter (RPE65 promoter) coupled to murine VEGF164 cDNA with a rabbit β-globin-3′ UTR was introduced into the genome of albino mice. Transgene mRNA was expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium at all ages peaking at 4 months. The expression of VEGF protein was increased in both the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. An increase of intravascular adherent leukocytes and vessel leakage was observed. Histopathology revealed intrachoroidal neovascularization that did not penetrate through an intact Bruch’s membrane. These results support the hypothesis that additional insults to the integrity of Bruch’s membrane are required to induce growth of choroidal vessels into the subretinal space as seen in age-related macular degeneration. This model may be useful to screen for inhibitors of choroidal vessel growth. PMID:11238064

  2. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  3. Retinal oximetry with a multiaperture camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Lompado, Art; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2010-02-01

    Oxygen saturation measurements in the retina is an essential measurement in monitoring eye health of diabetic patient. In this paper, preliminary result of oxygen saturation measurements for a healthy patient retina is presented. The retinal oximeter used is based on a regular fundus camera to which was added an optimized optical train designed to perform aperture division whereas a filter array help select the requested wavelengths. Hence, nine equivalent wavelength-dependent sub-images are taken in a snapshot which helps minimizing the effects of eye movements. The setup is calibrated by using a set of reflectance calibration phantoms and a lookuptable (LUT) is computed. An inverse model based on the LUT is presented to extract the optical properties of a patient fundus and further estimate the oxygen saturation in a retina vessel.

  4. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  5. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-09-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision.

  6. Functional and Molecular Characterization of the Endothelin System in Retinal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Travis W.; Ren, Yi; Yuan, Zhaoxu; Xu, Wenjuan; Somvanshi, Sonal; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Kuo, Lih

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Activation of the endothelin (ET) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic disease. Although ET-1, the predominant endogenous isoform of ET, has been shown to cause constriction of retinal vessels, the expression and functional significance of its synthesis and the involved specific ET receptors in retinal arterioles remain unknown. The authors examined the roles of ETA and ETB receptors and of endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1 in ET-1–induced vasomotor responses of single retinal arterioles. Methods To exclude systemic confounding effects, porcine retinal arterioles were isolated for vasoreactivity and molecular studies. Results Isolated and pressurized retinal arterioles developed basal tone and constricted in a manner dependent on concentration to ET-1. ET-1 precursor big ET-1 elicited time-dependent vasoconstriction over 20 minutes, which was blocked by the ECE-1 inhibitor phosphoramidon. ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 inhibited most (approximately 90%) of vasoconstrictions to ET-1 and big ET-1. ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin also elicited concentration-dependent constriction of retinal arterioles but with significantly less potency than ET-1. ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 abolished vasoconstriction to sarafotoxin but only slightly reduced responses to ET-1 and big ET-1. Protein and mRNA expressions of ETA, ETB, and ECE-1 were detected in retinal arterioles. Immunohistochemistry revealed ETA and ETB receptors predominantly in smooth muscle and ECE-1 predominantly in endothelium and smooth muscle. Conclusions ET-1 elicits constriction of retinal arterioles predominantly through the activation of smooth muscle ETA receptors. Endogenous production of ET-1 from vascular ECE-1 is sufficient to evoke ETA receptor–dependent constriction in retinal arterioles. PMID:19151386

  7. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  8. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  9. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  10. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  11. Low Level Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    18 Related Projects ........................ . . ....... 20 References . . . . .......................... 22 2 INTRODUCTION The objectives of...fluorescein is a potent phototoxic agent in the retina.26 The damage threshold for blue light retinal damage is lowered by a factor of ten after an... Related to the Probiem of Retinal Light Damage 1. Corneal Holography 2. Hematoporphyrin Studies 3. Fluorescein Fluorescence Measurements 7 EQUIPMENT

  12. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  13. The peptidomimetic Vasotide targets two retinal VEGF receptors and reduces pathological angiogenesis in murine and nonhuman primate models of retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Richard L.; Li, Jianxue; Lawrence, Matthew; Hu, Wenzheng; Musso, Gary F.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessel growth from preexisting vessels (angiogenesis) underlies many severe diseases including major blinding retinal diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and aged macular degeneration (AMD). This observation has driven development of antibody inhibitors that block a central factor in AMD, named vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), from binding to its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. However, some patients are insensitive to current anti-VEGF drugs or develop resistance, and the required repeated intravitreal injection of these large molecules is costly and clinically problematic. Here, we have evaluated a small cyclic retro-inverted peptidomimetic, D(Cys-Leu-Pro-Arg-Cys), abbreviated as D(CLPRC), and hereafter named Vasotide, that inhibits retinal angiogenesis by binding selectively to the VEGF receptors, VEGFR-1 and Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1). Delivery of Vasotide in eye drops or via intraperitoneal injection in a laser-induced monkey model of human wet AMD, a mouse genetic knockout model of the AMD subtype called retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), and a mouse oxygen-induced model of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) markedly decreased retinal angiogenesis in all three animal models. This prototype drug candidate is a promising new dual receptor inhibitor of the VEGF ligand with potential for translation into safer, less invasive applications to combat pathological angiogenesis in retinal disorders. PMID:26468327

  14. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  15. [Retinal vascular changes--predictive and prognostic factor in systemic disease].

    PubMed

    Vicol, Anca Delia; Bogdănici, Tudor; Bogdănici, Camelia

    2014-01-01

    The retinal circulation represents a unique window for the direct, non invazive in vivo status of the systemic mycrocirculation, but it can also offer scientific support for theories related strictly to ocular diseases, such as glaucoma (vascular theory). The interaction between intraocular pressure, retinal vessels and cerebrospinal fluid pressure located at the retrolaminar part of the optic nerve has been of great interest for both ophthalmologists or neuroscientists, both clinicians and researchers. The retinal vascular bed has structural and functional similarities with other vascular teritories such as Central Nervous System (CNS), kidneys and heart, so as for the ophthalmologist any vascular change in the retina can signalize a systemic disease (diabetes mellitus, stroke, arterial hypertension) that is more or less symptomatic for the patient. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to reviview recent literature data related to the connections between different hemodynamic structures and their impact on the retinal blood flow.

  16. Is the peripapillary retinal perfusion related to myopia in healthy eyes? A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Kong, Xiangmei; Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Mengwei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripapillary and parafoveal perfusion of young, healthy myopic subjects with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Design A prospective comparative study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. Setting Participants recruited from a population-based study performed by the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai. Participants A total of 78 Chinese normal subjects (78 eyes) with different refraction were included. Myopia was divided into 4 groups on the basis of the refractive status: 20 eyes with emmetropia (mean spherical equivalent (MSE) 0.50D to −0.50D), 20 eyes with mild myopia (MSE −0.75D to −2.75D), 20 eyes with moderate myopia (MSE −3.00D to −5.75D), and 18 eyes with high myopia (MSE≤−6.00D). Main outcome measures Peripapillary and parafoveal retinal and choroidal perfusion parameters and their relationships with axial length (AL) and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness were analysed. Results Significant differences were found for the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area among the 4 groups, but not in the parafoveal area. The high myopia group had the lowest peripapillary retinal flow index and vessel density. In addition, there was a negative correlation (β=−0.002, p=0.047) between the AL and peripapillary retinal flow index and a positive correlation between RNFL thickness and the peripapillary retinal perfusion parameters (flow index: β=0.001, p=0.006; vessel density: β=0.350, p=0.002) even after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions Highly myopic eyes have a decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with emmetropic eyes. Such vascular features might increase the susceptibility to vascular-related eye diseases. PMID:26969645

  17. Neurophysiology of central retinal degeneration in cat.

    PubMed

    Levick, W R; Thibos, L N

    1993-01-01

    Receptive fields of ganglion cells have been studied in cats possessing a chronic, arrested lesion of central retinal degeneration. Lesions were characterized by an ophthalmoscopically sharp border separating apparently normal retina from the region of the lesion. Under direct ophthalmoscopic guidance, a succession of recordings was obtained from ganglion cells having cell bodies at various positions relative to the lesion. Cells located more than 1 deg outside the ophthalmoscopic border had normal visual sensitivity as assessed by area-threshold experiments. Inside the lesion cells within 1 deg of the border had reduced sensitivity which often precluded functional classification by the usual visual tests. Ganglion cells located more than 1 deg inside the border of large lesions were blind and some had abnormal patterns of maintained discharge of action potentials. Nevertheless, the antidromic latencies of these blind cells fell into the familiar conduction groups (T1/T2/T3). Receptive-field maps of cells near the border of the lesion often appeared truncated, with the missing portion of the field covered by the lesion. These observations were consistent with the abnormal form of area-threshold curves. Although the responsiveness of cells near the lesion was abnormally low for grating stimuli, cutoff spatial frequency and orientation bias of these cells were within normal limits.

  18. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Hyperglycemia and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Rahman, Ireni S. Ali; Binz, Nicolette; Li, Cai-Rui; Vagaja, Nermina N.; de Pinho, Marisa; Lai, Chooi-May

    2010-01-01

    One of the limitations of research into diabetic retinopathy is the lack of suitable animal models. To study how the two important factors—hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor—interact in diabetic retinopathy, the Akimba mouse (Ins2AkitaVEGF+/−) was generated by crossing the Akita mouse (Ins2Akita) with the Kimba mouse (VEGF+/+). C57Bl/6 and the parental and Akimba mouse lines were characterized by biometric measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Spectralis Heidelberg retinal angiography and optical coherence tomography. The Akimba line not only retained the characteristics of the parental strains, such as developing hyperglycemia and retinal neovascularization, but developed higher blood glucose levels at a younger age and had worse kidney-body weight ratios than the Akita line. With aging, the Akimba line demonstrated enhanced photoreceptor cell loss, thinning of the retina, and more severe retinal vascular pathology, including more severe capillary nonperfusion, vessel constriction, beading, neovascularization, fibroses, and edema, compared with the Kimba line. The vascular changes were associated with major histocompatibility complex class II+ cellular staining throughout the retina. Together, these observations suggest that hyperglycemia resulted in higher prevalences of edema and exacerbated the vascular endothelial growth factor-driven neovascular and retinal changes in the Akimba line. Thus, the Akimba line could become a useful model for studying the interplay between hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor and for testing treatment strategies for potentially blinding complications, such as edema. PMID:20829433

  19. Chorioretinal Coloboma Complications: Retinal Detachment and Choroidal Neovascular Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rehan M.; Abbey, Ashkan M.; Shah, Ankoor R.; Drenser, Kimberly A.; Trese, Michael T.; Capone, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the chorioretinal coloboma, and its association with increased risk of retinal detachment (RD) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods: This retrospective case series included eyes with chorioretinal coloboma diagnosed between 1995 and 2014 with a focus on RD and CNV as related complications. Cases of CNV were managed with laser photocoagulation or intravitreal injection of bevacizumab. For eyes with CNV, therapeutic success was defined as resolution of the subretinal hemorrhage on fundus examination and resolution of the subretinal and intraretinal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OCT). For eyes with RD, anatomic success following surgical intervention was defined as attachment of the retina at the last follow-up visit. Results: Fifty-one eyes of 31 patients with chorioretinal coloboma were identified for review. Bilateral chorioretinal coloboma was present in 64.5% of subjects. RD developed in 15 eyes (29.4%). Among 15 eyes with RD, 4 eyes (27%) had retinal breaks identified within the coloboma, 5 eyes (33%) had retinal breaks outside the coloboma, 2 eyes (13%) showed retinal breaks both inside and outside the coloboma, and in 4 eyes (27%) the causative retinal break was not localized. The overall rate of anatomic success after RD repair was 85.7%. CNV developed in 7 eyes (13.7%) and was located along the margin of the coloboma in all cases. CNV was bilateral in 2 of the 5 affected individuals (40%). Conclusion: RD and CNV were present in a high percentage of eyes with chorioretinal coloboma in these series. The frequent finding of retinal breaks outside the coloboma bed suggests that vitreoretinal interface abnormalities may play a role in development of RD in these eyes. PMID:28299000

  20. An automated blood vessel segmentation algorithm using histogram equalization and automatic threshold selection.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Marwan D; Eswaran, C; Mueen, Ahmed

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the detection of retinal blood vessels which play a vital role in reducing the proliferative diabetic retinopathy and for preventing the loss of visual capability. The proposed algorithm which takes advantage of the powerful preprocessing techniques such as the contrast enhancement and thresholding offers an automated segmentation procedure for retinal blood vessels. To evaluate the performance of the new algorithm, experiments are conducted on 40 images collected from DRIVE database. The results show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the other known algorithms in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm being simple and easy to implement, is best suited for fast processing applications.

  1. Usefulness of retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction as a predictor of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Fiadh, Ali H; Wong, Tien Y; Kawasaki, Ryo; Clark, David J; Patel, Sheila K; Freeman, Melanie; Wilson, Andrew; Burrell, Louise M; Farouque, Omar

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of atherosclerosis. Retinal microvascular endothelial function can be assessed using noninvasive dynamic vessel imaging techniques. Whether it is impaired in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the relation of retinal microvascular endothelial function with CAD. Vascular studies were performed in 197 prospectively recruited subjects divided into 2 groups: those without CAD but ≥2 cardiovascular risk factors (non-CAD controls; n = 119) and those with stable CAD (n = 78). Retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction was assessed by measuring retinal arteriolar and venular dilatation to flicker light, a nitric oxide-dependent phenomenon, expressed as percentage increase over baseline diameter. Fingertip pulse-volume amplitude was measured to calculate reactive hyperaemia index and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation assessed as measures of peripheral microvascular and conduit vessel endothelial function, respectively. Mean retinal arteriolar dilatation was attenuated in patients with CAD compared with non-CAD controls (1.51 ± 1.51% vs 2.37 ± 1.95%, p = 0.001). Retinal arteriolar dilatation was independently associated with CAD after adjustment for age, gender, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication use (odds ratio 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 2.25, p = 0.007). Reactive hyperaemia index and flow-mediated dilatation were not different. In conclusion, the capacity of retinal arterioles to dilate in response to flicker light is an independent predictor of the presence of CAD and suggests that retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction is a marker for underlying CAD.

  2. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  3. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  4. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  5. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  6. A region growing vessel segmentation algorithm based on spectrum information.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; He, Baochun; Fang, Di; Ma, Zhiyuan; Yang, Benqiang; Zhang, Libo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a region growing vessel segmentation algorithm based on spectrum information. First, the algorithm does Fourier transform on the region of interest containing vascular structures to obtain its spectrum information, according to which its primary feature direction will be extracted. Then combined edge information with primary feature direction computes the vascular structure's center points as the seed points of region growing segmentation. At last, the improved region growing method with branch-based growth strategy is used to segment the vessels. To prove the effectiveness of our algorithm, we use the retinal and abdomen liver vascular CT images to do experiments. The results show that the proposed vessel segmentation algorithm can not only extract the high quality target vessel region, but also can effectively reduce the manual intervention.

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  8. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  9. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  10. Retinal Oximetry with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Vehmeijer, Wouter B.; Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual wavelength retinal oximetry has been developed for adults, but is not available for infants. Retinal oximetry may provide insight into the pathophysiology of oxygen-mediated diseases like retinopathy of prematurity. More insight in the oxygen metabolism of the retina in infants may provide valuable clues for better understanding and subsequent prevention or treatment of the disease. The measurements of oxygen saturation are obtained with two fundus images simultaneously captured in two different wavelengths of light. The comparison in light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin can be used to estimate the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels by means of a software algorithm. This study aims to make retinal oximetry available for neonates. The first step towards estimating retinal oxygen saturation is determining the optical density ratio. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to image healthy newborn infants with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and determine the optical density ratio for retinal oximetry analysis. Methods Images of the retina of full-term healthy infants were obtained with an SLO, Optomap 200Tx (Optos), with two laser wavelengths (532nm and 633nm). The infant lay face down on the lower arm of the parent, while the parent supported the chest and chin with one hand, and stabilized the back with the other hand. No mydriatics or eyelid specula were used during this study. The images were analyzed with modified Oxymap Analyzer software for calculation of the Optical Density Ratio (ODR) and vessel width. The ODR is inversely and approximately linearly related to the oxygen saturation. Measurements were included from the superotemporal vessel pair. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty-nine infants, (58% female), were included with mean gestational age of 40 ± 1.3 weeks (mean ± SD) and mean post-natal age of 16 ± 4.8 days. A total of 28 images were selected for retinal oximetry analysis

  11. Imaging of retinal vasculature using adaptive optics SLO/OCT

    PubMed Central

    Felberer, Franz; Rechenmacher, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We use our previously developed adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument to investigate its capability for imaging retinal vasculature. The system records SLO and OCT images simultaneously with a pixel to pixel correspondence which allows a direct comparison between those imaging modalities. Different field of views ranging from 0.8°x0.8° up to 4°x4° are supported by the instrument. In addition a dynamic focus scheme was developed for the AO-SLO/OCT system in order to maintain the high transverse resolution throughout imaging depth. The active axial eye tracking that is implemented in the OCT channel allows time resolved measurements of the retinal vasculature in the en-face imaging plane. Vessel walls and structures that we believe correspond to individual erythrocytes could be visualized with the system. PMID:25909024

  12. Imaging of retinal vasculature using adaptive optics SLO/OCT.

    PubMed

    Felberer, Franz; Rechenmacher, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Pircher, Michael

    2015-04-01

    We use our previously developed adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument to investigate its capability for imaging retinal vasculature. The system records SLO and OCT images simultaneously with a pixel to pixel correspondence which allows a direct comparison between those imaging modalities. Different field of views ranging from 0.8°x0.8° up to 4°x4° are supported by the instrument. In addition a dynamic focus scheme was developed for the AO-SLO/OCT system in order to maintain the high transverse resolution throughout imaging depth. The active axial eye tracking that is implemented in the OCT channel allows time resolved measurements of the retinal vasculature in the en-face imaging plane. Vessel walls and structures that we believe correspond to individual erythrocytes could be visualized with the system.

  13. Retinal cell imaging in myopic chickens using adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Juan M.; Palacios, Raquel; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Gualda, Emilio J.; Schaeffel, Frank; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal eye growth induced by visual deprivation can modify the structure and density of the retinal cells. We have used an adaptive optics multiphoton microscope to image photoreceptors (PRs) and ganglion cells (GCs) at different retinal locations in unstained retinas of chicken eyes with about 10D of myopia and their normal-sighted fellow eyes. In all samples, the local averaged inter-PR distance increased with eccentricity. No significant differences in PR density were found between control and myopic eyes. GC density declined in myopic eyes compared to control eyes and the inter-cell distance increased. In normal eyes, the size of the GC cell bodies increased approximately two-fold between the area centralis and the peripheral retina. In myopic eyes, this trend was preserved but the GC bodies were larger at each retinal location, compared to control eyes. Obviously, GC morphology is changing when the retinal area is enlarged in myopic eyes. PMID:24688804

  14. Novel Strategies for the Improvement of Stem Cells' Transplantation in Degenerative Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Șușman, Sergiu; Tudoran, Oana; Bărbos, Otilia; Cherecheș, Gabriela; Aștilean, Simion; Potara, Monica; Sorițău, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure for the permanent vision loss caused by degenerative retinal diseases. One of the novel therapeutic strategies aims at the development of stem cells (SCs) based neuroprotective and regenerative medicine. The main sources of SCs for the treatment of retinal diseases are the embryo, the bone marrow, the region of neuronal genesis, and the eye. The success of transplantation depends on the origin of cells, the route of administration, the local microenvironment, and the proper combinative formula of growth factors. The feasibility of SCs based therapies for degenerative retinal diseases was proved in the preclinical setting. However, their translation into the clinical realm is limited by various factors: the immunogenicity of the cells, the stability of the cell phenotype, the predilection of SCs to form tumors in situ, the abnormality of the microenvironment, and the association of a synaptic rewiring. To improve SCs based therapies, nanotechnology offers a smart delivery system for biomolecules, such as growth factors for SCs implantation and differentiation into retinal progenitors. This review explores the main advances in the field of retinal transplantology and applications of nanotechnology in the treatment of retinal diseases, discusses the challenges, and suggests new therapeutic approaches in retinal transplantation. PMID:27293444

  15. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-02-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases.

  16. Characteristic Retinal Atrophy with Secondary “Inverse” Optic Atrophy Identifies Vigabatrin Toxicity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Buncic, J. Raymond; Westall, Carol A.; Panton, Carole M.; Munn, J. Robert; MacKeen, Leslie D.; Logan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical pattern of retinal atrophy in children caused by the anticonvulsant vigabatrin. Design An interventional case series report. Participants One hundred thirty-eight patients, mainly infants, were evaluated regularly for evidence of possible vigabatrin toxicity in the Eye and Neurology clinics at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. Method Sequential clinical and electroretinographic (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision standards) evaluations every 6 months. Main Outcome Measures Presence of recognizable retinal and optic atrophy in the presence of abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) and other clinical findings. Results Three children being treated for seizures with vigabatrin showed definite clinical findings of peripheral retinal nerve fiber layer atrophy, with relative sparing of the central or macular portion of the retina and relative nasal optic nerve atrophic changes. Some macular wrinkling was evident in 1 case. Progressive ERG changes showing decreased responses, especially the 30-Hz flicker response, supported the presence of decreased retinal function. Conclusions A recognizable and characteristic form of peripheral retinal atrophy and nasal or “inverse” optic disc atrophy can occur in a small number of children being treated with vigabatrin. The changes in superficial light reflexes of the retina in children facilitate the clinical recognition of nerve fiber layer atrophy. The macula is relatively spared, although superficial retinal light reflexes indicating wrinkling of the innermost retina suggest early macular toxicity as well. Because these changes are accompanied by electrophysiologic evidence of retinal dysfunction, discontinuation of vigabatrin should be strongly considered. PMID:15465561

  17. Outer Retinal Structure Following Closed Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Flatter, John A.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubow, Michael J.; Pinhas, Alexander; Singh, Ravi S.; Kapur, Rashmi; Shah, Nishit; Walsh, Ryan D.; Hong, Sang H.; Weinberg, David V.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Wirostko, William J.; Robison, Scott; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.; Connor, Thomas B.; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outer retinal structural abnormalities in patients with visual deficits following closed globe blunt ocular trauma (cgBOT). Methods Nine subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT were examined between 1 month post-trauma and 6 years post-trauma. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess outer retinal architecture, while adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) was used to analyze photoreceptor mosaic integrity. Results Visual deficits ranged from central scotomas to decreased visual acuity. SD-OCT defects included focal foveal photoreceptor lesions, variable attenuation of the interdigitation zone, and mottling of the outer segment band, with one subject having normal outer retinal structure. AOSLO revealed disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic in all subjects, variably manifesting as foveal focal discontinuities, perifoveal hyporeflective cones, and paracentral regions of selective cone loss. Conclusions We observe persistent outer retinal disruption in subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT, albeit to a variable degree. AOSLO imaging allows assessment of photoreceptor structure at a level of detail not resolvable using SD-OCT or other current clinical imaging tools. Multimodal imaging appears useful for revealing the cause of visual complaints in patients following cgBOT. Future studies are needed to better understand how photoreceptor structure changes longitudinally in response to various trauma. PMID:24752010

  18. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  19. Effects of the Abnormal Acceleratory Environment of Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    responses and fundus oculi changes as determined by ophthalmos- copy. . 28 4. Range of visual thresholds in relation to +GZ tolerance 30...in blood flow in the fundus oculi during 4GZ have been correlated with subjective visual responses using direct ophthalmoscopy (Table 3), Retinal...potentiated reduction in performance. Several physical abnormalities (such as varicose veins, hemorrhoids, hernia, high myopia , and glaucoma) also exist which

  20. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  1. Topical Administration of Somatostatin Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; García-Ramírez, Marta; Corraliza, Lidia; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Farrera-Sinfreu, Josep; Ponsati, Berta; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Valverde, Ángela M.; Simó, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Somatostatin (SST) is an endogenous neuroprotective peptide that is downregulated in the diabetic eye. The aim of the study was to test the usefulness of topical administration of SST in preventing retinal neurodegeneration. For this purpose, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (STZ-DM) were treated with either SST eye drops or vehicle for 15 days. Nondiabetic rats treated with vehicle served as a control group. Functional abnormalities were assessed by electroretinography (ERG), and neurodegeneration was assessed by measuring glial activation and the apoptotic rate. In addition, proapoptotic (FasL, Bid, and activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3) and survival signaling pathways (BclxL) were examined. Intraretinal concentrations of glutamate and its main transporter glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) were also determined. Treatment with SST eye drops prevented ERG abnormalities, glial activation, apoptosis, and the misbalance between proapoptotic and survival signaling detected in STZ-DM rats. In addition, SST eye drops inhibited glutamate accumulation in the retina and GLAST downregulation induced by diabetes mellitus. We conclude that topical administration of SST has a potent effect in preventing retinal neurodegeneration induced by diabetes mellitus. In addition, our findings open up a new preventive pharmacological strategy targeted to early stages of DR. PMID:23474487

  2. Sectoral iris heterochromia and retinal pigment variation in 13q-syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kutzbach, Beth; Mendelsohn, Nancy; Rath, Pamela; Summers, C Gail

    2007-10-01

    Chromosome 13q deletion syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, cognitive delays, and organ and musculoskeletal deformities. Typical ocular associations include retinoblastoma, microphthalmia, and colobomas. We report a case of bilateral iris heterochromia and retinal pigment abnormalities in a child with 13q-syndrome.

  3. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  4. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  5. The Extract of Aster Koraiensis Prevents Retinal Pericyte Apoptosis in Diabetic Rats and Its Active Compound, Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits AGE Formation and AGE/RAGE Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Jo, Kyuhyung; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Retinal capillary cell loss is a hallmark of early diabetic retinal changes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to retinal microvascular cell loss in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, the protective effects of Aster koraiensis extract (AKE) against damage to retinal vascular cells were investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. To examine this issue further, AGE accumulation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were investigated using retinal trypsin digests from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the diabetic rats, TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling)-positive retinal microvascular cells were markedly increased. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that AGEs were accumulated within the retinal microvascular cells, and this accumulation paralleled the activation of NF-κB and the expression of iNOS in the diabetic rats. However, AKE prevented retinal microvascular cell apoptosis through the inhibition of AGE accumulation and NF-κB activation. Moreover, to determine the active compounds of AKE, two major compounds, chlorogenic acid and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, were tested in an in vitro assay. Among these compounds, chlorogenic acid significantly reduced AGE formation as well as AGE/RAGE (receptor for AGEs) binding activity. These results suggest that AKE, particularly chlorogenic acid, is useful in inhibiting AGE accumulation in retinal vessels and exerts a preventive effect against the injuries of diabetic retinal vascular cells. PMID:27657123

  6. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  7. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  8. Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization in zebrafish embryos: a potential model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chao-Yuan; Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2-4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression.

  9. Dual-wavelength retinal images denoising algorithm for improving the accuracy of oxygen saturation calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yong-Li; Dai, Yun; Gao, Chun-Ming; Du, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in retinal vessels is based on spectrophotometry and spectral absorption characteristics of tissue. Retinal images at 570 and 600 nm are simultaneously captured by dual-wavelength retinal oximetry based on fundus camera. SO2 is finally measured after vessel segmentation, image registration, and calculation of optical density ratio of two images. However, image noise can dramatically affect subsequent image processing and SO2 calculation accuracy. The aforementioned problem remains to be addressed. The purpose of this study was to improve image quality and SO2 calculation accuracy by noise analysis and denoising algorithm for dual-wavelength images. First, noise parameters were estimated by mixed Poisson-Gaussian (MPG) noise model. Second, an MPG denoising algorithm which we called variance stabilizing transform (VST) + dual-domain image denoising (DDID) was proposed based on VST and improved dual-domain filter. The results show that VST + DDID is able to effectively remove MPG noise and preserve image edge details. VST + DDID is better than VST + block-matching and three-dimensional filtering, especially in preserving low-contrast details. The following simulation and analysis indicate that MPG noise in the retinal images can lead to erroneously low measurement for SO2, and the denoised images can provide more accurate grayscale values for retinal oximetry.

  10. Structural Abnormalities of the Inner Macula in Incontinentia Pigmenti

    PubMed Central

    Basilius, Jacob; Young, Marielle P.; Michaelis, Timothy C.; Hobbs, Ronald; Jenkins, Glen; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Importance This report presents evidence from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (sdOCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) of inner foveal structural abnormalities associated with vision loss in Incontinentia pigmenti (IP). Observations Two children had reduced visual behavior in association with abnormalities of the inner foveal layers on sdOCT. FA showed filling defects in retinal and choroidal circulations and irregularities of the foveal avascular zones (FAZ). The foveal/parafoveal ratios were greater than 0.57 in 6 eyes of 3 patients who had extraretinal NV and/or peripheral avascular retina on FA and were treated with laser. Of these, 3 eyes of 2 patients had irregularities in FAZ and poor vision. Conclusions and Relevance Besides traction retinal detachment, visual loss in IP can occur with abnormalities of the inner fovea structure seen on sdOCT, consistent with prior descriptions of foveal hypoplasia. The evolution of abnormalities in the neural and vascular retina suggests a vascular cause of the foveal structural changes. More study is needed to determine any potential benefit of the foveal/parafoveal ratio in children with IP. Even with marked foveal structural abnormalities, vision can be preserved in some patients with IP with vigilant surveillance in the early years of life. PMID:26043102

  11. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  12. Protein Misfolding and Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Stein, Linda; Kaushal, Shalesh

    2011-01-01

    The retina is a highly complex and specialized organ that performs preliminary analysis of visual information. Composed of highly metabolically active tissue, the retina requires a precise and well-balanced means of maintaining its functional activity during extended periods of time. Maintenance and regulation of a vast array of different structural and functional proteins is required for normal function of the retina. This process is referred to as protein homeostasis and involves a variety of activities, including protein synthesis, folding, transport, degradation, elimination, and recycling. Deregulation of any of these activities can lead to malfunctioning of the retina, from subtle subclinical signs to severe retinal degenerative diseases leading to blindness. Examples of retinal degenerative diseases caused by disruption of protein homeostasis include retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt’s disease. A detailed discussion of the role of disruption in protein homeostasis in these and other retinal diseases is presented, followed by examples of some existing and potential treatments. PMID:21825021

  13. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  14. [Research progress of treatment strategies for retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Qian, T W; Xu, X

    2017-02-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal disorders characterized by photoreceptor cell death, associated with night blindness, vision loss, progressive peripheral visual field loss and abnormalities in the electroretinogram. A number of gene defects have so far been associated with RP, which cause a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor function, followed by cone photoreceptor dysfunction and eventually complete blindness. The rate of blindness related to RP is high. At present there is no effective therapeutic strategy for RP. In recent years, with the progress of molecular biology technique, many new therapeutic approaches have become promising. This article summarizes the pathogenesis of RP and gives a brief overview of related research progress of RP therapeutic strategies. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 148-153).

  15. Encephalopathy with retinitis due to cat-scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Scott, B; Beverley, D W; Lyon, F; Taylor, R

    2007-12-01

    Cat-scratch disease is one of several diseases known to be caused by Bartonella species. Some infections due to Bartonella resolve spontaneously without treatment with antibiotics, but in other cases the disease can be fatal without treatment. This case study reports a 7-year-old male who presented with an unexplained encephalopathy and unusual retinal findings associated with evidence supporting infection by B. henselae. The 7-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of general malaise and cervical lymphadenopathy progressing onto fever, headache, vomiting, and confusion associated with meningism. Lumbar puncture revealed a raised cerebrospinal fluid protein, low glucose, and raised white cell count. Abnormal retinal findings and raised antibodies titres to B. quintana indicated a diagnosis of cat-scratch disease. He was treated with azithromycin orally for 3 weeks and made a complete recovery.

  16. Preparation of Xenopus laevis retinal cryosections for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tam, Beatrice M; Yang, Lee Ling; Bogėa, Tami H; Ross, Bradford; Martens, Garnet; Moritz, Orson L

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is the gold standard for examination of photoreceptor outer segment morphology and photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities in transgenic animal models of retinal disease. Small vertebrates such as zebrafish and Xenopus laevis tadpoles have been used to generate retinal disease models and to study outer segment processes such as protein trafficking, and their breeding capabilities facilitate experiments involving large numbers of animals and conditions. However, electron microscopy processing and analysis of these very small eyes can be challenging. Here we present a methodology that facilitates processing of X. laevis tadpole eyes for electron microscopy by introducing an intermediate cryosectioning step. This method reproducibly provides a well-oriented tissue block that can be sectioned with minimal effort by a non-expert, and also allows retroactive analysis of samples collected on slides for light microscopy.

  17. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  18. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  19. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  20. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  2. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  3. Pressure vessel bottle mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A mounting assembly for mounting a composite pressure vessel to a vehicle includes a saddle having a curved surface extending between two pillars for receiving the vessel. The saddle also has flanged portions which can be bolted to the vehicle. Each of the pillars has hole in which is mounted the shaft portion of an attachment member. A resilient member is disposed between each of the shaft portions and the holes and loaded by a tightening nut. External to the holes, each of the attachment members has a head portion to which a steel band is attached. The steel band circumscribes the vessel and translates the load on the springs into a clamping force on the vessel. As the vessel expands and contracts, the resilient members expand and contract so that the clamping force applied by the band to the vessel remains constant.

  4. Retinal Regeneration is Facilitated by the Presence of Surviving Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sherpa, Tshering; Lankford, Tyler; McGinn, Tim E.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Frey, Ruth A.; Sun, Chi; Ryan, Mariel; Robison, Barrie D.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish regenerate their retinas after damage, in contrast to mammals. In zebrafish subjected to an extensive ouabain-induced lesion that destroys all neurons and spares Müller glia, functional recovery and restoration of normal optic nerve head (ONH) diameter take place at 100 days post-injury. Subsequently, regenerated retinas overproduce cells in the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer, and the ONH becomes enlarged. Here we test the hypothesis that a selective injury, which spares photoreceptors and Müller glia, results in faster functional recovery and fewer long-term histological abnormalities. Following this selective retinal damage, recovery of visual function required 60 days, consistent with this hypothesis. In contrast to extensively damaged retinas, selectively damaged retinas showed fewer histological errors and did not overproduce neurons. Extensively damaged retinas had RGC axons that were delayed in pathfinding to the ONH, and showed misrouted axons within the ONH, suggesting that delayed functional recovery following an extensive lesion is related to defects in RGC axons exiting the eye and/or reaching their central targets. The atoh7, fgf8a, shha, and netrin-1 genes were differentially expressed, and the distribution of Hh protein was disrupted following extensive damage as compared with selective damage. Confirming a role for Shh signaling in supporting rapid regeneration, shhat4+/− zebrafish showed delayed functional recovery following selective damage. We suggest that surviving retinal neurons provide structural/molecular information to regenerating neurons, and that this patterning mechanism regulates factors such as Shh. These factors in turn control neuronal number, retinal lamination, and RGC axon pathfinding during retinal regeneration. PMID:24488694

  5. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  6. Ruptured retinal arterial macroaneurysm: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Speilburg, Ashley M; Klemencic, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an acquired, focal dilation of a retinal artery, typically occurring within the first three bifurcations of the central retinal artery. The clinical presentation of a retinal arterial macroaneurysm is highly variable, making initial diagnosis difficult and differentials many. Identification of retinal arterial macroaneurysms is crucial to appropriately co-manage with the primary care physician for hypertension control. Prognosis is generally good and observation is often an adequate treatment. However, in cases of macular threat or involvement, some treatment options are available and referral to a retinal specialist is indicated.

  7. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  8. Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts due to recessive mutations in the CTC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Bisserbe, A; Tertian, G; Buffet, C; Turhan, A; Lambotte, O; Nasser, G; Alvin, P; Tardieu, M; Riant, F; Bergametti, F; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Denier, C

    2015-05-01

    Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) or Coats plus syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder affecting the eyes, brain, bone and gastrointestinal tract. Its primary pathogenesis involves small vessel obliterative microangiopathy. Recently, autosomal recessively inherited mutations in CTC1 have been reported in CRMCC patients. We herein report an adolescent referred to our hospital following new seizures in a context of an undefined multisystem disorder. Cerebral imaging disclosed asymmetrical leukopathy, intracranial calcifications and cysts. In addition, he presented other typical CRMCC features i.e. a history of intrauterine growth retardation, skeletal demineralization and osteopenia, bilateral exudative vitreo-retinopathy reminiscent of Coats disease, recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhages secondary to watermelon stomach and variceal bleeding of the esophagus due to idiopathic portal hypertension and telangiectatic and angiodysplasic changes in the small intestine and colon, and anemia due to recurrent bleeding and bone marrow abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with Coats plus syndrome. CTC1 gene screening confirmed the diagnosis with the identification of heterozygous deleterious mutations. CRMCC due to CTC1 mutations has a broad clinical expressivity. Our case report illustrates the main possible associated phenotypes and their complications, demonstrating the need for a careful etiological search in order to initiate appropriate therapeutic and preventive measures.

  9. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Optical coherence tomography angiography microvascular findings in macular edema due to central and branch retinal vein occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Rodolfo, Mastropasqua; Lisa, Toto; Luca, Di Antonio; Enrico, Borrelli; Alfonso, Senatore; Marta, Di Nicola; Giuseppe, Di Martino; Marco, Ciancaglini; Carpineto, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate retinal and choriocapillaris vessel density using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) complicated by macular edema (ME). Sixty eyes of 60 patients with CRVO or BRVO and ME and 40 healthy subjects underwent measurements of superficial and deep foveal and parafoveal vessel density (FVD, PFVD) and choricapillary density using OCTA at baseline and 60 days after intravitreal dexamethasone implant (IVDEX). FVD and PFVD of the superficial plexus were not significantly lower in CRVO group compared to the controls while in the BRVO group overall PFVD were significantly lower compared to control group (p < 0.001). Overall PFVD of the deep plexus was significantly lower in CRVO and BRVO groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001). FVD and overall PFVD of choriocapillaris were significantly reduced compared to controls in CRVO group (p < 0.001) and PFVD of choriocapillaris was significantly reduced compared to controls in the affected hemi fields in BRVO groups (p < 0.001). OCTA showed vessel density reduction in BRVO and CRVO with main involvement of the deep retinal plexus compared to the superficial retinal plexus due to ischemia that did not recover after intravitreal dexamethasone implant. PMID:28098203

  11. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  12. Amelioration of both functional and morphological abnormalities in the retina of a mouse model of ocular albinism following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Surace, Enrico Maria; Domenici, Luciano; Cortese, Katia; Cotugno, Gabriella; Di Vicino, Umberto; Venturi, Consuelo; Cellerino, Alessandro; Marigo, Valeria; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ballabio, Andrea; Auricchio, Alberto

    2005-10-01

    X-linked recessive ocular albinism type I (OA1) is due to mutations in the OA1 gene (approved gene symbol GPR143), which is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The Oa1 (Gpr143) knockout mouse (Oa1(-/-)) model recapitulates many of the OA1 retinal morphological anomalies, including a lower number of melanosomes of increased size in the RPE. The Oa1(-/-) mouse also displays some of the retinal developmental abnormalities observed in albino patients such as misrouting of the optic tracts. Here, we show that these anomalies are associated with retinal electrophysiological abnormalities, including significant decrease in a- and b-wave amplitude and delayed recovery of b-wave amplitude from photoreceptor desensitization following bright light exposure. This suggests that lack of Oa1 in the RPE impacts on photoreceptor activity. More interestingly, adeno-associated viral vector-mediated Oa1 gene transfer to the retina of the Oa1(-/-) mouse model results in significant recovery of its retinal functional abnormalities. In addition, Oa1 retinal gene transfer increases the number of melanosomes in the Oa1(-/-) mouse RPE. Our data show that gene transfer to the adult retina unexpectedly rescues both functional and morphological abnormalities in a retinal developmental disorder, opening novel potential therapeutic perspectives for this and other forms of albinism.

  13. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  14. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  15. Reactivity of retinal blood flow to 100% oxygen breathing after lipopolysaccharide administration in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lasta, Michael; Polska, Elzbieta; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2008-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the retinal vascular reactivity after LPS infusion. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study, 18 healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg LPS or placebo as an intravenous bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4h after LPS/placebo administration. At baseline and at 4h after administration a short period of 100% oxygen inhalation was used to assess retinal vasoreactivity to this stimulus. Perimacular white blood cell velocity, density and flux were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, retinal branch arterial and venous diameters were measured with a retinal vessel analyzer and red blood cell velocity in retinal branch veins was measured with laser Doppler velocimetry. LPS is associated with peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased white blood cell density in ocular microvessels (p<0.001). In addition, retinal arterial (p=0.02) and venous (p<0.01) diameters were increased. All retinal hemodynamic parameters showed a decrease during 100% oxygen breathing. This decrease was significantly blunted by LPS for all retinal outcome parameters except venous diameter (p=0.04 for white blood cell velocity, p=0.0002 for white blood cell density, p<0.0001 for white blood cell flux, p=0.01 for arterial diameter, p=0.02 for red blood cell velocity and p=0.006 for red blood cell flux). These data indicate that LPS-induced inflammation induces vascular dysregulation in the retina. This may provide a link between inflammation and vascular dysregulation. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether this model may be suitable to study inflammation induced vascular dysregulation in the eye.

  16. Ablation of Kcnj10 expression in retinal explants revealed pivotal roles for Kcnj10 in the proliferation and development of Müller glia

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eisuke; Baba, Yukihiro; Iwagawa, Toshiro; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Yujin; Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously found that Kcnj10, an inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, is a gene expressed in c-kit-positive retinal progenitor cells on P1. The shRNA-mediated screening of the functions of the genes for retinal development in retinal explant culture suggested a role for Kcnj10 in the differentiation of 23Müller glia. In the present study, we extended the work and focused on analyzing the role of Kcnj10 in retinal development. Methods shRNA-mediated downregulation of Kcnj10 in retinal explants and the in vivo mouse retina at the P1 stage was performed. Differentiation and proliferation of the retina were examined with immunohistochemistry. The effect of barium (Ba2+) treatment, which inhibits potassium currents by blocking potassium channels, on retinal development was examined. Results When Kcnj10 was downregulated at E18, cellular proliferation and morphological differentiation were perturbed; in particular, a decreased number of Müller glial cells with abnormal morphological maturation was observed. The overexpression of Kcnj10 in retinal progenitors did not result in gross abnormality during retinal development, but rescued the abnormal differentiation induced with sh-Kcnj10. The presence of Ba2+ in the retinal explant medium led to a phenotype similar to that seen with sh-Kcnj10. Ba2+ exerts an effect mainly during late retinal development, and sh-Kcnj10 in the P1 retina affected Müller glia maturation, suggesting that Kcnj10 plays a pivotal role in the maturation of retinal cell subsets. A previous study of Kcnj10-knockout mice showed no obvious abnormality in retinal differentiation, especially of Müller glia. We examined the effects of the downregulation of Kcnj10 with in vivo electroporation of sh-Kcnj10 in the P1 retina. Retinal differentiation was perturbed, as seen following the in vitro downregulation of Kcnj10, suggesting that compensatory gene expression and/or signaling occurred in the Kcnj10-knockout mice in the retina, leading to

  17. Requirement of Smad4 from Ocular Surface Ectoderm for Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Shusheng; Anderson, Chastain; Zhao, Fangkun; Qin, Yu; Wu, Di; Wu, Xinwei; Liu, Jia; He, Xuefei; Zhao, Jiangyue; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia is characterized by abnormally small eyes and usually retinal dysplasia, accounting for up to 11% of the blindness in children. Right now there is no effective treatment for the disease, and the underlying mechanisms, especially how retinal dysplasia develops from microphthalmia and whether it depends on the signals from lens ectoderm are still unclear. Mutations in genes of the TGF-β superfamily have been noted in patients with microphthalmia. Using conditional knockout mice, here we address the question that whether ocular surface ectoderm-derived Smad4 modulates retinal development. We found that loss of Smad4 specifically on surface lens ectoderm leads to microphthalmia and dysplasia of retina. Retinal dysplasia in the knockout mice is caused by the delayed or failed differentiation and apoptosis of retinal cells. Microarray analyses revealed that members of Hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways are affected in the knockout retinas, suggesting that ocular surface ectoderm-derived Smad4 can regulate Hedgehog and Wnt signaling in the retina. Our studies suggest that defective of ocular surface ectoderm may affect retinal development. PMID:27494603

  18. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    García-Arumí, J; Martínez-Castillo, V; Boixadera, A; Blasco, H; Marticorena, J; Zapata, M Á; Macià, C; Badal, J; Distéfano, L; Rafart, J M; Berrocal, M; Zambrano, A; Ruíz-Moreno, J M; Figueroa, M S

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines general guidelines following the initial diagnosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. These include preoperative evaluation, treatment, possible intra- and post-operative complications, retinal re-detachment, and all therapeutic options available for each case. Treatment of the traumatic retinal detachment is also described, due to its importance and peculiarities. Treatment or prophylactic guidelines are suggested for the different types of retinal detachment described. These are based on both the experience of the ophthalmologists that have participated in preparing the guidelines, and also on evidence-based grading linked to bibliographical sources. However, these guidelines should not be interpreted as being mandatory. Given that there is a wide spectrum of options for treatment of retinal detachment, the surgeons' experience with one or other surgical technique will be of utmost importance in obtaining the best surgical result. As guidelines, they are intended as an additional aid to the surgeon during the decision-making process, with the expectation that the final choice will still be left to the surgeon's judgment and past experience.

  19. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  20. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  1. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  2. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal<