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  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  2. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001029.htm Retinitis pigmentosa To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retinitis pigmentosa is an eye disease in which there is ...

  3. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms ... Pigmentosa Additional Resources for Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to ...

  4. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  5. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  6. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  7. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  8. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization.

  9. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  10. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Other Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Mrejen, Sarah; Audo, Isabelle; Bonnel, Sébastien; Sahel, José-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive degeneration of rod and cone cells that affects predominantly peripheral visual fields. Macular edema may cause additional central visual acuity decrease. Cystoid macular edema (CME) is one of the few treatable causes of visual loss in RP. The prevalence of CME in RP has been found to be between 10 and 20% on fluorescein angiography-based studies, and as high as 49% on reports based on optical coherence tomography. Macular edema can manifest at any stage of the disease and may be unilateral or bilateral. It can be found in any genetic form, but is more often associated with RP caused by CRB1 mutations. The origin of macular edema in RP patients still remains poorly understood. Some mechanisms have been suggested, including antiretinal antibodies (retinal, carbonic anhydrase, and enolase antibodies), vitreous traction, retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction, and Müller cell edema. There is no gold standard therapeutic strategy. Drug therapy is the primary treatment. Systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as oral acetazolamide or topical dorzolamide, are still the mainstays of initial therapy. If CME is refractory to acetazolamide, intravitreal corticosteroid injections may be a therapeutic option. However, antivascular endothelium growth factor injections have limited effect and should be avoided. Vitrectomy has also been evaluated, but its exact role remains to be determined. The benefits of these therapies are variable among patients. The establishment of therapeutic approaches is limited by our poor understanding of the pathophysiology of CME in patients with RP. Autoimmune retinopathies (AIRs) are a group of rare diseases characterized by acute or subacute progressive vision loss and are thought to be mediated by autoantibodies specific to retinal antigens. The AIRs encompass paraneoplastic syndromes, such as cancer-associated retinopathy and

  11. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that causes a variety ...

  12. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  13. A Psychophysical Test for Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Thomas R; Mancini, Michael

    A new test designed to detect an hereditary eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is described. This condition is revealed by pigmentation in the retina, but early diagnosis is difficult because the symptoms are subtle, and since it is genetically recessive it frequently occurs in families with no history of early blindness. In many cases…

  14. The Retinitis Pigmentosa Student: Selected Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Franklin N.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of RP (retinitis pigmentosa-an untreatable conditions usually resulting in night blindness) are discussed and functioning considerations in the classroom (including the use of protective devices and mobility aids) are noted. Classroom modifications such as darklined paper and black pens are suggested. (CL)

  15. Photopic ERG components in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, M; Lauricella, M; Ponte, F

    1992-04-01

    The persistence of a residual flicker electroretinogram 20 Hz response in many cases of retinitis pigmentosa, when the Oscillatory Potentials (OPs) were no longer recordable, led the authors to an investigation by Fourier analysis. The study was carried out in 33 patients affected by different hereditary forms of retinitis pigmentosa revealing recordable 20 Hz flash ERG responses. We applied the Fourier analysis to this ERG response and compared the weight percentage of the first two components to the OP added amplitude. The analysis showed that the 20 Hz flash ERG response contains only the first harmonic in patients with no recordable OPs and both harmonics in patients with recordable OPs. This relationship between OPs and 20 Hz second component, that is possibly related to the activity of inner retina as well as the OPs, can demonstrate an alteration of the inner retina which evolves with distinct electrophysiological features from the ERG photoreceptor impairment.

  16. Diagnostic imaging in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Katome, Takashi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive inherited retinal disease, and patients with RP have reduced visual function caused by a degeneration of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). At the end stage of RP, the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the fovea reduces central vision, and RP is one of the main causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. Therefore, morphological and functional assessments of the photoreceptors in the macula area can be useful in estimating the residual retinal function in RP patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well-established method of examining the retinal architecture in situ. The photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction is observed as a distinct, highly reflective line by OCT. The presence of the IS/OS junction in the OCT images is essential for normal visual function. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) results from the accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE cells and has been used to investigate RPE and retinal function. More than one-half of RP patients have an abnormally high density parafoveal FAF ring (AF ring). The AF ring represents the border between functional and dysfunctional retina. In this review, we shall summarize recent progress on diagnostic imaging in eyes with RP.

  17. Halting progressive neurodegeneration in advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Susanne F.; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Duong, Jimmy K.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wei-Pu; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are characterized by the progressive loss of rod photoreceptors followed by loss of cones. While retinal gene therapy clinical trials demonstrated temporary improvement in visual function, this approach has yet to achieve sustained functional and anatomical rescue after disease onset in patients. The lack of sustained benefit could be due to insufficient transduction efficiency of viral vectors (“too little”) and/or because the disease is too advanced (“too late”) at the time therapy is initiated. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis and developed a mouse RP model that permits restoration of the mutant gene in all diseased photoreceptor cells, thereby ensuring sufficient transduction efficiency. We then treated mice at early, mid, or late disease stages. At all 3 time points, degeneration was halted and function was rescued for at least 1 year. Not only do our results demonstrate that gene therapy effectively preserves function after the onset of degeneration, our study also demonstrates that there is a broad therapeutic time window. Moreover, these results suggest that RP patients are treatable, despite most being diagnosed after substantial photoreceptor loss, and that gene therapy research must focus on improving transduction efficiency to maximize clinical impact. PMID:26301813

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa and ocular blood flow

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Is the concept of integrative, preventive and personalised medicine applicable to the relationship between retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and ocular blood flow (OBF)? RP encompasses a group of hereditary diseases of the posterior segment of the eye characterised by degeneration, atrophy and finally loss of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium, leading to progressive visual loss. Many different mutations affecting different genes can lead to the clinical picture of RP. Even though the disease has a clear genetic background, there are obviously other factors influencing the manifestation and progression of RP. In this review, we focus on the role of OBF. There is evidence that, in PR patients, OBF is more reduced than one would expect secondary to the retinal atrophy. The main cause of this additional component seems to be primary vascular dysregulation (PVD) syndrome. As PVD syndrome is partly treatable, a vascular evaluation of RP patients is meaningful. Based on the outcome, a targeted individualised, preventive or supportive treatment might be introduced in selected RP patients. PMID:23199279

  19. Retinitis pigmentosa: clinical observations and correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, R C

    1983-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a study of 384 eyes of 192 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years who presented with typical retinitis pigmentosa. The major findings are outlined below, together with suggested hypotheses: Cataract was found in 46.4% of the eyes. Among these, 93.6% showed posterior subcapsular opacification. The incidence of cataract increased with age. The vitreous degeneration that is characteristic of the RP syndrome and begins in childhood was described as showing dust-like, particulate matter throughout the gel; posterior vitreous separation; formation of a posterior matrix of coarse, white, interconnected strands and opacities; and final collapse of the residual gel. Ultrastructural studies of vitreous material from eight eyes revealed that the particles were isolated pigment granules and the coarse strands were composed of condensed collagen fibers. Notwithstanding the vitreous degeneration and prevalence of myopia in RP, neurosensory retinal breaks and/or rhegmatogenous detachment were found in only 7 (1.8%) of the 384 eyes studied. Premature separation of the vitreous from the retina, absence of lattice retinal degeneration, and perhaps a stronger than normal RPE-neurosensory retinal bond are thought to be possible protective factors. Rather than searching for a "toxin," elaborated by diseased retina, that causes vitreous degeneration and cataract formation, it is suggested that the ocular media be studied for an absence of moieties that are normally produced by healthy retina for vitreous and lens maintenance. The classic criteria for diagnosis of RP were met by 96.3% of eyes that showed retinal vascular attenuation and by 52.0% that showed pallor of the optic disc. Less frequent manifestations included solitary retinal hemorrhage, peripheral microaneurysms, telangiectasia, and fluorescein leakage at the macula and disc. Seven additional cases with a Coats'-like retinal detachment were added to the 14 already presented in the

  20. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report 14 new cases of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and three new cases of cone-rod dystrophy and to compare the similarities and dissimilarities to those found in the bilateral forms of these disorders. Methods: A total of 272 cases of retinitis pigmentosa and 167 cases of cone-rod dystrophy were studied by corneal full field electroretinograms and electrooculograms. The student t-test was used to compare categories. Results: The percentage of familial and nonfamilial cases was the same for the bilateral and unilateral forms of the disease. In our series, unilateral retinitis pigmentosa makes up approximately 5% of the total population of retinitis pigmentosa, while unilateral cone-rod dystrophy makes up only about 2% of the total. In the familial forms of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa the most common inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant and all affected relatives had bilateral disease. Conclusion: Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy appear to be directly related to the more common bilateral forms of these disorders. The genetic mechanisms which account for asymmetric disorders are not currently understood. It may be a different unidentified mutation at a single loci or it is possible that nonlinked mutations in multiple loci account for this unusual disorder. PMID:19668577

  1. A Qualitative Self-Study of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourie, Robert James

    2007-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a retinal degenerative disease causing progressive blindness. Most research on RP is biomedical, and mostly from an observer perspective, therefore poorly reflecting the lived experience of having RP. Accordingly, the researcher conducted a retrospective qualitative self-study, to analyze reflections on his own…

  2. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Raffaele; Comberiati, Anna Maria; Galeoto, Giovanni; Fratipietro, Manuela; Arrico, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM) disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males) with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5%) of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: -1 diopter ±3 SD) or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted). Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin.

  3. Detection of retinitis pigmentosa by differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Hyunho; Cho, Joon Hyong; Cho, Young Ho; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Lee, Seok; Park, Ki Ho; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lee, Hyuk-Jae; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2014-01-01

    Differential interference contrast microscopy is designed to image unstained and transparent specimens by enhancing the contrast resulting from the Nomarski prism-effected optical path difference. Retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common inherited retinal diseases, is characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors. In this study, Differential interference contrast microscopy was evaluated as a new and simple application for observation of the retinal photoreceptor layer and retinitis pigmentosa diagnostics and monitoring. Retinal tissues of Royal College of Surgeons rats and retinal-degeneration mice, both well-established animal models for the disease, were prepared as flatmounts and histological sections representing different elapsed times since the occurrence of the disease. Under the microscopy, the retinal flatmounts showed that the mosaic pattern of the photoreceptor layer was irregular and partly collapsed at the early stage of retinitis pigmentosa, and, by the advanced stage, amorphous. The histological sections, similarly, showed thinning of the photoreceptor layer at the early stage and loss of the outer nuclear layer by the advanced stage. To count and compare the number of photoreceptors in the normal and early-retinitis pigmentosa-stage tissues, an automated cell-counting program designed with MATLAB, a numerical computing language, using a morphological reconstruction method, was applied to the differential interference contrast microscopic images. The number of cells significantly decreased, on average, from 282 to 143 cells for the Royal College of Surgeons rats and from 255 to 170 for the retinal-degeneration mouse. We successfully demonstrated the potential of the differential interference contrast microscopy technique's application to the diagnosis and monitoring of RP.

  4. Rod Photoreceptor Temporal Properties in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Locke, Kirsten G.; Hood, Donald C.; Birch, David G.

    2011-01-01

    One of the characteristic signs of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the progressive loss of night vision. We have previously shown that the gain of rod photoreceptor activation is moderately reduced in some patients with RP, but this decrease in activation kinetics is not sufficient to account for the night blindness. Recently, single rod recording from animal models of RP showed rods under degeneration remain saturated for shorter periods than normal rods; i.e. are less able to sustain the rod photoresponse. Using paired-flash ERG, here we determine whether rod phototransduction inactivation parameters might also be abnormal in patients with RP. Inactivation parameters were derived from 13 subjects with normal vision, 16 patients with adRP, and 16 patients with autosomal recessive/isolate (rec/iso) RP. The adRP cases included 9 patients with rhodopsin mutations and 7 patients with peripherin/RDS mutations. The inactivation phase was derived using a double-flash paradigm, with a test flash of 2.7 log scot td-sec followed at varying intervals by a 4.2 log scot td-sec probe flash. Derived rod photoresponses to this just-saturating test flash in normal subjects exhibit a critical time to the initiation of recovery (Tsat) of 525±90 (SD) msec. The values of Tsat were 336±104 (SD) msec in patients with adRP (P<0.001) and 271±45 (SD) msec (P<0.001) in patients with rec/iso RP. When Tsat values were categorized by mutations, the values were 294±91 (SD) msec (P<0.001) for rhodopsin mutations, and 389±100 (SD) msec (p=0.01) for peripherin/RDS mutations. Overall, Tsat in patients with RP was significantly correlated with the amplitude of ISCEV standard rod response (r = 0.56; P < 0.001) and the gain of the activation phase of phototransduction (r=0.6, P<0.001). Tsat may be a useful marker for therapeutic efficacy in future clinical trials in RP. PMID:21219898

  5. Politics and Human Welfare: Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, B. W.; Leketi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that apartheid impacted the sociopsychological and physical circumstances of 12 African and 11 White people with retinitis pigmentosa in South Africa. Findings are discussed in terms of onset of condition, effects on subjects' lives, knowledge of social services, and needs unmet by existing services. (JDD)

  6. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  7. Workplace-Based Management of Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herse, Peter; Yapp, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the workplace-based accommodations that allowed a 45-year-old Southeast Asian woman with a moderate hearing deficit, who was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, to continue to perform her duties as a checkout operator. Emphasizes the importance of conducting workplace evaluations before providers offer advice on vocational matters. (CR)

  8. Multiprotein Complexes of Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR), a Ciliary Protein Mutated in X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP)

    PubMed Central

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) are a frequent cause of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP). The RPGR gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing and encodes for distinct protein isoforms in the retina. Extensive studies using isoform-specific antibodies and mouse mutants have revealed that RPGR predominantly localizes to the transition zone to primary cilia and associates with selected ciliary and microtubule-associated assemblies in photoreceptors. In this chapter, we have summarized recent advances on understanding the role of RPGR in photoreceptor protein trafficking. We also provide new evidence that suggests the existence of discrete RPGR multiprotein complexes in photoreceptors. Piecing together the RPGR-interactome in different subcellular compartments should provide critical insights into the role of alternative RPGR isoforms in associated orphan and syndromic retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:20238008

  9. The bacterial toxin CNF1 as a tool to induce retinal degeneration reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guadagni, Viviana; Cerri, Chiara; Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Fiorentini, Carla; Caleo, Matteo; Strettoi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of inherited pathologies characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. In rodent models of RP, expression of defective genes and retinal degeneration usually manifest during the first weeks of postnatal life, making it difficult to distinguish consequences of primary genetic defects from abnormalities in retinal development. Moreover, mouse eyes are small and not always adequate to test pharmacological and surgical treatments. An inducible paradigm of retinal degeneration potentially extensible to large animals is therefore desirable. Starting from the serendipitous observation that intraocular injections of a Rho GTPase activator, the bacterial toxin Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), lead to retinal degeneration, we implemented an inducible model recapitulating most of the key features of Retinitis Pigmentosa. The model also unmasks an intrinsic vulnerability of photoreceptors to the mechanism of CNF1 action, indicating still unexplored molecular pathways potentially leading to the death of these cells in inherited forms of retinal degeneration. PMID:27775019

  10. Psychological and Educational Recommendations for Working with Young People with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacón-López, Helena; López-Justicia, Maria D.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the consequences of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a retinal degenerative disease with progressive reduction of the visual field, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and night blindness. Retinitis Pigmentosa is addressed from both a psychological and an educational standpoint, focusing on the impact on learning, emotional well-being,…

  11. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Julia M; Michelson, Georg; Juenemann, Anselm G

    2014-01-01

    This case report depicts the clinical course of a female patient with unilateral retinitis pigmentosa (RP), who presented first in 1984 at the age of 43 years. At the beginning, there were cells in the vitreous leading to the diagnosis of uveitis with vasculitis. Within 30 years, the complete clinical manifestation of RP developed with bone spicule-shaped pigment deposits, pale optic disc, narrowed arterioles, cystoid macular oedema, posterior subcapsular cataract, concentric narrowing of the visual field and undetectable electroretinogram signal. At the age of 72 years, there are still no signs of retinal dystrophy in the other eye. PMID:24515232

  12. Recent Advances of Stem Cell Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuxi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xin; Ghazaryan, Emma; Li, Ying; Xie, Jianan; Su, Guanfang

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors and eventually leads to retina degeneration and atrophy. Until now, the exact pathogenesis and etiology of this disease has not been clear, and many approaches for RP therapies have been carried out in animals and in clinical trials. In recent years, stem cell transplantation-based attempts made some progress, especially the transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review will provide an overview of stem cell-based treatment of RP and its main problems, to provide evidence for the safety and feasibility for further clinical treatment. PMID:25141102

  13. ADIPOR1 is mutated in syndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mingchu; Eblimit, Aiden; Wang, Jing; Li, Jianli; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Xia; Xiao, Ningna; Li, Yumei; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Lewis, Richard A.; Chen, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Despite the numerous genes associated with RP already identified, the genetic basis remains unknown in a substantial number of patients and families. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing to investigate the molecular basis of a syndromic RP case which cannot be solved by mutations in known disease-causing genes. After applying a series of variant filtering strategies, we identified an apparently homozygous frameshift mutation, c.31delC (p.Q11Rfs*24) in the ADIPOR1 gene. The reported phenotypes of Adipor1-null mice contain retinal dystrophy, obesity and behavioral abnormalities, which highly mimic those in the syndromic RP patient. We further confirmed ADIPOR1 retina expression by immunohistochemistry. Our results established ADIPOR1 as a novel disease-causing gene for syndromic RP and highlight the importance of fatty acid transport in the retina. PMID:26662040

  14. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Mistrafficking of prenylated proteins causes retinitis pigmentosa 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houbin; Hanke-Gogokhia, Christin; Jiang, Li; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Pu; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Yang, Zhenglin; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The retinitis pigmentosa 2 polypeptide (RP2) functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for ARL3 (Arf-like protein 3), a small GTPase. ARL3 is an effector of phosphodiesterase 6 Δ (PDE6D), a prenyl-binding protein and chaperone of prenylated protein in photoreceptors. Mutations in the human RP2 gene cause X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and cone-rod dystrophy (XL-CORD). To study mechanisms causing XLRP, we generated an RP2 knockout mouse. The Rp2h−/− mice exhibited a slowly progressing rod-cone dystrophy simulating the human disease. Rp2h−/− scotopic a-wave and photopic b-wave amplitudes declined at 1 mo of age and continued to decline over the next 6 mo. Prenylated PDE6 subunits and G-protein coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) were unable to traffic effectively to the Rp2h−/− outer segments. Mechanistically, absence of RP2 GAP activity increases ARL3-GTP levels, forcing PDE6D to assume a predominantly “closed” conformation that impedes binding of lipids. Lack of interaction disrupts trafficking of PDE6 and GRK1 to their destination, the photoreceptor outer segments. We propose that hyperactivity of ARL3-GTP in RP2 knockout mice and human patients with RP2 null alleles leads to XLRP resembling recessive rod-cone dystrophy.—Zhang, H., Hanke-Gogokhia, C., Jiang, L., Li, X., Wang, P., Gerstner, C. D., Frederick, J. M., Yang, Z., Baehr, W. Mistrafficking of prenylated proteins causes retinitis pigmentosa 2. PMID:25422369

  16. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine; Tu, Hong Anh; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients’ lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. Results One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life

  17. [Research progress of treatment strategies for retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Qian, T W; Xu, X

    2017-02-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary retinal disorders characterized by photoreceptor cell death, associated with night blindness, vision loss, progressive peripheral visual field loss and abnormalities in the electroretinogram. A number of gene defects have so far been associated with RP, which cause a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor function, followed by cone photoreceptor dysfunction and eventually complete blindness. The rate of blindness related to RP is high. At present there is no effective therapeutic strategy for RP. In recent years, with the progress of molecular biology technique, many new therapeutic approaches have become promising. This article summarizes the pathogenesis of RP and gives a brief overview of related research progress of RP therapeutic strategies. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 148-153).

  18. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R.; Ross, Jason W.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Dean, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nightime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and thus is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment -rich outer segments (OS), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  19. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  20. SPP2 Mutations Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Xu, Qihua; Gao, Xiang; Tam, Pancy O. S.; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chen, Li Jia; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Qingshun; Vollrath, Douglas; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) shows progressive loss of photoreceptors involved with heterogeneous genetic background. Here, by exome sequencing and linkage analysis on a Chinese family with autosomal dominant RP, we identified a putative pathogenic variant, p.Gly97Arg, in the gene SPP2, of which expression was detected in multiple tissues including retina. The p.Gly97Arg was absent in 800 ethnically matched chromosomes and 1400 in-house exome dataset, and was located in the first of the two highly conserved disulfide bonded loop of secreted phosphoprotein 2 (Spp-24) encoded by SPP2. Overexpression of p.Gly97Arg and another signal peptide mutation, p.Gly29Asp, caused cellular retention of both endogenous wild type and exogenous mutants in vitro, and primarily affected rod photoreceptors in zebrafish mimicking cardinal feature of RP. Taken together, our data indicate that the two mutations of SPP2 have dominant negative effects and cellular accumulation of Spp-24 might be particularly toxic to photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. SPP2 has a new role in retinal degeneration. PMID:26459573

  1. Bifurcation analysis of a photoreceptor interaction model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Erika T.; Radulescu, Anca; Wirkus, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the term used to describe a diverse set of degenerative eye diseases affecting the photoreceptors (rods and cones) in the retina. This work builds on an existing mathematical model of RP that focused on the interaction of the rods and cones. We non-dimensionalize the model and examine the stability of the equilibria. We then numerically investigate other stable modes that are present in the system for various parameter values and relate these modes to the original problem. Our results show that stable modes exist for a wider range of parameter values than the stability of the equilibrium solutions alone, suggesting that additional approaches to preventing cone death may exist.

  2. Bone marrow–derived stem cells preserve cone vision in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lois E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a heritable group of blinding diseases resulting from loss of photoreceptors, primarily rods and secondarily cones, that mediate central vision. Loss of retinal vasculature is a presumed metabolic consequence of photoreceptor degeneration. A new study shows that autologous bone marrow–derived lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells, which incorporate into the degenerating blood vessels in two murine models of retinitis pigmentosa, rd1 and rd10, prevent cone loss. The use of autologous bone marrow might avoid problems with rejection while preserving central cone vision in a wide variety of genetically disparate retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:15372096

  3. Unravelling the genetic basis of simplex Retinitis Pigmentosa cases

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; González-del Pozo, María; Martín-Sánchez, Marta; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) characterized ultimately by photoreceptors degeneration. Exhibiting great clinical and genetic heterogeneity, RP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (ad), autosomal recessive (ar) and X-linked (xl) disorder. Although the relative prevalence of each form varies somewhat between populations, a major proportion (41% in Spain) of patients represent simplex cases (sRP) in which the mode of inheritance is unknown. Molecular genetic diagnostic is crucial, but also challenging, for sRP patients because any of the 81 RP genes identified to date may be causative. Herein, we report the use of a customized targeted gene panel consisting of 68 IRD genes for the molecular characterization of 106 sRP cases. The diagnostic rate was 62.26% (66 of 106) with a proportion of clinical refinements of 30.3%, demonstrating the high efficiency of this genomic approach even for clinically ambiguous cases. The high number of patients diagnosed here has allowed us to study in detail the genetic basis of the sRP. The solved sRP cohort is composed of 62.1% of arRP cases, 24.2% of adRP and 13.6% of xlRP, which implies consequences for counselling of patients and families. PMID:28157192

  4. Unravelling the genetic basis of simplex Retinitis Pigmentosa cases.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; González-Del Pozo, María; Martín-Sánchez, Marta; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-02-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) characterized ultimately by photoreceptors degeneration. Exhibiting great clinical and genetic heterogeneity, RP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (ad), autosomal recessive (ar) and X-linked (xl) disorder. Although the relative prevalence of each form varies somewhat between populations, a major proportion (41% in Spain) of patients represent simplex cases (sRP) in which the mode of inheritance is unknown. Molecular genetic diagnostic is crucial, but also challenging, for sRP patients because any of the 81 RP genes identified to date may be causative. Herein, we report the use of a customized targeted gene panel consisting of 68 IRD genes for the molecular characterization of 106 sRP cases. The diagnostic rate was 62.26% (66 of 106) with a proportion of clinical refinements of 30.3%, demonstrating the high efficiency of this genomic approach even for clinically ambiguous cases. The high number of patients diagnosed here has allowed us to study in detail the genetic basis of the sRP. The solved sRP cohort is composed of 62.1% of arRP cases, 24.2% of adRP and 13.6% of xlRP, which implies consequences for counselling of patients and families.

  5. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations—F45L, V209M and F220C—yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5. PMID:27694816

  6. Pharmacological approaches to retinitis pigmentosa: A laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, Viviana; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Gargini, Claudia; Strettoi, Enrica

    2015-09-01

    Retinal photoreceptors are highly specialized and performing neurons. Their cellular architecture is exquisitely designed to host a high concentration of molecules involved in light capture, phototransduction, electric and chemical signaling, membrane and molecular turnover, light and dark adaption, network activities etc. Such high efficiency and molecular complexity require a great metabolic demand, altogether conferring to photoreceptors particular susceptibility to external and internal insults, whose occurrence usually precipitate into degeneration of these cells and blindness. In Retinitis Pigmentosa, an impressive number of mutations in genes expressed in the retina and coding for a large varieties of proteins leads to the progressive death of photoreceptors and blindness. Recent advances in molecular tools have greatly facilitated the identification of the underlying genetics and molecular bases of RP leading to the successful implementation of gene therapy for some types of mutations, with visual restoration in human patients. Yet, genetic heterogeneity of RP makes mutation-independent approaches highly desirable, although many obstacles pave the way to general strategies for treating this complex disease, which remains orphan. The review will focus on treatments for RP based on pharmacological tools, choosing, among the many ongoing studies, approaches which rely on strong experimental evidence or rationale. For perspective treatments, new concepts are foreseen to emerge from basic studies elucidating the pathways connecting the primary mutations to photoreceptor death, possibly revealing common molecular targets for drug intervention.

  7. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  8. Increased aqueous flare is associated with thickening of inner retinal layers in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaka, Yosuke; Ito, Yasuki; Ueno, Shinji; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa(RP) is a hereditary retinal disease that causes photoreceptor, outer retinal, degeneration. Although the pathogenesis is still unclear, there have been numerous reports regarding inner retinal changes in RP eyes. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the changes in the thicknesses of different retinal layers of RP eyes, and its association with aqueous flare, which is used for measuring the intensity of intraocular inflammation. A total of 125 eyes of 64 patients with RP and 13 normal eyes were studied. The thicknesses of total neural retina,nerve fiber layer(NFL),ganglion cell layer(GCL),inner plexiform layer(IPL),inner nuclear layer(INL),outer layers and foveal thickness were measured in the optical coherence tomographic images. Aqueous flare was measured with a laser flare-cell meter. The associations between those parameters, visual acuity and visual field were determined in RP eyes using multivariate analysis. The results of this study showed the significant thickening of NFL, GCL and INL, the significant thinning of outer layers and the association of them with increased aqueous flare, whereas NFL and INL thickening associated with outer retinal thinning. These results can suggest the involvement of intraocular inflammation in the pathogenesis of inner retinal thickening as a secondary change following outer retinal degeneration. PMID:27653207

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography to Estimate Retinal Blood Flow in Eyes with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Masako; Miyata, Manabu; Ishihara, Kenji; Gotoh, Norimoto; Morooka, Satoshi; Ogino, Ken; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Hirashima, Takako; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Hata, Masayuki; Muraoka, Yuki; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-04-13

    Ophthalmologists sometimes face difficulties in identifying the origin of visual acuity (VA) loss in a retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patient, particularly before cataract surgery: cataract or the retinal disease state. Therefore, it is important to identify the significant factors correlating with VA. Nowadays, retinal blood flow in superficial and deep layers can be estimated non-invasively using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). We estimated blood flow per retinal layer by using OCTA; investigated the correlation between VA and other parameters including blood flow and retinal thickness; and identified the most associated factor with VA in patients with RP. OCTA images in 68 of consecutive 110 Japanese RP patients were analysable (analysable RP group). Thirty-two age- and axial length-matched healthy eyes (control group) were studied. In the analysable RP group, the parafoveal flow density in superficial and deep layers was 47.0 ± 4.9% and 52.4 ± 5.5%, respectively, which was significantly lower than that in controls. Using multivariate analysis, we found that the parafoveal flow density in the deep layer and superficial foveal avascular area were the factors associated with VA. Non-invasive estimation of retinal blood flow per retinal layer using OCTA is useful for predicting VA in RP patients.

  10. [Molecular-physiological aspects of peptide regulation of function of the retina in retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Proniaeva, V E; Lin'kova, N S; Trofimova, S V; Umnpv, R S

    2014-01-01

    Peptide's bioregulators promotes restoration of the physiological activity of the retina in retinitis pigmentosa in older adults and in animal models. The molecular mechanism of physiological activity of peptides is connected with its ability to regulate synthesis of protein markers of differentiation of neurons and retinal pigment epithelium epigenetically.

  11. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  12. Assessing Photoreceptor Structure in Retinitis Pigmentosa and Usher Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lynn W.; Johnson, Ryan D.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Cooper, Robert F.; Razeen, Moataz M.; Russillo, Madia C.; Dubra, Alfredo; Connor, Thomas B.; Han, Dennis P.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Kay, Christine N.; Weinberg, David V.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine cone photoreceptor structure in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Usher syndrome using confocal and nonconfocal split-detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Methods Nineteen subjects (11 RP, 8 Usher syndrome) underwent ophthalmic and genetic testing, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and AOSLO imaging. Split-detector images obtained in 11 subjects (7 RP, 4 Usher syndrome) were used to assess remnant cone structure in areas of altered cone reflectivity on confocal AOSLO. Results Despite normal interdigitation zone and ellipsoid zone appearance on OCT, foveal and parafoveal cone densities derived from confocal AOSLO images were significantly lower in Usher syndrome compared with RP. This was due in large part to an increased prevalence of non-waveguiding cones in the Usher syndrome retina. Although significantly correlated to best-corrected visual acuity and foveal sensitivity, cone density can decrease by nearly 38% before visual acuity becomes abnormal. Aberrantly waveguiding cones were noted within the transition zone of all eyes and corresponded to intact inner segment structures. These remnant cones decreased in density and increased in diameter across the transition zone and disappeared with external limiting membrane collapse. Conclusions Foveal cone density can be decreased in RP and Usher syndrome before visible changes on OCT or a decline in visual function. Thus, AOSLO imaging may allow more sensitive monitoring of disease than current methods. However, confocal AOSLO is limited by dependence on cone waveguiding, whereas split-detector AOSLO offers unambiguous and quantifiable visualization of remnant cone inner segment structure. Confocal and split-detector thus offer complementary insights into retinal pathology. PMID:27145477

  13. [Electroretinography changes in carriers of X-chromosomal retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Brischnik, E; Niemeyer, G

    1988-05-01

    Out of five families with pedigrees typical for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP) the authors examined eight definite and eight possible female carriers. Subjective symptoms were mild and variable, consisting mainly of relative nyctalopia. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed a normal fundus, or mild changes suggestive of RP, or even marked changes. Perimetry (Goldmann) revealed some narrowing of the outer isopter corresponding to a significant reduction in visual field area. In testing dark adaptation, the final rod threshold was slightly elevated in five out of 16 subjects. Ganzfeld-electroretinography using matched band filters in conditions of dark and light adaptation to selectively stimulate rod and cone signals revealed reduced b-wave amplitudes in most cases. White stimuli, applied in dark adaptation, generated ERGs with less abnormality than the selective rod and cone ERGs. Peak times of the cone b-waves were prolonged in most cases. The ERG abnormalities were more pronounced in definite carriers and in advanced age. In some cases remarkable differences were noted between the two eyes as regards fundus morphology and ERG responses. The authors conclude that the possibility of improved genetic and educational counseling in families afflicted by X-linked RP justifies the considerable diagnostic effort involved in such examinations.

  14. Mutations in phosphodiesterase 6 identified in familial cases of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Guru, Aditya A; Ayyagari, Radha; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, S Amer

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the genetic determinants associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal disorder, we recruited four large families manifesting cardinal symptoms of RP. We localized these families to regions on the human genome harboring the α and β subunits of phosphodiesterase 6 and identified mutations that were absent in control chromosomes. Our data suggest that mutations in PDE6A and PDE6B are responsible for the retinal phenotype in these families. PMID:27917291

  15. Effect of Purified Murine NGF on Isolated Photoreceptors of a Rodent Developing Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Petrocchi Passeri, Pamela; Micera, Alessandra; Aloe, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A number of different studies have shown that neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) support the survival of retinal ganglion neurons during a variety if insults. Recently, we have reported that that eye NGF administration can protect also photoreceptor degeneration in a mice and rat with inherited retinitis pigmentosa. However, the evidence that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors and that other retinal cells mediate the NGF effect could not be excluded. In the present study we have isolated retinal cells from rats with inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) during the post-natal stage of photoreceptor degenerative. In presence of NGF, these cells are characterized by enhanced expression of NGF-receptors and rhodopsin, the specific marker of photoreceptor and better cell survival, as well as neuritis outgrowth. Together these observations support the hypothesis that NGF that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors survival and prevents photoreceptor degeneration as previously suggested by in vivo studies. PMID:25897972

  16. Subjective Perception of Visual Distortions or Scotomas in Individuals with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Watanabe, Donald H.; Kapusta, Michael A.; Overbury, Olga

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed that persons who develop ocular disease have some form of visual experience that makes them aware of their deficits. However, in the case of peripheral field loss or decreasing vision in dim lighting, as in retinitis pigmentosa, for example, symptoms are more obscure and may not be as easily identified by the persons who have…

  17. The Self-Concept of Spanish Young Adults with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Justicia, Maria Dolores; Cordoba, Inmaculada Nieto

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease of the retina that causes the severe impairment of visual functioning similar to low vision, leading, in many cases, to blindness. Because the construct of self-concept plays a key role in personality, this study was designed to measure self-concept in a group of young adults with RP. The…

  18. Clinical trial of lutein in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 nonsmoking patients, aged 18 to 60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received ...

  19. Connecting Research on Retinitis Pigmentosa to the Practice of Orientation and Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geruschat, Duane R.; Turano, Kathleen A.

    2002-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) causes restriction of the visual field, progressive vision loss, and night blindness. This article presents an overview of the most common problems in orientation and mobility (O&M) for individuals with RP, appropriate interventions, vision science discoveries related to RP, and the impact of RP on functional visual…

  20. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  1. INTERACTION AND LOCALIZATION OF THE RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA PROTEIN RP2 AND NSF IN RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS†

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Juha M.; Cheng, Christiana L.; Molday, Laurie L.; Johal, Gurp; Coleman, Jonathan; Dyka, Frank; Hii, Theresa; Ahn, Jinhi; Molday, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    RP2 is a ubiquitously expressed protein encoded by a gene associated with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), a retinal degenerative disease that causes severe vision loss. Previous in vitro studies have shown that RP2 binds to ADP ribosylation factor-like 3 (Arl3) and activates its intrinsic GTPase activity, but the function of RP2 in the retina, and in particular photoreceptor cells, remains unclear. To begin to define the role of RP2 in the retina and XLRP, we have carried out biochemical studies to identify proteins in retinal cell extracts that interact with RP2. Here, we show that RP2 interacts with N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) in retinal cells as well as cultured embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biochemical analysis. This interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain of NSF. The E138G and ΔI137 mutations of RP2 known to cause XLRP abolished the interaction of RP2 with the N-terminal domain of NSF. Immunofluorescence labeling studies further showed that RP2 co-localized with NSF in photoreceptors and other cells of the retina. Intense punctate staining of RP2 was observed close to the junction between the inner and outer segments beneath the connecting cilium, as well as within the synaptic region of rod and cone photoreceptors. Our studies indicate that RP2, in addition to serving as a regulator of Arl3, interacts with NSF and this complex may play an important role in membrane protein trafficking in photoreceptors and other cells of the retina. PMID:20669900

  2. LOCAL SIGNALING FROM A RETINAL PROSTHETIC IN A RODENT RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA MODEL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared (NIR) laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main Results When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (≤ 7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent

  3. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  4. Post-cataract surgery visual disturbance in a retinitis pigmentosa patient with asteroid hyalosis.

    PubMed

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-05-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery.

  5. Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Disturbance in a Retinitis Pigmentosa Patient with Asteroid Hyalosis

    PubMed Central

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-01-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery. PMID:21941506

  6. Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yuuki; Maeda, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ishigami, Chie; Kosugi, Shinji; Mandai, Michiko; Kurimoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD. PMID:26161267

  7. Layer-specific blood-flow MRI of retinitis pigmentosa in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; De La Garza, Bryan; Shih, Yen-Yu I; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2012-08-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an established animal model of retinitis pigmentosa, a family of inherited retinal diseases which starts with loss of peripheral vision and progresses to eventual blindness. Blood flow (BF), an important physiological parameter, is intricately coupled to metabolic function under normal physiological conditions and is perturbed in many neurological and retinal diseases. This study reports non-invasive high-resolution MRI (44 × 44 × 600 μm) to image quantitative retinal and choroidal BF and layer-specific retinal thicknesses in RCS rat retinas at different stages of retinal degeneration compared with age-matched controls. The unique ability to separate retinal and choroidal BF was made possible by the depth-resolved MRI technique. RBF decreased with progressive retinal degeneration, but ChBF did not change in RCS rats up to post-natal day 90. We concluded that choroidal and retinal circulations have different susceptibility to progressive retinal degeneration in RCS rats. Layer-specific retinal thickness became progressively thinner and was corroborated by histological analysis in the same animals. MRI can detect progressive anatomical and BF changes during retinal degeneration with laminar resolution.

  8. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chlorogenic acid supplementation improves multifocal electroretinography in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of chlorogenic acid supplementation in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, we evaluated objective change in visual function with multifocal electroretinography, along with visual acuity, visual field, standard electroretinography, and contrast sensitivity. Eighteen patients diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were enrolled in this prospective, non-comparative, single-arm study. Multifocal electroretinography, best-corrected visual acuity in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters, total point score on visual field examination with Humphrey Field Analyzer II, electroretinography, and contrast sensitivity were measured and repeated after 3 months supplementation with chlorogenic acid. The amplitude of ring 5 was significantly higher on multifocal electroretinography after 3 months of chlorogenic acid supplementation (7.2 ± 9.5 vs 8.3 ± 10.8 nV/deg(2), mean ± standard deviation, P = 0.022). There were no significant changes in the best-corrected visual acuity, total point score on Humphrey Field Analyzer, 30 Hz flicker amplitude on standard electroretinography, or contrast sensitivity. Chlorogenic acid may have a beneficial effect on the peripheral area at the margins of retinal degeneration, and should be considered as an anti-oxidant for the management of retinitis pigmentosa.

  10. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  11. Emotional Health of People with Visual Impairment Caused by Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Keziah; Baranian, Mohammad; Timmis, Matthew; Pardhan, Shahina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the emotional difficulties associated with living with the ocular condition Retinitis Pigmentosa, and to examine the functioning of a self-report instrument used to assess this construct. Methods The difficulty of goals and tasks in the emotional health domain of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory were rated by 166 people with Retinitis Pigmentosa in a cross-sectional study. Demographic factors were also assessed. Results Responses to the 23 emotional health tasks were Rasch analysed and could be used to form either one 20 item overview scale with some multidimensionality, or three unidimensional subscales addressing feelings (4 items), communicating visual loss (5 items) and fatigue (7 items). The most difficult individual tasks related to communicating visual loss to other people, and dealing with feelings such as frustration, anxiety and stress. The use of mobility aids and female gender were associated with increased difficulty with emotional health, explaining 19% of the variance in the overview scale. Conclusions The emotional health domain of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory is a valid tool to assess emotional difficulties arising from visual loss. Interventions to aid people with Retinitis Pigmentosa deal with emotional difficulties should particularly address communicating vision loss effectively to others and coping with negative feelings. PMID:26713624

  12. [Study on treatment of retinitis pigmentosa with traditional Chinese medicine by Flicker electroretinogram].

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Tang, Y Z

    1996-06-01

    Study on treatment of 54 patients (106 eyes) of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with traditional Chinese medicine was conducted by using modified method of electroretinography. Results showed: (1) Flicker response of electroretinogram was the most sensitive-criterion in examination, it was more effective when combined with infrared spectrogram. (2) The 30 Hz flicker index, response time were improved after TCM therapy in different hereditary types of RP, the improvement was significant in patients with Yang-Deficiency of Spleen-Kidney Syndrome and those of autosomal dominant inheritance type (P < 0.01). (3) Decrease of phase angle (phi) under different frequency of flicker after treatment was also significant statistically. The results suggested that flicker responses, which represents mainly retinal cone activity of patients, could be improved to a certain extent by TCM treatment, even in those with advanced retinal degeneration. TCM treatment could also enhance the bioactivity of nerve network and therefore have a definite significance in retarding the progression of disease and keeping the central vision. The flicker ERG, especially its flicker index, is an effective, sensitive and useful parameter for detection of visual function in patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

  13. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  14. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  15. CNTF Gene Therapy Confers Lifelong Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Singh, Mandeep S; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward J; Davies, Wayne I L; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioral responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread upregulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  16. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 35 Hispanic retinitis pigmentosa probands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Xu, Mingchu; Verriotto, Jennifer D.; Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Gan, Lin; Lam, Byron L.; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases. The prevalence of RP and the mutation spectrum vary across populations. Hispanic people account for approximately 17% of the United States population, and the genetic etiologies of RP of this ethnic group still remain not well defined. Utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we screened mutations in known retinal disease-causing genes in an RP cohort of 35 unrelated Hispanic probands from the Miami area. We achieved a solving rate of 66% and identified 15 novel putative pathogenic mutations, including a frequent founder mutation disrupting PRPF31 splicing. Our data show that the mutation spectrum of Hispanic RP receives a significant impact from disease-causing alleles of Spanish origin and may also contain population-specific alleles. PMID:27596865

  17. Optical imaging of oxidative stress in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Eells, Janis T.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during retinal degenerative disorders, contributes to photoreceptor cell loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the eye tissue in rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa by using the cryofluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FADH2 are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The NADH redox ratio (RR), which is the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), was used as a quantitative diagnostic marker. The NADH RR was examined in an established rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the P23H rat, and compared to that of control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and P23H NIR treated rats. Our results demonstrated 24% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from P23H transgenic rats compared to normal rats and 20% increase in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from the P23H NIR treated rats compared to P23H non-treated rats.

  18. Low-dose-rate, low-dose irradiation delays neurodegeneration in a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Guo, Congrong; Oishi, Akio; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    The existence of radiation hormesis is controversial. Several stimulatory effects of low-dose (LD) radiation have been reported to date; however, the effects on neural tissue or neurodegeneration remain unknown. Here, we show that LD radiation has a neuroprotective effect in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary, progressive neurodegenerative disease that leads to blindness. Various LD radiation doses were administered to the eyes in a retinal degeneration mouse model, and their pathological and physiological effects were analyzed. LD gamma radiation in a low-dose-rate (LDR) condition rescues photoreceptor cell apoptosis both morphologically and functionally. The greatest effect was observed in a condition using 650 mGy irradiation and a 26 mGy/minute dose rate. Multiple rounds of irradiation strengthened this neuroprotective effect. A characteristic up-regulation (563%) of antioxidative gene peroxiredoxin-2 (Prdx2) in the LDR-LD-irradiated retina was observed compared to the sham-treated control retina. Silencing the Prdx2 using small-interfering RNA administration reduced the LDR-LD rescue effect on the photoreceptors. Our results demonstrate for the first time that LDR-LD irradiation has a biological effect in neural cells of living animals. The results support that radiation exhibits hormesis, and this effect may be applied as a novel therapeutic concept for retinitis pigmentosa and for other progressive neurodegenerative diseases regardless of the mechanism of degeneration involved.

  19. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa caused by MFRP mutations: human phenotype and preliminary proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C; Aleman, Tomas S; Schwartz, Sharon B; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L; Cideciyan, Artur V; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2012-04-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy.

  20. Gene Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by MFRP Mutations: Human Phenotype and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A.; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:22142163

  1. Clinical Trial of Lutein in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa Receiving Vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Berson, Eliot L.; Rosner, Bernard; Sandberg, Michael A.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Brockhurst, Robert J.; Hayes, K.C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Anderson, Ellen J.; Johnson, Chris A.; Gaudio, Alexander R.; Willett, Walter C.; Schaefer, Ernst J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. Design Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 non-smoking patients, age 18-60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received lutein 12 mg or a control tablet daily. All were given vitamin A palmitate 15,000 IU/day. Randomization took into account genetic type and baseline serum lutein. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was the total point score for the Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) 30-2 program; pre-specified secondary outcomes were the total point scores for the 60-4 program and for the 30-2 and 60-4 combined, 30-Hz electroretinogram amplitude, and ETDRS acuity. Results No significant difference in rate of decline was found between the lutein + A and control + A groups over a 4-year interval for the HFA 30-2 program. For the HFA 60-4 program a decrease in mean rate of sensitivity loss was observed in the lutein + A group (p=0.05). Mean decline with the 60-4 program was slower among those with the highest serum lutein or with the highest increase in macular pigment optical density (MPOD) at follow-up (p= 0.01 and p=0.006 respectively). Those with the highest increase in MPOD also had the slowest decline in 30-2 and 60-4 combined field sensitivity (p=0.005). No significant toxic side effects of lutein supplementation were observed. Conclusion Lutein supplementation 12 mg/d slowed loss of midperipheral visual field on average among nonsmoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa taking vitamin A. Application to Clinical Practice Data are presented that support use of lutein 12 mg/day to slow visual field loss among non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa on vitamin A. Trial Registry Randomized Clinical Trial for Retinitis Pigmentosa, NCT00346333, www.ClinicalTrial.gov PMID:20385935

  2. Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex) for Refractory Macular Edema Secondary to Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Örnek, Nurgül; Örnek, Kemal; Erbahçeci, İnci Elif

    2016-01-01

    Macular edema (ME) in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) often impairs central vision dramatically. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with RP was referred to our outpatient clinic due to severe visual deterioration in both eyes. The patient was treated with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, topical corticosteroids and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide injections, but her ME recurred. Intravitreal 0.7 mg dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex, Allergan) was administered into both eyes without complications. On the fourth day after both injections, visual acuity improved and ME almost totally resolved. No recurrence was observed at follow-up six months later. PMID:28058154

  3. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  5. Quantifying Fundus Autofluorescence in Patients With Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Schuerch, Kaspar; Woods, Russell L.; Lee, Winston; Duncker, Tobias; Delori, François C.; Allikmets, Rando; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using quantitative fundus autofluorescence (qAF), we analyzed short-wavelength autofluorescent (SW-AF) rings in RP. Methods Short-wavelength autofluorescent images (486 nm excitation) of 40 patients with RP (69 eyes) were acquired with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with an internal fluorescent reference. Mean qAF was measured in eight preset segments (qAF8) and in region of interest (ROI)-qAF (200–700 μm) within and external to the borders of the rings at superior, temporal, and inferior sites relative to the ring. For both groups, qAF in patients with RP was compared to age-similar and race/ethnicity-matched healthy eyes at equivalent retinal locations. Results In 71% of eyes of RP patients, qAF8 acquired internal to the inner border of the ring, was within the 95% confidence interval (CI) for healthy eyes, while in the remaining RP eyes qAF8 was either higher or lower than the CI. Measured external to the ring, qAF8 values were within the CI in 47% of RP eyes with the other eyes being higher or lower. In 28% of sites measured by ROI-qAF within the SW-AF ring, values were above the 95% CI of healthy controls. Region of interest-qAF measured just external to the ring was within the CI of healthy eyes in 74% of locations. The average local elevation in qAF within the ring was approximately 15%. In SD-OCT scans, photoreceptor-attributable reflectivity bands were thinned within and external to the ring. Conclusions Increased fluorophore production may be a factor in the formation of the SW-AF rings in RP. PMID:28358950

  6. Insights from retinitis pigmentosa into the roles of isocitrate dehydrogenases in the Krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Hartong, Dyonne T; Dange, Mayura; McGee, Terri L; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Colman, Roberta F

    2008-10-01

    Here we describe two families with retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary neurodegeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. Affected family members were homozygous for loss-of-function mutations in IDH3B, encoding the beta-subunit of NAD-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH, or IDH3), which is believed to catalyze the oxidation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate in the citric acid cycle. Cells from affected individuals had a substantial reduction of NAD-IDH activity, with about a 300-fold increase in the K(m) for NAD. NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-IDH, or IDH2), an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction, was normal in affected individuals, and they had no health problems associated with the enzyme deficiency except for retinitis pigmentosa. These findings support the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADP-IDH, rather than NAD-IDH, serves as the main catalyst for this reaction in the citric acid cycle outside the retina, and that the retina has a particular requirement for NAD-IDH.

  7. Molecular study of the rhodopsin gene in retinitis pigmentosa patients in the Basque Country.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A I; Arostegui, E; Martin, R; Duran, M; Onaindia, M L; Molina, M; Tejada, M I

    1998-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disorder affecting the outer segment of the retina and leading to night blindness and progressive visual field loss. The rhodopsin gene encodes a photolabile pigment located in the rod outer segments constituting around 80-90% of its protein content and is the initiation point for the visual cascade upon absorption of a single photon. Seventy-five unrelated, isolated RP families in the Basque Country, with at least one affected member, were diagnosed at our hospital after ophthalmic examination and electroretinogram analysis. The patients received genetic counselling according to their individual case based on their clinical diagnosis. The modes of inheritance found from pedigree studies were the following: 20% (15/75) were classified as autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP), 17.33% (13/75) were autosomal recessive (ARRP), 2.66% (2/75) were unclassified (NC), and 60% (45/75) were sporadic cases (SCRP). From these families, 75 unrelated and affected index cases together with 22 affected relatives and 42 unaffected relatives were screened for mutations in the rhodopsin gene by GC clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that five ADRP, three ARRP, 15 SCRP, and one NC families had alterations in this gene. Only three of these alterations, that is 4% (3/75) (95% CL 0-8), appeared to be responsible for the disease. This represents a lower percentage than the 10% previously reported.

  8. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. Results We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures. PMID:25352746

  9. Small molecules targeting glycogen synthase kinase 3 as potential drug candidates for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Marchena, Miguel; Villarejo-Zori, Beatriz; Zaldivar-Diez, Josefa; Palomo, Valle; Gil, Carmen; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina; Martínez, Ana; de la Rosa, Enrique J

    2017-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy that courses with progressive degeneration of retinal tissue and loss of vision. Currently, RP is an unpreventable, incurable condition. We propose glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) inhibitors as potential leads for retinal cell neuroprotection, since the retina is also a part of the central nervous system and GSK-3 inhibitors are potent neuroprotectant agents. Using a chemical genetic approach, diverse small molecules with different potency and binding mode to GSK-3 have been used to validate and confirm GSK-3 as a pharmacological target for RP. Moreover, this medicinal chemistry approach has provided new leads for the future disease-modifying treatment of RP.

  10. Activation of retinal stem cells in the proliferating marginal region of RCS rats during development of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jian, Qian; Xu, Haiwei; Xie, Hanping; Tian, Chunyu; Zhao, Tongtao; Yin, ZhengQin

    2009-11-06

    Retinal stem cells (RSCs) have been demonstrated at the proliferating marginal regions from the pars plana of ciliary body to the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) in adult lower vertebrates and mammals. Investigations in the lower vertebrates have provided some evidence that RSCs can proliferate following retinal damage; however, the evidence that this occurs in mammals is not clear. In this study, we explored RSCs proliferation potential of adult mammalian in proliferating marginal regions of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, an animal model for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The proliferation was evaluated using BrdU labeling, and Chx-10 as markers to discern progenitor cell of CMZ in Long-Evan's and RCS rats at different postnatal day (PND) after eye opening. We found that few Chx-10 and BrdU labeled cells in the proliferating marginal regions of Long-Evan's rats, which significantly increased in RCS rats at PND30 and PND60. Consistent with this, Chx-10/Vimentin double staining cells in the center retina of RCS rats increased significantly at PND30 after eye opening. In addition, mRNA expression of Shh, Ptch1 and Smo was up-regulated in RCS rats at PND60 compared to age-matched Long-Evan's rats, which revealed Shh/ptc pathway involving in the activation of RSCs. These results suggest that RSCs in the mammalian retinal proliferating marginal regions has the potential to regenerate following degeneration.

  11. Identical mutation in a novel retinal gene causes progressive rod-cone degeneration in dogs and retinitis pigmentosa in humans.

    PubMed

    Zangerl, Barbara; Goldstein, Orly; Philp, Alisdair R; Lindauer, Sarah J P; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Mullins, Robert F; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Ripoll, Daniel; Felix, Jeanette S; Stone, Edwin M; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2006-11-01

    Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a late-onset, autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration of dogs and a homolog for some forms of human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Previously, the disease-relevant interval was reduced to a 106-kb region on CFA9, and a common phenotype-specific haplotype was identified in all affected dogs from several different breeds and breed varieties. Screening of a canine retinal EST library identified partial cDNAs for novel candidate genes in the disease-relevant interval. The complete cDNA of one of these, PRCD, was cloned in dog, human, and mouse. The gene codes for a 54-amino-acid (aa) protein in dog and human and a 53-aa protein in the mouse; the first 24 aa, coded for by exon 1, are highly conserved in 14 vertebrate species. A homozygous mutation (TGC --> TAC) in the second codon shows complete concordance with the disorder in 18 different dog breeds/breed varieties tested. The same homozygous mutation was identified in a human patient from Bangladesh with autosomal recessive RP. Expression studies support the predominant expression of this gene in the retina, with equal expression in the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor, and ganglion cell layers. This study provides strong evidence that a mutation in the novel gene PRCD is the cause of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in both dogs and humans.

  12. Retinitis pigmentosa-associated cystoid macular oedema: pathogenesis and avenues of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Strong, S; Liew, G; Michaelides, M

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary retinal diseases are now the leading cause of blindness certification in the working age population (age 16–64 years) in England and Wales, of which retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common disorder. RP may be complicated by cystoid macular oedema (CMO), causing a reduction of central vision. The underlying pathogenesis of RP-associated CMO (RP-CMO) remains uncertain, however, several mechanisms have been proposed, including: (1) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, (2) failure (or dysfunction) of the pumping mechanism in the retinal pigment epithelial, (3) Müller cell oedema and dysfunction, (4) antiretinal antibodies and (5) vitreous traction. There are limited data on efficacy of treatments for RP-CMO. Treatments attempted to date include oral and topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, oral, topical, intravitreal and periocular steroids, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, photocoagulation, vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peel, oral lutein and intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor injections. This review summarises the evidence supporting these treatment modalities. Successful management of RP-CMO should aim to improve both quality and quantity of vision in the short term and may also slow central vision loss over time. PMID:27913439

  13. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  14. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  15. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP.

  16. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses.

  17. Microglia-Müller glia crosstalk in the rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Arroba, Ana I; Alvarez-Lindo, Noemí; van Rooijen, Nico; de la Rosa, Enrique J

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa refers to a large, genetically heterogeneous group of retinal dystrophies. This condition is characterized by the gradual onset of blindness due to progressive deterioration of the retina, a process that includes photoreceptor and retinal-pigmented-epithelium cell decay and death, microglial recruitment, reactive gliosis, and vascular disorganization and regression. We found that early in the degenerative process, the rd10 mouse retina exhibits high levels of photoreceptor cell death and reactive Müller gliosis. In explant cultures, both degenerative processes were abrogated by IGF-I treatment. Moreover, the beneficial effect of IGF-I was diminished by microglial depletion using clodronate-containing liposomes. Interestingly, in the absence of IGF-I, microglial depletion partially prevented cell death without affecting Müller gliosis. These findings strongly suggest a role for microglia-Müller glia crosstalk in neuroprotection. However, a subpopulation of microglial cells appears to promote neurodegeneration in the dystrophic retina. Our findings indicate that beneficial neuroprotective effects may be achieved through strategies that modulate microglial cell responses.

  18. A profile of transcriptomic changes in the rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Uren, Philip J.; Lee, Justine T.; Doroudchi, M. Mehdi; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a photoreceptor disease that affects approximately 100,000 people in the United States. Treatment options are limited, and the prognosis for most patients is progressive vision loss. Unfortunately, understanding of the molecular underpinnings of RP initiation and progression is still limited. However, the development of animal models of RP, coupled with high-throughput sequencing, has provided an opportunity to study the underlying cellular and molecular changes in this disease. Methods Using RNA-Seq, we present the first retinal transcriptome analysis of the rd10 murine model of retinal degeneration. Results Our data confirm the loss of rod-specific transcripts and the increased relative expression of Müller-specific transcripts, emphasizing the important role of reactive gliosis and innate immune activation in RP. Moreover, we report substantial changes in relative isoform usage among neuronal differentiation and morphogenesis genes, including a marked shift to shorter transcripts. Conclusions Our analyses implicate remodeling of the inner retina and possible Müller cell dedifferentiation. PMID:25489233

  19. Human iPSC derived disease model of MERTK-associated retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Artero Castro, Ana; Delgado, Ana Belen Garcia; Bernal, María de los Angeles Martín; Luna Pelaez, Noelia; Díez Lloret, Andrea; Perez Espejo, Rocío; Kamenarova, Kunka; Fernández Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cortón, Marta; Avila Fernandez, Almudena; Sorkio, Anni; Skottman, Heli; Ayuso, Carmen; Erceg, Slaven; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) represents a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal dystrophies affecting mainly the rod photoreceptors and in some instances also the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Clinical symptoms and disease progression leading to moderate to severe loss of vision are well established and despite significant progress in the identification of causative genes, the disease pathology remains unclear. Lack of this understanding has so far hindered development of effective therapies. Here we report successful generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from skin fibroblasts of a patient harboring a novel Ser331Cysfs*5 mutation in the MERTK gene. The patient was diagnosed with an early onset and severe form of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Upon differentiation of these iPSC towards RPE, patient-specific RPE cells exhibited defective phagocytosis, a characteristic phenotype of MERTK deficiency observed in human patients and animal models. Thus we have created a faithful cellular model of arRP incorporating the human genetic background which will allow us to investigate in detail the disease mechanism, explore screening of a variety of therapeutic compounds/reagents and design either combined cell and gene- based therapies or independent approaches. PMID:26263531

  20. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  1. Localization of retinitis pigmentosa 2 to cilia is regulated by Importin β2

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Toby W.; Fan, Shuling; Margolis, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliopathies represent a newly emerging group of human diseases that share a common etiology resulting from dysfunction of the cilium or centrosome. The gene encoding the retinitis pigmentosa 2 protein (RP2) is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 localizes to the ciliary base and this requires the dual acylation of the N-terminus, but the precise mechanism by which RP2 is trafficked to the cilia is unknown. Here we have characterized an interaction between RP2 and Importin β2 (transportin-1), a member of the Importin-β family that regulates nuclear–cytoplasmic shuttling. We demonstrate that Importin β2 is necessary for localization of RP2 to the primary cilium because ablation of Importin β2 by shRNA blocks entry both of endogenous and exogenous RP2 to the cilium. Furthermore, we identify two distinct binding sites of RP2, which interact independently with Importin β2. One binding site is a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-like sequence that is located at the N-terminus of RP2 and the other is an M9-like sequence within the tubulin folding cofactor C (TBCC) domain. Mutation of the NLS-like consensus sequence did not abolish localization of RP2 to cilia, suggesting that the sequence is not essential for RP2 ciliary targeting. Interestingly, we found that several missense mutations that cause human disease fall within the M9-like sequence of RP2 and these mutations block entry of RP2 into the cilium, as well as its interaction with Importin β2. Together, this work further highlights a role of Importin β2 in regulation of the entry of RP2 and other proteins into the ciliary compartment. PMID:21285245

  2. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  3. The Relationship of Central Foveal Thickness to Urinary Iodine Concentration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients with or without Cystoid Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Michael A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Harper, Shyana; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Hart, Lois; Rosner, Bernard; Berson, Eliot L.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Current treatments for cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa are not always effective, may lead to adverse side effects, and may not restore loss of visual acuity. The present research lays the rationale for evaluating whether an iodine supplement could reduce cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa. Objective To determine whether central foveal thickness in the presence of cystoid macular edema is related to dietary iodine intake inferred from urinary iodine concentration in non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Institutional referral center. Participants Non-smoking adult patients with retinitis pigmentosa (n = 212, ages 18 to 69 years) with a visual acuity ≥ 20/200 in at least one eye. Main outcome measure The relationship of log central foveal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography to urinary iodine concentration measured from multiple spot samples and represented as a 3-level classification variable (< 100 μg/L, 100 μg/L - 199 μg/L, and ≥ 200 μg/L), assigning greater weight to patients with more reliable urinary iodine concentration estimates. Results Analyses were limited to 199 patients after excluding 11 patients who failed to return urine samples for measuring urinary iodine concentration and 2 outliers for urinary iodine concentration. Thirty-six percent of these patients had cystoid macular edema in one or both eyes. Although log central foveal thickness was inversely related to urinary iodine concentration based on all patients (p = 0.02), regression of log central foveal thickness on urinary iodine concentration separately for patients with and without cystoid macular edema showed a strong inverse significant relationship for the former group (p < 0.001) and no significant relationship for the latter group as tested (p = 0.66). In contrast, we found no significant association between cystoid macular edema prevalence and urinary iodine concentration based on the

  4. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  5. Progression of Pro23His Retinopathy in a Miniature Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; de Castro, Juan P. Fernandez; DeMarco, Paul J.; Ross, Jason W.; Njoka, Josephat; Walters, Eric; Prather, Randall S.; McCall, Maureen A.; Kaplan, Henry J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We characterize the progression of retinopathy in Filial 1 (F1) progeny of a transgenic (Tg) founder miniswine exhibiting severe Pro23His (P23H) retinopathy. Methods The F1 TgP23H miniswine progeny were created by crossing TgP23H founder miniswine 53-1 with wild type (WT) inbred miniature swine. Scotopic (rod-driven) and photopic (cone-driven) retinal functions were evaluated in F1 TgP23H and WT littermates using full field electroretinograms (ffERGs) at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of age, as well as the Tg founder miniswine at 6 years of age. Miniswine were euthanized and their retinas processed for morphologic evaluation at the light and electron microscopic level. Retinal morphology of a 36-month-old Tg miniswine also was examined. Results Wild type littermates reached mature scotopic and photopic retinal function by 3 months, while TgP23H miniswine showed abnormal scotopic ffERGs at the earliest time point, 1 month, and depressed photopic ffERGs after 2 months. Rod and cone photoreceptors (PR) exhibited morphologic abnormalities and dropout from the outer nuclear layer at 1 month, with only a monolayer of cone PR somata remaining after 2 months. The retinas showed progressive neural remodeling of the outer retina that included dendritic retraction of rod bipolar cells and glial seal formation by Müller cells. The TgP23H founder miniswine showed cone PR with relatively intact morphology exclusive to the area centralis. Conclusions The F1 Tg miniswine and the TgP23H founder miniswine exhibit similar retinopathy. Translational Relevance TgP23H miniswine are a useful large-eye model to study pathogenesis and preservation cone PRs in humans with retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:28316877

  6. Neuroprotective actions of progesterone in an in vivo model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallejo, V; Benlloch-Navarro, S; López-Pedrajas, R; Romero, F J; Miranda, M

    2015-09-01

    Progesterone has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental acute brain injury models, but little is known about the effects of steroid sex hormones in models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The aim of this study was to asses whether progesterone had a protective effect in one animal model of RP (the rd1 mice), and whether its action was due at least in part, to its ability to reduce free radical damage or to increase antioxidant defences. Rd1 and wild type (wt) mice received an oral administration of 100 mg/kg body/weight of progesterone on alternate days starting at postnatal day 7 (PN7) and were sacrificed at different postnatal days. Our results show that progesterone decreases cell death, as the number of TUNEL-positive cells were decreased in the ONL of the retina from treated rd1 mice. At PN15, treatment with progesterone increased values of ERG b-wave amplitude (p<0,5) when compared with untreated mice. Progesterone also decreased the observed gliosis in RP, though this effect was transient. Treatment with progesterone significantly reduced retinal glutamate concentrations at PN15 and PN17. To clarify the mechanism by which progesterone is able to decrease retinal glutamate concentration, we examined expression levels of glutamine synthase (GS). Our results showed a significant increase in GS in rd1 treated retinas at PN13. Treatment with progesterone, significantly increase not only GSH but also oxidized glutathione retinal concentrations, probably because progesterone is able to partially increase glutamate cysteine ligase c subunit (GCLC) at PN15 and PN17 (p<0,05). In summary, our results demonstrate that oral administration of progesterone appears to act on multiple levels to delay photoreceptor death in this model of RP.

  7. Structural analysis of retinal photoreceptor ellipsoid zone and postreceptor retinal layer associated with visual acuity in patients with retinitis pigmentosa by ganglion cell analysis combined with OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Li, Hui; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Ding; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to examine changes in photoreceptor ellipsoid zone (EZ) and postreceptor retinal layer in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients by ganglion cell analysis (GCA) combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to evaluate the structure–function relationships between retinal layer changes and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Sixty-eight eyes of 35 patients with RP and 65 eyes of 35 normal controls were analyzed in the study. The average length of EZ was 911.1 ± 208.8 μm in RP patients, which was shortened with the progression of the disease on the OCT images. The average ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer thickness (GCIPLT) was 54.7 ± 18.9 μm in RP patients, while in normal controls it was 85.6 ± 6.8 μm. The GCIPLT in all quarters became significantly thinner along with outer retinal thinning. There was a significantly positive correlation between BCVA and EZ (r = −0.7622, P < 0.001) and GCIPLT (r = −0.452, P < 0.001). Therefore, we assess the retinal layer changes from a new perspective in RP patients, which suggests that EZ and GCIPLT obtained by GCA combined with OCT imaging are the direct and valid indicators to diagnosis and predict the pathological process of RP. PMID:28033301

  8. CRISPR Repair Reveals Causative Mutation in a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Justus, Sally; Lee, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Lijuan; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Bassuk, Alexander G; Mahajan, Vinit B; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-08-01

    Massive parallel sequencing enables identification of numerous genetic variants in mutant organisms, but determining pathogenicity of any one mutation can be daunting. The most commonly studied preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa called the "rodless" (rd1) mouse is homozygous for two mutations: a nonsense point mutation (Y347X) and an intronic insertion of a leukemia virus (Xmv-28). Distinguishing which mutation causes retinal degeneration is still under debate nearly a century after the discovery of this model organism. Here, we performed gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and demonstrated that the Y347X mutation is the causative variant of disease. Genome editing in the first generation produced animals that were mosaic for the corrected allele but still showed neurofunction preservation despite low repair frequencies. Furthermore, second-generation CRISPR-repaired mice showed an even more robust rescue and amelioration of the disease. This predicts excellent outcomes for gene editing in diseased human tissue, as Pde6b, the mutated gene in rd1 mice, has an orthologous intron-exon relationship comparable with the human PDE6B gene. Not only do these findings resolve the debate surrounding the source of neurodegeneration in the rd1 model, but they also provide the first example of homology-directed recombination-mediated gene correction in the visual system.

  9. Mutation Screening of Multiple Genes in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa by Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    González-del Pozo, María; Borrego, Salud; Barragán, Isabel; Pieras, Juan I.; Santoyo, Javier; Matamala, Nerea; Naranjo, Belén; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. RP is the leading cause of visual loss in individuals younger than 60 years, with a prevalence of about 1 in 4000. The molecular genetic diagnosis of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) is challenging due to the large genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Traditional methods for sequencing arRP genes are often laborious and not easily available and a screening technique that enables the rapid detection of the genetic cause would be very helpful in the clinical practice. The goal of this study was to develop and apply microarray-based resequencing technology capable of detecting both known and novel mutations on a single high-throughput platform. Hence, the coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of 16 arRP genes were resequenced using microarrays in 102 Spanish patients with clinical diagnosis of arRP. All the detected variations were confirmed by direct sequencing and potential pathogenicity was assessed by functional predictions and frequency in controls. For validation purposes 4 positive controls for variants consisting of previously identified changes were hybridized on the array. As a result of the screening, we detected 44 variants, of which 15 are very likely pathogenic detected in 14 arRP families (14%). Finally, the design of this array can easily be transformed in an equivalent diagnostic system based on targeted enrichment followed by next generation sequencing. PMID:22164218

  10. The Role of Mislocalized Phototransduction in Photoreceptor Cell Death of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Takeshi; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Notomi, Shoji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Most of inherited retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) cause photoreceptor cell death resulting in blindness. RP is a large family of diseases in which the photoreceptor cell death can be caused by a number of pathways. Among them, light exposure has been reported to induce photoreceptor cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which photoreceptor cell death is caused by light exposure is unclear. In this study, we have shown that even a mild light exposure can induce ectopic phototransduction and result in the acceleration of rod photoreceptor cell death in some vertebrate models. In ovl, a zebrafish model of outer segment deficiency, photoreceptor cell death is associated with light exposure. The ovl larvae show ectopic accumulation of rhodopsin and knockdown of ectopic rhodopsin and transducin rescue rod photoreceptor cell death. However, knockdown of phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that mediates the next step of phototransduction, does not. So, ectopic phototransduction activated by light exposure, which leads to rod photoreceptor cell death, is through the action of transducin. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that forced activation of adenylyl cyclase in the inner segment leads to rod photoreceptor cell death. For further confirmation, we have also generated a transgenic fish which possesses a human rhodopsin mutation, Q344X. This fish and rd10 model mice show photoreceptor cell death caused by adenylyl cyclase. In short, our study indicates that in some RP, adenylyl cyclase is involved in photoreceptor cell death pathway; its inhibition is potentially a logical approach for a novel RP therapy. PMID:22485131

  11. Use of Hydrogen as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy Against Photoreceptor Degeneration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Geng, Lei; Wang, Liqiang; Xu, Weiwei; Qin, Limin; Peng, Guanghua; Huang, Yi Fei; Yang, Ji xue

    2016-03-08

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by progressive photoreceptor apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as critical initiators of the photoreceptor apoptosis in RP. Photoreceptor survival in RP mutants will not only require the inhibition of effectors of apoptotic machinery, but also the elimination of the initiating upstream signals, such as ROS. These cytotoxic ROS should be neutralized by the antioxidant defense system, otherwise they would interact with the macromolecules essential for photoreceptor survival. Hydrogen is a promising gaseous agent that has come to the forefront of therapeutic research over the last few years. It has been verified that hydrogen is capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic ROS selectively, rectifying abnormities in the apoptotic cascades, and attenuating the related inflammatory response. Hydrogen is so mild that it does not disturb the metabolic oxidation-reduction reactions or disrupt the physiologic ROS involved in cell signaling. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that hydrogen might be an effective therapeutic agent to slow or prevent photoreceptor degeneration in RP retinas. It is a logical step to test hydrogen for therapeutic use in multiple RP animal models, and ultimately in human RP patients.

  12. NGS-based Molecular diagnosis of 105 eyeGENE(®) probands with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhongqi; Bowles, Kristen; Goetz, Kerry; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xinjing; Xu, Shan; Wang, Keqing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Rui

    2015-12-15

    The National Ophthalmic Disease Genotyping and Phenotyping Network (eyeGENE(®)) was established in an effort to facilitate basic and clinical research of human inherited eye disease. In order to provide high quality genetic testing to eyeGENE(®)'s enrolled patients which potentially aids clinical diagnosis and disease treatment, we carried out a pilot study and performed Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based molecular diagnosis for 105 Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) patients randomly selected from the network. A custom capture panel was designed, which incorporated 195 known retinal disease genes, including 61 known RP genes. As a result, disease-causing mutations were identified in 52 out of 105 probands (solving rate of 49.5%). A total of 82 mutations were identified, and 48 of them were novel. Interestingly, for three probands the molecular diagnosis was inconsistent with the initial clinical diagnosis, while for five probands the molecular information suggested a different inheritance model other than that assigned by the physician. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that NGS target sequencing is efficient and sufficiently precise for molecular diagnosis of a highly heterogeneous patient cohort from eyeGENE(®).

  13. A Partial Structural and Functional Rescue of a Retinitis Pigmentosa Model with Compacted DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue; Nash, Zack; Conley, Shannon M.; Fliesler, Steven J.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2009-01-01

    Previously we have shown that compacted DNA nanoparticles can drive high levels of transgene expression after subretinal injection in the mouse eye. Here we delivered compacted DNA nanoparticles containing a therapeutic gene to the retinas of a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Nanoparticles containing the wild-type retinal degeneration slow (Rds) gene were injected into the subretinal space of rds+/− mice on postnatal day 5. Gene expression was sustained for up to four months at levels up to four times higher than in controls injected with saline or naked DNA. The nanoparticles were taken up into virtually all photoreceptors and mediated significant structural and biochemical rescue of the disease without histological or functional evidence of toxicity. Electroretinogram recordings showed that nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer restored cone function to a near-normal level in contrast to transfer of naked plasmid DNA. Rod function was also improved. These findings demonstrate that compacted DNA nanoparticles represent a viable option for development of gene-based interventions for ocular diseases and obviate major barriers commonly encountered with non-viral based therapies. PMID:19390689

  14. Interpretation of Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics Images in Subjects with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Gale, Michael J; Feng, Shu; Titus, Hope E; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate features on flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) images with color fundus, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We imaged 39 subjects diagnosed with RP using the rtx1™ flood-illuminated AO camera from Imagine Eyes (Orsay, France). We observed a correlation between hyper-autofluoresence changes on FAF, disruption of the interdigitation zone (IZ) on SD-OCT and loss of reflective cone profiles on AO. Four main patterns of cone-reflectivity were seen on AO: presumed healthy cone mosaics, hypo-reflective blurred cone-like structures, higher frequency disorganized hyper-reflective spots, and lower frequency hypo-reflective spots. These regions were correlated to progressive phases of cone photoreceptor degeneration observed using SD-OCT and FAF. These results help provide interpretation of en face images obtained by flood-illuminated AO in subjects with RP. However, significant ambiguity remains as to what truly constitutes a cone, especially in areas of degeneration. With further refinements in technology, flood illuminated AO imaging has the potential to provide rapid, standardized, longitudinal and lower cost imaging in patients with retinal degeneration.

  15. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  16. Mutation Spectrum of EYS in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Isabel; Borrego, Salud; Pieras, Juan Ignacio; Pozo, María González-del; Santoyo, Javier; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Millan, José M; Mena, Marcela; El-Aziz, Mai M Abd; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina; Littink, Karin W; Dopazo, Joaquín; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. We have recently identified a new gene (EYS) encoding an ortholog of Drosophila spacemaker (spam) as a commonly mutated gene in autosomal recessive RP. In the present study, we report the identification of 73 sequence variations in EYS, of which 28 are novel. Of these, 42.9% (12/28) are very likely pathogenic, 17.9% (5/28) are possibly pathogenic, whereas 39.3% (11/28) are SNPs. In addition, we have detected 3 pathogenic changes previously reported in other populations. We are also presenting the characterisation of EYS homologues in different species, and a detailed analysis of the EYS domains, with the identification of an interesting novel feature: a putative coiled-coil domain. Majority of the mutations in the arRP patients have been found within the domain structures of EYS. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our group of patients is of 15.9% (15/94), confirming a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Spanish population. Along with the detection of three recurrent mutations in Caucasian population, our hypothesis of EYS being the first prevalent gene in arRP has been reinforced in the present study. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21069908

  17. Potential of Small Molecule–Mediated Reprogramming of Rod Photoreceptors to Treat Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Paul A.; Tang, Shibing; Shimchuk, Andy A.; Ding, Sheng; Reh, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in rod photoreceptor genes can cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Rod gene expression is regulated by the nuclear hormone receptor, Nr2e3. Genetic deletion of Nr2e3 reprograms rods into cells that resemble cone photoreceptors, and might therefore prevent their death from some forms of RP. There are no identified ligands for Nr2e3; however, reverse agonists might mimic the genetic rescue effect and may be therapeutically useful for the treatment of RP. Methods We screened for small molecule modulators of Nr2e3 using primary retinal cell cultures and characterized the most potent, which we have named photoregulin1 (PR1), in vitro and in vivo. We also tested the ability of PR1 to slow the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in two common mouse models of autosomal dominant RP, the RhoP23H and the Pde6brd1 mutations. Results In developing retina, PR1 causes a decrease in rod gene expression and an increase in S opsin+ cones. Photoregulin1 continues to inhibit rod gene expression in adult mice. When applied to two mouse models of RP, PR1 slows the degeneration of photoreceptors. Conclusions Chemical compounds identified as modulators of Nr2e3 activity may be useful for the treatment of RP through their effects on expression of disease-causing mutant genes. PMID:27893103

  18. A Novel Method for Quantitative Serial Autofluorescence Analysis in Retinitis Pigmentosa Using Image Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Jasleen K.; Wagner, Siegfried K.; Moules, Jonathan; Gekeler, Florian; Webster, Andrew R.; Downes, Susan M.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identifying potential biomarkers for disease progression in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is highly relevant now that gene therapy and other treatments are in clinical trial. Here we report a novel technique for analysis of short-wavelength autofluorescence (AF) imaging to quantify defined regions of AF in RP patients. Methods Fifty-five–degree AF images were acquired from 12 participants with RP over a 12-month period. Of these, five were identified as having a hyperfluorescent annulus. A standard Cartesian coordinate system was superimposed on images with the fovea as the origin and eight bisecting lines traversing the center at 45 degrees to each other. Spatial extraction software was programmed to highlight pixels corresponding to varying degrees of percentile fluorescence such that the parafoveal AF ring was mapped. Distance between the fovea and midpoint of the AF ring was measured. Percentage of low luminance areas was utilized as a measure of atrophy. Results The hyperfluorescent ring was most accurately mapped using the 70th percentile of fluorescence. Both the AF ring and peripheral hypofluorescence showed robust repeatability at all time points noted (P = 0.93). Conclusions Both a hypofluorescent ring and retinal pigment epithelium atrophy were present on a significant proportion of RP patients and were consistently mapped over a 12-month period. There is potential extrapolation of this methodology to wide-field imaging as well as other retinal dystrophies. This anatomical change may provide a useful anatomical biomarker for assessing treatment end points in RP. Translational Relevance Spatial extraction software can be a valuable tool in the assessment of ophthalmic imaging data. PMID:27933220

  19. Contrast visual acuity in patients with retinitis pigmentosa assessed by a contrast sensitivity tester

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Maho; Nakamura, Hajime; Hangai, Masanori; Oishi, Akio; Otani, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess contrast visual acuity (CVA) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and compare the result with standard visual acuity (VA), retinal thickness, status of inner segment/outer segment junction, and central visual field. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine eyes of 39 patients with RP and 39 eyes of 39 healthy individuals were studied. To see the difference in CVA between RP patients and normal controls, only subjects with standard VA of 1.0 (20/20) or better were included. This was a cross-sectional study. CVA in various light conditions was measured with CAT-2000 and was compared between patients and controls. CVA of patients was further analyzed for association with other parameters including foveal retinal thickness, outer nuclear layer thickness, the status of inner segment/outer segment junction measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and visual field mean deviation (MD) measured with Humphrey field analyzer 10-2 program. Results: CVA impairment was evident in RP patients compared to controls (P < 0.01, in all measurement conditions). Multivariate analysis showed association of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) with CVAs in several conditions. None of the OCT measurements was associated with CVA. When patients were divided into three groups based on MD, the most advanced group (MD worse than or equal to –20 dB) showed impairment of mesopic CVA (P < 0.05, under mesopic condition of 100% without glare, with glare, and 25% without glare). Conclusion: CVA impairment was confirmed in RP patients, especially in advanced cases. CVA measured with CAT-2000 may be a useful tool for assessing foveal function in RP patients. PMID:23202395

  20. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Boloc, Daniel; Castillo-Lara, Sergio; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Abril, Josep F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA). The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies. Methodology We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet) by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space. Conclusions In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates. PMID:26267445

  1. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (RhoS334) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of RhoS334, which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  2. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  3. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  4. Hypomorphic mutations in TRNT1 cause retinitis pigmentosa with erythrocytic microcytosis.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott; Barnes, Jenna; Sharma, Tasneem P; Westfall, Trudi A; Scott, C Anthony; Weed, Matthew C; Wiley, Jill S; Wiley, Luke A; Johnston, Rebecca M; Schnieders, Michael J; Lentz, Steven R; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Slusarski, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells and progressive loss of vision. While hundreds of mutations in more than 100 genes have been reported to cause RP, discovering the causative mutations in many patients remains a significant challenge. Exome sequencing in an individual affected with non-syndromic RP revealed two plausibly disease-causing variants in TRNT1, a gene encoding a nucleotidyltransferase critical for tRNA processing. A total of 727 additional unrelated individuals with molecularly uncharacterized RP were completely screened for TRNT1 coding sequence variants, and a second family was identified with two members who exhibited a phenotype that was remarkably similar to the index patient. Inactivating mutations in TRNT1 have been previously shown to cause a severe congenital syndrome of sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, recurrent fevers and developmental delay (SIFD). Complete blood counts of all three of our patients revealed red blood cell microcytosis and anisocytosis with only mild anemia. Characterization of TRNT1 in patient-derived cell lines revealed reduced but detectable TRNT1 protein, consistent with partial function. Suppression of trnt1 expression in zebrafish recapitulated several features of the human SIFD syndrome, including anemia and sensory organ defects. When levels of trnt1 were titrated, visual dysfunction was found in the absence of other phenotypes. The visual defects in the trnt1-knockdown zebrafish were ameliorated by the addition of exogenous human TRNT1 RNA. Our findings indicate that hypomorphic TRNT1 mutations can cause a recessive disease that is almost entirely limited to the retina.

  5. Mutations in IMPG2, Encoding Interphotoreceptor Matrix Proteoglycan 2, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Collin, Rob W.J.; Banin, Eyal; Ingeborgh van den Born, L.; Coene, Karlien L.M.; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Zelinger, Lina; Khan, Muhammad I.; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Erdinest, Inbar; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Voesenek, Krysta; Blokland, Ellen A.W.; Strom, Tim M.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Qamar, Raheel; Banfi, Sandro; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases caused by progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified two families, each with three affected siblings sharing large overlapping homozygous regions that harbored the IMPG2 gene on chromosome 3. Sequence analysis of IMPG2 in the two index cases revealed homozygous mutations cosegregating with the disease in the respective families: three affected siblings of Iraqi Jewish ancestry displayed a nonsense mutation, and a Dutch family displayed a 1.8 kb genomic deletion that removes exon 9 and results in the absence of seven amino acids in a conserved SEA domain of the IMPG2 protein. Transient transfection of COS-1 cells showed that a construct expressing the wild-type SEA domain is properly targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas the mutant lacking the seven amino acids appears to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutation analysis in ten additional index cases that were of Dutch, Israeli, Italian, and Pakistani origin and had homozygous regions encompassing IMPG2 revealed five additional mutations; four nonsense mutations and one missense mutation affecting a highly conserved phenylalanine residue. Most patients with IMPG2 mutations showed an early-onset form of RP with progressive visual-field loss and deterioration of visual acuity. The patient with the missense mutation, however, was diagnosed with maculopathy. The IMPG2 gene encodes the interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan IMPG2, which is a constituent of the interphotoreceptor matrix. Our data therefore show that mutations in a structural component of the interphotoreceptor matrix can cause arRP. PMID:20673862

  6. Retinitis Pigmentosa Treatment with Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Peng, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Current management of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) includes an attempt at slowing down the degenerative process through therapies that use either Western or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Novel therapies in Western medicine (WM) include use of tailor-made gene therapy, transplantation of stem cells, or neuroprotection treatment. TCM treatment includes two major approaches. These are orally applied herbal decoctions and acupuncture. In fact, all TCM treatments are based on the differentiation of a symptom-complex, which is the characteristic essence of TCM. Thus, diagnosed RP may be treated via the liver, the kidney, and the spleen. The principle behind these treatments is to invigorate the blood and brighten the eyes by toning up the liver and the kidney. Also treatments to cope with deficiencies in the two concepts that are unique and fundamental to TCM are considered: Qi or “vital energy” and Yin and Yang or the harmony of all the opposite elements and forces that make up existence. In particular, the Qi deficiency that results from blood stasis is addressed in these treatments. This paper also puts forward the existing problems and the prospect of the future development on integrating TCM with WM. PMID:26124961

  7. Is There Excess Oxidative Stress and Damage in Eyes of Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa?

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Rupert W.; Lu, Lili; Hafiz, Gulnar; Wolfson, Yulia; Shah, Syed M.; Sophie, Raafay; Mir, Tahreem A.; Scholl, Hendrik P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of diseases in which a mutation in one of the large variety of genes causes death of rod photoreceptors. After rods die, cone photoreceptors gradually die resulting in constriction of visual fields and eventual blindness in many patients. Studies in animal models of RP have demonstrated that oxidative damage is a major contributor to cone cell death. In this study, we extended those findings to patients with RP, because compared to control patients, those with RP showed significant reduction in the reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio in aqueous humor and a significant increase in aqueous protein carbonyl content. In contrast, there was no significant decrease in the serum GSH/GSSG ratio or increase in carbonyl content of serum proteins. These data indicate that patients with RP have ocular oxidative stress and damage in the absence of manifestations of systemic oxidative stress and/or damage indicating that demonstrations of oxidative damage-induced cone cell death in animal models of RP may translate to human RP. These observations lead to the hypothesis that potent antioxidants will promote cone survival and function in patients with RP and that the aqueous GSH/GSSG ratio and carbonyl content on proteins may provide useful biomarkers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 643–648. PMID:25820114

  8. Two novel mutations in PRPF3 causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zilin; Yan, Min; Sun, Wan; Wu, Zehua; Han, Liyun; Zhou, Zheng; Zheng, Fang; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of hereditary eye diseases, characterized by selective death of photoreceptor cells in the retina, resulting in progressive visual impairment. Approximately 20–40% of RP cases are autosomal dominant RP (ADRP). In this study, a Chinese ADRP family previously localized to the region between D1S2819 and D1S2635 was sequenced via whole-exome sequencing and a variant c.1345C > G (p.R449G) was identified in PRPF3. The Sanger sequencing was performed in probands of additional 95 Chinese ADRP families to investigate the contribution of PRPF3 to ADRP in Chinese population and another variant c.1532A > C (p.H511P) was detected in one family. These two variants, co-segregate with RP in two families respectively and both variants are predicted to be pathological. This is the first report about the spectrum of PRPF3 mutations in Chinese population, leading to the identification of two novel PRPF3 mutations. Only three clustered mutations in PRPF3 have been identified so far in several populations and all are in exon 11. Our study expands the spectrum of PRPF3 mutations in RP. We also demonstrate that PRPF3 mutations are responsible for 2.08% of ADRP families in this cohort indicating that PRPF3 mutations might be relatively rare in Chinese ADRP patients. PMID:27886254

  9. Mutations in the PDE6B gene in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Danciger, M.; Blaney, J.; Gao, Y.Q.; Zhao, D.Y.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied 24 small families with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance of retinitis pigmentosa by a combination of haplotype analysis and exon screening. Initial analysis of the families was made with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism adjacent to the gene for rod cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6B). This was followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism electrophoresis (SSCPE) of the 22 exons and a portion of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the PDE6B gene in the probands of each family in which the PDE6B locus could not be ruled out from segregating with disease. Two probands were found with compound heterozygous mutations: Gly576Asp and His620(1-bp del) mutations were present in one proband, and a Lys706X null mutation and an AG to AT splice acceptor site mutation in intron 2 were present in the other. Only the affecteds of each of the two families carried both corresponding mutations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mutations in a BTB-Kelch Protein, KLHL7, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, James S.; Ray, Joseph W.; Waseem, Naushin; Johnson, Kory; Brooks, Matthew J.; Hugosson, Therése; Breuer, Debra; Branham, Kari E.; Krauth, Daniel S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Ponjavic, Vesna; Gränse, Lotta; Khanna, Ritu; Trager, Edward H.; Gieser, Linn M.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna; Cojocaru, Radu I.; Ghiasvand, Noor M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Abrahamson, Magnus; Göring, Harald H.H.; Webster, Andrew R.; Birch, David G.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Fann, Yang; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Heckenlively, John R.; Andréasson, Sten; Swaroop, Anand

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases that result in dysfunction and/or death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. So far, 18 genes have been identified for autosomal-dominant (ad) RP. Here, we describe an adRP locus (RP42) at chromosome 7p15 through linkage analysis in a six-generation Scandinavian family and identify a disease-causing mutation, c.449G→A (p.S150N), in exon 6 of the KLHL7 gene. Mutation screening of KLHL7 in 502 retinopathy probands has revealed three different missense mutations in six independent families. KLHL7 is widely expressed, including expression in rod photoreceptors, and encodes a 75 kDa protein of the BTB-Kelch subfamily within the BTB superfamily. BTB-Kelch proteins have been implicated in ubiquitination through Cullin E3 ligases. Notably, all three putative disease-causing KLHL7 mutations are within a conserved BACK domain; homology modeling suggests that mutant amino acid side chains can potentially fill the cleft between two helices, thereby affecting the ubiquitination complexes. Mutations in an identical region of another BTB-Kelch protein, gigaxonin, have previously been associated with giant axonal neuropathy. Our studies suggest an additional role of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein-degradation pathway in maintaining neuronal health and in disease. PMID:19520207

  12. Activated mTORC1 promotes long-term cone survival in retinitis pigmentosa mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Aditya; Ma, Shan; Le, Yun Z.; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Punzo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited photoreceptor degenerative disorder that results in blindness. The disease is often caused by mutations in genes that are specific to rod photoreceptors; however, blindness results from the secondary loss of cones by a still unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is required to slow the progression of cone death during disease and that constitutive activation of mTORC1 in cones is sufficient to maintain cone function and promote long-term cone survival. Activation of mTORC1 in cones enhanced glucose uptake, retention, and utilization, leading to increased levels of the key metabolite NADPH. Moreover, cone death was delayed in the absence of the NADPH-sensitive cell death protease caspase 2, supporting the contribution of reduced NADPH in promoting cone death. Constitutive activation of mTORC1 preserved cones in 2 mouse models of RP, suggesting that the secondary loss of cones is caused mainly by metabolic deficits and is independent of a specific rod-associated mutation. Together, the results of this study address a longstanding question in the field and suggest that activating mTORC1 in cones has therapeutic potential to prolong vision in RP. PMID:25798619

  13. Novel immunodeficient Pde6b rd1 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa to investigate potential therapeutics and pathogenesis of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Alaknanda; Das, Barun; Nath, Madhu; Iyer, Srikanth; Kesarwani, Ashwani; Bhattacharjee, Jashdeep; Arindkar, Shailendra; Sahay, Preeti; Jain, Kshama; Sahu, Parul; Sinha, Prakriti; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Nagarajan, Perumal; Upadhyay, Pramod

    2017-03-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a common retinal degeneration disease caused by mutation in any gene of the photo transduction cascade and results in photoreceptor dystrophy. Over decades, several animal models have been used to address the need for elucidation of effective therapeutics and factors regulating retinal degeneration to prohibit or renew the damaged retina. However, controversies over immune privilege of retina during cell transplantation and role of immune modulation during RP still remain largely uninvestigated due to lack of proper animal models. Therefore, in our present study, we have developed an immune compromised mouse model NOD.SCID- rd1 for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) by crossing CBA/J and NOD SCID mice and selecting homozygous double mutant animals for further breeding. Characterization of the newly developed RP model indicates similar retinal degeneration pattern as CBA/J with decreased apoptosis rate and rhodopsin loss. It also exhibits loss of T cells, B cells and NK cells. NOD.SCID- rd1model is extremely useful for xenogenic cell based therapeutics as indicated by higher cell integration capacity post transplantation. The dissection of underlying role of immune system in the progression of RP and effect of immune deficiency on immune privilege of eye has also been further elucidated using comparative qPCR studies of this model with immune competent RP model.

  14. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations in Bad Response to Refrigeration 2 (Brr2) Impair ATPase and Helicase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Sarah; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-06-03

    Brr2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required to unwind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex during spliceosome assembly. Mutations within the ratchet helix of the Brr2 RNA binding channel result in a form of degenerative human blindness known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The biochemical consequences of these mutations on Brr2's RNA binding, helicase, and ATPase activity have not yet been characterized. Therefore, we identified the largest construct of Brr2 that is soluble in vitro, which truncates the first 247 amino acids of the N terminus (Δ247-Brr2), to characterize the effects of the RP mutations on Brr2 activity. The Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants exhibit a gradient of severity of weakened RNA binding, reduced helicase activity, and reduced ATPase activity compared with wild type Δ247-Brr2. The globular C-terminal Jab1/Mpn1-like domain of Prp8 increases the ability of Δ247-Brr2 to bind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex at high pH and increases Δ247-Brr2's RNA-dependent ATPase activity and the extent of RNA unwinding. However, this domain of Prp8 does not differentially affect the Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants compared with the wild type Δ247-Brr2. When stimulated by Prp8, wild type Δ247-Brr2 is able to unwind long stable duplexes in vitro, and even the RP mutants capable of binding RNA with tight affinity are incapable of fully unwinding short duplex RNAs. Our data suggest that the RP mutations within the ratchet helix impair Brr2 translocation through RNA helices.

  15. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia and early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.

  16. Correlation of vision loss with tactile-evoked V1 responses in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Samantha I; Weiland, James D; Bao, Pinglei; Lopez-Jaime, Gilberto Raul; Tjan, Bosco S

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that the visual cortex of visually impaired humans is active during tactile tasks. We sought to determine if this cross-modal activation in the primary visual cortex is correlated with vision loss in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease that progressively diminishes vision later in life. RP and sighted subjects completed three tactile tasks: a symmetry discrimination task, a Braille-dot counting task, and a sandpaper roughness discrimination task. We measured tactile-evoked blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). For each subject, we quantified the cortical extent of the tactile-evoked response by the proportion of modulated voxels within the primary visual cortex (V1) and its strength by the mean absolute modulation amplitude of the modulated voxels. We characterized vision loss in terms of visual acuity and the areal proportion of V1 that corresponds to the preserved visual field. Visual acuity and proportion of the preserved visual field both had a highly significant effect on the cortical extent of the V1 BOLD response to tactile stimulation, while visual acuity also had a significant effect on the strength of the V1 response. These effects of vision loss on cross-modal responses were reliable despite high inter-subject variability. Controlling for task-evoked responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) across subjects further strengthened the effects of vision loss on cross-model responses in V1. We propose that such cross-modal responses in V1 and other visual areas may be used as a cortically localized biomarker to account for individual differences in visual performance following sight recovery treatments.

  17. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  18. Prp8 retinitis pigmentosa mutants cause defects in the transition between the catalytic steps of splicing.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing must occur with high fidelity and efficiency for proper gene expression. The spliceosome uses DExD/H box helicases to promote on-pathway interactions while simultaneously minimizing errors. Prp8 and Snu114, an EF2-like GTPase, regulate the activity of the Brr2 helicase, promoting RNA unwinding by Brr2 at appropriate points in the splicing cycle and repressing it at others. Mutations linked to retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a disease that causes blindness in humans, map to the Brr2 regulatory region of Prp8. Previous in vitro studies of homologous mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiaes how that Prp8-RP mutants cause defects in spliceosome activation. Here we show that a subset of RP mutations in Prp8 also causes defects in the transition between the first and second catalytic steps of splicing. Though Prp8-RP mutants do not cause defects in splicing fidelity, they result in an overall decrease in splicing efficiency. Furthermore, genetic analyses link Snu114 GTP/GDP occupancy to Prp8-dependent regulation of Brr2. Our results implicate the transition between the first and second catalytic steps as a critical place in the splicing cycle where Prp8-RP mutants influence splicing efficiency. The location of the Prp8-RP mutants, at the "hinge" that links the Prp8 Jab1-MPN regulatory "tail" to the globular portion of the domain, suggests that these Prp8-RP mutants inhibit regulated movement of the Prp8 Jab1/MPN domain into the Brr2 RNA binding channel to transiently inhibit Brr2. Therefore, in Prp8-linked RP, disease likely results not only from defects in spliceosome assembly and activation, but also because of defects in splicing catalysis.

  19. A novel mitochondrial mutation m.8989G>C associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa - the NARP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Baggesen, Kirsten; Rosenberg, Thomas; Kjaer, Niels; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2013-02-25

    The archetypal NARP syndrome is almost exclusively associated with the m.8993T>C/G mutation in the sixth subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, whereas other mutations in the MT-ATP6 gene primarily associate with Leigh syndrome or Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We report a novel mitochondrial point mutation, m.8989G>C, in a patient presenting with neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa constituting the classical NARP phenotype. This mutation alters the amino acid right next to canonical NARP mutation. We suggest that classic NARP syndrome relates to a defined dysfunction of p.MT-ATP6.

  20. Acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration: a report of three patients, including the second reported case with hypoprebetalipoproteinemia (HARP syndrome).

    PubMed

    Orrell, R W; Amrolia, P J; Heald, A; Cleland, P G; Owen, J S; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E; Marsden, C D

    1995-03-01

    We describe an example of a variant of Hallervorden-Spatz disease, characterized by hypoprebeta-lipoproteinemia, acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration (HARP syndrome), in an 18-year-old woman who presented with longstanding intellectual subnormality, night blindness, and a 2-year history of orobuccolingual dystonia causing dysarthria and dysphagia. Investigation showed acanthocytosis and hypoprebetalipoproteinemia, and electroretinograms were typical of tapetoretinal degeneration. T2-weighted MRI showed decreased signal intensity in the pallidal nuclei with central hyperintensity, constituting the "eye-of-the-tiger" sign. The patient's sister and mother have a similar lipid disorder but no retinal or neurologic disease. We also report two patients with clinical and radiologic features similar to those of the patient with HARP syndrome but who had normal lipid studies. These various combinations of components of HARP syndrome may be caused by several distinct genetic diseases or may represent variable manifestations of a contiguous gene defect.

  1. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in RP1 that causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in an Indonesian family

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Astuti, Galuh D.N.; Arimadyo, Kentar; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; Cremers, Frans P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying molecular genetic defect in an Indonesian family with three affected individuals who had received a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical evaluation of the family members included measuring visual acuity and fundoscopy, and assessing visual field and color vision. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with Illumina 700k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, and homozygous regions were identified using PLINK software. Mutation analysis was performed with sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene that resided in one of the homozygous regions. The frequency of the identified mutation in the Indonesian population was determined with TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results A novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 4 of the RP1 gene, c.1012C>T (p.R338*), was identified in the proband and her two affected sisters. Unaffected family members either carried two wild-type alleles or were heterozygous carriers of the mutation. The mutation was not present in 184 Indonesian control samples. Conclusions Most of the previously reported RP1 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, and appear to cluster in exon 4. Here, we identified a novel homozygous p.R338* mutation in exon 4 of RP1, and speculate on the mutational mechanisms of different RP1 mutations underlying dominant and recessive RP. PMID:23077400

  2. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Bilateral Idiopathic Demyelinating Optic Neuritis in a 6-Year-Old Boy with OFD1 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Zheng, Cong; Liu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    To identify the cause of a sudden binocular vision decrease in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis is difficult, but early diagnosis and treatment significantly improve the prognosis. Here, we report a 6-year-old boy with a progressive binocular vision decrease in 38 days. The patient had a history of night blindness, a mottled retina without pigmentation, extinguished electroretinographic response, tritanopia, and an absent ellipsoid zone outside the macula fovea by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. His condition was diagnosed as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (IDON). After corticosteroid therapy, visual acuity recovered to OD: 0.5 and OS: 0.4. Genetic analysis revealed a G985S variant in the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 gene. Ophthalmologists should pay attention to the existence of other complications in patients with RP who suffer a sudden decrease in vision. A gene survey can help clarify this diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with RP and ON, as well as genetic testing results. Nevertheless, the pathogenicity of the variant needs further confirmation. PMID:28191358

  3. Autosomal recessive posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa caused by novel mutations in the FLVCR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz; Wong, Lee-Jun; Wei Zhang, Victor; Lewis, Richard Alan; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe sensory ataxia, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Recently, mutations in the FLVCR1 gene were described in four families with this condition. We investigated the molecular basis and studied the phenotype of PCARP in a new family. The proband is a 33-year-old woman presented with sensory polyneuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The constellation of clinical findings with normal metabolic and genetic evaluation, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis and normal levels of phytanic acid and vitamin E, prompted us to seek other causes of our patient's condition. Sequencing of FLVCR1 in the proband and targeted mutation testing in her two affected siblings revealed two novel variants, c.1547G > A (p.R516Q) and c.1593+5_+8delGTAA predicted, respectively, to be highly conserved throughout evolution and affecting the normal splicing, therefore, deleterious. This study supports the pathogenic role of FLVCR1 in PCARP and expands the molecular and clinical spectra of PCARP. We show for the first time that nontransmembrane domain (TMD) mutations in the FLVCR1 can cause PCARP, suggesting different mechanisms for pathogenicity. Our clinical data reveal that impaired sensation can be part of the phenotypic spectrum of PCARP. This study along with previously reported cases suggests that targeted sequencing of the FLVCR1 gene should be considered in patients with severe sensory ataxia, RP, and peripheral sensory neuropathy.

  4. Macular Cone Abnormalities in Retinitis Pigmentosa with Preserved Central Vision Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Yukiko; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Takayama, Kohei; Uji, Akihito; Oishi, Akio; Ogino, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess macular photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with preserved central vision using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods Fourteen eyes of 14 patients with RP (best-corrected visual acuity 20/20 or better) and 12 eyes of 12 volunteers underwent a full ophthalmologic examination, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and imaging with a prototype AO-SLO system. Cone density and spatial organization of the cone mosaic were assessed using AO-SLO images. Results In 3 eyes with RP and preserved central vision, cones formed a mostly regular mosaic pattern with small patchy dark areas, and in 10 eyes, the cone mosaic patterns were less regular, and large dark regions with missing cones were apparent. Only one eye with RP demonstrated a normal, regular cone mosaic pattern. In eyes with RP, cone density was significantly lower at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea compared to normal eyes (P<0.001 and 0.021, respectively). At 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea, a decreased number of cones had 6 neighbors in eyes with RP (P = 0.002 for both). Greater decrease in cone density was related to disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment (IS) ellipsoid band on SD-OCT images (P = 0.044); however, dark regions were seen on AO-SLO even in areas of continuous IS ellipsoid on SD-OCT. Decreased cone density correlated thinner outer nuclear layer (P = 0.029) and thinner inner segment and outer segment thickness (P = 0.011) on SD-OCT. Conclusions Cone density is decreased and the regularity of the cone mosaic spatial arrangement is disrupted in eyes with RP, even when visual acuity and foveal sensitivity are good. AO-SLO imaging is a sensitive quantitative tool for detecting photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with RP. PMID:24260224

  5. Reported effects of non-traditional treatments and complementary and alternative medicine by retinitis pigmentosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Ava K; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2011-01-01

    Background Benefits of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)-related interventions have been demonstrated for patients with chronic, systemic diseases in which stress, anxiety and disability are prevalent. Subjects with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) commonly indicate that they have ‘good’ and ‘bad’ vision days, stating that stress causes a decrease in vision and that vision improves when the stress is alleviated. We assessed CAM use by RP patients and its perceived effectiveness. Methods We enquired about nine CAM areas: meditation, mind-body therapies, yoga, movement therapies, energy therapies, acupuncture, massage therapy, spirituality/religion and herbal therapies/aromatherapy. Ninety-six RP patients with any level of vision completed an anonymous internet survey. Results Ninety-five per cent of respondents tried at least one of the nine CAM areas. Seventy-five per cent have used nutritional supplements, including lutein (47 per cent), bilberry (32), vitamin A palmitate (36) and docosahexaenoic acid (23 per cent). Some tried meditation (47) and yoga (31 per cent). Stress and anxiety levels were reported as improved in 93, 92 and 87 per cent of those who used yoga, meditation and mind-body therapies, respectively. Many of those who tried mind-body therapies (40) or acupuncture (50 per cent), used it with a desire to fight RP. Vision was subjectively affected in 65 per cent of acupuncture users and from 20 to 35 per cent of the users of the other CAM areas. Those who indicated that their vision was affected by at least one type of CAM (35 per cent) were statistically significantly more likely to require magnification to read (that is, they had lost more vision and RP had progressed), than those who did not believe vision was impacted (59 versus 84 per cent). Conclusions RP patients are using CAM and are experiencing some impact on vision and physical/emotional well-being. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of its use. Clinical trials with CAM

  6. RP1L1 variants are associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa and occult macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Alice E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Mackay, Donna S; Wright, Genevieve A; Waseem, Naushin H; Michaelides, Michel; Holder, Graham E; Robson, Anthony G; Moore, Anthony T; Plagnol, Vincent; Webster, Andrew R

    2013-03-01

    In one consanguineous family with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a condition characterized by progressive visual loss due to retinal degeneration, homozygosity mapping, and candidate gene sequencing suggested a novel locus. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshifting mutation, c.601delG, p.Lys203Argfs*28, in RP1L1 encoding RP 1-like1, a photoreceptor-specific protein. A screen of a further 285 unrelated individuals with autosomal recessive RP identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense variant, c.1637G>C, p.Ser546Thr, in RP1L1. A distinct retinal disorder, occult macular dystrophy (OCMD) solely affects the central retinal cone photoreceptors and has previously been reported to be associated with variants in the same gene. The association between mutations in RP1L1 and the disorder OCMD was explored by screening a cohort of 28 unrelated individuals with the condition; 10 were found to harbor rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.5% in the 1,000 genomes dataset) heterozygous RP1L1 missense variants. Analysis of family members revealed many unaffected relatives harboring the same variant. Linkage analysis excluded the possibility of a recessive mode of inheritance, and sequencing of RP1, a photoreceptor protein that interacts with RP1L1, excluded a digenic mechanism involving this gene. These findings imply an important and diverse role for RP1L1 in human retinal physiology and disease.

  7. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to evaluate the pathophysiology of TRNT1-associated Retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tasneem P; Wiley, Luke A; Whitmore, S Scott; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Oppedal, Douglas J; Daggett, Heather T; Mullins, Robert F; Tucker, Budd A; Stone, Edwin M

    2017-03-18

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of monogenic disorders characterized by progressive death of the light-sensing photoreceptor cells of the outer neural retina. We recently identified novel hypomorphic mutations in the tRNA Nucleotidyl Transferase, CCA-Adding 1 (TRNT1) gene that cause early-onset RP. To model this disease in vitro, we generated patient-specific iPSCs and iPSC-derived retinal organoids from dermal fibroblasts of patients with molecularly confirmed TRNT1-associated RP. Pluripotency was confirmed using rt-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and a TaqMan Scorecard Assay. Mutations in TRNT1 caused reduced levels of full-length TRNT1 protein and expression of a truncated smaller protein in both patient-specific iPSCs and iPSC-derived retinal organoids. Patient-specific iPSCs and iPSC-derived retinal organoids exhibited a deficit in autophagy, as evidenced by aberrant accumulation of LC3-II and elevated levels of oxidative stress. Autologous stem cell-based disease modeling will provide a platform for testing multiple avenues of treatment in patients suffering from TRNT1-associated RP.

  8. Pathogenic Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 Predominantly Result in Loss of RP2 Protein Stability in Human and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Qin, Yayun; Yu, Shanshan; Soares, Dinesh C; Yang, Lifang; Weng, Jun; Li, Chang; Gao, Meng; Lu, Zhaojing; Hu, Xuebin; Liu, Xiliang; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Jing Y; Shu, Xinhua; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Mugen

    2017-02-16

    Mutations in retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) account for 10-20% of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP) cases. The encoded RP2 protein is implicated in ciliary trafficking of myristoylated and prenylated proteins in photoreceptor cells. To date, over 70 mutations in RP2 have been identified. How these mutations disrupt the function of RP2 is not fully understood. Here, we report a novel in-frame 12-bp deletion (c.357_368del, p.Pro120_Gly123del) in zebrafish rp2 The mutant zebrafish shows reduced rod phototransduction proteins and progressive retinal degeneration. Interestingly, the protein level of mutant Rp2 is almost undetectable, while its mRNA level is near normal, indicating a possible post-translational effect of the mutation. Consistent with this hypothesis, the equivalent 12-bp deletion in human RP2 markedly impairs RP2 protein stability and reduces its protein level. Furthermore, we found that a majority of the RP2 pathogenic mutations (including missense, single-residue deletion and C-terminal truncation mutations) severely destabilize the RP2 protein. The destabilized RP2 mutant proteins are degraded via the proteasome pathway, resulting in dramatically decreased protein levels. The remaining non-destabilizing mutations T87I, R118H/G/L/C, E138G and R211H/L are suggested to impair the interaction between RP2 and its protein partners (such as ARL3) or with as yet unknown partners. By utilizing a combination of in silico, in vitro and in vivo approaches, our work comprehensively indicates that loss of RP2 protein structural stability is the predominating pathogenic consequence for most RP2 mutations. Our study also reveals a role of the C-terminal domain of RP2 in maintaining the overall protein stability.

  9. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Almoguera, Berta; Li, Jiankang; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies.

  10. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  11. ℮-conome: an automated tissue counting platform of cone photoreceptors for rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by the sequential loss of rod and cone photoreceptors. The preservation of cones would prevent blindness due to their essential role in human vision. Rod-derived Cone Viability Factor is a thioredoxin-like protein that is secreted by rods and is involved in cone survival. To validate the activity of Rod-derived Cone Viability Factors (RdCVFs) as therapeutic agents for treating retinitis Pigmentosa, we have developed e-conome, an automated cell counting platform for retinal flat mounts of rodent models of cone degeneration. This automated quantification method allows for faster data analysis thereby accelerating translational research. Methods An inverted fluorescent microscope, motorized and coupled to a CCD camera records images of cones labeled with fluorescent peanut agglutinin lectin on flat-mounted retinas. In an average of 300 fields per retina, nine Z-planes at magnification X40 are acquired after two-stage autofocus individually for each field. The projection of the stack of 9 images is subject to a threshold, filtered to exclude aberrant images based on preset variables. The cones are identified by treating the resulting image using 13 variables empirically determined. The cone density is calculated over the 300 fields. Results The method was validated by comparison to the conventional stereological counting. The decrease in cone density in rd1 mouse was found to be equivalent to the decrease determined by stereological counting. We also studied the spatiotemporal pattern of the degeneration of cones in the rd1 mouse and show that while the reduction in cone density starts in the central part of the retina, cone degeneration progresses at the same speed over the whole retinal surface. We finally show that for mice with an inactivation of the Nucleoredoxin-like genes Nxnl1 or Nxnl2 encoding RdCVFs, the loss of cones is more pronounced in the ventral retina. Conclusion The automated platform ℮-conome used

  12. Animals deficient in C2Orf71, an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa-associated locus, develop severe early-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kevany, Brian M; Zhang, Ning; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-05-01

    Genetic mapping was recently used to identify the underlying cause for a previously uncharacterized cohort of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa cases. Genetic mapping of affected individuals resulted in the identification of an uncharacterized gene, C2Orf71, as the causative locus. However, initial homology searches failed to reveal similarities to any previously characterized protein or domain. To address this issue, we characterized the mouse homolog, BC027072. Immunohistochemistry with a custom polyclonal antibody showed staining localized to the inner segments (IS) of photoreceptor cells, as well as the outer segments (OS) of cone cells. A knockout mouse line (BC(-/-)) was generated and demonstrated that loss of this gene results in a severe, early-onset retinal degeneration. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed disorganized OS as early as 3 weeks with complete loss by 24 weeks of age. EM micrographs displayed packets of cellular material containing OS discs or IS organelles in the OS region and abnormal retinal pigmented epithelium cells. Analyses of retinoids and rhodopsin levels showed <20% in BC(-/-) versus wild-type mice early in development. Electroretinograms demonstrated that affected mice were virtually non-responsive to light by 8 weeks of age. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of ocular gene expression in BC(-/-) mice revealed clues to the causes of the progressive retinal degenerations. Although its function remains unknown, this protein appears essential for normal OS development/maintenance and vision in humans and mice. RNAseq data are available in the GEO database under accession: GSE63810.

  13. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Riess, O.; Weber, B.; Hayden, M.R. ); Noerremoelle, A. ); Musarella, M.A. )

    1992-10-01

    The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons including 196 bp of the 5[prime] region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected individuals of seven different ancestries. However, a frequent intronic and two exonic polymorphisms (Leu[sup 489][yields]Gln and Gly[sup 842][yields]Gly) were identified. Segregation analysis using these polymorphic sites excludes linkage of ARRP to the PDEB gene in a family with two affected children. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The retinitis pigmentosa protein RP2 interacts with polycystin 2 and regulates cilia-mediated vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Toby; Zhou, Weibin; Jenkins, Paul; Liu, Chia-Jen; Swaroop, Anand; Khanna, Hemant; Martens, Jeffrey; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Margolis, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Ciliopathies represent a growing group of human genetic diseases whose etiology lies in defects in ciliogenesis or ciliary function. Given the established entity of renal–retinal ciliopathies, we have been examining the role of cilia-localized proteins mutated in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in regulating renal ciliogenesis or cilia-dependent signaling cascades. Specifically, this study examines the role of the RP2 gene product with an emphasis on renal and vertebrate development. We demonstrate that in renal epithelia, RP2 localizes to the primary cilium through dual acylation of the amino-terminus. We also show that RP2 forms a calcium-sensitive complex with the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease protein polycystin 2. Ablation of RP2 by shRNA promotes swelling of the cilia tip that may be a result of aberrant trafficking of polycystin 2 and other ciliary proteins. Morpholino-mediated repression of RP2 expression in zebrafish results in multiple developmental defects that have been previously associated with ciliary dysfunction, such as hydrocephalus, kidney cysts and situs inversus. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to our observed physical interaction between RP2 and polycystin 2, dual morpholino-mediated knockdown of polycystin 2 and RP2 results in enhanced situs inversus, indicating that these two genes also regulate a common developmental process. This work suggests that RP2 may be an important regulator of ciliary function through its association with polycystin 2 and provides evidence of a further link between retinal and renal cilia function. PMID:20729296

  15. Whole exome sequencing identified novel CRB1 mutations in Chinese and Indian populations with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin; Yang, Yeming; Huang, Lulin; Zhai, Yaru; Li, Jie; Jiang, Zhilin; Gong, Bo; Fang, Hao; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun; Zhou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a leading cause of inherited blindness characterized by progressive degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells. This study aims to identify genetic mutations in a Chinese family RP-2236, an Indian family RP-IC-90 and 100 sporadic Indian individuals with autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Whole exome sequencing was performed on the index patients of RP-2236, RP-IC-90 and all of the 100 sporadic Indian patients. Direct Sanger sequencing was used to validate the mutations identified. Four novel mutations and one reported mutation in the crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene, which has been known to cause severe retinal dystrophies, were identified. A novel homozygous splicing mutation c.2129-1G>C was found in the three patients In family RP-2236. A homozygous point mutation p.R664C was found in RP-IC-90. A novel homozygous mutation p.G1310C was identified in patient I-44, while novel compound heterozygous mutations p.N629D and p.A593T were found in patient I-7. All mutations described above were not present in the 1000 normal controls. In conclusion, we identified four novel mutations in CRB1 in a cohort of RP patients from the Chinese and Indian populations. Our data enlarges the CRB1 mutation spectrums and may provide new target loci for RP diagnose and treatment. PMID:27670293

  16. The transplantation of human fetal neuroretinal cells in advanced retinitis pigmentosa patients: results of a long-term safety study.

    PubMed

    Das, T; del Cerro, M; Jalali, S; Rao, V S; Gullapalli, V K; Little, C; Loreto, D A; Sharma, S; Sreedharan, A; del Cerro, C; Rao, G N

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term safety of transplanting human fetal neuroretinal cells (14 to 18 week gestational age) into a series of patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa (RP). After obtaining informed consent, both hosts and mothers of donors were screened for transmissible diseases. Pre- and postoperative clinical exams, visual acuity, electroretinograms, and fluorescein angiograms were performed and visual field testing was attempted in each case. Surgically, an anterior approach through pars plana ciliaris was used. A retinotomy was performed in the paramacular area and a two-function cannula was introduced into the subretinal space to deliver a suspension of donor cells. The cell suspension carried approximately 4000 cells/microl; the volume injected did not exceed 150 microl. The patients were examined for periods ranging from 12 to 40 months posttransplantation. To date, no evidence of inflammation, infection, or overt rejection of the graft was noted in the host eye, neither was any change observed in the contralateral, unoperated eye. In conclusion, neuroretinal cells were injected into the subretinal space of 14 patients with advanced RP with no clinical appearance of detrimental effects at the time of surgery or up to 40 months postinjection except in 1 patient who developed retinal detachment. This sets the stage for a phase II clinical trial to determine the possible beneficial effects of this procedure in patients blinded by degenerative retinal disease.

  17. Identification of the Photoreceptor Transcriptional Co-Repressor SAMD11 as Novel Cause of Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Corton, M.; Avila-Fernández, A.; Campello, L.; Sánchez, M.; Benavides, B.; López-Molina, M. I.; Fernández-Sánchez, L.; Sánchez-Alcudia, R.; da Silva, L. R. J.; Reyes, N.; Martín-Garrido, E.; Zurita, O.; Fernández-San José, P.; Pérez-Carro, R.; García-García, F.; Dopazo, J.; García-Sandoval, B.; Cuenca, N.; Ayuso, C.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most frequent form of inherited retinal dystrophy is characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Many genes have been implicated in RP development, but several others remain to be identified. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping, whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequencing, we found a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in SAMD11 in five individuals diagnosed with adult-onset RP from two unrelated consanguineous Spanish families. SAMD11 is ortholog to the mouse major retinal SAM domain (mr-s) protein that is implicated in CRX-mediated transcriptional regulation in the retina. Accordingly, protein-protein network analysis revealed a significant interaction of SAMD11 with CRX. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed strong expression of SAMD11 in human retina. Immunolocalization studies revealed SAMD11 was detected in the three nuclear layers of the human retina and interestingly differential expression between cone and rod photoreceptors was observed. Our study strongly implicates SAMD11 as novel cause of RP playing an important role in the pathogenesis of human degeneration of photoreceptors. PMID:27734943

  18. Loss of HCN1 enhances disease progression in mouse models of CNG channel-linked retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Asteriti, Sabrina; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Herms, Jochen; Seeliger, Mathias W; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-03-15

    Most inherited blinding diseases are characterized by compromised retinal function and progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. However, the factors that affect the life span of photoreceptors in such degenerative retinal diseases are rather poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) in this context. HCN1 is known to adjust retinal function under mesopic conditions, and although it is expressed at high levels in rod and cone photoreceptor inner segments, no association with any retinal disorder has yet been found. We investigated the effects of an additional genetic deletion of HCN1 on the function and survival of photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGB1-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We found that the absence of HCN1 in Cngb1 knockout (KO) mice exacerbated photoreceptor degeneration. The deleterious effect was reduced by expression of HCN1 using a viral vector. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HCN1 also enhanced rod degeneration in Cngb1 KO mice. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that the membrane potentials of Cngb1 KO and Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO rods were both significantly depolarized. We also found evidence for altered calcium homeostasis and increased activation of the protease calpain in Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO mice. Finally, the deletion of HCN1 also exacerbated degeneration of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGA3-linked achromatopsia. Our results identify HCN1 as a major modifier of photoreceptor degeneration and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels may enhance disease progression in RP and achromatopsia patients.

  19. Characterization of macular structure and function in two Swedish families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Abdulridha-Aboud, Wissam; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the phenotype in two families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) focusing on macular structure and function. Methods Clinical data were collected at the Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden, for affected and unaffected family members from two pedigrees with adRP. Examinations included optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Molecular genetic screening was performed for known mutations associated with adRP. Results The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant in both families. The members of the family with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene had clinical features characteristic of RP, with severely reduced retinal rod and cone function. The degree of deterioration correlated well with increasing age. The mfERG showed only centrally preserved macular function that correlated well with retinal thinning on OCT. The family with a mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene had an extreme intrafamilial variability of the phenotype, with more severe disease in the younger generations. OCT showed pathology, but the degree of morphological changes was not correlated with age or with the mfERG results. The mother, with a de novo mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene, had a normal ffERG, and her retinal degeneration was detected merely with the reduced mfERG. Conclusions These two families demonstrate the extreme inter- and intrafamilial variability in the clinical phenotype of adRP. This is the first Swedish report of the clinical phenotype associated with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene. Our results indicate that methods for assessment of the central retinal structure and function may improve the detection and characterization of the RP phenotype. PMID:27212874

  20. Analysis of RP2 and RPGR Mutations in Five X-Linked Chinese Families with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wu, Xiaofei; Shen, Di; Dong, Lijin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Li, Ningdong

    2017-03-15

    Mutations in RP2 and RPGR genes are responsible for the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). In this study, we analyzed the RP2 and RPGR gene mutations in five Han Chinese families with XLRP. An approximately 17Kb large deletion including the exon 4 and exon 5 of RP2 gene was found in an XLRP family. In addition, four frameshift mutations including three novel mutations of c.1059 + 1 G > T, c.2002dupC and c.2236_2237del CT, as well as a previously reported mutation of c.2899delG were detected in the RPGR gene in the other four families. Our study further expands the mutation spectrum of RP2 and RPGR, and will be helpful for further study molecular pathogenesis of XLRP.

  1. Analysis of RP2 and RPGR Mutations in Five X-Linked Chinese Families with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wu, Xiaofei; Shen, Di; Dong, Lijin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Li, Ningdong

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in RP2 and RPGR genes are responsible for the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). In this study, we analyzed the RP2 and RPGR gene mutations in five Han Chinese families with XLRP. An approximately 17Kb large deletion including the exon 4 and exon 5 of RP2 gene was found in an XLRP family. In addition, four frameshift mutations including three novel mutations of c.1059 + 1 G > T, c.2002dupC and c.2236_2237del CT, as well as a previously reported mutation of c.2899delG were detected in the RPGR gene in the other four families. Our study further expands the mutation spectrum of RP2 and RPGR, and will be helpful for further study molecular pathogenesis of XLRP. PMID:28294154

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid phospholipid differentially modulates the conformation of G90V and N55K rhodopsin mutants associated with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Herrera-Hernández, María Guadalupe; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2017-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual photoreceptor of the retinal rod cells that mediates dim light vision and a prototypical member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The structural stability and functional performance of rhodopsin are modulated by membrane lipids. Docosahexaenoic acid has been shown to interact with native rhodopsin but no direct evidence has been established on the effect of such lipid on the stability and regeneration of rhodopsin mutants associated with retinal diseases. The stability and regeneration of two thermosensitive mutants G90V and N55K, associated with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa, have been analyzed in docosohexaenoic phospholipid (1,2-didocosa-hexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DDHA-PC) liposomes. G90V mutant reconstituted in DDHA-PC liposomes significantly increased its thermal stability, but N55K mutant showed similar thermal sensitivity both in dodecyl maltoside detergent solution and in DDHA-PC liposomes. The retinal release process, measured by fluorescence spectroscopy, became faster in the lipid system for the two mutants. The opsin conformation was stabilized for the G90V mutant allowing improved retinal uptake whereas no chromophore binding could be detected for N55K opsin after photoactivation. The results emphasize the distinct role of DHA on different phenotypic rhodopsin mutations associated with classical (G90V) and sector (N55K) retinitis pigmentosa.

  3. Identification of novel X-linked gain-of-function RPGR-ORF15 mutation in Italian family with retinitis pigmentosa and pathologic myopia

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Barbaro, Vanessa; De Nadai, Katia; Lavezzo, Enrico; Toppo, Stefano; Chizzolini, Marzio; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new pathogenic variant in the mutational hot spot exon ORF15 of retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene within an Italian family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP), detailing its distinctive genotype-phenotype correlation with pathologic myopia (PM). All members of this RP-PM family underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. The entire open reading frames of RPGR and retinitis pigmentosa 2 genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. A novel frame-shift mutation in exon ORF15 of RPGR gene (c.2091_2092insA; p.A697fs) was identified as hemizygous variant in the male proband with RP, and as heterozygous variant in the females of this pedigree who invariably exhibited symmetrical PM in both eyes. The c.2091_2092insA mutation coherently co-segregated with the observed phenotypes. These findings expand the spectrum of X-linked RP variants. Interestingly, focusing on Caucasian ethnicity, just three RPGR mutations are hitherto reported in RP-PM families: one of these is located in exon ORF15, but none appears to be characterized by a high penetrance of PM trait as observed in the present, relatively small, pedigree. The geno-phenotypic attributes of this heterozygosity suggest that gain-of-function mechanism could give rise to PM via a degenerative cell-cell remodeling of the retinal structures. PMID:27995965

  4. Autofluorescence Imaging and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Incomplete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness and Comparison with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, ROYCE W. S.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; LAZOW, MARGOT A.; RAMACHANDRAN, RITHU; LIMA, LUIZ H.; HWANG, JOHN C.; SCHUBERT, CARL; BRAUNSTEIN, ALEXANDRA; ALLIKMETS, RANDO; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that the evaluation of retinal structure can have diagnostic value in differentiating between incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To compare retinal thickness differences between patients with CSNB2 and myopic controls. DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study. METHODS Ten eyes of 5 patients diagnosed with CSNB2 (4 X-linked recessive, 1 autosomal recessive) and 6 eyes of 3 patients with RP (2 autosomal dominant, 1 autosomal recessive) were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Diagnoses of CSNB2 and RP were confirmed by full-field electroretinography (ERG). Manual segmentation of retinal layers, aided by a computer program, was performed by 2 professional segmenters on SD OCT images of all CSNB2 patients and 4 age-similar, normal myopic controls. Seven patients were screened for mutations with congenital stationary night blindness and RP genotyping arrays. RESULTS Patients with CSNB2 had specific findings on SD OCT and FAF that were distinct from those found in RP. CSNB2 patients showed qualitatively normal SD OCT results with preserved photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction, whereas this junction was lost in RP patients. In addition, CSNB2 patients had normal FAF images, whereas patients with RP demonstrated a ring of increased autofluorescence around the macula. On SD OCT segmentation, the inner and outer retinal layers of both X-linked recessive and autosomal recessive CSNB2 patients were thinner compared with those of normal myopic controls, with means generally outside of normal 95% confidence intervals. The only layers that demonstrated similar thickness between CSNB2 patients and the controls were the retinal nerve fiber layer and, temporal to the fovea, the combined outer segment layer and retinal pigment epithelium. A proband and his 2 affected brothers from a family segregating X-linked recessive

  5. Mutation analysis in 129 genes associated with other forms of retinal dystrophy in 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa based on exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Shiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Jia, Xiaoyun; Yang, Jianhua; Guo, Xiangming; Yin, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in 60 known genes were previously identified by exome sequencing in 79 of 157 families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This study analyzed variants in 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy in the same cohort. Methods Apart from the 73 genes previously analyzed, a further 129 genes responsible for other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy were selected based on RetNet. Variants in the 129 genes determined by whole exome sequencing were selected and filtered by bioinformatics analysis. Candidate variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and validated by analysis of available family members and controls. Results A total of 90 candidate variants were present in the 129 genes. Sanger sequencing confirmed 83 of the 90 variants. Analysis of family members and controls excluded 76 of these 83 variants. The remaining seven variants were considered to be potential pathogenic mutations; these were c.899A>G, c.1814C>G, and c.2107C>T in BBS2; c.1073C>T and c.1669C>T in INPP5E; and c.3582C>G and c.5704–5C>G in CACNA1F. Six of these seven mutations were novel. The mutations were detected in five unrelated patients without a family history, including three patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in BBS2 and INPP5E, and two patients with hemizygous mutations in CACNA1F. None of the patients had mutations in the genes associated with autosome dominant retinal dystrophy. Conclusions Only a small portion of patients with RP, about 3% (5/157), had causative mutations in the 129 genes associated with other forms of hereditary retinal dystrophy. PMID:25999675

  6. Functional Analysis of Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 (RP2) Protein Reveals Variable Pathogenic Potential of Disease-Associated Missense Variants

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suresh B.; Hurd, Toby W.; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos A.; Khanna, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    Genetic mutations are frequently associated with diverse phenotypic consequences, which limits the interpretation of the consequence of a variation in patients. Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene are associated with X-linked RP, which is a phenotypically heterogenic form of retinal degeneration. The purpose of this study was to assess the functional consequence of disease-associated mutations in the RP2 gene using an in vivo assay. Morpholino-mediated depletion of rp2 in zebrafish resulted in perturbations in photoreceptor development and microphthalmia (small eye). Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence analyses revealed defective photoreceptor outer segment development and lack of expression of photoreceptor-specific proteins. The retinopathy phenotype could be rescued by expressing the wild-type human RP2 protein. Notably, the tested RP2 mutants exhibited variable degrees of rescue of rod versus cone photoreceptor development as well as microphthalmia. Our results suggest that RP2 plays a key role in photoreceptor development and maintenance in zebrafish and that the clinical heterogeneity associated with RP2 mutations may, in part, result from its potentially distinct functional relevance in rod versus cone photoreceptors. PMID:21738648

  7. Necrotic enlargement of cone photoreceptor cells and the release of high-mobility group box-1 in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Ikeda, Y; Nakatake, S; Tachibana, T; Fujiwara, K; Yoshida, N; Notomi, S; Nakao, S; Hisatomi, T; Miller, J W; Vavvas, DG; Sonoda, KH; Ishibashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerations resulting form rod and cone photoreceptor cell death. The rod cell death due to deleterious genetic mutations has been shown to occur mainly through apoptosis, whereas the mechanisms and features of the secondary cone cell death have not been fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that the cone cell death in rd10 mice, an animal model of RP, involves necrotic features and is partly mediated by the receptor interacting protein kinase. However, the relevancy of necrotic cone cell death in human RP patients remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that dying cone cells in rd10 mice exhibited cellular enlargement, along with necrotic changes such as cellular swelling and mitochondrial rupture. In human eyes, live imaging of cone cells by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed significantly increased percentages of enlarged cone cells in the RP patients compared with the control subjects. The vitreous of the RP patients contained significantly higher levels of high-mobility group box-1, which is released extracellularly associated with necrotic cell death. These findings suggest that necrotic enlargement of cone cells is involved in the process of cone degeneration, and that necrosis may be a novel target to prevent or delay the loss of cone-mediated central vision in RP. PMID:27551484

  8. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  9. A ninth locus (RP18) for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa maps in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Schwartz, M; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1996-08-01

    We studied a large Danish family of seven generations in which autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a heterogeneous genetic form of retinal dystrophy, was segregating. After linkage had been excluded to all known adRP loci on chromosomes 3q, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 17p, 17q and 19q, a genome screening was performed. Positive lod scores suggestive of linkage with values ranging between Z = 1.58-5.36 at theta = 0.04-0.20 were obtained for eight loci on proximal 1p and 1q. Close linkage without recombination and a maximum lod score of 7.22 at theta = 0.00 was found between the adRP locus (RP18) in this family and D1S498 which is on 1q very near the centromere. Analysis of multiply informative meioses suggests that in this family D1S534 and D1S305 flank RP18 in interval 1p13-q23. No linkage has been found to loci from this chromosomal region in six other medium sized adRP families in which the disease locus has been excluded from all known chromosomal regions harbouring an adRP gene or locus suggesting that there is (at least) one further adRP locus to be mapped in the future.

  10. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  11. Postmortem study of ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa by mutation of the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, T; Uchihara, T; Kumagai, J; Shiojiri, T; Pang, J; Arita, M; Arai, H; Hayashi, M; Kiyosawa, M; Okeda, R; Mizusawa, H

    2000-01-01

    A new syndrome of ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa with vitamin E deficiency caused by the missense mutation of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) gene was recently proposed. After studying the first postmortem case with this mutation pathologically and biochemically, whether the symptoms can be treated by supplementation of vitamin E or not is discussed. The major pathological findings were retinal atrophy; severe dying back-type degeneration of the posterior column; and massive accumulation of lipofuscin in neurons including dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which were almost identical to those in vitamin E deficient animals and patients with fat malabsorption. Also, mild loss of Purkinje cells was noted. Because robust expression of α-TTP was detected in the cerebellum as well as in the liver and the tissue concentration of vitamin E in the cerebellum was still low even after oral supplementation, the mild Purkinje cell loss might be related to the mutant α-TTP in the cerebellum. By contrast, in the DRG, thought to be mainly responsible for ataxia, no expression of α-TTP was detected, and the tissue concentration of vitamin E increased to normal after supplementation. It is therefore considered that oral supplementation of vitamin E should effectively counteract the progression of ataxia.

 PMID:10727494

  12. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials on Safety and Efficacy of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Marta; Mantelli, Flavio; Merlo, Daniela; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Several treatments have been proposed to slow down progression of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal degenerative condition leading to severe visual impairment. The aim of this study is to systematically review data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating safety and efficacy of medical interventions for the treatment of RP. Methods. Randomized clinical trials on medical treatments for syndromic and nonsyndromic RP published up to December 2014 were included in the review. Visual acuity, visual field, electroretinogram, and adverse events were used as outcome measures. Results. The 19 RCTs included in this systematic review included trials on hyperbaric oxygen delivery, topical brimonidine tartrate, vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid, gangliosides, lutein, oral nilvadipine, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and valproic acid. All treatments proved safe but did not show significant benefit on visual function. Long term supplementation with vitamin A showed a significantly slower decline rate in electroretinogram amplitude. Conclusions. Although all medical treatments for RP appear safe, evidence emerging from RCTs is limited since they do not present comparable results suitable for quantitative statistical analysis. The limited number of RCTs, the poor clinical results, and the heterogeneity among studies negatively influence the strength of recommendations for the long term management of RP patients. PMID:26339504

  13. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  14. Intravitreal Injection of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Patients with Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa; a Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Satarian, Leila; Nourinia, Ramin; Safi, Sare; Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Jarughi, Neda; Daftarian, Narsis; Arab, Leila; Aghdami, Nasser; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety of a single intravitreal injection of autologous bone Marrow Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: A prospective, phase I, nonrandomized, open-label study was conducted on 3 eyes of 3 volunteers with advanced RP. Visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, fundus examination, optical coherence tomography, fundus auto-fluorescence, fluorescein angiography and multifocal electroretinography were performed before and after an intravitreal injection of approximately one-million MSCs. The patients were followed for one year. Further evaluation of MSCs was performed by injection of these cells into the mouse vitreous cavity. Results: No, adverse events were observed in eyes of 2 out of 3 patients after transplantation of MSCs. These patients reported improvements in perception of the light after two weeks, which lasted for 3 months. However, severe fibrous tissue proliferation was observed in the vitreous cavity and retrolental space of the third patient's eye, which led to tractional retinal detachment (TRD), iris neovascularization and formation of mature cataract. Injection of this patient's MSCs into the vitreous cavity of mice also resulted in fibrosis; however, intravitreal injections of the two other patients' cells into the mouse vitreous did not generate any fibrous tissue. Conclusion: Intravitreal injection of autologous bone marrow MSCs into patients' eyes with advanced RP does not meet safety standards. Major side effects of this therapy can include fibrosis and TRD. We propose thorough evaluation of MSCs prior to transplantation by intravitreal injection in the laboratory animals.\\ PMID:28299008

  15. Long-term rescue of cone photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2)-knockout mice by gene replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mookherjee, Suddhasil; Hiriyanna, Suja; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Li, Linjing; Li, Yichao; Li, Wei; Qian, Haohua; Li, Tiansen; Khanna, Hemant; Colosi, Peter; Swaroop, Anand; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative diseases are especially attractive targets for gene replacement therapy, which appears to be clinically effective for several monogenic diseases. X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) are relatively severe blinding disorders, resulting from progressive photoreceptor dysfunction primarily caused by mutations in RPGR or RP2 gene. With a goal to develop gene therapy for the XLRP-RP2 disease, we first performed detailed characterization of the Rp2-knockout (Rp2-KO) mice and observed early-onset cone dysfunction, which was followed by progressive cone degeneration, mimicking cone vision impairment in XLRP patients. The mice also exhibited distinct and significantly delayed falling phase of photopic b-wave of electroretinogram (ERG). Concurrently, we generated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying human RP2-coding sequence and demonstrated its ability to mediate stable RP2 protein expression in mouse photoreceptors. A long-term efficacy study was then conducted in Rp2-KO mice following AAV-RP2 vector administration. Preservation of cone function was achieved with a wide dose range over 18-month duration, as evidenced by photopic ERG and optomotor tests. The slower b-wave kinetics was also completely restored. Morphologically, the treatment preserved cone viability, corrected mis-trafficking of M-cone opsin and restored cone PDE6 expression. The therapeutic effect was achieved even in mice that received treatment at an advanced disease stage. The highest AAV-RP2 dose group demonstrated retinal toxicity, highlighting the importance of careful vector dosing in designing future human trials. The wide range of effective dose, a broad treatment window and long-lasting therapeutic effects should make the RP2 gene therapy attractive for clinical development. PMID:26358772

  16. Preserved functional and structural integrity of the papillomacular area correlates with better visual acuity in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Konieczka, K; Bojinova, R I; Valmaggia, C; Schorderet, D F; Todorova, M G

    2016-10-01

    PurposeLinking multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings with visual acuity in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients.DesignProspective, cross-sectional, nonintervention study.SubjectsPatients with typical RP and age-matched controls, who underwent SD-OCT (spectral domain OCT) and mfERG, were included.MethodsMfERG responses were averaged in three zones (zone 1 (0°-3°), zone 2 (3°-8°), and zone 3 (8°-15°)). Baseline-to-trough- (N1) and trough-to-peak amplitudes (N1P1) of the mfERG were compared with corresponding areas of the OCT. The papillomacular area (PMA) was analyzed separately. Correlations between best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, logMAR) and each parameter were determined.Main outcome measuresComparing structural (OCT) and functional (mfERG) measures with the BCVA.ResultsIn RP patients, the N1 and N1P1 responses showed positive association with the central retinal thickness outside zone 1 (P≤0.002), while the central N1 and the N1P1 responses in zones 1, 2, and 3-with the BCVA (P≤0.007). The integrity of the IS/OS line on OCT showed also a positive association with the BCVA (P<0.001). Isolated analysis of the PMA strengthened further the structure-function association with the BCVA (P≤0.037). Interactions between the BCVA and the OCT, respectively, the mfERG parameters were more pronounced in the RP subgroup without macular edema (P≤0.020).ConclusionIn RP patients, preserved structure-function of PMA, measured by mfERG amplitude and OCT retinal thickness, correlated well with the remaining BCVA. The subgroup analyses revealed stronger links between the examined parameters, in the RP subgroup without appearance of macular edema.

  17. Characterization of a canine model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa due to a PDE6A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tuntivanich, Nalinee; Pittler, Steven J.; Fischer, Andy J.; Omar, Ghezal; Kiupel, Matti; Weber, Arthur; Yao, Suxia; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Khan, Naheed Wali; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To characterize a canine model of autosomal recessive RP due to a PDE6A gene mutation. Methods Affected and breed- and age-matched control puppies were studied by electroretinography (ERG), light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and by assay for retinal PDE6 levels and enzymatic activity. Results The mutant puppies failed to develop normal rod-mediated ERG responses and had reduced light-adapted a-wave amplitudes from an early age. The residual ERG waveforms originated primarily from cone-driven responses. Development of photoreceptor outer segments was halted and rod cells were lost by apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a marked reduction in rod-opsin immunostaining outer segments and relative preservation of cones early in the disease process. With exception of rod bipolar cells that appeared to be reduced in number relatively early in the disease process other inner retinal cells were preserved in the early stages of the disease although there was marked and early activation of Müller glia. Western blotting showed that the PDE6A mutation not only resulted in a lack of PDE6A protein but the affected retinas also lacked the other PDE6 subunits, suggesting expression of PDE6A is required for normal expression of PDE6B and PDE6G. Affected retinas lacked PDE6 enzymatic activity. Conclusions This represents the first characterization of a PDE6A model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and the PDE6A mutant dog shows promise as a large animal model for investigation of therapies to rescue mutant rod photoreceptors and to preserve cone photoreceptors in the face a rapid loss of rod cells. PMID:18775863

  18. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kijas, James W; Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Pianta, Michael J; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Miller, Brian J; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2002-04-30

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies.

  19. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2005-04-05

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease.

  20. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease. PMID:15784735

  1. Mutations in ARL2BP, Encoding ADP-Ribosylation-Factor-Like 2 Binding Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Schwarz, Nele; Zelinger, Lina; Stern-Schneider, Gabriele; Shoemark, Amelia; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Gross, Menachem; Laxer, Uri; Sosna, Jacob; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Wilson, Robert; Kahn, Richard A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Wolfrum, Uwe; Banin, Eyal; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Sharon, Dror; Webster, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor death, which results in visual failure. Here, we used a combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify mutations in ARL2BP, which encodes an effector protein of the small GTPases ARL2 and ARL3, as causative for autosomal-recessive RP (RP66). In a family affected by RP and situs inversus, a homozygous, splice-acceptor mutation, c.101−1G>C, which alters pre-mRNA splicing of ARLBP2 in blood RNA, was identified. In another family, a homozygous c.134T>G (p.Met45Arg) mutation was identified. In the mouse retina, ARL2BP localized to the basal body and cilium-associated centriole of photoreceptors and the periciliary extension of the inner segment. Depletion of ARL2BP caused cilia shortening. Moreover, depletion of ARL2, but not ARL3, caused displacement of ARL2BP from the basal body, suggesting that ARL2 is vital for recruiting or anchoring ARL2BP at the base of the cilium. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the p.Met45Arg amino acid substitution reduced binding to ARL2 and caused the loss of ARL2BP localization at the basal body in ciliated nasal epithelial cells. These data demonstrate a role for ARL2BP and ARL2 in primary cilia function and that this role is essential for normal photoreceptor maintenance and function. PMID:23849777

  2. Towards an assistive peripheral visual prosthesis for long-term treatment of retinitis pigmentosa: evaluating mobility performance in immersive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, Marc Patrick H.; Boon, Mei-Ying; Matteucci, Paul B.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The prospective efficacy of a future peripheral retinal prosthesis complementing residual vision to raise mobility performance in non-end stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was evaluated using simulated prosthetic vision (SPV). Approach. Normally sighted volunteers were fitted with a wide-angle head-mounted display and carried out mobility tasks in photorealistic virtual pedestrian scenarios. Circumvention of low-lying obstacles, path following, and navigating around static and moving pedestrians were performed either with central simulated residual vision of 10° alone or enhanced by assistive SPV in the lower and lateral peripheral visual field (VF). Three layouts of assistive vision corresponding to hypothetical electrode array layouts were compared, emphasizing higher visual acuity, a wider visual angle, or eccentricity-dependent acuity across an intermediate angle. Movement speed, task time, distance walked and collisions with the environment were analysed as performance measures. Main results. Circumvention of low-lying obstacles was improved with all tested configurations of assistive SPV. Higher-acuity assistive vision allowed for greatest improvement in walking speeds—14% above that of plain residual vision, while only wide-angle and eccentricity-dependent vision significantly reduced the number of collisions—both by 21%. Navigating around pedestrians, there were significant reductions in collisions with static pedestrians by 33% and task time by 7.7% with the higher-acuity layout. Following a path, higher-acuity assistive vision increased walking speed by 9%, and decreased collisions with stationary cars by 18%. Significance. The ability of assistive peripheral prosthetic vision to improve mobility performance in persons with constricted VFs has been demonstrated. In a prospective peripheral visual prosthesis, electrode array designs need to be carefully tailored to the scope of tasks in which a device aims to assist. We posit that maximum

  3. PAP-1, the mutated gene underlying the RP9 form of dominant retinitis pigmentosa, is a splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Keen, T Jeffrey; Inglehearn, Chris F; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2004-11-01

    PAP-1 is an in vitro phosphorylation target of the Pim-1 oncogene. Although PAP-1 binds to Pim-1, it is not a substrate for phosphorylation by Pim-1 in vivo. PAP-1 has recently been implicated as the defective gene in RP9, one type of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). However, RP9 is a rare disease and only two missense mutations have been described, so the report of a link between PAP-1 and RP9 was tentative. The precise cellular role of PAP-1 was also unknown at that time. We now report that PAP-1 localizes in nuclear speckles containing the splicing factor SC35 and interacts directly with another splicing factor, U2AF35. Furthermore, we used in vitro and in vivo splicing assays to show that PAP-1 has an activity, which alters the pattern of pre-mRNA splicing and that this activity is dependent on the phosphorylation state of PAP-1. We used the same splicing assay to examine the activities of two mutant forms of PAP-1 found in RP9 patients. The results showed that while one of the mutations, H137L, had no effect on splicing activity compared with that of wild-type PAP-1, the other, D170G, resulted in both a defect in splicing activity and a decreased proportion of phosphorylated PAP-1. The D170G mutation may therefore cause RP by altering splicing of retinal genes through a decrease in PAP-1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that PAP-1 has a role in pre-mRNA splicing and, given that three other splicing factors have been implicated in adRP, this finding provides compelling further evidence that PAP-1 is indeed the RP9 gene.

  4. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Avery, Cheryl E.; Cadena, Elizabeth D.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Lewis, Richard A.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3–q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  5. Genetic Analysis of the Rhodopsin Gene Identifies a Mosaic Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutation in a Healthy Individual

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Levy, Gal; Blumenfeld, Anat; Meyer, Segev; Namburi, Prasanthi; Morad, Yair; Gradstein, Libe; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous hereditary retinal diseases that result in blindness due to photoreceptor degeneration. Mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and are responsible for 16% to 35% of adRP cases in the Western population. Our purpose was to investigate the contribution of RHO to adRP in the Israeli and Palestinian populations. Methods Thirty-two adRP families participated in the study. Mutation detection was performed by whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing of RHO exons. Fluorescence PCR reactions of serially diluted samples were used to predict the percentage of mosaic cells in blood samples. Results Eight RHO disease-causing mutations were identified in nine families, with only one novel mutation, c.548-638dup91bp, identified in a family where WES failed to detect any causal variant. Segregation analysis revealed that the origin of the mutation is in a mosaic healthy individual carrying the mutation in approximately 13% of blood cells. Conclusions This is the first report of the mutation spectrum of a known adRP gene in the Israeli and Palestinian populations, leading to the identification of seven previously reported mutations and one novel mutation. Our study shows that RHO mutations are a major cause of adRP in this cohort and are responsible for 28% of adRP families. The novel mutation exhibits a unique phenomenon in which an unaffected individual is mosaic for an adRP-causing mutation. PMID:26962691

  6. Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Enhances Rod Survival in the S334ter-line3 Retinitis Pigmentosa Model

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-A; Kim, Hwa Sun; Vargas, Andrew; Yu, Wan-Qing; Eom, Yun Sung; Craft, Cheryl Mae; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common forms of inherited visual loss with the initial degeneration of rod photoreceptors, followed by a progressive cone photoreceptor deterioration. Coinciding with this visual loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is reorganized, which alters matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity levels. A potential pathological role of MMPs, MMP-9 in particular, involves an excitotoxicity-mediated physiological response. In the current study, we examine the MMP-9 and MMP-2 expression levels in the rhodopsin S334ter-line3 RP rat model and investigate the impact of treatment with SB-3CT, a specific MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibitor, on rod cell survival was tested. Retinal MMP-9 and MMP-2 expression levels were quantified by immunoblot analysis from S334ter-line3 rats compared to controls. Gelatinolytic activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 by zymography were examined. The geometry of rod death was further evaluated using Voronoi analysis. Our results revealed that MMP-9 was elevated while MMP-2 was relatively unchanged when S334ter-line 3 retinas were compared to controls. With SB-3CT treatment, we observed gelatinolytic activity of both MMPs was decreased and diminished clustering associated with rod death, in addition to a robust preservation of rod photoreceptors. These results demonstrate that up-regulation of MMP-9 in retinas of S334ter-line3 are associated with rod death. The application of SB-3CT dramatically interferes with mechanisms leading to apoptosis in an MMP-9-dependent manner. Future studies will determine the feasibility of using SB-3CT as a potential therapeutic strategy to slow progression of vision loss in genetic inherited forms of human RP. PMID:27893855

  7. The Severe Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Rhodopsin Mutant Ter349Glu Mislocalizes and Induces Rapid Rod Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, T. J.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause approximately one-tenth of retinitis pigmentosa cases worldwide, and most result in endoplasmic reticulum retention and apoptosis. Other rhodopsin mutations cause receptor mislocalization, diminished/constitutive activity, or faulty protein-protein interactions. The purpose of this study was to test for mechanisms by which the autosomal dominant rhodopsin mutation Ter349Glu causes an early, rapid retinal degeneration in patients. The mutation adds an additional 51 amino acids to the C terminus of the protein. Folding and ligand interaction of Ter349Glu rhodopsin were tested by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. The ability of the mutant to initiate phototransduction was tested using a radioactive filter binding assay. Photoreceptor localization was assessed both in vitro and in vivo utilizing fluorescent immunochemistry on transfected cells, transgenic Xenopus laevis, and knock-in mice. Photoreceptor ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Spectrally, Ter349Glu rhodopsin behaves similarly to wild-type rhodopsin, absorbing maximally at 500 nm. The mutant protein also displays in vitro G protein activation similar to that of WT. In cultured cells, mislocalization was observed at high expression levels whereas ciliary localization occurred at low expression levels. Similarly, transgenic X. laevis expressing Ter349Glu rhodopsin exhibited partial mislocalization. Analysis of the Ter349Glu rhodopsin knock-in mouse showed a rapid, early onset degeneration in homozygotes with a loss of proper rod outer segment development and improper disc formation. Together, the data show that both mislocalization and rod outer segment morphogenesis are likely associated with the human phenotype. PMID:23940033

  8. Spontaneous dislocation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PC IOLs) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa – Case series

    PubMed Central

    Masket, Samuel; Bostanci Ceran, Basak; Fram, Nicole R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcomes of intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation management in 6 cases with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). Setting Private practice, Los Angeles, USA. Design Retrospective interventional case series. Methods The medical reports of six eyes of four RP patients with capsule bag fixated posterior chamber IOL dislocation were retrospectively reviewed. Pre-operative data included demographics, systemic or ocular disorders, history of trauma, previous intraocular surgery and pre-operative visual acuity. Outcome measures included the type of surgery, surgical complications, elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP), ocular inflammation, cystoid macular edema (CME) and IOL dislocation at 3 months or greater post-operatively. Results The medical records of six eyes of four patients operated on between December 2009 and May 2011 were evaluated. In four cases, dislocated PC IOL implants were sutured to the sclera. In two eyes of one patient anterior chamber IOLs (AC IOLs) were implanted after PC IOLs were explanted. One eye developed CME during the follow-up period. Despite modest tilt in one case and modest decentration in another, stability and centration of the IOLs was excellent during the follow-up period. No eyes had intraocular inflammation requiring long term medical treatment, new onset glaucoma or retinal detachment. Mean follow-up time was 6.9 months (range 3-20). Conclusions Cataract surgeons should be aware of the increased risk for decentration and malposition of PC IOLs in patients with RP. Satisfactory results can be achieved by fixation of the PC IOL or AC IOL implantation. PMID:23960970

  9. Targeted exome capture and sequencing identifies novel PRPF31 mutations in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Chinese families

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liping; Yin, Xiaobei; Wu, Lemeng; Chen, Ningning; Zhang, Huirong; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify disease-causing mutations in two Chinese families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Design Prospective analysis. Patients Two Chinese adRP families underwent genetic diagnosis. A specific hereditary eye disease enrichment panel (HEDEP) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of targeted 371 hereditary eye disease genes; high throughput sequencing was done with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variants were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Setting All experiments were performed in a large laboratory specialising in genetic studies in the Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital. Results Two novel mutations, including one splice site mutation (Int10 c.1074-2 A>T; p.Y359SfsX29) and one insertion (c.824_825insA; p.Y275X) of PRPF31 were identified in the two families. The two mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in their respective families. Conclusions Our findings broaden the spectrum of PRPF31 mutations causing adRP and the phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients. The HEDEP based on targeted exome capture technology is an efficient method for molecular diagnosis in adRP patients. PMID:24202059

  10. A Novel PRPF31 Mutation in a Large Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jiyun; Shi, Yi; Lin, Ying; Gong, Bo; Zhu, Xianjun; Ma, Shi; Qiao, Lifeng; Lin, He; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Zhenglin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was intended to identify the disease causing genes in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Methods A genome scan analysis was conducted in this family for disease gene preliminary mapping. Snapshot analysis of selected SNPs for two-point LOD score analysis for candidate gene filter. Candidate gene PRPF31 whole exons' sequencing was executed to identify mutations. Results A novel nonsense mutation caused by an insertion was found in PRPF31 gene. All the 19 RP patients in 1085 family are carrying this heterozygous nonsense mutation. The nonsense mutation is in PRPF31 gene exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961, inserting nucleotide “A” that generates the coding protein frame shift from p.307 and early termination at p.322 in the snoRNA binding domain (NOP domain). Conclusion This report is the first to associate PRPF31 gene's nonsense mutation and adRP and JMD. Our findings revealed that PRPF31 can lead to different clinical phenotypes in the same family, resulting either in adRP or syndrome of adRP and JMD. We believe our identification of the novel “A” insertion mutation in exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961 in PRPF31 can provide further genetic evidence for clinical test for adRP and JMD. PMID:24244300

  11. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Anna M.; Shah, Amna Z.; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  12. A novel mutation in C5L2 gene was associated with hyperlipidemia and retinitis pigmentosa in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicated that hyperlipidemia was associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We aimed to identify the mutations in the C5L2 gene which was reported to be associated with hyperlipidemia in a Chinese family with (RP). Methods The Proband from the family was screened for mutations in the C5L2 gene that was known to cause hyperlipidemia. Cosegregation analysis was performed in the available family members. Linkage analysis was performed for one missense mutation to calculate the likelihood of its pathogenicity. One hundred and fifty unrelated, healthy Chinese subjects were screened to exclude nonpathogenic polymorphisms. Results By direct sequencing method, we identified a novel mutation (Thr196Asn) in C5L2 gene. In this family, each affected family members with RP showed a heterozygous mutation in the C5L2 gene. And all the carriers with heterozygous mutation have increased serum lipid levels in this family. Conclusions The present study has extended the mutation spectrum of C5L2, and Thr196Asn mutations in C5L2 were associated with RP and serum lipid levels. PMID:24885523

  13. Rd9 Is a Naturally Occurring Mouse Model of a Common Form of Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by Mutations in RPGR-ORF15

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo; Jia, Lin; Grahek, Garrett; Wu, Zhijian; Hiriyanna, Suja; Nellissery, Jacob; Li, Tiansen; Khanna, Hemant; Colosi, Peter; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of human disease are an invaluable component of studies aimed at understanding disease pathogenesis and therapeutic possibilities. Mutations in the gene encoding retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) are the most common cause of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and are estimated to cause 20% of all retinal dystrophy cases. A majority of RPGR mutations are present in ORF15, the purine-rich terminal exon of the predominant splice-variant expressed in retina. Here we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of the retinal degeneration 9 (Rd9) strain of mice, a naturally occurring animal model of XLRP. Rd9 mice were found to carry a 32-base-pair duplication within ORF15 that causes a shift in the reading frame that introduces a premature-stop codon. Rpgr ORF15 transcripts, but not protein, were detected in retinas from Rd9/Y male mice that exhibited retinal pathology, including pigment loss and slowly progressing decrease in outer nuclear layer thickness. The levels of rhodopsin and transducin in rod outer segments were also decreased, and M-cone opsin appeared mislocalized within cone photoreceptors. In addition, electroretinogram (ERG) a- and b-wave amplitudes of both Rd9/Y male and Rd9/Rd9 female mice showed moderate gradual reduction that continued to 24 months of age. The presence of multiple retinal features that correlate with findings in individuals with XLRP identifies Rd9 as a valuable model for use in gaining insight into ORF15-associated disease progression and pathogenesis, as well as accelerating the development and testing of therapeutic strategies for this common form of retinal dystrophy. PMID:22563472

  14. Rd9 is a naturally occurring mouse model of a common form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in RPGR-ORF15.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debra A; Khan, Naheed W; Othman, Mohammad I; Chang, Bo; Jia, Lin; Grahek, Garrett; Wu, Zhijian; Hiriyanna, Suja; Nellissery, Jacob; Li, Tiansen; Khanna, Hemant; Colosi, Peter; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of human disease are an invaluable component of studies aimed at understanding disease pathogenesis and therapeutic possibilities. Mutations in the gene encoding retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) are the most common cause of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and are estimated to cause 20% of all retinal dystrophy cases. A majority of RPGR mutations are present in ORF15, the purine-rich terminal exon of the predominant splice-variant expressed in retina. Here we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of the retinal degeneration 9 (Rd9) strain of mice, a naturally occurring animal model of XLRP. Rd9 mice were found to carry a 32-base-pair duplication within ORF15 that causes a shift in the reading frame that introduces a premature-stop codon. Rpgr ORF15 transcripts, but not protein, were detected in retinas from Rd9/Y male mice that exhibited retinal pathology, including pigment loss and slowly progressing decrease in outer nuclear layer thickness. The levels of rhodopsin and transducin in rod outer segments were also decreased, and M-cone opsin appeared mislocalized within cone photoreceptors. In addition, electroretinogram (ERG) a- and b-wave amplitudes of both Rd9/Y male and Rd9/Rd9 female mice showed moderate gradual reduction that continued to 24 months of age. The presence of multiple retinal features that correlate with findings in individuals with XLRP identifies Rd9 as a valuable model for use in gaining insight into ORF15-associated disease progression and pathogenesis, as well as accelerating the development and testing of therapeutic strategies for this common form of retinal dystrophy.

  15. Complexity of the Class B Phenotype in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Rhodopsin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; McGuigan, David B.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Gruzensky, Michaela L.; Sheplock, Rebecca; Palma, Judy; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previously, patients with RHO mutations and a class A phenotype were found to have severe early-onset loss of rod function, whereas patients with a class B phenotype retained rod function at least in certain retinal regions. Here class B patients were studied at different disease stages to understand the topographic details of the phenotype in preparation for therapies of this regionalized retinopathy. Methods A cohort of patients with RHO mutations and class B phenotype (n = 28; ages 10–80 years) were studied with rod and cone perimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results At least three components of the phenotype were identified in these cross-sectional studies. Patients could have hemifield dysfunction, pericentral loss of function, or a diffuse rod sensitivity loss across the visual field. Combinations of these different patterns were also found. Colocalized photoreceptor layer thicknesses were in agreement with the psychophysical results. Conclusions These disorders with regional retinal variation of severity require pre-evaluations before enrollment into clinical trials to seek answers to questions about where in the retina would be appropriate to deliver focal treatments, and, for retina-wide treatment strategies, where in the retina should be monitored for therapeutic efficacy (or safety). PMID:27654411

  16. Identification of Disease-Causing Mutations in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) Using Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Ding, Li; Fulton, Robert; Abbott, Rachel M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Birch, David G.; Wheaton, Dianna H.; Heckenlively, John R.; Liu, Qin; Pierce, Eric A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether massively parallel next-generation DNA sequencing offers rapid and efficient detection of disease-causing mutations in patients with monogenic inherited diseases. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a challenging application for this technology because it is a monogenic disease in individuals and families but is highly heterogeneous in patient populations. RP has multiple patterns of inheritance, with mutations in many genes for each inheritance pattern and numerous, distinct, disease-causing mutations at each locus; further, many RP genes have not been identified yet. Methods. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify mutations in pairs of affected individuals from 21 families with autosomal dominant RP, selected from a cohort of families without mutations in “common” RP genes. One thousand amplicons targeting 249,267 unique bases of 46 candidate genes were sequenced with the 454GS FLX Titanium (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and GAIIx (Illumina/Solexa, San Diego, CA) platforms. Results. An average sequence depth of 70× and 125× was obtained for the 454GS FLX and GAIIx platforms, respectively. More than 9000 sequence variants were identified and analyzed, to assess the likelihood of pathogenicity. One hundred twelve of these were selected as likely candidates and tested for segregation with traditional di-deoxy capillary electrophoresis sequencing of additional family members and control subjects. Five disease-causing mutations (24%) were identified in the 21 families. Conclusion. This project demonstrates that next-generation sequencing is an effective approach for detecting novel, rare mutations causing heterogeneous monogenic disorders such as RP. With the addition of this technology, disease-causing mutations can now be identified in 65% of autosomal dominant RP cases. PMID:20861475

  17. Validity and cost-effectiveness of cone adaptation test as a screening tool to detect retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rahul; Save, Prajakta; Deshpande, Madan; Shegunashi, Mahadev; Chougule, Marium; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cone adaptation test is to detect retinitis pigmentosa (RP) cases confirmed by electroretinogram (ERG). We present the validity and cost-effectiveness of cone adaptation test as a screening tool for detecting RP. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2013 and December 2013. All RP cases diagnosed by ophthalmologists of H. V. Desai Eye Hospital in the last 5 years were participated in this study. The cone adaptation test was done in photopic and scotopic illumination. Failed test means 10 s or more to complete the test under scotopic illumination. A technician who was masked for cone adaptation test finding carried out ERG. Demographics, symptoms, and history of treatment were inquired. Those with flat ERG wave in scotopic condition and corresponding clinical findings were defined as having RP. Sensitivity, specificity, and false-positive and false-negative parameters of validity were estimated. The unit cost of performing test and ERG was calculated. Results: All 32 RP patients (28 male, age median 23.5 ± 14.5 years) had a vision more than 6/60 and flat wave in ERG under mesopic/scotopic illumination. Thirty-one participants failed cone adaptation test. The sensitivity was 31/32 × 100 = 97%. The specificity was 100%. There was no false-positive case. Consanguinity rate among parents was 43%. The cost of testing one child using “cone adaptation test kit” was 2.5 US $. The unit cost of diagnosing RP using ERG was 10 US $. Conclusion: Cone adaptation is a valid and cost-effective screening tool test for RP. The consanguinity rate among parents of an RP patient was high. PMID:27843226

  18. Assessing Visual Fields in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa Using a Novel Microperimeter with Eye Tracking: The MP-3

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Nozomi; Matsuura, Masato; Hashimoto, Yohei; Hirasawa, Kazunori; Murata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ryo, Obata; Aihara, Makoto; Asaoka, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the current study is to investigate the test-retest reproducibility of visual fields (VFs) measured with the MP-3 microperimeter, in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Method VFs were twice measured with the MP-3 and also the Humphrey Field Analyzer, using the 10–2 test grid pattern in both perimeters, in 30 eyes (15 right and 15 left eyes) of 18 RP patients (11 males and 7 females). Test-retest reproducibility was assessed using the mean absolute deviation (MAD) measure at all 68 points in the test grid. Reproducibility was also evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of VF sensitivities. Result The mean sensitivity measured in the HFA 10–2 was significantly higher than that measured in the MP-3 in both the first and second VF tests (p <0.0001, linear mixed model). The MAD was 2.4±0.6 [1.1 to 3.6] dB for MP-3 and 2.4±0.9 [1.1 to 5.1] dB for HFA 10–2, which was not significantly different (p = 0.76, linear mixed model). The ICC value associated with the MP-3 VFs was 0.81±0.13 [0.49 to 0.98], which was significantly larger than that observed for the HFA 10–2 VFs: 0.77±0.19 [0.20 to 0.94] (p = 0.043, linear mixed model). Conclusion The MP-3 microperimeter appears to be useful to evaluate central visual function in RP eyes, exhibiting test-retest reproducibility that is equal to, or better than, that observed in HFA 10–2 VFs. PMID:27893769

  19. Dorzolamide Chlorhydrate Versus Acetazolamide in the Management of Chronic Macular Edema in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa: Description of Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Elena; Arrico, Loredana; Santamaria, Valentina; Turchetti, Paolo; Carbotti, Maria Rosaria; La Torre, Giuseppe; Pacella, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    AIMS To assess the efficacy of topical dorzolamide for treating cystoid macular edema in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and minimize the secondary effects of maintenance therapy in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) who present with chronic microcystic macular edema. METHODS To replace acetazolamide systemic treatment, with a topical treatment using 2% dorzolamide in three patients. The methods performed were OCT scan with a Spectralis HRA-OCT, for the measurement of macular thickness and morphology; best corrected visual acuity was assessed using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS), was assessed slit-lamp biomicroscopy, ocular tonometry, fundus biomiocrosopy, and color fundus photography. This therapeutic protocol has been applied and described in three patients. RESULTS In all three tested patients, following the administration of dorzolamide in eye drop, we observed a remarkable decrease in macular edema, almost comparable to that obtained with acetazolamide per os. CONCLUSION The study confirms the anti-edematogenic effect of topical dorzolamide in RP with recurring macular cysts, as this can have a favorable response with topical dorzolamide. In all the three examined patients, the instillation of topical dorzolamide caused a remarkable reduction in their macular edema, as highlighted on OCT. PMID:24932106

  20. Novel mutations in CRB1 gene identified in a chinese pedigree with retinitis pigmentosa by targeted capture and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lo, David; Weng, Jingning; Liu, xiaohong; Yang, Juhua; He, Fen; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xuyang

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To detect the disease-causing gene in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal-recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). METHODS All subjects in this family underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Targeted-capture next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed on the proband to detect variants. All variants were verified in the remaining family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. RESULTS All the affected subjects in this pedigree were diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The compound heterozygous c.138delA (p.Asp47IlefsX24) and c.1841G>T (p.Gly614Val) mutations in the Crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene were identified in all the affected patients but not in the unaffected individuals in this family. These mutations were inherited from their parents, respectively. CONCLUSION The novel compound heterozygous mutations in CRB1 were identified in a Chinese pedigree with ARRP using targeted-capture next generation sequencing. After evaluating the significant heredity and impaired protein function, the compound heterozygous c.138delA (p.Asp47IlefsX24) and c.1841G>T (p.Gly614Val) mutations are the causal genes of early onset ARRP in this pedigree. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report regarding the compound mutations. PMID:27806333

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration in a patient with ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency with a novel c.717 del C mutation in the TTPA gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Kazuo; Shima, Keisuke; Komai, Kiyonobu; Nishida, Yoichiro; Yokota, Takanori; Yamada, Masahito

    2014-10-15

    Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA). The clinical features of the disease resemble Friedreich's ataxia. However, AVED is associated with low plasma vitamin E levels, which results in compromised antioxidant function. Dysregulation of this lipid-soluble antioxidant vitamin plays a major role in the neurodegeneration observed in AVED. Some AVED patients experience decreased visual acuity. Retinitis pigmentosa is thought to be the main cause of this visual impairment. Although antioxidant levels are important for the prevention of macular degeneration, there have been no reports of macular degeneration in AVED. Here, we describe a patient with AVED with progressive macular degeneration, who carried a novel truncating mutation-c.717 del C (p.D239EfsX25)-in exon 5 of the TTPA gene. These findings suggest that this newly identified mutation results in severely low serum vitamin E levels, which may be associated with the development of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration.

  2. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  3. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Maeda, Tadao; Bereta, Grzegorz; Okano, Kiichiro; Golczak, Marcin; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment mediating vision under dim light, is composed of the apoprotein opsin and the chromophore ligand 11-cis-retinal. A P23H mutation in the opsin gene is one of the most prevalent causes of the human blinding disease, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cultured cell and transgenic animal models have been developed, there remains controversy over whether they fully mimic the human phenotype; and the exact mechanism by which this mutation leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration remains unknown. By generating P23H opsin knock-in mice, we found that the P23H protein was inadequately glycosylated with levels 1–10% that of wild type opsin. Moreover, the P23H protein failed to accumulate in rod photoreceptor cell endoplasmic reticulum but instead disrupted rod photoreceptor disks. Genetically engineered P23H mice lacking the chromophore showed accelerated photoreceptor cell degeneration. These results indicate that most synthesized P23H protein is degraded, and its retinal cytotoxicity is enhanced by lack of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore during rod outer segment development. PMID:21224384

  4. Autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa caused by a mutation in SNRNP200, a gene required for unwinding of U4/U6 snRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Bellur, Deepti L; Lu, Shasha; Zhao, Feng; Grassi, Michael A; Bowne, Sara J; Sullivan, Lori S; Daiger, Stephen P; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Kanxing; Staley, Jonathan P; Larsson, Catharina

    2009-11-01

    Mutations in genes associated with the U4/U6-U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex of the spliceosome are implicated in autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a group of progressive retinal degenerative disorders leading to visual impairment, loss of visual field, and even blindness. We recently assigned a locus (RP33) for adRP to 2cen-q12.1, a region that harbors the SNRNP200 gene encoding hBrr2, another U4/U6-U5 snRNP component that is required for unwinding of U4/U6 snRNAs during spliceosome activation and for disassembly of the spliceosome. Here, we report the identification of a missense mutation, c.3260C>T (p.S1087L), in exon 25 of the SNRNP200 gene in an RP33-linked family. The c.3260C>T substitution showed complete cosegregation with the retinitis pigmentosa (RP) phenotype over four generations, but was absent in a panel of 400 controls. The p.S1087L mutation and p.R1090L, another adRP-associated allele, reside in the "ratchet" helix of the first of two Sec63 domains implicated in the directionality and processivity of nucleic acid unwinding. Indeed, marked defects in U4/U6 unwinding, but not U4/U6-U5 snRNP assembly, were observed in budding yeast for the analogous mutations (N1104L and R1107L) of the corresponding Brr2p residues. The linkage of hBrr2 to adRP suggests that the mechanism of pathogenesis for splicing-factor-related RP may fundamentally derive from a defect in hBrr2-dependent RNA unwinding and a consequent defect in spliceosome activation.

  5. Possible protective role of the ABCA4 gene c.1268A>G missense variant in Stargardt disease and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa in a Sicilian family: Preliminary data.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Donato, Luigi; Venza, Isabella; Scimone, Concetta; Aragona, Pasquale; Sidoti, Antonina

    2017-04-01

    In the wide horizon of ophthalmologically rare diseases among retinitis pigmentosa forms, Stargardt disease has gradually assumed a significant role due to its heterogeneity. In the present study, we aimed to support one of two opposite hypotheses concerning the causative or protective role of heterozygous c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene in Stargardt disease and in syndromic retinitis pigmentosa. This study was based on a family consisting of three members: proband, age 54, with high myopia, myopic chorioretinitis and retinal dystrophy; wife, age 65, with mild symptoms; daughter, age 29, asymptomatic. After genetic counseling, ABCA4 and RP1 gene analysis was performed. The results highlighted an important genetic picture. The proband was found to carry two variant RP1 SNPs, rs2293869 (c.2953A>T) and rs61739567 (c.6098G>A), and, a wild-type condition for four RP1 polymorphisms, rs444772 (c.2623G>A) and three SNPs in the 'hot-spot' region, exon 4. The proband's wife, instead, showed an opposite condition compared to her husband: a homozygous mutated condition for the first four SNPs analyzed, while the last two were wild-type. Regarding the ABCA4 gene, the proband evidenced a wild-type condition. Furthermore, the wife showed a heterozygous condition of ABCA4 rs3112831 (c.1268A>G). As expected, the daughter presented heterozygosity for all variants of both genes. In conclusion, even though the c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene has often been reported as causative of disease, and in other cases protective of disease, in our family case, the variant appears to reduce or delay the risk of onset of Stargardt disease.

  6. Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa, p.Gly56Arg Mutation in NR2E3: Phenotype in a Large Cohort of 24 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Martinez, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Millan, Jose M.; García Sandoval, Blanca; Ayuso, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Importance This research is the single largest NR2E3 genotype-phenotype correlation study performed to date in autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. Objective The aim of this study is to analyse the frequency of the p.Gly56Arg mutation in NR2E3 for the largest cohort of autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa patients to date and its associated phenotype. Patients and Methods A cohort of 201 unrelated Spanish families affected by autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. The p.Gly56Arg mutation in the NR2E3 (NM_014249.2) gene was analysed in 201 families. In the 24 cases where the mutation had been detected, a haplotype analysis linked to the p.Gly56Arg families was performed, using four extragenic polymorphic markers D15S967, D15S1050, D15S204 and D15S188. Phenotype study included presence and age of onset of night blindness, visual field loss and cataracts; and an ophthalmoscopic examination after pupillary dilation and electroretinogram for the 24 cases. Results Seven of the 201 analyzed families were positive for the p.Gly56Arg, leading to a prevalence of 3.5%. Clinical data were available for 24 subjects. Night blindness was the first noticeable symptom (mean 15.9 years). Visual field loss onset was variable (23.3 ± 11.9 years). Loss of visual acuity appeared late in the disease´s evolution. Most of the patients with cataracts (50%) presented it from the third decade of life. Fundus changes showed inter and intrafamiliar variability, but most of the patients showed typical RP changes and it was common to find macular affectation (47.4%). Electroretinogram was impaired from the beginning of the disease. Two families shared a common haplotype. Additionally, all patients shared a 104Kb region between D15S1050 and the NR2E3 gene. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of p.Gly56Arg in the NR2E3 gene as a common mutation associated with adRP, and provides new clues to its phenotype, which can allow for a better clinical management and genetic

  7. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world's first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA). The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes. PMID:28203188

  8. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world's first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA). The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes.

  9. Improving nighttime mobility in persons with night blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa: A comparison of two low-vision mobility devices.

    PubMed

    Mancil, Rickilyn M; Mancil, Gary L; King, Ellis; Legault, Claudine; Munday, Julie; Alfieri, Salvatore; Nowakowski, Rod; Blasch, Bruce B

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the ITT Night Vision Viewer with the Wide Angle Mobility Lamp (WAML) as low-vision mobility devices for people experiencing night blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Both engineering bench testing and functional evaluations were used in the assessments. Engineering evaluations were conducted for (1) consistency of the manufacturer's specifications, (2) ergonomic characteristics, (3) modifications of devices, and (4) pedestrian safety issues. Twenty-seven patients with RP conducted rehabilitation evaluations with each device that included both clinical and functional tests. Both devices improved nighttime travel for people with night blindness as compared with nighttime travel with no device. Overall, the WAML provided better travel efficiency-equivalent to that measured in daytime. Recommendations have been developed on ergonomic factors for both devices. Although some participants preferred the ITT Night Vision Viewer, overall most participants performed better with the WAML.

  10. Assistive peripheral phosphene arrays deliver advantages in obstacle avoidance in simulated end-stage retinitis pigmentosa: a virtual-reality study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, Marc Patrick H.; Boon, Mei-Ying; Lovell, Nigel H.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. The prospective efficacy of peripheral retinal prostheses for guiding orientation and mobility in the absence of residual vision, as compared to an implant for the central visual field (VF), was evaluated using simulated prosthetic vision (SPV). Approach. Sighted volunteers wearing a head-mounted display performed an obstacle circumvention task under SPV. Mobility and orientation performance with three layouts of prosthetic vision were compared: peripheral prosthetic vision of higher visual acuity (VA) but limited VF, of wider VF but limited VA, as well as centrally restricted prosthetic vision. Learning curves using these layouts were compared fitting an exponential model to the mobility and orientation measures. Main results. Using peripheral layouts, performance was superior to the central layout. Walking speed with both higher-acuity and wider-angle layouts was 5.6% higher, and mobility errors reduced by 46.4% and 48.6%, respectively, as compared to the central layout. The wider-angle layout yielded the least number of collisions, 63% less than the higher-acuity and 73% less than the central layout. Using peripheral layouts, the number of visual-scanning related head movements was 54.3% (higher-acuity) and 60.7% (wider-angle) lower, as compared to the central layout, and the ratio of time standing versus time walking was 51.9% and 61.5% lower, respectively. Learning curves did not differ between layouts, except for time standing versus time walking, where both peripheral layouts achieved significantly lower asymptotic values compared to the central layout. Significance. Beyond complementing residual vision for an improved performance, peripheral prosthetic vision can effectively guide mobility in the later stages of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) without residual vision. Further, the temporal dynamics of learning peripheral and central prosthetic vision are similar. Therefore, development of a peripheral retinal prosthesis and early implantation to

  11. Preclinical potency and safety studies of an AAV2-mediated gene therapy vector for the treatment of MERTK associated retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Thomas J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Pang, Ji-jing; Ryals, Renee; Clément, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian; McDoom, Issam; Boye, Shannon E; Peden, Marc C; Sherwood, Mark B; Abernathy, Corinne R; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Proof of concept for MERTK gene replacement therapy has been demonstrated using different viral vectors in the Royal College of Surgeon (RCS) rat, a well characterized model of recessive retinitis pigmentosa that contains a mutation in the Mertk gene. MERTK plays a key role in renewal of photoreceptor outer segments (OS) by phagocytosis of shed OS tips. Mutations in MERTK cause impaired phagocytic activity and accumulation of OS debris in the interphotoreceptor space that ultimately leads to photoreceptor cell death. In the present study, we conducted a series of preclinical potency and GLP-compliant safety evaluations of an adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vector expressing human MERTK cDNA driven by the retinal pigment epithelium-specific, VMD2 promoter. We demonstrate the potency of the vector in RCS rats by improved electroretinogram (ERG) responses in treated eyes compared with contralateral untreated controls. Toxicology and biodistribution studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats injected with two different doses of AAV vectors and buffer control. Delivery of vector in SD rats did not result in a change in ERG amplitudes of rod and cone responses relative to balanced salt solution control-injected eyes, indicating that administration of AAV vector did not adversely affect normal retinal function. In vivo fundoscopic analysis and postmortem retinal morphology of the vector-injected eyes were normal compared with controls. Evaluation of blood smears showed the lack of transformed cells in the treated eyes. All injected eyes and day 1 blood samples were positive for vector genomes, and all peripheral tissues were negative. Our results demonstrate the potency and safety of the AAV2-VMD2-hMERTK vector in animal models tested. A GMP vector has been manufactured and is presently in clinical trial.

  12. AAV8(Y733F)-mediated gene therapy in a Spata7 knockout mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Eblimit, Aiden; Moayedi, Yalda; Boye, Sanford L; Chiodo, Vince A; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Nichols, Ralph M; Hauswirth, William W; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Loss of SPATA7 function causes the pathogenesis of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa. Spata7 knockout mice mimic human SPATA7–related retinal disease with apparent photoreceptor degeneration observed as early as postnatal day 15 (P15). To test the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for rescue of photoreceptor survival and function in Spata7 mutant mice, we employed the AAV8(Y733F) vector carrying hGRK1-driven full-length FLAG-tagged Spata7 cDNA to target both rod and cone photoreceptors. Following subretinal injection of this vector, FLAG-tagged SPATA7 was found to co-localize with endogenous SPATA7 in wild-type mice. In Spata7 mutant mice initially treated at P15, we observed improvement of photoresponse, photoreceptor ultrastructure, and significant alleviation of photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore we performed treatments at P28 and P56 and found that all treatments (P15-P56) can ameliorate rod and cone loss in the long term (1 year); however, none efficiently protect photoreceptors from degeneration by 86 weeks of age since only a small amount of treated photoreceptors can survive to this time. This study demonstrates long-term improvement of photoreceptor function by AAV8(Y733F)-introduced Spata7 expression in a mouse model as potential treatment of the human disease but also suggests that treated mutant photoreceptors still undergo progressive degeneration. PMID:25965394

  13. AAV8(Y733F)-mediated gene therapy in a Spata7 knockout mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Eblimit, A; Moayedi, Y; Boye, S L; Chiodo, V A; Chen, Y; Li, Y; Nichols, R M; Hauswirth, W W; Chen, R; Mardon, G

    2015-08-01

    Loss of SPATA7 function causes the pathogenesis of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa. Spata7 knockout mice mimic human SPATA7-related retinal disease with apparent photoreceptor degeneration observed as early as postnatal day 15 (P15). To test the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for rescue of photoreceptor survival and function in Spata7 mutant mice, we employed the AAV8(Y733F) vector carrying hGRK1-driven full-length FLAG-tagged Spata7 cDNA to target both rod and cone photoreceptors. Following subretinal injection of this vector, FLAG-tagged SPATA7 was found to colocalize with endogenous SPATA7 in wild-type mice. In Spata7 mutant mice initially treated at P15, we observed improvement of photoresponse, photoreceptor ultrastructure and significant alleviation of photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore, we performed treatments at P28 and P56 and found that all treatments (P15-P56) can ameliorate rod and cone loss in the long term (1 year); however, none efficiently protect photoreceptors from degeneration by 86 weeks of age as only a small amount of treated photoreceptors can survive to this time. This study demonstrates long-term improvement of photoreceptor function by AAV8(Y733F)-introduced Spata7 expression in a mouse model as potential treatment of the human disease, but also suggests that treated mutant photoreceptors still undergo progressive degeneration.

  14. Gene Therapy in Patient-specific Stem Cell Lines and a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa With Membrane Frizzled-related Protein Defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Lawrence; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Maumenee, Irene H; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Hoang, Quan V; Hua, Haiqing; Egli, Dieter; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Defects in Membrane Frizzled-related Protein (MFRP) cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). MFRP codes for a retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific membrane receptor of unknown function. In patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-derived RPE cells, precise levels of MFRP, and its dicistronic partner CTRP5, are critical to the regulation of actin organization. Overexpression of CTRP5 in naïve human RPE cells phenocopied behavior of MFRP-deficient patient RPE (iPS-RPE) cells. AAV8 (Y733F) vector expressing human MFRP rescued the actin disorganization phenotype and restored apical microvilli in patient-specific iPS-RPE cell lines. As a result, AAV-treated MFRP mutant iPS-RPE recovered pigmentation and transepithelial resistance. The efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy was also evaluated in Mfrprd6/Mfrprd6 mice—an established preclinical model of RP—and long-term improvement in visual function was observed in AAV-Mfrp-treated mice. This report is the first to indicate the successful use of human iPS-RPE cells as a recipient for gene therapy. The observed favorable response to gene therapy in both patient-specific cell lines, and the Mfrprd6/Mfrprd6 preclinical model suggests that this form of degeneration caused by MFRP mutations is a potential target for interventional trials. PMID:24895994

  15. Gene therapy in patient-specific stem cell lines and a preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa with membrane frizzled-related protein defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Lawrence; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Maumenee, Irene H; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Hoang, Quan V; Hua, Haiqing; Egli, Dieter; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-09-01

    Defects in Membrane Frizzled-related Protein (MFRP) cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). MFRP codes for a retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific membrane receptor of unknown function. In patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-derived RPE cells, precise levels of MFRP, and its dicistronic partner CTRP5, are critical to the regulation of actin organization. Overexpression of CTRP5 in naïve human RPE cells phenocopied behavior of MFRP-deficient patient RPE (iPS-RPE) cells. AAV8 (Y733F) vector expressing human MFRP rescued the actin disorganization phenotype and restored apical microvilli in patient-specific iPS-RPE cell lines. As a result, AAV-treated MFRP mutant iPS-RPE recovered pigmentation and transepithelial resistance. The efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy was also evaluated in Mfrp(rd6)/Mfrp(rd6) mice--an established preclinical model of RP--and long-term improvement in visual function was observed in AAV-Mfrp-treated mice. This report is the first to indicate the successful use of human iPS-RPE cells as a recipient for gene therapy. The observed favorable response to gene therapy in both patient-specific cell lines, and the Mfrp(rd6)/Mfrp(rd6) preclinical model suggests that this form of degeneration caused by MFRP mutations is a potential target for interventional trials.

  16. Evidence that the penetrance of mutations at the RP11 locus causing dominant retinitis pigmentosa is influenced by a gene linked to the homologous RP11 allele.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T L; Devoto, M; Ott, J; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1997-01-01

    A subset of families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) display reduced penetrance with some asymptomatic gene carriers showing no retinal abnormalities by ophthalmic examination or by electroretinography. Here we describe a study of three families with reduced-penetrance RP. In all three families the disease gene appears to be linked to chromosome 19q13.4, the region containing the RP11 locus, as defined by previously reported linkage studies based on five other reduced-penetrance families. Meiotic recombinants in one of the newly identified RP11 families and in two of the previously reported families serve to restrict the disease locus to a 6-cM region bounded by markers D19S572 and D19S926. We also compared the disease status of RP11 carriers with the segregation of microsatellite alleles within 19q13.4 from the noncarrier parents in the newly reported and the previously reported families. The results support the hypothesis that wild-type alleles at the RP11 locus or at a closely linked locus inherited from the noncarrier parents are a major factor influencing the penetrance of pathogenic alleles at this locus. PMID:9345108

  17. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Saikia, Bibhuti B; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhu, Xiong; Liu, Yuqing; Huang, Lulin; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Yin; Qu, Chao; Hao, Fang; Gong, Bo; Tai, Zhengfu; Niu, Lihong; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun

    2015-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. To identify genetic mutations underlying autosomal recessive RP (arRP), we performed whole-exome sequencing study on two consanguineous marriage Indian families (RP-252 and RP-182) and 100 sporadic RP patients. Here we reported novel mutation in FAM161A in RP-252 and RP-182 with two patients affected with RP in each family. The FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. By whole-exome sequencing we identified several homozygous genomic regions, one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked arRP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 in both patients of family RP-252 and family RP-182. In 100 sporadic Indian RP patients, this novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 was identified in one sporadic patient ARRP-S-I-46 by whole-exome sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, this homozygous frameshift mutation was absent in 1000 ethnicity-matched control samples screened by direct Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutations of RP28-linked RP gene FAM161A in Indian population.

  18. Assignment of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP12) to chromosome 1q31-q32.1 in an inbred and genetically heterogeneous disease population

    SciTech Connect

    Van Soest, S.; Ingeborgh Van Den Born, L.; Bergen, A.A.B.

    1994-08-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a large family segregating for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), originating from a genetically isolated population in The Netherlands. Within the family, clinical heterogeneity was observed, with a major section of the family segregating arRP with characteristic para-arteriolar preservation of the retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE). In the remainder of the arRP patients no PPRPE was found. Initially, all branches of the family were analyzed jointly, and linkage was found between the marker F13B, located at 1q31-q32.1, and RP12 ({Zeta}{sub max} = 4.99 at 8% recombination). Analysis of linkage heterogeneity between five branches of the family yielded significant evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity within this family, coinciding with the observed clinical differences. Multipoint analysis, carried out in the branches that showed linkage, favored the locus order 1cen-D1S158-(F13B, RP12)-D1S53-1qter ({Zeta}{sub max} = 9.17). The finding of a single founder allele associated with the disease phenotype supports this localization. This study reveals that even in a large family, apparently segregating for a single disease entity, genetic heterogeneity can be detected and resolved successfully. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa due to mutations in the mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC gene, heparan-alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT)

    PubMed Central

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Newman, Hadas; Leibu, Rina; Bax, Nathalie M.; Baris, Hagit N; Rizel, Leah; Banin, Eyal; Massarweh, Amir; Roosing, Susanne; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N.; Isakov, Ofer; Shomron, Noam; Sharon, Dror; Den Hollander, Anneke I.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most common form of inherited retinal degeneration, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and can appear as syndromic or non-syndromic. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPS IIIC) is a lethal disorder, caused by mutations in the heparan-alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT) gene and characterized by progressive neurological deterioration, with retinal degeneration as a prominent feature. We identified HGSNAT mutations in six patients with non-syndromic RP. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in an Ashkenazi Jewish Israeli RP patient revealed a novel homozygous HGSNAT variant, c.370A>T, which leads to partial skipping of exon 3. Screening of 66 Ashkenazi RP index cases revealed an additional family with two siblings homozygous for c.370A>T. WES in three Dutch siblings with RP revealed a complex HGSNAT variant, c.[398G>C; 1843G>A] on one allele, and c.1843G>A on the other allele. HGSNAT activity levels in blood leukocytes of patients were reduced compared with healthy controls, but usually higher than those in MPS IIIC patients. All patients were diagnosed with non-syndromic RP and did not exhibit neurological deterioration, or any phenotypic features consistent with MPS IIIC. Furthermore, four of the patients were over 60 years old, exceeding by far the life expectancy of MPS IIIC patients. HGSNAT is highly expressed in the mouse retina, and we hypothesize that the retina requires higher HGSNAT activity to maintain proper function, compared with other tissues associated with MPS IIIC, such as the brain. This report broadens the spectrum of phenotypes associated with HGSNAT mutations and highlights the critical function of HGSNAT in the human retina. PMID:25859010

  20. Genetic heterogeneity and consanguinity lead to a “double hit”: Homozygous mutations of MYO7A and PDE6B in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Banin, Eyal; Zalzstein, Yael; Cohen, Ben; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Rizel, Leah; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most genetically heterogeneous disorder in humans, actually represents a group of pigmentary retinopathies characterized by night blindness followed by visual-field loss. RP can appear as either syndromic or nonsyndromic. One of the most common forms of syndromic RP is Usher syndrome, characterized by the combination of RP, hearing loss, and vestibular dysfunction. Methods The underlying cause of the appearance of syndromic and nonsyndromic RP in three siblings from a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family was studied with whole-genome homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing. Results The family was found to segregate novel mutations of two different genes: myosin VIIA (MYO7A), which causes type 1 Usher syndrome, and phosphodiesterase 6B, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific, rod, beta (PDE6B), which causes nonsyndromic RP. One affected child was homozygous for both mutations. Since the retinal phenotype seen in this patient results from overlapping pathologies, one might expect to find severe retinal degeneration. Indeed, he was diagnosed with RP based on an abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) at a young age (9 months). However, this early diagnosis may be biased, as two of his older siblings had already been diagnosed, leading to increased awareness. At the age of 32 months, he had relatively good vision with normal visual fields. Further testing of visual function and structure at different ages in the three siblings is needed to determine whether the two RP-causing genes mutated in this youngest sibling confer increased disease severity. Conclusions This report further supports the genetic heterogeneity of RP, and demonstrates how consanguinity could increase intrafamilial clustering of multiple hereditary diseases. Moreover, this report provides a unique opportunity to study the clinical implications of the coexistence of pathogenic mutations in two RP-causative genes in a human patient. PMID:23882135

  1. Lutein supplementation in retinitis pigmentosa: PC-based vision assessment in a randomized double-masked placebo-controlled clinical trial [NCT00029289

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Hossein; Melia, Michele; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2006-01-01

    Background There is no generally accepted medical or surgical treatment to stop the progressive course of retinitis pigmentosa. Previous studies have suggested lutein as a potential treatment with positive effects on macular pigment density. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of lutein supplementation on preservation of visual function in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) Methods In a double-masked randomized placebo-controlled phase I/II clinical trial with a cross-over design, 34 adult patients with RP were randomized to two groups. One group, consisted of 16 participants, received lutein supplementation (10 mg/d for 12 wks followed by 30 mg/d) for the first 24 weeks and then placebo for the following 24 weeks, while the other group included 18 participants for whom placebo (24 weeks) was administered prior to lutein. Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and central visual field were measured at different illumination levels at baseline and every week using a PC-based test at home. Results For visual acuity (VA) at normal illumination level, treatment with lutein reduced logMAR, i.e. improved VA, but this effect was not statistically significant. The changes in normal (100%), low (4%), and very low (0.1%) illumination log CS were not statistically significant (p-values: 0.34, 0.23, and 0.32, respectively). Lutein had a statistically significant effect on visual field (p-value: 0.038) and this effect increased in the model assuming a 6-week delay in effect of lutein. Comparing the development of vision measures against the natural loss expected to occur over the course of 48 weeks, most measures showed reduced decline, and these reductions were significant for normal illumination VA and CS. Conclusion These results suggest that lutein supplementation improves visual field and also might improve visual acuity slightly, although these results should be interpreted cautiously. As a combined phase I and II clinical trial, this study

  2. Characterisation of the canine rod-cone dysplasia type one gene (rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase beta subunit (PDEB)) - a model for human retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, P.J.M.; Gregory, C.Y.; Petersen-Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Rod-cone dysplasia type one (rod-1) is an early onset, autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy segregating in the Irish setter breed. It is a model for certain forms of human autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) caused by mutations in the same gene, PDEB. We confirmed the codon 807 Trp to Stop mutation and were the first to show cosegregation of the mutant allele with disease in a pedigree. We believe that this currently represents the best animal model available for some aspects of arRP, since canine tissues are relatively easy to access compared to human and yet the canine eye is of comparable size, unlike that of the rd mouse. This facilitates therapeutic intervention particularly at the subretinal level. In order to more fully investigate this model we have been characterizing the PDEB gene in the normal dog. Using PCR we have partially mapped the intron/exon structure, demonstrating a very high degree of evolutionary conservation with the mouse and human genes. RT-PCR has been used to reveal expression in a variety of neural and non-neural tissues. A PCR product spanning exons 19 to 22 (which also contains the site for the rcd-1 mutation) is detected in retina but also in tissues such as visual cortex, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, lateral geniculate nucleus, adrenal gland, lung, kidney and ovary. All of these tissues gave a negative result with primers for rds/peripherin, a gene which is expressed in rods and cones. This raises interesting questions about the regulation of PDEB transcripts which is initially being investigated by Northern analysis. In addition, anchored PCR techniques have generated upstream genomic sequences and we are currently mapping the 5{prime} extent of the mRNA transcript in the retina. This will facilitate the analysis of potential upstream promoter elements involved in directing expression.

  3. Association of PAP-1 and Prp3p, the products of causative genes of dominant retinitis pigmentosa, in the tri-snRNP complex.

    PubMed

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2005-01-01

    PAP-1 has been identified by us as a Pim-1-binding protein and has recently been implicated as the defective gene in RP9, one type of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). We have then shown that PAP-1 plays a role in pre-mRNA splicing. Because four causative genes for adRP, including PAP-1, Prp31, Prp8, and Prp3, encode proteins that function as splicing factors or splicing-modulating factors, we investigated the interaction of PAP-1 with Prp3p and Prp31p in this study. The results showed that PAP-1 interacted with Prp3p but not Prp31p in human cells and yeast, and that the basic region of PAP-1 and the C-terminal region of Prp3p, regions beside spots found in adRP mutations, were needed for binding. Furthermore, both Prp3p and a part of PAP-1 were found to be components of the U4/U6.U5-tri-snRNP complex, one form of the spliceosome, in Ba/F3 and K562 cells by analysis of sucrose density gradients, suggesting that PAP-1 is weakly associated with the spliceosome. These results also suggest that splicing factors implicated in adRP contribute alone or mutually to proper splicing in the retina and that loss of their functions leads to onset of adRP.

  4. Objective visual field determination in forensic ophthalmology with an optimized 4-channel multifocal VEP perimetry system: a case report of a patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, C; Horn, F K; Kremers, J; Juenemann, A; Bergua, A

    2011-10-01

    We present the case of a 59-year-old male patient with progressive vision impairment and consecutive visual field narrowing ("tunnel view") for 7 years and a known retinitis pigmentosa for 5 years. The remaining Goldmann perimetric visual field at time reported was less than 5°. A request for blindness-related social benefits was rejected because an ophthalmologic expert assessment suggested malingering. This prompted us to assess an objective determination of the visual field using multifocal VEPs. Objective visual field recordings were performed with a four-channel multifocal VEP-perimeter using 58 stimulus fields (pattern reversal dartboard stimulus configuration). The correlated signal data were processed using an off-line method. At each field, the recording from the channel with the maximal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was retained, thus resulting in an SNR optimized virtual recording. Analysis of VEP signals was performed for each single field and concentric rings and compared to an average response measured in five healthy subjects. Substantial VEP responses could be identified in three fields within the innermost ring (eccentricity, 1.7°) for both eyes, although SNR was generally low. More eccentric stimuli did not elicit reliable VEP responses. The mfVEP recording was correlated with perimetric visual field data. The current SNR optimization by using the channel with the largest SNR provides a good method to extract useful data from recordings and may be appropriate for the use in forensic ophthalmology.

  5. Safety and Proof-of-Concept Study of Oral QLT091001 in Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Inherited Deficiencies of Retinal Pigment Epithelial 65 Protein (RPE65) or Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Fishman, Gerald A.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Bittner, Ava; Bowles, Kristen; Fletcher, Emily C.; Collison, Frederick T.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Degli Eposti, Simona; Michaelides, Michel; Saperstein, David A.; Schuchard, Ronald A.; Barnes, Claire; Zein, Wadih; Zobor, Ditta; Birch, David G.; Mendola, Janine D.; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in inherited retinal degenerations remains an unmet medical need. In mice exhibiting a genetically engineered block of the visual cycle, vision was recently successfully restored by oral administration of 9-cis-retinyl acetate (QLT091001). Safety and visual outcomes of a once-daily oral dose of 40 mg/m2/day QLT091001 for 7 consecutive days was investigated in an international, multi-center, open-label, proof-of-concept study in 18 patients with RPE65- or LRAT-related retinitis pigmentosa. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed a ≥20% increase and 4 of 18 (22%) showed a ≥40% increase in functional retinal area determined from Goldmann visual fields; 12 (67%) and 5 (28%) of 18 patients showed a ≥5 and ≥10 ETDRS letter score increase of visual acuity, respectively, in one or both eyes at two or more visits within 2 months of treatment. In two patients who underwent fMRI, a significant positive response was measured to stimuli of medium contrast, moving, pattern targets in both left and right hemispheres of the occipital cortex. There were no serious adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were transient and the most common included headache, photophobia, nausea, vomiting, and minor biochemical abnormalities. Measuring the outer segment length of the photoreceptor layer with high-definition optical coherence tomography was highly predictive of treatment responses with responders having a significantly larger baseline outer segment thickness (11.7 ± 4.8 μm, mean ± 95% CI) than non-responders (3.5 ± 1.2 μm). This structure-function relationship suggests that treatment with QLT091001 is more likely to be efficacious if there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014052 PMID:26656277

  6. Structure-Function Modeling of Optical Coherence Tomography and Standard Automated Perimetry in the Retina of Patients with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Travis B.; Parker, Maria; Steinkamp, Peter N.; Weleber, Richard G.; Smith, Ning; Wilson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess relationships between structural and functional biomarkers, including new topographic measures of visual field sensitivity, in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Spectral domain optical coherence tomography line scans and hill of vision (HOV) sensitivity surfaces from full-field standard automated perimetry were semi-automatically aligned for 60 eyes of 35 patients. Structural biomarkers were extracted from outer retina b-scans along horizontal and vertical midlines. Functional biomarkers were extracted from local sensitivity profiles along the b-scans and from the full visual field. These included topographic measures of functional transition such as the contour of most rapid sensitivity decline around the HOV, herein called HOV slope for convenience. Biomarker relationships were assessed pairwise by coefficients of determination (R2) from mixed-effects analysis with automatic model selection. Results Structure-function relationships were accurately modeled (conditional R2>0.8 in most cases). The best-fit relationship models and correlation patterns for horizontally oriented biomarkers were different than vertically oriented ones. The structural biomarker with the largest number of significant functional correlates was the ellipsoid zone (EZ) width, followed by the total photoreceptor layer thickness. The strongest correlation observed was between EZ width and HOV slope distance (marginal R2 = 0.85, p<10−10). The mean sensitivity defect at the EZ edge was 7.6 dB. Among all functional biomarkers, the HOV slope mean value, HOV slope mean distance, and maximum sensitivity along the b-scan had the largest number of significant structural correlates. Conclusions Topographic slope metrics show promise as functional biomarkers relevant to the transition zone. EZ width is strongly associated with the location of most rapid HOV decline. PMID:26845445

  7. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I.

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  8. TSC but not PTEN loss in starving cones of retinitis pigmentosa mice leads to an autophagy defect and mTORC1 dissociation from the lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, A; Ma, S; Punzo, C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to secondary cone photoreceptor loss in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is critical to devise strategies to prolong vision in this neurodegenerative disease. We previously showed that constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), by loss of its negative regulator the tuberous sclerosis complex protein 1 (Tsc1; also known as Hamartin), was sufficient to promote robust survival of nutrient-stressed cones in two mouse models of RP by improving glucose uptake and utilization. However, while cone protection remained initially stable for several weeks, eventually cone loss resumed. Here we show that loss of Tsc1 in the cones of RP mice causes a defect in autophagy, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates. We demonstrate that this defect was not due to an inhibition of autophagy initiation, but due to an accumulation of autolysosomes, suggesting a defect in the end-stage of the process causing an amino-acid shortage in cones, thereby hampering long-term cone survival. Because cells with TSC loss fail to completely inhibit mTORC1 and properly activate autophagy in the absence of amino acids, we sporadically administered the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, which was sufficient to correct the defects seen in cones, further enhancing the efficiency of cone survival mediated by Tsc1 loss. Concordantly, activation of mTORC1 by loss of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) did not affect autophagy and amino-acid metabolism, leading to a more sustained long-term protection of cones. As loss of Pten, which in cones results in less robust mTORC1 activation when compared with loss of Tsc1, still affords long-term cone survival, therapeutic interventions with mTORC1 activators or gene therapy with selected mTORC1 targets that improve glucose metabolism are potential strategies to delay vision loss in patients with RP. PMID:27362797

  9. Refined genetic mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP18 reduces the critical region to 2 cM between D1S442 and D1S2858 on chromosome 1q.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1998-04-01

    Linkage analysis was performed on a large Danish family to refine the position of RP18, the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, mapped previously between D1S534 and D1S305 in chromosome 1p13-q21. We genotyped the family members for five microsatellite-type DNA polymorphisms and mapped RP18 between D1S422 and D1S2858 to a region of less than 2 cM. No obvious candidate gene has yet been assigned to the chromosomal interval defined here.

  10. Screening of a large cohort of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa patients identifies novel LCA5 mutations and new genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Ruifang; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Berson, Eliot L.; Ocaka, Louise A.; Davidson, Alice E.; Heckenlively, John R.; Branham, Kari; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Maria, Maleeha; Azam, Maleeha; Henkes, Arjen; Blokland, Ellen; Qamar, Raheel; Webster, Andrew R.; Andreasson, Sten; de Baere, Elfride; Bennett, Jean; Chader, Gerald J.; Berger, Wolfgang; Golovleva, Irina; Greenberg, Jacquie; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus N.; Ramsear, Raj; Roberts, Lisa; Roepman, Ronald; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of sequence variants in LCA5 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), early onset rod-cone dystrophy (EORD) and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), to delineate the ocular phenotypes, and to provide an overview of all published LCA5 variants in an online database._Patients underwent standard ophthalmic evaluations after providing informed consent. In selected patients, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence imaging was possible. DNA samples from 797 unrelated patients with LCA and 211 with the various types of RP were screened by Sanger sequence analysis of all LCA5 exons and intron/exon junctions. Some LCA patients were pre-screened by APEX technology or selected based on homozygosity mapping. In silico analyses were performed to assess the pathogenicity of the variants. Segregation analysis was performed where possible. Published and novel LCA5 variants were collected, amended for their correct nomenclature, and listed in a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). Sequence analysis identified 18 new probands with 19 different LCA5 variants. Seventeen of the 19 LCA5 variants were novel. Except for two missense variants and one splice site variant, all variants were protein-truncating mutations. Most patients expressed a severe phenotype, typical of LCA. However, some LCA subjects had better vision and intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions on OCT imaging. In two families with LCA5 variants, the phenotype was more compatible with EORD with affected individuals displaying preserved islands of RPE. One of these milder families harbored a homozygous splice site mutation, a second family was found to have a combination of a stop mutation and a missense mutation. This is the largest LCA5 study to date. We sequenced 1008 patients (797 with LCA, 211 with arRP) and identified 18 probands with LCA5 mutations. Mutations in LCA5 are a rare cause of childhood retinal dystrophy accounting for

  11. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations in USH2A in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; González-del Pozo, María; Vela-Boza, Alicia; Santoyo-López, Javier; López-Domingo, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Marouschek, Carmen; Dopazo, Joaquin; Borrego, Salud

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Thus, the diagnosis is not always easily performed due to phenotypic and genetic overlap. Current clinical practices have focused on the systematic evaluation of a set of known genes for each phenotype, but this approach may fail in patients with inaccurate diagnosis or infrequent genetic cause. In the present study, we investigated the genetic cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) in a Spanish family in which the causal mutation has not yet been identified with primer extension technology and resequencing. Methods We designed a whole-exome sequencing (WES)-based approach using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and the SOLiD 5500×l next-generation sequencing platform. We sequenced the exomes of both unaffected parents and two affected siblings. Exome analysis resulted in the identification of 43,204 variants in the index patient. All variants passing filter criteria were validated with Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and absence in the control population. In silico prediction tools were used to determine mutational impact on protein function and the structure of the identified variants. Results Novel Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) compound heterozygous mutations, c.4325T>C (p.F1442S) and c.15188T>G (p.L5063R), located in exons 20 and 70, respectively, were identified as probable causative mutations for RP in this family. Family segregation of the variants showed the presence of both mutations in all affected members and in two siblings who were apparently asymptomatic at the time of family ascertainment. Clinical reassessment confirmed the diagnosis of RP in these patients. Conclusions Using WES, we identified two heterozygous novel mutations in USH2A as the most likely disease-causing variants in a Spanish family diagnosed with arRP in which the cause of the disease had not yet been identified with

  12. Stability and Safety of an AAV Vector for Treating RPGR-ORF15 X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Dinculescu, Astra; Li, Jie; Zhu, Ping; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Conlon, Thomas J; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Hauswirth, William W

    2015-09-01

    Our collaborative successful gene replacement therapy using AAV vectors expressing a variant of human RPGR-ORF15 in two canine models provided therapeutic proof of concept for translation into human treatment. The ORF15 sequence contained within this AAV vector, however, has ORF15 DNA sequence variations compared to the published sequence that are likely due to its unusual composition of repetitive purine nucleotides. This mutability is a concern for AAV vector production and safety when contemplating a human trial. In this study, we establish the safety profile of AAV-hIRBP-hRPGR and AAV-hGRK1-hRPGR vectors used in the initial canine proof-of-principle experiments by demonstrating hRPGR-ORF15 sequence stability during all phases of manipulation, from plasmid propagation to vector production to its stability in vivo after subretinal administration to animals. We also evaluate potential toxicity in vivo by investigating protein expression, retinal structure and function, and vector biodistribution. Expression of hRPGR is detected in the inner segments and synaptic terminals of photoreceptors and is restricted to the connecting cilium when the vector is further diluted. Treated eyes exhibit no toxicity as assessed by retinal histopathology, immunocytochemistry, optical coherence tomography, fundoscopy, electroretinogram, and vector biodistribution. Therefore, the hRPGR-ORF15 variant in our AAV vectors appears to be a more stable form than the endogenous hRPGR cDNA when propagated in vitro. Its safety profile presented here in combination with its proven efficacy supports future gene therapy clinical trials.

  13. Photoactivation-Induced Instability of Rhodopsin Mutants T4K and T17M in Rod Outer Segments Underlies Retinal Degeneration in X. laevis Transgenic Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Beatrice M.; Noorwez, Syed M.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. PMID:25274813

  14. Photoreceptor Rescue by an Abbreviated Human RPGR Gene in a Murine Model of X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Pawlyk, Basil S.; Adamian, Michael; Sun, Xun; Bulgakov, Oleg V.; Shu, Xinhua; Smith, Alexander J.; Berson, Eliot L.; Ali, Robin R.; Khani, Shahrokh; F.Wright, Alan; Sandberg, Michael A.; Li, Tiansen

    2015-01-01

    The X-linked RP3 gene codes for the ciliary protein RPGR and accounts for over 10% of inherited retinal degenerations. The critical RPGR-ORF15 splice variant contains a highly repetitive purine-rich linker region that renders it unstable and difficult to adapt for gene therapy. To test the hypothesis that the precise length of the linker region is not critical for function, we evaluated whether AAV-mediated replacement gene therapy with a human ORF15 variant containing in-frame shortening of the linker region could reconstitute RPGR function in vivo. We delivered human RPGR-ORF15 replacement genes with deletion of most (314-codons, “short form”) or 1/3 (126-codons, “long form”) of the linker region to Rpgr null mice. Human RPGR-ORF15 expression was detected post-treatment with both forms of ORF15 transgenes. However, only the long form correctly localized to the connecting cilia and led to significant functional and morphological rescue of rods and cones. Thus the highly repetitive region of RPGR is functionally important but that moderate shortening of its length, which confers the advantage of added stability, preserves its function. These findings provide a theoretical basis for optimizing replacement gene design in clinical trials for X-linked RP3. PMID:26348595

  15. Mutation in the splicing factor Hprp3p linked to retinitis pigmentosa impairs interactions within the U4/U6 snRNP complex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Duan, Rongqi Cathleen; Hu, Jim

    2008-01-15

    Mutations in PRPF3, a gene encoding the essential pre-mRNA splicing factor Hprp3p, have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa type 18 (RP18). Patients with RP18 have one of two single amino acid substitutions, Pro493Ser or Thr494Met, at the highly conserved Hprp3p C-terminal region. Pro493Ser occurs sporadically, whereas Thr494Met is observed in several unlinked RP families worldwide. The latter mutation also alters a potential recognition motif for phosphorylation by casein kinase II (CKII). To understand the molecular basis of RP18, we examined the consequences of Thr494Met mutation on Hprp3p molecular interactions with components of the U4/U6.U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) complex. Since numerous mutations causing human diseases change pre-mRNA splice sites, we investigated whether Thr494Met substitution affects the processing of PRPF3 mRNA. We found that Thr494Met does not affect PRPF3 mRNA processing, indicating that the mutation may exert its effect primarily at the protein level. We used small hairpin RNAs to specifically silence the endogenous PRPF3 while simultaneously expressing HA-tagged Thr494Met. We demonstrated that the C- but not N-terminal region of Hprp3p is indeed phosphorylated by CKII in vitro and in cells. CKII-mediated Hprp3p phosphorylation was significantly reduced by Thr494Met mutation. Consequently, the Hprp3p C-terminal region is rendered partially defective in its association with itself, Hprp4p, and U4/U6 snRNA. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of Hprp3p and suggest that the loss of Hprp3p phosphorylation at Thr494 is a key step for initiating Thr494Met aberrant interactions within U4/U6 snRNP complex and that these are likely linked to the RP18 phenotype.

  16. Treatment of retinitis pigmentosa due to MERTK mutations by ocular subretinal injection of adeno-associated virus gene vector: results of a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Nicola G; Abboud, Emad B; Nowilaty, Sawsan R; Alkuraya, Hisham; Alhommadi, Abdulrahman; Cai, Huimin; Hou, Rui; Deng, Wen-Tao; Boye, Sanford L; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Al Saikhan, Fahad; Al-Dhibi, Hassan; Birch, David; Chung, Christopher; Colak, Dilek; LaVail, Matthew M; Vollrath, Douglas; Erger, Kirsten; Wang, Wenqiu; Conlon, Thomas; Zhang, Kang; Hauswirth, William; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-03-01

    MERTK is an essential component of the signaling network that controls phagocytosis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the loss of which results in photoreceptor degeneration. Previous proof-of-concept studies have demonstrated the efficacy of gene therapy using human MERTK (hMERTK) packaged into adeno-associated virus (AAV2) in treating RCS rats and mice with MERTK deficiency. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of gene transfer via subretinal administration of rAAV2-VMD2-hMERTK in subjects with MERTK-associated retinitis pigmentosa (RP). After a preclinical phase confirming the safety of the study vector in monkeys, six patients (aged 14 to 54, mean 33.3 years) with MERTK-related RP and baseline visual acuity (VA) ranging from 20/50 to <20/6400 were entered in a phase I open-label, dose-escalation trial. One eye of each patient (the worse-seeing eye in five subjects) received a submacular injection of the viral vector, first at a dose of 150 µl (5.96 × 10(10)vg; 2 patients) and then 450 µl (17.88 × 10(10)vg; 4 patients). Patients were followed daily for 10 days at 30, 60, 90, 180, 270, 365, 540, and 730 days post-injection. Collected data included (1) full ophthalmologic examination including best-corrected VA, intraocular pressure, color fundus photographs, macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography and full-field stimulus threshold test (FST) in both the study and fellow eyes; (2) systemic safety data including CBC, liver and kidney function tests, coagulation profiles, urine analysis, AAV antibody titers, peripheral blood PCR and ASR measurement; and (3) listing of ophthalmological or systemic adverse effects. All patients completed the 2-year follow-up. Subretinal injection of rAAV2-VMD2-hMERTK was associated with acceptable ocular and systemic safety profiles based on 2-year follow-up. None of the patients developed complications that could be attributed to the gene vector with certainty. Postoperatively, one patient developed

  17. Intravitreal injection or topical eye-drop application of a μ-calpain C2L domain peptide protects against photoreceptor cell death in Royal College of Surgeons' rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Tomita, Hiroshi; Isago, Hitomi; Baba, Ayaka; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial μ-calpain initiates apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent apoptosis in retinal photoreceptor degeneration. Mitochondrial μ-calpain inhibitors may represent therapeutic targets for the disease. Therefore, we sought to identify inhibitors of mitochondrial calpains and determine their effects in Royal College of Surgeons' (RCS) rats, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We synthesized 20-mer peptides of the C2-like (C2L) domain of μ-calpain. Two μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 inhibited mitochondrial μ-calpain activity (IC(50); 892 and 498nM, respectively), but not other proteases. Western blotting showed that 50μM of both μ-calpain peptides caused specific degradation of mitochondrial μ-calpain. Three-dimensional structure of calpains suggested that the peptides N2 and N9 corresponded to the regions forming salt bridges between the protease core domain 2 and the C2L domain. We determined the inhibitory regions of μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 using 10-mers, and one peptide, N2-10-2, inhibited the activity of mitochondrial μ-calpain (IC(50); 112nM). We next conjugated the peptide N2-10-2 to the C-terminal of HIV-1 tat (HIV), a cell-penetrating peptide. Using isolated rat liver mitochondria, 50μM HIV-conjugated μ-calpain N2-10-2 peptide (HIV-Nμ, IC(50); 285nM) significantly inhibited AIF truncation. The intravitreal injection of 20mM HIV-Nμ also prevented retinal photoreceptor apoptosis determined by TUNEL staining, and preserved retinal function assessed by electroretinography in RCS rats. Topical application of 40mM HIV-Nμ also prevented apoptosis of retinal photoreceptors in RCS rats. Our results demonstrate that HIV-Nμ, a peptide inhibitor of mitochondrial μ-calpain, offers a new modality for treating RP.

  18. Acne vulgaris in the context of complex medical co-morbities: the management of severe acne vulgaris in a female with retinitis pigmentosa - utilizing pulse dye laser in conjunction with medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Ayesha; Keck, Laura; Zlotoff, Barrett

    2014-03-17

    Acne vulgaris is a pervasive inflammatory disorder of the skin, with multiple etiologies and treatment options. Although first-line therapies exist, it is often the case that a patient will present with an underlying disorder that prohibits the use of most currently accepted treatment modalities. We present a patient with severe acne vulgaris and a history of retinitis pigmentosa who was treated with 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser therapy, in conjunction with therapeutic alternatives to first-line acne medications. Our patient exhibited a significant and sustained improvement with the combined use of 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser, Yaz (drospirenone-ethinyl estradiol), dapsone, topical metronidazole, sodium-sulfacetamide wash, and topical azelaic acid. The positive results in this case, suggest that this combined treatment modality may serve as an example of a safe and effective treatment alternative in the management of acne vulgaris complicated by medical co-morbidities that contraindicate the use of most first-line treatment options.

  19. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  20. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    visual impairment usually ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease) . As new interventions b... retinitis pigmentosa continues at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five additional recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the

  1. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis caused by defects in AIPL1: effective rescue of mouse models of partial and complete Aipl1 deficiency using AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Hong; Smith, Alexander J.; Pawlyk, Basil; Xu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Bainbridge, James B.; Basche, Mark; McIntosh, Jenny; Tran, Hoai Viet; Nathwani, Amit; Li, Tiansen; Ali, Robin R.

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) are clinically heterogeneous and present as Leber Congenital Amaurosis, the severest form of early-onset retinal dystrophy and milder forms of retinal dystrophies such as juvenile retinitis pigmentosa and dominant cone-rod dystrophy. [Perrault, I., Rozet, J.M., Gerber, S., Ghazi, I., Leowski, C., Ducroq, D., Souied, E., Dufier, J.L., Munnich, A. and Kaplan, J. (1999) Leber congenital amaurosis. Mol. Genet. Metab., 68, 200–208.] Although not yet fully elucidated, AIPL1 is likely to function as a specialized chaperone for rod phosphodiesterase (PDE). We evaluate whether AAV-mediated gene replacement therapy is able to improve photoreceptor function and survival in retinal degeneration associated with AIPL1 defects. We used two mouse models of AIPL1 deficiency simulating three different rates of photoreceptor degeneration. The Aipl1 hypomorphic (h/h) mouse has reduced Aipl1 levels and a relatively slow degeneration. Under light acceleration, the rate of degeneration in the Aipl1 h/h mouse is increased by 2–3-fold. The Aipl1−/− mouse has no functional Aipl1 and has a very rapid retinal degeneration. To treat the different rates of degeneration, two pseudotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibiting different transduction kinetics are used for gene transfer. We demonstrate restoration of cellular function and preservation of photoreceptor cells and retinal function in Aipl1 h/h mice following gene replacement therapy using an AAV2/2 vector and in the light accelerated Aipl1 h/h model and Aipl1−/− mice using an AAV2/8 vector. We have thus established the potential of gene replacement therapy in varying rates of degeneration that reflect the clinical spectrum of disease. This is the first gene replacement study to report long-term rescue of a photoreceptor-specific defect and to demonstrate effective rescue of a rapid photoreceptor

  2. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  3. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable...34Preservation of the inner retina in retinitis pigmentosa . A morphometric analysis," Arch Ophthalmol, vol. 115, no. 4, pp. 511-515, Apr.1997...Towards a completely implantable, light-sensitive intraocular retinal prosthesis. M.S. Humayun, J.D. Weiland, B. Justus1, C. Merrit1, J. Whalen, D

  4. Dermatopathia pigmentosa reticularis.

    PubMed

    Brar, Balvinder K; Mehta, Vivek; Kubba, Asha

    2007-01-01

    Dermatopathia pigmentosa reticularis is a rare inherited pigmentary disorder of the skin characterized by generalized reticulate hyperpigmentation, nonscarring alopecia and onychodystrophy. The reticulate pigmentation occurs at birth or during early childhood. We hereby report a 12-year-old Indian patient with this disorder.

  5. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization

    PubMed Central

    Zimbardi, Ana L. R. L.; Camargo, Priscila F.; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P.; Rosa, Jose C.; De Andrade, Adalgisa R.; Jorge, João A.; Furriel, Rosa P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH4Cl and 50 mmol·L−1 CuSO4, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g−1), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g−1. Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0–8.0, and after two hours at 55–60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L−1, maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg−1 and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol−1·s−1. The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents. PMID:27164083

  6. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization.

    PubMed

    Zimbardi, Ana L R L; Camargo, Priscila F; Carli, Sibeli; Aquino Neto, Sidney; Meleiro, Luana P; Rosa, Jose C; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Jorge, João A; Furriel, Rosa P M

    2016-05-05

    Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1) was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w) milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w) NH₄Cl and 50 mmol·L(-1) CuSO₄, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g(-1)), the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g(-1). Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate). Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0-8.0, and after two hours at 55-60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE). ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L(-1), maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg(-1) and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol(-1)·s(-1). The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB), remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4), at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents.

  7. Bullous prurigo pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Vincenzo; Quinkenstein, Eva; Mariuzzi, Laura; Frattasio, Alfonsina; Pillon, Barbara; Patrone, Pasquale

    2006-01-01

    Prurigo pigmentosa is a rare inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology, characterized by recurrent, symmetrical, pruritic, erythematous papules resulting in gross reticular hyperpigmentation. The rash occurs mainly on the back, the chest and the nape of the neck. While PP is observed rather frequently in Japan, only a few cases have come to notice in other countries. Vesicular or bullous forms have been reported only rarely. The differential diagnosis includes lichen pigmentosus, pigmented contact dermatitis, confluent and reticulated papillomatosis of Gougerot and Carteaud, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous lichen ruber planus. This case report concerns a young Caucasian patient with prurigo pigmentosa, in whom predominantly vesicular, but also bullous manifestations appeared on an existing maculopapular eruption on the trunk.

  8. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  9. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  10. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  11. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  12. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  13. Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration are the leading causes of blindness in the developing world...53featured research 2005 NRL Review Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue D. Scribner,1 L. Johnson,4 P. Skeath,4 R. Klein,4...GOALS The development of a high-resolution retinal prosthesis device at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) was first discussed in the late 1990s

  14. Functional and Behavioral Metrics for Evaluating Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    pigmentosa , and retinal detachment10. mfERG response characteristics have been shown to vary depending on the part of the retina that is affected by a...DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). 20100715258 Functional and behavioral metrics for evaluating laser retinal damage Cheryl...potential for and severity of laser eye injury and retinal damage is increasing . Sensitive and accurate methods to evaluate and follow laser retinal

  15. Misfolded Proteins and Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan H.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations associated with retinal degeneration lead to the production of misfolded proteins by cells of the retina. Emerging evidence suggests that these abnormal proteins cause cell death by activating the Unfolded Protein Response, a set of conserved intracellular signaling pathways that detect protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum and control protective and proapoptotic signal transduction pathways. Here, we review the misfolded proteins associated with select types of retinitis pigmentosa, Stargadt-like macular degeneration, and Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy and discuss the role that endoplasmic reticulum stress and UPR signaling play in their pathogenesis. Last, we review new therapies for these diseases based on preventing protein misfolding in the retina. PMID:20238009

  16. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  17. [Urticaria pigmentosa: a current approach].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Elizondo, Antonio David; Zepeda-Ortega, Benjamín; del Pino-Rojas, Gladys Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The term urticaria pigmentosa (UP) denotes a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth and accumulation of mast cells (MC) in the skin. Symptoms result from MC chemical mediator's release, pathologic infiltration of neoplastic MC in tissues or both. Multiple molecular, genetic and chromosomal defects seem contribute to an autonomous growth, but somatic c-kit D816V mutation is more frequently found, especially in systemic disease. The aim of this paper is to provide a current overview for a better understanding of the symptoms associated with this disease, to describe its classification, recent advances in its pathophysiology and its treatment.

  18. Protein Misfolding and Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Stein, Linda; Kaushal, Shalesh

    2011-01-01

    The retina is a highly complex and specialized organ that performs preliminary analysis of visual information. Composed of highly metabolically active tissue, the retina requires a precise and well-balanced means of maintaining its functional activity during extended periods of time. Maintenance and regulation of a vast array of different structural and functional proteins is required for normal function of the retina. This process is referred to as protein homeostasis and involves a variety of activities, including protein synthesis, folding, transport, degradation, elimination, and recycling. Deregulation of any of these activities can lead to malfunctioning of the retina, from subtle subclinical signs to severe retinal degenerative diseases leading to blindness. Examples of retinal degenerative diseases caused by disruption of protein homeostasis include retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt’s disease. A detailed discussion of the role of disruption in protein homeostasis in these and other retinal diseases is presented, followed by examples of some existing and potential treatments. PMID:21825021

  19. Stem cell-based therapeutic applications in retinal degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yiming; Enzmann, Volker; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases that target photoreceptors or the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration (RD) is found in many different forms of retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma. Effective treatment for retinal degeneration has been widely investigated. Gene-replacement therapy has been shown to improve visual function in inherited retinal disease. However, this treatment was less effective with advanced disease. Stem cell-based therapy is being pursued as a potential alternative approach in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. In this review, we will focus on stem cell-based therapies in the pipeline and summarize progress in treatment of retinal degenerative disease. PMID:20859770

  20. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  1. Urticaria pigmentosa-like disease in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Pariser, Marlene S.; Gram, Dunbar W.

    2015-01-01

    Urticaria pigmentosa is a rare dermatologic syndrome in humans, cats, and dogs. This report documents a case of canine urticaria pigmentosa-like disease with unusual features and no C-kit mutation. PMID:25750443

  2. Hearing Loss Associated with Retinitis Pigmentosa. Short Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Adrienne

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a variation of Usher's Syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by visual and auditory impairments, in which moderate, postlingual, and sometimes progressive hearing impairments may go undetected. Identification guidelines are offered. (Author/CL)

  3. Estimating Time-to-Collision with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tim

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the ability of observers who are sighted and those with low vision to make time-to-collision (TTC) estimations using video. The TTC estimations made by the observers with low vision were comparable to those made by the sighted observers, and both groups made underestimation errors that were similar to those that were…

  4. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  5. Visual Search in the Detection of Retinal Injury: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    D, Heyes A. et al. Mobility of people with retinitis pigmentosa as a function of vision and psychological variables. Optometry and Vision Science...AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2013-0019 Visual Search in the Detection of Retinal Injury: A Feasibility Study Thomas Kuyk TASC, Inc. Lei Liu The...Detection of Retinal Injury: A Feasibility Study" 2013 0019 LEON N. McLIN, JR., DR-III, DAF Work Unit Manager 711 HPW/ RHDO POLHAMUS.GARR ETT.D

  6. Patch clamp recordings of retinal bipolar cells in response to extracellular electrical stimulation in wholemount mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Walston, Steven T; Chow, Robert H; Weiland, James D

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a family of inherited retinal diseases identified by the degeneration of photoreceptors, which leads to blindness. In efforts to restore vision lost to retinitis pigmentosa, retinal prostheses have been developed to generate visual percepts by electrically stimulating the surviving retinal bipolar and ganglion cells. The response of retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation has been characterized through direct measurement. However, the response of bipolar cells has only been inferred by measuring retinal ganglion cell activity. This investigation reports on a novel tissue preparation technique facilitating bipolar cell patch clamp recordings in wholemount retina. We find that bipolar cells respond to extracellular electrical stimuli with time-locked voltage spike depolarizations, which are likely mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels.

  7. An Xp22.1-p22.2 YAC contig encompassing the disease loci for RS, KFSD, CLS, HYP and RP15: refined localization of RS.

    PubMed

    Van de Vosse, E; Bergen, A A; Meershoek, E J; Oosterwijk, J C; Gregory, S; Bakker, B; Weissenbach, J; Coffey, A J; van Ommen, G J; Den Dunnen, J T

    1996-01-01

    To facilitate the positional cloning of the genes involved in retinoschisis (RS), keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD), Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS), X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH, locus name HYP) and X-linked dominant cone-rod degeneration (locus name RP15), we have extended the molecular map of the Xp22 region. Screening of several YAC libraries allowed us to identify 156 YACs, 52 of which localize between markers DXS414 (P90) and DXS451 (kQST80H1). Analysis of their marker content facilitated the construction of a YAC contig from the region spanning (in this order): DXS414 - DXS987 - DXS207 - DXS1053 - DXS197 - DXS 43 - DXS1195 - DXS418 - DXS999 - PDHA1 - DXS7161 - DXS443 - DXS 7592 - DXS1229 - DXS365 - DXS7101 - DXS7593 - DXS1052 - DXS274 - DXS989 - DXS451. The region between DXS414 and DXS451 covers about 4.5-5 Mb. Two additional markers (DXS7593 and DXS7592) were placed in the region, thereby increasing the genetic resolution. Using the deduced marker order, the analysis of key recombinants in families segregating RS allowed us to refine the critical region for RS to 0.6 Mb, between DXS418 and DXS7161.

  8. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  9. Novel Serum Proteomic Signatures in a Non-Human Primate Model of Retinal Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    photoreceptors [50] and PGK1 deficiency has been implicated in one case of retinitis pigmentosa [51]. It is likely this enzyme is abundant in metabolically...DB=tr 2 3 2 1 0.234633 0.218250 Q4G3V7 KIAA0476 (Fragment) OS=Macaca mulatta PE=2 SV=1 DB=tr 2 3 2 1 0.234633 0.218250 Q4G413 Retinitis pigmentosa 1...4.070046 0.142449 Q4G413 Retinitis pigmentosa 1 (Fragment) OS=Macaca mulatta GN=RP1 PE=2 SV=1 DB=tr 5 6 1 4 4.070046 0.142449 Q6IYG8 NADH-ubiquinone

  10. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed Laser Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    years or younger, either sex, with no mitigating ocular or retinal pathology such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa , etc. Donor: The...USAFA TR 2004-01 Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed...TR 2004-01 This article, "Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps

  12. Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Thomas C

    2016-12-30

    As our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited retinal disease has expanded, gene therapy has advanced into clinical development. When the gene mutations associated with inherited retinal dystrophies were identified, it became possible to create animal models in which individual gene were altered to match the human mutations. The retina of these animals were then characterized to assess whether the mutated genes produced retinal phenotypes characteristic of disease-affected patients. Following the identification of a subpopulation of patients with the affected gene and the development of techniques for the viral gene transduction of retinal cells, it has become possible to deliver a copy of the normal gene into the retinal sites of the mutated genes. When this was performed in animal models of monogenic diseases, at an early stage of retinal degeneration when the affected cells remained viable, successful gene augmentation corrected the structural and functional lesions characteristic of the specific diseases in the areas of the retina that were successfully transduced. These studies provided the essential proof-of-concept needed to advance monogenic gene therapies into clinic development; these therapies include treatments for: Leber's congenital amaurosis type 2, caused by mutations to RPE65, retinoid isomerohydrolase; choroideremia, caused by mutations to REP1, Rab escort protein 1; autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, caused by mutations to ABCA4, the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding transporter; Usher 1B disease caused by mutations to MYO7A, myosin heavy chain 7; X-linked juvenile retinoschisis caused by mutations to RS1, retinoschisin; autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations to MERTK, the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase MER; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by mutations to ND4, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) subunit 4 and achromatopsia, caused by

  13. Vitiligo and disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, D M; Wagoner, M D; Pruett, R C; Nordlund, J J; Lerner, A B

    1983-01-01

    The association of vitiligo with inflammation of the uveal tract is well established. The relationship between vitiligo and hypopigmentation and/or degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) not secondary to ocular inflammation has not been adequately investigated. Sixty (27%) of 223 consecutive patients with vitiligo were found to have some evidence of RPE hypopigmentation ranging from mild, focal areas of involvement in most cases to extensive RPE degeneration with a retinitis pigmentosa-like syndrome in one patient. Fifteen (25%) patients complained of night blindness. Only 6 (4%) of 148 patients in a control group had similar funduscopic findings (p less than 0.001). None of these patients were symptomatic. There have been isolated reports of vitiligo occurring with tapetoretinal degeneration. We report 2 patients with both vitiligo and retinitis pigmentosa. Images PMID:6824621

  14. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  15. Dampening Spontaneous Activity Improves the Light Sensitivity and Spatial Acuity of Optogenetic Retinal Prosthetic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John Martin; Hilgen, Gerrit; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes irreversible visual impairment and blindness. Retinal prostheses currently represent the only clinically available vision-restoring treatment, but the quality of vision returned remains poor. Recently, it has been suggested that the pathological spontaneous hyperactivity present in dystrophic retinas may contribute to the poor quality of vision returned by retinal prosthetics by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of prosthetic responses. Here, we investigated to what extent blocking this hyperactivity can improve optogenetic retinal prosthetic responses. We recorded activity from channelrhodopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells in retinal wholemounts in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Sophisticated stimuli, inspired by those used in clinical visual assessment, were used to assess light sensitivity, contrast sensitivity and spatial acuity of optogenetic responses; in all cases these were improved after blocking spontaneous hyperactivity using meclofenamic acid, a gap junction blocker. Our results suggest that this approach significantly improves the quality of vision returned by retinal prosthetics, paving the way to novel clinical applications. Moreover, the improvements in sensitivity achieved by blocking spontaneous hyperactivity may extend the dynamic range of optogenetic retinal prostheses, allowing them to be used at lower light intensities such as those encountered in everyday life. PMID:27650332

  16. Optopharmacological tools for restoring visual function in degenerative retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Kramer, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are progressive retinal diseases that result from the death of rod and cone photoreceptors, ultimately leading to blindness. The only currently approved vision restoration treatment employs an implanted retinal ‘chip’ as a prosthetic device to electrically stimulate retinal neurons that survive after the photoreceptors are gone, thereby restoring light-driven neural signaling to the brain. An alternative strategy has been proposed, which would utilize optogenetic or opto-pharmacological tools to enable direct optical stimulation of surviving retinal neurons. Here, we review the latest studies evaluating the feasibility of these molecular tools as potential therapeutics for restoring visual function in human blinding disease. PMID:25706312

  17. Regenerative ophthalmology: Technologic and pharmacologic approaches to restoring sight via retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, R

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis technology can restore rudimentary form vision in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) who have lost all eyesight. This continually advancing field within regenerative ophthalmology represents the merger of micro-electromechanical systems technology with neurosensory retina. This man-machine interface is reliant upon the long-term health of a neurosensory retina undergoing progressive pathophysiologic changes. Pharmacologic approaches that address the pathophysiologic consequences of RP will likely play an important role for all regenerative treatment strategies.

  18. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... men more than women and whites more than African Americans. A retinal detachment is also more likely to occur in people who Are extremely nearsighted Have had a retinal detachment in the other eye Have a family history of retinal detachment Have had cataract surgery Have ...

  19. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  20. Targeting Inflammation in Emerging Therapies for Genetic Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A.; Bashar, Abu E.; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.; Moritz, Orson L.; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Genetic retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and monogenic diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa account for some of the commonest causes of blindness in the developed world. Diverse genetic abnormalities and environmental causes have been implicated in triggering multiple pathological mechanisms such as oxidative stress, lipofuscin deposits, neovascularisation, and programmed cell death. In recent years, inflammation has also been highlighted although whether inflammatory mediators play a central role in pathogenesis or a more minor secondary role has yet to be established. Despite this, numerous interventional studies, particularly targeting the complement system, are underway with the promise of novel therapeutic strategies for these important blinding conditions. PMID:23509666

  1. Optical coherence tomography-guided retinal prosthesis design: model of degenerated retinal curvature and thickness for patient-specific devices.

    PubMed

    Opie, Nicholas L; Ayton, Lauren N; Apollo, Nicholas V; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Guymer, Robyn H; Luu, Chi D

    2014-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa affects over 1.5 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness. While retinal prostheses have shown some success in restoring basic levels of vision, only generic, "one-size-fits-all" devices are currently being implanted. In this study, we used optical coherence tomography scans of the degenerated retina from 88 patients with retinitis pigmentosa to generate models of retinal thickness and curvature for the design of customized implants. We found the average retinal thickness at the fovea to be 152.9 ± 61.3 μm, increasing to a maximum retinal thickness of 250.9 ± 57.5 μm at a nasal eccentricity of 5°. These measures could be used to assist the development of custom-made penetrating electrodes to enhance and optimize epiretinal prostheses. From the retinal thickness measurements, we determined that the optimal length of penetrating electrodes to selectively stimulate retinal ganglion cell bodies and interneuron axons in the ganglion cell layer should be 30-100 μm, and to preferentially stimulate interneurons in the inner nuclear layer, electrodes should be 100-200 μm long. Electrodes greater than 200 μm long had the potential to penetrate through the retina into the choroid, which could cause devastating complications to the eye and should be avoided. The two- and three-dimensional models of retinal thickness developed in this study can be used to design patient-specific epiretinal implants that will help with safety and to optimize the efficacy of neuronal stimulation, ensuring the best functional performance of the device for patients.

  2. Cell-Based Therapy for Degenerative Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors (PRs) have restored vision in preclinical models of human retinal degenerative disease. This review discusses characteristics of stem cell therapy in the eye and the challenges to clinical implementation that are being confronted today. Based on encouraging results from Phase I/II trials, the first Phase II clinical trials of stem cell-derived RPE transplantation are underway. PR transplant experiments have demonstrated restoration of visual function in preclinical models of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration, but also indicate that no single approach is likely to succeed in overcoming PR loss in all cases. A greater understanding of the mechanisms controlling synapse formation as well as the immunoreactivity of transplanted retinal cells is urgently needed.

  3. Nrl knockdown by AAV-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 prevents retinal degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenhan; Mookherjee, Suddhasil; Chaitankar, Vijender; Hiriyanna, Suja; Kim, Jung-Woong; Brooks, Matthew; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Sun, Xun; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand; Wu, Zhijian

    2017-03-14

    In retinitis pigmentosa, loss of cone photoreceptors leads to blindness, and preservation of cone function is a major therapeutic goal. However, cone loss is thought to occur as a secondary event resulting from degeneration of rod photoreceptors. Here we report a genome editing approach in which adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 delivery to postmitotic photoreceptors is used to target the Nrl gene, encoding for Neural retina-specific leucine zipper protein, a rod fate determinant during photoreceptor development. Following Nrl disruption, rods gain partial features of cones and present with improved survival in the presence of mutations in rod-specific genes, consequently preventing secondary cone degeneration. In three different mouse models of retinal degeneration, the treatment substantially improves rod survival and preserves cone function. Our data suggest that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated NRL disruption in rods may be a promising treatment option for patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  4. A method and technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornig, Ralf; Laube, Thomas; Walter, Peter; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Bornfeld, Norbert; Feucht, Matthias; Akguel, Harun; Rössler, Gernot; Alteheld, Nils; Lütke Notarp, Dietmar; Wyatt, John; Richard, Gisbert

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on methods and technical equipment to investigate the epiretinal stimulation of the retina in blind human subjects in acute trials. Current is applied to the retina through a thin, flexible microcontact film (microelectrode array) with electrode diameters ranging from 50 to 360 µm. The film is mounted in a custom-designed surgical tool that is hand-held by the surgeon during stimulation. The eventual goal of the work is the development of a chronically implantable retinal prosthesis to restore a useful level of vision to patients who are blind with outer retinal degenerations, specifically retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration.

  5. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  6. Construction of a plasmid for human brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its effect on retinal pigment epithelial cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bo-jing; Wu, Zhi-zhong; Chong, Wei-hua; Li, Gen-lin

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the protective functions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in retinitis pigmentosa. However, a BDNF-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is not yet available. To develop an efficient treatment for fundus disease, an eukaryotic expression plasmid was generated and used to transfect human 293T cells to assess the expression and bioactivity of BDNF on acute retinal pigment epithelial-19 (ARPE-19) cells, a human retinal epithelial cell line. After 96 hours of co-culture in a Transwell chamber, ARPE-19 cells exposed to BDNF secreted by 293T cells were more viable than ARPE-19 cells not exposed to secreted BDNF. Western blot assay showed that Bax levels were downregulated and that Bcl-2 levels were upregulated in human ARPE-19 cells exposed to BDNF. Furthermore, 293T cells transfected with the BDNF gene steadily secreted the protein. The powerful anti-apoptotic function of this BDNF may be useful for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28197196

  7. Retinal Remodeling: Concerns, Emerging Remedies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Vidhyasankar; Cherukuri, Pitchaiah; Poria, Deepak; Goel, Manvi; Dagar, Sushma; Dhingra, Narender K.

    2016-01-01

    Deafferentation results not only in sensory loss, but also in a variety of alterations in the postsynaptic circuitry. These alterations may have detrimental impact on potential treatment strategies. Progressive loss of photoreceptors in retinal degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, leads to several changes in the remnant retinal circuitry. Müller glial cells undergo hypertrophy and form a glial seal. The second- and third-order retinal neurons undergo morphological, biochemical and physiological alterations. A result of these alterations is that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the output neurons of the retina, become hyperactive and exhibit spontaneous, oscillatory bursts of spikes. This aberrant electrical activity degrades the signal-to-noise ratio in RGC responses, and thus the quality of information they transmit to the brain. These changes in the remnant retina, collectively termed “retinal remodeling”, pose challenges for genetic, cellular and bionic approaches to restore vision. It is therefore crucial to understand the nature of retinal remodeling, how it affects the ability of remnant retina to respond to novel therapeutic strategies, and how to ameliorate its effects. In this article, we discuss these topics, and suggest that the pathological state of the retinal output following photoreceptor loss is reversible, and therefore, amenable to restorative strategies. PMID:26924962

  8. Identification of Helicobacter pylori in skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Missall, Tricia A; Pruden, Samuel; Nelson, Christine; Fohn, Laurel; Vidal, Claudia I; Hurley, M Yadira

    2012-06-01

    A 23-year-old Chinese man presented with a 3-year history of a pruritic eruption. On examination, pink urticarial papules associated with hyperpigmented reticulated patches were noted on his neck, back, and upper chest. Histopathology revealed vacuolar interface dermatitis and numerous gram-negative rods within a dilated hair follicle. The organisms were reactive with anti-Helicobacter pylori immunohistochemisty. The histologic findings and clinical presentation support the diagnosis of prurigo pigmentosa. Additional testing demonstrated a positive urease breath test and serum H. pylori IgG antibodies. The patient was referred to gastroenterology and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After treatment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed chronic gastritis without evidence of H. pylori infection and his skin showed reticulated hyperpigmented patches without evidence of active inflammatory papules. Although previous reports have associated prurigo pigmentosa to H. Pylori gastritis, this is the first report of H. pylori organisms identified in a skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

  9. Lin28b stimulates the reprogramming of rat Müller glia to retinal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Tao, Zui; Xue, Langyue; Zeng, Yuxiao; Wang, Yi; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-03-01

    In lower-order vertebrates, Müller glia exhibit characteristics of retinal progenitor cells, while in higher vertebrates, such as mammals, the regenerative capacity of Müller glia is limited. Recently, we reported that Lin28b promoted the trans-differentiation of Müller cells to rod photoreceptor and bipolar cells in the retina of retinitis pigmentosa rat model, whereas it is unclear whether Lin28b can stimulate the reprogramming of Müller glia in vitro for transplantation into a damaged retina. In the present study, Long-Evens rat Müller glia were infected with Adeno-Lin28b or Adeno-GFP. Over-expression of Lin28b in isolated rat Müller glia resulted in the suppression of GFAP expression, enhancement of cell proliferation and a significant increase of the expression of retinal progenitor markers 5 days after infection. Moreover, Lin28b caused a significant reduction of the Let-7 family of microRNAs. Following sub-retinal space transplantation, Müller glia-derived retinal progenitors improved b-wave amplification of 30d Royal College of Surgeons retinitis pigmentosa model (RCS-P+) rats, as detected by electroretinography (ERG) recordings. Taken together, these data suggest that the up-regulation of Lin28b expression facilitated the reprogramming of Müller cells toward characteristics of retinal progenitors.

  10. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  11. Safety, efficacy, and quality control of a photoelectric dye-based retinal prosthesis (Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis) as a medical device.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Takarabe, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells as a result of genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The basic concept of retinal prostheses is to replace dead photoreceptor cells with artificial devices to stimulate the remaining neurons with electric currents or potentials. Photodiode arrays and digital camera-type electrode arrays are the two main approaches for retinal prostheses to stimulate retinal neurons, but these arrays have the problems of poor biocompatibility, low sensitivity, and low output of electric currents, and hence have a requirement for external electric sources (batteries). To overcome these problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses that absorb light and convert photon energy to generate electric potentials. The prototype, using a photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could induce intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking embryonic retinal tissues and cultured retinal neurons. The subretinal implantation of the prototype in the eyes of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats led to vision recovery as proved by a behavior test. The photoelectric dye that was chosen for the prototype did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. The surface potentials of the photoelectric dye-coupled film showed a rapid on-and-off response to illumination with a threshold for light intensity as measured by a Kelvin probe system. Photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film of large size, corresponding to a large visual field, could be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. Clinical studies of photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses in patients with retinitis pigmentosa who lose sight will be planned after the manufacturing

  12. [Vision engineering--photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses: Okayama University model].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko

    2007-04-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells by genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells still remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The replacement of dead photoreceptor cells with something artificial is the basic concept of retinal prostheses. The remaining retinal neurons can be stimulated by either electric current or electric potential. Photodiode array and electrode array are two main ways to stimulate retinal neurons as retinal prostheses. These retinal prostheses have problems such as low sensitivity and requiring outer electric sources (batteries). To overcome the problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses which absorb light and convert photon energy to electric potentials. The prototype, photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could generate intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking retinal tissues and also in cultured retinal neurons. The photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film in a large size, corresponding to wide visual field, can be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. After the production control and the quality control have been established, clinical trials of the photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses would be planned in concordance with the Drugs and Medical Devices Law to prove the safety and the efficacy.

  13. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays.

    PubMed

    Light, Jacob G; Fransen, James W; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V; McCall, Maureen A; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-11-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6-12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16-26 weeks post-implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission.

  14. Scabies incognito presenting as urticaria pigmentosa in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Roh, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Jee-Ho; Sung, Kyung-Jeh; Moon, Kee-Chan; Koh, Jai-Kyoung

    2002-01-01

    Misdiagnosis is frequent in scabies of infants and children because of a low index of suspicion, secondary eczematous changes, and inappropriate therapy. Topical or systemic corticosteroids may modify the clinical presentation of scabies and that situation is referred to as scabies incognito. We describe a 10-month-old infant with scabies incognito mimicking urticaria pigmentosa.

  15. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  16. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  17. Vitamin A Derivatives as Treatment Options for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65) known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients. PMID:23857173

  18. a Review of Retinal Prosthesis Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, Tran Trung; Maul, Tomas; Bargiela, Andrzej

    Age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa are two of the most common diseases that cause degeneration in the outer retina, which can lead to several visual impairments up to blindness. Vision restoration is an important goal for which several different research approaches are currently being pursued. We are concerned with restoration via retinal prosthetic devices. Prostheses can be implemented intraocularly and extraocularly, which leads to different categories of devices. Cortical Prostheses and Optic Nerve Prostheses are examples of extraocular solutions while Epiretinal Prostheses and Subretinal Prostheses are examples of intraocular solutions. Some of the prostheses that are successfully implanted and tested in animals as well as humans can restore basic visual functions but still have limitations. This paper will give an overview of the current state of art of Retinal Prostheses and compare the advantages and limitations of each type. The purpose of this review is thus to summarize the current technologies and approaches used in developing Retinal Prostheses and therefore to lay a foundation for future designs and research directions.

  19. Retinal dystrophies, genomic applications in diagnosis and prospects for therapy.

    PubMed

    Nash, Benjamin M; Wright, Dale C; Grigg, John R; Bennetts, Bruce; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2015-04-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RDs) are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. This review aims to demonstrate the high degree of genetic complexity in both the causative disease genes and their associated phenotypes, highlighting the more common clinical manifestation of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The review also provides insight to recent advances in genomic molecular diagnosis and gene and cell-based therapies for the RDs.

  20. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M

    2014-09-15

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement.

  1. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement. PMID:24647603

  2. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  3. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  4. Retinal remodeling in the Tg P347L rabbit, a large-eye model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Watt, C B; Rapp, K; Anderson, J; Lin, Y; Shaw, M V; Yang, J-H; Marc, R E

    2011-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited blinding disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal photoreceptors. There are numerous rodent models of retinal degeneration, but most are poor platforms for interventions that will translate into clinical practice. The rabbit possesses a number of desirable qualities for a model of retinal disease including a large eye and an existing and substantial knowledge base in retinal circuitry, anatomy, and ophthalmology. We have analyzed degeneration, remodeling, and reprogramming in a rabbit model of retinal degeneration, expressing a rhodopsin proline 347 to leucine transgene in a TgP347L rabbit as a powerful model to study the pathophysiology and treatment of retinal degeneration. We show that disease progression in the TgP347L rabbit closely tracks human cone-sparing RP, including the cone-associated preservation of bipolar cell signaling and triggering of reprogramming. The relatively fast disease progression makes the TgP347L rabbit an excellent model for gene therapy, cell biological intervention, progenitor cell transplantation, surgical interventions, and bionic prosthetic studies.

  5. Bestrophin 1 and retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adiv A; Guziewicz, Karina E; Lee, C Justin; Kalathur, Ravi C; Pulido, Jose S; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2017-01-30

    Mutations in the gene BEST1 are causally associated with as many as five clinically distinct retinal degenerative diseases, which are collectively referred to as the "bestrophinopathies". These five associated diseases are: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy, adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. The most common of these is Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Bestrophin 1 (Best1), the protein encoded by the gene BEST1, has been the subject of a great deal of research since it was first identified nearly two decades ago. Today we know that Best1 functions as both a pentameric anion channel and a regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Best1 is an integral membrane protein which, within the eye, is uniquely expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium where it predominantly localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane. Within the brain, Best1 expression has been documented in both glial cells and astrocytes where it functions in both tonic GABA release and glutamate transport. The crystal structure of Best1 has revealed critical information about how Best1 functions as an ion channel and how Ca(2+) regulates that function. Studies using animal models have led to critical insights into the physiological roles of Best1 and advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the development of patient-derived, "disease in a dish" models. In this article we review our knowledge of Best1 and discuss prospects for near-term clinical trials to test therapies for the bestrophinopathies, a currently incurable and untreatable set of diseases.

  6. Neural reprogramming in retinal degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Robert E.; Jones, Bryan W.; Anderson, James R.; Kinard, Krista; Marshak, David W.; Wilson, John H.; Wensel, Theodore; Lucas, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Early visual defects in degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) may arise from phased remodeling of the neural retina. We sought to explore the functional expression of ionotropic (iGluR) and group III, type 6 metabotropic (mGluR6) glutamate receptors in late-stage photoreceptor degenerations. Methods Excitation mapping with organic cations and computational molecular phenotyping were used to determine whether retinal neurons displayed functional glutamate receptor signaling in rodent models of retinal degenerations and a sample of human RP. Results After photoreceptor loss in rodent models of RP, bipolar cells lose mGluR6 and iGluR glutamate-activated currents, while amacrine and ganglion cells retain iGluR-mediated responsivity. Paradoxically, amacrine and ganglion cells show spontaneous iGluR signals in vivo even though bipolar cells lack glutamate-coupled depolarization mechanisms. Cone survival can rescue iGluR expression by OFF bipolar cells. In a case of human RP with cone sparing, iGluR signaling appeared intact, but the numbers of bipolar cells expressing functional iGluRs was double that of normal retina. Conclusions RP triggers permanent loss of bipolar cell glutamate receptor expression, though spontaneous iGluR-mediated signaling by amacrine and ganglion cells implies that such truncated bipolar cells still release glutamate in response to some non-glutamatergic depolarization. Focal cone-sparing can preserve iGluR display by nearby bipolar cells, which may facilitate late-RP photoreceptor transplant attempts. An instance of human RP provides evidence that rod bipolar cell dendrite switching likely triggers new gene expression patterns and may impair cone pathway function. PMID:17591910

  7. Inner retinal change in a novel rd1-FTL mouse model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Greferath, Ursula; Anderson, Emily E.; Jobling, Andrew I.; Vessey, Kirstan A.; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U.; Kalloniatis, Michael; Fletcher, Erica L.

    2015-01-01

    While photoreceptor loss is the most devastating result of inherited retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa, inner retinal neurons also undergo significant alteration. Detailing these changes has become important as many vision restorative therapies target the remaining neurons. In this study, the rd1-Fos-Tau-LacZ (rd1-FTL) mouse model was used to explore inner retinal change at a late stage of retinal degeneration, after the loss of photoreceptor nuclei. The rd1-FTL model carries a mutation in the phosphodiesterase gene, Pde6b, and an axonally targeted transgenic beta galactosidase reporter system under the control of the c-fos promoter. Retinae of transgenic rd1-FTL mice and control FTL animals aged 2–12 months were processed for indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry. At 2 months of age, a time when the majority of photoreceptor nuclei are lost, there was negligible c-fos reporter (FTL) expression, however, from 4 months, reporter expression was observed to increase within subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells within the central retina. These areas of inner retinal FTL expression coincided with regions that contained aberrant Müller cells. Specifically, these cells exhibited reduced glutamine synthetase and Kir4.1 immunolabelling, whilst showing evidence of proliferative gliosis (increased cyclinD1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression). These changes were limited to distinct regions where cone photoreceptor terminals were absent. Overall, these results highlight that distinct areas of the rd1-FTL central retina undergo significant glial alterations after cone photoreceptor loss. These areas coincide with up-regulation of the c-fos reporter in the inner retina, which may represent a change in neuronal function/plasticity. The rd1-FTL mouse is a useful model system to probe changes that occur in the inner retina at later stages of retinal degeneration. PMID:26283925

  8. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm(-2) (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  9. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm-2 (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  10. Retine revisited.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D E

    2002-10-01

    Retine, so named by Albert Szent-Györgyi, an inhibitor of the growth of transplanted malignant tumours in animals, is present in all mammalian tissues and in urine. Its inhibitory activity was extensively investigated by Szent-Györgyi, but its exact chemical identity was not determined. Details of the reported physical and chemical properties of retine and its ubiquitous occurrence identify it as being identical to a complex mixture of lipid 2,4-diketones of similar ubiquitous occurrence. This lipid mixture has been extensively studied, and individual members have been synthesized.

  11. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  12. Non-syndromic retinal ciliopathies: translating gene discovery into therapy.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Roepman, Ronald; Cremers, Frans P M; den Hollander, Anneke I; Mans, Dorus A

    2012-10-15

    Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing have accelerated the discovery of gene mutations and modifier alleles implicated in inherited retinal degeneration in humans. To date, 158 genes have been found to be mutated in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Approximately one-third of the gene defects underlying retinal degeneration affect the structure and/or function of the 'connecting cilium' in photoreceptors. This structure corresponds to the transition zone of a prototypic cilium, a region with increasing relevance for ciliary homeostasis. The connecting cilium connects the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptor, mediating bi-directional transport of phototransducing proteins required for vision. In fact, the outer segment, connecting cilium and associated basal body, forms a highly specialized sensory cilium, fully dedicated to photoreception and subsequent signal transduction to the brain. At least 21 genes that encode ciliary proteins are implicated in non-syndromic retinal dystrophies such as cone dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The generation and characterization of vertebrate retinal ciliopathy animal models have revealed insights into the molecular disease mechanism which are indispensable for the development and evaluation of therapeutic strategies. Gene augmentation therapy has proven to be safe and successful in restoring long-term sight in mice, dogs and humans suffering from LCA or RP. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the genes, mutations and modifier alleles involved in non-syndromic retinal ciliopathies, review the progress in dissecting the associated retinal disease mechanisms and evaluate gene augmentation approaches to antagonize retinal degeneration in these ciliopathies.

  13. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  14. Activation of Bone Marrow-Derived Microglia Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Manabu; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Nakamura, Hajime; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2008-01-01

    The role of microglia in neurodegeneration is controversial, although microglial activation in the retina has been shown to provide an early response against infection, injury, ischemia, and degeneration. Here we show that endogenous bone marrow (BM)-derived microglia play a protective role in vascular and neural degeneration in the retinitis pigmentosa model of inherited retinal degeneration. BM-derived cells were recruited to the degenerating retina where they differentiated into microglia and subsequently localized to the degenerating vessels and neurons. Inhibition of stromal-derived factor-1 in the retina reduced the number of BM-derived microglia and accelerated the rate of neurovascular degeneration. Systemic depletion of myeloid progenitors also accelerated the degenerative process. Conversely, activation of BM-derived myeloid progenitors by systemic administration of both granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin resulted in the deceleration of retinal degeneration and the promotion of cone cell survival. These data indicate that BM-derived microglia may play a protective role in retinitis pigmentosa. Functional activation of BM-derived myeloid progenitors by cytokine therapy may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of inherited retinal degeneration and other neurodegenerative diseases, regardless of the underlying genetic defect. PMID:18483210

  15. Dendrimer-based targeted intravitreal therapy for sustained attenuation of neuroinflammation in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Raymond; Guru, Bharath R; Glybina, Inna V; Mishra, Manoj K; Kennedy, Alexander; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2012-01-01

    Retinal neuroinflammation, mediated by activated microglia, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cell loss in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Targeted drug therapy for attenuation of neuroinflammation in the retina was explored using hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-drug conjugate nanodevices. We show that, upon intravitreal administration, PAMAM dendrimers selectively localize within activated outer retinal microglia in two rat models of retinal degeneration, but not in the retina of healthy controls. This pathology-dependent biodistribution was exploited for drug delivery, by covalently conjugating fluocinolone acetonide to the dendrimer. The conjugate released the drug in a sustained manner over 90 days. In vivo efficacy was assessed using the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat retinal degeneration model over a four-week period when peak retinal degeneration occurs. One intravitreal injection of 1 μg of FA conjugated to 7 μg of the dendrimer was able to arrest retinal degeneration, preserve photoreceptor outer nuclear cell counts, and attenuate activated microglia, for an entire month. These studies suggest that PAMAM dendrimers (with no targeting ligands) have an intrinsic ability to selectively localize in activated microglia, and can deliver drugs inside these cells for a sustained period for the treatment of retinal neuroinflammation.

  16. Cellular responses following retinal injuries and therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Nicolás; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Campello, Laura; Maneu, Victoria; De la Villa, Pedro; Lax, Pedro; Pinilla, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinitis pigmentosa each have a different etiology and pathogenesis. However, at the cellular and molecular level, the response to retinal injury is similar in all of them, and results in morphological and functional impairment of retinal cells. This retinal degeneration may be triggered by gene defects, increased intraocular pressure, high levels of blood glucose, other types of stress or aging, but they all frequently induce a set of cell signals that lead to well-established and similar morphological and functional changes, including controlled cell death and retinal remodeling. Interestingly, an inflammatory response, oxidative stress and activation of apoptotic pathways are common features in all these diseases. Furthermore, it is important to note the relevant role of glial cells, including astrocytes, Müller cells and microglia, because their response to injury is decisive for maintaining the health of the retina or its degeneration. Several therapeutic approaches have been developed to preserve retinal function or restore eyesight in pathological conditions. In this context, neuroprotective compounds, gene therapy, cell transplantation or artificial devices should be applied at the appropriate stage of retinal degeneration to obtain successful results. This review provides an overview of the common and distinctive features of retinal neurodegenerative diseases, including the molecular, anatomical and functional changes caused by the cellular response to damage, in order to establish appropriate treatments for these pathologies.

  17. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  18. Retinal Pigment Epithelium Differentiation of Stem Cells: Current Status and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Uygun, Basak E.; Sharma, Nripen; Yarmush, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the cause of a number of degenerative retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, leading to blindness that affects three million Americans as of now. Transplantation of RPE aims to restore retinal structure and the interaction between the RPE and photoreceptors, which is fundamental to sight. Although a significant amount of progress has been made in the past 20 years in autologous RPE transplantation, sources for RPE cells are limited. Recent advances in stem cell culture and differentiation techniques have allowed the generation of RPE cells from pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we discuss strategies for generating functional RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and summarize transplantation studies of these derived RPEs. We conclude with challenges in cell-replacement therapies using human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPEs. PMID:20528731

  19. Cloning and characterization of canine SHARP1 and its evaluation as a positional candidate for canine early retinal degeneration (erd).

    PubMed

    Kukekova, Anna V; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2003-07-17

    Canine early retinal degeneration (erd) is an early onset form of canine progressive retinal atrophy phenotypically similar to human retinitis pigmentosa. In a previous study, the locus responsible for erd was mapped to canine chromosome 27 in the region corresponding to HSA12p, a region where no human retinal degeneration loci have been mapped. Canine SHARP1 gene has been localized on CFA27 in the erd interval by RH mapping, and considered as a positional candidate gene for erd. SHARP1 was cloned and sequenced from normal and erd affected dogs, and no disease-causing mutations were identified. Genotyping of 117 dogs from informative pedigrees did not reveal any recombinants between SHARP1 and erd. To date SHARP1 gene is the closest gene-specific marker to erd; genotyping additional informative pedigrees, and sequencing SHARP1 upstream regions from normal and affected dogs will be necessary to establish if SHARP1 is involved in this canine retinal disease.

  20. The molecular basis of human retinal and vitreoretinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Wolfgang; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Neidhardt, John

    2010-09-01

    During the last two to three decades, a large body of work has revealed the molecular basis of many human disorders, including retinal and vitreoretinal degenerations and dysfunctions. Although belonging to the group of orphan diseases, they affect probably more than two million people worldwide. Most excitingly, treatment of a particular form of congenital retinal degeneration is now possible. A major advantage for treatment is the unique structure and accessibility of the eye and its different components, including the vitreous and retina. Knowledge of the many different eye diseases affecting retinal structure and function (night and colour blindness, retinitis pigmentosa, cone and cone rod dystrophies, photoreceptor dysfunctions, as well as vitreoretinal traits) is critical for future therapeutic development. We have attempted to present a comprehensive picture of these disorders, including biological, clinical, genetic and molecular information. The structural organization of the review leads the reader through non-syndromic and syndromic forms of (i) rod dominated diseases, (ii) cone dominated diseases, (iii) generalized retinal degenerations and (iv) vitreoretinal disorders, caused by mutations in more than 165 genes. Clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity have an important impact on genetic testing and counselling of affected families. As phenotypes do not always correlate with the respective genotypes, it is of utmost importance that clinicians, geneticists, counsellors, diagnostic laboratories and basic researchers understand the relationships between phenotypic manifestations and specific genes, as well as mutations and pathophysiologic mechanisms. We discuss future perspectives.

  1. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Ferrell, William D; Watt, Carl B; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease.

  2. Early visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Prokofyeva, Elena; Troeger, Eric; Wilke, Robert; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2011-01-01

    The present retrospective study compared initial visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) on the basis of records of 544 patients diagnosed with a wide variety of IRD at the Tuebingen University Eye Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Age at first onset of symptoms was noted, and the following clinical data were analyzed: visual acuity (VA), night vision disturbances, photophobia, onset of visual field defects, best corrected VA, and types of visual field defects. Median age at visual symptom onset was defined with 25th and 75th percentiles and compared in 15 IRD types. The main trends in VA changes in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophies were identified. This study was the first to combine disease history and clinical data analysis in such a wide variety of IRD. It showed that patterns of initial symptoms in IRD can provide extra clues for early differential diagnosis and inclusion of IRD patients in clinical trials.

  3. Insights from Genetic Model Systems of Retinal Degeneration: Role of Epsins in Retinal Angiogenesis and VEGFR2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Liu, Yanjun; Deng, Lin; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The retina is a light sensitive tissue that contains specialized photoreceptor cells called rods and cones which process visual signals. These signals are relayed to the brain through interneurons and the fibers of the optic nerve. The retina is susceptible to a variety of degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other inherited retinal degenerations. In order to reveal the mechanism underlying these diseases and to find methods for the prevention/treatment of retinal degeneration, animal models have been generated to mimic human eye diseases. In this paper, several well-characterized and commonly used animal models are reviewed. Of particular interest are the contributions of these models to our understanding of the mechanisms of retinal degeneration and thereby providing novel treatment options including gene therapy, stem cell therapy, nanomedicine, and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. Role of newly-identified adaptor protein epsins from our laboratory is discussed in retinal angiogenesis and VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:28191500

  4. Perspectives of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Age-Related Retinal Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Holan, Vladimir; Hermankova, Barbora; Kossl, Jan

    2017-03-17

    Retinal degenerative diseases, which include age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma, mostly affect the elderly population, and are the most common cause of decreased quality of vision or even blindness. So far, there is no satisfactory treatment protocol to prevent, stop or cure these disorders. A great hope and promise for patients suffering from retinal diseases is represented by stem cell-based therapy which could replace diseased or missing retinal cells, and support regeneration. In this respect, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be obtained from the particular patient, and used as autologous cells, have turned out to be a promising stem cell type for treatment. Here we show that MSCs can differentiate into cells expressing markers of retinal cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by retinal tissue and produce a number of growth and neuroprotective factors for retinal regeneration. All of these properties make MSCs a prospective cell type for cell-based therapy of age-related retinal degenerative diseases.

  5. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  6. Intra-familial Similarity of Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence in Inherited Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yuka; Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Akio; Gotoh, Norimoto; Makiyama, Yukiko; Oishi, Maho; Kurimoto, Masafumi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    To examine the similarity of wide-field fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in inherited retinal dystrophy between siblings and between parents and their children. The subjects included 17 siblings (12 with retinitis pigmentosa and 5 with cone rod dystrophy) and 10 parent-child pairs (8 with retinitis pigmentosa and 2 with cone rod dystrophy). We quantified the similarity of wide-field FAF using image processing techniques of cropping, binarization, superimposition, and subtraction. The estimated similarity of the siblings was compared with that of the parent-child pairs and that of the age-matched unrelated patients. The similarity between siblings was significantly higher that of parent-child pairs or that of age-matched unrelated patients (P = 0.004 and P = 0.049, respectively). Wide-field FAF images were similar between siblings with inherited retinal dystrophy but different between parent-child pairs. This suggests that aging is a confounding factor in genotype-phenotype correlation studies.

  7. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  8. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  9. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  10. Degeneration stage-specific response pattern of retinal ganglion cell spikes in rd10 mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Park, D J; Senok, S S; Goo, Y S

    2015-01-01

    It is known that with retinal degeneration there is rewiring of retinal networks. Consequently, electrical stimulation of the degenerating retina produces responses that differ according to the stage of retinal degeneration. We sought to delineate a degeneration stage-specific parameter for the response pattern of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes as a strategy for stage-specific electrical stimulation for perceptual efficiency of prosthetic vision devices. Electrically-evoked RGC spikes were recorded at different degeneration stages in the rd10 mouse model for human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Retinal explants mounted on an 8×8 multi-electrode array were stimulated by applying 1 Hz cathodic-phase first biphasic current pulses. RGC firing rate during the first 100 ms post-stimulus was compared to that during the 100-1000 ms period and a response ratio of 100 ms (RR100 ms) was calculated through the different postnatal weeks. Our results show that during post-stimulus 100-1000 ms, the degree of correlation between pulse amplitude and evoked RGC spikes drastically decreases at PNW 4.5. This pattern was closely matched by the RR100 ms curve at this stage. We conclude that the RR100 ms might be a good indicator of the therapeutic potential of a retinal electrical prosthesis.

  11. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    SciTech Connect

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. High resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of retinal tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K; Caprioli, Richard M; Schey, Kevin L

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4(-/-) knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  13. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism’s surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4−/− knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers. PMID:24819461

  14. High Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Retinal Tissue Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Koutalos, Yiannis; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2014-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) has the ability to provide an enormous amount of information on the abundances and spatial distributions of molecules within biological tissues. The rapid progress in the development of this technology significantly improves our ability to analyze smaller and smaller areas and features within tissues. The mammalian eye has evolved over millions of years to become an essential asset for survival, providing important sensory input of an organism's surroundings. The highly complex sensory retina of the eye is comprised of numerous cell types organized into specific layers with varying dimensions, the thinnest of which is the 10 μm retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This single cell layer and the photoreceptor layer contain the complex biochemical machinery required to convert photons of light into electrical signals that are transported to the brain by axons of retinal ganglion cells. Diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, occur when the functions of these cells are interrupted by molecular processes that are not fully understood. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high spatial resolution MALDI IMS and FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry in the Abca4 -/- knockout mouse model of Stargardt disease, a juvenile onset form of macular degeneration. The spatial distributions and identity of lipid and retinoid metabolites are shown to be unique to specific retinal cell layers.

  15. First-in-Human Trial of a Novel Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Lauren N.; Blamey, Peter J.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Luu, Chi D.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F.; Briggs, Robert J.; Opie, Nicholas L.; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N.; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris D.; Walker, Janine G.; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Allen, Penelope J.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses (“bionic eyes”) have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576 PMID:25521292

  16. Photoreceptor counting and montaging of en-face retinal images from an adaptive optics fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Werner, John S.

    2007-05-01

    A fast and efficient method for quantifying photoreceptor density in images obtained with an en-face flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging system is described. To improve accuracy of cone counting, en-face images are analyzed over extended areas. This is achieved with two separate semiautomated algorithms: (1) a montaging algorithm that joins retinal images with overlapping common features without edge effects and (2) a cone density measurement algorithm that counts the individual cones in the montaged image. The accuracy of the cone density measurement algorithm is high, with >97% agreement for a simulated retinal image (of known density, with low contrast) and for AO images from normal eyes when compared with previously reported histological data. Our algorithms do not require spatial regularity in cone packing and are, therefore, useful for counting cones in diseased retinas, as demonstrated for eyes with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

  17. RPE65: role in the visual cycle, human retinal disease, and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2009-06-01

    RPE65 is an isomerohydrolase expressed in retinal pigment epithelium. It is critical for the regeneration of the visual pigment necessary for both rod and cone-mediated vision. Mutations in human RPE65 cause Leber's congenital amaurosis and other forms of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa which are associated with early-onset blindness. Several RPE65 animal models including two different mouse models and a naturally occurring canine model have been thoroughly characterized to determine the mechanisms that underlie RPE65 associated retinal dystrophies. More recently, substantial effort has gone into designing gene therapies for these diseases. Based on several encouraging reports from animal models, at least three clinical trials are currently underway for the treatment of LCA using modified AAV vectors carrying the RPE65 cDNA and have reported positive preliminary results.

  18. RPE65: Role in the visual cycle, human retinal disease, and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    RPE65 is an isomerohydrolase expressed in retinal pigment epithelium. It is critical for the regeneration of the visual pigment necessary for both rod and cone-mediated vision. Mutations in human RPE65 cause Leber’s congenital amaurosis and other forms of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa which are associated with early-onset blindness. Several RPE65 animal models including two different mouse models and a naturally occurring canine model have been thoroughly characterized to determine the mechanisms that underlie RPE65 associated retinal dystrophies. More recently, substantial effort has gone into designing gene therapies for these diseases. Based on several encouraging reports from animal models, at least three clinical trials are currently underway for the treatment of LCA using modified AAV vectors carrying the RPE65 cDNA and have reported positive preliminary results. PMID:19373675

  19. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD. PMID:27990367

  20. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-09-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision.

  1. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  2. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanming; Li, Jianli; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Lewis, Richard A.; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives. Methods We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy. Results Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42) of the unsolved cases. Conclusion Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases. PMID:27788217

  3. AAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal disorders in large animal models.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lhériteau, Elsa; Lhéariteau, Elsa; Moullier, Phillip; Rolling, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inherited and noninherited blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they elicit minimal immune responses and mediated long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types. Extensive preclinical evaluation of new strategies in large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. Because of differences in the retinal structures among species and unique structures such as the macula and fovea in the primate retina, nonhuman primates are widely used as preclinical animal models. But the observation of inherited retinal degenerations in dogs, which share a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with humans, has led to the characterization of several canine models for retinal diseases, one of which has already responded successfully to AAV-mediated gene therapy. This article presents a review and detailed discussion of the various large animal models available for the study of AAV-mediated gene-based therapies in the retina.

  4. Panel-Based Population Next-Generation Sequencing for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, Matthew; Duignan, Emma; Malone, Conor P. G.; Stephenson, Kirk; Saad, Tahira; McDermott, Ciara; Green, Andrew; Keegan, David; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F.; Farrar, G. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies affect approximately two and a half million people globally, yet the majority of affected patients lack clear genetic diagnoses given the diverse range of genes and mutations implicated in these conditions. We present results from a next-generation sequencing study of a large inherited retinal disease patient population, with the goal of providing clear and actionable genetic diagnoses. Targeted sequencing was performed on 539 individuals from 309 inherited retinal disease pedigrees. Causative mutations were identified in the majority (57%, 176/309) of pedigrees. We report the association of many previously unreported variants with retinal disease, as well as new disease phenotypes associated with known genes, including the first association of the SLC24A1 gene with retinitis pigmentosa. Population statistics reporting the genes most commonly implicated in retinal disease in the cohort are presented, as are some diagnostic conundrums that can arise during such studies. Inherited retinal diseases represent an exemplar group of disorders for the application of panel-based next-generation sequencing as an effective tool for detection of causative mutations. PMID:27624628

  5. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach. Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results. Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance. During degeneration, physiological changes in RGCs affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials.

  6. A long-term efficacy study of gene replacement therapy for RPGR-associated retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhijian; Hiriyanna, Suja; Qian, Haohua; Mookherjee, Suddhasil; Campos, Maria M.; Gao, Chun; Fariss, Robert; Sieving, Paul A.; Li, Tiansen; Colosi, Peter; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene account for >70% of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and 15–20% of all inherited retinal degeneration. Gene replacement therapy for RPGR-XLRP was hampered by the relatively slow disease progression in mouse models and by difficulties in cloning the full-length RPGR-ORF15 cDNA that includes a purine-rich 3′-coding region; however, its effectiveness has recently been demonstrated in four dogs with RPGR mutations. To advance the therapy to clinical stage, we generated new stable vectors in AAV8 or AAV9 carrying mouse and human full-length RPGR-ORF15-coding sequence and conducted a comprehensive long-term dose-efficacy study in Rpgr-knockout mice. After validating their ability to produce full-length proteins that localize to photoreceptor connecting cilia, we evaluated various vector doses in mice during a 2-year study. We demonstrate that eyes treated with a single injection of mouse or human RPGR-ORF15 vector at an optimal dose maintained the expression of RPGR-ORF15 throughout the study duration and exhibited higher electroretinogram amplitude, thicker photoreceptor layer and better targeting of opsins to outer segments compared with sham-treated eyes. Furthermore, mice that received treatment at an advanced age also showed remarkable preservation of retinal structure and function. Retinal toxicity was observed at high vector doses, highlighting the importance of careful dose optimization in future clinical experiments. Our long-term dose-efficacy study should facilitate the design of human trials with human RPGR-ORF15 vector as a clinical candidate. PMID:25877300

  7. Loss of RPGR glutamylation underlies the pathogenic mechanism of retinal dystrophy caused by TTLL5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xun; Park, James H.; Gumerson, Jessica; Wu, Zhijian; Swaroop, Anand; Qian, Haohua; Roll-Mecak, Antonina; Li, Tiansen

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene are a major cause of retinitis pigmentosa, a blinding retinal disease resulting from photoreceptor degeneration. A photoreceptor specific ORF15 variant of RPGR (RPGRORF15), carrying multiple Glu-Gly tandem repeats and a C-terminal basic domain of unknown function, localizes to the connecting cilium where it is thought to regulate cargo trafficking. Here we show that tubulin tyrosine ligase like-5 (TTLL5) glutamylates RPGRORF15 in its Glu-Gly–rich repetitive region containing motifs homologous to the α-tubulin C-terminal tail. The RPGRORF15 C-terminal basic domain binds to the noncatalytic cofactor interaction domain unique to TTLL5 among TTLL family glutamylases and targets TTLL5 to glutamylate RPGR. Only TTLL5 and not other TTLL family glutamylases interacts with RPGRORF15 when expressed transiently in cells. Consistent with this, a Ttll5 mutant mouse displays a complete loss of RPGR glutamylation without marked changes in tubulin glutamylation levels. The Ttll5 mutant mouse develops slow photoreceptor degeneration with early mislocalization of cone opsins, features resembling those of Rpgr-null mice. Moreover TTLL5 disease mutants that cause human retinal dystrophy show impaired glutamylation of RPGRORF15. Thus, RPGRORF15 is a novel glutamylation substrate, and this posttranslational modification is critical for its function in photoreceptors. Our study uncovers the pathogenic mechanism whereby absence of RPGRORF15 glutamylation leads to retinal pathology in patients with TTLL5 gene mutations and connects these two genes into a common disease pathway. PMID:27162334

  8. Retinal dystrophies, genomic applications in diagnosis and prospects for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Benjamin M.; Wright, Dale C.; Grigg, John R.; Bennetts, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RDs) are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. This review aims to demonstrate the high degree of genetic complexity in both the causative disease genes and their associated phenotypes, highlighting the more common clinical manifestation of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The review also provides insight to recent advances in genomic molecular diagnosis and gene and cell-based therapies for the RDs. PMID:26835369

  9. Differential Light-induced Responses in Sectorial Inherited Retinal Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Eva; Cordomí, Arnau; Aguilà, Mònica; Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Dong, Xiaoyun; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Garriga, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited degenerative retinopathies caused by abnormalities of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor located in the vertebrate retina and is responsible for dim light vision. Here, novel M39R and N55K variants were identified as causing an intriguing sector phenotype of RP in affected patients, with selective degeneration in the inferior retina. To gain insights into the molecular aspects associated with this sector RP phenotype, whose molecular mechanism remains elusive, the mutations were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in heterologous systems, and studied by biochemical, spectroscopic, and functional assays. M39R and N55K opsins had variable degrees of chromophore regeneration when compared with WT opsin but showed no gross structural misfolding or altered trafficking. M39R showed a faster rate for transducin activation than WT rhodopsin with a faster metarhodopsinII decay, whereas N55K presented a reduced activation rate and an altered photobleaching pattern. N55K also showed an altered retinal release from the opsin binding pocket upon light exposure, affecting its optimal functional response. Our data suggest that these sector RP mutations cause different protein phenotypes that may be related to their different clinical progression. Overall, these findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms of sector RP associated with rhodopsin mutations. PMID:25359768

  10. ASIC design and data communications for the Boston retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shire, Douglas B; Ellersick, William; Kelly, Shawn K; Doyle, Patrick; Priplata, Attila; Drohan, William; Mendoza, Oscar; Gingerich, Marcus; McKee, Bruce; Wyatt, John L; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and testing of a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that has been developed as a key component of the Boston retinal prosthesis. This device has been designed for patients who are blind due to age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa. Key safety and communication features of the low-power ASIC are described, as are the highly configurable neural stimulation current waveforms that are delivered to its greater than 256 output electrodes. The ASIC was created using an 0.18 micron Si fabrication process utilizing standard 1.8 volt CMOS transistors as well as 20 volt lightly doped drain FETs. The communication system receives frequency-shift keyed inputs at 6.78 MHz from an implanted secondary coil, and transmits data back to the control unit through a lower-bandwidth channel that employs load-shift keying. The design's safety is ensured by on-board electrode voltage monitoring, stimulus charge limits, error checking of data transmitted to the implant, and comprehensive self-test and performance monitoring features. Each stimulus cycle is initiated by a transmitted word with a full 32-bit error check code. Taken together, these features allow researchers to safely and wirelessly tailor retinal stimulation and vision recovery for each patient.

  11. Clinical Characteristics and Current Therapies for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307–316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod–cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone–rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  12. Genetic Instability in the Mating Type System of Tetrahymena pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ellen M.; Orias, Eduardo

    1987-01-01

    Selfing clones of Tetrahymena pigmentosa show several interesting genetic features, and provide some insight into the mechanisms of mating type (mt) determination. They differ significantly from those of Tetrahymena thermophila. They are distributed nonrandomly in crosses. Their rates of stabilization are highly variable, but most are much lower than those reported for T. thermophila. A number of subclones derived from nearly all the selfers have maintained stable mts in culture for several years. However, some subclones manifest persistent selfing, long after the calculated completion of allelic assortment for heterozygous loci. This phenomenon along with the perpetual maintenance of dominant mts in heterozygotes shows that phenotypic assortment is not involved in mt expression.—In crosses, many selfers exhibit quantitative and qualitative aberrations in the transmission of alleles to the gametes; some of the micronuclear changes underlying these aberrations occur during vegetative growth. There are rare illegitimate appearances of dominant alleles in sexual progeny, and more common illegitimate appearances of the most recessive phenotype.—Various models to explain mt determination in this species are considered. One which might account for the troubling phenomena of the system consists of an active mat expression site, with "cassettes" at other sites specific for the different dominant alleles and capable of transposition to the expression site. PMID:3692137

  13. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  14. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  15. Rod-cone interactions and analysis of retinal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Arden, G B; Hogg, C R

    1985-01-01

    Cone flicker threshold rises as the rods dark adapt, though the cone threshold to continuous light remains constant. The rise is normally about 1 log unit, but in certain patients who complain of night blindness it may be as great as 2.5 log units. In these persons the kinetics of the rod-cone interaction are those of the recovery of rod sensitivity. The rods impose a low-pass filter on the cones. This effect is absent in congenital nyctalopia and X-linked retinoschisis. We suggest that cone flicker is maintained through a feedback system involving horizontal cells, and when the rod dark current returns in dark adaptation this feedback is altered. Rod cone interaction thus tests rod dark current, and cases of abnormal interaction in patients with retinitis pigmentosa occur, which indicate that the transduction mechanism and the membrane dark current may be differentially affected. Images PMID:3873959

  16. An experimental comparison of human and bovine rhodopsin provides insight into the molecular basis of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Morrow, James M; Castiglione, Gianni M; Dungan, Sarah Z; Tang, Portia L; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Hauser, Frances E; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-30

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment that mediates dim-light vision in vertebrates and is a model system for the study of retinal disease. The majority of rhodopsin experiments are performed using bovine rhodopsin; however, recent evidence suggests that significant functional differences exist among mammalian rhodopsins. In this study, we identify differences in both thermal decay and light-activated retinal release rates between bovine and human rhodopsin and perform mutagenesis studies to highlight two clusters of substitutions that contribute to these differences. We also demonstrate that the retinitis pigmentosa-associated mutation G51A behaves differently in human rhodopsin compared to bovine rhodopsin and determine that the thermal decay rate of an ancestrally reconstructed mammalian rhodopsin displays an intermediate phenotype compared to the two extant pigments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Nephronophthisis and retinal degeneration in tmem218-/- mice: a novel mouse model for Senior-Løken syndrome?

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Gelfman, C M; Issa, T; Payne, B J; Hansen, G M; Read, R W; Jones, C; Pitcher, M R; Ding, Z-M; DaCosta, C M; Shadoan, M K; Vance, R B; Powell, D R

    2015-05-01

    Mice deficient in TMEM218 (Tmem218(-/-) ) were generated as part of an effort to identify and validate pharmaceutically tractable targets for drug development through large-scale phenotypic screening of knockout mice. Routine diagnostics, expression analysis, histopathology, and electroretinogram analyses completed on Tmem218(-/-) mice identified a previously unknown role for TMEM218 in the development and function of the kidney and eye. The major observed phenotypes in Tmem218(-/-) mice were progressive cystic kidney disease and retinal degeneration. The renal lesions were characterized by diffuse renal cyst development with tubulointerstitial nephropathy and disruption of tubular basement membranes in essentially normal-sized kidneys. The retinal lesions were characterized by slow-onset loss of photoreceptors, which resulted in reduced electroretinogram responses. These renal and retinal lesions are most similar to those associated with nephronophthisis (NPHP) and retinitis pigmentosa in humans. At least 10% of NPHP cases present with extrarenal conditions, which most often include retinal degeneration. Senior-Løken syndrome is characterized by the concurrent development of autosomal recessive NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutations in the known NPHP genes collectively account for only about 30% of NPHP cases, it is possible that TMEM218 could be involved in the development of similar ciliopathies in humans. In reviewing all other reported mouse models of NPHP, we suggest that Tmem218(-/-) mice could provide a useful model for elucidating the pathogenesis of cilia-associated disease in both the kidney and the retina, as well as in developing and testing novel therapeutic strategies for Senior-Løken syndrome.

  18. Activation of Müller cells occurs during retinal degeneration in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong Tao; Tian, Chun Yu; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2010-01-01

    Müller cells can be activated and included in different functions under many kinds of pathological conditions, however, the status of Müller cells in retinitis pigmentosa are still unknown. Using immunohistochemisty, Western blots and co-culture, we found that Müller cells RCS rats, a classic model of RP, could be activated during the progression of retinal degeneration. After being activated at early stage, Müller cells began to proliferate and hypertrophy, while at later stages, they formed a local 'glial seal' in the subretinal space. As markers of Müller cells activation, the expression of GFAP and ERK increased significantly with progression of retinal degeneration. Co-cultures of normal rat Müller cells and mixed RCS rat retinal cells show that Müller cells significantly increase GFAP and ERK in response to diffusable factors from the degenerting retina, which implies that Müller cells activation is a secondary response to retinal degeneration.

  19. Visual BOLD Response in Late Blind Subjects with Argus II Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, E.; Cicchini, G. M.; Cinelli, L.; Rizzo, S.; Morrone, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis technologies require that the visual system downstream of the retinal circuitry be capable of transmitting and elaborating visual signals. We studied the capability of plastic remodeling in late blind subjects implanted with the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis with psychophysics and functional MRI (fMRI). After surgery, six out of seven retinitis pigmentosa (RP) blind subjects were able to detect high-contrast stimuli using the prosthetic implant. However, direction discrimination to contrast modulated stimuli remained at chance level in all of them. No subject showed any improvement of contrast sensitivity in either eye when not using the Argus II. Before the implant, the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in V1 and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) was very weak or absent. Surprisingly, after prolonged use of Argus II, BOLD responses to visual input were enhanced. This is, to our knowledge, the first study tracking the neural changes of visual areas in patients after retinal implant, revealing a capacity to respond to restored visual input even after years of deprivation. PMID:27780207

  20. Primary visual cortical remapping in patients with inherited peripheral retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sónia; Pereira, Andreia Carvalho; Quendera, Bruno; Reis, Aldina; Silva, Eduardo Duarte; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Human studies addressing the long-term effects of peripheral retinal degeneration on visual cortical function and structure are scarce. Here we investigated this question in patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a genetic condition leading to peripheral visual degeneration. We acquired functional and anatomical magnetic resonance data from thirteen patients with different levels of visual loss and twenty-two healthy participants to study primary (V1) visual cortical retinotopic remapping and cortical thickness. We identified systematic visual field remapping in the absence of structural changes in the primary visual cortex of RP patients. Remapping consisted in a retinotopic eccentricity shift of central retinal inputs to more peripheral locations in V1. Importantly, this was associated with changes in visual experience, as assessed by the extent of the visual loss, with more constricted visual fields resulting in larger remapping. This pattern of remapping is consistent with expansion or shifting of neuronal receptive fields into the cortical regions with reduced retinal input. These data provide evidence for functional changes in V1 that are dependent on the magnitude of peripheral visual loss in RP, which may be explained by rapid cortical adaptation mechanisms or long-term cortical reorganization. This study highlights the importance of analyzing the retinal determinants of brain functional and structural alterations for future visual restoration approaches.

  1. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  2. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  3. Persistent inflammatory state after photoreceptor loss in an animal model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Noailles, Agustina; Maneu, Victoria; Campello, Laura; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Microglia act as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, including the retina. In response to damaging stimuli microglia adopt an activated state, which can progress into a phagocytic phenotype and play a potentially harmful role by eliciting the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in microglia during retinal degeneration in the homozygous P23H rat, a model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Microglial phenotypes, morphology and density were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and cytokine antibody array. In addition, we performed electroretinograms to evaluate the retinal response. In the P23H retina, sclera, choroid and ciliary body, inflammatory cells increased in number compared with the control at all ages analyzed. As the rats became older, a higher number of amoeboid MHC-II+ cells were observed in the P23H retina, which correlated with an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that, in the P23H model, retinal neuroinflammation persists throughout the rat’s life span even after photoreceptor depletion. Therefore, the inclusion of anti-inflammatory drugs at advanced stages of the neurodegenerative process may provide better retinal fitness so the remaining cells could still be used as targets of cellular or gene therapies. PMID:27624537

  4. neuroBi: A Highly Configurable Neurostimulator for a Retinal Prosthesis and Other Applications.

    PubMed

    Slater, Kyle D; Sinclair, Nicholas C; Nelson, Timothy S; Blamey, Peter J; McDermott, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis, a highly configurable external neurostimulator is required. In order to meet functional and safety specifications, it was necessary to develop a custom device. A system is presented which can deliver charge-balanced, constant-current biphasic pulses, with widely adjustable parameters, to arbitrary configurations of output electrodes. This system is shown to be effective in eliciting visual percepts in a patient with approximately 20 years of light perception vision only due to retinitis pigmentosa, using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. The flexibility of the system also makes it suitable for use in a number of other emerging clinical neurostimulation applications, including epileptic seizure suppression and closed-loop deep brain stimulation. Clinical trial registration number NCT01603576 (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  5. neuroBi: A Highly Configurable Neurostimulator for a Retinal Prosthesis and Other Applications

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Kyle D.; Nelson, Timothy S.; Blamey, Peter J.; Mcdermott, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis, a highly configurable external neurostimulator is required. In order to meet functional and safety specifications, it was necessary to develop a custom device. A system is presented which can deliver charge-balanced, constant-current biphasic pulses, with widely adjustable parameters, to arbitrary configurations of output electrodes. This system is shown to be effective in eliciting visual percepts in a patient with approximately 20 years of light perception vision only due to retinitis pigmentosa, using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. The flexibility of the system also makes it suitable for use in a number of other emerging clinical neurostimulation applications, including epileptic seizure suppression and closed-loop deep brain stimulation. Clinical trial registration number NCT01603576 (www.clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:27170910

  6. A fully organic retinal prosthesis restores vision in a rat model of degenerative blindness.

    PubMed

    Maya-Vetencourt, José Fernando; Ghezzi, Diego; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Colombo, Elisabetta; Mete, Maurizio; Feyen, Paul; Desii, Andrea; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Di Paolo, Mattia; Di Marco, Stefano; Ticconi, Flavia; Emionite, Laura; Shmal, Dmytro; Marini, Cecilia; Donelli, Ilaria; Freddi, Giuliano; Maccarone, Rita; Bisti, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Pertile, Grazia; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio

    2017-03-06

    The degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina is one of the major causes of adult blindness in humans. Unfortunately, no effective clinical treatments exist for the majority of retinal degenerative disorders. Here we report on the fabrication and functional validation of a fully organic prosthesis for long-term in vivo subretinal implantation in the eye of Royal College of Surgeons rats, a widely recognized model of retinitis pigmentosa. Electrophysiological and behavioural analyses reveal a prosthesis-dependent recovery of light sensitivity and visual acuity that persists up to 6-10 months after surgery. The rescue of the visual function is accompanied by an increase in the basal metabolic activity of the primary visual cortex, as demonstrated by positron emission tomography imaging. Our results highlight the possibility of developing a new generation of fully organic, highly biocompatible and functionally autonomous photovoltaic prostheses for subretinal implants to treat degenerative blindness.

  7. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  8. Design of a High-resolution Optoelectronic Retinal Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. So far retinal implants have had just a few electrodes, whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for any functional restoration of sight. We will discuss physical limitations on the number of stimulating electrodes and on delivery of information and power to the retinal implant. Using a model of extracellular stimulation we derive the threshold values of current and voltage as a function of electrode size and distance to the target cell. Electrolysis, tissue heating, and cross-talk between neighboring electrodes depend critically on separation between electrodes and cells, thus strongly limiting the pixels size and spacing. Minimal pixel density required for 20/80 visual acuity (2500 pixels/mm2, pixel size 20 um) cannot be achieved unless the target neurons are within 7 um of the electrodes. At a separation of 50 um, the density drops to 44 pixels/mm2, and at 100 um it is further reduced to 10 pixels/mm2. We will present designs of subretinal implants that provide close proximity of electrodes to cells using migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries will be described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. In addition, we will discuss delivery of information to the implant that allows for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. It operates similarly to ``virtual reality'' imaging devices where an image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for flexible control of the image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters. In summary, we will describe solutions to some of the major problems

  9. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Judith C; van Soest, Simone; Swagemakers, Sigrid MA; Essing, Anke HW; Verkerk, Annemieke JMH; van der Spek, Peter J; Gorgels, Theo GMF; Bergen, Arthur AB

    2009-01-01

    Background To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy human donor eyes (aged 63–78 years) were laser dissected and used for 22k microarray studies (Agilent technologies). Data were analyzed with Rosetta Resolver, the web tool DAVID and Ingenuity software. Results In total, we identified 19,746 array entries with significant expression in the RPE. Gene expression was analyzed according to expression levels, interindividual variability and functionality. A group of highly (n = 2,194) expressed RPE genes showed an overrepresentation of genes of the oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis and ribosome pathways. In the group of moderately expressed genes (n = 8,776) genes of the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and aminosugars metabolism were overrepresented. As expected, the top 10 percent (n = 2,194) of genes with the highest interindividual differences in expression showed functional overrepresentation of the complement cascade, essential in inflammation in age-related macular degeneration, and other signaling pathways. Surprisingly, this same category also includes the genes involved in Bruch's membrane (BM) composition. Among the top 10 percent of genes with low interindividual differences, there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in local glycosaminoglycan turnover. Conclusion Our study expands current knowledge of the RPE transcriptome by assigning new genes, and adding data about expression level and interindividual variation. Functional annotation suggests that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, and is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. Our data sheds new light on the molecular composition of BM, adjacent to the RPE, and is useful for

  10. Electrophysiology Alterations in Primary Visual Cortex Neurons of Retinal Degeneration (S334ter-line-3) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Wang, Yi; Liang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yihuai; Ng, Tsz Kin; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the brain is critical for the success of treatments aimed at restoring vision at the retinal level. The success of these treatments relies highly on the functionality of the surviving neurons along the entire visual pathway. Electrophysiological properties at the retina level have been investigated during the progression of retinal degeneration; however, little is known about the changes in electrophysiological properties that occur in the primary visual cortex (V1) during the course of retinal degeneration. By conducting extracellular recording, we examined the electrophysiological properties of V1 in S334ter-line-3 rats (a transgenic model of retinal degeneration developed to express a rhodopsin mutation similar to that found in human retinitis pigmentosa patients). We measured the orientation tuning, spatial and temporal frequency tunings and the receptive field (RF) size for 127 V1 neurons from 11 S334ter-3 rats and 10 Long-Evans (LE) rats. V1 neurons in the S334ter-3 rats showed weaker orientation selectivity, lower optimal spatial and temporal frequency values and a smaller receptive field size compared to the LE rats. These results suggest that the visual cognitive ability significantly changes during retinal degeneration. PMID:27225415

  11. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  12. Successful arrest of photoreceptor and vision loss expands the therapeutic window of retinal gene therapy to later stages of disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, William A.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Kosyk, Mychajlo S.; McDaid, Kendra; Martynyuk, Inna; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Shaffer, James; Deng, Wen-Tao; Boye, Sanford L.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations cause progressive loss of photoreceptor neurons with eventual blindness. Corrective or neuroprotective gene therapies under development could be delivered at a predegeneration stage to prevent the onset of disease, as well as at intermediate-degeneration stages to slow the rate of progression. Most preclinical gene therapy successes to date have been as predegeneration interventions. In many animal models, as well as in human studies, to date, retinal gene therapy administered well after the onset of degeneration was not able to modify the rate of progression even when successfully reversing dysfunction. We evaluated consequences of gene therapy delivered at intermediate stages of disease in a canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by a mutation in the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) gene. Spatiotemporal natural history of disease was defined and therapeutic dose selected based on predegeneration results. Then interventions were timed at earlier and later phases of intermediate-stage disease, and photoreceptor degeneration monitored with noninvasive imaging, electrophysiological function, and visual behavior for more than 2 y. All parameters showed substantial and significant arrest of the progressive time course of disease with treatment, which resulted in long-term improved retinal function and visual behavior compared with control eyes. Histology confirmed that the human RPGR transgene was stably expressed in photoreceptors and associated with improved structural preservation of rods, cones, and ON bipolar cells together with correction of opsin mislocalization. These findings in a clinically relevant large animal model demonstrate the long-term efficacy of RPGR gene augmentation and substantially broaden the therapeutic window for intervention in patients with RPGR-XLRP. PMID:26460017

  13. Successful arrest of photoreceptor and vision loss expands the therapeutic window of retinal gene therapy to later stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Kosyk, Mychajlo S; McDaid, Kendra; Martynyuk, Inna; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Shaffer, James; Deng, Wen-Tao; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2015-10-27

    Inherited retinal degenerations cause progressive loss of photoreceptor neurons with eventual blindness. Corrective or neuroprotective gene therapies under development could be delivered at a predegeneration stage to prevent the onset of disease, as well as at intermediate-degeneration stages to slow the rate of progression. Most preclinical gene therapy successes to date have been as predegeneration interventions. In many animal models, as well as in human studies, to date, retinal gene therapy administered well after the onset of degeneration was not able to modify the rate of progression even when successfully reversing dysfunction. We evaluated consequences of gene therapy delivered at intermediate stages of disease in a canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by a mutation in the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) gene. Spatiotemporal natural history of disease was defined and therapeutic dose selected based on predegeneration results. Then interventions were timed at earlier and later phases of intermediate-stage disease, and photoreceptor degeneration monitored with noninvasive imaging, electrophysiological function, and visual behavior for more than 2 y. All parameters showed substantial and significant arrest of the progressive time course of disease with treatment, which resulted in long-term improved retinal function and visual behavior compared with control eyes. Histology confirmed that the human RPGR transgene was stably expressed in photoreceptors and associated with improved structural preservation of rods, cones, and ON bipolar cells together with correction of opsin mislocalization. These findings in a clinically relevant large animal model demonstrate the long-term efficacy of RPGR gene augmentation and substantially broaden the therapeutic window for intervention in patients with RPGR-XLRP.

  14. Optimal voltage stimulation parameters for network-mediated responses in wild type and rd10 mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Jalligampala, Archana; Sekhar, Sudarshan; Zrenner, Eberhart; Rathbun, Daniel L

    2017-04-01

    To further improve the quality of visual percepts elicited by microelectronic retinal prosthetics, substantial efforts have been made to understand how retinal neurons respond to electrical stimulation. It is generally assumed that a sufficiently strong stimulus will recruit most retinal neurons. However, recent evidence has shown that the responses of some retinal neurons decrease with excessively strong stimuli (a non-monotonic response function). Therefore, it is necessary to identify stimuli that can be used to activate the majority of retinal neurons even when such non-monotonic cells are part of the neuronal population. Taking these non-monotonic responses into consideration, we establish the optimal voltage stimulation parameters (amplitude, duration, and polarity) for epiretinal stimulation of network-mediated (indirect) ganglion cell responses. We recorded responses from 3958 mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in both healthy (wild type, WT) and a degenerating (rd10) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa-using flat-mounted retina on a microelectrode array. Rectangular monophasic voltage-controlled pulses were presented with varying voltage, duration, and polarity. We found that in 4-5 weeks old rd10 mice the RGC thresholds were comparable to those of WT. There was a marked response variability among mouse RGCs. To account for this variability, we interpolated the percentage of RGCs activated at each point in the voltage-polarity-duration stimulus space, thus identifying the optimal voltage-controlled pulse (-2.4 V, 0.88 ms). The identified optimal voltage pulse can activate at least 65% of potentially responsive RGCs in both mouse strains. Furthermore, this pulse is well within the range of stimuli demonstrated to be safe and effective for retinal implant patients. Such optimized stimuli and the underlying method used to identify them support a high yield of responsive RGCs and will serve as an effective guideline for future in vitro investigations of

  15. Reprogramming metabolism by targeting sirtuin 6 attenuates retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijuan; Du, Jianhai; Justus, Sally; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wei-Pu; Jia, Yading; Duong, Jimmy K.; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Wang, Shuang; Hurley, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) encompasses a diverse group of Mendelian disorders leading to progressive degeneration of rods and then cones. For reasons that remain unclear, diseased RP photoreceptors begin to deteriorate, eventually leading to cell death and, consequently, loss of vision. Here, we have hypothesized that RP associated with mutations in phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6) provokes a metabolic aberration in rod cells that promotes the pathological consequences of elevated cGMP and Ca2+, which are induced by the Pde6 mutation. Inhibition of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a histone deacetylase repressor of glycolytic flux, reprogrammed rods into perpetual glycolysis, thereby driving the accumulation of biosynthetic intermediates, improving outer segment (OS) length, enhancing photoreceptor survival, and preserving vision. In mouse retinae lacking Sirt6, effectors of glycolytic flux were dramatically increased, leading to upregulation of key intermediates in glycolysis, TCA cycle, and glutaminolysis. Both transgenic and AAV2/8 gene therapy–mediated ablation of Sirt6 in rods provided electrophysiological and anatomic rescue of both rod and cone photoreceptors in a preclinical model of RP. Due to the extensive network of downstream effectors of Sirt6, this study motivates further research into the role that these pathways play in retinal degeneration. Because reprogramming metabolism by enhancing glycolysis is not gene specific, this strategy may be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27841758

  16. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics.

  17. Modeling the response of ON and OFF retinal bipolar cells during electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Werginz, P; Benav, H; Zrenner, E; Rattay, F

    2015-06-01

    Retinal implants allowing blind people suffering from diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration to regain rudimentary vision are struggling with several obstacles. One of the main problems during external electric stimulation is the co-activation of the ON and OFF pathways which results in mutual impairment. In this study the response of ON and OFF cone retinal bipolar cells during extracellular electric stimulation from the subretinal space was examined. To gain deeper insight into the behavior of these cells sustained L-type and transient T-type calcium channels were integrated in the synaptic terminals of reconstructed 3D morphologies of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium concentration in the synaptic regions of the model neurons was investigated as well since calcium influx is a crucial parameter for cell-to-cell activity between bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells. It was shown that monophasic stimulation results in significant different calcium concentrations in the synaptic terminals of ON and OFF bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium increased to values up to fourfold higher in the OFF bipolar model neuron in comparison to the ON bipolar cell. Furthermore, geometric properties strongly influence the activation of bipolar cells. Monophasic, biphasic, single and repetitive pulses with similar lengths, amplitudes and polarities were applied to the two model neurons.

  18. Modeling the response of ON and OFF retinal bipolar cells during electric stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Werginz, P.; Benav, H.; Zrenner, E.; Rattay, F.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal implants allowing blind people suffering from diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration to regain rudimentary vision are struggling with several obstacles. One of the main problems during external electric stimulation is the co-activation of the ON and OFF pathways which results in mutual impairment. In this study the response of ON and OFF cone retinal bipolar cells during extracellular electric stimulation from the subretinal space was examined. To gain deeper insight into the behavior of these cells sustained L-type and transient T-type calcium channels were integrated in the synaptic terminals of reconstructed 3D morphologies of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium concentration in the synaptic regions of the model neurons was investigated as well since calcium influx is a crucial parameter for cell-to-cell activity between bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells. It was shown that monophasic stimulation results in significant different calcium concentrations in the synaptic terminals of ON and OFF bipolar cells. Intracellular calcium increased to values up to fourfold higher in the OFF bipolar model neuron in comparison to the ON bipolar cell. Furthermore, geometric properties strongly influence the activation of bipolar cells. Monophasic, biphasic, single and repetitive pulses with similar lengths, amplitudes and polarities were applied to the two model neurons. PMID:25499837

  19. Mutations in the Spliceosome Component CWC27 Cause Retinal Degeneration with or without Additional Developmental Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Xie, Yajing Angela; Abouzeid, Hana; Gordon, Christopher T; Fiorentino, Alessia; Sun, Zixi; Lehman, Anna; Osman, Ihab S; Dharmat, Rachayata; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Bapst-Wicht, Linda; Babino, Darwin; Arno, Gavin; Busetto, Virginia; Zhao, Li; Li, Hui; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel A; Azevedo, Liliana F; Hubert, Laurence; Pontikos, Nikolas; Eblimit, Aiden; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Kheir, Valeria; Plagnol, Vincent; Oufadem, Myriam; Soens, Zachry T; Yang, Lizhu; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Pfundt, Rolph; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Nitschké, Patrick; Cheetham, Michael E; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Agrawal, Smriti A; Li, Huajin; Pinton, Gaëtan; Michaelides, Michel; Besmond, Claude; Li, Yumei; Yuan, Zhisheng; von Lintig, Johannes; Webster, Andrew R; Le Hir, Hervé; Stoilov, Peter; Amiel, Jeanne; Hardcastle, Alison J; Ayuso, Carmen; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui; Allikmets, Rando; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-04-06

    Pre-mRNA splicing factors play a fundamental role in regulating transcript diversity both temporally and spatially. Genetic defects in several spliceosome components have been linked to a set of non-overlapping spliceosomopathy phenotypes in humans, among which skeletal developmental defects and non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are frequent findings. Here we report that defects in spliceosome-associated protein CWC27 are associated with a spectrum of disease phenotypes ranging from isolated RP to severe syndromic forms. By whole-exome sequencing, recessive protein-truncating mutations in CWC27 were found in seven unrelated families that show a range of clinical phenotypes, including retinal degeneration, brachydactyly, craniofacial abnormalities, short stature, and neurological defects. Remarkably, variable expressivity of the human phenotype can be recapitulated in Cwc27 mutant mouse models, with significant embryonic lethality and severe phenotypes in the complete knockout mice while mice with a partial loss-of-function allele mimic the isolated retinal degeneration phenotype. Our study describes a retinal dystrophy-related phenotype spectrum as well as its genetic etiology and highlights the complexity of the spliceosomal gene network.

  20. Non-Invasive Gene Transfer by Iontophoresis for Therapy of an Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Souied, Eric H.; Reid, Silvia N. M.; Piri, Natik I.; Lerner, Leonid E.; Nusinowitz, Steven; Farber, Debora B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research on many of the genes responsible for inherited retinal degenerations leading to blindness, no effective treatment is currently available for patients affected with these diseases. Among the therapeutic approaches tested on animal models of human retinal degeneration, gene therapy using different types of viral vectors as delivery agents has yielded promising results. We report here our results on a non-invasive, non-viral delivery approach using transscleral iontophoresis for transfer of plasmid DNA into mouse retina. Proof of principle experiments were carried out using plasmid containing GFP cDNA to demonstrate expression of the transferred gene in the retina after single applications of iontophoresis. Various parameters for multiple applications of iontophoresis were optimized to sustain GFP gene expression in mouse photoreceptors. Subsequently, repeated iontophoresis of plasmid containing normal β-phosphodiesterase (β-PDE) cDNA was performed in the rd1 mouse, an animal model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by a mutant β-PDE gene. In normal mice, transscleral iontophoresis of the GFP plasmid provided a significant increase in fluorescence of the retina in the treated versus non-treated eyes. In rd1 mice, repeated iontophoresis of β-PDE cDNA plasmid partially rescued photoreceptors morphologically, as observed by microscopy, and functionally, as recorded on ERG measurements, without adverse effects. Therefore, transscleral iontophoresis of plasmid DNA containing therapeutic genes may be an efficient, safe and non-invasive method for the treatment of retinal degenerations. PMID:18653181

  1. An Intraocular Camera for Retinal Prostheses: Restoring Sight to the Blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Noelle R. B.; McIntosh, Benjamin P.; Nasiatka, Patrick J.; Hauer, Michelle C.; Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Tanguay, Armand R., Jr.

    Implantation of an intraocular retinal prosthesis represents one possible approach to the restoration of sight in those with minimal light perception due to photoreceptor degenerating diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. In such an intraocular retinal prosthesis, a microstimulator array attached to the retina is used to electrically stimulate still-viable retinal ganglion cells that transmit retinotopic image information to the visual cortex by means of the optic nerve, thereby creating an image percept. We describe herein an intraocular camera that is designed to be implanted in the crystalline lens sac and connected to the microstimulator array. Replacement of an extraocular (head-mounted) camera with the intraocular camera restores the natural coupling of head and eye motion associated with foveation, thereby enhancing visual acquisition, navigation, and mobility tasks. This research is in no small part inspired by the unique scientific style and research methodologies that many of us have learned from Prof. Richard K. Chang of Yale University, and is included herein as an example of the extent and breadth of his impact and legacy.

  2. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

  3. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  4. Retinal dysplasia of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Ian R; Layer, Noelle; de Alba Campomanes, Alejandra G

    2014-03-04

    Retinal dysplasia occurs in the setting of sporadic and syndromic holoprosencephaly, which often has associated ocular malformations. The pathology of this dysplasia, which includes rosettes, has been previously described. However, its funduscopic findings have not been well documented. The authors present the fundus images of a patient with severe holoprosencephaly with retinal dysplasia and bilateral optic nerve colobomas that resulted in death 2 weeks after birth.

  5. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  6. Linkage analysis of a new locus for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) on chromosome 6p

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Y.Y.; Knowles, J.A.; Banerjee, P.

    1994-09-01

    We report the localization of the arRP gene segregating in a large kindred from the Dominican Republic and the progress in refining the arRP region. The arRP gene in this family was found to be closely linked to markers D6S291, D6S273 with lod scores of 6.75, 3.08 at {theta}=0, 0.08, respectively. Since it was suggested that mutant peripherin causes arRP on 6p, we typed marker RDS1 at the peripherin-rds locus and detected four recombinants. More markers have been typed to further refine the location of arRP. Lod scores of 5.31. 5.89 and 2.05 were obtained with D6S439, UT722 and D6S426 at {theta}=0, 0, and 0.14, respectively. Some of the new markers were not included in the Genethon map, thus we used the CEPH (V7.0) data to order markers D6S273, D6S439, UT722, D6S426 and to estimate the recombination fractions as well as the ratios of female to male map distance. The best supported order is: D6S273 - D6S439 - D6S291 - UT722 - D6S426. Multipoint analyses were performed with the markers D6S273 - ({theta}{sub m}=0.0-21) - D6S439 - ({theta}{sub m}=0.066) - D6S426 with a constant sex ratio of 2.749. A maximum lod score of 9.74 was obtained at the marker D6S439. In conclusion, the most likely location for the arRP gene in the Dominican pedigree is approximately 20 centimorgans (cM) telomeric from peripherin.

  7. Alterations of sodium and potassium channels of RGCs in RCS rat with the development of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongshan; Song, Yanping; Yao, Junping; Weng, Chuanhuang; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2013-11-01

    All know that retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of hereditary retinal degenerative diseases characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptors and associated with progressive cells loss; nevertheless, little is known about how rods and cones loss affects the surviving inner retinal neurons and networks. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) process and convey visual information from retina to visual centers in the brain. The healthy various ion channels determine the normal reception and projection of visual signals from RGCs. Previous work on the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, as a kind of classical RP animal model, indicated that, at late stages of retinal degeneration in RCS rat, RGCs were also morphologically and functionally affected. Here, retrograde labeling for RGCs with Fluorogold was performed to investigate the distribution, density, and morphological changes of RGCs during retinal degeneration. Then, patch clamp recording, western blot, and immunofluorescence staining were performed to study the channels of sodium and potassium properties of RGCs, so as to explore the molecular and proteinic basis for understanding the alterations of RGCs membrane properties and firing functions. We found that the resting membrane potential, input resistance, and capacitance of RGCs changed significantly at the late stage of retinal degeneration. Action potential could not be evoked in a part of RGCs. Inward sodium current and outward potassium current recording showed that sodium current was impaired severely but only slightly in potassium current. Expressions of sodium channel protein were impaired dramatically at the late stage of retinal degeneration. The results suggested that the density of RGCs decreased, process ramification impaired, and sodium ion channel proteins destructed, which led to the impairment of electrophysiological functions of RGCs and eventually resulted in the loss of visual function.

  8. Characteristics of rod regeneration in a novel zebrafish retinal degeneration model using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU).

    PubMed

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Balmer, Jasmin; Iglicki, Matias; Schuerch, Kaspar; Jazwinska, Anna; Enzmann, Volker; Tschopp, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Primary loss of photoreceptors caused by diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa is one of the main causes of blindness worldwide. To study such diseases, rodent models of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration are widely used. As zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a popular model system for visual research that offers persistent retinal neurogenesis throughout the lifetime and retinal regeneration after severe damage, we have established a novel MNU-induced model in this species. Histology with staining for apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (PCNA), activated Müller glial cells (GFAP), rods (rhodopsin) and cones (zpr-1) were performed. A characteristic sequence of retinal changes was found. First, apoptosis of rod photoreceptors occurred 3 days after MNU treatment and resulted in a loss of rod cells. Consequently, proliferation started in the inner nuclear layer (INL) with a maximum at day 8, whereas in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) a maximum was observed at day 15. The proliferation in the ONL persisted to the end of the follow-up (3 months), interestingly, without ongoing rod cell death. We demonstrate that rod degeneration is a sufficient trigger for the induction of Müller glial cell activation, even if only a minimal number of rod cells undergo cell death. In conclusion, the use of MNU is a simple and feasible model for rod photoreceptor degeneration in the zebrafish that offers new insights into rod regeneration.

  9. Characteristics of Rod Regeneration in a Novel Zebrafish Retinal Degeneration Model Using N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU)

    PubMed Central

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Balmer, Jasmin; Iglicki, Matias; Schuerch, Kaspar; Jazwinska, Anna; Enzmann, Volker; Tschopp, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Primary loss of photoreceptors caused by diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa is one of the main causes of blindness worldwide. To study such diseases, rodent models of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration are widely used. As zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a popular model system for visual research that offers persistent retinal neurogenesis throughout the lifetime and retinal regeneration after severe damage, we have established a novel MNU-induced model in this species. Histology with staining for apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (PCNA), activated Müller glial cells (GFAP), rods (rhodopsin) and cones (zpr-1) were performed. A characteristic sequence of retinal changes was found. First, apoptosis of rod photoreceptors occurred 3 days after MNU treatment and resulted in a loss of rod cells. Consequently, proliferation started in the inner nuclear layer (INL) with a maximum at day 8, whereas in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) a maximum was observed at day 15. The proliferation in the ONL persisted to the end of the follow-up (3 months), interestingly, without ongoing rod cell death. We demonstrate that rod degeneration is a sufficient trigger for the induction of Müller glial cell activation, even if only a minimal number of rod cells undergo cell death. In conclusion, the use of MNU is a simple and feasible model for rod photoreceptor degeneration in the zebrafish that offers new insights into rod regeneration. PMID:23951079

  10. Retinal ganglion cell responses to voltage and current stimulation in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Yong Sook; Ye, Jang Hee; Lee, Seokyoung; Nam, Yoonkey; Ryu, Sang Baek; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses are being developed to restore vision for those with retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Since neural prostheses depend upon electrical stimulation to control neural activity, optimal stimulation parameters for successful encoding of visual information are one of the most important requirements to enable visual perception. In this paper, we focused on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses to different stimulation parameters and compared threshold charge densities in wild-type and rd1 mice. For this purpose, we used in vitro retinal preparations of wild-type and rd1 mice. When the neural network was stimulated with voltage- and current-controlled pulses, RGCs from both wild-type and rd1 mice responded; however the temporal pattern of RGC response is very different. In wild-type RGCs, a single peak within 100 ms appears, while multiple peaks (approximately four peaks) with ~10 Hz rhythm within 400 ms appear in RGCs in the degenerated retina of rd1 mice. We find that an anodic phase-first biphasic voltage-controlled pulse is more efficient for stimulation than a biphasic current-controlled pulse based on lower threshold charge density. The threshold charge densities for activation of RGCs both with voltage- and current-controlled pulses are overall more elevated for the rd1 mouse than the wild-type mouse. Here, we propose the stimulus range for wild-type and rd1 retinas when the optimal modulation of a RGC response is possible.

  11. Longitudinal Study of Cone Photoreceptors during Retinal Degeneration and in Response to Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Talcott, Katherine E.; Ratnam, Kavitha; Sundquist, Sanna M.; Lucero, Anna S.; Lujan, Brandon J.; Tao, Weng; Porco, Travis C.; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To study cone photoreceptor structure and function in patients with inherited retinal degenerations treated with sustained-release ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Methods. Two patients with retinitis pigmentosa and one with Usher syndrome type 2 who participated in a phase 2 clinical trial received CNTF delivered by an encapsulated cell technology implant in one eye and sham surgery in the contralateral eye. Patients were followed longitudinally over 30 to 35 months. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) provided high-resolution images at baseline and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. AOSLO measures of cone spacing and density and optical coherence tomography measures of retinal thickness were correlated with visual function, including visual acuity (VA), visual field sensitivity, and full-field electroretinography (ERG). Results. No significant changes in VA, visual field sensitivity, or ERG responses were observed in either eye of the three patients over 24 months. Outer retinal layers were significantly thicker in CNTF-treated eyes than in sham-treated eyes (P < 0.005). Cone spacing increased by 2.9% more per year in sham-treated eyes than in CNTF-treated eyes (P < 0.001, linear mixed model), and cone density decreased by 9.1%, or 223 cones/degree2 more per year in sham-treated than in CNTF-treated eyes (P = 0.002, linear mixed model). Conclusions. AOSLO images provided a sensitive measure of disease progression and treatment response in patients with inherited retinal degenerations. Larger studies of cone structure using high-resolution imaging techniques are urgently needed to evaluate the effect of CNTF treatment in patients with inherited retinal degenerations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00447980.) PMID:21087953

  12. IRetinal Organization in the retinal degeneration 10 (rd10) Mutant Mouse: a Morphological and ERG Study

    PubMed Central

    Gargini, Cludia; Terzibasi, Eva; Mazzoni, Francesca; Strettoi, Enrica

    2008-01-01

    Retinal degeneration 10 (rd10) mice are a model of autosomal recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), identified by Chang et al. in 2002. These mice carry a spontaneous mutation of the rod-phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene, leading to a rod degeneration that starts around P18. Later, cones are also lost. Because of photoreceptor degeneration does not overlap with retinal development, and light responses can be recorded for about a month after birth, rd10 mice mimic typical human RP more closely than the well-known rd1 mutants. Aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the morphology and function of the rd10 mouse retina during the period of maximum photoreceptor degeneration, thus contributing useful data for exploiting this novel model to study RP. We analyze the morphology and survival of retinal cells in rd10 mice of various ages with quantitative immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy; we also study retinal function with the electroretinogram (ERG), recorded between P18 and P30. We find that photoreceptor death (peaking around P25) is accompanied and followed by dendritic retraction in bipolar and horizontal cells, which eventually undergo secondary degeneration. ERG reveals alterations in the physiology of the inner retina as early as P18 (before any obvious morphological change of inner neurons) and yet consistently with a reduced band amplification by bipolar cells. Thus, changes in the rd10 retina are very similar to what previously found in rd1 mutants. However, an overall slower decay of retinal structure and function predict that rd10 mice might become excellent models for rescue approaches. PMID:17111372

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Voluntary Exercise in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Adam M.; Lawson, Eric C.; Prunty, Megan; Gogniat, Marissa; Aung, Moe H.; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our previous investigations showed that involuntary treadmill exercise is neuroprotective in a light-induced retinal degeneration mouse model, and it may act through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors. This study investigated whether voluntary running wheel exercise can be neuroprotective in an inheritable model of the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP), rd10 mice. Methods Breeding pairs of rd10 and C57BL/6J mice were given free-spinning (active) or locked (inactive) running wheels. Pups were weaned into separate cages with their parents' respective wheel types, and visual function was tested with ERG and a virtual optokinetic system at 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age. Offspring were killed at 6 weeks of age and retinal cross-sections were prepared for photoreceptor nuclei counting. Additionally, separate cohorts of active and inactive rd10 pups were injected daily for 14 days after eye opening with a selective TrkB receptor antagonist (ANA-12) or vehicle solution and assessed as described above. Results Mice in the rd10 active group exhibited significant preservation of visual acuity, cone nuclei, and total photoreceptor nuclei number. Injection with ANA-12 precluded the preservation of visual acuity and photoreceptor nuclei number in rd10 mice. Conclusions Voluntary running partially protected against the retinal degeneration and vision loss that otherwise occurs in the rd10 mouse model of RP. This protection was prevented by injection of ANA-12, suggesting that TrkB activation mediates exercise's preservation of the retina. Exercise may serve as an effective, clinically translational intervention against retinal degeneration. PMID:26567796

  14. Correlation between SD-OCT, immunocytochemistry and functional findings in an animal model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Nicolás; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Sauvé, Yves; Segura, Francisco J.; Martínez-Navarrete, Gema; Tamarit, José Manuel; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Sanchez-Cano, Ana; Pinilla, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The P23H rhodopsin mutation is an autosomal dominant cause of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The degeneration can be tracked using different anatomical and functional methods. In our case, we evaluated the anatomical changes using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) and correlated the findings with retinal thickness values determined by immunocytochemistry.Methods: Pigmented rats heterozygous for the P23H mutation, with ages between P18 and P180 were studied. Function was assessed by means of optomotor testing and ERGs. Retinal thicknesses measurements, autofluorescence and fluorescein angiography were performed using Spectralis OCT. Retinas were studied by means of immunohistochemistry. Results: Between P30 and P180, visual acuity decreased from 0.500 to 0.182 cycles per degree (cyc/deg) and contrast sensitivity decreased from 54.56 to 2.98 for a spatial frequency of 0.089 cyc/deg. Only cone-driven b-wave responses reached developmental maturity. Flicker fusions were also comparable at P29 (42 Hz). Double flash-isolated rod-driven responses were already affected at P29. Photopic responses revealed deterioration after P29.A reduction in retinal thicknesses and morphological modifications were seen in OCT sections. Statistically significant differences were found in all evaluated thicknesses. Autofluorescence was seen in P23H rats as sparse dots. Immunocytochemistry showed a progressive decrease in the outer nuclear layer (ONL), and morphological changes. Although anatomical thickness measures were significantly lower than OCT values, there was a very strong correlation between the values measured by both techniques.Conclusions: In pigmented P23H rats, a progressive deterioration occurs in both retinal function and anatomy. Anatomical changes can be effectively evaluated using SD-OCT and immunocytochemistry, with a good correlation between their values, thus making SD-OCT an important tool for research in retinal degeneration. PMID:25565976

  15. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  16. Cancers Affecting the Retina

    MedlinePlus

    ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ... or ARMD) Epiretinal Membrane Detachment of the Retina Retinitis Pigmentosa Blockage of Central Retinal Veins and Branch Retinal ...

  17. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  18. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  19. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  20. Exclusion of the Unfolded Protein Response in Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in the Canine T4R RHO Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Stefania; Genini, Sem; Sudharsan, Raghavi; Gingrich, Jeremy; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Beltran, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute light damage in the naturally-occurring canine model of RHO-adRP (T4R RHO dog). Methods The left eyes of T4R RHO dogs were briefly light-exposed and retinas collected 3, 6 and 24 hours later. The contra-lateral eyes were shielded and used as controls. To evaluate the time course of cell death, histology and TUNEL assays were performed. Electron microscopy was used to examine ultrastructural alterations in photoreceptors at 15 min, 1 hour, and 6 hours after light exposure. Gene expression of markers of ER stress and UPR were assessed by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and western blot at the 6 hour time-point. Calpain and caspase-3 activation were assessed at 1, 3 and 6 hours after exposure. Results A brief exposure to clinically-relevant levels of white light causes within minutes acute disruption of the rod outer segment disc membranes, followed by prominent ultrastructural alterations in the inner segments and the initiation of cell death by 6 hours. Activation of the PERK and IRE1 pathways, and downstream targets (BIP, CHOP) of the UPR was not observed. However increased transcription of caspase-12 and hsp70 occurred, as well as calpain activation, but not that of caspase-3. Conclusion The UPR is not activated in the early phase of light-induced photoreceptor cell death in the T4R RHO model. Instead, disruption in rods of disc and plasma membranes within minutes after light exposure followed by increase in calpain activity and caspase-12 expression suggests a different mechanism of degeneration. PMID:25695253

  1. The Marshall M. Parks memorial lecture: making sense of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies--the clinical phenotype of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I

    2010-10-01

    A correct diagnosis of the early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies requires careful clinical evaluation, the detection of suggestive or pathognomonic ophthalmoscopic clues, the use of electrophysiology to document characteristic electroretinographic findings and, in some cases, the utilisation of newer diagnostic modalities such as optical coherence tomography. Molecular diagnosis confirms the clinical diagnosis and provides the basis for possible future gene therapy. A strict definition of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies (EOCRDs) does not exist, but inherited retinal dystrophies that are diagnosed in the first few years of life could be included under this umbrella terminology. The clinical ophthalmological manifestations of these diseases may or may not be detected at birth, and include the triad of severe vision loss, sensory nystagmus and electroretinographic abnormalities. Their clinical manifestations are light sensitivity, night blindness, fundus pigmentary changes and other psychophysical and retinal anatomic abnormalities. Diseases that could be included in the EOCRDs are Leber congenital amaurosis, achromatopsia, congenital stationary night blindness, X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, Goldmann-Favre disease and other NR2E3-related disorders, and possibly some very early-onset forms of Stargardt disease and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa. In this paper, phenotypic clues to the diagnosis of the underlying molecular defect in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis are discussed and an overview of the clinical workup of the child with a retinal dystrophy is presented. An accurate diagnosis of individual EOCRD allows a better prediction of the clinical course and the planning of possible and emerging therapies.

  2. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  3. Retinoids and Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular understanding of the retinoid cycle in mammalian retina stems from painstaking biochemical reconstitution studies supported by natural or engineered animal models with known genetic lesions and studies of humans with specific genetic blinding diseases. Structural and membrane biology have been used to detect critical retinal enzymes and proteins and their substrates and ligands, placing them in a cellular context. These studies have been supplemented by analytical chemistry methods that have identified small molecules by their spectral characteristics, often in conjunction with the evaluation of models of animal retinal disease. It is from this background that rational therapeutic interventions to correct genetic defects or environmental insults are identified. Thus, most presently accepted modulators of the retinoid cycle already have demonstrated promising results in animal models of retinal degeneration. These encouraging signs indicate that some human blinding diseases can be alleviated by pharmacological interventions. PMID:27917399

  4. Automatic Retinal Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, G. H.; Karlsson, R. A.; Hardarson, S. H.; Mura, M. Dalla; Eysteinsson, T.; Beach, J. M.; Stefansson, E.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automating the evaluation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the retina. This method should prove useful for monitoring ischemic retinal diseases and the effect of treatment. In order to obtain saturation values automatically, spectral images must be registered in pairs, the vessels of the retina located and measurement points must be selected. The registration algorithm is based on a data driven approach that circumvents many of the problems that have plagued previous methods. The vessels are extracted using an algorithm based on morphological profiles and supervised classifiers. Measurement points on retinal arterioles and venules as well as reference points on the adjacent fundus are automatically selected. Oxygen saturation values along vessels are averaged to arrive at a more accurate estimate of the retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The system yields reproducible results as well as being sensitive to changes in oxygen saturation.

  5. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes.

  6. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  7. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Beach, James

    2014-09-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry.

  8. Cilio-retinal arterial circulation in central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that an occlusion of the central retinal artery is an essential prerequisite for haemorrhage formation after central retinal vein obstruction has been investigated by examining the fundus changes in patients with a cilio-retinal arterial circulation; the findings are at variance with the 'combined occlusion hypothesis'. Comparisons were made between the pathological features in two retinal capillary beds with independent sources of arterial supply--namely, the central retinal and cilio-retinal arteries--but with an obstructed venous drainage channel common to both--namely, the central retinal vein. The importance of intraluminal pressure changes (as distinct from perfusion changes) in the causation of haemorrhages and oedema after venous occlusion is stressed, and the role of arterial disease in the pathogenesis of venous occlusions is distinguished from its role in determining the sequelae of such occlusions. Images PMID:1203235

  9. Segmentation of locally varying numbers of outer retinal layers by a model selection approach.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Jelena; Yzer, Suzanne; Vermeer, Koenraad; Van Vliet, Lucas

    2017-02-08

    Extraction of image-based biomarkers, such as the presence, visibility or thickness of a certain layer, from 3D optical coherence tomography data provides relevant clinical information. We present a method to simultaneously determine the number of visible layers in the outer retina and segment them. The method is based on a model selection approach with special attention given to the balance between the quality of a fit and model complexity. This will ensure that a more complex model is selected only if this is sufficiently supported by the data. The performance of the method was evaluated on healthy and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affected eyes. Additionally, the reproducibility of automatic method and manual annotations was evaluated on healthy eyes. A good agreement between the segmentation performed manually by a medical doctor and results obtained from the automatic segmentation was found. The mean unsigned deviation for all outer retinal layers in healthy and RP affected eyes varied between 2.6 and 4.9 μm. The reproducibility of the automatic method was similar to the reproducibility of the manual segmentation. Overall, the method provides a flexible and accurate solution for determining the visibility and location of outer retinal layers and could be used as an aid for the disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  10. Neuoroprotective efficacies by KUS121, a VCP modulator, on animal models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Muraoka, Yuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko; Kakizuka, Akira; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the leading causes of adult blindness and has no established therapy. We have shown that valosin-containing protein (VCP) modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs), ameliorated abnormally low ATP levels by inhibiting the ATPase of VCP, thereby protected several types of cells, including retinal neurons, from cell death-inducing insults. In this study, we found that KUS121, one of the VCP modulators, effectively protects photoreceptors both morphologically and functionally, in two animal models of retinal degeneration, rd12 mice and RP rabbits with a rhodopsin (Pro347Leu) mutation. In rd12 mice, KUS121 suppressed the loss of photoreceptors, not only rods but also cones, as well as the visual function deterioration. Significant protective effects existed even when the medication was started in later stages of the disease. In RP rabbits, KUS121 suppressed thinning of the outer nuclear layer and maintained visual function. In the retinas treated with KUS121, suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin and suppression of disease-associated apoptosis were evident. The ability of KUS121 to protect photoreceptors, especially cones, even in later stages of the disease may contribute to the preservation of central vision in RP patients, which is important for quality of vision. PMID:27503804

  11. Mutation of POC1B in a severe syndromic retinal ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Bodo B.; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Bartram, Malte P.; Wegner, Jeremy; Thoenes, Michaela; Pannes, Andrea; Sampson, Josephina; Heller, Raoul; Göbel, Heike; Koerber, Friederike; Neugebauer, Antje; Hedergott, Andrea; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Staubach, Simon; Boycott, Kym M.; Valente, Enza Maria; Janecke, Andreas R.; Eisenberger, Tobias; Bergmann, Carsten; Tebbe, Lars; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yundong; Fry, Andrew M.; Westerfield, Monte; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a consanguineous Iraqi family with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and polycystic kidney disease. Targeted NGS for excluding mutations in known LCA and JBTS genes, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant, c.317G>C (p.Arg106Pro), in POC1B, a gene essential for ciliogenesis, basal body and centrosome integrity. In silico modeling suggested a requirement of p.Arg106 for formation of the third WD40 repeat and a protein interaction interface. In human and mouse retina, POC1B localized to the basal body and centriole adjacent to the connecting cilium of photoreceptors and in synapses of the outer plexiform layer. Knockdown of Poc1b in zebrafish caused cystic kidneys and retinal degeneration with shortened and reduced photoreceptor connecting cilia, compatible with the human syndromic ciliopathy. A recent study describes homozygosity for p.Arg106ProPOC1B in a family with non-syndromic cone-rod dystrophy. The phenotype associated with homozygous p.Arg106ProPOC1B may thus be highly variable, analogous to homozygous p.Leu710Ser in WDR19 causing either isolated retinitis pigmentosa or Jeune syndrome. Our study indicates that POC1B is required for retinal integrity, and we propose POC1B mutations as a probable cause for JBTS with severe polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25044745

  12. Whole exome sequencing using Ion Proton system enables reliable genetic diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Navarro, Rafael; Ruiz-Nogales, Sheila; Méndez, Pilar; Burés-Jelstrup, Anniken; Corcóstegui, Borja; Pomares, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) comprise a wide group of clinically and genetically complex diseases that progressively affect the retina. Over recent years, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods has transformed our ability to diagnose heterogeneous diseases. In this work, we have evaluated the implementation of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular diagnosis of IRD. Using Ion ProtonTM system, we simultaneously analyzed 212 genes that are responsible for more than 25 syndromic and non-syndromic IRD. This approach was used to evaluate 59 unrelated families, with the pathogenic variant(s) successfully identified in 71.18% of cases. Interestingly, the mutation detection rate varied substantially depending on the IRD subtype. Overall, we found 63 different mutations (21 novel) in 29 distinct genes, and performed in vivo functional studies to determine the deleterious impact of variants identified in MERTK, CDH23, and RPGRIP1. In addition, we provide evidences that support CDHR1 as a gene responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with early macular affectation, and present data regarding the disease mechanism of this gene. Altogether, these results demonstrate that targeted WES of all IRD genes is a reliable, hypothesis-free approach, and a cost- and time-effective strategy for the routine genetic diagnosis of retinal dystrophies. PMID:28181551

  13. Selective rod degeneration and partial cone inactivation characterize an iodoacetic acid model of Swine retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fernandez de Castro, Juan; Vukmanic, Eric; Zhou, Liang; Emery, Douglas; Demarco, Paul J; Kaplan, Henry J; Dean, Douglas C

    2011-10-07

    PURPOSE. Transgenic pigs carrying a mutant human rhodopsin transgene have been developed as a large animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This model displays some key features of human RP, but the time course of disease progression makes this model costly, time consuming, and difficult to study because of the size of the animals at end-stage disease. Here, the authors evaluate an iodoacetic acid (IAA) model of photoreceptor degeneration in the pig as an alternative model that shares features of the transgenic pig and human RP. METHODS. IAA blocks glycolysis, thereby inhibiting photoreceptor function. The effect of the intravenous injection of IAA on swine rod and cone photoreceptor viability and morphology was followed by histologic evaluation of different regions of the retina using hematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining. Rod and cone function was analyzed by full-field electroretinography and multifocal electroretinography. RESULTS. IAA led to specific loss of rods in a central-to-peripheral retinal gradient. Although cones were resistant, they showed shortened outer segments, loss of bipolar cell synaptic connections, and a diminished flicker ERG, hallmarks of transition to cone dysfunction in RP patients. CONCLUSIONS. IAA provides an alternative rod-dominant model of retinal damage that shares a surprising number of features with the pig transgenic model of RP and with human RP. This IAA model is cost-effective and rapid, ensuring that the size of the animals does not become prohibitive for end-stage evaluation or therapeutic intervention.

  14. Vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC mediated by HMOX1 rescues retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Zhao, Chen; Kumar, Anil; Lee, Chunsik; Chen, Mingquan; Huang, Lijuan; Wang, Jing; Ren, Xiangrong; Jiang, Yida; Chen, Wei; Wang, Bin; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhong, Zheng; Huang, Zijing; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Bing; Ding, Hao; Ju, Rong; Tang, Zhongshu; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai; Li, Xuri; Liu, Xialin

    2014-10-14

    Blood vessel degeneration is critically involved in nearly all types of degenerative diseases. Therefore strategies to enhance blood vessel protection and survival are highly needed. In this study, using different animal models and cultured cells, we show that PDGF-CC is a potent vascular protective and survival factor. PDGF-CC deficiency by genetic deletion exacerbated blood vessel regression/degeneration in various animal models. Importantly, treatment with PDGF-CC protein not only increased the survival of retinal blood vessels in a model of oxygen-induced blood vessel regression but also markedly rescued retinal and blood vessel degeneration in a disease model of retinitis pigmentosa. Mechanistically, we revealed that heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) activity is critically required for the vascular protective/survival effect of PDGF-CC, because blockade of HMOX1 completely abolished the protective effect of PDGF-CC in vitro and in vivo. We further found that both PDGF receptors, PDGFR-β and PDGFR-α, are required for the vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC. Thus our data show that PDGF-CC plays a pivotal role in maintaining blood vessel survival and may be of therapeutic value in treating various types of degenerative diseases.

  15. The first prototype of chromatic pupillometer for objective perimetry in retinal degeneration patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Chibel, Ron; Haj Yahia, Soad; Achiron, Asaf; Mahajna, Mohamad; Belkin, Michael; Sher, Ifat

    2015-03-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of quantifying pupil responses (PR) to multifocal chromatic light stimuli for objectively assessing visual field (VF). Here we assessed a second-generation chromatic multifocal pupillometer device with 76 LEDs of 18 degree visual field and a smaller spot size (2mm diameter), aimed of achieving better perimetric resolution. A computerized infrared pupillometer was used to record PR to short- and long-wavelength stimuli (peak 485 nm and 640 nm, respectively) presented by 76 LEDs, 1.8mm spot size, at light intensities of 10-1000 cd/m2 at different points of the 18 degree VF. PR amplitude was measured in 11 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients and 20 normal agedmatched controls. RP patients demonstrated statistically significant reduced pupil contraction amplitude in majority of perimetric locations under testing conditions that emphasized rod contribution (short-wavelength stimuli at 200 cd/m2) in peripheral locations (p<0.05). By contrast, the amplitude of pupillary responses under testing conditions that emphasized cone cell contribution (long-wavelength stimuli at 1000 cd/m2) were not significantly different between the groups in majority of perimetric locations, particularly in central locations. Minimal pupil contraction was recorded in areas that were non-detected by chromatic Goldmann. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using pupillometerbased chromatic perimetry for objectively assessing VF defects and retinal function in patients with retinal degeneration. This method may be used to distinguish between the damaged cells underlying the VF defect.

  16. Olaparib significantly delays photoreceptor loss in a model for hereditary retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sahaboglu, Ayse; Barth, Melanie; Secer, Enver; Amo, Eva M. del; Urtti, Arto; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Zrenner, Eberhart; Paquet-Durand, François

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) mediates DNA-repair and rearrangements of the nuclear chromatin. Generally, PARP activity is thought to promote cell survival and in recent years a number of PARP inhibitors have been clinically developed for cancer treatment. Paradoxically, PARP activity is also connected to many diseases including the untreatable blinding disease Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), where PARP activity appears to drive the pathogenesis of photoreceptor loss. We tested the efficacy of three different PARP inhibitors to prevent photoreceptor loss in the rd1 mouse model for RP. In retinal explant cultures in vitro, olaparib had strong and long-lasting photoreceptor neuroprotective capacities. We demonstrated target engagement by showing that olaparib reduced photoreceptor accumulation of poly-ADP-ribosylated proteins. Remarkably, olaparib also reduced accumulation of cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate (cGMP), a characteristic marker for photoreceptor degeneration. Moreover, intravitreal injection of olaparib in rd1 animals diminished PARP activity and increased photoreceptor survival, confirming in vivo neuroprotection. This study affirms the role of PARP in inherited retinal degeneration and for the first time shows that a clinically approved PARP inhibitor can prevent photoreceptor degeneration in an RP model. The wealth of human clinical data available for olaparib highlights its strong potential for a rapid clinical translation into a novel RP treatment. PMID:28004814

  17. Whole exome sequencing using Ion Proton system enables reliable genetic diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Riera, Marina; Navarro, Rafael; Ruiz-Nogales, Sheila; Méndez, Pilar; Burés-Jelstrup, Anniken; Corcóstegui, Borja; Pomares, Esther

    2017-02-09

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) comprise a wide group of clinically and genetically complex diseases that progressively affect the retina. Over recent years, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods has transformed our ability to diagnose heterogeneous diseases. In this work, we have evaluated the implementation of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular diagnosis of IRD. Using Ion Proton(TM) system, we simultaneously analyzed 212 genes that are responsible for more than 25 syndromic and non-syndromic IRD. This approach was used to evaluate 59 unrelated families, with the pathogenic variant(s) successfully identified in 71.18% of cases. Interestingly, the mutation detection rate varied substantially depending on the IRD subtype. Overall, we found 63 different mutations (21 novel) in 29 distinct genes, and performed in vivo functional studies to determine the deleterious impact of variants identified in MERTK, CDH23, and RPGRIP1. In addition, we provide evidences that support CDHR1 as a gene responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with early macular affectation, and present data regarding the disease mechanism of this gene. Altogether, these results demonstrate that targeted WES of all IRD genes is a reliable, hypothesis-free approach, and a cost- and time-effective strategy for the routine genetic diagnosis of retinal dystrophies.

  18. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  19. Vision function testing for a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis: effects of image filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Nick; Scott, Adele F.; Lieby, Paulette; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris; Stacey, Ashley; Ayton, Lauren N.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Lovell, Nigel H.; McDermott, Hugh J.; Walker, Janine G.; BVA Consortium,the

    2016-06-01

    Objective. One strategy to improve the effectiveness of prosthetic vision devices is to process incoming images to ensure that key information can be perceived by the user. This paper presents the first comprehensive results of vision function testing for a suprachoroidal retinal prosthetic device utilizing of 20 stimulating electrodes. Further, we investigate whether using image filtering can improve results on a light localization task for implanted participants compared to minimal vision processing. No controlled implanted participant studies have yet investigated whether vision processing methods that are not task-specific can lead to improved results. Approach. Three participants with profound vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa were implanted with a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. All three completed multiple trials of a light localization test, and one participant completed multiple trials of acuity tests. The visual representations used were: Lanczos2 (a high quality Nyquist bandlimited downsampling filter); minimal vision processing (MVP); wide view regional averaging filtering (WV); scrambled; and, system off. Main results. Using Lanczos2, all three participants successfully completed a light localization task and obtained a significantly higher percentage of correct responses than using MVP (p≤slant 0.025) or with system off (p\\lt 0.0001). Further, in a preliminary result using Lanczos2, one participant successfully completed grating acuity and Landolt C tasks, and showed significantly better performance (p=0.004) compared to WV, scrambled and system off on the grating acuity task. Significance. Participants successfully completed vision tasks using a 20 electrode suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. Vision processing with a Nyquist bandlimited image filter has shown an advantage for a light localization task. This result suggests that this and targeted, more advanced vision processing schemes may become important components of retinal prostheses

  20. RPGR-Associated Retinal Degeneration in Human X-Linked RP and a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei Chieh; Wright, Alan F.; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Manson, Forbes D.; Gewaily, Dina Y.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Sadigh, Sam; Limberis, Maria P.; Bell, Peter; Wilson, James M.; Swaroop, Anand; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the retinal disease due to mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene in human patients and in an Rpgr conditional knockout (cko) mouse model. Methods. XLRP patients with RPGR-ORF15 mutations (n = 35, ages at first visit 5–72 years) had clinical examinations, and rod and cone perimetry. Rpgr-cko mice, in which the proximal promoter and first exon were deleted ubiquitously, were back-crossed onto a BALB/c background, and studied with optical coherence tomography and electroretinography (ERG). Retinal histopathology was performed on a subset. Results. Different patterns of rod and cone dysfunction were present in patients. Frequently, there were midperipheral losses with residual rod and cone function in central and peripheral retina. Longitudinal data indicated that central rod loss preceded peripheral rod losses. Central cone-only vision with no peripheral function was a late stage. Less commonly, patients had central rod and cone dysfunction, but preserved, albeit abnormal, midperipheral rod and cone vision. Rpgr-cko mice had progressive retinal degeneration detectable in the first months of life. ERGs indicated relatively equal rod and cone disease. At late stages, there was greater inferior versus superior retinal degeneration. Conclusions. RPGR mutations lead to progressive loss of rod and cone vision, but show different patterns of residual photoreceptor disease expression. Knowledge of the patterns should guide treatment strategies. Rpgr-cko mice had onset of degeneration at relatively young ages and progressive photoreceptor disease. The natural history in this model will permit preclinical proof-of-concept studies to be designed and such studies should advance progress toward human therapy. PMID:22807293

  1. Topographic prominence discriminator for the detection of short-latency spikes of retinal ganglion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Ahn, Jungryul; Park, Dae Jin; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Kwangsoo; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Senok, Solomon S.; Koo, Kyo-in; Goo, Yong Sook

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Direct stimulation of retinal ganglion cells in degenerate retinas by implanting epi-retinal prostheses is a recognized strategy for restoration of visual perception in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Elucidating the best stimulus-response paradigms in the laboratory using multielectrode arrays (MEA) is complicated by the fact that the short-latency spikes (within 10 ms) elicited by direct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) stimulation are obscured by the stimulus artifact which is generated by the electrical stimulator. Approach. We developed an artifact subtraction algorithm based on topographic prominence discrimination, wherein the duration of prominences within the stimulus artifact is used as a strategy for identifying the artifact for subtraction and clarifying the obfuscated spikes which are then quantified using standard thresholding. Main results. We found that the prominence discrimination based filters perform creditably in simulation conditions by successfully isolating randomly inserted spikes in the presence of simple and even complex residual artifacts. We also show that the algorithm successfully isolated short-latency spikes in an MEA-based recording from degenerate mouse retinas, where the amplitude and frequency characteristics of the stimulus artifact vary according to the distance of the recording electrode from the stimulating electrode. By ROC analysis of false positive and false negative first spike detection rates in a dataset of one hundred and eight RGCs from four retinal patches, we found that the performance of our algorithm is comparable to that of a generally-used artifact subtraction filter algorithm which uses a strategy of local polynomial approximation (SALPA). Significance. We conclude that the application of topographic prominence discrimination is a valid and useful method for subtraction of stimulation artifacts with variable amplitudes and shapes. We propose that our algorithm

  2. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, ZANEVELD; Feng, WANG; Xia, WANG; Rui, CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients’ genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt’s disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23393028

  3. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Zaneveld, Jacques; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xia; Chen, Rui

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients' genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber's Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt's disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine.

  4. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  5. Gene expression changes during retinal development and rod specification

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, Matthew; Hokamp, Karsten; Farrar, G. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) typically results from individual mutations in any one of >70 genes that cause rod photoreceptor cells to degenerate prematurely, eventually resulting in blindness. Gene therapies targeting individual RP genes have shown efficacy at clinical trial; however, these therapies require the surviving photoreceptor cells to be viable and functional, and may be economically feasible for only the more commonly mutated genes. An alternative potential treatment strategy, particularly for late stage disease, may involve stem cell transplants into the photoreceptor layer of the retina. Rod progenitors from postnatal mouse retinas can be transplanted and can form photoreceptors in recipient adult retinas; optimal numbers of transplantable cells are obtained from postnatal day 3–5 (P3–5) retinas. These cells can also be expanded in culture; however, this results in the loss of photoreceptor potential. Gene expression differences between postnatal retinas, cultured retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), and rod photoreceptor precursors were investigated to identify gene expression patterns involved in the specification of rod photoreceptors. Methods Microarrays were used to investigate differences in gene expression between cultured RPCs that have lost photoreceptor potential, P1 retinas, and fresh P5 retinas that contain significant numbers of transplantable photoreceptors. Additionally, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) sorted Rho-eGFP-expressing rod photoreceptor precursors were compared with Rho-eGFP-negative cells from the same P5 retinas. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Results Analysis of the microarray data sets, including the use of t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) to identify expression pattern neighbors of key photoreceptor specific genes, resulted in the identification of 636 genes differentially regulated during rod specification. Forty-four of these

  6. Combined transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human retinal progenitor cells into the subretinal space of RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Linghui; Gao, Lixiong; Xu, Haiwei; Duan, Ping; Zeng, Yuxiao; Liu, Yong; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-03-15

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of hereditary retinal diseases characterized by the loss of photoreceptors. Cell transplantation has been clinically applied to treat RP patients. Human retinal progenitor cells (HRPCs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) are the two commonly and practically used stem cells for transplantation. Since combined transplantation could be a promising way to integrate the advantages of both stem cell types, we transplanted HRPCs and HBMSCs into the subretinal space (SRS) of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. We report that HRPCs/HBMSCs combined transplantation maintains the electroretinogram results much better than HRPCs or HBMSCs single transplantations. The thickness of outer nuclear layer also presented a better outcome in the combined transplantation. Importantly, grafted cells in the combination migrated better, both longitudinally and latitudinally, than single transplantation. The photoreceptor differentiation of grafted cells in the retina of RCS rats receiving combined transplantation also showed a higher ratio than single transplantation. Finally, activation of microglia and the gliosis of Müller cells were more effectively suppressed in combined transplantation, indicating better immunomodulatory and anti-gliosis effects. Taken together, combining the transplantation of HRPCs and HBMSCs is a more effective strategy in stem cell-based therapy for retinal degenerative diseases.

  7. Leaves of Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) Ameliorate N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Suk Woo; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Song, Youngwoo; Yang, Sung Jae; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2015-09-09

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the protective effects of the ethanol extract of Diospyros kaki (EEDK) persimmon leaves to study N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration in mice. EEDK was orally administered after MNU injection. Retinal layer thicknesses were significantly increased in the EEDK-treated group compared with the MNU-treated group. The outer nuclear layer was preserved in the retinas of EEDK-treated mice. Moreover, EEDK treatment reduced the MNU-dependent up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin expression in Müller and astrocyte cells. EEDK treatment also inhibited MNU-dependent down-regulation of rhodopsin expression. Quercetin exposure significantly attenuated the negative effects of H2O2 in R28 cells, suggesting that quercetin can act in an antioxidative capacity. Thus, EEDK may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing degenerative retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration.

  8. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; DeLuca, Adam P; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Kaalberg, Emily E; Penticoff, Jessica A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-07-29

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans.

  9. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; DeLuca, Adam P.; Anfinson, Kristin R.; Cranston, Cathryn M.; Kaalberg, Emily E.; Penticoff, Jessica A.; Affatigato, Louisa M.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans. PMID:27471043

  10. Assessment of Hereditary Retinal Degeneration in the English Springer Spaniel Dog and Disease Relationship to an RPGRIP1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Narfström, Kristina; Jeong, Manbok; Hyman, Jennifer; Madsen, Richard W.; Bergström, Tomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS) dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG) is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22550515

  11. Efficacy of electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells with temporal patterns resembling light-evoked spike trains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond C S; Garrett, David J; Grayden, David B; Ibbotson, Michael R; Cloherty, Shaun L

    2014-01-01

    People with degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa lose most of their photoreceptors but retain a significant proportion (~30%) of their retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Microelectronic retinal prostheses aim to bypass the lost photoreceptors and restore vision by directly stimulating the surviving RGCs. Here we investigate the extent to which electrical stimulation of RGCs can evoke neural spike trains with statistics resembling those of normal visually-evoked responses. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from individual cat RGCs in vitro. We first recorded the responses of each cell to short sequences of visual stimulation. These responses were converted to trains of electrical stimulation that we then presented to the same cell via an epiretinal stimulating electrode. We then quantified the efficacy of the electrical stimuli and the latency of the evoked spikes. In all cases, spikes were evoked with sub-millisecond latency (0.55 ms, median, ON cells, n = 8; 0.75 ms, median, OFF cells, n = 6) and efficacy ranged from 0.4-1.0 (0.79, median, ON cells; 0.97, median, OFF cells). These data demonstrate that meaningful spike trains, resembling normal responses of RGCs to visual stimulation, can be reliably evoked by epiretinal prostheses.

  12. Fluorescein angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be done if you have: Retinal detachment Retinitis pigmentosa Risks There is a slight chance of infection ... age-related Retina Retinal artery occlusion Retinal detachment Retinitis pigmentosa Retinopathy of prematurity Review Date 8/20/2016 ...

  13. Rare earth nanoparticles prevent retinal degeneration induced by intracellular peroxides:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junping; Patil, Swanand; Seal, Sudipta; McGinnis, James F.

    2006-11-01

    Photoreceptor cells are incessantly bombarded with photons of light, which, along with the cells' high rate of oxygen metabolism, continuously exposes them to elevated levels of toxic reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs). Vacancy-engineered mixed-valence-state cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria particles) scavenge ROIs. Our data show that nanoceria particles prevent increases in the intracellular concentrations of ROIs in primary cell cultures of rat retina and, in vivo, prevent loss of vision due to light-induced degeneration of photoreceptor cells. These data indicate that the nanoceria particles may be effective in inhibiting the progression of ROI-induced cell death, which is thought to be involved in macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and other blinding diseases, as well as the ROI-induced death of other cell types in diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, stroke and so on. The use of nanoceria particles as a direct therapy for multiple diseases represents a novel strategy and suggests that they may represent a unique platform technology.

  14. Spata7 is a retinal ciliopathy gene critical for correct RPGRIP1 localization and protein trafficking in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Eblimit, Aiden; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T.; Chen, Yiyun; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Zhong, Hua; Letteboer, Stef; Van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Simons, David L.; Ding, Qian; Wu, Ka Man; Li, Yumei; Van Beersum, Sylvia; Moayedi, Yalda; Xu, Huidan; Pickard, Patrick; Wang, Keqing; Gan, Lin; Wu, Samuel M.; Williams, David S.; Mardon, Graeme; Roepman, Ronald; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are severe hereditary diseases that causes visual impairment in infants and children. SPATA7 has recently been identified as the LCA3 and juvenile RP gene in humans, whose function in the retina remains elusive. Here, we show that SPATA7 localizes at the primary cilium of cells and at the connecting cilium (CC) of photoreceptor cells, indicating that SPATA7 is a ciliary protein. In addition, SPATA7 directly interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1), a key connecting cilium protein that has also been linked to LCA. In the retina of Spata7 null mutant mice, a substantial reduction of RPGRIP1 levels at the CC of photoreceptor cells is observed, suggesting that SPATA7 is required for the stable assembly and localization of the ciliary RPGRIP1 protein complex. Furthermore, our results pinpoint a role of this complex in protein trafficking across the CC to the outer segments, as we identified that rhodopsin accumulates in the inner segments and around the nucleus of photoreceptors. This accumulation then likely triggers the apoptosis of rod photoreceptors that was observed. Loss of Spata7 function in mice indeed results in a juvenile RP-like phenotype, characterized by progressive degeneration of photoreceptor cells and a strongly decreased light response. Together, these results indicate that SPATA7 functions as a key member of a retinal ciliopathy-associated protein complex, and that apoptosis of rod photoreceptor cells triggered by protein mislocalization is likely the mechanism of disease progression in LCA3/ juvenile RP patients. PMID:25398945

  15. Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko; Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Sargan, David R

    2012-02-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1(-/-) MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10(-13)) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ~11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1(-/-) alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD.

  16. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  17. Modifier genes as therapeutics: the nuclear hormone receptor Rev Erb alpha (Nr1d1) rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nelly M; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D; Baid, Rinku; Kompella, Uday; DeAngelis, Margaret M; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors play a major role in many important biological processes. Most nuclear hormone receptors are ubiquitously expressed and regulate processes such as metabolism, circadian function, and development. They function in these processes to maintain homeostasis through modulation of transcriptional gene networks. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of a nuclear hormone receptor gene to modulate retinal degeneration and restore the integrity of the retina. Currently, there are no effective treatment options for retinal degenerative diseases leading to progressive and irreversible blindness. In this study we demonstrate that the nuclear hormone receptor gene Nr1d1 (Rev-Erbα) rescues Nr2e3-associated retinal degeneration in the rd7 mouse, which lacks a functional Nr2e3 gene. Mutations in human NR2E3 are associated with several retinal degenerations including enhanced S cone syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa. The rd7 mouse, lacking Nr2e3, exhibits an increase in S cones and slow, progressive retinal degeneration. A traditional genetic mapping approach previously identified candidate modifier loci. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo delivery of the candidate modifier gene, Nr1d1 rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal degeneration. We observed clinical, histological, functional, and molecular restoration of the rd7 retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of rescue at the molecular and functional level is through the re-regulation of key genes within the Nr2e3-directed transcriptional network. Together, these findings reveal the potency of nuclear receptors as modulators of disease and specifically of NR1D1 as a novel therapeutic for retinal degenerations.

  18. P23H opsin knock-in mice reveal a novel step in retinal rod disc morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Retinal rod photoreceptor cells have double membrane discs located in their outer segments (ROS) that are continuously formed proximally from connecting cilia (CC) and phagocytized distally by the retinal pigmented epithelium. The major component of these rod discs, the light-sensitive visual pigment rhodopsin (Rho), consists of an opsin protein linked to 11-cis-retinal. The P23H mutation of rod opsin (P23H opsin) is the most common cause of human blinding autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). A mouse model of adRP with this mutation (RhoP23H/+) shows low levels of P23H opsin protein, partial misalignment of discs and progressive retinal degeneration. However, the impact of mutant P23H opsin on the formation of abnormal discs is unclear and it is still unknown whether this mutant pigment can mediate phototransduction. Using transretinal ERG recordings, we demonstrate that P23H mutant Rho can trigger phototransduction but RhoP23H/P23H rods are ∼17 000-fold less sensitive to light than Rho+/+ rods and produce abnormally fast photo-responses. By analyzing homozygous RhoP23H/P23H knock-in mice, we show that P23H opsin is transported to ciliary protrusions where it forms sagittally elongated discs. Transmission electron microscopy of postnatal day (PND) 14 RhoP23H/+ mouse retina revealed disordered sagittally oriented discs before the onset of retinal degeneration. Surprisingly, we also observed smaller, immature sagittally oriented discs in PND14 Rho+/− and Rho+/+ mice that were not seen in older animals. These findings provide fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of the P23H mutant opsin and reveal a novel early sagittally aligned disc formation step in normal ROS disc expansion. PMID:24214395

  19. Age-dependent disease expression determines remodeling of the retinal mosaic in carriers of RPGR exon ORF15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, William A.; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the retinal histopathology in carriers of X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA1 & XLPRA2), two canine models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused, respectively, by a stop and a frameshift mutation in RPGRORF15. Methods Retinas of XLPRA2 and XLPRA1 carriers of different ages were processed for morphologic evaluation, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemistry. Cell-specific markers were used to examine retinal remodeling events. Results A mosaic pattern composed of patches of diseased and normal retina was first detected in XLPRA2 carriers at 4.9 weeks of age. A peak of photoreceptor cell death led to focal rod loss; however, in these patches an increased density of cones was found to persist over time. Patches of disease gradually disappeared such that by 39 weeks of age the overall retinal morphology, albeit thinner, had improved lamination. In older XLPRA2 carriers (≥8.8 years), extended regions of severe degeneration occurred in the peripheral/mid-peripheral retina. In XLPRA1 carriers, opsin mislocalization and rare events of rod death were detected by TUNEL assay at 20 weeks of age, however patchy degeneration was only seen by 1.4 years, and was still apparent at 7.8 years. Conclusion The time of onset and the progression of the disease differed between the two models. In the early onset form (XLPRA2) the morphologic appearance of the retinal mosaic changed as a function of age, suggesting that structural plasticity persists in the early postnatal canine retina as mutant photoreceptors die. In the late onset form (XLPRA1), patches of disease persisted until later ages. PMID:19255154

  20. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  1. Inheritance of the group I rDNA intron in Tetrahymena pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H; Simon, E M; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We have previously argued from phylogenetic sequence data that the group I intron in the rRNA genes of Tetrahymena was acquired by different Tetrahymena species at different times during evolution. We have now approached the question of intron mobility experimentally by crossing intron+ and intron- strains looking for a strong polarity in the inheritance of the intron (intron homing). Based on the genetic analysis we find that the intron in T. pigmentosa is inherited as a neutral character and that intron+ and intron- alleles segregate in a Mendelian fashion with no sign of intron homing. In an analysis of vegetatively growing cells containing intron+ and intron- rDNA, initially in the same macronucleus, we similarly find no evidence of intron homing. During the course of this work, we observed to our surprise that progeny clones from some crosses contained three types of rDNA. One possible explanation is that T. pigmentosa has two rdn loci in contrast to the single locus found in T. thermophila. Some of the progeny clones from the genetic analysis were expanded for several hundred generations, and allelic assortment of the rDNA was demonstrated by subcloning analysis.

  2. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  3. The changes of potassium currents in RCS rat Müller cell during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, TongTao; Li, YaoChen; Weng, ChuanHuang; Yin, ZhengQin

    2012-01-03

    Müller cells are the principal glial cells expressing membrane-bound potassium channel and predominantly mediating the homeostatic regulation of extracellular K+ produced by neuronal activity in retina. It's well known that Müller cells can be activated in many pathological conditions, but little is known about the change of potassium currents of Müller cells during the progression of retinitis pigmentosa. Herein, the Royal College of Surgeons rats (RCS rat) were employed to investigate some phenotypic and functional changes of Müller cells during retinal degeneration such as the expression of Kir4.1, membrane properties and K+ channel currents by using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, western blot and whole-cell patch clamping respectively. Compared with Müller cells in control retina, increased glutamine synthetase (GS) mRNA levels were seen at P30 and P60, and then decreased gradually in RCS rat retina. Morphologically, Müller cells showed significant hypertrophy and proliferation after p60. The increased expression of intermediate filament, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin began at P30 and reached a peak at p60. Kir4.1 channels presented a peak expression at P30. Concomitantly, K(+) currents of Müller cells increased at P30 and decreased at P90 significantly. We concluded that retinal Müller cells of RCS rats underwent an activation initiated by the onset of retinal degeneration before p60 and then an obvious reactive gliosis, which led the basic membrane properties to suffer marked changes, and caused the Kir4.1 channels of Müller cells to occur a clear functional shift, even lose their normal electrophysiological properties. This process aggravates the impairment caused by the initial photoreceptor degeneration.

  4. Genetic testing for retinal dystrophies and dysfunctions: benefits, dilemmas and solutions.

    PubMed

    Koenekoop, Robert K; Lopez, Irma; den Hollander, Anneke I; Allikmets, Rando; Cremers, Frans P M

    2007-07-01

    Human retinal dystrophies have unparalleled genetic and clinical diversity and are currently linked to more than 185 genetic loci. Genotyping is a crucial exercise, as human gene-specific clinical trials to study photoreceptor rescue are on their way. Testing confirms the diagnosis at the molecular level and allows for a more precise prognosis of the possible future clinical evolution. As treatments are gene-specific and the 'window of opportunity' is time-sensitive; accurate, rapid and cost-effective genetic testing will play an ever-increasing crucial role. The gold standard is sequencing but is fraught with excessive costs, time, manpower issues and finding non-pathogenic variants. Therefore, no centre offers testing of all currently 132 known genes. Several new micro-array technologies have emerged recently, that offer rapid, cost-effective and accurate genotyping. The new disease chips from Asper Ophthalmics (for Stargardt dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis [LCA], Usher syndromes and retinitis pigmentosa) offer an excellent first pass opportunity. All known mutations are placed on the chip and in 4 h a patient's DNA is screened. Identification rates (identifying at least one disease-associated mutation) are currently approximately 70% (Stargardt), approximately 60-70% (LCA) and approximately 45% (Usher syndrome subtype 1). This may be combined with genotype-phenotype correlations that suggest the causal gene from the clinical appearance (e.g. preserved para-arteriolar retinal pigment epithelium suggests the involvement of the CRB1 gene in LCA). As approximately 50% of the retinal dystrophy genes still await discovery, these technologies will improve dramatically as additional novel mutations are added. Genetic testing will then become standard practice to complement the ophthalmic evaluation.

  5. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  6. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  7. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  8. Low Level Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    18 Related Projects ........................ . . ....... 20 References . . . . .......................... 22 2 INTRODUCTION The objectives of...fluorescein is a potent phototoxic agent in the retina.26 The damage threshold for blue light retinal damage is lowered by a factor of ten after an... Related to the Probiem of Retinal Light Damage 1. Corneal Holography 2. Hematoporphyrin Studies 3. Fluorescein Fluorescence Measurements 7 EQUIPMENT

  9. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  10. Urticaria pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... body fight infections. Mast cells make and release histamine, which causes nearby tissues to become swollen and inflamed. Things that can trigger histamine release and skin symptoms include: Rubbing the skin ...

  11. Progress of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for neural and retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Fortino, Veronica R; Pelaez, Daniel; Cheung, Herman S

    2014-01-01

    Complex circuitry and limited regenerative power make central nervous system (CNS) disorders the most challenging and difficult for functional repair. With elusive disease mechanisms, traditional surgical and medical interventions merely slow down the progression of the neurodegenerative diseases. However, the number of neurons still diminishes in many patients. Recently, stem cell therapy has been proposed as a viable option. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a widely-studied human adult stem cell population, have been discovered for more than 20 years. MSCs have been found all over the body and can be conveniently obtained from different accessible tissues: bone marrow, blood, and adipose and dental tissue. MSCs have high proliferative and differentiation abilities, providing an inexhaustible source of neurons and glia for cell replacement therapy. Moreover, MSCs also show neuroprotective effects without any genetic modification or reprogramming. In addition, the extraordinary immunomodulatory properties of MSCs enable autologous and heterologous transplantation. These qualities heighten the clinical applicability of MSCs when dealing with the pathologies of CNS disorders. Here, we summarize the latest progress of MSC experimental research as well as human clinical trials for neural and retinal diseases. This review article will focus on multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, autism, glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:24772238

  12. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M.; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M.; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease. PMID:26170250

  13. A non-stop S-antigen gene mutation is associated with late onset hereditary retinal degeneration in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Julie Ann; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the causative mutation of canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregating as an adult onset autosomal recessive disorder in the Basenji breed of dog. Methods Basenji dogs were ascertained for the PRA phenotype by clinical ophthalmoscopic examination. Blood samples from six affected cases and three nonaffected controls were collected, and DNA extraction was used for a genome-wide association study using the canine HD Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and PLINK. Positional candidate genes identified within the peak association signal region were evaluated. Results The highest -Log10(P) value of 4.65 was obtained for 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on three chromosomes. Homozygosity and linkage disequilibrium analyses favored one chromosome, CFA25, and screening of the S-antigen (SAG) gene identified a non-stop mutation (c.1216T>C), which would result in the addition of 25 amino acids (p.*405Rext*25). Conclusions Identification of this non-stop SAG mutation in dogs affected with retinal degeneration establishes this canine disease as orthologous to Oguchi disease and SAG-associated retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and offers opportunities for genetic therapeutic intervention. PMID:24019744

  14. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue 'Norgestrel' is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel's neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a promising

  15. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M.; Byrne, Ashleigh M.; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue ‘Norgestrel’ is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel’s neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a

  16. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  17. Retinal pseudoangiitis after intravitreal triamcinolone

    PubMed Central

    García-Campos, Jose Manuel; García-Basterra, Ignacio; Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a fundus image similar to frosted retinal angiitis after undergoing pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal triamcinolone injection. The patient with diabetic retinopathy was referred to our hospital with vision loss in her right eye secondary to vitreous haemorrhage. After pars plana vitrectomy and injection of triamcinolone acetonide a funduscopy examination revealed deposits of triamcinolone along the retinal vessels simulating a frosted retinal angiitis. Triamcinolone deposits along blood vessels could be the result of the reabsorption process of these crystals by the perivascular macrophages. Further studies are needed. PMID:25678611

  18. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  19. Refraction test

    MedlinePlus

    ... small artery that carries blood to the retina) Retinitis pigmentosa (damage of the retina) Risks There are no ... degeneration - age-related Retinal artery occlusion Retinal detachment Retinitis pigmentosa Vision problems Review Date 2/23/2015 Updated ...

  20. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  1. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  2. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  3. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  4. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.