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Sample records for retinol-binding protein levels

  1. Retinol Binding Protein-4 and Adiponectin Levels in Thyroid Overt and Subclinical Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, S; Papazoglou, D; Zisimopoulos, A; Papanas, N; Tiaka, E; Antonoglou, C; Maltezos, E

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is accompanied by numerous changes in intermediary metabolism. Retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4) and adiponectin are 2 adipocytokines that have multiple metabolic functions. The aim of our study was to examine serum RBP4 and adiponectin levels in clinical (before and after therapy) and subclinical hyperthyroid and hypothyroid subjects as compared to controls.150 patients with thyroid dysfunction were recruited (65 hyperthyroid and 85 hypothyroid) while 28 euthyroid subjects served as a control group. We measured anthropometric, biochemical and hormonal (free T4, free T3, TSH, insulin) parameters in all participants. RBP-4 and adiponectin were measured using commercial ELISA kits.Mean baseline levels of RBP-4 were higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism (29.0±10.2 ng/ml, 25.1±12.6 ng/ml, 38.8±16.5 ng/ml, 31.9±13.2 ng/ml, 20.4±8.2 ng/ml in patients with hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthryrodism, hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and controls respectively, F=4.86, P<0.001) and decreased significantly in patients with clinical hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism after normalization of thyroid hormones' levels (from 29.0±10.2 to 24.9±8.4 ng/ml, p=0.003 and from 38.8±16.5 to 29.0±10.8 ng/ml, p=0.001 respectively). We did not observe analogous changes in adiponectin levels in any of the studied groups.RBP-4 levels are higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism and exhibit a marked decrease after normalization of thyroid function in both hyper and hypothyroid patients. We suggest that RBP-4 may play a role in the metabolic disturbances which accompany thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26575118

  2. The effect of antenatal dexamethasone on maternal and fetal retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hustead, V A; Zachman, R D

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen rhesus monkeys received 0.1 to 15 mg/kg of antenatal dexamethasone at 132 days' gestation; seven control animals received placebo. At 135 days' gestation they underwent cesarean section, and maternal and fetal serum was assayed for retinol-binding protein. Fetal and maternal concentrations of retinol-binding protein increased after dexamethasone (p less than 0.05) and there was a trend for fetal levels of retinol-binding protein to increase with increasing dosage (p less than 0.01). Whether the elevation of retinol-binding protein in response to antenatal dexamethasone is a desirable side effect is not clear at this time. PMID:3946495

  3. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  8. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  9. Retinol Binding Protein: Marker for Insulin Resistance and Inflammation Postburn?

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N.; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Mecott, Gabriel A.; Trentzsch, Heiko; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Burn injury leads to vast changes in both metabolic and inflammatory responses and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperglycemia are major components of the hypermetabolic response found in burn-injured patients and subsequently contribute to adverse outcomes. Studies have shown that increased systemic retinol binding protein (RBP) levels are associated with IR and hyperinflammation in diabetic and obese patients. The aim of this study was to determine RBP profiles and to test the hypothesis that elevated RBP levels are associated with both IR and the inflammatory response in burned patients. Methods RBP was measured in 372 patients during the acute stay postburn. Patients’ demographics, glucose levels, and insulin administration were recorded. Cytokines, hormones, plasma proteins, and organ markers were measured. The average of all measurements of RBP (2.1 mg/dL) was used to divide patients into high and low groups. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test. Statistical significance was accepted at P < .05. Results Fifty-one patients (high group) had elevated RBP levels during acute hospitalization and demonstrated a significant higher incidence of multiorgan failure, sepsis, and mortality (P < .05). Moreover, in the high group, a significant increase of IR, inflammatory cytokines, and catabolic and organ-specific markers were detected (P < .05). Conclusions Increased RBP levels postburn correlate with increased IR, inflammatory and catabolic responses, incidence of multiorgan failure, and mortality. RBP may be a novel biomarker to monitor these detrimental responses postburn. PMID:22042048

  10. Decreased clearance of serum retinol-binding protein and elevated levels of transthyretin in insulin-resistant ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Nimesh; Graham, Timothy E.; Tsuji, Yuki; Yang, Qin; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2009-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein (RBP4) is secreted by liver and adipocytes and is implicated in systemic insulin resistance in rodents and humans. RBP4 normally binds to the larger transthyretin (TTR) homotetramer, forming a protein complex that reduces renal clearance of RBP4. To determine whether alterations in RBP4-TTR binding contribute to elevated plasma RBP4 levels in insulin-resistant states, we investigated RBP4-TTR interactions in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and high-fat-fed obese mice (HFD). Gel filtration chromatography of plasma showed that 88–94% of RBP4 is contained within the RBP4-TTR complex in ob/ob and lean mice. Coimmunoprecipitation with an RBP4 antibody brought down stoichiometrically equal amounts of TTR and RBP4, indicating that TTR was not more saturated with RBP4 in ob/ob mice than in controls. However, plasma TTR levels were elevated approximately fourfold in ob/ob mice vs. controls. RBP4 injected intravenously in lean mice cleared rapidly, whereas the t1/2 for disappearance was approximately twofold longer in ob/ob plasma. Urinary fractional excretion of RBP4 was reduced in ob/ob mice, consistent with increased retention. In HFD mice, plasma TTR levels and clearance of injected RBP4 were similar to chow-fed controls. Hepatic TTR mRNA levels were elevated approximately twofold in ob/ob but not in HFD mice. Since elevated circulating RBP4 causes insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in mice, these findings suggest that increased TTR or alterations in RBP4-TTR binding may contribute to insulin resistance by stabilizing RBP4 at higher steady-state concentrations in circulation. Lowering TTR levels or interfering with RBP4-TTR binding may enhance insulin sensitivity in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18285525

  11. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  12. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E. ); Bok, D. )

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  13. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-07-29

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection.

  14. Is Retinol Binding Protein 4 a Link Between Adiposity and Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Noa; Li, Li; Abola, Matthew V.; Berger, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), is synthesized in liver where it binds vitamin A, retinol, and transports it to tissues throughout the body. It has been shown in some studies that the level of circulating RBP4 increases with body mass, and the protein has been implicated as a mediator in development of insulin resistance and the metabolic disease. Adipose tissue serves as another site of RBP4 synthesis, accounting for its designation as an adipokine. In addition to its function as a transport protein, RBP4 serves as a signaling molecule which, by binding to the membrane receptor STRA6, triggers downstream activation of pro-oncogenic pathways including JAK2/STAT3/5. Taken together, available information suggests the possibility that RBP4 may be a link between obesity and cancer. PMID:26136304

  15. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  16. Male mice are susceptible to high fat diet-induced hyperglycaemia and display increased circulatory retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels and its expression in visceral adipose depots.

    PubMed

    Asha, G V; Raja Gopal Reddy, M; Mahesh, M; Vajreswari, A; Jeyakumar, S M

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A and its metabolites are known to modulate adipose tissue development and its associated complications. Here, we assessed the vitamin A status and its metabolic pathway gene expression in relation to sexual dimorphism by employing 35 days old C57BL/6J male and female mice, which were fed either stock or high fat (HF) diet for 26 weeks. HF diet feeding increased body weight/weight gain and white adipose tissue (WAT) of visceral and subcutaneous regions, however, increase in vitamin A levels observed only in subcutaneous WAT. Further, the expression of most of the vitamin A metabolic pathway genes showed no sexual dimorphism. The observed HF diet-induced hyperglycaemia in male corroborates with increased retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels in plasma and its expression in visceral adipose depots. In conclusion, the male mice are susceptible to high fat diet-induced hyperglycaemia and display higher plasma RBP4 levels, possibly due to its over-expression in visceral adipose depots.

  17. Retinol Binding Protein 4 in Relation to Diet, Inflammation, Immunity, and Cardiovascular Diseases12

    PubMed Central

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine. PMID:26567199

  18. Retinol binding protein 4 in relation to diet, inflammation, immunity, and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine.

  19. Urinary {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, and retinol-binding protein levels in general populations in Japan with references to cadmium in urine, blood, and 24-hour food duplicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Moon, Chan-Seok; Zhang, Zuo-Wen

    1995-07-01

    Possible cadmium (Cd) exposure-associated changes in urinary levels of low-molecular-weight proteins were studied in nonsmoking and nondrinking female members of the general Japanese population (378 subjects with no known occupational heavy metal exposure) who lived at 19 study sites (all without any known environmental heavy metal pollution) in 13 prefectures throughout Japan. The external Cd dose was evaluated in terms of daily Cd intake via food (Cd-F), whereas Cd levels in blood (Cd-B) and urine (Cd-U) were taken as internal dose indicators. When the subjects were classified according to Cd-F into three groups with {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} (20.4 {mu}g/day as a geometric mean of 97 women), {open_quotes}middle{close_quotes} (35.0 {mu}g/day, 120 women) and {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} (67.0 {mu}g/day, 66 women) exposure, both Cd-B and Cd-U increased in parallel with the changes in Cd-F. However, there were no dose-dependent changes in {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin or retinol-binding protein levels in urine. {alpha}{sub 1}-Microglobulin levels appeared to increase, but the distribution of the cases above the two cutoff levels of 9.6 and 15.8 {mu}g/mg creatinine among the three Cd-F groups did not show any bias. Overall, it was concluded that there was no apparent Cd exposure-associated elevation in urinary low-molecular-weight protein levels in the study population. 41 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Urinary retinol-binding protein as a prognostic marker in the treatment of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni Kirsztajn, G; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ajzen, H; Pereira, A B

    2000-10-01

    We studied the urinary levels of retinol-binding protein (urRBP), an index of proximal tubular dysfunction, in patients with nephrotic syndrome before and approximately 2 months after the beginning of steroid therapy as a predictor of response to therapy which included for some patients courses of immunosuppressive drugs. Those patients with minimal-change disease, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, and focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis who had normal pretreatment urRBP levels were responsive to treatment; occasionally, responsive patients had an initially elevated urRBP level which normalized during treatment. Contrariwise, those patients with abnormally high levels of urRBP which did not normalize during treatment did not respond to treatment. The chance of a patient with minimal-change disease, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, or focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis and a pretreatment urRBP level equal to or >1.0 mg/l being resistant to steroid treatment is 30 times that of a patient with a urRBP level <1.0 mg/l and even higher, if we consider the levels obtained during treatment. PMID:11014978

  1. Urinary retinol-binding protein as a prognostic marker in glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Kirsztajn, Gianna Mastroianni; Nishida, Sonia K; Silva, Marcelo S; Ajzen, Horacio; Moura, Luiz A; Pereira, Aparecido B

    2002-04-01

    Tubulointerstitial involvement seems to have a decisive influence on the progression of glomerular diseases. We have prospectively evaluated the levels of urinary retinol-binding protein (urRBP), a marker of proximal tubular dysfunction, in patients with different glomerulopathies (GPs) and correlated these levels with disease progression. By studying 238 patients with GPs, we found that urRBP tend to be lower in minimal change disease, glomerular hematuria and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis as compared to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranous nephropathy and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. By following 149 patients for up to 10 years, we have concluded that high levels of urRBP can identify patients who will progress with loss of renal function (defined as doubling of serum creatinine level) and that a urRBP level >1 mg/l was an efficient and independent indicator of poor prognosis as shown by multivariate analysis. This prediction was possible at a time when serum creatinine and creatinine clearance were still in the normal range. Our data suggest that this laboratory test adds important clinical information to the follow-up of GPs. PMID:11961401

  2. Retinol binding protein 4 and incident diabetes – the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC Study)

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Vivian C.; Pereira, Mark; Pankow, James S.; Ballantyne, Christie; Couper, David; Heiss, Gerardo; Duncan, Bruce B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been described as a link between impaired glucose uptake in adipocytes and systemic insulin sensitivity. Objective To determine whether RBP4 fasting levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes. Methods Using a case-cohort design, we followed 543 middle-aged individuals who developed diabetes and 537 who did not over ~9 years within the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Weighted Cox proportional hazards analyses permitted statistical inference of the RBP4 – incident diabetes associations to the entire cohort. Results Women in the highest tertile of RBP4 presented greater risk of developing diabetes (HR=1.74; 95%CI 1.03–2.94) in analyses adjusted for age, ethnicity, study center, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, nonesterified fatty acids, adiponectin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL-C. When additionally adjusted for fasting insulin, this association’s significance became borderline (HR=1.68; 95%CI 1.00–2.82). No association between RBP4 levels and incident diabetes was found in men. Conclusion These findings suggest that RBP4 levels may be directly involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in women. PMID:24142010

  3. Synthesis and secretion of interstitial retinol-binding protein by the human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Fliesler, S.J.; Rayborn, M.E.; Fong, S.L.; Landers, R.A.; Bridges, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) is a soluble glycoprotein present between the retina and pigmented epithelium, which may function to shuttle vitamin A derivatives between these tissues. While previous studies have shown that the retina is solely responsible for IRBP synthesis, the specific retinal cell(s) in which this occurs has not been established. Since the carbohydrate moiety of IRBP contains fucose, the authors have analyzed the sites of incorporation of /sup 3/H-fucose in the human retina in vitro, using autoradiography. Following a 30-min pulse incubation, all retinal layers exhibited incorporation of label; however, the rod photoreceptor inner segments contained one- to two-fold more radioactivity than was present in any other retinal compartment. In autoradiographs of retinas recovered following a 4 hr chase incubation, all retinal layers retained similar levels of radioactivity with the exception of the rod photoreceptors, cone photoreceptors and cells in the inner nuclear layer, which lost 75, 11, and 14 percent, respectively of the radioactivity present immediately following the 30-min pulse. Proteins present in the chase incubation medium were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. The principal labeled component in the chase medium was identified as IRBP by immunoprecipitation with antibovine-IRBP immunoglobulins.

  4. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Li-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1) and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3), are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE), age at first egg (AFE), weight at first egg (WFE) and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN). The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken. PMID:25083100

  5. Macrophages are novel sites of expression and regulation of retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4).

    PubMed

    Broch, M; Ramírez, R; Auguet, M T; Alcaide, M J; Aguilar, C; Garcia-Espana, A; Richart, C

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is linked to a low-level chronic inflammatory state that may contribute to the development of associated metabolic complications. Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is an adipokine associated with parameters of obesity including insulin resistance indices, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile, and recently, with circulating inflammatory factors. Due to the infiltration of adipose tissue in obesity by macrophages derived from circulating monocytes and, on the other hand, the existence of a close genetic relationship between adipocytes and macrophages, we decided to examine if RBP4 is expressed in monocytes and/or primary human macrophages. While we did not detect expression of RBP4 in undifferentiated monocytes, RBP4 expression became evident during the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and was highest in differentiated macrophages. Once we demonstrated the expression of RBP4 in macrophages, we checked if RBP4 expression could be regulated by inflammatory stimuli such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed that while RBP4 expression was strongly inhibited by TNF-alpha and LPS, it was not affected by IL-6. Our results highlight the complexity behind the regulation of this adipokine and demonstrate that RBP4 expression in macrophages could be modulated by inflammatory stimuli.

  6. Association of serum retinol binding protein 4 and insulin resistance in apparently healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk-Chul; Lee, Ji-Won; Im, Jee-Aee

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance constitutes a pathophysiologic link between obesity, atherosclerosis, and/or cardiovascular complications. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a newly discovered adipocyte product that modulates glucose metabolism and consequently induces insulin resistance. We investigated the association between serum RBP4 levels and insulin resistance in obese and nonobese adolescents. A total of 87 nonobese (60 males and 27 females) and 85 obese (62 males and 23 females) apparently healthy adolescents, 12 to 18 years old, were included in this study. A questionnaire was used to obtain participant medical history and lifestyle information, such as smoking and alcohol ingestion habits. Subjects' anthropometric measurements were taken to calculate for body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. Serum RBP4 levels were measured by an enzyme immunoassay kit. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting insulin were measured. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were calculated. Males had significantly higher RBP4 levels than females. Serum RBP4 levels were significantly higher in the obese group compared with the nonobese group. In all subjects, RBP4 was positively correlated with adiposity index (body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio), systolic and diastolic blood pressures, glucose tolerance index (fasting glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR), lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglycerides), and inflammatory indices (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, white blood cell count). In multiple linear regression analysis, RBP4 was independently associated with age, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels in the nonobese group and with sex and triglyceride levels in the obese group. These results suggest that serum RBP4 might have clinical implications for lipid metabolism and insulin action in adolescents.

  7. Novel role for retinol-binding protein 4 in the regulation of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Bettina J; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Polak, Pazit; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Shiroto, Takashi; Eskurza, Iratxe; Lee, Seung-Ah; Jiang, Hongfeng; Michel, Thomas; Kahn, Barbara B

    2015-08-01

    Elevated levels of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) contribute to insulin resistance and correlate with increased prevalence of hypertension and myocardial infarction. We sought to determine whether lowering RBP4 would improve blood pressure (BP) and protect against obesity- or angiotensin (Ang)-II-induced hypertension. Systolic and diastolic BP were lower in the RBP4-knockout (RBP4-KO) mice and higher in the RBP4-overexpressing (RBP4-Tg) mice compared with BP in the wild-type (WT) littermates. Carbachol-induced vasodilatation was increased in arteries from the RBP4-KO compared with the WT mice and was impaired in the RBP4-Tg mice. Aortic eNOS(Ser1177) phosphorylation was enhanced ∼50% in the RBP4-KO mice, with no change in total eNOS protein. Feeding a high-fat diet increased BP in the RBP4-KO mice only to the level in the WT mice fed chow and had no effect on aortic eNOS(Ser1177) phosphorylation. Ang-II infusion resulted in 22 mmHg lower systolic BP in the RBP4-KO than in the WT mice, although the relative BP increase over saline infusion was ∼30% in both. Ang-II treatment decreased aortic eNOS(Ser1177) phosphorylation in the WT and RBP4-KO mice, but phosphorylation remained higher in the RBP4-KO mice. Cardiac hypertrophy with Ang-II treatment was diminished by 56% in the RBP4-KO mice. Thus, elevated serum RBP4 raises BP and lack of RBP4 reduces it, with commensurate changes in aortic eNOS(Ser1177) phosphorylation. Lowering RBP4 may reduce BP through enhanced eNOS-mediated vasodilatation and may be a novel therapeutic approach for hypertension. PMID:25911613

  8. Urinary retinol binding protein is a marker of the extent of interstitial kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Chauvet, Sophie; Chassé, Jean-François; Vincent, Marc; Avillach, Paul; Levi, Charlene; Meas-Yedid, Vannary; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Nga-Matsogo, Diane; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Karras, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Currently, a non-invasive method to estimate the degree of interstitial fibrosis (IF) in chronic kidney disease is not available in routine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the measurement of urinary low molecular weight (LMW) protein concentrations as a method to determine the extent of IF. The urines specimen from 162 consecutive patients who underwent renal biopsy were used in the analysis. Numerical quantification software based on the colorimetric analysis of fibrous areas was used to assess the percentage IF. Total proteinuria, albuminuria, and the urinary levels of retinol binding protein (RBP), alpha1-microglobulin (α1MG), beta 2-microglobulin (β2MG), transferrin, and IgG immunoglobulins were measured. There was a significant correlation between the degree of IF and the RBP/creatinine (creat) ratio (R2: 0.11, p<0.0001). IF was associated to a lesser extent with urinary β2MG and α1MG; however, there was no association with total proteinuria or high molecular weight (HMW) proteinuria. The correlation between IF and RBP/creat remained significant after adjustment to the estimated glomerular filtration rate, age, body mass index, α1MG, and β2MG. The specificity of the test for diagnosing a fibrosis score of >25% of the parenchyma was 95% when using a threshold of 20 mg/g creat. In conclusion, RBP appears to be a quantitative and non-invasive marker for the independent prediction of the extent of kidney IF. Because methods for the measurement of urinary RBP are available in most clinical chemistry departments, RBP measurement is appealing for implementation in the routine care of patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:24416268

  9. Is serum retinol binding protein-4: A predictor for diabetes in genetically high risk population?

    PubMed Central

    Bose, K. Subhash Chandra; Gupta, Shachin K.; Singh, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Retinol binding protein-4 (BP-4) a new adipocytokine, specifically binds to retinol, through experimental studies, reported its link between obesity and insulin resistance (IR). But till date no studies are available on influence of genetic predisposition of diabetes on RBP-4 expression. Hence, we aimed to study the influence of genetic predisposition of diabetes on the serum RBP-4 and its role in development of IR and diabetes in genetically high risk population. Materials and Methods: Healthy non diabetic individuals (age 18 to 22) were grouped into Group I: Control (n = 81), whose parents are non diabetic, non hypertensive and does not have any family history of coronary heart diseases. Group II: (n = 157) with one of their parents diabetic and Group III: (n = 47) with both parents diabetic. In all the participants, we estimated fasting serum RBP-4, insulin and glucose. Homeostasis model for assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and homeostasis model for assessment-beta cell dysfunction (HOMA-B) were calculated from fasting serum insulin and glucose levels. Results: In this study, we observed significantly higher RBP-4 levels 12.71 ± 2.3 in Group-II and 13.25 ± 2 in Group-III, respectively when compared to Group-I 11.4 ± 1.8 (P < 0.01). RBP-4 showed a significantly strong positive correlation with plasma insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR in genetically high risk population (group II and III) P < 0.01. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong positive association of RBP-4 with parental diabetes even after adjusting for BMI, age and sex (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.089-1.40). Conclusion: Higher serum RBP-4 and its positive correlation with Insulin, glucose, and HOMA-IR in healthy non diabetic participants of genetically high risk population, indicating its role as predictor for the onset of diabetes in coming future. PMID:23833574

  10. Circulating Retinol-Binding Protein-4 Concentration Might Reflect Insulin Resistance–Associated Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Moreno, José María; Ricart, Wifredo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The mechanisms behind the association between retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and insulin resistance are not well understood. An interaction between iron and vitamin A status, of which RBP4 is a surrogate, has long been recognized. We hypothesized that iron-associated insulin resistance could be behind the impaired insulin action caused by RBP4. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Serum ferritin and RBP4 concentration and insulin resistance were evaluated in a sample of middle-aged men (n = 132) and in a replication independent study. Serum RBP4 was also studied before and after iron depletion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Finally, the effect of iron on RBP4 release was evaluated in vitro in adipose tissue. RESULTS—A positive correlation between circulating RBP4 and log serum ferritin (r = 0.35 and r = 0.61, respectively; P < 0.0001) was observed in both independent studies. Serum RBP4 concentration was higher in men than women in parallel to increased ferritin levels. On multiple regression analyses to predict serum RBP4, log serum ferritin contributed significantly to RBP4 variance after controlling for BMI, age, and homeostasis model assessment value. Serum RBP4 concentration decreased after iron depletion in type 2 diabetic patients (percent mean difference −13.7 [95% CI −25.4 to −2.04]; P = 0.024). The iron donor lactoferrin led to increased dose-dependent adipose tissue release of RBP4 (2.4-fold, P = 0.005) and increased RBP4 expression, while apotransferrin and deferoxamine led to decreased RBP4 release. CONCLUSIONS—The relationship between circulating RBP4 and iron stores, both cross-sectional and after iron depletion, and in vitro findings suggest that iron could play a role in the RBP4–insulin resistance relationship. PMID:18426863

  11. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-04-11

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  12. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  13. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2016-10-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range (~1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  14. Characterisation of a fatty acid and retinol binding protein orthologue from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Keke C; Vermeire, Jon J; Harrison, Lisa M; Bungiro, Richard D; Grant, Wayne; Husain, Sohail Z; Cappello, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Hookworms, bloodfeeding intestinal nematodes, infect nearly one billion people in resource limited countries and are a leading cause of anaemia and malnutrition. Like other nematodes, hookworms lack the capacity to synthesise essential fatty acids de novo and therefore must acquire those from exogenous sources. The cDNA corresponding to a putative Ancylostoma ceylanicum fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1 (AceFAR-1) was amplified from adult hookworm mRNA. Studies using quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR demonstrate that AceFAR-1 transcripts are most abundant in the earliest developmental stages of the parasite, and greater in females than males. Using in vitro assays, the recombinant AceFAR-1 (rAceFAR-1) was shown to bind individual fatty acids with equilibrium dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. The pattern of fatty acid uptake by live adult worms cultured ex vivo was similar to the in vitro binding profile of rAceFAR-1, raising the possibility that the native protein may be involved in acquisition of fatty acids by A. ceylanicum. Animals vaccinated orally with rAceFAR-1 and the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin exhibited a statistically significant (40-47%) reduction in intestinal worm burden compared with controls immunized with antigen or adjuvant alone. Together, these data suggest a potential role for AceFAR-1 in hookworm biology, making it a potentially valuable target for drug and vaccine development.

  15. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymometric assays of retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A B; Nishida, S K; Vieira, J G; Lombardi, M T; Silva, M S; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L

    1993-03-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is a low-molecular-mass protein (21 kDa), easily filtered in renal glomeruli and very efficiently reabsorbed by the proximal convoluted tubules (PCTs). In PCT dysfunction, high concentrations of RBP are found in urine. Several methods have been used to determine RBP in serum or urine. We describe the production, selection, labeling, and utilization of anti-RBP monoclonal antibodies in two- or one-step immunoenzymometric assays for the determination of RBP. The one-step assay has good precision, with within-run and between-run CVs < 6.6% and 5.9%, respectively. Comparison with radial immunodiffusion (x) showed good agreement: y = 0.068 mg/L + 0.899x (n = 24). Comparison between the one-step (y) and two-step (x) versions of the assay also showed a very good correlation: y = 212 micrograms/L + 0.910x. The one-step assay has been adopted for routine work; it detects transthyretin-bound as well as free RBP and may have clinical usefulness in evaluating the functional status of PCTs. PMID:8448859

  16. Characterization of a fatty acid and retinol binding protein orthologue from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum✯

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Keke C.; Vermeire, Jon J.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Bungiro, Richard D.; Grant, Wayne; Husain, Sohail Z.; Cappello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hookworms, bloodfeeding intestinal nematodes, infect nearly one billion people in resource limited countries and are a leading cause of anemia and malnutrition. Like other nematodes, hookworms lack the capacity to synthesize essential fatty acids de novo and therefore must acquire those from exogenous sources. The cDNA corresponding to a putative Ancylostoma ceylanicum fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1 (AceFAR-1) was amplified from adult hookworm mRNA. Studies using quantitative reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrate that AceFAR-1 transcripts are most abundant in the earliest developmental stages of the parasite, and greater in females than males. Using in vitro assays, the recombinant AceFAR-1 (rAceFAR-1) was shown to bind individual fatty acids with equilibrium dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. The pattern of fatty acid uptake by live adult worms cultured ex vivo was similar to the in vitro binding profile of rAceFAR-1, raising the possibility that the native protein may be involved in acquisition of fatty acids by A. ceylanicum. Animals vaccinated orally with rAceFAR-1 and the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin exhibited a statistically significant (40–47%) reduction in intestinal worm burden compared with controls immunized with antigen or adjuvant alone. Together, these data suggest a potential role for AceFAR-1 in hookworm biology, making it a potentially valuable target for drug and vaccine development. PMID:19591834

  17. Liver Retinol Transporter and Receptor for Serum Retinol-binding Protein (RBP4)*

    PubMed Central

    Alapatt, Philomena; Guo, Fangjian; Komanetsky, Susan M.; Wang, Shuping; Cai, Jinjin; Sargsyan, Ashot; Rodríguez Díaz, Eduardo; Bacon, Brandon T.; Aryal, Pratik; Graham, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) is absorbed in the small intestine, stored in liver, and secreted into circulation bound to serum retinol-binding protein (RBP4). Circulating retinol may be taken up by extrahepatic tissues or recycled back to liver multiple times before it is finally metabolized or degraded. Liver exhibits high affinity binding sites for RBP4, but specific receptors have not been identified. The only known high affinity receptor for RBP4, Stra6, is not expressed in the liver. Here we report discovery of RBP4 receptor-2 (RBPR2), a novel retinol transporter expressed primarily in liver and intestine and induced in adipose tissue of obese mice. RBPR2 is structurally related to Stra6 and highly conserved in vertebrates, including humans. Expression of RBPR2 in cultured cells confers high affinity RBP4 binding and retinol transport, and RBPR2 knockdown reduces RBP4 binding/retinol transport. RBPR2 expression is suppressed by retinol and retinoic acid and correlates inversely with liver retinol stores in vivo. We conclude that RBPR2 is a novel retinol transporter that potentially regulates retinol homeostasis in liver and other tissues. In addition, expression of RBPR2 in liver and fat suggests a possible role in mediating established metabolic actions of RBP4 in those tissues. PMID:23105095

  18. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  19. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  20. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander; Farjo, Krysten M

    2015-08-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  1. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A.; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  2. A Polymorphism in the Retinol Binding Protein 4 Gene is Not Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Several Different Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Urschitz, Johann; Sultan, Omar; Ward, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Objective Various Asian and Pacifific Islander groups have higher prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. This increased incidence is likely to include genetic factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the retinol binding protein 4 gene have been linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Hypothesizing a link between retinol binding protein 4 and gestational diabetes, we performed a candidate gene study to look for an association between an important retinol binding protein gene polymorphism (rs3758539) and gestational diabetes. Study Design Blood was collected from Caucasian, Asian, and Pacific Islander women diagnosed with gestational diabetes and from ethnically matched non-diabetic controls. DNA was extracted and real time PCR technology (TaqMan, Applied Biosystems) used to screen for the rs3758539 single nucleotide polymorphism located 5′ of exon 1 of the retinol binding protein 4 gene. Results Genotype and allele frequencies in the controls and gestational diabetes cases were tested using chi-square contingency tests. Genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was no association between the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism and gestational diabetes in the Caucasian, Filipino, or Pacific Islander groups. Conclusion Interestingly, the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism was not found to be associated with gestational diabetes. The absence of association suggests that gestational and type 2 diabetes may have more divergent molecular pathophysiology than previously suspected. PMID:21886308

  3. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  4. Assessment of lupus nephritis activity using urinary retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sesso, R; Rettori, R; Nishida, S; Sato, E; Ajzen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the presence of proximal renal tubular dysfunction as measured by urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) in 70 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Renal disease activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index. This is a clinical-laboratory score based on the principle of the physician's intention to treat. Increased urinary RBP (> 400 micrograms/l) was detected in 17 of 22 (77%) patients with active nephritis, six of 18 (33%) patients with probably active nephritis, one of nine (12%) cases with stable renal disease, and one of 21 (5%) cases without apparent renal disease (P < 0.01). Compared to initial values, mean urinary RBP decreased significantly in six patients evaluated after improvement of the exacerbation of renal disease. There was a positive correlation between urinary RBP and 24-h proteinuria (r = 0.40, P < 0.01), and an inverse correlation between urinary RBP and creatinine clearance (r = -0.60, P < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis adjusting for duration of disease, blood pressure, 24-h proteinuria, and creatinine clearance, mean urinary RBP continued to be significantly and progressively greater for patients with no renal disease, stable renal disease, probably active and active nephritis. Proximal tubular dysfunction is frequent in patients with active lupus nephritis. This association cannot be completely explained by the effects of increased total proteinuria, reduced glomerular filtration rate, and systemic hypertension. Urinary RBP seems to be a marker of renal disease activity. This test may be clinically useful to differentiate patients with active lupus nephritis from those with stable or absent renal disease. PMID:8084448

  5. Maternal Plasma Retinol Binding Protein 4 in Acute Pyelonephritis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Sun Kwon; Ogge, Giovanna; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Adipokines have been implicated in metabolic regulation and the immune response thus providing a molecular mechanism for the interaction between these two systems. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that plays a role in the pathophysiology of obesity-induced insulin resistance, as well as in the modulation of inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are changes in maternal plasma concentrations of RBP4 in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis. Study design This cross-sectional study included pregnant women in the following groups: 1) normal pregnancy (n=80); 2) pyelonephritis (n=39). Maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Non-parametric statistics were used for analyses. Results 1) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration was lower in patients with acute pyelonephritis than in those with a normal pregnancy (3709.6 ng/mL, IQR 2917.7-5484.2 vs. 9167.6 ng/mL, IQR 7496.1-10384.1, p<0.001; 2) the median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration did not differ significantly between patients with acute pyelonephritis who had a positive blood culture and those with a negative culture (3285.3 ng/mL, IQR 2274.1-4741.1 vs. 3922.6 ng/mL, IQR 3126.8-5547.1, respectively, p=0.2); and 3) lower maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were independently associated with pyelonephritis after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusions In contrast to what has been reported in preeclampsia, acute pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with lower maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations than in normal pregnancy. This finding suggests that the acute maternal inflammatory process associated with pyelonephritis is fundamentally different from that of the chronic systemic inflammatory process suggested in preeclampsia, in which RBP4 concentrations were found to be elevated. PMID:20163326

  6. Prenatal ethanol consumption increases retinol and cellular retinol-binding protein expression in the rat fetal snout.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Grummer, M A

    2001-08-01

    Fetal exposure to ethanol disrupts normal craniofacial development, resulting in characteristic features of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). One mechanism that could result in some anomalies of this syndrome is through ethanol disrupting the regulatory role played by vitamin A in fetal development, thereby inducing morphological alterations which manifest as FAS. This work begins to explore a possible interaction of ethanol with vitamin A in craniofacial development. Retinoid levels and the expression of cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) and retinoic acid receptor (RAR) mRNA were determined in snouts of 20-day fetuses exposed to ethanol throughout gestation, compared to controls. Snout retinol and retinyl palmitate levels were elevated in fetuses of ethanol-treated rats, but retinoic acid levels were unaffected. The expression of CRBP mRNA, as determined by Northern analysis, was greater in snouts of fetuses exposed to ethanol, but there was no change in RAR alpha, beta, gamma or retinoid X receptor beta mRNA. These results demonstrate that prenatal ethanol consumption can alter certain markers of vitamin A metabolism and function in the fetal snout. PMID:11509816

  7. Urinary Kininogen-1 and Retinol binding protein-4 respond to Acute Kidney Injury: predictors of patient prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Ramos-Barron, Angeles; Ruiz-Criado, Jorge; Maroto, Aroa S.; Ortiz, Alberto; Gomez-Alamillo, Carlos; Arias, Manuel; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) depends on successful prediction of individual patient prognosis. Clinical markers as serum creatinine (sCr) have limitations in sensitivity and early response. The aim of the study was to identify novel molecules in urine which show altered levels in response to AKI and investigate their value as predictors of recovery. Changes in the urinary proteome were here investigated in a cohort of 88 subjects (55 AKI patients and 33 healthy donors) grouped in discovery and validation independent cohorts. Patients’ urine was collected at three time points: within the first 48 h after diagnosis(T1), at 7 days of follow-up(T2) and at discharge of Nephrology(T3). Differential gel electrophoresis was performed and data were confirmed by Western blot (WB), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and kininogen-1 (KNG1) were found significantly altered following AKI. RBP4 increased at T1, and progressively decreased towards normalization. Maintained decrease was observed for KNG1 from T1. Individual patient response along time revealed RBP4 responds to recovery earlier than sCr. In conclusion, KNG1 and RBP4 respond to AKI. By monitoring RBP4, patient’s recovery can be anticipated pointing to a role of RBP4 in prognosis evaluation. PMID:26792617

  8. Hepatic uptake of (TH)retinol bound to the serum retinol binding protein involves both parenchymal and perisinusoidal stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.

    1985-11-05

    We have studied the hepatic uptake of retinol bound to the circulating retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. Labeled complex was obtained from the plasma of donor rats that were fed radioactive retinol. When labeled retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex was injected intravenously into control rats, about 45% of the administered dose was recovered in liver after 56 h. Parenchymal liver cells were responsible for an initial rapid uptake. Perisinusoidal stellate cells initially accumulated radioactivity more slowly than did the parenchymal cells, but after 16 h, these cells contained more radioactivity than the parenchymal cells. After 56 h, about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in liver was present in stellate cells. For the first 2 h after injection, most of the radioactivity in parenchymal cells was recovered as unesterified retinol. The radioactivity in the retinyl ester fraction increased after a lag period of about 2 h, and after 5 h more than 60% of the radioactivity was recovered as retinyl esters. In stellate cells, radioactivity was mostly present as retinyl esters at all time points examined. Uptake of retinol in both parenchymal cells and stellate cells was reduced considerably in vitamin A-deficient rats. Less than 5% of the injected dose of radioactivity was found in liver after 5-6 h (as compared to 25% in control rats), and the radioactivity recovered in liver from these animals was mostly in the unesterified retinol fraction. Studies with separated cells in vitro suggested that both parenchymal and stellate cells isolated from control rats were able to take up retinol from the retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. This uptake was temperature dependent.

  9. Retinol Binding Protein 4 – A Novel Association with Early-Onset Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Erez, Offer; Kim, Sun Kwon; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Gotsch, Francesca; Than, Nandor Gabor; Dong, Zhong; Pacora, Percy; Lamont, Ronald; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Objective Dysregulation of maternal circulating adipokines has been implicated in several “great obstetrical syndromes” including preeclampsia (PE), small-for-gestational age (SGA) neonate and fetal death (FD). It has been suggested that adipokines provide a molecular link between metabolic derangements and inflammatory response in complicated pregnancies. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), a novel adipokine, plays a role in obesity-related disorders, as well as in the regulation of the immune response. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are changes in maternal plasma concentrations of RBP4 in patients with PE and in those with an SGA neonate or FD. Study design This cross-sectional study included patients in the following groups: 1) normal pregnancy (n=134); 2) PE (n=104); 3) SGA neonate (n=28); and 4) FD (n=37). Maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were determined by ELISA. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration was higher among patients with PE than in those with a normal pregnancy (p=0.03); 2) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations of patients with preterm PE (<37 weeks) was higher than that of those with term PE (p=0.017) and than that of those with a normal pregnancy (p=0.002); 3) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration did not differ significantly between patients with a normal pregnancy and those with an SGA neonate or with an FD; 4) Among normal pregnant women, the maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations did not correlate with pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational age at blood sampling and neonatal birthweight. Conclusions 1) Preeclampsia, but not pregnancy with an SGA neonate or an FD, is associated with a higher median maternal plasma concentration of RBP4 than normal pregnancy; 2) Preterm PE, and specifically early-onset PE, is associated with higher median RBP4 concentrations in maternal plasma compared to term PE. These findings suggest a role for

  10. Role of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in cell viability, lipogenesis, and retinol-binding protein 4 expression in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye-Young; Hong, Chae-Geun; Suh, Young-Sung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Park, Won-Kyun; Han, Jin; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2010-10-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a bioactive compound of green tea, is known to combat obesity by reducing the viability and lipid accumulation of adipocytes. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism and clinical relevance on those actions of EGCG. We measured the viability of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and adipocytes by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Lipid accumulation was measured by Oil Red O staining. Intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a flow cytometer. Cellular glucose uptake was determined with 2-deoxy-[(3)H]-glucose. The protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as well as the protein level and secretion of plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP4) in human adipocytes, were measured by western blot. EGCG at concentrations higher than 10 μM induced ROS generation and decreased the viability and lipid accumulation of adipocytes. It also decreased the expression of PPAR-γ and adiponectin. At concentrations readily achievable in human plasma via green tea intake (≤10 μM), EGCG inhibited cellular glucose uptake and enhanced the expression and secretion of RBP4 in adipocytes. Pharmacological doses of EGCG showed cytotoxic effects in preadipocytes and adipocytes. EGCG-mediated glucose uptake inhibition in adipocytes may be clinically relevant and is probably linked to the increase in the expression and secretion of RBP4. Because secreted RBP4 from adipocytes inhibits muscular glucose uptake and enhance hepatic glucose output, the systemic effect of EGCG associated with its effect on RBP4 secretion should be further determined, as it may negatively regulate whole-body insulin sensitivity, contrary to general belief.

  11. Decreased retinol-binding protein 4 in the sera of patients with end-stage renal disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W X; Zhou, W; Zhang, Z M; Zhang, Z Q; He, J F; Shi, B Y

    2014-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have very high serum RBP4 levels. However, whether successful kidney transplantation alleviates these elevated serum RBP4 levels is unclear. The serum RBP4 levels of 24 ESRD patients were determined before transplantation and at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after kidney transplantation. The control group included 22 healthy subjects. Serum RBP4 concentrations were measured using a commercial kit via the immunologic turbidimetric method, and were related to biomarkers for renal and liver function. The serum RBP4 level of ESRD patients before kidney transplantation (160.8 ± 29.1 mg/L) was approximately 7-fold higher than that of normal controls (22.6 ± 11.0 mg/L; P = 0.000). The serum RBP4 level before transplantation was significantly higher than that at 1 day (65.3 ± 28.4 mg/L), 1 week (48.3 ± 22.9 mg/L), and 1 month after transplantation (53.1 ± 25.5 mg/L; P = 0.000). However, these values were still higher than those of controls (P = 0.000). Univariate regression analysis showed that the percent changes in serum RBP4 concentration before and after kidney transplantation were positively correlated with serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, phosphate, and pre-albumin concentrations and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate. The serum RBP4 concentration of patients with ESRD decreased significantly after kidney transplantation; therefore, we found that serum RBP4 concentration was related to renal function. PMID:25299197

  12. Retinol-binding protein 4 correlates with triglycerides but not insulin resistance in prepubertal children with and without premature adrenarche

    PubMed Central

    Sopher, Aviva B.; Gerken, Adrienne T.; Lee, Eun-Ju; Blaner, William E.; Deeds, Stefanie; Gallagher, Dympna; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Mao, Xiangling; Hassoun, Abeer; McMahon, Donald J.; Oberfield, Sharon E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been proposed as an early marker for insulin resistance (IR), but no prior studies have addressed RBP4 in an exclusively prepubertal population. Children with premature adrenarche (PA) are at increased risk for IR and metabolic syndrome (MeS), thus finding an appropriate early marker for IR in this population would allow for early intervention and prevention of morbidity related to IR and MeS. Objective To determine whether prepubertal children with PA have higher levels of RBP4 than controls and whether RBP4 correlates with comorbidities of metabolic disease in prepubertal children. Subjects This study comprised 49 prepubertal children (24 with PA and 25 control subjects), 20 boys and 29 girls, who were between the ages of 5 and 9 years. Methods This was a cross-sectional, case-control study conducted in a subspecialty ambulatory clinic based in a quaternary care center. RBP4 levels, hormonal values, lipids and response to an oral glucose tolerance test were evaluated in children with PA and controls, and body composition measures were obtained in a subset of patients (n=18). Results RBP4 correlated with triglycerides (r = 0.57, P < 0.0001) but did not correlate with IR in a body mass index z-score-adjusted Pearson correlation analysis. There was no difference in RBP4 levels between the PA and control groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that RBP4 may be an early marker of dyslipidemia, which may herald future onset of hepatic IR, polycystic ovary syndrome and MeS. PMID:22145457

  13. Reorganization of cellular retinol-binding protein type 1 and lecithin:retinol acyltransferase during retinyl ester biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiya; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular retinol-binding protein, type 1 (Crbp1), chaperones retinyl ester (RE) biosynthesis catalyzed by lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). Methods We monitored the subcellular loci of LRAT and Crbp1 before and during RE biosynthesis, and compared the results to diacylglycerol:acyltransferase type 2 (DGAT2) during triacylglycerol biosynthesis in three cell lines: COS7, CHO and HepG2. Results Before initiation of RE biosynthesis, LRAT distributed throughout the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), similar to DGAT2, and Crpb1 localized with mitochondria associated membranes (MAM), surrounded by LRAT. Upon initiating RE biosynthesis in cells transfected with low amounts of vector to simulate physiological expression levels, Crpb1 remained with MAM, and both Crbp1 and MAM re-localized with LRAT. LRAT formed rings around the growing lipid droplets. LRAT activity was higher in these rings relative to the general ER. LRAT-containing rings colocalized with the lipid-droplet surface proteins, desnutrin/adipose triglyceride lipase and perilipin 2. Colocalization with lipid droplets required the 38 N-terminal amino acid residues of LRAT, and specifically K36 and R38. Formation of rings around the growing lipid droplets did not require functional microtubules. General significance These data indicate a relationship between LRAT and Crbp1 during RE biosynthesis in which MAM-associated Crpb1 and LRAT colocalize, and both surround the growing RE-containing lipid droplet. The N-terminus of LRAT, especially K36 and R38, are essential to colocalization with the lipid droplet. PMID:22498138

  14. Retinol binding protein 4 is associated with adiposity-related co-morbidity risk factors in children

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Rushika; Espinal, Yomery; Fennoy, Ilene; Accacha, Siham; Boucher-Berry, Claudia; Carey, Dennis E.; Close, Sharron; DeSantis, Deborah; Gupta, Rishi; Hassoun, Abeer A.; Iazzetti, Loretta; Jacques, Fabean J.; Jean, Amy M.; Michel, Lesly; Pavlovich, Katherine; Rapaport, Robert; Rosenfeld, Warren; Shamoon, Elisabeth; Shelov, Steven; Speiser, Phyllis W.; Ten, Svetlana; Rosenbaum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective In adults, elevated levels of retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) have been associated with biochemical markers of adiposity-related co-morbidities including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and abdominal obesity. This study examined the relationship between RBP4 and risk factors for co-morbidities of adiposity in a population of ethnically diverse children in early- to mid-adolescence in the public school system of New York City. Materials/methods We analyzed anthropometric (body mass index, % body fat, waist circumference), metabolic (lipids, glucose), and inflammatory (TNF-α, interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, adiponectin) markers for adiposity-related co-morbidities and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in 106 school children (65 males, 41 females) 11–15 years of age (mean ± SD = 13.0 ± 0.1 years) who were enrolled in the Reduce Obesity and Diabetes (ROAD) project. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. Insulin secretory capacity was measured as acute insulin response and glucose disposal index. Results Serum RBP4 was significantly correlated directly with ALT, triglycerides, and triglyceride z-score, and inversely correlated with adiponectin. Correlations with ALT and adiponectin remained significant when corrected for % body fat, age, and gender. There were significant ethnic differences in the relationship of RBP4 to ALT, glucose disposal index and adiponectin. Conclusions In early- to mid-adolescents, circulating concentrations of RBP4 are correlated with multiple risk factors for adiposity-related co-morbidities. The observation that many associations persisted when corrected for % body fat, suggests that RBP4 can be viewed as an independent marker of adiposity-related co-morbidity risk in children. PMID:22308842

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Wide Photoabsorption Spectral Shifts of Color Variants of Human Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kamiya, Motoshi; Uchida, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2015-10-21

    Color variants of human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) created by protein engineering were recently shown to exhibit anomalously wide photoabsorption spectral shifts over ∼200 nm across the visible region. The remarkable phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the molecular basis of the color tuning of retinal binding proteins for understanding of color vision as well as for engineering of novel color variants of retinal binding photoreceptor proteins employed in optogenetics. Here, we report a theoretical investigation of the molecular mechanism underlying the anomalously wide spectral shifts of the color variants of hCRBPII. Computational modeling of the color variants with hybrid molecular simulations of free energy geometry optimization succeeded in reproducing the experimentally observed wide spectral shifts, and revealed that protein flexibility, through which the active site structure of the protein and bound water molecules is altered by remote mutations, plays a significant role in inducing the large spectral shifts.

  16. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Serum Retinol Binding Protein4, Insulin Resistance and Blood Lipids in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    TAGHIAN, Farzaneh; ZOLFAGHARI, Maryam; HEDAYATI, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Retinol binding protein4 (RBP4) is a type of adipokine which transports vitamin A to serum. RBP4 could be a bridge between obesity and insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aerobic exercises on RBP4 serum’s concentration and metabolic syndrome risk factors in obese women. Methods Twenty obese women with body max index 35.81±3.67Kg/m2, fat percentage 43.98±4.02, and waist to hip ratio 1.03±0.05 were included and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received aerobic exercises for a period of 12 weeks each three sessions on treadmill workout. The treadmill speed were based on a 60-65 and 80-85 maximal heart rate percentage and duration of 15-20 and 45-50 minutes, at the beginning and the end of exercise, respectively. Body composition, serum glucose, insulin, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, total cholesterol, and RBP4, were measured in both groups before and after the treatment by ELISA method. Insulin resistance was measured by HOMA-IR. To compare within group differences and between group comparisons t-correlated and t-independent tests were used, respectively. Results After 12 week aerobic exercises; weight, fat percentage, WHR, and BMI in the experimental group was significantly decreased (P<0.05). RBP4, insulin, insulin resistance, TG and HDL-C had significant differences between two groups. The cholesterol level, LDL-C and glucose did not have any significant changes. Conclusion The aerobic exercises can decrease body composition, insulin resistance, TG, and RBP4, so it can be beneficial for obese women’s health, because it. PMID:26060767

  17. Carotenoid and retinoid transport to fish oocytes and eggs: what is the role of retinol binding protein?

    PubMed

    Lubzens, E; Lissauer, L; Levavi-Sivan, B; Avarre, J-C; Sammar, M

    2003-12-01

    Fish eggs contain carotenoids, retinals (retinal and dehydroretinal) and retinols (retinol, dehydroretinol and retinyl-esters) that are utilized during embryonic development, after fertilization. The carotenoids (mainly astaxanthins) are transported in the plasma by the low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins, and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and were found to be associated also with serum albumin. Retinals were found to be associated vitellogenin (VTG), a component of the plasma VHDL fraction that is internalized by oocytes during vitellogenesis. However, the transport of retinols and retinyl-esters that were located in the oil droplet fraction of homogenized eggs, has yet to be elucidated. Retinols are more abundant in freshwater fish eggs than in eggs of marine fish species. Since retinol is transported in the plasma of vertebrates in association with retinol binding protein (RBP), recent studies on the molecular characterization and expression sites of RBP, could contribute to determining the involvement of RBP in transporting retinol to developing oocytes in vertebrates.Recently, results from our laboratory show that RBP mRNA levels in the liver and RBP plasma levels did not significantly change with the onset and during vitellogenesis in the Rainbow trout. These results were in contrast with a dramatic elevation in the mRNA levels of VTG in the liver and an increase in VTG plasma levels that was observed in the same females. Moreover, 17beta-estradiol treatment of immature fish, resulted in relatively lower mRNA levels of RBP in the liver, concomitantly with an increase in the level of VTG transcripts and the appearance of VTG in the plasma of treated fish. In addition, RBP was localized in the cytosol of ovulated oocytes. These results for Rainbow trout are similar to those reported for the chicken but differ from those of Xenopus, where an increase in RBP mRNA was reported in the liver and higher levels of retinal and retinol were found

  18. Transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells in liver is mediated by retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Berg, T.; Norum, K.R. )

    1988-05-01

    Newly absorbed chylomicron remnant retinyl ester is endocytosed by parenchymal liver cells, and retinol is subsequently transferred to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver. In the present study, the authors have used several approaches to elucidate the mechanism for the paracrine transfer of retinol between liver parenchymal and stellate cells. In one series of experiments, chylomicrons labeled with ({sup 3}H)retinyl palmitate or with retinyl ({sup 3}H)palimtate were injected intravenously into rats. It was shown that the retinol as well as the palmitate moiety were initially taken up in parenchymal liver cells. However, only the retinol moiety was detected in stellate cells, indicating that the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed before retinol is transferred to stellate cells. It is well known that parenchymal liver cells secrete retinol bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), and they have recently found that stellate cells do have RBP receptors. Here they report that antibodies against RBP completely block the transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells. These findings indicate that following uptake of chylomicron remnant retinyl ester in parenchymal cells, the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed, and retinol secreted from parenchymal cells on RBP is taken up by stellate cells by means of RBP receptors.

  19. Transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells in liver is mediated by retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Blomhoff, R; Berg, T; Norum, K R

    1988-01-01

    Newly absorbed chylomicron remnant retinyl ester is endocytosed by parenchymal liver cells, and retinol is subsequently transferred to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver. In the present study we have used several approaches to elucidate the mechanism for the paracrine transfer of retinol between liver parenchymal and stellate cells. In one series of experiments, chylomicrons labeled with [3H]retinyl palmitate or with retinyl [3H]palmitate were injected intravenously into rats. It was shown that the retinol as well as the palmitate moiety were initially taken up in parenchymal liver cells. However, only the retinol moiety was detected in stellate cells, indicating that the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed before retinol is transferred to stellate cells. It is well known that parenchymal liver cells secrete retinol bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), and we have recently found that stellate cells do have RBP receptors. Here we report that antibodies against RBP completely block the transfer of retinol from parenchymal to stellate cells. These findings indicate that following uptake of chylomicron remnant retinyl ester in parenchymal cells, the retinyl ester is hydrolyzed, and retinol secreted from parenchymal cells on RBP is taken up by stellate cells by means of RBP receptors. PMID:3368453

  20. Plasmatic retinol-binding protein 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein as biomarkers to differentiate ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Llombart, Víctor; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Bustamante, Alejandro; Giralt, Dolors; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Muchada, Marian; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    A rapid differentiation of acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is essential for an adequate treatment and to promote a better outcome. Our aim was to identify new plasma biomarkers to differentiate stroke subtypes and to combine their diagnostic ability with other biomarkers already described for this clinical indication. Plasma samples of ischemic stroke patients (36) and ICH patients (10) were screened using a 177 antibodies library, and 11 showed different concentrations among stroke subtypes (p < 0.05), mainly chemokines, growth factors and angiogenic factors. Five proteins were selected for replication in 16 ischemic stroke patients and 16 ICH patients, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RPB4), apolipoprotein B100 and pigment epithelial-derived factor were replicated (p < 0.05). These proteins, together with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and receptor for advanced glycation end product, were tested in 38 ischemic stroke and 28 ICH samples. Finally, RBP4 >61 μg/mL and GFAP <0.07 ng/mL showed a specificity of 100% for both subtypes. Moreover, after multivariate logistic regression analysis, RBP4 >48.75 μg/mL (ORadj : 6.09 (1.3-28.57), p = 0.02) and GFAP <0.07 ng/mL (ORadj : 0.03 (0.003-0.31), p = 0.003) resulted in independent predictors of stroke subtype, improving discrimination by 29% (p < 0.0001). Both biomarkers might be useful as diagnostic biomarkers to differentiate ischemic stroke and ICH. A rapid differentiation of ischemic stroke from intracerebral hemorrhage is essential to provide the appropriate treatment. We describe the discovery and subsequent replications of RBP4 and its combination with circulating GFAP as plasmatic biomarkers for hyperacute stroke subtype differentiation. The combination of these biomarkers and others might aid to speed up the discrimination of both stroke subtypes improving the outcome of patients.

  1. Photoperiodic regulation of cellular retinol binding protein, CRBP1 [corrected] and nestin in tanycytes of the third ventricle ependymal layer of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Perry; Ivanova, Elena; Graham, E Scott; Ross, Alexander W; Wilson, Dana; Plé, Helene; Mercer, Julian G; Ebling, Francis J; Schuhler, Sandrine; Dupré, Sandrine M; Loudon, Andrew; Morgan, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Tanycytes in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle act both as a barrier and a communication gateway between the cerebrospinal fluid, brain and portal blood supply to the pituitary gland. However, the range, importance and mechanisms involved in the function of tanycytes remain to be explored. In this study, we have utilized a photoperiodic animal to examine the expression of three unrelated gene sequences in relation to photoperiod-induced changes in seasonal physiology and behaviour. We demonstrate that cellular retinol binding protein [corrected] (CRBP1), a retinoic acid transport protein, GPR50, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor and nestin, an intermediate filament protein, are down-regulated in short-day photoperiods. The distribution of the three sequences is very similar, with expression located in cells with tanycyte morphology in the region of the ependymal layer where tanycytes are located. Furthermore, CRBP1 expression in the ependymal layer is shown to be independent of a circadian clock and altered testosterone levels associated with testicular regression in short photo-period. Pinealectomy of Siberian hamsters demonstrates CRBP1 expression is likely to be dependent on melatonin output from the pineal gland. This provides evidence that tanycytes are seasonally responsive cells and are likely to be an important part of the mechanism to facilitate seasonal physiology and behaviour in the Siberian hamster.

  2. Sitagliptin downregulates retinol-binding protein 4 and upregulates glucose transporter type 4 expression in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Honglin; Xu, Min; Qi, Renjuan; Wang, Youmin; Wang, Changjiang; Liu, Jiongjiong; Luo, Li; Xia, Li; Fang, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sitagliptin on metabolic parameters as well as the expression levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of low-dose streptozotocin. Rats were divided into three groups: normal control group, diabetes group, and diabetes + sitagliptin group. Body weight, glycemic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting insulin (FINS) and serum RBP4 levels were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of therapy. Western blotting was used to detect the tissue RBP4 and GLUT4 expression levels. After treatment for 6 weeks, the diabetes + sitagliptin group displayed significantly improve levels of blood sugar, blood grease, and insulin sensitizing functions (P < 0.05) than the diabetes group. Sitagliptin markedly down regulated RBP4 expression levels and up-regulated GLUT4 expression levels in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The results indicate that sitagliptin can modulate the RBP4-GLUT4 system in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Modulation of the RBP4-GLUT4 system may be one of the mechanisms by which sitagliptin ameliorates the symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26770384

  3. Sitagliptin downregulates retinol-binding protein 4 and upregulates glucose transporter type 4 expression in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honglin; Xu, Min; Qi, Renjuan; Wang, Youmin; Wang, Changjiang; Liu, Jiongjiong; Luo, Li; Xia, Li; Fang, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sitagliptin on metabolic parameters as well as the expression levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of low-dose streptozotocin. Rats were divided into three groups: normal control group, diabetes group, and diabetes + sitagliptin group. Body weight, glycemic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting insulin (FINS) and serum RBP4 levels were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of therapy. Western blotting was used to detect the tissue RBP4 and GLUT4 expression levels. After treatment for 6 weeks, the diabetes + sitagliptin group displayed significantly improve levels of blood sugar, blood grease, and insulin sensitizing functions (P < 0.05) than the diabetes group. Sitagliptin markedly down regulated RBP4 expression levels and up-regulated GLUT4 expression levels in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The results indicate that sitagliptin can modulate the RBP4-GLUT4 system in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Modulation of the RBP4-GLUT4 system may be one of the mechanisms by which sitagliptin ameliorates the symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26770384

  4. Novel Zn2+-binding sites in human transthyretin: implications for amyloidogenesis and retinol-binding protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Leonardo de C; Lima, Luis Mauricio T R; Freire, Juliana B B; Bleicher, Lucas; Polikarpov, Igor; Almeida, Fabio C L; Foguel, Debora

    2010-10-01

    Human transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein involved in several amyloidoses. Zn(2+) enhances TTR aggregation in vitro, and is a component of ex vivo TTR amyloid fibrils. We report the first crystal structure of human TTR in complex with Zn(2+) at pH 4.6-7.5. All four structures reveal three tetra-coordinated Zn(2+)-binding sites (ZBS 1-3) per monomer, plus a fourth site (ZBS 4) involving amino acid residues from a symmetry-related tetramer that is not visible in solution by NMR. Zn(2+) binding perturbs loop E-α-helix-loop F, the region involved in holo-retinol-binding protein (holo-RBP) recognition, mainly at acidic pH; TTR affinity for holo-RBP decreases ∼5-fold in the presence of Zn(2+). Interestingly, this same region is disrupted in the crystal structure of the amyloidogenic intermediate of TTR formed at acidic pH in the absence of Zn(2+). HNCO and HNCA experiments performed in solution at pH 7.5 revealed that upon Zn(2+) binding, although the α-helix persists, there are perturbations in the resonances of the residues that flank this region, suggesting an increase in structural flexibility. While stability of the monomer of TTR decreases in the presence of Zn(2+), which is consistent with the tertiary structural perturbation provoked by Zn(2+) binding, tetramer stability is only marginally affected by Zn(2+). These data highlight structural and functional roles of Zn(2+) in TTR-related amyloidoses, as well as in holo-RBP recognition and vitamin A homeostasis. PMID:20659897

  5. The STRA6 Receptor Is Essential for Retinol-binding Protein-induced Insulin Resistance but Not for Maintaining Vitamin A Homeostasis in Tissues Other Than the Eye*

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Daniel C.; Jacobs, Hugues; Marwarha, Gurdeep; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; O'Byrne, Sheila M.; DeSantis, David; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Feret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Blaner, William S.; Croniger, Colleen M.; Mark, Manuel; Noy, Noa; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane protein STRA6 is thought to mediate uptake of retinol from its blood carrier retinol-binding protein (RBP) into cells and to function as a surface receptor that, upon binding of holo-RBP, activates a JAK/STAT cascade. It was suggested that STRA6 signaling underlies insulin resistance induced by elevated serum levels of RBP in obese animals. To investigate these activities in vivo, we generated and analyzed Stra6-null mice. We show that the contribution of STRA6 to retinol uptake by tissues in vivo is small and that, with the exception of the eye, ablation of Stra6 has only a modest effect on retinoid homeostasis and does not impair physiological functions that critically depend on retinoic acid in the embryo or in the adult. However, ablation of Stra6 effectively protects mice from RBP-induced suppression of insulin signaling. Thus one biological function of STRA6 in tissues other than the eye appears to be the coupling of circulating holo-RBP levels to cell signaling, in turn regulating key processes such as insulin response. PMID:23839944

  6. Vitamin A Transport and the Transmembrane Pore in the Cell-Surface Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Kawaguchi, Riki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Kassai, Miki; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) play diverse and crucial functions from embryogenesis to adulthood and are used as therapeutic agents in human medicine for eye and skin diseases, infections and cancer. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principal and specific vitamin A carrier in the blood and binds vitamin A at 1∶1 ratio. STRA6 is the high-affinity membrane receptor for RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. STRA6 null mice have severely depleted vitamin A reserves for vision and consequently have vision loss, even under vitamin A sufficient conditions. STRA6 null humans have a wide range of severe pathological phenotypes in many organs including the eye, brain, heart and lung. Known membrane transport mechanisms involve transmembrane pores that regulate the transport of the substrate (e.g., the gating of ion channels). STRA6 represents a new type of membrane receptor. How this receptor interacts with its transport substrate vitamin A and the functions of its nine transmembrane domains are still completely unknown. These questions are critical to understanding the molecular basis of STRA6′s activities and its regulation. We employ acute chemical modification to introduce chemical side chains to STRA6 in a site-specific manner. We found that modifications with specific chemicals at specific positions in or near the transmembrane domains of this receptor can almost completely suppress its vitamin A transport activity. These experiments provide the first evidence for the existence of a transmembrane pore, analogous to the pore of ion channels, for this new type of cell-surface receptor. PMID:24223695

  7. High fat diet induced insulin resistance and elevated retinol binding protein 4 in female rats; treatment and protection with Berberis vulgaris extract and vitamin A.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mohamed Mohammed; Ghareeb, Doaa Ahmad; Talat, Heba Allah; Sarhan, Eman Mohammed

    2013-11-01

    This research was conducted to investigate two main aims; the first aim was to find if there is a relationship between insulin resistance (IR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4). The second aim was to use berberis vulgaris extract and vitamin A as protective and/or curative agents against insulin resistance. IR was developed by feeding the female rats a high fat diet (HFD) for six weeks then treating or protecting them with b. vulgaris extract (0.2 g/Kg body weight) or vitamin A (12.8μg/Kg/day) for two weeks. HFD intake elevated insulin level and RBP4 expression that associated with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Co-administration of vitamin A and B. vulgaris extracts reduced blood glucose level, insulin, body weight and RBP4 expression before, during and after HFD. Furthermore, vitamin A reduced the blood glucose, triglycerides (TG) and cholesterol levels. IR syndrome associated with the RBP 4 alteration that gives high indication about the role of RBP4 expression in the IR progression and development. Furthermore, the treatment with vitamin A and/or b. vulgaris alleviated the IR syndrome through the action on RBP4 and Insulin secretion. On the other hand, vitamin A must be avoided for the predisposed IR and prediabetic patients.

  8. Lower Fetuin-A, Retinol Binding Protein 4 and Several Metabolites after Gastric Bypass Compared to Sleeve Gastrectomy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jüllig, Mia; Yip, Shelley; Xu, Aimin; Smith, Greg; Middleditch, Martin; Booth, Michael; Babor, Richard; Beban, Grant; Murphy, Rinki

    2014-01-01

    Background Bypass of foregut secreted factors promoting insulin resistance is hypothesized to be one of the mechanisms by which resolution of type 2 diabetes (T2D) follows roux-en-y gastric bypass (GBP) surgery. Aim To identify insulin resistance-associated proteins and metabolites which decrease more after GBP than after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) prior to diabetes remission. Methods Fasting plasma from 15 subjects with T2D undergoing GBP or SG was analyzed by proteomic and metabolomic methods 3 days before and 3 days after surgery. Subjects were matched for age, BMI, metformin therapy and glycemic control. Insulin resistance was calculated using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). For proteomics, samples were depleted of abundant plasma proteins, digested with trypsin and labeled with iTRAQ isobaric tags prior to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Metabolomic analysis was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The effect of the respective bariatric surgery on identified proteins and metabolites was evaluated using two-way analysis of variance and appropriate post-hoc tests. Results HOMA-IR improved, albeit not significantly, in both groups after surgery. Proteomic analysis yielded seven proteins which decreased significantly after GBP only, including Fetuin-A and Retinol binding protein 4, both previously linked to insulin resistance. Significant decrease in Fetuin-A and Retinol binding protein 4 after GBP was confirmed using ELISA and immunoassay. Metabolomic analysis identified significant decrease of citrate, proline, histidine and decanoic acid specifically after GBP. Conclusion Greater early decrease was seen for Fetuin-A, Retinol binding protein 4, and several metabolites after GBP compared to SG, preceding significant weight loss. This may contribute to enhanced T2D remission observed following foregut bypass procedures. PMID:24800810

  9. Retinol binding protein and vitamin D associations with serum antibody isotypes, serum influenza virus-specific neutralizing activities and airway cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Jones, B G; Oshansky, C M; Bajracharya, R; Tang, L; Sun, Y; Wong, S S; Webby, R; Thomas, P G; Hurwitz, J L

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A supports the induction of immunoglobulin (Ig)A responses at mucosal surfaces in mice, but much less is known about the influence of vitamins on antibody isotype expression in humans. To address this knowledge gap, we examined 46 residual blood samples from adults and children, some of whom were experiencing influenza virus infections of the respiratory tract. Assays were performed for retinol binding protein (RBP, a surrogate for vitamin A), vitamin D (a related vitamin) and antibody isotypes. Results showed that all but two tested samples exhibited RBP and/or vitamin D insufficiencies or deficiencies. Vitamin D correlated with blood IgM and IgG3, while RBP correlated with IgG4 and IgA. RBP also correlated positively with age and with influenza virus-specific antibody neutralization titres. Individuals with low blood RBP levels exhibited the highest frequencies of over-expressed cytokines and growth factors in nasal wash samples, an indication of inflamed mucosal tissues. While cause-effect relationships were not discerned, results support a hypothesis that vitamins directly influence B cell isotype expression in humans, and by so doing may help protect mucosal surfaces from respiratory viral disease. PMID:26425827

  10. Bicyclic [3.3.0]-Octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo Antagonists of Retinol Binding Protein 4: Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Racz, Boglarka; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Dobri, Nicoleta; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2015-08-13

    Antagonists of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) impede ocular uptake of serum all-trans retinol (1) and have been shown to reduce cytotoxic bisretinoid formation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which is associated with the pathogenesis of both dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Stargardt disease. Thus, these agents show promise as a potential pharmacotherapy by which to stem further neurodegeneration and concomitant vision loss associated with geographic atrophy of the macula. We previously disclosed the discovery of a novel series of nonretinoid RBP4 antagonists, represented by bicyclic [3.3.0]-octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo analogue 4. We describe herein the utilization of a pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid fragment as a suitable isostere for the anthranilic acid appendage of 4, which led to the discovery of standout antagonist 33. Analogue 33 possesses exquisite in vitro RBP4 binding affinity and favorable drug-like characteristics and was found to reduce circulating plasma RBP4 levels in vivo in a robust manner (>90%). PMID:26181715

  11. Transfer of retinol-binding protein from HepG2 human hepatoma cells to cocultured rat stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, H; Smeland, S; Malaba, L; Bjerknes, T; Stang, E; Roos, N; Berg, T; Norum, K R; Blomhoff, R

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver stellate cells were cocultured with HepG2 human hepatoma cells, which are known to synthesize and secrete retinol-binding protein (RBP). Transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was studied by cryoimmunoelectron microscopy. In stellate cells, human RBP was found on the cell surface and within endosomes. The transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was blocked by addition of RBP antibodies to the culture medium. Very little uptake of RBP was observed when fibroblasts were cocultured with HepG2 cells. In a series of experiments, RBP was bound to its putative cell surface receptor at 4 degrees C, and the stellate cells were washed and then incubated at 37 degrees C in order to allow them to internalize a pulse of RBP. About 50% of the RBP was internalized after 6 min of incubation. The RBP-positive vesicles were initially (after 1-2 min) located close to the cell surface and later were found deeper in the cytoplasm. During the first 10 min, RBP was mainly observed in close association with membranes. After 2 hr, however, most RBP was localized in intracellular vesicles at a distance from the vesicular membranes, suggesting that RBP had been released from its receptor. Saturable binding of RBP to liver cells was demonstrated when cells were incubated with 125I-RBP at 4 degrees C and cell-associated radioactivity was determined. The calculated dissociation constant for the specific binding was 12.7 +/- 3.2 nM. A binding assay was also developed for determination of solubilized RBP receptor. Solubilized proteins from the nonparenchymal liver cells bound about 30 times more 125I-labeled RBP than did parenchymal cells (based on mass of cell protein). These data suggest that RBP mediates the paracrine transfer of retinol from hepatocytes to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver and that stellate cells bind and internalize RBP by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8386378

  12. Retinol to Retinol-Binding Protein (RBP) is Low in Obese Adults due to Elevated apo-RBP

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jordan P.; Furr, Harold C.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated serum retinol-binding protein (RBP) concentration has been associated with obesity and insulin resistance, but accompanying retinol values have not been reported. Assessment of retinol is required to discriminate between apo-RBP, which may act as an adipokine, and holo-RBP, which transports vitamin A. The relations between serum RBP, retinol, retinyl esters, BMI, and measures of insulin resistance were determined in obese adults. Fasting blood (≥8 h) was collected from obese men and women (n = 76) and blood chemistries were obtained. Retinol and retinyl esters were quantified by HPLC and RBP by ELISA. RBP and retinol were determined in age and sex-matched, nonobese individuals (n = 41) for comparison. Serum apo-RBP was two-fold higher in obese (0.90 ± 0.62 µM) than nonobese subjects (0.44 ± 0.56 µM) (P < 0.001). The retinol to RBP ratio (retinol:RBP) was significantly lower in obese (0.73 ± 0.13) than nonobese subjects (0.90 ± 0.22) (P < 0.001) and RBP was strongly associated with retinol in both groups (r = 0.71 and 0.90, respectively, P < 0.0001). In obese subjects, RBP was associated with insulin (r = 0.26, P < 0.05), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (r = 0.29, P < 0.05), and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (r = −0.27, P < 0.05). RBP was associated with BMI only when obese and nonobese subjects were combined (r = 0.25, P < 0.01). Elevated serum RBP, derived in part from apo-RBP, was more strongly associated with retinol than with BMI or measures of insulin resistance in obese adults. Investigations into the role of RBP in obesity and insulin resistance should include retinol to facilitate the measurement of apo-RBP and retinol:RBP. When evaluating the therapeutic potential of lowering serum RBP, consideration of the consequences on vitamin A metabolism is paramount. PMID:18641048

  13. Urinary Retinol-Binding Protein: Relationship to Renal Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Maria Alice Muniz; Moreira, Silvia Regina; Gomez, Luz; Goulart, Alessandra; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela; Titan, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The role of urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) as a biomarker of CKD in proximal tubular diseases, glomerulopathies and in transplantation is well established. However, whether urinary RBP is also a biomarker of renal damage and CKD progression in general CKD is not known. In this study, we evaluated the association of urinary RBP with renal function and cardiovascular risk factors in the baseline data of the Progredir Study, a CKD cohort in Sao Paulo, Brazil, comprising 454 participants with stages 3 and 4 CKD. In univariate analysis, urinary RBP was inversely related to estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD-EPI eGFR) and several cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustments, however, only CKD-EPI eGFR, albuminuria, systolic blood pressure, anemia, acidosis, and left atrium diameter remained significantly related to urinary RBP. The inverse relationship of eGFR to urinary RBP (β-0.02 ± 95CI -0.02; -0.01, p<0.0001 for adjusted model) remained in all strata of albuminuria, even after adjustments: in normoalbuminuria (β-0.008 ± 95CI (-0.02; -0.001, p = 0.03), in microalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.02, p<0,0001) and in macroalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.01, p<0,0001). Lastly, urinary RBP was able to significantly increase the accuracy of a logistic regression model (adjusted for sex, age, SBP, diabetes and albuminuria) in diagnosing eGFR<35 ml/min/1.73m2 (AUC 0,77, 95%CI 0,72–0,81 versus AUC 0,71, 95%CI 0,65–0,75, respectively; p = 0,05). Our results suggest that urinary RBP is significantly associated to renal function in CKD in general, a finding that expands the interest in this biomarker beyond the context of proximal tubulopathies, glomerulopathies or transplantation. Urinary RBP should be further explored as a predictive marker of CKD progression. PMID:27655369

  14. Suppression of retinol-binding protein 4 with RNA oligonucleotide prevents high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Sun, Lun-Quan; Kamal, Mohammad A; Wang, Xiaoyang; Seale, J Paul; Qu, Xianqin

    2011-12-01

    Conflicting data have been reported regarding the role of retinol-binding protein (RBP4) in insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this study, we used pharmacological methods to investigate the role of RBP4. RNA oligonucleotide against RBP4 (anti-RBP4 oligo) was transfected into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. RT-PCR analysis showed that RBP4 mRNA expression decreased by 55% (p<0.01) compared with control cells. Validated RNA oligo was used in an in vivo study with high fat diet (HFD) fed - mice. 14 weeks of HFD feeding increased RBP4 expression (associated with elevated serum levels measured with immunoblotting and ELISA) by 56% in adipose tissue (p<0.05) and 68% in the liver (p<0.01). Adipose RBP4 levels were significantly reduced after 4 weeks treatment with anti-RBP4 oligo (25mg/kg, p<0.01) and rosiglitazone (RSG, 10mg/kg, p<0.05) compared with scrambled RNA oligo (25mg/kg) treated mice. Only anti-RBP4 oligo significantly inhibited RBP4 protein (p<0.01) and mRNA expression (p<0.01) in the liver and reduced serum RBP4 levels. Anti-RBP4 oligo and RSG showed comparable effects on impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia. Anti-RBP4 oligo significantly enhanced adipose-GLUT4 expression (p<0.01) but did not increase muscle-GLUT4. Both RSG and anti-RBP4 oligo significantly reduced hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression (both p<0.05). Histological analysis revealed that anti-RBP4 oligo ameliorated hepatic steatosis and reduced lipid droplets associated with normalized liver function. Histological and pharmacological results of this study indicate that RBP4 is not only an adipocytokine, but also a hepatic cytokine leading to metabolic syndrome, NAFLD and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Role of conserved residues in structure and stability: Tryptophans of human serum retinol-binding protein, a model for the lipocalin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lesley H.; Chrysina, Evangelia D.; Irons, Laurence I.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Brew, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Serum retinol binding protein (RBP) is a member of the lipocalin family, proteins with up-and-down β-barrel folds, low levels of sequence identity, and diverse functions. Although tryptophan 24 of RBP is highly conserved among lipocalins, it does not play a direct role in activity. To determine if Trp24 and other conserved residues have roles in stability and/or folding, we investigated the effects of conservative substitutions for the four tryptophans and some adjacent residues on the structure, stability, and spectroscopic properties of apo-RBP. Crystal structures of recombinant human apo-RBP and of a mutant with substitutions for tryptophans 67 and 91 at 1.7 Å and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, as well as stability measurements, indicate that these relatively exposed tryptophans have little influence on structure or stability. Although Trp105 is largely buried in the wall of the β-barrel, it can be replaced with minor effects on stability to thermal and chemical unfolding. In contrast, substitutions of three different amino acids for Trp24 or replacement of Arg139, a conserved residue that interacts with Trp24, lead to similar large losses in stability and lower yields of native protein generated by in vitro folding. The results and the coordinated nature of natural substitutions at these sites support the idea that conserved residues in functionally divergent homologs have roles in stabilizing the native relative to misfolded structures. They also establish conditions for studies of the kinetics of folding and unfolding by ideying spectroscopic signals for monitoring the formation of different substructures. PMID:11604536

  16. IRBP-like proteins in the eyes of six cephalopod species--immunochemical relationship to vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) and cephalopod retinal-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fong, S L; Lee, P G; Ozaki, K; Hara, R; Hara, T; Bridges, C D

    1988-01-01

    SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting were used to examine soluble proteins from the eyes of six species of cephalopods i.e. Lolliguncula brevis, Sepia officinalis, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides, Rossia pacifica and Loligo opalescens. All species had a protein ("IRBP") with molecular weight virtually identical with vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) averaging 132,400 +/- 700 (n = 6). "IRBP" reacted on nitrocellulose blot transfers with rabbit antibovine IRBP and rabbit antifrog IRBP antibodies. Unlike vertebrate IRBP, cephalopod "IRBP" (from L. brevis) did not bind exogenous retinol or concanavalin A. The N-terminal amino acid appeared to be blocked in samples electroeluted from SDS gels. The antifrog IRBP antibodies also reacted with a series of proteins with molecular weights between 46,000 and 47,000, identified as retinal-binding protein (RALBP) with anti-RALBP antibodies. Anti-IRBP also reacted with pure RALBP prepared from Todarodes pacificus. Occasionally, anti-RALBP antibodies were seen to react weakly with "IRBP" in some cephalopods. We conclude that RALBP, cephalopod "IRBP" and vertebrate IRBP share a common but distant ancestry, and that a protein resembling IRBP appeared before the vertebrates diverged from the invertebrates. Both RALBP and IRBP appear to have analogous functions in shuttling retinoids between rhodopsin and the corresponding isomerizing system, retinochrome in the cephalopods and retinol isomerase in the vertebrates. The function of cephalopod "IRBP" is unknown. PMID:3195063

  17. Expression of retinol binding protein 4 and nuclear factor-κB in diabetic rats with atherosclerosis and the intervention effect of pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wan; Ye, Shandong; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the expression of retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in diabetic rats with atherosclerosis, and to evaluate the intervention effect of pioglitazone. A total of 75 Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Normal control (NC), diabetic rats (DM1), diabetic rats with atherosclerosis (DM2) and diabetic rats treated with pioglitazone (DM + Pio). The activity of NF-κB, the levels of serum and adipose tissue RBP4, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), triglycerides (TG) and arteria caudilis systolic blood pressure (SBP) were measured. Percentage of fat mass (PFM), atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were calculated. Compared with the NC and DM + Pio groups, all the parameters mentioned above increased significantly in the DM1 and DM2 groups, with the exception that HDL-c decreased. Pearson analysis showed that RBP4 in serum and adipose tissue were positively associated with TG, LDL-c, FINS, PFM, AIP, HOMA-IR, NF-κB, SBP and negatively associated with HDL-c. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that serum RBP4 and TG were predictors for the presence of diabetic atherosclerosis. In conclusion, RBP4 may be an effective predictor for diabetic atherosclerosis; pioglitazone is able to decrease RBP4 and NF-κB, which may partly contribute to its protective effect against diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27446311

  18. Cellular retinol-binding protein-1 is transiently expressed in granulation tissue fibroblasts and differentially expressed in fibroblasts cultured from different organs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G.; Redard, M.; Gabbiani, G.; Neuville, P.

    1997-01-01

    We have reported that cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) is transiently expressed by arterial smooth muscle cells during experimental intimal repair (P. Neuville, A. Geinoz, G. Benzonana, M. Redard, F. Gabbiani, P. Ropraz, G. Gabbiani: Am J Pathol 1997, 150:509-521). We have examined here the expression of CRBP-1 during wound healing after a full-thickness rat skin wound. CRBP-1 was transiently expressed by a significant proportion of fibroblastic cells including myofibroblasts. Expression started 4 days after wounding, reached a maximum at 12 days, and persisted up to 30 days when a scar was formed. After wound closure, most CRBP-1-containing fibroblastic cells underwent apoptosis. We have further investigated CRBP-1 expression in rat fibroblasts cultured from different organs. CRBP-1 was abundant in lung and heart fibroblasts and was detected in decreasing amounts in muscle, tendon, subcutaneous tissue, and granulation tissue fibroblasts. Dermis fibroblasts contained no detectable levels of CRBP-1. All-trans retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibited cell proliferation and increased CRBP-1 expression in fibroblastic populations except dermis fibroblasts. We demonstrate that during granulation tissue formation a subpopulation of fibroblastic cells express CRBP-1 de novo. We also demonstrate that CRBP-1 expression by fibroblasts is regulated in vitro by retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1. Our results suggest that CRBP-1 and possibly retinoic acid play a role in the evolution of granulation tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9403724

  19. Associations between retinol-binding protein 4 and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in recently postmenopausal women: cross-sectional analyses from the KEEPS study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The published literature regarding the relationships between retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis is conflicting, likely due, in part, to limitations of frequently used RBP4 assays. Prior large studies have not utilized the gold-standard western blot analysis of RBP4 levels. Methods Full-length serum RBP4 levels were measured by western blot in 709 postmenopausal women screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Cross-sectional analyses related RBP4 levels to cardiometabolic risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Results The mean age of women was 52.9 (± 2.6) years, and the median RBP4 level was 49.0 (interquartile range 36.9-61.5) μg/mL. Higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with higher triglycerides (age, race, and smoking-adjusted partial Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.10; P = 0.01), but were unrelated to blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, and CIMT levels (all partial Spearman correlation coefficients ≤0.06, P > 0.05). Results suggested a curvilinear association between RBP4 levels and CAC, with women in the bottom and upper quartiles of RBP4 having higher odds of CAC (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.10 [1.07-4.09], 2.00 [1.02-3.92], 1.64 [0.82-3.27] for the 1st, 3rd, and 4th RBP4 quartiles vs. the 2nd quartile). However, a squared RBP4 term in regression modeling was non-significant (P = 0.10). Conclusions In these healthy, recently postmenopausal women, higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with elevations in triglycerides and with CAC, but not with other risk factors or CIMT. These data using the gold standard of RBP4 methodology only weakly support the possibility that perturbations in RBP4 homeostasis may be an additional risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00154180 PMID:22587616

  20. Fatty Acid-and Retinol-Binding Protein, Mj-FAR-1 Induces Tomato Host Susceptibility to Root-Knot Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Iberkleid, Ionit; Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Firester, Kalia; Spiegel, Yitzhak; Horowitz, Sigal Brown

    2013-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes produce at least one structurally unique class of small helix-rich retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins that have no counterparts in their plant hosts. Herein we describe a protein of the plant-parasitic root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica, which is a member of the nematode-specific fatty-acid- and retinol-binding (Mj-FAR-1) family of proteins. The mj-far-1 mRNA was detected through M. javanica pre-parasitic J2s, migratory and sedentary parasitic stages by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Immunolocalization assays demonstrate that the FAR protein of Meloidogyne is secreted during sedentary stages, as evidenced by the accumulation of FAR at the nematode cuticle surface and along the adjacent host root tissues. Tomato roots constitutively expressing mj-far-1 demonstrated an increased susceptibility to root-knot nematodes infection as observed by accelerated gall induction and expansion, accompanied by a higher percentage of nematodes developing into mature females compared to control roots. RNA interference assays that expressed double-stranded RNA complementary to mj-far-1 in transgenic tomato lines specifically reduced nematode infection levels. Histological analysis of nematode-infested roots indicated that in roots overexpressing mj-far-1, galls contained larger feeding cells and might support a faster nematode development and maturation. Roots overexpressing mj-far-1 suppressed jasmonic acid responsive genes such as the proteinase inhibitor (Pin2) and γ-thionin, illustrating the possible role of Mj-FAR-1 in manipulating the lipid based signaling in planta. This data, suggests that Meloidogyne FAR might have a strategic function during the interaction of the nematode with its plant host. Our study present the first demonstration of an in planta functional characterization and localization of FAR proteins secreted by plant-parasitic nematodes. It provides evidence that Mj-FAR-1 facilitates

  1. All-trans retinol and retinol-binding protein from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid exhibit dynamic behaviour during early central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2008-06-11

    Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) is involved in the regulation of survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of neuroectodermal progenitor cells, as well as in the control of mesencephalic gene expression in collaboration with the isthmic organizer. Recently, we showed the presence of retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the E-CSF proteome. RBP is an all-trans retinol carrier, a molecule that can be metabolized into retinoic acid, a morphogen involved in central nervous system (CNS) morphogenesis and patterning. Here we demonstrate the presence of all-trans retinol within the E-CSF and analyse the dynamics of RBP and all-trans retinol within this fluid, as well as the expression of retinoic acid-synthesizing enzymes during early CNS development. Our results suggest a relationship between the dynamics of these molecules and the early events of CNS patterning. PMID:18520998

  2. Serum retinol binding protein 4 is negatively related to beta cell function in Chinese women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To observe the relationship between serum retinol binding protein 4(RBP4) and β cell function in Chinese subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and without known diabetes. Methods 106 patients diagnosed as fatty liver by ultrasonography (M/F: 61/45; aged 47.44 ± 14.16 years) were enrolled in our current cross-sectional study. Subjects with known diabetes, chronic virus hepatitis and excessive alcohol consumption were excluded. Serum RBP4 was detected by ELISA and validated by quantitative Western blotting. β cell function were assessed by HOMA in all subjects and by hyperglycemic clamp in 17 normal glucose tolerance subjects (M = 6, F = 11). Results The levels of serum RBP4 in men were higher than that in women (55.96 ± 11.14 vs 45.87 ± 10.31 μg/ml, p < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation analysis demonstrated that in women, serum RBP4 levels were significantly associated with fasting blood glucose (FBG), HOMA-β, and increment of first phase insulin secretion (1PH), but not associated with age, BMI, waist circumference, WHR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), TC, TG, HDL-c, LDL-c, 2 h blood glucose, HOMA-IR, ALT, AST, γ-GT, hepatic fat content (HFC), and insulin sensitivity index (ISI). However, in men, serum RBP4 levels were significantly associated with HDL-c, ALT, AST, but not associated with any other parameters as mentioned above. A stepwise multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that in women, HOMA-IR and RBP4 were significantly associated with HOMA-β, while in men, HOMA-IR and BMI were significantly variables associated with HOMA-β. Conclusions Serum RBP4, secreted mainly by liver and adipose tissue, may involve in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in Chinese women patients with NAFLD. PMID:24160775

  3. Prenatal ethanol consumption alters the expression of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor mRNA in fetal rat embryo and brain.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1995-12-01

    The mechanism by which prenatal ethanol ingestion causes fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is unknown. We hypothesize that ethanol disrupts the normal function of retinoids in embryogenesis and differentiation, resulting in FAS. The present work was designed to determine if prenatal ethanol ingestion affects the expression of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP) and nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paired timed pregnant rats were fed a liquid diet, one group treated with 36% of carbohydrate calories replaced with ethanol. Maternal serum retinol concentrations during pregnancy peaked on the 6th day of pregnancy, but no difference was noted between the ethanol and control group. At the 12th and 20th day of gestation, embryos or fetal brain were removed, and RNA was isolated for Northern hybridization. The abundance of CRBP mRNA was significantly elevated by ethanol consumption. In both the 12-day embryo (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.10; vs. ethanol: 1.87 +/- 0.30, p < 0.05) and 20-day fetal brain (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.09; vs. ethanol: 1.46 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01). In the embryo, ethanol ingestion resulted in a decrease in the level of RAR-beta mRNA (control: 1.00 +/- 0.05; vs. ethanol: 0.71 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01), but had no effect on RAR-alpha or RAR-gamma mRNA. In contrast to the embryo, the expression of both the 3.7- and 2.7-kb RAR-alpha transcripts was significantly greater in day 20 fetal brain of ethanol-treated rats (3.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.11; vs. ethanol: 1.65 +/- 0.06; p < 0.001; 2.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.14; vs. ethanol: 1.74 +/- 0.27, p < 0.05), whereas RAR-beta and RAR-gamma expression were not altered. These observations suggest that altered vitamin A function is a potential factor in the embryopathy of prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:8749798

  4. Specific, sensitive and accurate quantification of albumin, retinol binding protein and transferrin in human urine and serum by zone immunoelectrophoresis assay (ZIA).

    PubMed

    Vesterberg, O

    1994-05-01

    For zone immunoelectrophoresis assay (ZIA) glass tubes, ID 2 mm and 90 mm high, are filled to 2/3 with buffer containing agarose and antibodies against the protein to be quantified, each sample being pipetted on top of separate agarose gel rods. On electrophoresis at 35-150 V for several hours, the sample proteins enter the gel with resultant immunoprecipitates, visualized by staining. The extension of each immunoprecipitation zone from the upper gel surface (measured with a ruler) is directly proportional to the amount of protein in each sample and can easily be quantitated by comparison with a linear calibration curve. ZIA can be used for quantification of several proteins in blood serum and plasma as well as in urine, as is illustrated for albumin, retinol-binding protein (RBP) and transferrin. The recovery of the pure proteins added to urine is often close to 100%. ZIA has many advantages: (i) simple apparatus and procedure (no gel punching nor cooling), (ii) minimal antiserum consumption (1 mL may allow > 1000 assays), (iii) electrophoresis can be performed within a few hours or overnight, (iv) low coefficient of variation (often < 4%), (v) linear calibration curves, (vi) low detection limit (< 20 ng/mL), (vii) wide concentration ranges, (viii) no kits nor unique antisera preparation are required, and (ix) good agreement with the results from other methods.

  5. Early expression of the gene for interphotoreceptor retinol-binding protein during photoreceptor differentiation suggests a critical role for the interphotoreceptor matrix in retinal development.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, F; Healy, J I

    1990-12-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinol-binding protein (IRBP), the major protein component of the subretinal space, is in a strategic position to mediate cellular interactions between the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and the neural retina. While IRBP appears to be involved in vitamin A transport during the visual cycle in the adult, the role of this protein during eye development has not been determined. As a first step to understanding the role of IRBP during retinal development, we have studied the expression of the mRNA for this glycolipoprotein during photoreceptor differentiation in the rat. A rat neural retina cDNA library was prepared from which an IRBP clone was isolated. The clone contains an open reading frame followed by a 3' noncoding sequence ending in 10 adenosine residues. The coding region has an identity of 83.9 and 82.5% with the nucleotide sequence of human and bovine IRBP, respectively. Rats (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar, and Royal College of Surgeon pink-eyed controls) have a 6.4 and a 5.2-kb mRNA for IRBP which are present in a 1:4 ratio and thus are the only vertebrate known to definitely have more than one major form of the IRBP message. Genomic Southern blots are consistent with the hypothesis that there is only one allele of the IRBP gene, suggesting that the two forms are produced by alternative processing of the mRNA. To generate an antisense RNA probe for use in molecular titration assays and Northern blots, an Eco RI-Bam HI fragment from the coding region was subcloned in between flanking Sp6 and T7 promoters. Total RNA was prepared from undissected rat globes from postnatal days p0-p22. The expression of the mRNA for IRBP was studied by Northern blots and the level of the transcripts determined by solution hybridization assays. Approximately 10(5) IRBP mRNA transcripts/micrograms total eye RNA are present at birth. This increases to a final level of 3.1 X 10(6) transcripts/micrograms total RNA by p9. The one-half maximal level of the mRNA occurs

  6. Structures of holo wild-type human cellular retinol-binding protein II (hCRBPII) bound to retinol and retinal

    PubMed Central

    Nossoni, Zahra; Assar, Zahra; Yapici, Ipek; Nosrati, Meisam; Wang, Wenjing; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs) I and II, which are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) family, are retinoid chaperones that are responsible for the intracellular transport and delivery of both retinol and retinal. Although structures of retinol-bound CRBPI and CRBPII are known, no structure of a retinal-bound CRBP has been reported. In addition, the retinol-bound human CRBPII (hCRBPII) structure shows partial occupancy of a non­canonical conformation of retinol in the binding pocket. Here, the structure of retinal-bound hCRBPII and the structure of retinol-bound hCRBPII with retinol fully occupying the binding pocket are reported. It is further shown that the retinoid derivative seen in both the zebrafish CRBP and the hCRBPII structures is likely to be the product of flux-dependent and wavelength-dependent X-ray damage during data collection. The structures of retinoid-bound CRBPs are compared and contrasted, and rationales for the differences in binding affinities for retinal and retinol are provided. PMID:25478840

  7. Structures of holo wild-type human cellular retinol-binding protein II (hCRBPII) bound to retinol and retinal.

    PubMed

    Nossoni, Zahra; Assar, Zahra; Yapici, Ipek; Nosrati, Meisam; Wang, Wenjing; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James

    2014-12-01

    Cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs) I and II, which are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) family, are retinoid chaperones that are responsible for the intracellular transport and delivery of both retinol and retinal. Although structures of retinol-bound CRBPI and CRBPII are known, no structure of a retinal-bound CRBP has been reported. In addition, the retinol-bound human CRBPII (hCRBPII) structure shows partial occupancy of a noncanonical conformation of retinol in the binding pocket. Here, the structure of retinal-bound hCRBPII and the structure of retinol-bound hCRBPII with retinol fully occupying the binding pocket are reported. It is further shown that the retinoid derivative seen in both the zebrafish CRBP and the hCRBPII structures is likely to be the product of flux-dependent and wavelength-dependent X-ray damage during data collection. The structures of retinoid-bound CRBPs are compared and contrasted, and rationales for the differences in binding affinities for retinal and retinol are provided. PMID:25478840

  8. Structure and cell-specific expression of a cloned human retinol binding protein gene: the 5'-flanking region contains hepatoma specific transcriptional signals.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, C; Colantuoni, V; Cortese, R

    1985-08-01

    Human plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is coded by a single gene and is specifically synthesized in the liver. We have characterized a lambda clone, from a human DNA library, carrying the gene coding for plasma RBP. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing show that the gene is composed of six exons and five introns. Primer elongation and S1 mapping experiments allowed the definition of the initiation of transcription and the identification of the putative promoter. The 5'-flanking region of the RBP gene was fused upstream to the coding sequence of the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT): the chimeric gene was introduced, by calcium phosphate precipitation, into the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 and into HeLa cells. Efficient expression of CAT was obtained only in Hep G2. Primer elongation analysis of the RNA extracted from transfected Hep G2 showed that initiation of transcription of the transfected chimeric gene occurs at a position identical to that of the natural gene. Transcriptional analysis of Bal31 deletions from the 3' end of the RBP 5'-flanking DNA allowed the identification of the RBP gene promoter.

  9. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus.

    PubMed

    Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R; Roe, Andrew J; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein-ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male.

  10. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R.; Roe, Andrew J.; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein–ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  11. High dietary fat-induced obesity in Wistar rats and type 2 diabetes in nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rats differentially affect retinol binding protein 4 expression and vitamin A metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomomi; Shichi, Yuta; Sato, Miyuki; Tanioka, Yuri; Furusho, Tadasu; Ota, Toru; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which is caused mainly by insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the only specific transport protein for retinol in the serum. RBP4 level is increased in the diabetic state and high-fat condition, indicating that retinol metabolism may be affected under these conditions. However, the precise effect of diabetes and high fat-induced obesity on retinol metabolism is unknown. In this study, we examined differences in retinol metabolite levels in rat models of diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes (Goto-Kakizaki [GK] rat). Four-week-old male Wistar and GK rats were given either a control diet (AIN-93G) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% fat kJ). After 15 weeks of feeding, the RBP4 levels increased by 2-fold in the serum of GK rats but not HFD-fed rats. The hepatic retinol concentration of HFD-fed rats was approximately 50% that of the controls (P < .01). In contrast, the renal retinol concentrations of GK rats increased by 70% (P < .01). However, expression of RARβ in the kidney, which was induced in a retinoic acid-dependent manner, was downregulated by 90% (P < .01) in GK rats. In conclusion, diabetes and obesity affected retinol metabolism differently, and the effects were different in different peripheral tissues. The impact of HFD may be limited to the storage of hepatic vitamin A as retinyl palmitate. In particular, our data indicate that renal retinoic acid production might represent an important target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26923513

  12. Retinoid Content, Visual Responses, and Ocular Morphology Are Compromised in the Retinas of Mice Lacking the Retinol-Binding Protein Receptor, STRA6

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Alberto; Mark, Manuel; Jacobs, Hugues; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Habib, Samer; Tosha, Chinatsu; Radu, Roxana A; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Nusinowitz, Steven; Bok, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We report generation of a mouse model in which the STRA6 gene has been disrupted functionally to facilitate the study of visual responses, changes in ocular morphology, and retinoid processing under STRA6 protein deficiency. Methods. A null mouse line, stra6 −/−, was generated. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry were used to determine expression of STRA6 protein. Visual responses and morphological studies were performed on 6-week, 5-month and 10-month-old mice. The retinoid content of eye tissues was evaluated in dark-adapted mice by high performance liquid chromatography. Results. STRA6 protein was not detectable in stra6 −/− null mice, which had a consistent reduction, but not total ablation of their visual responses. The mice also showed significant depletion of their retinoid content in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neurosensory retina, including a 95% reduction in retinyl esters. At the morphological level, a reduction in thickness of the neurosensory retina due to shortening of the rod outer and inner segments was observed when compared to control litter mates with a commensurate reduction in rod a- and b-wave amplitudes. In addition, there was a reduction in cone photoreceptor cell number and cone b-wave amplitude. A typical hallmark in stra6 −/− null eyes was the presence of a persistent primary hypertrophic vitreous, an optically dense vascularized structure located in the vitreous humor between the posterior surface of the lens and neurosensory retina. Conclusions. Our studies of stra6 −/− null mice established the importance of the STRA6 protein for the uptake, intracellular transport, and processing of retinol by the RPE. In its absence, rod photoreceptor outer and inner segment length was reduced, and cone cell numbers were reduced, as were scotopic and photopic responses. STRA6 also was required for dissolution of the primary vitreous. However, it was clear from these studies that STRA6 is not the only pathway for

  13. Comparison of the rate of uptake and biologic effects of retinol added to human keratinocytes either directly to the culture medium or bound to serum retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hodam, J.R.; St. Hilaire, P.; Creek, K.E. )

    1991-08-01

    Retinol circulates in the plasma bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP), but the mechanism by which retinol is transferred from RBP to target cells is not known. To study retinol delivery, human keratinocytes (HKc) were incubated with (3H)retinol added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP and the uptake of (3H)retinol was determined at various times. During the first hour of incubation, the rate of (3H)retinol accumulation by HKc was about 40 times greater when the vitamin was added directly to the media rather than bound to RBP. Although maximal uptake of (3H)retinol added directly to the culture medium occurred at 3 h, the uptake of (3H)retinol from RBP was linear with time for at least 72 h. By 57 h, cell-associated (3H)retinol was the same whether it was added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP. Excess unlabeled retinol or pretreatment of HKc with retinol had no effect on the uptake of (3H)retinol added directly to the culture medium or bound to RBP. Apo- but not holo-RBP was capable of competing with HKc for the uptake of (3H)retinol from RBP. No specific or saturable binding of 125I-labeled RBP to HKc cultured in the absence or the presence of retinol was found. The dose response of retinol inhibition of cholesterol sulfate synthesis and phorbol ester-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity or retinol modulation of keratin expression was the same whether the retinol was delivered to HKc bound to RBP or added directly to the medium. Our data support a mechanism for retinol delivery from RBP to HKc that does not involve cell-surface RBP receptors but instead suggest that the vitamin is first slowly released from RBP and then becomes cell-associated from the aqueous phase. This mechanism is consistent with the finding that HKc respond identically to retinol whether or not it is delivered to them bound to RBP.

  14. Transport proteins and acute phase reactant proteins in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, R. P.; Kuvibidila, S.; Gordon, L.; Humbert, J.

    1994-01-01

    Transport proteins, acute-phase reactant proteins (APRP), hematology, and anthropometry were studied in 34 sickle cell disease (SCD) children (20 boys, 14 girls) and 27 controls without growth deficits (13 boys, 14 girls) [corrected]. The age range was 1/2 to 16 1/2 years. Weight deficits (< 80%) by Waterlow's classification were observed in 41% of SCD boys and 25% of SCD girls, and height deficits (< 90%) were observed in 25% SCD boys and 25% girls. Mean white blood cell counts were significantly higher (P < .001) and hematocrit and hemoglobin (Hb) lower (P < .005) in SCD children than in controls. Although both groups had similar mean levels of albumin, transferrin, and APRP, SCD children had significantly lower mean levels of retinol-binding protein (RBP) (P < .001) and retinol-prealbumin (P < .001). Retinol-binding protein levels were abnormal in 18 (53%) SCD children and in only 23% controls (chi 2 = 14.06; P < 0.005); transferrin levels were abnormal in 20% of SCD children and in none of the controls. Children with SC and SF Hb phenotype had normal mean levels of RBP, whereas those with S beta thal and SS phenotype had levels below normal. Growth-retarded children by weight and height had reduced mean levels of RBP and prealbumin compared with growth-normal SCD children. The implication of primary protein-energy malnutrition on growth retardation in SCD children is under study. PMID:7512147

  15. Differentiation-dependent expression of retinoid-binding proteins in BFC-1 beta adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zovich, D C; Orologa, A; Okuno, M; Kong, L W; Talmage, D A; Piantedosi, R; Goodman, D S; Blaner, W S

    1992-07-15

    Recently, we demonstrated that adipose tissue plays an important role in retinol storage and retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis. Our data suggested that RBP expression in adipose tissue is dependent on the state of adipocyte differentiation. To examine this possibility, we explored the differentiation-dependent expression of RBP using BFC-1 beta preadipocytes, which can be stimulated to undergo adipose differentiation. Total RNA was isolated from undifferentiated (preadipocytes) and differentiated (adipocytes) BFC-1 beta cells and analyzed by Northern blotting. RBP mRNA was not detected in the preadipocytes, but considerable RBP mRNA was present in differentiated BFC-1 beta cells. In BFC-1 beta cells, induced to differentiate with insulin and thyroid hormone, RBP mRNA was first detected after 4 days, reached a maximum level by day 10, and remained at this maximum level for at least 2 more days. Cellular retinol-binding protein was expressed at low levels in the BFC-1 beta preadipocytes and the level of expression increased for 6 days after induction to differentiate and slowly declined on later days. Neither the maximum level of RBP expression nor the day on which this level was reached was influenced by the level of retinol provided in the BFC-1 beta culture medium. BFC-1 beta cells secreted newly synthesized RBP into the culture medium at a rate of 43 +/- 14 ng RBP/24 h/10(6) adipocytes. When the BFC-1 beta adipocytes were provided 1.0 microM retinol in the medium, they accumulated the retinol and synthesized retinyl esters. These studies with BFC-1 beta cells confirm that RBP synthesis and secretion and retinol accumulation are intrinsic properties of differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, they suggest that RBP and cellular retinol-binding protein gene expression are regulated as part of a package of genes which are modulated during adipocyte differentiation.

  16. The accumulation of alpha-Tocopherol and Retinol in the milk of water buffalo is correlated with the plasma levels of triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, M S; Cigliano, L; Sarubbi, F; Polimeno, F; Ferrara, L; Bertoni, G; Abrescia, P

    2003-01-01

    Milk is the most important source of Retinol and alpha-Tocopherol for calves. These antioxidants save the food quality and prevent lipid oxidation in the mammary gland and the calf growing tissues. In Bubalus bubalis, seasonal changes for the plasma levels of both antioxidants were not found. The levels of Retinol and alpha-Tocopherol in the milk were 2 and 1.7 times higher in winter than in summer, respectively. These levels were correlated with the plasma level of triiodothyronine, and markedly increased in cows injected with triiodothyronine in summer. The cytosol from alveolar epithelial cells of mammary glands was incubated with alpha-Tocopherol and 3H-Retinol and, after gel filtration chromatography, both antioxidants were found associated with proteins migrating as a single peak of 33 kD. The amount of alpha-Tocopherol and Retinol binding proteins was 1.5 and 2.3 times higher in winter than in summer respectively. The Retinol binding proteins migrated as two bands (33 and 16 kD) by electrophoresis in denaturing and reducing conditions. Our data suggest that triiodothyronine enhances the transport of both liposoluble antioxidants through the blood-mammary barrier, and demonstrate that proteins of the mammary epithelial cells are involved in such a transport.

  17. Uterocalin, a lipocalin provisioning the preattachment equine conceptus: fatty acid and retinol binding properties, and structural characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Suire, S; Stewart, F; Beauchamp, J; Kennedy, M W

    2001-01-01

    The equine conceptus is surrounded by a fibrous capsule that persists until about day 20 of pregnancy, whereupon the capsule is lost, the conceptus attaches to the endometrium and placentation proceeds. Before attachment, the endometrium secretes in abundance a protein of the lipocalin family, uterocalin. The cessation of secretion coincides with the end of the period during which the conceptus is enclosed in its capsule, suggesting that uterocalin is essential for the support of the embryo before direct contact between maternal and foetal tissues is established. Using recombinant protein and fluorescence-based assays, we show that equine uterocalin binds the fluorescent fatty acids 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid, dansyl-D,L-alpha-amino-octanoic acid and cis-parinaric acid, and, by competition, oleic, palmitic, arachidonic, docosahexaenoic, gamma-linolenic, cis-eicosapentaenoic and linoleic acids. Uterocalin also binds all-trans-retinol, the binding site for which is coincident or interactive with that for fatty acids. Molecular modelling and intrinsic fluorescence analysis of the wild-type protein and a Trp-->Glu mutant protein indicated that uterocalin has an unusually solvent-exposed Trp side chain projecting from its large helix directly into solvent. This feature is unusual among lipocalins and might relate to binding to, and uptake by, the trophoblast. Uterocalin therefore has the localization and binding activities for the provisioning of the equine conceptus with lipids including those essential for morphogenesis and pattern formation. The possession of a fibrous capsule surrounding the conceptus might be an ancestral condition in mammals; homologues of uterocalin might be essential for early development in marsupials and in eutherians in which there is a prolonged preimplantation period. PMID:11368763

  18. Serum protein concentrations in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Graninger, W; Thalhammer, F; Hollenstein, U; Zotter, G M; Kremsner, P G

    1992-12-01

    In patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infection cytokine-mediated serum protein levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), coeruloplasmin (COE), beta 2-microglobulin (B2M), alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), haptoglobin (HPT), prealbumin (PRE), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin (ALB) and transferrin (TRF) were measured in an endemic area of the Amazonian rain forest. Semi-immune (SI) and nonimmune (NI) patients were investigated. In both patient groups the serum concentrations of CRP, COE and B2M were elevated on admission. In addition AAG and AAT concentrations were increased in NI patients compared to control subjects. Significantly lower serum concentrations of HPT, PRE, RBP, ALB and TRF were seen in both patient groups during the acute phase of the disease, and were more pronounced in NI patients. After a 28-day follow-up, AAT and B2M were normal in SI patients but HPT, AAT and B2M were still significantly altered in NI patients.

  19. Mapping the Interactions of Dengue Virus NS1 Protein with Human Liver Proteins Using a Yeast Two-Hybrid System: Identification of C1q as an Interacting Partner

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Nogueira, Mauricio L.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    Dengue constitutes a global health concern. The clinical manifestation of this disease varies from mild febrile illness to severe hemorrhage and/or fatal hypovolemic shock. Flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a secreted glycoprotein that is displayed on the surface of infected cells but is absent in viral particles. NS1 accumulates at high levels in the plasma of dengue virus (DENV)-infected patients, and previous reports highlight its involvement in immune evasion, dengue severity, liver dysfunction and pathogenesis. In the present study, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to search for DENV2 NS1-interacting partners using a human liver cDNA library. We identified fifty genes, including human complement component 1 (C1q), which was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, ELISA and immunofluorescence assays, revealing for the first time the direct binding of this protein to NS1. Furthermore, the majority of the identified genes encode proteins that are secreted into the plasma of patients, and most of these proteins are classified as acute-phase proteins (APPs), such as plasminogen, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, retinol binding protein 4, transferrin, and C4. The results presented here confirm the direct interaction of DENV NS1 with a key protein of the complement system and suggest a role for this complement protein in the pathogenesis of DENV infection. PMID:23516407

  20. Adipocytokine levels in obese and non-obese subjects: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Fogari, Elena; D'Angelo, Angela; Bianchi, Lucio; Bonaventura, Aldo; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated the levels of some inflammatory adipocytokines in 363 obese and 365 non-obese subjects. We measured: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, blood pressure, lipid profile, retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), vaspin, omentin-1, leptin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), visfatin, resistin, adiponectin (ADN), adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed higher BMI, WC, FPI, HOMA index, TC, LDL-C, RBP-4, leptin, IL-6, adipsin, Hs-CRP, vaspin, resistin and TNF-α levels, and lower visfatin, and ADN levels in obese compared to non-obese subjects. Higher WC correlated with lower ADN and visfatin levels, and higher vaspin levels. Higher HOMA index correlated with higher resistin, adipsin, RBP-4, and leptin concentrations, while higher leptin levels correlated with higher TNF-α, Hs-CRP, and IL-6 concentration, and lower ADN values. We confirmed obese subjects' predisposition to develop dysmetabolic disease and hormonal dysfunctions.

  1. Identification of tuberculosis-associated proteins in whole blood supernatant

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biological parameters are useful tools for understanding and monitoring complicated disease processes. In this study, we attempted to identify proteins associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) using a proteomic approach. Methods To assess TB-associated changes in the composition of human proteins, whole blood supernatants were collected from patients with active TB and healthy control subjects. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was performed to analyze proteins with high molecular weights (approximately >20 kDa). Baseline protein levels were initially compared between patients with active TB and control subjects. Possible changes of protein patterns in active TB were also compared ex vivo between whole blood samples incubated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific antigens (stimulated condition) and under unstimulated conditions. Immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were performed to confirm differences in identified proteins. Results Under the baseline condition, we found that the levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), fetuin-A (also called α-HS-glycoprotein), and vitamin D-binding protein differed between patients with active TB and control subjects on 2D gels. Immunoblotting results confirmed differential expression of RBP4 and fetuin-A. ELISA results further confirmed significantly lower levels of these two proteins in samples from patients with active TB than in control subjects (P < 0.0001). Mtb-specific antigen stimulation ex vivo altered clusterin expression in whole blood samples collected from patients with active TB. Conclusions We identified TB-associated proteins in whole blood supernatants. The dynamics of protein expression during disease progression may improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of TB. PMID:21418657

  2. Renal and Neurologic Effects of Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in Children: Evidence of Early Effects and Multiple Interactions at Environmental Exposure Levels

    PubMed Central

    de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Leroyer, Ariane; Nisse, Catherine; Haguenoer, Jean-Marie; Mutti, Antonio; Smerhovský, Zdenek; Cikrt, Miroslav; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Malgorzata; Razniewska, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Marek; Bernard, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic are common environmental pollutants in industrialized countries, but their combined impact on children’s health is little known. We studied their effects on two main targets, the renal and dopaminergic systems, in > 800 children during a cross-sectional European survey. Control and exposed children were recruited from those living around historical nonferrous smelters in France, the Czech Republic, and Poland. Children provided blood and urine samples for the determination of the metals and sensitive renal or neurologic biomarkers. Serum concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, and β2-microglobulin were negatively correlated with blood lead levels (PbB), suggesting an early renal hyperfiltration that averaged 7% in the upper quartile of PbB levels (> 55 μg/L; mean, 78.4 μg/L). The urinary excretion of retinol-binding protein, Clara cell protein, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was associated mainly with cadmium levels in blood or urine and with urinary mercury. All four metals influenced the dopaminergic markers serum prolactin and urinary homovanillic acid, with complex interactions brought to light. Heavy metals polluting the environment can cause subtle effects on children’s renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, which reinforces the need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by heavy metals. PMID:16581550

  3. Efficiency of enteral nitrogen support in surgical patients: small peptides v non-degraded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, F; Ollivier, J M; Cynober, L; Masini, J P; Coudray-Lucas, C; Levy, E; Giboudeau, J

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study, 12 intensive care patients, after abdominal surgery, received three alternate six-day courses of two enteral diets with identical nitrogen (0.3 g N/kg per day) and energy (60 kcal/kg per day) supply. The protein hydrolysate (PH) diet contained enzyme-hydrolysed casein and lactoserum (60% small peptides), while the non-degraded protein (NDP) diet contained a nitrogen source of similar amino acid composition, but in the form of non-degraded proteins. The patients were randomised to receive either PH-NDP-PH or NDP-PH-NDP. Parameters reflecting protein metabolism were assessed in the plasma, urine, and stomal effluent on days 1, 6, 12, and 18, three hours after stopping the nutrition (t0), and one hour after restarting it (t1). Comparisons of t1 and t0 values showed that 13 amino acids (including the eight essential amino acids) increased significantly with the protein hydrolysate diet, but only two increased with the non-degraded protein diet. Similarly, with protein hydrolysate, insulin-aemia at t1 was significantly higher than at t0 and correlated with plasma leucine, phenylalanine, alanine, and lysine concentrations. In addition, significant improvements in plasma albumin, transferrin, and retinol binding protein concentrations were seen with protein hydrolysate, together with a significant decrease in the plasma phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion. We conclude that in patients in intensive care after abdominal surgery enteral support containing small peptides is more effective than an equivalent diet containing whole proteins in restoring plasma amino acid and protein levels. PMID:2123819

  4. Residual protein levels on reprocessed dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Letters, S; Lange, A; Perrett, D; McHugh, S; Bagg, J

    2005-11-01

    Reduction of the initial bioburden on instruments, prior to sterilization, is believed to reduce transmission risks of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Endodontic files are used in the preparation of root canals and are likely to have close contact and become contaminated with neural material from branches of the maxillary and mandibular cranial nerves. This study examined methods used by 22 dental practices to clean endodontic files, and scored visible debris and residual protein levels adhering to 220 dental endodontic files that had been used, cleaned, autoclaved and were deemed ready for re-use. Visible debris was scored after examination under a dissecting light microscope. Residual protein was quantified using a fluorescent assay based on reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine. There was wide variation in the methods used by practices to clean endodontic files. The cleaning process varied from a wipe with an alcohol-impregnated cloth to hand scrubbing and/or use of an ultrasonic bath. Surface debris was visually detected on 98% of files. Residual protein was detected on all the files examined (median amount: 5.4 microg; range: 0.5-63.2 microg). These results demonstrate that the cleaning of some instruments reprocessed routinely in primary care is incomplete, and such instruments cannot be excluded as a potential source of cross-infection.

  5. [Comprehensive analysis of urinary proteins for identification of renal disease markers].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki

    2014-07-01

    Urine can be obtained noninvasively and relatively easily to provide a large sample and it is an important source of biomarker discovery in kidney diseases. Today, urinary albumin screening is not only useful for detecting early kidney diseases, but also recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have shown different kinds of post-translational modification of urinary albumin in patients with glomerulonephritis, such as high- and low-molecular mass forms of albumin and highly carbonylated albumin. These characteristic molecular forms of albumin are not detected in serum samples obtained from the same patients or urine of healthy subjects, reflecting the kidney diseases processes. Furthermore, measuring the levels of albumin and other urinary proteins enables comprehensive kidney examination. The urinary protein profile using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis coupled with colloidal silver staining allows us to construct urinary protein profiles. Basically, urinary protein patterns in patients with glomerulonephritis show 5 fractions, the same as the serum pattern; however, characteristic bands of cathode β and anode β fractions, reflecting β2-microglobulin and retinol binding protein, appear in patients with tubular dysfunction. This method is useful to diagnose damaged portions of the kidney, and it provides supportive data for renal biopsy. Most recently, exosome-derived proteins are considered as a new marker source which reflects in-situ alterations in the urology and renal diseases. Different forms of electrophoresis reveal slight alterations in the protein profile on the analysis of urinary proteins including exosomes. This report introduces the electrophoresis-based urinary proteome results generated by our research group. PMID:25669044

  6. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins.

  7. Serum and muscle levels of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinol are normal in chronic alcoholic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Solà, J; Villegas, E; Nicolàs, J M; Deulofeu, R; Antúnez, E; Sacanella, E; Estruch, R; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1998-04-01

    Some authors have suggested a possible loss of antioxidant factors in alcoholic skeletal myopathy. To assess the relationship between ethanol consumption and serum and muscle levels of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinol in chronic alcoholics with and without skeletal myopathy, a prospective cross-sectional study was performed in the Alcohol Unit of a 1000-bed university hospital. Twenty-five chronic male alcoholic patients (10 with skeletal myopathy) and 15 male controls of similar age were included. Evaluation of daily and lifetime ethanol consumption, assessment of anthropometric and protein nutritional parameters, and open biopsy of the left deltoid muscle were performed, as well as determinations of serum and muscle levels of retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid by HPLC analysis. Ten of the 25 chronic alcoholic patients presented histological criteria of skeletal myopathy. Four alcoholics presented caloric malnutrition and three protein malnutrition. All of the muscle biopsies of the control group were entirely normal, as were their nutritional studies. The serum and muscular levels of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinol were normal and were similar in both alcoholics and controls. Except for serum retinol, these values were also similar in alcoholic patients with or without skeletal myopathy. In the univariate analysis, we identified the total lifetime dose of ethanol (p < 0.003), the muscle arm area (p < 0.05), and serum levels of prealbumin (p < 0.03) and retinol-binding protein (p < 0.05) as factors influencing the development of alcoholic myopathy. However, in multivariate analysis, the total lifetime dose of ethanol was the only independent factor in relation to alcoholic myopathy (p < 0.003). Serum and muscle levels of the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinol do not influence the presence of skeletal myopathy in chronic alcoholic patients.

  8. [Significance of low molecular weight urinary protein for assessment of early renal damage in patients with multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-Jing; Zhai, Yong-Ping; Yu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Hai-Ning; Li, Feng; Song, Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; An, Zhi-Ming; Shao, Jing-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan

    2013-04-01

    This study was purposed to evaluate the clinical significance of low molecular weight urinary proteins for diagnosis of early renal damage in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Medical records of 278 patients with MM in Nanjing School of Clinical Medicine from January 2004 to May 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. These patients were divided into 3 groups: glomerular damage group (n = 143), tubular damage group (n = 114) and normal group (n = 21). The clinical and laboratorial data were compared among them. The correlations of urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) or urinary N-acetyl-β-D-amino-glucosaminidase (NAG) with blood urea nitrogen (BUN), Scr, blood cystatin-C (Cys-C), clearance of creatinine (Ccr), 24 h protein uria and 24 h urine light chains were further analyzed, and the correlation of renal tubulointerstitial lesion scores with low molecular weight urinary proteins in 61 patients were also analyzed. The area under curve (ROC curve) was used to evaluate and compare the discrimination of urinary RBP and urinary NAG. The results showed that glomerular damage group had higher urinary RBP than tubular damage group. However, glomerular damage group had lower urinary NAG than tubular damage group. The two groups had higher urinary RBP and urinary NAG than that in normal group. Urinary RBP related positively to the level of Scr, BUN, Cys-C, 24 h proteinurias and related negatively to the level of Ccr. Urinary NAG related positively to the level of 24 h proteinurias, Ccr and related negatively to the level of Cys-C. Renal tubulointerstitial lesions were significantly correlated with urinary RBP, but weakly correlated with urinary NAG. It is concluded that urinary RBP significantly correlates with renal tubular damage. Compared with urinary NAG, urinary RBP can better assess the extent of renal damage, and has higher specificity.

  9. Yeast prions: Paramutation at the protein level?

    PubMed

    Tuite, Mick F

    2015-08-01

    Prions are proteins that have the potential to refold into a novel conformation that templates the conversion of like molecules to the altered infectious form. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, trans-generational epigenetic inheritance can be mediated by a number of structurally and functionally diverse prions. Prionogenesis can confer both loss-of-function and gain-of-function properties to the prion protein and this in turn can have a major impact on host phenotype, short-term adaptation and evolution of new traits. Prionogenesis shares a number of properties in common with paramutation and can be considered as a mitotically and meiotically heritable change in protein conformation induced by trans-interactions between homologous proteins. PMID:26386407

  10. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern results in significant reductions in C-reactive protein levels in adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neale, E P; Batterham, M J; Tapsell, L C

    2016-05-01

    Consumption of healthy dietary patterns has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary intervention targets disease prevention, so studies increasingly use biomarkers of underlying inflammation and metabolic syndrome progression to examine the diet-health relationship. The extent to which these biomarkers contribute to the body of evidence on healthy dietary patterns is unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of healthy dietary patterns on biomarkers associated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammation in adults. A systematic search of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all years to April 2015) was conducted. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials; effects of dietary patterns assessed on C-reactive protein (CRP), total adiponectin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin:leptin, resistin, or retinol binding protein 4. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess the weighted mean differences in change or final mean values for each outcome. Seventeen studies were included in the review. These reflected research on dietary patterns associated with the Mediterranean diet, Nordic diet, Tibetan diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern was associated with significant reductions in CRP (weighted mean difference, -0.75 [-1.16, -0.35]; P = .0003). Non-significant changes were found for all other biomarkers. This analysis found evidence for favorable effects of healthy dietary patterns on CRP, with limited evidence for other biomarkers. Future research should include additional randomized controlled trials incorporating a greater range of dietary patterns and biomarkers. PMID:27101757

  11. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  12. Short-Term Preoperative Calorie and Protein Restriction Is Feasible in Healthy Kidney Donors and Morbidly Obese Patients Scheduled for Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jongbloed, Franny; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Klaassen, René A.; Beekhof, Piet; van Steeg, Harry; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; van der Harst, Erwin; Dollé, Martijn E. T.; IJzermans, Jan N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgery-induced oxidative stress increases the risk of perioperative complications and delay in postoperative recovery. In mice, short-term preoperative dietary and protein restriction protect against oxidative stress. We investigated the feasibility of a calorie- and protein-restricted diet in two patient populations. Methods. In this pilot study, 30 live kidney donors and 38 morbidly obese patients awaiting surgery were randomized into three groups: a restricted diet group, who received a synthetic liquid diet with 30% fewer calories and 80% less protein for five consecutive days; a group who received a synthetic diet containing the daily energy requirements (DER); and a control group. Feasibility was assessed using self-reported discomfort, body weight changes, and metabolic parameters in blood samples. Results. Twenty patients (71%) complied with the restricted and 13 (65%) with the DER-diet. In total, 68% of the patients reported minor discomfort that resolved after normal eating resumed. The mean weight loss on the restricted diet was significantly greater (2.4 kg) than in the control group (0 kg, p = 0.002), but not in the DER-diet (1.5 kg). The restricted diet significantly reduced levels of serum urea and plasma prealbumin (PAB) and retinol binding protein (RBP). Conclusions. A short-term preoperative calorie- and protein-restricted diet is feasible in kidney donors and morbidly obese patients. Compliance is high and can be objectively measured via changes in urea, PAB, and RBP levels. These results demonstrate that this diet can be used to study the effects of dietary restriction on surgery-induced oxidative stress in a clinical setting. PMID:27213441

  13. Analysis of the expression pattern of the carrier protein transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human scalp skin and hair follicles: hair cycle-associated changes.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A

    2010-12-01

    Transthyretin is a serum and cerebrospinal fluid protein synthesized early in development by the liver, choroid plexus and several other tissues. It is a carrier protein for the antioxidant vitamins, retinol, and thyroid hormones. Transthyretin helps internalize thyroxine and retinol-binding protein into cells by binding to megalin, which is a multi-ligand receptor expressed on the luminal surface of various epithelia. We investigated the expression of transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human skin; however, their expression pattern in the hair follicle is still to be elucidated. This study addresses this issue and tests the hypothesis that "the expression of transthyretin and megalin undergoes hair follicle cycle-dependent changes." A total of 50 normal human scalp skin biopsies were examined (healthy females, 53-62 years) using immunofluorescence staining methods and real-time PCR. In each case, 50 hair follicles were analyzed (35, 10, and 5 follicles in anagen, catagen, and telogen, respectively). Transthyretin and megalin were prominently expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles, on both gene and protein levels. The concentrations of transthyretin and megalin were 0.12 and 0.03 Ul/ml, respectively, as indicated by PCR. The expression showed hair follicle cycle-associated changes i.e., strong expression during early and mature anagen, very weak expression during catagen and moderate expression during telogen. The expression values of these proteins in the anagen were statistically significantly higher than those of either catagen or telogen hair follicles (P ≤ 0.001). This study provides the first morphologic indication that transthyretin and megalin are variably expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles. It also reports variations in the expression of these proteins during hair follicle cycling. The clinical ramifications of these findings are open for further investigations.

  14. A contact map matching approach to protein structure similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Raquel C; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo R; Fernandes, Fernando A; da Silveira, Carlos Henrique; Santoro, Marcelo M; Carceroni, Rodrigo L; Meira, Wagner; Araújo, Arnaldo de A

    2006-01-01

    We modeled the problem of identifying how close two proteins are structurally by measuring the dissimilarity of their contact maps. These contact maps are colored images, in which the chromatic information encodes the chemical nature of the contacts. We studied two conceptually distinct image-processing algorithms to measure the dissimilarity between these contact maps; one was a content-based image retrieval method, and the other was based on image registration. In experiments with contact maps constructed from the protein data bank, our approach was able to identify, with greater than 80% precision, instances of monomers of apolipoproteins, globins, plastocyanins, retinol binding proteins and thioredoxins, among the monomers of Protein Data Bank Select. The image registration approach was only slightly more accurate than the content-based image retrieval approach. PMID:16819709

  15. Protein profiling of nasopharyngeal aspirates of hospitalized and outpatients revealed cytokines associated with severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Gaelings, Lana; Jalovaara, Petri; Kakkola, Laura; Kinnunen, Mervi T; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Valkonen, Miia; Kantele, Anu; Kainov, Denis E

    2016-10-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) mutate rapidly and cause seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics, which result in substantial number of patient visits to the doctors and even hospitalizations. We aimed here to identify inflammatory proteins, which levels correlated to clinical severity of the disease. For this we analysed 102 cytokines and growth factors in human nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples of 27 hospitalized and 27 outpatients diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. We found that the relative levels of monocyte differentiation antigen CD14, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), C-C-motif chemokine 20 (CCL20), CD147, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (uPAR), pro-epidermal growth factor (EGF), trefoil factor 3 (TFF3), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were significantly lower (p<0.008), whereas levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), C-X-C motif chemokine 5 (CXCL5), interleukin-8 (IL-8), complement factor D (CFD), adiponectin, and chitinase-3-like 1 (CHI3L1) were significantly higher (p<0.008) in NPA samples of hospitalized than non-hospitalized patients. While changes in CD14, LCN2, CCL20, uPAR, EGF, MIF, CXCL5, IL-8, adiponectin and CHI3L1 levels have already been correlated with severity of IAV infection in mice and humans, our study is the first to describe association of CD147, RBP4, TFF3, and CFD with hospitalization of IAV-infected patients. Thus, we identified local innate immune profiles, which were associated with the clinical severity of influenza infections. PMID:27442005

  16. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. "Tainong 57"] starch improves insulin sensitivity in high-fructose diet-fed rats by ameliorating adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Yen; Lai, Ming-Hoang; Hung, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-glycemic index (GI) sweet potato starch on adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling in the high-fructose diet-induced insulin-resistant rat. We randomly divided 24 insulin-resistant rats and 16 normal rats into two groups fed a diet containing 575 g/kg of starch: a low-GI sweet potato starch (S) or a high-GI potato starch (P). The four experimental groups were labeled as follows: insulin-resistant P (IR-P), insulin-resistant S (IR-S), normal P (N-P) and normal S (N-S). After 4 wk on the experimental diets, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted, and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, and insulin signaling-related protein expression were measured. The homeostasis model assessment values were significantly lower in the IR-S than in the IR-P group, suggesting that insulin sensitivity was improved among sweet potato starch-fed rats. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, resistin, and retinol binding protein-4 were significantly lower in the IR-S versus the IR-P group, indicating an improvement of pro-inflammatory status in sweet potato starch-fed rats. The sweet potato starch diet also significantly enhanced the protein expression of phospho-Tyr-insulin receptor substrate-1 and improved the translocation of glucose transporter 4 in the skeletal muscle. Our results illustrated that sweet potato starch feeding for 4 wk can improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant rats, possibly by improving the adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

  17. Dietary protein level and performance of growing Baladi kids.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, M M; Aljumaah, R S

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of protein to black Baladi breed kids. Weanling Baladi kids (n=18; 75 to 90 days old) were selected and individually housed at our experimental farm. Kids were divided randomly to one of the three treatments for 12 weeks. The three dietary treatments were: T1: control ration, formulated according to NRC to cover the protein (level 1) and other nutrients requirements. T2: ration formulated to cover only 75% of protein (level 2) recommended by NRC. T3: control diet + 2.4 g undegradable methionine (Smartamine®)/day/kid (level 3). Feed intake, initial and monthly body weights were recorded. Blood samples were collected monthly and analyzed for metabolites and Co, Zn and Cu levels. Decreasing the dietary level of protein (T2) negatively affected (P<0.05) the total live weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio when compared with the control and T3 groups. Moreover, treatment, time and time × treatment caused a significant change on Co concentration in blood serum with higher value at the end of the experiment. Treatments had a significant effect (P<0.05) on blood serum cholesterol and protein levels. Undegradable methionine supplementation (T3) significantly increased longissimus dorsi weight, fat thickness and omental fat%. In conclusion, feeding Baladi kids below the NRC requirements of protein negatively affect the growth performance and feed efficiency. The recommended protein level by NRC for growing kids cover the requirements of growing black Baladi kids for maximum growth and productivity.

  18. Dietary protein level and performance of growing Baladi kids

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, M. M.; Aljumaah, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of protein to black Baladi breed kids. Weanling Baladi kids (n=18; 75 to 90 days old) were selected and individually housed at our experimental farm. Kids were divided randomly to one of the three treatments for 12 weeks. The three dietary treatments were: T1: control ration, formulated according to NRC to cover the protein (level 1) and other nutrients requirements. T2: ration formulated to cover only 75% of protein (level 2) recommended by NRC. T3: control diet + 2.4 g undegradable methionine (Smartamine®)/day/kid (level 3). Feed intake, initial and monthly body weights were recorded. Blood samples were collected monthly and analyzed for metabolites and Co, Zn and Cu levels. Decreasing the dietary level of protein (T2) negatively affected (P<0.05) the total live weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio when compared with the control and T3 groups. Moreover, treatment, time and time × treatment caused a significant change on Co concentration in blood serum with higher value at the end of the experiment. Treatments had a significant effect (P<0.05) on blood serum cholesterol and protein levels. Undegradable methionine supplementation (T3) significantly increased longissimus dorsi weight, fat thickness and omental fat%. In conclusion, feeding Baladi kids below the NRC requirements of protein negatively affect the growth performance and feed efficiency. The recommended protein level by NRC for growing kids cover the requirements of growing black Baladi kids for maximum growth and productivity. PMID:27175130

  19. Plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Terry, Mary Beth; Gammon, Marilie D; Agrawal, Meenakshi; Zhang, Fang Fang; Ferris, Jennifer S; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Eng, Sybil M; Gaudet, Mia M; Neugut, Alfred I; Santella, Regina M

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of oxidative stress in breast cancer risk, we analysed plasma levels of protein carbonyls in 1050 cases and 1107 controls. We found a statistically significant trend in breast cancer risk in relation to increasing quartiles of plasma protein carbonyl levels (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.9-1.5; OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-2.0; OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1, for the 2(nd), 3(rd) and 4(th) quartile relative to the lowest quartile, respectively, P for trend = 0.0001). The increase in risk was similar for younger (<50 years) and older women, more pronounced among women with higher physical activity levels (0.7 hrs/week for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-3.0), higher alcohol consumption (> or = 15 grams/day for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1-4.7), and hormone replacement therapy use (HRT, OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-4.4 for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile). The multiplicative interaction terms were statistically significant only for physical activity and HRT. The positive association between plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk was also observed when the analysis was restricted to women who had not received chemotherapy or radiation therapy prior to blood collection. Among controls, oxidized protein levels significantly increased with cigarette smoking and higher fruit and vegetable consumption, and decreased with alcohol consumption >30 grams per day. Women with higher levels of plasma protein carbonyl and urinary 15F(2t)-isoprostane had an 80% increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.6) compared to women with levels below the median for both markers of oxidative stress. In summary, our results suggest that increased plasma protein carbonyl levels may be associated with breast cancer risk.

  20. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  1. Nmnat1-Rbp7 Is a Conserved Fusion-Protein That Combines NAD+ Catalysis of Nmnat1 with Subcellular Localization of Rbp7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Babino, Darwin; Schoenbichler, Stefan A.; Arkhipova, Valeryia; Töchterle, Sonja; Martin, Fabian; Huck, Christian W.; von Lintig, Johannes; Meyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding proteins (Rbps) are known as carriers for transport and targeting of retinoids to their metabolizing enzymes. Rbps are also reported to function in regulating the homeostatic balance of retinoid metabolism, as their level of retinoid occupancy impacts the activities of retinoid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used zebrafish as a model to study rbp7a function and regulation. We find that early embryonic rbp7a expression is negatively regulated by the Nodal/FoxH1-signaling pathway and we show that Nodal/FoxH1 activity has the opposite effect on aldh1a2, which encodes the major enzyme for early embryonic retinoic acid production. The data are consistent with a Nodal-dependent coordination of the allocation of retinoid precursors to processing enzymes with the catalysis of retinoic acid formation. Further, we describe a novel nmnat1-rbp7 transcript encoding a fusion of Rbp7 and the NAD+ (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) synthesizing enzyme Nmnat1. We show that nmnat1-rbp7 is conserved in fish, mouse and chicken, and that in zebrafish regulation of nmnat1-rbp7a is distinct from that of rbp7a and nmnat1. Injection experiments in zebrafish further revealed that Nmnat1-Rbp7a and Nmnat1 have similar NAD+ catalyzing activities but a different subcellular localization. HPLC measurements and protein localization analysis highlight Nmnat1-Rbp7a as the only known cytoplasmic and presumably endoplasmic reticulum (ER) specific NAD+ catalyzing enzyme. These studies, taken together with previously documented NAD+ dependent interaction of RBPs with ER-associated enzymes of retinal catalysis, implicate functions of this newly described NMNAT1-Rbp7 fusion protein in retinol oxidation. PMID:26618989

  2. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins' biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein-protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein-protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent).

  3. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins' biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein-protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein-protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent). PMID:26157620

  4. Proteomic Investigation of Falciparum and Vivax Malaria for Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan; Renu, Durairaj; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Taur, Santosh; Jhaveri, Tulip; Dhali, Snigdha; Chennareddy, Srinivasarao; Potla, Ankit; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Srikanth, Rapole; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM) (n = 20), vivax malaria (VM) (n = 17) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 20) were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC). Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05) serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2%) of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC) were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates

  5. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Tuning the Electronic Absorption of Protein-Embedded All-trans-Retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjing; Nossoni, Zahra; Berbasova, Tetyana; Watson, Camille T.; Yapici, Ipek; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-10-02

    Protein-chromophore interactions are a central component of a wide variety of critical biological processes such as color vision and photosynthesis. To understand the fundamental elements that contribute to spectral tuning of a chromophore inside the protein cavity, we redesigned human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) to fully encapsulate all-trans-retinal and form a covalent bond as a protonated Schiff base. The system, using rational mutagenesis designed to alter the electrostatic environment within the binding pocket of the host protein, enabled regulation of the absorption maximum of the pigment in the range of 425 to 644 nanometers. Moreover, with only nine point mutations, the hCRBPII mutants induced a systematic shift in the absorption profile of all-trans-retinal of more than 200 nanometers across the visible spectrum.

  7. Response of protein and urea kinetics in burn patients to different levels of protein intake.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, R R; Goodenough, R D; Burke, J F; Wolfe, M H

    1983-01-01

    The effects of two levels of protein intake on protein metabolism in six severely burned adult patients were studied (means of 70% BSA burned). A crossover experimental design enabled the authors to study each patient at the end of two three-day dietary regimens. All diets were isocaloric and provided approximately 25% more calories than the measured energy expenditure (means = 40.8 Kcal/kg X day). In one regimen, each patient received 2.2 g protein/kg X day, while during the other treatment period they received 1.4 g protein/kg X day. The patients were studied in the fed state and after 10 to 12 hours of fasting. Leucine kinetics were determined by means of the primed-constant infusion of [1--13C]--leucine. The authors were able to distinguish the oxidation of plasma leucine from the oxidation of leucine derived from intracellular protein at the site of the deamination of leucine (predominantly muscle) by simultaneously determining both leucine and alpha-ketoisocaproic acid enrichment. Also, rates of whole-body protein synthesis and catabolism were calculated from the leucine flux and oxidation data. Net protein synthesis was also calculated by means of another stable-isotope technique involving the infusion of [15N2]--urea. Finally, a third means of estimating net protein catabolism based on urinary N-excretion data was used at the same time that the isotopic studies were performed. The 13C leucine-data and the N-excretion data indicated that a balance between protein synthesis and catabolism could be achieved with a protein intake of 1.4 protein/kg X day. When protein intake was increased to 2.2 g protein/kg X day, neither isotopic method indicated a further beneficial effect on net protein synthesis, although the absolute rates of protein synthesis and catabolism were stimulated. The N-excretion data, on the other hand, indicated a significant improvement in net protein synthesis with higher protein intake. Regardless of the level of protein intake, the

  8. Correlation of secretion of retinol and protein by the lacrimal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ubels, J.L.; Rismondo, V.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol, which is present in tears, is secreted by the lacrimal gland. Retinol secretion is stimulated by cholinergic drugs and vasoactive intestinal peptide with characteristics very similar to the exocytotic secretion of protein by the lacrimal gland, suggesting that retinol and protein are secreted by similar mechanisms. The authors investigated this by cannulating the lacrimal gland ducts of rabbits and collecting lacrimal gland fluid (LGF) under conditions of maximal flow stimulated by IV injection of pilocarpine (400 ..mu..g/kg) every 20 min for 4.5 hr. Over this period LGF protein concentration decreased 36.4% from 22.8 +/- 1.94 mg/ml to 8.29 1.86 mg/ml while retinol decreased 37% from 55.1 +/- 16.2 ng/ml to 20.4 +/- 6.5 ng/ml. The retinol/protein ratio remained constant at 2.88 ng/mg. This demonstrates a strong correlation between retinol and protein secretion, suggesting that retinol may be protein bound. To investigate binding of retinol to LGF protein, LGF was incubated with /sup 3/H-retinol. The bound and unbound retinol were separated on a Lipidex 1000 column. Retinol binding was linear over a range of 1.25-200 nM /sup 3/H-retinol. Binding was not inhibited by PCMBS or addition of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled retinol and was not increased by prior extraction of endogenous retinol from the LGF. This indicates that the binding of retinol to LGF protein is non-specific. Retinol therefore appears to be secreted by the lacrimal gland cells in non-specific association with protein.

  9. ORMDL proteins regulate ceramide levels during sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Oyeniran, Clement; Biswas, Debolina D; Allegood, Jeremy; Milstien, Sheldon; Kordula, Tomasz; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, ceramide, regulates physiological processes important for inflammation and elevated levels of ceramide have been implicated in IL-1-mediated events. Although much has been learned about ceramide generation by activation of sphingomyelinases in response to IL-1, the contribution of the de novo pathway is not completely understood. Because yeast ORM1 and ORM2 proteins negatively regulate ceramide levels through inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase, the first committed step in ceramide biosynthesis, we examined the functions of individual mammalian ORM orthologs, ORM (yeast)-like (ORMDL)1-3, in regulation of ceramide levels. In HepG2 liver cells, downregulation of ORMDL3 markedly increased the ceramide precursors, dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide, primarily from de novo biosynthesis based on [U-(13)C]palmitate incorporation into base-labeled and dual-labeled dihydroceramides, whereas downregulation of each isoform increased dihydroceramides [(13)C]labeled in only the amide-linked fatty acid. IL-1 and the IL-6 family cytokine, oncostatin M, increased dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in HepG2 cells and concomitantly decreased ORMDL proteins. Moreover, during irritant-induced sterile inflammation in mice leading to induction of the acute-phase response, which is dependent on IL-1, expression of ORMDL proteins in the liver was strongly downregulated and accompanied by increased ceramide levels in the liver and accumulation in the blood. Together, our results suggest that ORMDLs may be involved in regulation of ceramides during IL-1-mediated sterile inflammation. PMID:27313060

  10. Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions from the Molecular to the Proteome Level.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ozlem; Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila

    2016-04-27

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is at the center of molecular biology considering the unquestionable role of proteins in cells. Combinatorial interactions result in a repertoire of multiple functions; hence, knowledge of PPI and binding regions naturally serve to functional proteomics and drug discovery. Given experimental limitations to find all interactions in a proteome, computational prediction/modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete interactions at the proteome level. This review aims to provide a background on PPIs and their types. Computational methods for PPI predictions can use a variety of biological data including sequence-, evolution-, expression-, and structure-based data. Physical and statistical modeling are commonly used to integrate these data and infer PPI predictions. We review and list the state-of-the-art methods, servers, databases, and tools for protein-protein interaction prediction. PMID:27074302

  11. UCP2, a mitochondrial protein regulated at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Fiorini, Claudia; Palmieri, Marta

    2014-04-01

    An ever-increasing number of studies highlight the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of UCP2 regulation is becoming fundamental in both the comprehension of UCP2-related physiological events and the identification of novel therapeutic strategies based on UCP2 modulation. The study of UCP2 regulation is a fast-moving field. Recently, several research groups have made a great effort to thoroughly understand the various molecular mechanisms at the basis of UCP2 regulation. In this review, we describe novel findings concerning events that can occur in a concerted manner at various levels: Ucp2 gene mutation (single nucleotide polymorphisms), UCP2 mRNA and protein expression (transcriptional, translational, and protein turn-over regulation), UCP2 proton conductance (ligands and post-transcriptional modifications), and nutritional and pharmacological regulation of UCP2.

  12. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  13. Low Copper and High Manganese Levels in Prion Protein Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecht, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system. PMID:23435237

  14. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher J; Gilbert, P U P A; Abrecht, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L; Russell, Robin E; Pedersen, Joel A; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  15. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months

    PubMed Central

    Reinbott, Anika; Jordan, Irmgard; Herrmann, Johannes; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3–23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and retinol binding protein (RBP) were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI) was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored. Results Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%). Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF) significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin. Conclusion Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young

  16. Residue level quantification of protein stability in living cells.

    PubMed

    Monteith, William B; Pielak, Gary J

    2014-08-01

    The intracellular milieu differs from the dilute conditions in which most biophysical and biochemical studies are performed. This difference has led both experimentalists and theoreticians to tackle the challenging task of understanding how the intracellular environment affects the properties of biopolymers. Despite a growing number of in-cell studies, there is a lack of quantitative, residue-level information about equilibrium thermodynamic protein stability under nonperturbing conditions. We report the use of NMR-detected hydrogen-deuterium exchange of quenched cell lysates to measure individual opening free energies of the 56-aa B1 domain of protein G (GB1) in living Escherichia coli cells without adding destabilizing cosolutes or heat. Comparisons to dilute solution data (pH 7.6 and 37 °C) show that opening free energies increase by as much as 1.14 ± 0.05 kcal/mol in cells. Importantly, we also show that homogeneous protein crowders destabilize GB1, highlighting the challenge of recreating the cellular interior. We discuss our findings in terms of hard-core excluded volume effects, charge-charge GB1-crowder interactions, and other factors. The quenched lysate method identifies the residues most important for folding GB1 in cells, and should prove useful for quantifying the stability of other globular proteins in cells to gain a more complete understanding of the effects of the intracellular environment on protein chemistry.

  17. Accumulated p53 protein and UVA protection level of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Seité, S; Moyal, D; Verdier, M P; Hourseau, C; Fourtanier, A

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear p53 expression is a sensitive parameter for the detection of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage, and it has been used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness of sunscreens. In this study, we compared the protection provided by two sunscreens having identical sun protection factors (SPF) but different UVA protection factors (UVA-PF) measured by the persistent pigment darkening method (PPD). The SPF of the sunscreens was 7 and the UVA-PF were respectively 7 and 3. Nuclear p53 protein was quantified in human skin biopsies treated with sunscreens and exposed 8 times to 5 MED of solar simulated radiation (SSR). The results showed that both sunscreens offered only partial protection against the increased expression of nuclear p53 protein induced by repetitive SSR exposures. However, a significantly lower level of p53-positive cells was found in areas protected with the sunscreen having the higher UVA-PF compared to the other sunscreen protected areas. In order to verify whether the difference in efficacy of these products was due to the difference in UVA absorption capacity, we quantified epidermal p53 protein accumulation after 8 exposures to either UVA (320-400 nm) or UVA1 (340-400 nm). We showed that as with SSR, repetitive exposures to 12.5 and 25 J/cm2 of UVA or UVA1 induced a significant increase in p53-positive cells in the human epidermis. These results confirmed that SPF determined on the basis of an acute erythemal reaction does not predict the level of protection against cumulative damage. They also showed that the protection provided by two sunscreens with different UVA protection factors is different (based on nuclear p53 protein accumulation), and that the PPD method can distinguish varying levels of sunscreen efficacy against UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:10721857

  18. Effect of protein level and protein source on zinc absorption in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.A.; Almgren, A.; Kivistoe, B.C.; Cederblad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing levels of various protein sources on zinc absorption from a legume-based meal was studied in humans with the use of a radionuclide technique. The meals were extrinsically labelled with 65Zn and absorption was determined from measurements of the whole-body retention of the isotope. The mean fractional zinc absorption for the 13 meals was 24.7 +/- 6.9% and was only influenced by the protein content of the meal to a limited extent (r = 0.45). However, the amount of zinc absorbed from the meals was strongly correlated with both the protein (r = 0.85) and zinc content (r = 0.86): 5.9 +/- 1.7 mumol of zinc was absorbed from the basal bean meal which had the lowest protein content; the addition of low zinc chicken doubled the protein content and increased zinc absorption to 10.3 +/- 2.0 mumol; the addition of zinc-rich beef also doubled the protein content, however, zinc absorption was increased to 15.9 +/- 4.7 mumol. It is concluded that the zinc content of the main protein source of the diet determines the amount of zinc absorbed to a large extent. However, relatively small amounts of animal protein can significantly improve the value of a legume-based meal as a source of zinc.

  19. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates mitotic checkpoint protein levels in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hualong; Zhu, Songcheng; Song, Chenlin; Liu, Naifa; Kang, Jiuhong

    2012-04-01

    Aberrant expression of mitotic checkpoint genes compromises mitotic checkpoint, leads to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis. However, the cell signals that control mitotic checkpoint gene expression have not been reported so far. In the present study we show that, in human breast cancer cells, chemical inhibition of Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), but not Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), abrogates the mitotic arrest induced by nocodazole. Protein expression analysis reveals that inhibition of BMP signaling dramatically down regulates protein levels of mitotic checkpoint components BUB3, Hec1, TTK and MAD2, but inhibition of TGF-β has relatively minor effect on the expression of these proteins. Activation of BMP signaling specifically up regulates BUB3, and activation of Activin A signaling globally down regulates these proteins level. Furthermore, overexpressing MAD2, TTK, BUB3 or Hec1 significantly rescues the mitotic arrest defect caused by BMP inhibition. Our results demonstrated for the first time that TGF-β family cytokines are cellular signals regulating mitotic checkpoint and perturbations in intrinsic BMP signaling could lead to suppression of mitotic checkpoint signaling by downregulating key checkpoint proteins. The results suggest a possible mechanism by which dysregulation of TGF-β signaling causes mitotic checkpoint defects and drives tumorigenesis. The finding also provides a potential and more specific strategy for cancer prevention by targeting BMP and mitotic checkpoint connection. PMID:22234345

  1. The interrelationship of thyroid hormones with vitamin A and zinc nutritional status in patients with chronic hepatic and gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Russell, R M; Reed, A; Carney, E A; Hershman, J M

    1981-08-01

    To define the role of vitamin A, retinol binding protein, and zinc deficiency in producing the thyroid hormone abnormalities found in chronic illness, we studied 62 clinically stable patients with hepatic and gastrointestinal disorders. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) and free T3 index (FT3I) were depressed compared to controls (p less than 0.05) in the patients. Retinol binding protein and prealbumin levels correlated with both T3 and FT3I (p less than 0.01), whereas vitamin A levels did not. Vitamin A therapy in patients with documented vitamin A deficiency produced an increase in T3, thyroxine (T4), FT3I, FT4I, and free T3 by dialysis, with a concomitant increase in retinol binding protein and no alteration in prealbumin concentrations. Zinc-deficient patients had significantly depressed T3 and FT3I (p less than 0.001) and increased prolactin levels (p less than 0.01). Zinc supplementation failed to return any of these parameters to normal. Vitamin A therapy in normals produced a transient decrease in T3 and T4 after 1 wk of therapy, but after a further 2 wk, thyroid function returned to normal. Our data suggest a causal relationship between the pathogenesis of deranged vitamin A-retinol binding protein metabolism and the low T3 syndrome either by interfering with T4 entry into tissues or by directly affecting the enzymatic conversion of T4 to T3. PMID:7196691

  2. Classification of G-protein coupled receptors at four levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing-Bin; Wang, Zheng-Zhi

    2006-11-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are transmembrane proteins which via G-proteins initiate some of the important signaling pathways in a cell and are involved in various physiological processes. Thus, computational prediction and classification of GPCRs can supply significant information for the development of novel drugs in pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, a nearest neighbor method has been introduced to discriminate GPCRs from non-GPCRs and subsequently classify GPCRs at four levels on the basis of amino acid composition and dipeptide composition of proteins. Its performance is evaluated on a non-redundant dataset consisted of 1406 GPCRs for six families and 1406 globular proteins using the jackknife test. The present method based on amino acid composition achieved an overall accuracy of 96.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.930 for correctly picking out the GPCRs from globular proteins. The overall accuracy and MCC were further enhanced to 99.8% and 0.996 by dipeptide composition-based method. On the other hand, the present method has successfully classified 1406 GPCRs into six families with an overall accuracy of 89.6 and 98.8% using amino acid composition and dipeptide composition, respectively. For the subfamily prediction of 1181 GPCRs of rhodopsin-like family, the present method achieved an overall accuracy of 76.7 and 94.5% based on the amino acid composition and dipeptide composition, respectively. Finally, GPCRs belonging to the amine subfamily and olfactory subfamily of rhodopsin-like family were further analyzed at the type level. The overall accuracy of dipeptide composition-based method for the classification of amine type and olfactory type of GPCRs reached 94.5 and 86.9%, respectively, while the overall accuracy of amino acid composition-based method was very low for both subfamilies. In comparison with existing methods in the literature, the present method also displayed great competitiveness. These results demonstrate

  3. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  4. Adipokines levels are associated with the severity of liver disease in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalafateli, Maria; Triantos, Christos; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Michalaki, Marina; Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos; Kyriazopoulou, Venetsanea; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Burroughs, Andrew; Lambropoulou-Karatza, Chryssoula; Nikolopoulou, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the adipokine levels of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), apelin in alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC). METHODS: Forty non-diabetic ALC patients [median age: 59 years, males: 35 (87.5%), Child-Pugh (CP) score: median 7 (5-12), CP A/B/C: 18/10/12, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD): median 10 (6-25), follow-up: median 32.5 mo (10-43)] were prospectively included. The serum adipokine levels were estimated in duplicate by ELISA. Somatometric characteristics were assessed with tetrapolar bioelectrical impedance analysis. Pearson’s rank correlation coefficient was used to assess possible associations with adipokine levels. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine independent predictors for overall survival. RESULTS: Body mass index: median 25.9 (range: 20.1-39.3), fat: 23.4% (7.6-42.1), fat mass: 17.8 (5.49-45.4), free fat mass: 56.1 (39.6-74.4), total body water (TBW): 40.6 (29.8-58.8). Leptin and visfatin levels were positively associated with fat mass (P < 0.001/P = 0.027, respectively) and RBP4 with TBW (P = 0.025). Median adiponectin levels were significantly higher in CPC compared to CPA (CPA: 7.99 ± 14.07, CPB: 7.66 ± 3.48, CPC: 25.73 ± 26.8, P = 0.04), whereas median RBP4 and apelin levels decreased across the spectrum of disease severity (P = 0.006/P = 0.034, respectively). Following adjustment for fat mass, visfatin and adiponectin levels were significantly increased from CPA to CPC (both P < 0.001), whereas an inverse correlation was observed for both RBP4 and apelin (both P < 0.001). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, only MELD had an independent association with overall survival (HR = 1.53, 95%CI: 1.05-2.32; P = 0.029). CONCLUSION: Adipokines are associated with deteriorating liver function in a complex manner in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. PMID:25780301

  5. Characterization of protein expression levels with label-free detected reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuexue; Deng, Yihong; Zhu, Chenggang; Cai, Junlong; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Zheng, Fengyun; Cheng, Xunjia; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-09-15

    In reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA), one immobilizes complex samples (e.g., cellular lysate, tissue lysate or serum etc.) on solid supports and performs parallel reactions of antibodies with immobilized protein targets from the complex samples. In this work, we describe a label-free detection of RPPA that enables quantification of RPPA data and thus facilitates comparison of studies performed on different samples and on different solid supports. We applied this detection platform to characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) expression levels in Acanthamoeba lysates treated with artemether and the results were confirmed by Western blot studies. PMID:27372609

  6. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of children with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weibin; Li, Shuxian; Shen, Qiong; Guo, Xiuxia; Rong, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of Turner syndrome (TS). Metho d s: Total 45 patients with TS admitted between Jul. 2008 and Jun. 2011 were involved in this study. All patients received the clinical evaluation of body fat, plasma lipids, proteins and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after rhGH therapy. Results : Our results indicated a significant decrease of body fat (FAT%) from 23.56±4.21 to 18.71±2.23 but no obvious change on the level of fat mass (FM) (p>0.05) was observed after rhGH therapy. We also detected significant changes on plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) from (1.65±0.58 mmol/L) to (2.20±0.65 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDH-C) from (2.55±0.55 mmol/L) to (2.10±0.54 mmol/L) after rhGH exposure. However, no statistical significance was detected on the level of plasma triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO). Interestingly, the levels of plasma retinol binding protein (RbP) (32.55±4.28mg/L), transferrin (TRF) (2.95±0.40 mg/L), serum albumin (PRE) (250.00±45.50 mg/L) and albumin (propagated) (33.58±4.25 mg/L) were significantly increased. When it goes to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) test, there were 10 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) cases among all patients before and after rhGH therapy. No significant change was observed on homeostasis model assessment- insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) level during rhGH intervention. Conclusion : Abnormal lipid and protein metabolisms of the children with TS can be improved with rhGH therapy for 6 months. PMID:25097506

  7. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset. PMID:24588117

  8. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset.

  9. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Queenie W T; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J

    2013-11-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed.

  10. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Queenie W T; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J

    2013-11-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed. PMID:23878156

  11. Cullin-3 protein expression levels correlate with breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Haagenson, Kelly K.; Tait, Larry; Wang, Juan; Shekhar, Malathy P.; Polin, Lisa; Chen, Wei; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Cullin-3 is a component of the Cullin-Ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) family that plays an important role in mediating protein degradation. Deregulation of Cullin-3 expression has been observed in human cancers; however, a role for Cullin-3 in tumor progression has not been previously recognized. Using the MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer xenograft model, we show that Cullin-3 is increasingly expressed during progression from comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinomas. Cullin-3 protein is not detected in early lesions but is noticeably increased in DCIS tumors and significantly overexpressed in invasive cancers. In experimental metastasis assays, high expression of Cullin-3 was observed in the lung site. Importantly, Cullin-3 staining is detected in human breast cancer tissues, not in normal breast tissues and its expression level positively correlates with tumor stage. These data suggest that Cullin-3 may play an important role in tumor progression from DCIS to invasive cancer and may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of aggressive breast cancer. PMID:22825334

  12. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  13. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 serum levels in ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hefler, L; Tempfer, C; Heinze, G; Mayerhofer, K; Breitenecker, G; Leodolter, S; Reinthaller, A; Kainz, C

    1999-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 is an important mediator of monocyte infiltration in various solid tumours of epithelial origin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of MCP-1 in the natural history of ovarian cancer and to determine its value as differentiation marker and prognostic marker regarding disease free and overall survival. This retrospective study comprises 86 patients with ovarian cancer, 48 with primary ovarian cancer and 38 with recurrent ovarian cancer, 67 patients with benign ovarian cysts and 42 healthy women. Median serum levels in patients with primary ovarian cancer, recurrent ovarian cancer, benign ovarian cysts and in healthy women were 535.6 (range 129.6–1200) pg ml–1, 427.3 (range 193.4–1101) pg ml–1, 371.2 (range 222–986.8) pg ml–1 and 318.7 (range 241.3–681.4) pg ml–1 respectively (Mann–Whitney U-test, P < 0.001). Univariate logistic regression models revealed a significant influence of MCP-1 serum levels on the odds of presenting with primary ovarian cancer versus benign cysts and versus healthy women respectively (univariate logistic regression, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 respectively). In a multivariate logistic regression model considering MCP-1 and CA 125 serum levels simultaneously, both MCP-1 and CA 125 revealed statistical significance on the odds of presenting with primary ovarian cancer versus benign cysts (multivariate logistic regression, P = 0.05 and P < 0.001 respectively). In ovarian cancer patients, MCP-1 serum levels showed a statistically significant correlation with histological grade (Mann–Whitney U-test, P = 0.02) and age at the time of diagnosis (Mann–Whitney U-test, P = 0.03). Elevated MCP-1 serum levels prior to therapy were not associated with disease-free and overall survival (log-rank test, P = 0.2 and P = 0.7 respectively). In summary these data indicate that MCP-1 might play a functional role in the natural history of ovarian cancer and might serve as

  14. A case for protein-level and site-level specificity in glycoproteomic studies of disease.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Katherine N; Dodds, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal glycosylation of proteins is known to be either resultant or causative of a variety of diseases. This makes glycoproteins appealing targets as potential biomarkers and focal points of molecular studies on the development and progression of human ailment. To date, a majority of efforts in disease glycoproteomics have tended to center on either determining the concentration of a given glycoprotein, or on profiling the total population of glycans released from a mixture of glycoproteins. While these approaches have demonstrated some diagnostic potential, they are inherently insensitive to the fine molecular detail which distinguishes unique and possibly disease relevant glycoforms of specific proteins. As a consequence, such analyses can be of limited sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy because they do not comprehensively consider the glycosylation status of any particular glycoprotein, or of any particular glycosylation site. Therefore, significant opportunities exist to improve glycoproteomic inquiry into disease by engaging in these studies at the level of individual glycoproteins and their exact loci of glycosylation. In this concise review, the rationale for glycoprotein and glycosylation site specificity is developed in the context of human disease glycoproteomics with an emphasis on N-glycosylation. Recent examples highlighting disease-related perturbations in glycosylation will be presented, including those involving alterations in the overall glycosylation of a specific protein, alterations in the occupancy of a given glycosylation site, and alterations in the compositional heterogeneity of glycans occurring at a given glycosylation site. Each will be discussed with particular emphasis on how protein-specific and site-specific approaches can contribute to improved discrimination between glycoproteomes and glycoproteins associated with healthy and unhealthy states.

  15. Auxin acts independently of DELLA proteins in regulating gibberellin levels.

    PubMed

    Reid, James B; Davidson, Sandra E; Ross, John J

    2011-03-01

    Shoot elongation is a vital process for plant development and productivity, in both ecological and economic contexts. Auxin and bioactive gibberellins (GAs), such as GA1, play critical roles in the control of elongation, along with environmental and endogenous factors, including other hormones such as the brassinosteroids. The effect of auxins, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), is at least in part mediated by its effect on GA metabolism, since auxin up-regulates biosynthesis genes such as GA 3-oxidase and GA 20-oxidase and down regulates GA catabolism genes such as GA 2-oxidases, leading to elevated levels of bioactive GA 1. In our recent paper, we have provided evidence that this action of IAA is largely independent of DELLA proteins, the negative regulators of GA action, since the auxin effects are still present in the DELLA-deficient la cry-s genotype of pea. This was a crucial issue to resolve, since like auxin, the DELLAs also promote GA 1 synthesis and inhibit its deactivation. DELLAs are deactivated by GA, and thereby mediate a feedback system by which bioactive GA regulates its own level. However, our recent results, in themselves, do not show the generality of the auxin-GA relationship across species and phylogenetic groups or across different tissue types and responses. Further, they do not touch on the ecological benefits of the auxin-GA interaction. These issues are discussed below as well as the need for the development of suitable experimental systems to allow this process to be examined. PMID:21358281

  16. A novel antilithiatic protein from Tribulus terrestris having cytoprotective potency.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anshu; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2012-08-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals to kidney cells is a key event in kidney stones associated with marked hyperoxaluria. As the propensity of stone recurrence and persistent side effects are not altered by surgical techniques available, phytotherapeutic agents could be useful as an adjuvant therapy. The present study is aimed at examining the antilithiatic potency of the protein biomolecules of Tribulus terrestris, a plant which is a common constituent of herbal marketed preparations to treat urolithiasis. Various biochemical methods with mass spectrometry were used to purify and characterize the purified protein. The protective potency of the protein was tested on the oxalate induced injury on renal epithelial cell lines (NRK 52E). An antilithiatic protein having molecular weight of ~ 60kDa was purified. This purified protein showed similarities with Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7 (CCD7) of Arabidopsis thaliana after matching peptide mass fingerprints in MASCOT search engine. An EF hand domain was identified in CCD7 by SCAN PROSITE. Presence of an EF hand domain, a characteristic feature of calcium binding proteins and a role in the synthesis of retinol which is transported by retinol binding protein, a protein found in kidney stone matrix; of CCD7 support the role of TTP as an antilithiatic protein. The protective potency of TTP on NRK 52E was quite comparable to the aqueous extract of cystone. Our findings suggest that this purified protein biomolecule from Tribulus terrestris could open new vista in medical management of urolithiasis.

  17. Association Between Thyrotropin Levels and Insulin Sensitivity in Euthyroid Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Asma; Balagopal, P. Babu; Vella, Adrian; Fischer, Philip R.; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Giesler, Paula D.; Laugen, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyrotropin (TSH) levels display a positive association with body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of isolated hyperthyrotropinemia is higher in obese adolescents compared to their normal weight controls. However, the metabolic significance of the higher TSH in obese adolescents is less clear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between TSH concentrations and insulin sensitivity, lipids, and adipokines in euthyroid, non-diabetic, obese adolescents. Methods: Thirty-six euthyroid, non-diabetic, obese adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 years underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin sensitivity (Si) and pancreatic β-cell function as assessed by disposition index (DI) were measured using the oral glucose minimal model approach. Cholesterol (total, low-density lipoprotein [LDL-C], and high-density lipoprotein [HDL-C]), triglycerides (TG), interleukin-6 (IL-6), total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were also determined. Associations between measures of thyroid function and Si, DI, lipids, and adipokines were computed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 14.3±1.88 years, and the mean BMI was 32.5±4.65 kg/m2; 97% were non-Hispanic white and 47% were male. The mean TSH was 2.7±1.2 mIU/L. Increasing serum TSH was correlated with decreasing Si (log Si) in the entire cohort (p=0.03), but this relationship persisted only in males (p=0.02). The correlation between TSH and Si in males remained significant after adjusting for BMI (p=0.02). There was no correlation between TSH and pancreatic β-cell function as assessed by DI (p=0.48). TSH correlated positively with LDL-C (p=0.04) and IL-6 (p=0.03), but these associations vanished or weakened after adjusting for BMI (LDL-C p-value=0.44; IL-6 p-value=0.07). Conclusions: This study suggests a sex-specific association between TSH and insulin

  18. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  19. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  20. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-07-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape.

  1. Atomic-level Snapshot Catches Protein Motor in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art protein crystallography beamline at Berkeley Labs Advanced Light Source, researchers have captured a critical action shapshot of an enzyme that is vital to the survival of all biological cells.

  2. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  3. A proteogenomic approach for protein-level evidence of genomic variants in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeonghun; Kabir, Mohammad Humayun; Lim, Byungho; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Cheolju

    2016-01-01

    Variations in protein coding sequence may sometimes play important roles in cancer development. However, since variants may not express into proteins due to various cellular quality control systems, it is important to get protein-level evidence of the genomic variations. We present a proteogenomic strategy getting protein-level evidence of genomic variants, which we call sequential targeted LC-MS/MS based on prediction of peptide pI and Retention time (STaLPIR). Our approach shows improved peptide identification, and has the potential for the unbiased analysis of variant sequence as well as corresponding reference sequence. Integrated analysis of DNA, mRNA and protein suggests that protein expression level of the nonsynonymous variant is regulated either before or after translation, according to influence of the variant on protein function. In conclusion, our data provides an excellent approach getting direct evidence for the expression of variant protein forms from genome sequence data. PMID:27734975

  4. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  5. Effect of N-acetylcysteine administration on homocysteine level, oxidative damage to proteins, and levels of iron (Fe) and Fe-related proteins in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Romuk, Ewa; Rykaczewska-Czerwińska, Monika; Pawlas, Natalia; Birkner, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) could be included in protocols designed for the treatment of lead toxicity. Therefore, in this study, we decided to investigate the influence of NAC administration on homocysteine (Hcy) levels, oxidative damage to proteins, and the levels of iron (Fe), transferrin (TRF), and haptoglobin (HPG) in lead (Pb)-exposed workers. The examined population (n = 171) was composed of male employees who worked with Pb. They were randomized into four groups. Workers who were not administered any antioxidants, drugs, vitamins, or dietary supplements were classified as the reference group (n = 49). The remaining three groups consisted of workers who were treated orally with NAC at three different doses (1 × 200, 2 × 200, or 2 × 400 mg) for 12 weeks. After the treatment, blood Pb levels significantly decreased in the groups receiving NAC compared with the reference group. The protein concentration was not affected by NAC administration. In contrast, Hcy levels significantly decreased or showed a strong tendency toward lower values depending on the NAC dose. Levels of the protein carbonyl groups were significantly decreased in all of the groups receiving NAC. Conversely, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly elevated in all of the groups receiving NAC, while the level of protein thiol groups was significantly elevated only in the group receiving 200 mg of NAC. Treatment with NAC did not significantly affect Fe and TRF levels, whereas HPG levels showed a tendency toward lower values. Treatment with NAC normalized the level of Hcy and decreased oxidative stress as measured by the protein carbonyl content; this effect occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, small doses of NAC elevated the levels of protein thiol groups. Therefore, NAC could be introduced as an alternative therapy for chronic Pb toxicity in humans. PMID:25731901

  6. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere. PMID:24083427

  7. Protein metabolism in growing pigs fed corn or cassava peel based diets containing graded protein levels.

    PubMed

    Tewe, O O

    1985-05-01

    Sixty-four Large White cross Landrace weanling pigs were randomly allotted to eight treatments in a two by four factorial arrangement. The two dietary variables were cassava peel (0 and 40 per cent) and crude protein (20, 15, 10 and 5 per cent). Total serum protein concentration was significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced by protein deficiency and by its interaction with cassava peel. The multiple coefficient of determination (R2) showed that protein intake was the primary factor determining changes in serum protein. R2 values for cyanide intake (independent variable) on serum protein (dependent variable) increased from day 30 to 90 of the trial. Serum urea was increased on the 5 per cent protein diets on days 60 and 90 of the trial. The R2 values for cyanide and protein intake on serum urea concentration increased from day 30 to day 90 of the trial. Serum creatinine increased (P less than 0.05) on the 5 per cent protein diet on day 90 of the trial. The R2 value for the effects of protein intake on serum creatinine was higher than for cyanide intake on days 30 and 90. The results confirm the progressive and pronounced effects of long term cyanide intake on serum nitrogenous metabolites in pigs consuming between 110 and 120 ppm hydrocyanic acid, especially in diets containing 10 per cent or less protein. PMID:2989987

  8. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  9. The Hsp90-Dependent Proteome Is Conserved and Enriched for Hub Proteins with High Levels of Protein–Protein Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Krishna B.S.; Yu, Jau-Song; Schuyler, Scott C.; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 is one of the most abundant and conserved proteins in the cell. Reduced levels or activity of Hsp90 causes defects in many cellular processes and also reveals genetic and nongenetic variation within a population. Despite information about Hsp90 protein–protein interactions, a global view of the Hsp90-regulated proteome in yeast is unavailable. To investigate the degree of dependency of individual yeast proteins on Hsp90, we used the “stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture” method coupled with mass spectrometry to quantify around 4,000 proteins in low-Hsp90 cells. We observed that 904 proteins changed in their abundance by more than 1.5-fold. When compared with the transcriptome of the same population of cells, two-thirds of the misregulated proteins were observed to be affected posttranscriptionally, of which the majority were downregulated. Further analyses indicated that the downregulated proteins are highly conserved and assume central roles in cellular networks with a high number of protein interacting partners, suggesting that Hsp90 buffers genetic and nongenetic variation through regulating protein network hubs. The downregulated proteins were enriched for essential proteins previously not known to be Hsp90-dependent. Finally, we observed that downregulation of transcription factors and mating pathway components by attenuating Hsp90 function led to decreased target gene expression and pheromone response, respectively, providing a direct link between observed proteome regulation and cellular phenotypes. PMID:25316598

  10. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  11. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  12. Small Molecule Control of Intracellular Protein Levels Through Modulation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biological probes and drugs have targeted the activities of proteins (such as enzymes and receptors) that can be easily controlled by small molecules. The remaining majority of the proteome has been deemed “undruggable”. By using small molecule modulators of the ubiquitin proteasome, protein levels, rather than protein activities can be targeted instead, increasing the number of druggable targets. While targeting the proteasome itself can lead to a global increase in protein levels, targeting other components of the UPS (e.g., the hundreds of E3 ubiquitin ligases) can lead to an increase in protein levels in a more targeted fashion. Alternatively, multiple strategies for inducing protein degradation with small molecule probes are emerging. With the ability to induce and inhibit the degradation of targeted proteins, small molecule modulators of the UPS have the potential to significantly expand the druggable portion of the proteome beyond traditional targets such as enzymes and receptors. PMID:24459094

  13. Heritability and genetic basis of protein level variation in an outbred population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Chun; Tekkedil, Manu M.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Caudy, Amy A.; Fraser, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic basis of heritable traits has been studied for decades. Although recent mapping efforts have elucidated genetic determinants of transcript levels, mapping of protein abundance has lagged. Here, we analyze levels of 4084 GFP-tagged yeast proteins in the progeny of a cross between a laboratory and a wild strain using flow cytometry and high-content microscopy. The genotype of trans variants contributed little to protein level variation between individual cells but explained >50% of the variance in the population’s average protein abundance for half of the GFP fusions tested. To map trans-acting factors responsible, we performed flow sorting and bulk segregant analysis of 25 proteins, finding a median of five protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs) per GFP fusion. Further, we find that cis-acting variants predominate; the genotype of a gene and its surrounding region had a large effect on protein level six times more frequently than the rest of the genome combined. We present evidence for both shared and independent genetic control of transcript and protein abundance: More than half of the expression QTLs (eQTLs) contribute to changes in protein levels of regulated genes, but several pQTLs do not affect their cognate transcript levels. Allele replacements of genes known to underlie trans eQTL hotspots confirmed the correlation of effects on mRNA and protein levels. This study represents the first genome-scale measurement of genetic contribution to protein levels in single cells and populations, identifies more than a hundred trans pQTLs, and validates the propagation of effects associated with transcript variation to protein abundance. PMID:24823668

  14. Solvating atomic level fine-grained proteins in supra-molecular level coarse-grained water for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-08-01

    Simulation of the dynamics of a protein in aqueous solution using an atomic model for both the protein and the many water molecules is still computationally extremely demanding considering the time scale of protein motions. The use of supra-atomic or supra-molecular coarse-grained (CG) models may enhance the computational efficiency, but inevitably at the cost of reduced accuracy. Coarse-graining solvent degrees of freedom is likely to yield a favourable balance between reduced accuracy and enhanced computational speed. Here, the use of a supra-molecular coarse-grained water model that largely preserves the thermodynamic and dielectric properties of atomic level fine-grained (FG) water in molecular dynamics simulations of an atomic model for four proteins is investigated. The results of using an FG, a CG, an implicit, or a vacuum solvent environment of the four proteins are compared, and for hen egg-white lysozyme a comparison to NMR data is made. The mixed-grained simulations do not show large differences compared to the FG atomic level simulations, apart from an increased tendency to form hydrogen bonds between long side chains, which is due to the reduced ability of the supra-molecular CG beads that represent five FG water molecules to make solvent-protein hydrogen bonds. But, the mixed-grained simulations are at least an order of magnitude faster than the atomic level ones.

  15. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats.

    PubMed

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  16. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  17. Calcium, phosphorus and protein levels as factors in the distribution of the pheasant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1958-01-01

    Summary of work on pheasant nutrition conducted since 1949 at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Pheasant chicks fed experimental diets failed to develop normally on protein levels of 15 and 18%. With 22% protein they grew at a reduced rate as compared to those on 28%. Protein level of the reproductive diet was shown to be important; low production of eggs and young resulted from levels below 25%. Calcium was found to be even more critical than protein level for reproduction; birds on a winter diet that furnished 145 mg./kg. per day had poor reproductive success the following spring. About 600 mg./kg. of Ca per day was necessary in the reproduction diet. Birds on an intermediate level of Ca (about 0.5% of diet) showed evidence of cumulative deficiency. It was concluded that pheasants receiving levels of Ca no higher than 0.5% in nature might display 'straggling failure' such as has been observed in several midwestern areas.

  18. Effect of the level of dietary protein on the utilization of alpha-ketoisocaproate for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.W.; Tungsanga, K.; Walser, M.

    1986-04-01

    The efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC) as a dietary substitute for leucine in rats on varying protein intake was estimated by an isotopic method, previously shown to yield the same results as comparative growth experiments. /sup 14/C-KIC and /sup 3/H-leucine are injected orally. Six hours later the ratio, R, of /sup 14/C//sup 3/H in isolated proteins, divided by the same ratio in the injectate is measured. This ratio has been shown to be approximately equal to nutritional efficiency of KIC relative to leucine. As dietary protein increased from 6.3% to 48.3%, whole body protein R decreased from 0.515 +/- 0.045 to 0.299 +/- 0.016. Variations with protein intake were noted in R of protein isolated from individual organs. The magnitude of R in these organs varied two-fold, in the following sequence: brain greater than heart greater than or equal to skeletal muscle greater than or equal to salivary gland greater than or equal to kidney greater than liver. Whole body protein R could be confidently predicted (r2 = 0.992) from R in the protein of kidney and muscle. Thus, the nutritional efficiency of KIC as a dietary substitute for leucine in individual organs as well as in the whole animal is strongly dependent on the level of protein intake.

  19. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels.

    PubMed

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago - TNRC6 levels.

  20. Circulating IGF-axis Protein Levels and Their Relation with Levels of Plasma Adipocytokines and Macronutrient Consumption in Women

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Jeannette M.; Wedick, Nicole M.; Rajpathak, Swapnil N.; Xue, Xiaonan; Holmes, Michelle D.; Gunter, Marc J.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Rohan, Thomas E.; Pollak, Michael; Kaplan, Robert C.; Hu, Frank B.; Sun, Qi; Strickler, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Circulating free insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and its binding proteins, most notably, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2, have been prospectively associated with incident type 2 diabetes in women. However, little is known regarding the factors that may influence these IGF-axis protein levels. To study the relation of IGF-axis protein levels with adipocytokines, macronutrient consumption, and other factors related to diabetes. Design Fasting plasma from 558 controls enrolled in a nested case-control study within the Nurses’ Health Study of incident type 2 diabetes in women were tested for: IGF-axis proteins (free and total IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3), adipocytokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin), soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R), inflammatory factors (IL-18 and C-reactive protein (CRP)), insulin, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C). Results In multivariate models, each 1% increase in sOB-R (mean 34.9 ng/mL, standard deviation (SD) ±11.3) was associated with −0.20% total IGF-I (P=0.0003) and −0.42% free IGF-I (P=0.002), as well as 0.73% higher IGFBP-1 (P<0.0001) and 0.27% IGFBP-2 (P=0.003). For example, a one SD change from the mean sOB-R level was associated with 11% lower free IGF-I. Insulin levels (mean 6.8 μU/mL ±5.3) were inversely and adiponectin (mean 18.3 μg/mL ±7.4) positively associated with IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 (all P<0.01). Consumption of dairy protein, monounsaturated fats, and saturated fats, was also correlated with IGF-axis protein levels (all P<0.05). Conclusions Several molecular factors and macronutrients were independently associated with plasma IGF-axis protein levels. Which of these, if any, reflect biologic relationships that can be intervened upon to influence IGF-axis protein concentrations warrants further investigation. PMID:24888819

  1. A local average connectivity-based method for identifying essential proteins from the network level.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Huan; Pan, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Identifying essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements of cellular survival and development. Fast growth in the amount of available protein-protein interactions has produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting protein essentiality from the network level. Essential proteins have been found to be more abundant among those highly connected proteins. However, there exist a number of highly connected proteins which are not essential. By analyzing these proteins, we find that few of their neighbors interact with each other. Thus, we propose a new local method, named LAC, to determine a protein's essentiality by evaluating the relationship between a protein and its neighbors. The performance of LAC is validated based on the yeast protein interaction networks obtained from two different databases: DIP and BioGRID. The experimental results of the two networks show that the number of essential proteins predicted by LAC clearly exceeds that explored by Degree Centrality (DC). More over, LAC is also compared with other seven measures of protein centrality (Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Bottle Neck (BN), Information Centrality (IC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), and Subgraph Centrality (SC)) in identifying essential proteins. The comparison results based on the validations of sensitivity, specificity, F-measure, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy consistently show that LAC outweighs these seven previous methods. PMID:21704260

  2. Effects of dietary protein level on growth and utilization of protein and energy by juvenile mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, Abbas; Khalid, Jamil; Rukhsana, Akhtar; Lin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted in a recirculating water system to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on growth, feed utilization, hepatosomatic index and liver lipid deposition of juvenile red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (average initial wet weight 8.0 ± 0.39 g and total length 3.14 ± 0.3 cm). In the experiment, six fishmeal-based diets were formulated to contain various protein levels (20% to 45% in 5% increments), with dietary energy ranging from 2210.7kJ lOOg to 2250.2kJlOOg dry matter. The protein to energy ratios of diets ranged from 8.58 mg protein kJ-1 to 20.03 mg protein kJ-1. Diets were fed for 90d to triplicate groups of fish stocked in 0.128m3 seawater tanks, 25 individuals each. The daily ration of 2% wet body weight was offered to the fish thrice a day. The fish at the end of the study had more than ten-fold (77.0g) increase in weight compared to the initial (8.0g). Fish fed diets of 40% and 45% protein produced significantly (P<0.05) higher weight gain of 77.2g and 76.5g, and specific growth rate (SGR) of 2.65% and 2.62% than those of 67.0 g and 68.3g, and 2.49% and 2.51% of the other diets. The broken-line regression of SGR against dietary protein level yielded an optimum dietary protein requirement of 42.6% (Y=-1.6295 + 0.1114 X 2,P<0.05). Survival remained 100% among groups. Feed conversion ratio decreased from 0.45 for fish fed 20% dietary protein to 0.35 for fish fed 45% dietary protein. Nitrogen intake increased with an increase in dietary protein, which in turn resulted in an increase in nitrogen gain of fish whole body. Fish fed 40% and 45% protein diets showed higher (P<0.05) nitrogen gain (0.27g and 0.26g) than those (0.23g and 025g) fed all other diets. Gross energy intake (GEI) in fish fed 45% protein was lower (600.67kJ) than that (607.97 kJ) of 40% protein diet, though the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05); GEI ranging from 677.31 kJ to 663.20 kJ at remaining four diets (20% to 35% protein

  3. Influence of protein level and supplemental methionine in practical rations for young endangered masked bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the protein requirement of young endangered masked Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi). Five practical starting rations containing 24 to 32% protein were fed alone and supplemented with methionine for 5 weeks. Supplemental methionine significantly improved growth of quail fed diets containing 24 and 26% protein. Increasing the protein level improved growth of quail fed unsupplemented diets but did not do so when diets contained supplemental methionine. A methionine-supplemented ration containing 24% protein appeared adequate for supporting rapid growth of masked Bobwhite quail.

  4. Protein levels and colony development of Africanized and European honey bees fed natural and artificial diets.

    PubMed

    Morais, M M; Turcatto, A P; Pereira, R A; Francoy, T M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, K R; Gonçalves, L S; de Almeida, J M V; Ellis, J D; De Jong, D

    2013-12-19

    Pollen substitute diets are a valuable resource for maintaining strong and health honey bee colonies. Specific diets may be useful in one region or country and inadequate or economically unviable in others. We compared two artificial protein diets that had been formulated from locally-available ingredients in Brazil with bee bread and a non-protein sucrose diet. Groups of 100 newly-emerged, adult workers of Africanized honey bees in Brazil and European honey bees in the USA were confined in small cages and fed on one of four diets for seven days. The artificial diets included a high protein diet made of soy milk powder and albumin, and a lower protein level diet consisting of soy milk powder, brewer's yeast and rice bran. The initial protein levels in newly emerged bees were approximately 18-21 µg/µL hemolymph. After feeding on the diets for seven days, the protein levels in the hemolymph were similar among the protein diet groups (~37-49 µg/µL after seven days), although Africanized bees acquired higher protein levels, increasing 145 and 100% on diets D1 and D2, respectively, versus 83 and 60% in the European bees. All the protein diets resulted in significantly higher levels of protein than sucrose solution alone. In the field, the two pollen substitute diets were tested during periods of low pollen availability in the field in two regions of Brazil. Food consumption, population development, colony weight, and honey production were evaluated to determine the impact of the diets on colony strength parameters. The colonies fed artificial diets had a significant improvement in all parameters, while control colonies dwindled during the dearth period. We conclude that these two artificial protein diets have good potential as pollen substitutes during dearth periods and that Africanized bees more efficiently utilize artificial protein diets than do European honey bees.

  5. Synergistic Control of Kinetochore Protein Levels by Psh1 and Ubr2

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Eva; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division is achieved by attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle via the kinetochore, a large multi-protein complex that assembles on centromeres. The budding yeast kinetochore comprises more than 60 different proteins. Although the structure and function of many of these proteins has been investigated, we have little understanding of the steady state regulation of kinetochores. The primary model of kinetochore homeostasis suggests that kinetochores assemble hierarchically from the centromeric DNA via the inclusion of a centromere-specific histone into chromatin. We tested this model by trying to perturb kinetochore protein levels by overexpressing an outer kinetochore gene, MTW1. This increase in protein failed to change protein recruitment, consistent with the hierarchical assembly model. However, we find that deletion of Psh1, a key ubiquitin ligase that is known to restrict inner kinetochore protein loading, does not increase levels of outer kinetochore proteins, thus breaking the normal kinetochore stoichiometry. This perturbation leads to chromosome segregation defects, which can be partially suppressed by mutation of Ubr2, a second ubiquitin ligase that normally restricts protein levels at the outer kinetochore. Together these data show that Psh1 and Ubr2 synergistically control the amount of proteins at the kinetochore. PMID:26891228

  6. Physicochemical effects of the lipid phase and protein level on meat emulsion stability, texture, and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Barbut, S

    2010-03-01

    The effects of beef fat (25%) substitution with rendered beef fat, canola oil, palm oil, or hydrogenated palm oil at varying meat protein levels (8%, 11%, and 14%) were studied in emulsified beef meat batters. There was no significant difference in fat loss among meat batters made with beef fat, rendered beef fat, or palm oil. Hydrogenated palm oil provided the most stable batters at all protein levels. Increasing meat protein to 14% resulted in high fat loss in batters prepared with canola oil, which did not occur in the other formulations. This indicates that the physicochemical characteristics of fat/oil affect emulsion stability. Cooked batter hardness was higher (P < 0.05) when protein level was raised; highest in hydrogenated palm oil batters when compared at similar protein levels. As protein level was raised springiness values were increased in all the meat treatments. Springiness was higher in the canola oil treatments. Light microscopy revealed fat globule coalescence in canola oil meat batters prepared with 14% protein, as well as the development of fat channels and more protein aggregation; both seem to result in lower emulsion stability. Hydrogenated palm oil batters showed fat particles with sharp edges as opposed to the round ones seen in all other treatments.

  7. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels. PMID:27410252

  8. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels.

  9. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase. PMID:16631439

  10. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase.

  11. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  12. The effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on fetal rat heart vitamin A: a model for fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeJonge, M H; Zachman, R D

    1995-04-01

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, nutritional alterations caused by ethanol exposure may be an etiologic factor in FAS. The congenital heart defects seen in FAS are similar to those found in vitamin A teratogenesis. Because ethanol ingestion alters vitamin A metabolism, we hypothesized that the cardiac manifestations seen in FAS result from an alteration in vitamin A metabolism or function in the developing fetus. Twenty-day gestation fetal rat hearts from ethanol-exposed and control pregnancies were analyzed for 1) levels of endogenous retinol, retinyl palmitate, and retinoic acid by quantitative HPLC; 2) binding activity levels of both retinol by cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid by cellular retinoic acid binding protein using specific competitive binding assays; and 3) relative abundance of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor alpha, beta, and gamma subtype message as expressed in mRNA. Levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate were significantly higher (p < 0.01) and the level of retinoic acid was significantly lower (p < 0.02) in the ethanol-exposed fetal hearts. Binding activity levels of cellular retinol binding protein and cellular retinoic acid binding protein were not different in the two groups. The message for retinoic acid receptor alpha (3.7 kb) was increased (p < 0.01) and the message for retinoic acid receptor beta was decreased (p < 0.05) in the ethanol-exposed hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7596680

  13. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  14. Less is More: Membrane Protein Digestion Beyond Urea–Trypsin Solution for Next-level Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of next-level bottom-up membrane proteomics is protein function investigation, via high-coverage high-throughput peptide-centric quantitation of expression, modifications and dynamic structures at systems scale. Yet efficient digestion of mammalian membrane proteins presents a daunting barrier, and prevalent day-long urea–trypsin in-solution digestion proved insufficient to reach this goal. Many efforts contributed incremental advances over past years, but involved protein denaturation that disconnected measurement from functional states. Beyond denaturation, the recent discovery of structure/proteomics omni-compatible detergent n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside, combined with pepsin and PNGase F columns, enabled breakthroughs in membrane protein digestion: a 2010 DDM-low-TCEP (DLT) method for H/D-exchange (HDX) using human G protein-coupled receptor, and a 2015 flow/detergent-facilitated protease and de-PTM digestions (FDD) for integrative deep sequencing and quantitation using full-length human ion channel complex. Distinguishing protein solubilization from denaturation, protease digestion reliability from theoretical specificity, and reduction from alkylation, these methods shifted day(s)-long paradigms into minutes, and afforded fully automatable (HDX)-protein-peptide-(tandem mass tag)-HPLC pipelines to instantly measure functional proteins at deep coverage, high peptide reproducibility, low artifacts and minimal leakage. Promoting—not destroying—structures and activities harnessed membrane proteins for the next-level streamlined functional proteomics. This review analyzes recent advances in membrane protein digestion methods and highlights critical discoveries for future proteomics. PMID:26081834

  15. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  16. Identification and validation of genetic variants that influence transcription factor and cell signaling protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ronald J; Stark, Amy L; Antao, Nirav N; Gorsic, Lidija K; Chung, Sophie H; Brown, Christopher D; Wong, Shan S; Gill, Daniel F; Myers, Jamie L; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P; Dolan, M Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-08-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression.

  17. Optimality and evolutionary tuning of the expression level of a protein.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2005-07-28

    Different proteins have different expression levels. It is unclear to what extent these expression levels are optimized to their environment. Evolutionary theories suggest that protein expression levels maximize fitness, but the fitness as a function of protein level has seldom been directly measured. To address this, we studied the lac system of Escherichia coli, which allows the cell to use the sugar lactose for growth. We experimentally measured the growth burden due to production and maintenance of the Lac proteins (cost), as well as the growth advantage (benefit) conferred by the Lac proteins when lactose is present. The fitness function, given by the difference between the benefit and the cost, predicts that for each lactose environment there exists an optimal Lac expression level that maximizes growth rate. We then performed serial dilution evolution experiments at different lactose concentrations. In a few hundred generations, cells evolved to reach the predicted optimal expression levels. Thus, protein expression from the lac operon seems to be a solution of a cost-benefit optimization problem, and can be rapidly tuned by evolution to function optimally in new environments. PMID:16049495

  18. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  19. How to talk about protein-level false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; Tasnim, Ayesha; Käll, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    A frequently sought output from a shotgun proteomics experiment is a list of proteins that we believe to have been present in the analyzed sample before proteolytic digestion. The standard technique to control for errors in such lists is to enforce a preset threshold for the false discovery rate (FDR). Many consider protein-level FDRs a difficult and vague concept, as the measurement entities, spectra, are manifestations of peptides and not proteins. Here, we argue that this confusion is unnecessary and provide a framework on how to think about protein-level FDRs, starting from its basic principle: the null hypothesis. Specifically, we point out that two competing null hypotheses are used concurrently in today's protein inference methods, which has gone unnoticed by many. Using simulations of a shotgun proteomics experiment, we show how confusing one null hypothesis for the other can lead to serious discrepancies in the FDR. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the same simulations can be used to verify FDR estimates of protein inference methods. In particular, we show that, for a simple protein inference method, decoy models can be used to accurately estimate protein-level FDRs for both competing null hypotheses.

  20. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  1. Luteinizing hormone levels are positively correlated with plasma amyloid-beta protein levels in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Yeap, Bu B; Clarnette, Roger M; Dhaliwal, Satvinder; Burkhardt, Melanie S; Chubb, S A Paul; De Ruyck, Karl; Rodrigues, Mark; Mehta, Pankaj D; Foster, Jonathan K; Bruce, David G; Martins, Ralph N

    2008-06-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis during aging has been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and developing dementia. Compared to controls, men with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been shown to have lower serum testosterone levels and higher serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. As serum free testosterone concentration is negatively correlated with LH in older men, the independent contributions of these hormones to the pathogenesis of AD warrants further clarification. To explore this notion, we measured plasma amyloid-beta (Abeta), serum testosterone, serum LH and other biochemical parameters in 40 cognitively normal elderly men. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that serum LH concentration is the only parameter that significantly correlates with plasma Abeta levels in these men (r=0.5, p=0.041). These results suggest that increased serum LH concentration, rather than lower serum free testosterone, is associated with the accumulation of Abeta in plasma. Larger, longitudinal human studies are needed to determine the significance of LH in the pathogenesis of AD.

  2. Effect of energy and protein levels on nutrient utilization and their requirements in growing Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Sonali; Kundu, Shivlal Singh; Mondal, Goutam; Sontakke, Umesh; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate different levels of energy and protein for optimum growth of Murrah male buffalo calves, a growth trial (150 days) was conducted on 30 calves (body weight 202.5 ± 6.8 kg). Six diets were formulated to provide 90, 100 and 110% protein level and 90 and 110% energy level requirements for buffalo calves, derived from ICAR 2013 recommendations for buffaloes. The crude protein (CP) intake was increased with higher dietary CP, whereas no effect of energy levels or interaction between protein and energy was observed on CP intake. There were significant effects (P < 0.01) of the interaction between protein and energy (P < 0.05) on metabolizable energy (ME) intake. The digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) was higher (P < 0.0001) in high-energy groups compared to low-energy groups. The CP digestibility increased with the increased CP and ME of the rations. The absorbed N was improved linearly with an increased level of dietary CP, whereas the N retention was similar among all the groups distributed as per different energy or protein levels. The nutrient intake (protein or energy) per kg body weight (BW)(0.75) at various fortnight intervals was regressed linearly from the average daily gain (ADG) per kg BW(0.75). By setting the average daily gain at zero in the developed regression equation, a maintenance requirement was obtained, i.e. 133.1 kcal ME, 6.45 g CP and 3.95 g metabolizable protein (MP) per kg BW(0.75). Requirement for growth was 6.12 kcal ME, 0.46 g CP and 0.32 g MP per kg BW(0.75) per day. Metabolizable amino acid requirement was estimated from partitioning of MP intake and ADG. The ME requirements were lower, whereas the MP requirement of Murrah buffaloes was higher than ICAR (2013) recommendations. PMID:26970972

  3. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches.

  4. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches. PMID:26357227

  5. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently.

  6. Exploring Sequence Characteristics Related to High-Level Production of Secreted Proteins in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bastiaan A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hulsman, Marc; Wu, Liang; Pel, Herman J.; Roubos, Johannes A.; de Ridder, Dick

    2012-01-01

    Protein sequence features are explored in relation to the production of over-expressed extracellular proteins by fungi. Knowledge on features influencing protein production and secretion could be employed to improve enzyme production levels in industrial bioprocesses via protein engineering. A large set, over 600 homologous and nearly 2,000 heterologous fungal genes, were overexpressed in Aspergillus niger using a standardized expression cassette and scored for high versus no production. Subsequently, sequence-based machine learning techniques were applied for identifying relevant DNA and protein sequence features. The amino-acid composition of the protein sequence was found to be most predictive and interpretation revealed that, for both homologous and heterologous gene expression, the same features are important: tyrosine and asparagine composition was found to have a positive correlation with high-level production, whereas for unsuccessful production, contributions were found for methionine and lysine composition. The predictor is available online at http://bioinformatics.tudelft.nl/hipsec. Subsequent work aims at validating these findings by protein engineering as a method for increasing expression levels per gene copy. PMID:23049690

  7. Serum leptin and insulin levels in lactating protein-restricted rats: implications for energy balance.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C L P; Macêdo, G M; Latorraca, M Q; Arantes, V C; Veloso, R V; Carneiro, E M; Boschero, A C; Nascimento, C M O; Gaíva, M H

    2007-01-01

    The present study analysed the effect of protein restriction on serum insulin and leptin levels and their relationship with energy balance during lactation. Four groups of rats received isocaloric diets containing 170 g protein/kg or 60 g protein/kg from pregnancy until the 14th day of lactation: control non-lactating, control lactating (both fed a control diet), low-protein non-lactating and low-protein lactating. Energy intake, body composition, energy balance, serum insulin and leptin concentrations and the relationship between these hormones and several factors related to obesity were analysed. Low-protein-intake lactating rats exhibited hypoinsulinaemia, hyperleptinaemia, hypophagia and decreased energy expenditure compared with control lactating rats. The protein level in the carcasses was lower in the low-protein lactating group than in the control lactating group, resulting in a higher fat content in the first group compared with the latter. Body fat correlated inversely with serum insulin and positively with serum leptin level. There was a significant negative correlation between serum leptin and energy intake, and a positive relationship between energy intake and serum insulin level in lactating rats and in the combined data from both groups. Energy expenditure was correlated positively with serum insulin and negatively with serum leptin in lactating rats and when data from control non-lactating and lactating rats were pooled. Lactating rats submitted to protein restriction, compared with lactating control rats, showed that maternal reserves were preserved owing to less severe negative energy balance. This metabolic adaptation was obtained, at least in part, by hypoinsulinaemia that resulted in increased insulin sensitivity favouring enhanced fat deposition, hyperleptinaemia and hypophagia. PMID:17217557

  8. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  9. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  10. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety usingmore » an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.« less

  11. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety using an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.

  12. Dysregulation of TAp63 mRNA and protein levels in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Lundqvist, Elisabet N; Coates, Philip J; Thurfjell, Niklas; Wettersand, Emma; Nylander, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and excessive inflammation of the skin and is currently incurable. The cause of psoriasis remains poorly understood and a central and cooperative role for keratinocytes and T-cells in triggering the disease is highlighted. The p63 gene encodes six different proteins with homology to the tumor suppressor protein p53 that are crucial for normal development of ectodermally derived structures such as skin and oral mucosa. In this study, we have analyzed levels of the different p63 isoforms using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in 15 patients diagnosed with psoriasis. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed downregulation of the full-length TAp63 in psoriatic lesions compared to both clinically normal skin from patients (P<0.001) and matched healthy controls (P<0.001); however, p63 protein levels detected by immunohistochemistry were similar. All psoriasis lesions also had detectable levels of activated Stat3, a protein indicated in development of the disease, whereas control tissue lacked this protein. The present data show a different regulation of TAp63 in psoriasis, where the discrepancy between mRNA levels and protein expression indicates a post-transcriptional regulation analogous to that seen in p53.

  13. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein–protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein–protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins’ biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein–protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein–protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent). PMID:26157620

  14. Activity and circadian rhythm influence synaptic Shank3 protein levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Tasnuva; Chhabra, Resham; Vilella, Antonietta; Boeckers, Tobias M; Zoli, Michele; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    Various recent studies revealed that the proteins of the Shank family act as major scaffold organizing elements in the post-synaptic density of excitatory synapses and that their expression level is able to influence synapse formation, maturation and ultimately brain plasticity. An imbalance in Shank3 protein levels has been associated with a variety of neuropsychological and neurodegenerative disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Given that sleep disorders and low melatonin levels are frequently observed in autism spectrum disorders, and that circadian rhythms may be able to modulate Shank3 signaling and thereby synaptic function, here, we performed in vivo studies on CBA mice using protein biochemistry to investigate the synaptic expression levels of Shank3α during the day in different brain regions. Our results show that synaptic Shank3 protein concentrations exhibit minor oscillations during the day in hippocampal and striatal brain regions that correlate with changes in serum melatonin levels. Furthermore, as circadian rhythms are tightly connected to activity levels in mice, we increased physical activity using running wheels. The expression of Shank3α increases rapidly by induced activity in thalamus and cortex, but decreases in striatum, superimposing the circadian rhythms of different brain regions. We conclude that synaptic Shank3 proteins build highly dynamic platforms that are modulated by the light:dark cycles but even more so driven by activity. Using wild-type CBA mice, we show that Shank3 is a highly dynamic and activity-regulated protein at synapses. In the hippocampus, changes in synaptic Shank3 levels are influenced by circadian rhythm/melatonin concentration, while running activity increases and decreases levels of Shank3 in the cortex and striatum respectively. PMID:27329942

  15. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins.

  16. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins. PMID:27451365

  17. Predicting protein folding rate change upon point mutation using residue-level coevolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Das, Smita; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Change in folding kinetics of globular proteins upon point mutation is crucial to a wide spectrum of biological research, such as protein misfolding, toxicity, and aggregations. Here we seek to address whether residue-level coevolutionary information of globular proteins can be informative to folding rate changes upon point mutations. Generating residue-level coevolutionary networks of globular proteins, we analyze three parameters: relative coevolution order (rCEO), network density (ND), and characteristic path length (CPL). A point mutation is considered to be equivalent to a node deletion of this network and respective percentage changes in rCEO, ND, CPL are found linearly correlated (0.84, 0.73, and -0.61, respectively) with experimental folding rate changes. The three parameters predict the folding rate change upon a point mutation with 0.031, 0.045, and 0.059 standard errors, respectively.

  18. Quality of buffalo milk as affected by dietary protein level and flaxseed supplementation.

    PubMed

    Santillo, A; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A; Albenzio, M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of protein level and flaxseed supplementation on the yield and quality of buffalo milk. In particular, the fatty acid profile of milk from buffalo cows subjected to different diets has been investigated. A 2×3 factorial design was tested with buffalo cows receiving 2 dietary crude protein (CP) and 3 flaxseed (FS) supplementation levels. Treatments were (1) low dietary CP level [12% of dry matter (DM)] and no flaxseed supplementation (LP); (2) low dietary CP level (12% of DM) and low flaxseed supplementation (500g/d) (LPFS500); (3) low dietary CP level (12% of DM) and moderate flaxseed supplementation (1,000g/d) (LPFS1000); (4) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and no flaxseed supplementation (MP); (5) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and low flaxseed supplementation (500g/d) (MPFS500); and (6) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and moderate flaxseed supplementation (1,000g/d) (MPFS1000). Milk protein and casein were affected by flaxseed supplementation being higher in MP, intermediate in LP, and lower in flaxseed-supplemented diets. However, the results from the present study highlighted that low protein diets sustained milk yield, protein, and casein synthesis in milk when whole flaxseed was administered. Short-chain fatty acids, in particular C8:0 and C10:0, were the lowest in milk from buffalo cows fed the highest level of flaxseed supplementation. Medium-chain fatty acids were the lowest in FS1000, intermediate in FS500, and the highest in the HP and LP groups. Long-chain fatty acids were the highest in FS1000, intermediate in FS500 groups, and the lowest in milk from buffalo receiving no flaxseed supplementation. Protein level of the diet influenced the percentage of C18:0, which was higher in MP than LP groups. Total conjugated linoleic acid content evidenced the same trend of long-chain fatty acids, with an increase of about 7% in FL500 and of 22% in FL1000 than the control. Apart from

  19. Quality of buffalo milk as affected by dietary protein level and flaxseed supplementation.

    PubMed

    Santillo, A; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A; Albenzio, M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of protein level and flaxseed supplementation on the yield and quality of buffalo milk. In particular, the fatty acid profile of milk from buffalo cows subjected to different diets has been investigated. A 2×3 factorial design was tested with buffalo cows receiving 2 dietary crude protein (CP) and 3 flaxseed (FS) supplementation levels. Treatments were (1) low dietary CP level [12% of dry matter (DM)] and no flaxseed supplementation (LP); (2) low dietary CP level (12% of DM) and low flaxseed supplementation (500g/d) (LPFS500); (3) low dietary CP level (12% of DM) and moderate flaxseed supplementation (1,000g/d) (LPFS1000); (4) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and no flaxseed supplementation (MP); (5) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and low flaxseed supplementation (500g/d) (MPFS500); and (6) moderate dietary CP level (15% of DM) and moderate flaxseed supplementation (1,000g/d) (MPFS1000). Milk protein and casein were affected by flaxseed supplementation being higher in MP, intermediate in LP, and lower in flaxseed-supplemented diets. However, the results from the present study highlighted that low protein diets sustained milk yield, protein, and casein synthesis in milk when whole flaxseed was administered. Short-chain fatty acids, in particular C8:0 and C10:0, were the lowest in milk from buffalo cows fed the highest level of flaxseed supplementation. Medium-chain fatty acids were the lowest in FS1000, intermediate in FS500, and the highest in the HP and LP groups. Long-chain fatty acids were the highest in FS1000, intermediate in FS500 groups, and the lowest in milk from buffalo receiving no flaxseed supplementation. Protein level of the diet influenced the percentage of C18:0, which was higher in MP than LP groups. Total conjugated linoleic acid content evidenced the same trend of long-chain fatty acids, with an increase of about 7% in FL500 and of 22% in FL1000 than the control. Apart from

  20. Protein Consumption and the Elderly: What Is the Optimal Level of Intake?

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jamie I.; Kim, Il-Young; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining independence, quality of life, and health is crucial for elderly adults. One of the major threats to living independently is the loss of muscle mass, strength, and function that progressively occurs with aging, known as sarcopenia. Several studies have identified protein (especially the essential amino acids) as a key nutrient for muscle health in elderly adults. Elderly adults are less responsive to the anabolic stimulus of low doses of amino acid intake compared to younger individuals. However, this lack of responsiveness in elderly adults can be overcome with higher levels of protein (or essential amino acid) consumption. The requirement for a larger dose of protein to generate responses in elderly adults similar to the responses in younger adults provides the support for a beneficial effect of increased protein in older populations. The purpose of this review is to present the current evidence related to dietary protein intake and muscle health in elderly adults. PMID:27338461

  1. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione.

  2. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione. PMID:23095819

  3. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  4. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  5. Alterations of DNA mismatch repair proteins and microsatellite instability levels in gastric cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Tao, Hong; Kim, Jae J; Burkhead, Benjamin; Carloni, Emilia; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2004-07-01

    Alterations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins result in microsatellite instability (MSI), increased mutation accumulation at target genes and cancer development. About one-third of gastric cancers display high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-High) and low-level microsatellite instability (MSI-Low) is frequently detected. To determine whether variations in the levels of MMR proteins or mutations in the main DNA MMR genes are associated with MSI-Low and MSI-High in gastric cancer cell lines, the MSI status (MSI-High, MSI-Low or MS-Stable (MSS)) of 14 gastric cancer lines was determined using multiple clone analysis with a panel of five microsatellite markers. Protein levels of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH6, hPMS2 and hPMS1 were determined by Western blot. Sequence analysis of hMLH1 and hMSH2 was performed and the methylation status of the hMLH1 promoter was examined. The cell lines SNU1 and SNU638 showed MSI-High, decreased to essentially absent hMLH1 and hPMS2 and reduced hPMS1 and hMSH6 protein levels. The hMLH1 promoter region was hypermethylated in SNU638 cells. The MKN28, MKN87, KATOIII and SNU601 cell lines showed MSI-Low. The MMR protein levels of cells with MSI-Low status was similar to the levels detected in MSS cells. A marked decrease in the expression levels of MutL MMR proteins (hMLH1, hPMS2 and hPMS1) is associated with high levels of MSI mutations in gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cell lines with MSI-Low status do not show significant changes in the levels of the main DNA MMR proteins or mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes hMSH2 and hMLH1. These well-characterized gastric cancer cell lines are a valuable resource to further our understanding of DNA MMR deficiency in cancer development, progression and prognosis. PMID:15133479

  6. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions.

  7. Stochastic protein expression in individual cells at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Long; Friedman, Nir; Xie, X. Sunney

    2006-03-01

    In a living cell, gene expression-the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA followed by translation to protein-occurs stochastically, as a consequence of the low copy number of DNA and mRNA molecules involved. These stochastic events of protein production are difficult to observe directly with measurements on large ensembles of cells owing to lack of synchronization among cells. Measurements so far on single cells lack the sensitivity to resolve individual events of protein production. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic-based assay that allows real-time observation of the expression of β-galactosidase in living Escherichia coli cells with single molecule sensitivity. We observe that protein production occurs in bursts, with the number of molecules per burst following an exponential distribution. We show that the two key parameters of protein expression-the burst size and frequency-can be either determined directly from real-time monitoring of protein production or extracted from a measurement of the steady-state copy number distribution in a population of cells. Application of this assay to probe gene expression in individual budding yeast and mouse embryonic stem cells demonstrates its generality. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, and are thus inaccessible by current genomic and proteomic techniques. This microfluidic single cell assay opens up possibilities for system-wide characterization of the expression of these low copy number proteins.

  8. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  9. Ground level environmental protein concentrations in various ecuadorian environments: potential uses of aerosolized protein for ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staton, Sarah J.R.; Woodward, Andrea; Castillo, Josemar A.; Swing, Kelly; Hayes, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of free protein in the environment and other bioaerosols are ubiquitous throughout terrestrial ground level environments and may be integrative indicators of ecosystem status. Samples of ground level bioaerosols were collected from various ecosystems throughout Ecuador, including pristine humid tropical forest (pristine), highly altered secondary humid tropical forest (highly altered), secondary transitional very humid forest (regrowth transitional), and suburban dry montane deforested (suburban deforested). The results explored the sensitivity of localized aerosol protein concentrations to spatial and temporal variations within ecosystems, and their value for assessing environmental change. Ecosystem specific variations in environmental protein concentrations were observed: pristine 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3, highly altered 0.07 ± 0.05 μg/m3, regrowth transitional 0.17 ± 0.06 μg/m3, and suburban deforested 0.09 ± 0.04 μg/m3. Additionally, comparisons of intra-environmental differences in seasonal/daily weather (dry season 0.08 ± 0.03 μg/m3 and wet season 0.10 ± 0.04 μg/m3), environmental fragmentation (buffered 0.19 ± 0.06 μg/m3 and edge 0.15 ± 0.06 μg/m3), and sampling height (ground level 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3 and 10 m 0.24 ± 0.04 μg/m3) demonstrated the sensitivity of protein concentrations to environmental conditions. Local protein concentrations in altered environments correlated well with satellite-based spectral indices describing vegetation productivity: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (r2 = 0.801), net primary production (NPP) (r2 = 0.827), leaf area index (LAI) (r2 = 0.410). Moreover, protein concentrations distinguished the pristine site, which was not differentiated in spectral indices, potentially due to spectral saturation typical of highly vegetated environments. Bioaerosol concentrations represent an inexpensive method to increase understanding of environmental changes, especially in densely vegetated

  10. GPCR-MPredictor: multi-level prediction of G protein-coupled receptors using genetic ensemble.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Khan, Asifullah; Khan, Asif Ullah

    2012-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are transmembrane proteins, which transduce signals from extracellular ligands to intracellular G protein. Automatic classification of GPCRs can provide important information for the development of novel drugs in pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, we propose an evolutionary approach, GPCR-MPredictor, which combines individual classifiers for predicting GPCRs. GPCR-MPredictor is a web predictor that can efficiently predict GPCRs at five levels. The first level determines whether a protein sequence is a GPCR or a non-GPCR. If the predicted sequence is a GPCR, then it is further classified into family, subfamily, sub-subfamily, and subtype levels. In this work, our aim is to analyze the discriminative power of different feature extraction and classification strategies in case of GPCRs prediction and then to use an evolutionary ensemble approach for enhanced prediction performance. Features are extracted using amino acid composition, pseudo amino acid composition, and dipeptide composition of protein sequences. Different classification approaches, such as k-nearest neighbor (KNN), support vector machine (SVM), probabilistic neural networks (PNN), J48, Adaboost, and Naives Bayes, have been used to classify GPCRs. The proposed hierarchical GA-based ensemble classifier exploits the prediction results of SVM, KNN, PNN, and J48 at each level. The GA-based ensemble yields an accuracy of 99.75, 92.45, 87.80, 83.57, and 96.17% at the five levels, on the first dataset. We further perform predictions on a dataset consisting of 8,000 GPCRs at the family, subfamily, and sub-subfamily level, and on two other datasets of 365 and 167 GPCRs at the second and fourth levels, respectively. In comparison with the existing methods, the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed GPCR-MPredictor in classifying GPCRs families. It is accessible at http://111.68.99.218/gpcr-mpredictor/.

  11. mRNA and Protein levels of rat pancreas specific protein disulphide isomerase are downregulated during Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajani; Bhar, Kaushik; Sen, Nandini; Bhowmick, Debajit; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Panda, Koustubh; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes (Type I and Type II) which affects nearly every organ in the body is a multi-factorial non-communicable disorder. Hyperglycemia is the most characteristic feature of this disease. Loss of beta cells is common in both types of diabetes whose detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. As this disease is complex, identification of specific biomarkers for its early detection, management and devising new therapies is challenging. Based on the fact that functionally defective proteins provide the biochemical basis for many diseases, in this study, we tried to identify differentially expressed proteins during hyperglycemia. For that, hyperglycemia was induced in overnight fasted rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The pancreas was isolated from control and treated rats for subsequent analyses. The 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-MS-MS analyses revealed several up- and down-regulated proteins in hyperglycemic rat pancreas including the downregulation of a pancreas specific isoform of protein disulphide isomerase a2 (Pdia2).This observation was validated by western blot. Quantitative PCR experiments showed that the level of Pdia2 mRNA is also proportionally reduced in hyperglycemic pancreas.

  12. Proteasome-mediated degradation antagonizes critical levels of the apoptosis-inducing C1D protein

    PubMed Central

    Rothbarth, Karsten; Stammer, Hermann; Werner, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The C1D gene is expressed in a broad spectrum of mammalian cells and tissues but its product induces apoptotic cell death when exceeding a critical level. Critical levels are achieved in a fraction of cells by transient transfection with EGFP-tagged C1D expression constructs. However, transfected cells expressing sub-critical levels of C1D(EGFP) escape apoptotic cell death by activation of a proteasome-mediated rescue mechanism. Inhibition of the proteasome-dependent degradation of the C1D(EGFP) protein results in a parallel increase of the intracellular C1D level and in the fraction of apoptotic cells. PMID:12379155

  13. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  14. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Boël, Grégory; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K.; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Aalberts, Daniel P.; Hunt, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyze the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  15. Flour sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extractable protein level as a cookie flour quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Pareyt, Bram; Bruneel, Charlotte; Brijs, Kristof; Goesaert, Hans; Delcour, Jan A

    2010-01-13

    Flour characteristics of laboratory-milled flour fractions of two wheat cultivars were related to their cookie-baking performance. Cultivar (cv.) Albatros wheat milling yielded fractions with lower damaged starch (DS) and arabinoxylan levels and higher sodium dodecyl sulfate-extractable protein (SDSEP) levels than did cv. Meunier wheat milling. During baking, cv. Albatros flour doughs spread faster and set later than their cv. Meunier counterparts and, hence, resulted in larger cookie diameters. DS levels negatively affected spread rate during both cv. Albatros (R2=0.68) and cv. Meunier (R2=0.51) cookie baking. SDSEP levels also influenced cookie quality. The use of flour heat-treated to reduce its SDSEP levels to different degrees led to reduction of the set time (R2=0.90). It was deduced that larger gluten polymer sizes limit dough spread time during baking and that, apart from DS level, the SDSEP level is an indicator for cookie flour quality.

  16. C-reactive protein serum level in patients with psoriasis before and after treatment with narrow-band ultraviolet B*

    PubMed Central

    Farshchian, Mahmoud; Ansar, Akram; Sobhan, Mohammadreza; Hoseinpoor, Valiollah

    2016-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein is an inflammatory biomarker and its level increases in the serum of psoriatic patients. Its level is also associated with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the decrement of serum C-reactive protein level with narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) therapy. Methods C-reactive protein serum levels in psoriasis patients were measured before and after treatment with NB-UVB and the data were analyzed in relation to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score improvement. Results Baseline C-reactive protein levels among psoriatic patients were higher than normal. These levels decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.001). At the beginning of the study, patients with higher levels of C-reactive protein also had more extensive and severe skin involvement. The highest decrease in C-reactive protein was observed in patients who responded better to the treatment and achieved a higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75%. There was an association between baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores and C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion Patients with moderate to severe plaque-type psoriasis had active systemic inflammation, which was demonstrated by increased levels of C-reactive protein. Furthermore, skin disease severity was correlated with C-reactive protein levels. Phototherapy healed the psoriatic skin lesions and reduced inflammation, while decreasing C-reactive protein levels.

  17. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  18. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stress such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin in transduced mammalian cells or 1% reconstituted milk enhances transcription and increases production of the foll...

  19. Influence of market stress and protein level on feeder pig hematologic and blood chemical values.

    PubMed

    Clemens, E T; Schultz, B D; Brumm, M C; Jesse, G W; Mayes, H F

    1986-02-01

    One hundred twenty crossbred feeder pigs were used in 2 trials to determine the effects of food and water deprivation at the auction market and the effects of protein levels of receiving diet on blood chemical values. Food- and water-deprived animals had significantly higher packed-cell volume, colloid osmotic pressure, and cortisol values than did nondeprived animals. Total osmolality and plasma triiodothyronine values were significantly lower in deprived animals. Measurable effects of food and water deprivation were no longer apparent by 14 days after arrival at the research facility. Plasma colloid osmotic pressure had a positive linear relationship with increasing dietary protein level and was statistically different among levels of protein fed. Gilts had higher plasma triiodothyronine values than did barrows. Differential WBC ratios were not different between groups. Measurable differences for treatments (food and water deprivation vs food and water access; and level of protein in the receiving diet) were no longer apparent 84 days after pigs had arrived at the finishing unit.

  20. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  1. Cold acclimation increases levels of some heat shock protein and sirtuin isoforms in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Laura E; Orczewska, Julieanna I; McLaughlin, Jessica; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] increase in response to rapid changes in temperatures, but long-term acclimation to cold temperature may also warrant elevations in HSPs. In fishes, cold acclimation increases mitochondrial density and oxidative stress in some tissues, which may increase demand for HSPs. We hypothesized that levels of HSPs, as well as sirtuins (SIRTs), NAD-dependent deacetylases that mediate changes in metabolism and responses to oxidative stress (including increases in HSPs), would increase during cold acclimation of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Transcript levels of hsp70, hsc70, hsp60 and hsp90-α, sirts1-4, as well as protein levels of HSP60, HSP90 and HSC70 were quantified in liver and pectoral adductor muscle of stickleback during cold acclimation from 20 °C to 8 °C. In liver, cold acclimation stimulated a transient increase in mRNA levels of hsp60 and hsc70. Transcript levels of sirt1 and sirt2 also increased in response to cold acclimation and remained elevated. In pectoral muscle, mRNA levels of hsp60, hsp90-α, hsc70 and sirt1 all transiently increased in response to cold acclimation, while levels of sirts2-4 remained constant or declined. Similar to transcript levels, protein levels of HSC70 increased in both liver and pectoral muscle. Levels of HSP90 also increased in liver after 4 weeks at 8 °C. HSP60 remained unchanged in both tissues, as did HSP90 in pectoral muscle. Our results indicate that while both HSPs and SIRTs increase in response to cold acclimation in stickleback, the response is tissue and isoform specific, likely reflecting differences in metabolism and oxidative stress.

  2. Identification of maize embryo-preferred promoters suitable for high-level heterologous protein production.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J; Bray, Jeffrey; Love, Robert T; Horn, Michael E; Lane, Jeffrey R; Drees, Carol F; Egelkrout, Erin M; Howard, John A

    2010-01-01

    The production of heterologous proteins in plants at levels consistent with commercialization of protein products requires molecular tools to ensure high-level transgene expression. The identification of strong promoters, preferably specific to the target expression tissue, is a focus for improving foreign protein yields using transgenic cereals as a production system. Thus, there is a requirement for strong embryo preferred monocot promoters. We obtained the sequences of 500 randomly selected maize cDNA clones to determine gene expression profiles in embryo tissues at multiple stages during development. Promoters corresponding to the most abundant clones were identified and isolated. These promoters were fused to the b-glucuronidase reporter and their tissue specificity and developmental expression characteristics assessed in transgenic maize. All of the isolated promoters tested drove transgene expression predominantly in the embryo and were most active late in embryogenesis during storage protein deposition. One of the most active promoters assessed by transgene expression was associated with the globulin-1 protein. Sequence identified here extended approximately 1.6 kb distal to the previously identified extent of the globulin-1 promoter, and this additional sequence boosted expression over two-fold. The extended globulin-1 promoter sequence isolated in this study has the potential for driving transgene expression at higher levels than those previously reported for cereals. Also, other highly active embryo promoters identified here offer opportunities to express multiple foreign proteins simultaneously at high levels in embryo tissues, while avoiding concerns over gene silencing due to the repeated use of a single promoter. PMID:21844671

  3. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  4. Relationship of vitamin A (retinol) status to lung disease in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hustead, V A; Gutcher, G R; Anderson, S A; Zachman, R D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma concentrations of retinol and retinol-binding protein were measured at birth in 91 preterm infants. In 64% of these babies retinol values were less than 20 micrograms/dl, suggestive of vitamin A deficiency. Forty-seven of these infants were observed with sequential measurements of retinol and retinol binding protein through 21 days of age. In babies with respiratory distress syndrome retinol values were similar to those in babies without respiratory distress syndrome. The retinol binding protein levels were lower on the third day of life in babies with respiratory distress syndrome. Babies who developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia had lower concentrations of retinol at birth (P less than 0.05) and on day 21 (P less than 0.05) than did babies who did not develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia, despite receiving recommended intakes of vitamin A. Many preterm infants are deficient in vitamin A at birth, and failure to correct this deficiency may contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. PMID:6481538

  5. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tie, Y X; Fu, Y Y; Xu, Z; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited 30 OSAS patients into the observation group (OSAS group), and subdivided them into mild, moderate and severe groups according to the apnea hypopnea index. In addition, 20 normal individuals were included in the control group. Plasma CRP levels of two groups were measured. As compared with the control group, the CRP levels in the OSAS group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). ANOVA showed that CRP levels in the three subgroups differ; statistically significant differences between the mild and severe OSA patients were observed (P < 0.05). It was hypothesized that OSAS patients show elevated serum CRP levels, and that serum CRP levels are associated with OSAS severity. PMID:27323094

  6. Low Levels of Aflatoxin B1, Ricin, and Milk Enhance Recombinant Protein Production in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in transduced mammalian cells correlates with virus titer, but high doses of vector for gene therapy leads to toxicity in humans and in animals. Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stressors, such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin, or 1% reconstituted milk, enhances transcription and increases production of proteins in transduced mammalian cells as demonstrated by production of the following three recombinant proteins: firefly luciferase, β-galactosidase, and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher concentrations of the stress-producing substances damage the cells beyond recovery, resulting in inhibited gene expression and cell death. We also evaluated the effect of the stressor substances on the enhanced infectivity of virus. The presented findings extend methods for large-scale transient recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and suggest that it may be possible to reduce the cytotoxicity of the adenovirus by reducing the virus titer without adversely affecting gene expression levels. PMID:23940780

  7. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  8. Human decidua-associated protein 200 levels in uterine fluid at hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Golan, A; Halperin, R; Herman, A; Hadas, E; Soffer, Y; Bukovsky, I; Caspi, E; Ron-El, R

    1994-01-01

    Hysterosocpic intrauterine findings and levels of human decidua-associated protein 200 (hDP 200) in the uterine fluid were recorded in 116 women investigated for infertility or recurrent abortions. The levels of hDP 200 were significantly higher in the presence of submucous myomas or endometrial polyps, and lower in the presence of intrauterine adhesions in comparison to those in normal uterine cavities. hDP 200, an immunoglobin secreted by the endometrium, may be involved in implantation and placentation and its level in the uterine cavity is influenced by the presence of intrauterine pathology.

  9. Elevated glial fibrillary acidic protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Feneberg, Emily; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Böhm, Bernhard; Mayer, Geert; Otto, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an established indicator of astrogliosis. Therefore, variable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of this protein might reflect disease-specific pathologic profiles. In patients with narcolepsy, a loss of hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1) neurons in the brain and low concentrations of hcrt-1 in CSF have been reported. We performed a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate if GFAP also is altered in the CSF of these patients. Here we detected significantly higher CSF levels of GFAP in patients with low hcrt-1 levels, of which the majority had a diagnosis of narcolepsy and cataplexy (NC); however, this finding was not observed in patients with hcrt-1 levels that were within reference range. In conclusion, GFAP may be useful as an additional disease biomarker in patients with narcolepsy, and this hypothesis should be investigated in larger studies.

  10. SPX proteins regulate Pi homeostasis and signaling in different subcellular level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhiye; Lv, Qundan; Shi, Jing; Zhong, Yongjia; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2015-01-01

    To cope with low phosphate (Pi) availability, plants have to adjust its gene expression profile to facilitate Pi acquisition and remobilization. Sensing the levels of Pi is essential for reprogramming the gene expression profile to adapt to the fluctuating Pi environment. AtPHR1 in Arabidopsis and OsPHR2 in rice are central regulators of Pi signaling, which regulates the expression of phosphate starvation-induced (PSI) genes by binding to the P1BS elements in the promoter of PSI genes. However, how the Pi level affects the central regulator to regulate the PSI genes have puzzled us for a decade. Recent progress in SPX proteins indicated that the SPX proteins play important role in regulating the activity of central regulator AtPHR1/OsPHR2 in a Pi dependent manner at different subcellular levels.

  11. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries. PMID:22569431

  12. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  13. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  14. Expression level tuning for optimal heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Parekh, R N; Wittrup, K D

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between expression level and secretion of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was determined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable amplifiable delta integration vector. Optimal secretory productivity of 15 mg of BPTI/g cell dry weight yields 180 mg/L secreted active BPTI in test-tube cultures, an order of magnitude increase over 2 mu plasmid-directed secretion. Maximum productivity is determined by the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Unfolded protein accumulates in the ER as synthesis increases, until a physiological instability is reached and secretion decreases precipitously despite high BPTI mRNA levels. Optimal specific productivity of a standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae is double that reported for secretion of BPTI by Pichia pastoris, indicating that efficient utilization of S. cerevisiae's available secretory capacity can eliminate apparent differences among yeast species in their capacity for heterologous protein secretion. Although not generally recognized, the existence of an optimum synthesis level for secretion is apparently a general feature of eucaryotic expression systems and could be of substantial significance for maximization of protein secretion in mammalian and insect cell culture. PMID:9104035

  15. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Verthelyi, Daniela; Wang, Vivian

    2010-12-22

    Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st) dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  16. Regulation of Protein Levels in Subcellular Domains through mRNA Transport and Localized Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Dianna E.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2010-01-01

    Localized protein synthesis is increasingly recognized as a means for polarized cells to modulate protein levels in subcellular regions and the distal reaches of their cytoplasm. The axonal and dendritic processes of neurons represent functional domains of cytoplasm that can be separated from their cell body by vast distances. This separation provides a biological setting where the cell uses locally synthesized proteins to both autonomously respond to stimuli and to retrogradely signal the cell body of events occurring is this distal environment. Other cell types undoubtedly take advantage of this localized mechanism, but these have not proven as amenable for isolation of functional subcellular domains. Consequently, neurons have provided an appealing experimental platform for study of mRNA transport and localized protein synthesis. Molecular biology approaches have shown both the population of mRNAs that can localize into axons and dendrites and an unexpectedly complex regulation of their transport into these processes. Several lines of evidence point to similar complexities and specificity for regulation of mRNA translation at subcellular sites. Proteomics studies are beginning to provide a comprehensive view of the protein constituents of subcellular domains in neurons and other cell types. However, these have currently fallen short of dissecting temporal regulation of new protein synthesis in subcellular sites and mechanisms used to ferry mRNAs to these sites. PMID:20167945

  17. Extraction of proteins with low fluoride level from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and their composition analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingzhao; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming; Yang, Bao

    2011-06-01

    The extraction of proteins with low fluoride level (LFP) from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) was investigated in this work. The optimal conditions for protein solubilization were determined to be pH 11.5 and 4 °C. The proteins were solubilized two times; a water/krill ratio (mL/g) of 6 and a time of 30 min were used for the first step, whereas the second used a water/krill residue ratio (mL/g) of 3 and a time of 30 min. The optimum pH for protein precipitation was 4.6. A LFP with fluoride content of 9.86 mg/kg (dry weight) was finally obtained through a fluoride removal program. The protein yield of LFP was 52.68%. Composition analysis of LFP indicated it was composed of 66.96% of crude proteins (dry weight) and 33.01% of total lipids (dry weight),, and all nine essential amino acids were in sufficient amounts to meet FAO/WHO/UNU requirements for adults and infants. In addition, LFP could be taken as a good source of EPA and DHA for consideration of use as a food item for human consumption.

  18. High level protein expression in mammalian cells using a safe viral vector: modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Hebben, Matthias; Brants, Jan; Birck, Catherine; Samama, Jean-Pierre; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Spehner, Danièle; Pradeau, Karine; Domi, Arban; Moss, Bernard; Schultz, Patrick; Drillien, Robert

    2007-12-01

    Vaccinia virus vectors are attractive tools to direct high level protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In one of the most efficient strategies developed so far, the gene to be expressed is positioned downstream of a bacteriophage T7 promoter within the vaccinia genome and transcribed by the T7 RNA polymerase, also encoded by the vaccinia virus genome. Tight regulation of transcription and efficient translation are ensured by control elements of the Escherichia coli lactose operon and the encephalomyocarditis virus leader sequence, respectively. We have integrated such a stringently controlled expression system, previously used successfully in a standard vaccinia virus backbone, into the modified vaccinia virus Ankara strain (MVA). In this manner, proteins of interest can be produced in mammalian cells under standard laboratory conditions because of the inherent safety of the MVA strain. Using this system for expression of beta-galactosidase, about 15 mg protein could be produced from 10(8) BHK21 cells over a 24-h period, a value 4-fold higher than the amount produced from an identical expression system based on a standard vaccinia virus strain. In another application, we employed the MVA vector to produce human tubulin tyrosine ligase and demonstrate that this protein becomes a major cellular protein upon induction conditions and displays its characteristic enzymatic activity. The MVA vector should prove useful for many other applications in which mammalian cells are required for protein production. PMID:17892951

  19. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  20. Using Spinach aptamer to correlate mRNA and protein levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pothoulakis, Georgios; Ellis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In vivo gene expression measurements have traditionally relied on fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the help of high-sensitivity equipment such as flow cytometers. However, fluorescent proteins report only on the protein level inside the cell without giving direct information about messenger RNA (mRNA) production. In 2011, an aptamer termed Spinach was presented that acts as an RNA mimic of GFP when produced in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. It was later shown that coexpression of a red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) and the Spinach aptamer, when included into the same gene expression cassette, could be utilized for parallel in vivo measurements of mRNA and protein production. As accurate characterization of component biological parts is becoming increasingly important for fields such as synthetic biology, Spinach in combination with mRFP1 provide a great tool for the characterization of promoters and ribosome binding sites. In this chapter, we discuss how live-cell imaging and flow cytometry can be used to detect and measure fluorescence produced in E. coli cells by different constructs that contain the Spinach aptamer and the mRFP1 gene.

  1. Levels of germination proteins in Bacillus subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinating spores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Melville, Stephen B; Popham, David L

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores exhibit extreme resistance to most conditions that rapidly kill other life forms, remaining viable in this dormant state for centuries or longer. While the majority of Bacillus subtilis dormant spores germinate rapidly in response to nutrient germinants, a small subpopulation termed superdormant spores are resistant to germination, potentially evading antibiotic and/or decontamination strategies. In an effort to better understand the underlying mechanisms of superdormancy, membrane-associated proteins were isolated from populations of B. subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinated spores, and the relative abundance of 11 germination-related proteins was determined using multiple-reaction-monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. GerAC, GerKC, and GerD were significantly less abundant in the membrane fractions obtained from superdormant spores than those derived from dormant spores. The amounts of YpeB, GerD, PrkC, GerAC, and GerKC recovered in membrane fractions decreased significantly during germination. Lipoproteins, as a protein class, decreased during spore germination, while YpeB appeared to be specifically degraded. Some protein abundance differences between membrane fractions of dormant and superdormant spores resemble protein changes that take place during germination, suggesting that the superdormant spore isolation procedure may have resulted in early, non-committal germination-associated changes. In addition to low levels of germinant receptor proteins, a deficiency in the GerD lipoprotein may contribute to heterogeneity of spore germination rates. Understanding the reasons for superdormancy may allow for better spore decontamination procedures.

  2. Evaluation of the hypocholesterolemic effect of vegetable proteins.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, F; Di Biase, G; Giacco, A; Pacioni, D; Moro, C O; Grasso, L; Mancini, M; Fidanza, F

    1983-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effect of dietary vegetable proteins was studied by comparing egg-white protein and fava bean protein concentrate in one normal and seven hypercholesterolemic (six type II A, one II B) persons; five completed the crossover design. To maintain stable body weight, subjects were kept on an isocaloric diet (20% protein, 48% carbohydrate (CH), 32% fat, P/S = 2) for 1 month and then hospitalized for two consecutive 18-day periods while receiving an isocaloric diet of different composition (15% protein, 50% CH, 26% fat, P/S = 2). Women were provided 50 g and men 70 g daily of egg-white or fava bean protein concentrate during the two crossover periods. Hematocrit and fasting plasma or serum were analyzed every 3 days for glucose, insulin, uric acid, creatinine, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterols, and for total and VLDL triglyceride. Dietary adequacy of both proteins was evaluated by measuring plasma concentration of prealbumin, transferrin, and retinol-binding globulin. Insulin and hematocrit did not show any change, nor did any other biochemical variables show significant differences when results were compared at the end of each crossover period. Compared with baseline, fasting plasma glucose significantly decreased on the fava bean diet. Serum total and LDL cholesterol decreased during both diets but were statistically significant only on the egg-white diet. Serum HDL cholesterol significantly decreased only on the fava bean diet. Serum total and VLDL triglyceride did not show any significant change. Labile plasma protein concentration was significantly reduced only on the fava bean diet. In conclusion, the fava bean diet did not show a significant effect on lowering serum total and LDL cholesterol. Such an effect was mild but significant on the egg-white diet, compared with baseline.

  3. Alterations in cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (CDK5) protein levels, activity and immunocytochemistry in canine motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Vulliet, P R; Pinter, M J; Cork, L C

    1998-11-01

    Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy (HCSMA) is a dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in Brittany spaniels that is clinically characterized by progressive muscle weakness leading to paralysis. Histopathologically, degeneration is confined to motor neurons with accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilaments in axonal internodes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a kinase related to the cell cycle kinase cdc2, phosphorylates neurofilaments and regulates neurofilament dynamics. We examined CDK5 activity, protein levels, and cellular immunoreactivity in nervous tissue from dogs with HCSMA, from closely age-matched controls and from dogs with other neurological diseases. On immunoblot analysis, CDK5 protein levels were increased in the HCSMA dogs (by approximately 1.5-fold in both the cytosolic and the particulate fractions). CDK5 activity was significantly increased (by approximately 3-fold) in the particulate fractions in the HCSMA dogs compared to all controls. The finding that CDK5 activity was increased in the young HCSMA homozygotes with the accelerated form of the disease, who do not show axonal swellings histologically, suggests that alterations in CDK5 occurs early in the pathogenesis, prior to the development of significant neurofilament pathology. Immunocytochemically, there was strong CDK5 staining of the nuclei, cytoplasm and axonal processes of the motor neurons in both control dogs and dogs with HCSMA. Further immunocytochemical studies demonstrated CDK5 staining where neurofilaments accumulated, in axonal swellings in the dogs with HCSMA. Our observations suggest phosphorylation-dependent events mediated by CDK5 occur in canine motor neuron disease.

  4. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion and the multiplexing potential of this technique. Limits of quantification (LOQs) at low ng/mL levels with a median CV of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum using as little as 2 µL serum. PRISM-SRM provided up to ~1000-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional SRM measurements. Multiplexing capability of PRISM-SRM was also evaluated by two sets of serum samples with 6 and 21 target peptides spiked at the low attomole/µL levels. The results from SRM measurements for pooled or post-concatenated samples were comparable to those obtained from individual peptide fractions in terms of signal-to-noise ratios and SRM peak area ratios of light to heavy peptides. PRISM-SRM was applied to measure several ng/mL-level endogenous plasma proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, in clinical patient sera where correlation coefficients > 0.99 were observed between the results from PRISM-SRM and ELISA assays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can be successfully used for quantification of low-abundance endogenous proteins in highly complex samples. Moderate throughput (50 samples/week) can be achieved by applying the post-concatenation or fraction multiplexing strategies. We anticipate broad applications for targeted PRISM

  5. Accounting for experimental noise reveals that mRNA levels, amplified by post-transcriptional processes, largely determine steady-state protein levels in yeast.

    PubMed

    Csárdi, Gábor; Franks, Alexander; Choi, David S; Airoldi, Edoardo M; Drummond, D Allan

    2015-05-01

    Cells respond to their environment by modulating protein levels through mRNA transcription and post-transcriptional control. Modest observed correlations between global steady-state mRNA and protein measurements have been interpreted as evidence that mRNA levels determine roughly 40% of the variation in protein levels, indicating dominant post-transcriptional effects. However, the techniques underlying these conclusions, such as correlation and regression, yield biased results when data are noisy, missing systematically, and collinear---properties of mRNA and protein measurements---which motivated us to revisit this subject. Noise-robust analyses of 24 studies of budding yeast reveal that mRNA levels explain more than 85% of the variation in steady-state protein levels. Protein levels are not proportional to mRNA levels, but rise much more rapidly. Regulation of translation suffices to explain this nonlinear effect, revealing post-transcriptional amplification of, rather than competition with, transcriptional signals. These results substantially revise widely credited models of protein-level regulation, and introduce multiple noise-aware approaches essential for proper analysis of many biological phenomena.

  6. Accounting for Experimental Noise Reveals That mRNA Levels, Amplified by Post-Transcriptional Processes, Largely Determine Steady-State Protein Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Csárdi, Gábor; Franks, Alexander; Choi, David S.; Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Drummond, D. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to their environment by modulating protein levels through mRNA transcription and post-transcriptional control. Modest observed correlations between global steady-state mRNA and protein measurements have been interpreted as evidence that mRNA levels determine roughly 40% of the variation in protein levels, indicating dominant post-transcriptional effects. However, the techniques underlying these conclusions, such as correlation and regression, yield biased results when data are noisy, missing systematically, and collinear---properties of mRNA and protein measurements---which motivated us to revisit this subject. Noise-robust analyses of 24 studies of budding yeast reveal that mRNA levels explain more than 85% of the variation in steady-state protein levels. Protein levels are not proportional to mRNA levels, but rise much more rapidly. Regulation of translation suffices to explain this nonlinear effect, revealing post-transcriptional amplification of, rather than competition with, transcriptional signals. These results substantially revise widely credited models of protein-level regulation, and introduce multiple noise-aware approaches essential for proper analysis of many biological phenomena. PMID:25950722

  7. Characterization of Three Novel Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-Binding Protein Genes (Ha-far-1, Ha-far-2 and Hf-far-1) from the Cereal Cyst Nematodes Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Luo, Shujie; Huang, Wenkun; Cui, Jiangkuan; Li, Xin; Kong, Lingan; Jiang, Daohong; Chitwood, David J.; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi are major parasites of wheat, reducing production worldwide. Both are sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, and their development and parasitism depend strongly on nutrients obtained from hosts. Secreted fatty acid- and retinol-binding (FAR) proteins are nematode-specific lipid carrier proteins used for nutrient acquisition as well as suppression of plant defenses. In this study, we obtained three novel FAR genes Ha-far-1 (KU877266), Ha-far-2 (KU877267), Hf-far-1 (KU877268). Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 were cloned from H. avenae, encoding proteins of 191 and 280 amino acids with molecular masses about 17 and 30 kDa, respectively and sequence identity of 28%. Protein Blast in NCBI revealed that Ha-FAR-1 sequence is 78% similar to the Gp-FAR-1 protein from Globodera pallida, while Ha-FAR-2 is 30% similar to Rs-FAR-1 from Radopholus similis. Only one FAR protein Hf-FAR-1was identified in H. filipjevi; it had 96% sequence identity to Ha-FAR-1. The three proteins are alpha-helix-rich and contain the conserved domain of Gp-FAR-1, but Ha-FAR-2 had a remarkable peptide at the C-terminus which was random-coil-rich. Both Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 had casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, while Ha-FAR-2 had predicted N-glycosylation sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the three proteins clustered together, though Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 adjoined each other in a plant-parasitic nematode branch, but Ha-FAR-2 was distinct from the other proteins in the group. Fluorescence-based ligand binding analysis showed the three FAR proteins bound to a fluorescent fatty acid derivative and retinol and with dissociation constants similar to FARs from other species, though Ha-FAR-2 binding ability was weaker than that of the two others. In situ hybridization detected mRNAs of Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 in the hypodermis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the Ha-far-1and Ha-far-2 were expressed in all developmental stages; Ha-far-1 expressed 70 times more than Ha-far-2 in

  8. Characterization of Three Novel Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-Binding Protein Genes (Ha-far-1, Ha-far-2 and Hf-far-1) from the Cereal Cyst Nematodes Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fen; Luo, Lilian; Peng, Huan; Luo, Shujie; Huang, Wenkun; Cui, Jiangkuan; Li, Xin; Kong, Lingan; Jiang, Daohong; Chitwood, David J; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi are major parasites of wheat, reducing production worldwide. Both are sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, and their development and parasitism depend strongly on nutrients obtained from hosts. Secreted fatty acid- and retinol-binding (FAR) proteins are nematode-specific lipid carrier proteins used for nutrient acquisition as well as suppression of plant defenses. In this study, we obtained three novel FAR genes Ha-far-1 (KU877266), Ha-far-2 (KU877267), Hf-far-1 (KU877268). Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 were cloned from H. avenae, encoding proteins of 191 and 280 amino acids with molecular masses about 17 and 30 kDa, respectively and sequence identity of 28%. Protein Blast in NCBI revealed that Ha-FAR-1 sequence is 78% similar to the Gp-FAR-1 protein from Globodera pallida, while Ha-FAR-2 is 30% similar to Rs-FAR-1 from Radopholus similis. Only one FAR protein Hf-FAR-1was identified in H. filipjevi; it had 96% sequence identity to Ha-FAR-1. The three proteins are alpha-helix-rich and contain the conserved domain of Gp-FAR-1, but Ha-FAR-2 had a remarkable peptide at the C-terminus which was random-coil-rich. Both Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 had casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, while Ha-FAR-2 had predicted N-glycosylation sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the three proteins clustered together, though Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 adjoined each other in a plant-parasitic nematode branch, but Ha-FAR-2 was distinct from the other proteins in the group. Fluorescence-based ligand binding analysis showed the three FAR proteins bound to a fluorescent fatty acid derivative and retinol and with dissociation constants similar to FARs from other species, though Ha-FAR-2 binding ability was weaker than that of the two others. In situ hybridization detected mRNAs of Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 in the hypodermis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the Ha-far-1and Ha-far-2 were expressed in all developmental stages; Ha-far-1 expressed 70 times more than Ha-far-2 in

  9. Ambient temperature and protein level in the ration of growing pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitman, H.; Morrison, S. R.

    1988-03-01

    Feed intake and body weight of 48 pigs in four trials were measured for 28- or 35-day periods under conditions including either constant optimal temperature or a temperature 10°C higher and at three levels of crude protein (CP) in the feed (12%, 14%, or 16%). The effect of CP level was significantly related ( P<0.01) to average daily weight gain and feed utilization. The interaction between CP level and temperature for gain approached significance at the 5% level. Comparison of CP levels at each temperature revealed that increasing little or no effect. Temperature stress lowered weight gain and feed consumption in this study, which confirms many previous studies.

  10. Altered MCM protein levels and autophagic flux in aged and systemic sclerosis dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Küttner, Victoria; Käppler, Jakob; Piera-Velazquez, Sonsoles; Jimenez, Sergio A; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Uitto, Jouni; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-09-01

    Aging is a common risk factor of many disorders. With age, the level of insoluble extracellular matrix increases leading to increased stiffness of a number of tissues. Matrix accumulation can also be observed in fibrotic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although the intrinsic aging process in skin is phenotypically distinct from SSc, here we demonstrate similar behavior of aged and SSc skin fibroblasts in culture. We have used quantitative proteomics to characterize the phenotype of dermal fibroblasts from healthy subjects of various ages and from patients with SSc. Our results demonstrate that proteins involved in DNA and RNA processing decrease with age and in SSc, whereas those involved in mitochondrial and other metabolic processes behave the opposite. Specifically, minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase proteins are less abundant with age and SSc, and they exhibit an altered subcellular distribution. We observed that lower levels of MCM7 correlate with reduced cell proliferation, lower autophagic capacity, and higher intracellular protein abundance phenotypes of aged and SSc cells. In addition, we show that SSc fibroblasts exhibit higher levels of senescence compared with their healthy counterparts, suggesting further similarities between the fibrotic disorder and the aging process. Hence, at the molecular level, SSc fibroblasts exhibit intrinsic characteristics of fibroblasts from aged skin.

  11. Cell-cycle-dependent changes in ceramide levels preceding retinoblastoma protein dephosphorylation in G2/M.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J Y; Leonhardt, L G; Obeid, L M

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide functions as a growth-inhibitory lipid-signalling molecule and might have a role in mediating the effects of extracellular agents on cell growth, differentiation and senescence. Here we investigate the roles of ceramide in cell cycle progression. With the use of the model of serum withdrawal, we were able to synchronize Wi-38 human diploid fibroblasts at different stages of cell cycle. Serum stimulation resulted in G0 to G1/S progression as determined by flow cytometric analysis and [3H]thymidine incorporation. Analyses of endogenous ceramide levels demonstrated that ceramide levels remained relatively constant on serum stimulation, indicating that ceramide might not be critical during G1/S transition. Treating exponentially growing Wi-38 human diploid fibroblasts with nocodazole led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; 2 h after the removal of nocodazole, retinoblastoma (Rb) protein became dephosphorylated and the cells exited from G2/M and moved to the G1 phase of the new cycle. When cells were released from G2/M block by nocodazole, and before Rb protein dephosphorylation, endogenous ceramide levels transiently increased up to 2-fold at 0.5 h after the removal of nocodazole. Fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of ceramide synthase, inhibited the elevation of ceramide levels. Desipramine and SR33557, both acid sphingomyelinase inhibitors, did not have an appreciable effect on the elevation of ceramide levels. Furthermore, fumonisin B1 inhibited Rb protein dephosphorylation induced by endogenous ceramide but not by exogenous ceramide. These results demonstrate for the first time changes in ceramide during cell cycle progression and suggest that ceramide synthesized de novo might function as an endogenous modulator of Rb protein and cell cycle progression. PMID:9716505

  12. Phosphorylation and nitration levels of photosynthetic proteins are conversely regulated by light stress.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, Dmitry; Lohscheider, Jens N; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Eugene N; Adamska, Iwona

    2011-11-01

    Using a label-free mass spectrometric approach, we investigated light-induced changes in the distribution of phosphorylated and nitrated proteins within subpopulations of native photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves adapted to growth light (GL) and subsequently exposed to high light (HL). Eight protein phosphorylation sites were identified in photosystem II (PSII) and the phosphorylation level of seven was regulated by HL as determined based on peak areas from ion chromatograms of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides. Although the phosphorylation of PSII proteins was reported in the past, we demonstrated for the first time that two minor antenna LHCB4 isoforms are alternately phosphorylated under GL and HL conditions in PSII monomers, dimers and supercomplexes. A role of LHCB4 phosphorylation in state transition and monomerization of PSII under HL conditions is proposed. We determined changes in the nitration level of 23 tyrosine residues in five photosystem I (PSI) and nine PSII proteins and demonstrated for the majority of them a lower nitration level in PSI and PSII complexes and supercomplexes under HL conditions, as compared to GL. In contrast, the nitration level significantly increased in assembled/disassembled PSI and PSII subcomplexes under HL conditions. A possible role of nitration in (1) monomerization of LHCB1-3 trimers under HL conditions (2) binding properties of ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase to photosystem I, and (3) PSII photodamage and repair cycle, is discussed. Based on these data, we propose that the conversely regulated phosphorylation and nitration levels regulate the stability and turnover of photosynthetic complexes under HL conditions.

  13. Study of Serum Levels of Leptin, C-Reactive Protein and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Hassanpour, Zahra; Pourmofatteh, Mahla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and decreases appetite. However, the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of hemodialysis (HD)-related malnutrition has not been fully evaluated. Objectives: The aim of study was to investigate the association between the serum leptin levels, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical descriptive study included 45 hemodialysis patients and 40 healthy subjects. Biochemical parameters and serum leptin levels were measured. The nutritional status was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the calculation of the body mass index (BMI). Results: Serum leptin (P < 0.05) and albumin (P < 0.0001) levels and BMI (P < 0.001) of HD patients were significantly lower, while CRP levels were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.0001). HD patients consumed the lower daily servings of the food groups compared to the control subjects (P < 0.0001). A significant positive correlation between serum levels of leptin and albumin and BMI was demonstrated. No significant correlations were identified between leptin level, CRP level, and other variables. Conclusions: The findings suggest that low levels of leptin may be a contributory factor for malnutrition in HD patients. Further studies are required to ascertain the significance of leptin levels in relation to nutritional factors in hemodialysis patients. PMID:26430525

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of proteins and sugars at single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Satoshi; Morikawa, Mika; Kaneda, Mugiho; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Nakatsuma, Akira; Ninomiya, Masaki; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Each cell produces its own responses even if it appears identical to other cells. To analyze these individual cell characteristics, we need to measure trace amounts of molecules in a single cell. Nucleic acids in a single cell can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction, but single-cell measurement of proteins and sugars will require de novo techniques. In the present study, we outline the techniques we have developed toward this end. For proteins, our ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide cycling can detect proteins at subattomoles per assay. For sugars, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy coupled with glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction allows us to measure glucose at tens of nM. Our methods thus offer versatile techniques for single-cell-level analyses, and they are hoped to strongly promote single-cell biology as well as to develop noninvasive tests in clinical medicine. PMID:27064305

  15. Amyloid beta protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid are elevated in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Shoji, M; Harigaya, Y; Watanabe, M; Hosoda, K; Cheung, T T; Shaffer, L M; Golde, T E; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1994-12-01

    The 4-kd amyloid beta protein (A beta) deposited as amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is produced and released by normal proteolytic processing of the amyloid beta protein precursor (beta APP) and is readily detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we present the levels of A beta in CSF from a total of 95 subjects, including 38 patients with AD, 14 with early-onset AD and 24 with late-onset AD, 25 normal control subjects, and 32 patients with other neurological diseases. The level of A beta decreased with normal aging, and there was a significant elevation in the level of A beta in the CSF of early-onset AD patients (4.14 +/- 1.37 pmol/ml, p < 0.01). Neither Mini-Mental State nor Functional Assessment Staging were correlated with the amount of A beta in the CSF. The A beta/secreted form of beta APP ratio was elevated, but the level of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the CSF did not correlate with the level of CSF A beta in early-onset AD patients. Thus, the level of A beta in the CSF is elevated in early-onset AD patients and is suggested to be correlated with the pathology in the brain that characterizes AD. PMID:7998778

  16. High levels of gene expression explain the strong evolutionary constraint of mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Nabholz, Benoit; Ellegren, Hans; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2013-02-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution has been widely accepted as the guiding principle for understanding how selection affects gene sequence evolution. One of its central predictions is that the rate at which proteins evolve should negatively scale with effective population size (N(e)). In contrast to the expectation of reduced selective constraint in the mitochondrial genome following from its lower N(e), we observe what can be interpreted as the opposite: for a taxonomically diverse set of organisms (birds, mammals, insects, and nematodes), mitochondrially encoded protein-coding genes from the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (mtOXPHOS; n = 12-13) show markedly stronger signatures of purifying selection (illustrated by low d(N)/d(S)) than their nuclear counterparts interacting in the same pathway (nuOXPHOS; n: ∼75). To understand these unexpected evolutionary dynamics, we consider a number of structural and functional parameters including gene expression, hydrophobicity, transmembrane position, gene ontology, GC content, substitution rate, proportion of amino acids in transmembrane helices, and protein-protein interaction. Across all taxa, unexpectedly large differences in gene expression levels (RNA-seq) between nuclear and mitochondrially encoded genes, and to a lower extent hydrophobicity, explained most of the variation in d(N)/d(S). Similarly, differences in d(N)/d(S) between functional OXPHOS protein complexes could largely be explained by gene expression differences. Overall, by including gene expression and other functional parameters, the unexpected mitochondrial evolutionary dynamics can be understood. Our results not only reaffirm the link between gene expression and protein evolution but also open new questions about the functional role of expression level variation between mitochondrial genes. PMID:23071102

  17. High levels of gene expression explain the strong evolutionary constraint of mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Nabholz, Benoit; Ellegren, Hans; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2013-02-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution has been widely accepted as the guiding principle for understanding how selection affects gene sequence evolution. One of its central predictions is that the rate at which proteins evolve should negatively scale with effective population size (N(e)). In contrast to the expectation of reduced selective constraint in the mitochondrial genome following from its lower N(e), we observe what can be interpreted as the opposite: for a taxonomically diverse set of organisms (birds, mammals, insects, and nematodes), mitochondrially encoded protein-coding genes from the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (mtOXPHOS; n = 12-13) show markedly stronger signatures of purifying selection (illustrated by low d(N)/d(S)) than their nuclear counterparts interacting in the same pathway (nuOXPHOS; n: ∼75). To understand these unexpected evolutionary dynamics, we consider a number of structural and functional parameters including gene expression, hydrophobicity, transmembrane position, gene ontology, GC content, substitution rate, proportion of amino acids in transmembrane helices, and protein-protein interaction. Across all taxa, unexpectedly large differences in gene expression levels (RNA-seq) between nuclear and mitochondrially encoded genes, and to a lower extent hydrophobicity, explained most of the variation in d(N)/d(S). Similarly, differences in d(N)/d(S) between functional OXPHOS protein complexes could largely be explained by gene expression differences. Overall, by including gene expression and other functional parameters, the unexpected mitochondrial evolutionary dynamics can be understood. Our results not only reaffirm the link between gene expression and protein evolution but also open new questions about the functional role of expression level variation between mitochondrial genes.

  18. Correlating Flavivirus virulence and levels of intrinsic disorder in shell proteins: protective roles vs. immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-05-24

    Computational analyses revealed correlations between the intrinsic disorder propensity of shell proteins and case fatality rates (CFRs) among Flaviviruses and within at least two Flavivirus species, such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and dengue virus (DENV). The shell proteins analyzed in this study are capsid (C) and membrane (PrM, Pr, and M) proteins. The highest correlations can be found when regression analyses were conducted using Pr (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.78, p < 0.01) or M (Flavivirus: r(2) = 0.91, p < 0.01) as an independent variable with C and CFR as co-explanatory and dependent variables, respectively. Interestingly, while predicted intrinsic disorder levels (PIDs) of both C and M are positively correlated with the virulence, the PIDs of Pr and CFR are negatively correlated. This is likely due to the fact that the Pr portion of PrM plays various roles in protecting the virion from damage, whereas M and C are assisted by greater potential in binding promiscuity as a result of greater disorder. The C protein of yellow fever virus (YFV), which is the most virulent virus in the sample, has the highest PID levels, whereas the second most virulent TBEV FE subtype has the second highest PID score due to its C protein, and the least virulent West Nile virus (WNV) has the least disordered C protein. This knowledge can be used while working on the development and identification of attenuated strains for vaccine. Curiously, unlike Flaviviruses, a disordered outer shell was described for hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which currently have no effective vaccine.

  19. Quantitative plasma proteome analysis reveals aberrant level of blood coagulation-related proteins in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pei-Hua; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shu-Chen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chi-De; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2011-05-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), one of the most common cancers in Southeast Asia, is not easily diagnosed until advanced stages. To discover potential biomarkers for improving NPC diagnosis, we herein identified the aberrant plasma proteins in NPC patients. We first removed the top-seven abundant proteins from plasma samples of healthy controls and NPC patients, and then labeled the samples with different fluorescent cyanine dyes. The labeled samples were then mixed equally and fractionated with ion-exchange chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Proteins showing altered levels in NPC patients were identified by in-gel tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS. When the biological roles of the 45 identified proteins were assessed via MetaCore™ analysis, the blood coagulation pathway emerged as the most significantly altered pathway in NPC plasma. Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) were chosen for evaluation as the candidate NPC biomarkers because of their involvement in blood coagulation. ELISAs confirmed the elevation of their plasma levels in NPC patients versus healthy controls. Western blot and activity assays further showed that the KLKB1 active form was significantly increased in NPC plasma. Collectively, our results identified the significant alteration of blood coagulation pathway in NPC patients, and KLKB1 and TAT may represent the potential NPC biomarkers.

  20. Phylogenomic evaluation of members above the species level within the phylum Firmicutes based on conserved proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhitang

    2015-04-01

    Currently, numerous taxonomic units above species level of the phylum Firmicutes are ambiguously placed in the phylogeny determined by 16S rRNA gene. Here, we evaluated the use of 16S rRNA gene compared with 81 conserved proteins (CPs) or 41 ribosomal proteins (RPs) as phylogenetic markers and applied this to the analysis of the phylum Firmicutes. Results show that the phylogenetic trees constructed are in good agreement with each other; however, the protein-based trees are able to resolve the relationships between several branches where so far only ambiguous classifications are possible. Thus, the phylogeny deduced based on concatenated proteins provides significant basis for re-classifying members in this phylum. It indicates that the genera Coprothermobacter and Thermodesulfobium represent two new phyla; the families Paenibacillaceae and Alicyclobacillaceae should be elevated to order level; and the families Bacillaceae and Thermodesulfobiaceae should be separated to 2 and 3 families respectively. We also suggest that four novel families should be proposed in the orders Clostridiales and Bacillales, and 11 genera should be moved to other existing families different from the current classification status. Moreover, notably, RPs are a well-suited subset of CPs that could be applied to Firmicutes phylogenetic analysis instead of the 16S rRNA gene.

  1. Ultraviolet-ozone treatment reduces levels of disease-associated prion protein and prion infectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Gilbert, P.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by novel infectious agents referred to as prions. Prions appear to be composed primarily, if not exclusively, of a misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein. TSE infectivity is remarkably stable and can resist many aggressive decontamination procedures, increasing human, livestock and wildlife exposure to TSEs. Findings. We tested the hypothesis that UV-ozone treatment reduces levels of the pathogenic prion protein and inactivates the infectious agent. We found that UV-ozone treatment decreased the carbon and prion protein content in infected brain homogenate to levels undetectable by dry-ashing carbon analysis or immunoblotting, respectively. After 8 weeks of ashing, UV-ozone treatment reduced the infectious titer of treated material by a factor of at least 105. A small amount of infectivity, however, persisted despite UV-ozone treatment. When bound to either montmorillonite clay or quartz surfaces, PrPTSE was still susceptible to degradation by UV-ozone. Conclusion. Our findings strongly suggest that UV-ozone treatment can degrade pathogenic prion protein and inactivate prions, even when the agent is associated with surfaces. Using larger UV-ozone doses or combining UV-ozone treatment with other decontaminant methods may allow the sterilization of TSE-contaminated materials. ?? 2009 Aiken et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  3. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  4. The human phenolsulphotransferase polymorphism is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A L; Roberts, R C; Coughtrie, M W

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of platelet phenolsulphotransferase (PST) in 60 individuals. Using an antibody which recognizes both forms of PST present in man (P-PST and M-PST), we determined that the polymorphism of platelet P-PST activity is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein. The implications for susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8257413

  5. Effects of antidepressant drugs on synaptic protein levels and dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Chan Hong; Cho, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Bong Ju; Kim, Ji Eun; Seol, Wongi; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Sung Woo

    2014-04-01

    The alteration of hippocampal plasticity has been proposed to play a critical role in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. In this study, the ability of different classes of antidepressant drugs (escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine) to mediate the expression of synaptic proteins and dendritic outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons was investigated under toxic conditions induced by B27 deprivation, which causes hippocampal cell death. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (SYP) levels were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Additionally, dendritic outgrowth was examined to determine whether antidepressant drugs affect the dendritic morphology of hippocampal neurons in B27-deprived cultures. Escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine significantly prevented B27 deprivation-induced decreases in levels of PSD-95, BDNF, and SYP. Moreover, the independent application of fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline significantly increased levels of BDNF under normal conditions. All antidepressant drugs significantly increased the total outgrowth of hippocampal dendrites under B27 deprivation. Specific inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), KN-93, protein kinase A (PKA), H-89, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, significantly decreased the effects of antidepressant drugs on dendritic outgrowth, whereas this effect was observed only with tianeptine for the PI3K inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggest that certain antidepressant drugs can enhance synaptic protein levels and encourage dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, effects on dendritic outgrowth likely require CaMKII, PKA, or PI3K signaling pathways. The observed effects may be may be due to chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs. PMID:24296153

  6. Oral supplementation with whey proteins increases plasma glutathione levels of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Micke, P; Beeh, K M; Schlaak, J F; Buhl, R

    2001-02-01

    HIV infection is characterized by an enhanced oxidant burden and a systemic deficiency of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant. The semi-essential amino acid cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and limits its synthesis. Therefore, different strategies to supplement cysteine supply have been suggested to increase glutathione levels in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with two different cysteine-rich whey protein formulas on plasma GSH levels and parameters of oxidative stress and immune status in HIV-infected patients. In a prospective double blind clinical trial, 30 patients (25 male, 5 female; mean age (+/- SD) 42 +/- 9.8 years) with stable HIV infection (221 +/- 102 CD4 + lymphocytes L-1) were randomized to a supplemental diet with a daily dose of 45 g whey proteins of either Protectamin (Fresenius Kabi, Bad Hamburg, Germany) or Immunocal (Immunotec, Vandreuil, Canada) for two weeks. Plasma concentrations of total, reduced and oxidized GSH, superoxide anion (O2-) release by blood mononuclear cells, plasma levels of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and 12 were quantified with standard methods at baseline and after therapy. Pre-therapy, plasma GSH levels (Protectamin: 1.92 +/- 0.6 microM; Immunocal: 1.98 +/- 0.9 microM) were less than normal (2.64 +/- 0.7 microM, P = 0.03). Following two weeks of oral supplementation with whey proteins, plasma GSH levels increased in the Protectamin group by 44 +/- 56% (2.79 +/- 1.2 microM, P = 0.004) while the difference in the Immunocal group did not reach significance (+ 24.5 +/- 59%, 2.51 +/- 1.48 microM, P = 0.43). Spontaneous O2- release by blood mononuclear cells was stable (20.1 +/- 14.2 vs. 22.6 +/- 16.1 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.52) whereas PMA-induced O2- release decreased in the Protectamin group (53.7 +/- 19 vs. 39.8 +/- 18 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and

  7. Melamine Impairs Female Fertility via Suppressing Protein Level of Juno in Mouse Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Mianqun; Lu, Yajuan; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Sun, Shaochen; Xiong, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is an organic nitrogenous compound widely used as an industrial chemical, and it has been recently reported by us that melamine has a toxic effect on the female reproductive system in mice, and renders females subfertile; the molecular basis, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we explore the underlying mechanism regarding how melamine compromises fertility in the mouse. The data showed that melamine exposure significantly impaired the fertilization capability of the egg during in vitro fertilization. To further figure out the cause, we analyzed ovastacin localization and protein level, the sperm binding ability of zona pellucida, and ZP2 cleavage status in unfertilized eggs from melamine fed mice, and no obvious differences were found between control and treatment groups. However, the protein level of Juno on the egg plasma membrane in the high-dose feeding group indeed significantly decreased compared to the control group. Thus, these data suggest that melamine compromises female fertility via suppressing Juno protein level on the egg membrane. PMID:26633308

  8. Melamine Impairs Female Fertility via Suppressing Protein Level of Juno in Mouse Eggs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Mianqun; Lu, Yajuan; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Sun, Shaochen; Xiong, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is an organic nitrogenous compound widely used as an industrial chemical, and it has been recently reported by us that melamine has a toxic effect on the female reproductive system in mice, and renders females subfertile; the molecular basis, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we explore the underlying mechanism regarding how melamine compromises fertility in the mouse. The data showed that melamine exposure significantly impaired the fertilization capability of the egg during in vitro fertilization. To further figure out the cause, we analyzed ovastacin localization and protein level, the sperm binding ability of zona pellucida, and ZP2 cleavage status in unfertilized eggs from melamine fed mice, and no obvious differences were found between control and treatment groups. However, the protein level of Juno on the egg plasma membrane in the high-dose feeding group indeed significantly decreased compared to the control group. Thus, these data suggest that melamine compromises female fertility via suppressing Juno protein level on the egg membrane.

  9. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  10. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Carvalho, Ana F. U.; Oliveira, José Tadeu A.; Farias, Davi F.; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  11. Studies of composition and major protein level in milk and colostrum of mares.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Ewa; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Zachwieja, Andrzej; Szulc, Tadeusz; Czyż, Katarzyna

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the changes in composition and physicochemical features (pH, density, thermostability and acidity) of mare colostrum and milk, and of protein fraction contribution (serum albumin, β-casein, γ-casein, α-lactalbumin, G class immunoglobulins) depending on lactation stage. The research material was colostrum and milk samples from 12 Arabian mares. Colostrum samples were collected within 2 h after parturition and milk samples were collected twice, in the 3rd and 6th weeks of lactation. The level of basic milk components decreased significantly (only lactose content increased) as compared to colostrum. Total bacteria count and somatic cell count decreased significantly with an increase in resistance and urea level. The changes observed were connected to differentiated contribution of particular protein fractions and their relative proportions. Lower levels of γ-casein (P ≤ 0.05), β-casein, serum albumin as well as α-lactalbumin were observed in colostrum as compared to those in milk. Any relationship between lactation stage and β-casein content was observed. Serum albumin and α-lactalbumin content increased in subsequent milkings. The level of G class immunoglobulins decreased significantly and its highest level was noted in colostrum. Any significant differences between the 3rd and 6th lactation weeks were obtained. PMID:22339698

  12. Birdsong decreases protein levels of FoxP2, a molecule required for human speech.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie E; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Condro, Michael C; Dosumu-Johnson, Ryan T; Geschwind, Daniel H; White, Stephanie A

    2008-10-01

    Cognitive and motor deficits associated with language and speech are seen in humans harboring FOXP2 mutations. The neural bases for FOXP2 mutation-related deficits are thought to reside in structural abnormalities distributed across systems important for language and motor learning including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In these brain regions, our prior research showed that FoxP2 mRNA expression patterns are strikingly similar between developing humans and songbirds. Within the songbird brain, this pattern persists throughout life and includes the striatal subregion, Area X, that is dedicated to song development and maintenance. The persistent mRNA expression suggests a role for FoxP2 that extends beyond the formation of vocal learning circuits to their ongoing use. Because FoxP2 is a transcription factor, a role in shaping circuits likely depends on FoxP2 protein levels which might not always parallel mRNA levels. Indeed our current study shows that FoxP2 protein, like its mRNA, is acutely downregulated in mature Area X when adult males sing with some differences. Total corticosterone levels associated with the different behavioral contexts did not vary, indicating that differences in FoxP2 levels are not likely attributable to stress. Our data, together with recent reports on FoxP2's target genes, suggest that lowered FoxP2 levels may allow for expression of genes important for circuit modification and thus vocal variability.

  13. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  14. Level of dietary protein does not impact whole body protein turnover during an exercise induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of a high protein diet on whole body protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. A sustained energy deficit induced by energy intake restriction increases protein catabolism which can cause lean-body mass loss. A high-protein diet has be...

  15. Plasma proteins as indices of response to nutritional therapy in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ota, D M; Frasier, P; Guevara, J; Foulkes, M

    1985-07-01

    The use of plasma albumin (ALB), transferrin (TFN), prealbumin (TBPA), retinol-binding protein (RBP), triceps skin fold (TSF), and midarm muscle circumference (MAMC) as determinants of response to nutritional therapy (TPN) was investigated in 40 cancer patients during preoperative TPN. Thirty-one patients received 90% or more of their anabolic caloric requirement (Harris-Benedict equation) by means of TPN. During this study period (average 11.1 +/- 4.7 days) nutritional assessments were completed before TPN and on the last day of TPN before surgery. Average weight loss based on usual body wt (UBW) and ideal body wt (IBW) was 19 +/- 11% and 9 +/- 15%, respectively (not significant, NS). Weight loss (UBW) correlated with ALB (P less than 0.001), TBPA (P less than 0.005) and RBP (P less than 0.02) but did not correlate with TFN (P less than 0.06), TSF, and MAMC. Weight loss (IBW) correlated with TSF (P less than 0.01) and MAMC (P less than 0.03) but did not correlate with plasma protein (PP). During TPN the average percent increases for PP were 0.1% (ALB, NS), 20% (TFN, NS), 60% (TBPA, P less than 0.02), and 116% (RBP, P less than 0.005). These results suggest that plasma TBPA and RBP are significant parameters of response to short-term nutritional therapy in cancer patients.

  16. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  17. Wolbachia Endosymbionts Modify Drosophila Ovary Protein Levels in a Context-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Steen; Pérez Dulzaides, Ricardo; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Momtaz, A. J. M. Zehadee; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Paul, Lake N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endosymbiosis is a unique form of interaction between organisms, with one organism dwelling inside the other. One of the most widespread endosymbionts is Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium carried by insects, crustaceans, mites, and filarial nematodes. Although candidate proteins that contribute to maternal transmission have been identified, the molecular basis for maternal Wolbachia transmission remains largely unknown. To investigate transmission-related processes in response to Wolbachia infection, ovarian proteomes were analyzed from Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Endogenous and variant host-strain combinations were investigated. Significant and differentially abundant ovarian proteins were detected, indicating substantial regulatory changes in response to Wolbachia. Variant Wolbachia strains were associated with a broader impact on the ovary proteome than endogenous Wolbachia strains. The D. melanogaster ovarian environment also exhibited a higher level of diversity of proteomic responses to Wolbachia than D. simulans. Overall, many Wolbachia-responsive ovarian proteins detected in this study were consistent with expectations from the experimental literature. This suggests that context-specific changes in protein abundance contribute to Wolbachia manipulation of transmission-related mechanisms in oogenesis. IMPORTANCE Millions of insect species naturally carry bacterial endosymbionts called Wolbachia. Wolbachia bacteria are transmitted by females to their offspring through a robust egg-loading mechanism. The molecular basis for Wolbachia transmission remains poorly understood at this time, however. This proteomic study identified specific fruit fly ovarian proteins as being upregulated or downregulated in response to Wolbachia infection. The majority of these protein responses correlated specifically with the type of host and Wolbachia strain involved. This work corroborates previously identified

  18. Effects of fat and protein levels on foraging preferences of tannin in scatter-hoarding rodents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Both as consumers and dispersers of seeds, scatter-hoarding rodents often play an important role in the reproductive ecology of many plant species. However, the seeds of many plant species contain tannins, which are a diverse group of water-soluble phenolic compounds that have a high affinity for proteins. The amount of tannins in seeds is expected to affect rodent foraging preferences because of their major impact on rodent physiology and survival. However, variable results have been obtained in studies that evaluated the effects of tannin on rodent foraging behavior. Hence, in this study, we aimed to explain these inconsistent results and proposed that a combination of seed traits might be important in rodent foraging behavior, because it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of individual traits on rodent foraging behavior and the interactions among them. By using a novel artificial seed system, we manipulated seed tannin and fat/protein levels to examine directly the univariate effects of each component on the seed preferences of free-ranging forest rats (Apodemus latronum and Apodemus chevrieri) during the behavioral process of scatter hoarding. Our results showed that both tannin and fat/protein had significant effects on rodent foraging behavior. Although only a few interactive effects of tannin and fat/protein were recorded, higher concentrations of both fat and protein could attenuate the exclusion of seeds with higher tannin concentrations by rodents, thus influencing seed fate. Furthermore, aside from the concentrations of tannin, fat, and protein, numerous other traits of plant seeds may also influence rodent foraging behavior. We suggest that by clarifying rodent foraging preferences, a better understanding of the evolution of plant seed traits may be obtained because of their strong potential for selective pressure.

  19. Effect of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate on the activity levels of certain plasma enzymes in CCl4-induced liver injury in low-protein fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, C Z; Opoku, A R; Terblanche, S E

    2005-04-01

    The effects of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo) protein isolate on the activity levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury in low-protein fed rats were investigated. A group of male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on a low-protein diet for 5 days were divided into three subgroups. Two subgroups were injected with carbon tetrachloride and the other group with an equivalent amount of olive oil. Two hours after CCl4 intoxication one of the two subgroups was administered with pumpkin seed protein isolate. All three subgroups of rats were maintained on the low-protein diet for the duration of the investigation. Groups of rats from the different subgroups were killed at 24, 48 and 72 h after their respective treatments. After 5 days on the low-protein diet the activity levels of all four enzymes were significantly higher than their counterparts on a normal balanced diet. CCl4 intoxication resulted in significant increases in the activity levels of all four enzymes investigated. The administration of pumpkin seed protein isolate after CCl4 intoxication resulted in significantly reduced activity levels of all four enzymes. It is concluded that pumpkin seed protein isolate administration was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects associated with protein malnutrition.

  20. Serum levels of hypersensitive-C-reactive protein in moderate and severe acne

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, M. R.; Parhizkar, A. R.; Jowkar, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to occur in psoriasis, urticaria, acne, rosacea and many other dermatological and nondermatological conditions. Chronic systemic inflammation has been implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and even carcinogenesis. The present study is designed to determine whether the level of inflammation created by acne vulgaris could be high enough to raise the serum levels of high-sensitive CRP. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris were enrolled, along with 44 age and sex matched healthy blood donors as controls. Hypersensitive-CRP (Hs-CRP) was measured in both groups. Results: Hypersensitive-C-reactive protein levels in the case group varied between 0 and 28.1 μg/ml with an average of 2.24 ± 4.87 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation) and a median of 0.6 μg/ml (interquartile range [IQR] =0.3, 1.4 μg/ml). Hs-CRP levels of the control group varied between 0 and 14 μg/ml with an average of 3.12 ± 3.67 μg/ml and a median of 1.5 μg/ml (IQR = 0.55, 5.0 μg/ml). No significant difference of Hs-CRP level between the two groups was seen (t = –0.961, 95% confidence interval: Lower = –2.6942, upper = 0.9377; P = 0.339). Additionally, no significant difference in the level of Hs-CRP was noted between the moderate and severe acne groups (95% confidence interval: Lower = –5.2495, upper = 1.6711; P = 0.165). Conclusion: Acne vulgaris, even in its severe grades (excluding acne fulminans and acne conglobata), does not induce significant inflammation at the systemic level. PMID:26225329

  1. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  2. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  3. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  4. Levels of Antibodies against Human Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 60 in Patients with Glaucoma in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Olesińska, Marzena; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Kocięcki, Jarosandlstrokaw; Sikora, Mariusz; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Tesla, Piotr; Czarnocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Although elevated intraocular pressure is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma, there is increasing evidence that the immune system may be involved in the development of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG is associated with elevated levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. Material/Methods The study was conducted in 139 subjects (35 subjects with NTG [Group 1], 34 subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma/POAG/[Group 2], 24 subjects with autoimmune rheumatic diseases [Group 3], and 36 healthy controls [Group 4]). All subjects had complete ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, tonometry, gonioscopy; visual-field examination, and optical coherence tomography/OCT/of the optic nerve head and the macula). Blood samples were collected for the measurements of serum levels of antibodies against human HSP60. Results The subjects with rheumatic diseases had the highest median serum level of antibodies against HSP60 – 20.49 ng/mL. The values in the subjects with NTG, POAG, and in controls were 18.79 ng/mL, 18.61 ng/mL and 17.61 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.96). Conclusions This study does not confirm the hypothesis that normal-tension glaucoma is associated with elevated blood levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. PMID:25786333

  5. Global analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation levels in nicotine-treated pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor in pancreatic disease, however, the biochemical mechanisms correlating smoking with pancreatic dysfunction remain poorly understood. Strategies using multiplexed isobaric tag-based mass spectrometry facilitate the study of drug-induced perturbations on biological systems. Here, we present the first large scale analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic alterations in pancreatic stellate cells following treatment with two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands: nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. We treated cells with nicotine or α-bungarotoxin for 12hr in triplicate and compared alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation levels to mock treated cells using a tandem mass tag (TMT9plex)-based approach. Over 8,100 proteins were quantified across all nine samples of which 46 were altered in abundance upon treatment with nicotine. Proteins with increased abundance included those associated with neurons, defense mechanisms, indicators of pancreatic disease and lysosomal proteins. In addition, we measured differences for ∼16,000 phosphorylation sites across all nine samples using a titanium dioxide-based strategy, of which 132 sites were altered with nicotine and 451 with α-bungarotoxin treatment. Many altered phosphorylation sites were involved in nuclear function and transcriptional events. This study supports the development of future targeted investigations to establish a better understanding for the role of nicotine and associated receptors in pancreatic disease. PMID:26265067

  6. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; DeSmet, Marsha; Thomas, Yanique; Morgan, Iain M.; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  7. Genetic contribution to C-reactive protein levels in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Geneviève; Guénard, Frédéric; Bouchard, Luigi; Garneau, Véronique; Turcot, Valérie; Houde, Alain; Tchernof, André; Bergeron, Jean; Deshaies, Yves; Hould, Frédéric-Simon; Lebel, Stéfane; Marceau, Picard; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2012-03-01

    Obese individuals are characterized by a chronic, low-grade inflammatory state. Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, have been observed in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. We have previously reported that genes encoding proteins involved in the anti-inflammatory and immune response are differentially expressed in visceral adipose tissue of obese men with or without the metabolic syndrome. Among these genes, the interferon-gamma-inducible protein 30 (IFI30), CD163 molecule (CD163), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 (CXCL9) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), were selected for further genetic analyses. The aim of the study was to verify whether IFI30, CD163, CXCL9 and TSLP gene polymorphisms contribute to explain the inter-individual variability of the inflammatory profile of obesity assessed by plasma high-sensitivity CRP concentrations. A total of 1185 severely obese individuals were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering most of the sequence-derived genetic variability at the IFI30, CD163, CXCL9 and TSLP gene loci (total of 27 SNPs). Following measurement of plasma CRP levels, subjects were divided into two groups, low vs. high using the median value of plasma CRP levels (8.31 mg/L) as a cutoff point. Genotype frequencies were compared between groups. Associations between genotypes and plasma CRP levels (continuous variable) were also tested after adjustments for age, sex, smoking and BMI. The rs11554159 and rs7125 IFI30 SNPs showed a significant difference in genotype frequencies (p<0.05) between subgroups of low vs. high plasma CRP levels (wild type homozygotes: rs11554159=47% vs. 55%, rs7125=31% vs. 24%, for low vs. high CRP groups, respectively). The association between rs11554159 and CRP levels as a continuous variable remained significant (p=0.004). Both carriers of the GA and AA genotypes demonstrated, on average, a 13% lower CRP levels in comparison with GG homozygotes. No association was

  8. Identification of proteins whose synthesis is preferentially enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Okudaira, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Eriko; Higashi, Kyohei; Kaneko, Mayumi; Ishii, Itsuko; Nishimura, Tomoe; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2009-11-01

    In Escherichia coli, several proteins whose synthesis is enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation have been identified. We looked for proteins that are similarly regulated in eukaryotes using a mouse mammary carcinoma FM3A cell culture system. Polyamine deficiency was induced by adding an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-difluoromethylornithine, to the medium. Proteins enhanced by polyamines were determined by comparison of protein levels in control and polyamine-deficient cells using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and were identified by Edman degradation and/or LC/MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Polyamine stimulation of the synthesis of these proteins at the level of translation was confirmed by measuring levels of the corresponding mRNAs and proteins, and levels of the [(35)S]methionine pulse-labeled proteins. The proteins identified in this way were T-complex protein 1, beta subunit (Cct2); heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (Hnrpl); and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Pgam1). Since Cct2 was most strongly enhanced by polyamines among three proteins, the mechanism of polyamine stimulation of Cct2 synthesis was studied using NIH3T3 cells transiently transfected with genes encoding Cct2-EGFP fusion mRNA with normal or mutated 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Cct2 mRNA. Polyamines most likely enhanced ribosome shunting on the 5'-UTR of Cct2 mRNA. PMID:19427401

  9. Transcriptional bursting explains the noise–versus–mean relationship in mRNA and protein levels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-07-28

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: thatmore » increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. In conclusion, the data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.« less

  10. Retroviral vectors elevate coexpressed protein levels in trans through cap-dependent translation

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Yongqiang; Byun, Hyewon; Zook, Adam E.; B. Singh, Gurvani; Nash, Andrea K.; Lozano, Mary M.; Dudley, Jaquelin P.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviruses cause immunodeficiency and cancer but also are used as vectors for the expression of heterologous genes. Nevertheless, optimal translation of introduced genes often is not achieved. Here we show that transfection into mammalian cells of lentiviral or gammaretroviral vectors, including those with specific shRNAs, increased expression of a cotransfected gene relative to standard plasmid vectors. Levels of most endogenous cellular proteins were unchanged. Transfer of lentiviral vector sequences into a standard plasmid conferred the ability to give increased expression of cotransfected genes (superinduction). Superinduction by the retroviral vector was not dependent on the cell type or species, the type of reporter gene, or the method of transfection. No differences were detected in the IFN, unfolded protein, or stress responses in the presence of retroviral vectors. RT-PCRs revealed that RNA levels of cotransfected genes were unchanged during superinduction, yet Western blotting, pulse labeling, and the use of bicistronic vectors showed increased cap-dependent translation of cointroduced genes. Expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase target 4E-BP1, but not the mTOR inhibitor Torin 1, preferentially inhibited superinduction relative to basal protein expression. Furthermore, transcription of lentiviral vector sequences from a doxycycline-inducible promoter eliminated superinduction, consistent with a DNA-triggered event. Thus, retroviral DNA increased translation of cointroduced genes in trans by an mTOR-independent signaling mechanism. Our experiments have broad applications for the design of retroviral vectors for transfections, DNA vaccines, and gene therapy. PMID:25737543

  11. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise–Versus–Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-to-cell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean. PMID:27467384

  12. Influence of cyclophilin D protein expression level on endothelial cell oxidative damage resistance.

    PubMed

    Peng, J Z; Xue, L; Chen, J; Chen, B S; Yang, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of cyclophilin-D (CypD) protein expression level on endothelial cell oxidative damage resistance. A model of CypD protein expression or high expression in endothelial cells was established through gene silencing or cloning. The comparable groups were normal endothelial cells cultured in phosphate-buffered solution in liquid handling cells containing 500 mM H2O2 for 90 or 120 min, and then the medium was replaced with common nutrient solution and cultured again for 24 h. The apoptosis rate and nitric oxide (NO) levels of each group were tested. The cell apoptosis rate of the CyPD low expression group (32.51 ± 6.6 %) was significantly lower than that of the control group (52.57 ± 5.84%, P = 0.001), and total NO production was 24.06 ± 3 and 13.03 ± 3.55 μM. The apoptosis rate of the CyPD high expression group (24.24 + 3.08%) was significantly higher than that of the control group (7.7 + 0.68%, P < 0.001); total NO production was 3.55 ± 1.53 and 8.46 ± 0.77 μM, which was significantly different (P = 0.008). CypD protein could increase oxidative stress and cause endothelial cell injury and apoptosis.

  13. Serum levels of bone Gla-protein in inhabitants exposed to environmental cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, T.; Honda, R.; Tsuritani, I.; Ishizaki, M.; Yamada, Y.; Nakagawa, H.; Nogawa, K.; Dohi, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    Serum levels of bone Gla-protein (BGP)--the vitamin K-dependent CA2(+)-binding protein--were evaluated in 76 cadmium (Cd)-exposed subjects with renal tubular dysfunction (32 men, 44 women) and 133 nonexposed subjects (53 men, 80 women). Serum BGP levels were higher in the Cd-exposed subjects than in nonexposed subjects. Significant correlations between BGP and each index measured by bone microdensitometry (MD), serum alkaline phosphatase activity, and Cd in blood and urine were found. For all of the Cd-exposed and nonexposed men and women, BGP showed a significant standard partial regression coefficient (multiple regression analysis) with the metacarpal index (MCI), which was one of the MD indicators. Bone Gla-protein also correlated significantly with urinary beta 2-microglobulin in the men and with serum creatinine in the women. Serum BGP values strongly reflect the degree of bone damage and also reflect, although less strongly, the degree of renal damage induced by exposure to Cd.

  14. Telomere protein RAP1 levels are affected by cellular aging and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark J.; Baribault, Michelle E.; Israel, Joanna N.; Bae, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are important for maintaining the integrity of the genome through the action of the shelterin complex. Previous studies indicted that the length of the telomere did not have an effect on the amount of the shelterin subunits; however, those experiments were performed using immortalized cells with stable telomere lengths. The interest of the present study was to observe how decreasing telomere lengths over successive generations would affect the shelterin subunits. As neonatal human dermal fibroblasts aged and their telomeres became shorter, the levels of the telomere-binding protein telomeric repeat factor 2 (TRF2) decreased significantly. By contrast, the levels of one of its binding partners, repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1), decreased to a lesser extent than would be expected from the decrease in TRF2. Other subunits, TERF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 and protection of telomeres protein 1, remained stable. The decrease in RAP1 in the older cells occurred in the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress was used as an artificial means of aging in the cells, and this resulted in RAP1 levels decreasing, but the effect was only observed in the nuclear portion. Similar results were obtained using U251 glioblastoma cells treated with H2O2 or grown in serum-depleted medium. The present findings indicate that TRF2 and RAP1 levels decrease as fibroblasts naturally age. RAP1 remains more stable compared to TRF2. RAP1 also responds to oxidative stress, but the response is different to that observed in aging. PMID:27446538

  15. Uncoupling protein 3 expression levels influence insulin sensitivity, fatty acid oxidation, and related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Senese, Rosalba; Valli, Vivien; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Cioffi, Federica; Silvestri, Elena; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Controversy exists on whether uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) positively or negatively influences insulin sensitivity in vivo, and the underlying signaling pathways have been scarcely studied. We studied how a progressive reduction in UCP3 expression (using UCP3 +/+, UCP3 +/-, and UCP3 -/- mice) modulates insulin sensitivity and related metabolic parameters. In order to further validate our observations, we also studied animals in which insulin resistance was induced by administration of a high-fat diet (HFD). In UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice, gastrocnemius muscle Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) (serine 473) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (threonine 171) phosphorylation, and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) membrane levels were reduced compared to UCP3 +/+ mice. The HOMA-IR index (insulin resistance parameter) was increased both in the UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In these mice, insulin administration normalized Akt/PKB phosphorylation between genotypes while AMPK phosphorylation was further reduced, and sarcolemmal GLUT4 levels were induced but did not reach control levels. Furthermore, non-insulin-stimulated muscle fatty acid oxidation and the expression of several involved genes both in muscle and in liver were reduced. HFD administration induced insulin resistance in UCP3 +/+ mice and the aforementioned parameters resulted similar to those of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In conclusion, high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance in wild-type mice mimics that of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice showing that progressive reduction of UCP3 levels results in insulin resistance. This is accompanied by decreased fatty acid oxidation and a less intense Akt/PKB and AMPK signaling.

  16. Genome-Wide Tuning of Protein Expression Levels to Rapidly Engineer Microbial Traits.

    PubMed

    Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Weiss, Sophie J; Garst, Andrew D; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The reliable engineering of biological systems requires quantitative mapping of predictable and context-independent expression over a broad range of protein expression levels. However, current techniques for modifying expression levels are cumbersome and are not amenable to high-throughput approaches. Here we present major improvements to current techniques through the design and construction of E. coli genome-wide libraries using synthetic DNA cassettes that can tune expression over a ∼10(4) range. The cassettes also contain molecular barcodes that are optimized for next-generation sequencing, enabling rapid and quantitative tracking of alleles that have the highest fitness advantage. We show these libraries can be used to determine which genes and expression levels confer greater fitness to E. coli under different growth conditions. PMID:26478262

  17. Serum Levels of Surfactant Proteins in Patients with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema (CPFE)

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Andriana I.; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Manali, Effrosyni D.; Papadaki, Georgia; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Mazioti, Argyro; Tomos, Ioannis; Papanikolaou, Ilias; Loukides, Stelios; Chainis, Kyriakos; Karakitsos, Petros; Griese, Matthias; Papiris, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emphysema and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) present either per se or coexist in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). Serum surfactant proteins (SPs) A, B, C and D levels may reflect lung damage. We evaluated serum SP levels in healthy controls, emphysema, IPF, and CPFE patients and their associations to disease severity and survival. Methods 122 consecutive patients (31 emphysema, 62 IPF, and 29 CPFE) and 25 healthy controls underwent PFTs, ABG-measurements, 6MWT and chest HRCT. Serum levels of SPs were measured. Patients were followed-up for 1-year. Results SP-A and SP-D levels differed between groups (p = 0.006 and p<0.001 respectively). In post-hoc analysis, SP-A levels differed only between controls and CPFE (p<0.05) and CPFE and emphysema (p<0.05). SP-D differed between controls and IPF or CPFE (p<0.001 for both comparisons). In IPF SP-B correlated to pulmonary function while SP-A, correlated to the Composite Physiological Index (CPI). Controls current smokers had higher SP-A and SP-D levels compared to non-smokers (p = 0.026 and p = 0.023 respectively). SP-D levels were higher in CPFE patients with extended emphysema (p = 0.042). In patients with IPF, SP-B levels at the upper quartile of its range (≥26 ng/mL) presented a weak association with reduced survival (p = 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, serum SP-A and SP-D levels were higher where fibrosis exists or coexists and related to disease severity, suggesting that serum SPs relate to alveolar damage in fibrotic lungs and may reflect either local overproduction or overleakage. The weak association between high levels of SP-B and survival needs further validation in clinical trials. PMID:27337142

  18. Effect of altered eating pattern on serum fructosamine: total protein ratio and plasma glucose level.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, S L; Cheah, S H; Husain, R; Duncan, M T

    1989-05-01

    The effect of alteration of eating pattern during Ramadan on body mass index (BMI), serum fructosamine: total protein ratio (F/TP), and glucose level in 18 healthy male Asiatic Moslems were studied. The results showed a significant decrease (p less than 0.025) in F/TP at the second week of Ramadan in 11 subjects who experienced continuous decrease in BMI throughout Ramadan. The remaining 7 subjects showed no significant changes in BMI and F/TP. No evidence of hypoglycaemia was observed in the subjects during the study. Serum fructosamine: total protein ratio in subjects with altered eating pattern preferably should be interpreted along with the change in body mass index.

  19. Combined serum and tissue proteomic study applied to a c-Myc transgenic mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma identified novel disease regulated proteins suitable for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Borlak, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Notably, most HCCs display c-Myc hyperactivity but this transcription factor participates in the regulation of as many as 15-20% of genes of the human genome. To better understand its oncogenic activity, a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach was employed to search for disease-regulated proteins in liver tissue and serum of c-Myc transgenic mice that specifically developed HCC. Overall, a total of 90 differentially expressed proteins were identified with retinol binding protein 4, transthyretin, major urinary protein family, apolipoprotein E, and glutathione peroxidase being regulated in common in tissue and serum of HCC mice. Importantly, this study identified n = 22 novel tumor tissue-regulated proteins to function in cell cycle and proliferation, nucleotide and ribosomal biogenesis, oxidative stress, and GSH metabolism, while bioinformatics revealed the coding sequences of regulated proteins to enharbour c-Myc binding sites. Translation of the findings to human disease was achieved by Western immunoblotting of serum proteins and by immunohistochemistry of human HCC. Taken collectively, our study helps to define a c-Myc proteome suitable for diagnostic and possible therapeutic intervention strategies.

  20. C-reactive protein levels are influenced by common IL-1 gene variations.

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter; McConnell, Joseph P; Nunn, Martha; Kornman, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Julian; Stephenson, Katherine; Duff, Gordon W

    2002-02-21

    Elevated markers of systemic inflammation are associated with the development of acute coronary syndromes, but there is no current explanation for increased inflammation in overtly healthy individuals. The influence of genetic control of the inflammatory response on the observed variability is unknown. We studied the frequency of four polymorphisms in interleukin (IL) 1 genes, known to modulate inflammation, in 454 individuals undergoing coronary angiography and analysed their influence on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen levels. Females and smokers had higher levels of CRP than males (Pi = 0.001) and non-smokers (Pi = 0.001). Patients with genotype 2.2 for the IL-1B(+3954) polymorphism had twice the median CRP levels of patients who were genotype 1.1 (4.33 vs 2.01 mg/l; P = 0.001). Patients with genotype 1.2 or 2.2 at the IL-1A(+4845) polymorphism also had higher median CRP (2.92 vs 2.05 mg/l, Pi = 0.023). In multivariate analyses, CRP levels remained significantly associated with IL-1 polymorphisms after adjustment for smoking, gender and age. Fibrinogen levels had similar associations with the IL-1 genotypes. These data indicate that IL-1 gene polymorphisms known to affect the inflammatory response are highly related to plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen in patients referred for coronary angiography.

  1. Cystine levels, cystine flux, and protein catabolism in cancer cachexia, HIV/SIV infection, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Schmid, D; Breitkreutz, R; Stahl-Henning, C; Drings, P; Kinscherf, R; Taut, F; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    1997-01-01

    Patients with skeletal muscle catabolism (cachexia) fail to conserve the skeletal muscle protein and release large amounts of nitrogen as urea. Previous studies suggest that the threshold for the conversion of amino acids into other forms of chemical energy and the concomitant production of urea are regulated by the plasma cystine level and hepatic cysteine catabolism. Studies of plasma amino acid exchange rates in the lower extremities now show that healthy young subjects regulate their plasma cystine level in a process that may be described as controlled constructive catabolism. The term controlled describes the fact that the release of cystine and other amino acids from the peripheral tissue is negatively correlated with (certain) plasma amino acid levels. The term constructive describes the fact that the release of cystine is correlated with an increase of the plasma cystine level. The regulation of the plasma cystine level is disturbed in conditions with progressive skeletal muscle catabolism including cancer, HIV infection, and old age. These conditions show also a low plasma glutamine:cystine ratio indicative of an impaired hepatic cystine catabolism. In HIV+ patients and SIV-infected macaques, a decrease of the plasma cystine level was found to coincide with the decrease of CD4+ T cells.

  2. Mechanical spectroscopy of retina explants at the protein level employing nanostructured scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mayazur Rahman, S; Reichenbach, Andreas; Zink, Mareike; Mayr, Stefan G

    2016-04-14

    Development of neuronal tissue, such as folding of the brain, and formation of the fovea centralis in the human retina are intimately connected with the mechanical properties of the underlying cells and the extracellular matrix. In particular for neuronal tissue as complex as the vertebrate retina, mechanical properties are still a matter of debate due to their relation to numerous diseases as well as surgery, where the tension of the retina can result in tissue detachment during cutting. However, measuring the elasticity of adult retina wholemounts is difficult and until now only the mechanical properties at the surface have been characterized with micrometer resolution. Many processes, however, such as pathological changes prone to cause tissue rupture and detachment, respectively, are reflected in variations of retina elasticity at smaller length scales at the protein level. In the present work we demonstrate that freely oscillating cantilevers composed of nanostructured TiO2 scaffolds can be employed to study the frequency-dependent mechanical response of adult mammalian retina explants at the nanoscale. Constituting highly versatile scaffolds with strong tissue attachment for long-term organotypic culture atop, these scaffolds perform damped vibrations as fingerprints of the mechanical tissue properties that are derived using finite element calculations. Since the tissue adheres to the nanostructures via constitutive proteins on the photoreceptor side of the retina, the latter are stretched and compressed during vibration of the underlying scaffold. Probing mechanical response of individual proteins within the tissue, the proposed mechanical spectroscopy approach opens the way for studying tissue mechanics, diseases and the effect of drugs at the protein level. PMID:26947970

  3. A sensitive and facile assay for the measurement of activated protein C activity levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orthner, C L; Kolen, B; Drohan, W N

    1993-05-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease which plays an important role as a naturally occurring antithrombotic enzyme. APC, which is formed by thrombin-catalyzed limited proteolysis of the zymogen protein C, functions as an anticoagulant by proteolytic inactivation of the coagulation cofactors VIIIa and Va: APC is inhibited by several members of the serpin family as well a by alpha 2-macroglobulin. APC is being developed as a therapeutic for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We have developed an assay to quantify circulating levels of enzymatically active APC during its administration to patients, in healthy individuals, and in various disease states. This assay utilizes an EDTA-dependent anti-protein C monoclonal antibody (Mab) 7D7B10 to capture both APC and protein C from plasma, prepared from blood collected in an anticoagulant supplemented with the reversible inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. Mab 7D7B10-derivatized agarose beads are added to the wells of a 96-well filtration plate, equilibrated with Tris-buffered saline, and incubated for 10 min with 200 microliters of plasma. After washing, APC and protein C are eluted from the immunosorbent beads with a calcium-containing buffer into the wells of a 96-well microtiter plate containing antithrombin III (ATIII) and heparin. The amidolytic activity of APC is then measured on a kinetic plate reader following the addition of L-pyroglutamyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (S-2366) substrate. The rate of substrate hydrolysis was proportional to APC concentration over a 200-fold concentration range (5.0 to 1,000 ng/ml) when measured continuously over a 15 to 30 min time period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  5. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 mRNA and protein level in rat brain by addictive drugs].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Fan, Xue-Liang; Yang, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Yan; Ma, Lan

    2004-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) plays an important role in the regulation of GPCR-transduced signals. Our previous study showed that acute administration of morphine could significantly increase GRK5 mRNA level in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat brain. The current study investigated the potential effects of acute administration of addictive drugs including morphine, heroine and cocaine on GRK5 mRNA level in the rat brain using in situ hybridization and analyzed the effects of acute and chronic morphine treatments on GRK5 protein level in the rat brain using Western blotting assay. Our results showed that 2 h after the initial morphine (10 mg/kg), cocaine (15 mg/kg) and heroine (1 mg/kg) treatment, the mRNA level of GRK5 in the parietal cortex increased about 110% (P<0.01), 70% (P<0.05) and 100% (P<0.01), respectively. In the temporal cortex, GRK5 mRNA level increased about 90% (P<0.01), 40% (P<0.05) and 80.0% (P<0.01), respectively . In the hippocampus, the mRNA level of GRK5 increased about 60% (P<0.01), 30% (P<0.05) and 80% (P<0.01). However, the mRNA level of GRK5 remained unchanged after acute morphine, cocaine or heroine treatment. In the cerebral cortex of the rat brain, the acute administration of morphine (NS-Mor) increased GRK5 protein level by about 60% while the chronic morphine treatment (Mor-Mor) increased GRK5 protein level even higher [about 130% compared with the control group (chronic saline treatment, NS-NS) group, P<0.01]. In the hippocampus, GRK5 protein level remained unchanged after acute administration of morphine (P>0.1),while the level of GRK5 protein tended to decrease after chronic morphine treatment (P=0.098). In the thalamus, acute morphine treatment caused no change in GRK5 protein level (P>0.1) while after chronic morphine treatment, GRK5 protein level decreased significantly (more than 90%, P<0.01), Taken together, our results indicate that addictive drugs can regulate GRK5 in the rat brain on protein level

  6. Pomegranate juice consumption increases GSH levels and reduces lipid and protein oxidation in human blood.

    PubMed

    Matthaiou, Chrysoula M; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Sarafoglou, Eleni; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Koulocheri, Sofia D; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of pomegranate juice (PJ) consumption in humans. Thus, 14 healthy volunteers consumed PJ daily for a period of 15days and the changes of oxidative stress markers in their blood were assessed at four different time points, immediately before the experiment (T1), after 15days of juice administration (T2), one (T3) and three weeks (T4) after the interruption of PJ administration. The markers studied were total antioxidant capacity (TAC), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (CARB) measured in plasma, as well as reduced glutathione (GSH), and catalase activity (CAT) measured in erythrocytes. The MDA was reduced by 24.4% at T3 and CARB were reduced by 19.6% and 17.7% at T2 and T3, respectively, supporting the evidence that PJ consumption enhances the antioxidant status in humans by decreasing lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Moreover, GSH levels were significantly increased (22.6%) at T2, indicating that PJ consumption improves the antioxidant mechanisms in erythrocytes by increasing GSH levels. Finally, it was shown that even a week after stopping PJ consumption some of its beneficial effects on antioxidant status still remained in the organism.

  7. A specific E3 ligase/deubiquitinase pair modulates TBP protein levels during muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Martinez, Silvia Sanchez; Hu, Wenxin; Liu, Zhe; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    TFIID-a complex of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs)-is a central component of the Pol II promoter recognition apparatus. Recent studies have revealed significant downregulation of TFIID subunits in terminally differentiated myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes. Here, we report that TBP protein levels are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Using an in vitro ubiquitination assay coupled with biochemical fractionation, we identified Huwe1 as an E3 ligase targeting TBP for K48-linked ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upregulation of Huwe1 expression during myogenesis induces TBP degradation and myotube differentiation. We found that Huwe1 activity on TBP is antagonized by the deubiquitinase USP10, which protects TBP from degradation. Thus, modulating the levels of both Huwe1 and USP10 appears to fine-tune the requisite degradation of TBP during myogenesis. Together, our study unmasks a previously unknown interplay between an E3 ligase and a deubiquitinating enzyme regulating TBP levels during cellular differentiation.

  8. A specific E3 ligase/deubiquitinase pair modulates TBP protein levels during muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Martinez, Silvia Sanchez; Hu, Wenxin; Liu, Zhe; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    TFIID—a complex of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs)—is a central component of the Pol II promoter recognition apparatus. Recent studies have revealed significant downregulation of TFIID subunits in terminally differentiated myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes. Here, we report that TBP protein levels are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Using an in vitro ubiquitination assay coupled with biochemical fractionation, we identified Huwe1 as an E3 ligase targeting TBP for K48-linked ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upregulation of Huwe1 expression during myogenesis induces TBP degradation and myotube differentiation. We found that Huwe1 activity on TBP is antagonized by the deubiquitinase USP10, which protects TBP from degradation. Thus, modulating the levels of both Huwe1 and USP10 appears to fine-tune the requisite degradation of TBP during myogenesis. Together, our study unmasks a previously unknown interplay between an E3 ligase and a deubiquitinating enzyme regulating TBP levels during cellular differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08536.001 PMID:26393420

  9. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  10. Expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins predict clinical outcome in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Rosita L; Meijer, Chris J L M; Dukers, Danny F; Kummer, J Alain; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Vos, Wim; Hack, C Erik; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Oudejans, Joost J

    2002-06-15

    In vitro studies suggest that resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis might explain poor response to therapy in fatal cases. Actual execution of apoptosis depends on proper functioning of effector caspases, particularly caspase 3, and on the expression levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins, including Bcl-2 and the recently identified granzyme B- specific protease inhibitor 9 (PI9). Thus, high levels of caspase 3 activation should reflect proper functioning of the apoptosis pathways, resulting in chemotherapy-sensitive neoplastic cells and a favorable prognosis. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying numbers of tumor cells positive for active caspase 3, Bcl-2, and PI9, respectively, in pretreatment biopsies of systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients and by comparing these numbers with clinical outcome. Activation of caspase 3 in more than 5% of the tumor cells was strongly correlated with a highly favorable outcome. High numbers of Bcl-2- and PI9-positive tumor cells were found to predict unfavorable prognosis. This prognostic effect was strongly related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status: ALK-positive ALCL had significantly higher levels of active caspase 3, while high expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and PI9 was almost completely restricted to ALK-negative cases. In conclusion, high numbers of active caspase 3-positive tumor cells predict a highly favorable prognosis in systemic ALCL patients. Poor prognosis is strongly related to high numbers of Bcl-2- and PI9-positive neoplastic cells. These data support the notion that a favorable response to chemotherapy depends on an intact apoptosis cascade. Moreover, these data indicate that differences in prognosis between ALK-positive and ALK-negative ALCL might be explained by differences in expression of apoptosis-inhibiting proteins.

  11. Effects of two different levels of dietary protein on body composition and protein nutritional status of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Tirapegui, Julio; Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Pires, Ivanir Santana de Oliveira; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a high-protein diet on growth, body composition, and protein nutritional status of young rats. Newly-weaned Wistar rats, weighing 45-50 g, were distributed in two experimental groups, according to their diets, which contained 12% (G12) or 26% protein (G26), over a period of 3 weeks. The animals were euthanized at the end of this period and the following analyses were performed: chemical composition of the carcass, proteoglycan synthesis, IGF-I concentration (serum, muscle and cartilage), total tissue RNA, protein concentration (muscle and cartilage) and protein synthesis (muscle and cartilage). The high-protein diet was found to result in a higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass in the carcass, with no difference in growth or protein nutritional status.

  12. Plasma levels of the chemokines monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 are elevated in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bossink, A W; Paemen, L; Jansen, P M; Hack, C E; Thijs, L G; Van Damme, J

    1995-11-15

    Because of their effects on monocytes, monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 (MCP-1 and MCP-2) may participate in the pathophysiology of sepsis. We measured circulating MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in 42 septic patients having positive local or blood cultures. MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels were elevated in 24 (57%) and 25 (59%) of 42 septic patients, respectively, compared with healthy volunteers. Both patients with gram-positive and gram-negative infections had elevated MCP-1 plasma levels (P = .0001) and P < .0001), respectively; Mann-Whitney-U test), whereas patients with gram-positive infection, but not those with gram-negative infection, had increased MCP-2 plasma levels (P= .0182). No relative differences in MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels were observed between several subgroups of patients (sepsis v septic shock; survivors v nonsurvivors), although levels of MCP-1 were the highest in patients with the more severe forms of sepsis, ie, those with shock or a lethal outcome. Serial observations showed that MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels remained elevated for at least 48 hours. MCP-1 correlated weakly with interleukin-8 and MCP-2, the correlations for which were most pronounced in patients with septic shock. MCP-2 correlated with interleukin-8, and surprisingly, with the complement activation product C3a; these correlations further improved when analyzing patients with septic shock or when applying gram-positive infections. Thus, our results not only show increased MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in patients with sepsis, but also suggest that the synthesis and release of MCP-1 and MCP-2 in sepsis are differently regulated in part.

  13. Low pregnancy-associated plasma protein A level in the first trimester

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Lise; Kingdom, John; Akhtar, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the recent evidence behind the association of low levels (ie, below the fifth percentile) of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) with adverse perinatal outcomes and to integrate new findings with the recommendations made by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada in 2008. Quality of evidence A review of recently published articles revealed that current evidence is sparse and mixed for the association of low PAPP-A level with small size for gestational age, preterm delivery, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and stillbirth. There is limited evidence that suggests an association between low PAPP-A levels and spontaneous pregnancy loss. Recent studies suggest that low PAPP-A levels are associated with abnormal placentation, which might be the root cause of the adverse perinatal outcomes of interest. Main message The evidence behind the association of low PAPP-A levels with adverse perinatal outcomes is both lacking and mixed. However, recent data do suggest an association between low PAPP-A levels and abnormal placentation. This emerging topic currently lacks strong evidence-based guidelines, yet has potential important implications for perinatal outcomes. Collaboration with obstetric specialists regarding pregnant women who have low PAPP-A levels in the context of normal first-trimester aneuploidy screening results might aid clinical decision making about pregnancy and placental surveillance. Conclusion While the clinical meaning of a low PAPP-A level detected in the context of normal fetal aneuploidy screening remains under debate, pregnant patients with such results should be counseled that at present no strong evidence exists to justify an ongoing ultrasound surveillance program. PMID:25316741

  14. Chlorophyllide a Oxygenase mRNA and Protein Levels Correlate with the Chlorophyll a/b Ratio in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Harper, Andrea L; von Gesjen, Sigrid E; Linford, Alicia S; Peterson, Michael P; Faircloth, Ruth S; Thissen, Michelle M; Brusslan, Judy A

    2004-02-01

    Plants can change the size of their light harvesting complexes in response to growth at different light intensities. Although these changes are small compared to those observed in algae, their conservation in many plant species suggest they play an important role in photoacclimation. A polyclonal antibody to the C-terminus of the Arabidopsis thaliana chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) protein was used to determine if CAO protein levels change under three conditions which perturb chlorophyll levels. These conditions were: (1) transfer to shaded light intensity; (2) limited chlorophyll synthesis, and (3) during photoinhibition. Transfer of wild-type plants from moderate to shaded light intensity resulted in a slight reduction in the Chl a/b ratio, and increases in both CAO and Lhcb1 mRNA levels as well as CAO protein levels. CAO protein levels were also measured in the cch1 mutant, a P642L missense mutation in the H subunit of Mg-chelatase. This mutant has reduced total Chl levels and an increased Chl a/b ratio when transferred to moderate light intensity. After transfer to moderate light intensity, CAO mRNA levels decreased in the cch1 mutant, and a concomitant decrease in CAO protein levels was also observed. Measurements of tetrapyrrole intermediates suggested that decreased Chl synthesis in the cch1 mutant was not a result of increased feedback inhibition at higher light intensity. When wild-type plants were exposed to photoinhibitory light intensity for 3 h, total Chl levels decreased and both CAO mRNA and CAO protein levels were also reduced. These results indicate that CAO protein levels correlate with CAO mRNA levels, and suggest that changes in Chl b levels in vascular plants, are regulated, in part, at the CAO mRNA level.

  15. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kocarek, Thomas A.; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki ); Dahn, Michael S.; Lee, Donna W.

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3 A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  16. The level of major urinary proteins is socially regulated in wild Mus musculus musculus.

    PubMed

    Janotova, Katerina; Stopka, Pavel

    2011-06-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are highly polymorphic proteins that have been shown to perform several important functions in the chemical communication of the house mouse, Mus musculus. Production of these proteins in C57Bl/6 females is cyclic, reaching the maximum just before the beginning of estrus. Social environment is an important factor that increases MUP production in both sexes. We examined responsiveness of MUP production to social stimuli in wild mice, Mus musculus musculus. The direction of change of MUP production in males depended on the sex of the stimulus animal. Males up-regulated MUP production when caged with a female, but down-regulated MUP production when caged with a male. Down-regulation was more pronounced in males that were defeated in a male-male encounter. Females responded to a male's presence with a decrease in MUP production. We conclude that social modulation of MUP production is specific and, in coordination with other mechanisms, facilitates adjustment of the animal's odor profile to different social contexts. Our results also suggest that in males, MUPs may play an important role in advertizing the male's quality to females. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of analyzing data corrected with creatinine, which show MUP production on the (post)translational level as well as raw data (non-corrected with creatinine), which represent actual concentrations of MUPs in the urine. PMID:21594616

  17. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zangar, Richard C; Kocarek, Thomas A; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki; Dahn, Michael S; Lee, Donna W

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  18. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, Chris S.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Montgomery, Alison P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment. PMID:23472107

  19. deconSTRUCT: general purpose protein database search on the substructure level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong Hong; Bharatham, Kavitha; Sherman, Westley A; Mihalek, Ivana

    2010-07-01

    deconSTRUCT webserver offers an interface to a protein database search engine, usable for a general purpose detection of similar protein (sub)structures. Initially, it deconstructs the query structure into its secondary structure elements (SSEs) and reassembles the match to the target by requiring a (tunable) degree of similarity in the direction and sequential order of SSEs. Hierarchical organization and judicious use of the information about protein structure enables deconSTRUCT to achieve the sensitivity and specificity of the established search engines at orders of magnitude increased speed, without tying up irretrievably the substructure information in the form of a hash. In a post-processing step, a match on the level of the backbone atoms is constructed. The results presented to the user consist of the list of the matched SSEs, the transformation matrix for rigid superposition of the structures and several ways of visualization, both downloadable and implemented as a web-browser plug-in. The server is available at http://epsf.bmad.bii.a-star.edu.sg/struct_server.html.

  20. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  1. Detection of clinically relevant levels of protein analyte under physiologic buffer using planar field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samit; Elias, Mark; Wen, Xuejin; Shapiro, John; Brillson, Leonard; Lu, Wu; Lee, Stephen Craig

    2008-12-01

    Electrochemical detection of protein binding at physiological salt concentration by planar field effect transistor platforms has yet to be documented convincingly. Here we report detection of streptavidin and clinically relevant levels of biotinylated monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG) at physiological salt concentrations with AlGaN heterojunction field effect transistors (HFETs). The AlGaN HFETs are functionalized with a silane linker and analyte-specific affinity elements. Polarity of sensor responses is as expected from n-type HFETs to negatively and positively charged analytes. Sensitivity of the HFET sensors increases when salt concentration decreases, and the devices also exhibit dose-dependent responses to analyte. Detection of clinically relevant MIG concentrations at physiological salt levels demonstrates the potential for AlGaN devices to be used in development of in vivo biosensors.

  2. The impact of dietary protein levels on nutrient digestibility and water and nitrogen balances in eventing horses.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C A A; Azevedo, J F; Martins, J A; Barreto, M P; Silva, V P; Julliand, V; Almeida, F Q

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of dietary protein levels on nutrient digestibility and water and nitrogen balances in conditioning eventing horses. Twenty-four Brazilian Sport Horses, male and female (8.0 to 15.0 yr; 488 ± 32 kg BW), were used in a randomized design with 4 levels of CP diets: 7.5%, 9.0%, 11.0%, and 13.0%. A digestion assay was performed with partial feces collection over 4 d, followed by 1 d of total urine collection. Data were submitted to regression analysis and adjusted to linear and quadratic models (P < 0.05). No differences were observed in the intake of DM, OM, EE, ADF, and NDF as a function of dietary protein levels. Dry matter intake average was 1.7% of BW. CP and N intake showed a linear increase as a function of increasing protein level in diets. A quadratic response (P < 0.05) was observed on the CP and NDF digestibility coefficients, with the maximum estimated level of digestibility at 11.6% and 11.4% CP in the diet, respectively. There was a linear effect on ADF digestibility coefficients, digestible DM and protein intake, and CP/DE ratio according to dietary protein levels. There was no impact of dietary protein levels on daily water intake, total water intake, or fecal water excretion. Urinary excretion values showed a linear increase in response to increased dietary protein levels, but no impact was observed on water balance, with an average of 8.4 L/d. Nitrogen intake (NI), N absorption (NA), and urinary N increased linearly as a function of increasing dietary protein levels. There was no impact of dietary protein levels on N retention (NR), with an average of 7.5 g N/d. Nitrogen retention as a percentage of NI or NA showed no significant changes in the function of dietary protein levels. There was an impact of dietary protein levels on the digestibility coefficient of CP, NDF, ADF, and digestible protein intake on conditioning eventing horses. The 11.6% CP level in the diet provided an intake of 2.25 g CP/kg BW

  3. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  4. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  5. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen.

  6. Protein- and tryptophan-restricted diets induce changes in rat gonadal hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Del Angel-Meza, A R.; Feria-Velasco, A; Ontiveros-Martínez, L; Gallardo, L; Gonzalez-Burgos, I; Beas-Zárate, C

    2001-04-01

    The release of gonadotrophic hormones starts at puberty and, along with the subsequent estral cyclicity, is subject to hormonal feedback systems and to the action of diverse neuroactive substances such as gamma amino butyric acid and catecholamines. This study shows the effect of the administration during 40 days of protein-restricted and corn-based (tryptophan- and lysine-deficient) diets on the serotonin concentration in medial hypothalamic fragments as well as in follicle-stimulating luteinizing hormones, 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone serum levels, and estral cyclicity in 60- and 100-day-old rats (young, mature, and in gestation). In young rats, a delay in vaginal aperture development, and a lengthening of the estral cycle to a continuous anestral state was observed, mainly in the group fed corn. This group showed a 25% decrease in the serotonin concentration compared with the protein-restricted group, which exhibited an increase of 9% over the control group. Luteinizing hormone levels decreased in 16% and 13%, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone increased in 13% and 5% in the young animals of restricted groups, respectively, compared with the control group. Serum progesterone levels decreased only in young restricted versus control animals, and no differences were seen among adult and gestational rats. Serum levels of 17-beta-estradiol in restricted animals showed different concentration patterns, mainly in the corn group, which was higher at the 20th gestational day, falling drastically postpartum. The results obtained in this study show serotonin to be a very important factor in the release of gonadotrophic hormones and the start of puberty.

  7. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    González, Natalia; Moresco, James J.; Bustos, Francisco; Yates, John R.; Olguín, Hugo C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate. PMID:27144531

  8. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. PMID:26244518

  9. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels.

  10. Infection and immunoglobulin levels in Sudanese children with severe protein-energy malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Omer S M; Salih, Mustafa A M; Karrar, Zein A; Mohammed, Abdelrahim O; Helsing, Chrestover

    2011-01-01

    A hospital-based case control study was carried out to determine the pattern of infections and immunoblobulin levels in Sudanese children with severe protein energy malnutrition (PEM). The pre-dietary rehabilitation levels of the three major immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM) were compared with those of normal controls, and with the levels after dietary rehabilitation. Eighty one children were included in the study: 49 with severe PEM (23 with marasmus, 17 with marasmic - kwashiorkor and 9 with kwashiorkor), 13 with tuberculosis and 19 healthy children as controls. The study showed high incidence of infections, especially pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections in the malnourished children. Of special concern was the high incidence of urinary tract infection: 13 (26.5%) had significant pyuria and 9 of them had positive urine cultures, mainly Escherichia coli. Eight of the malnourished children also had pulmonary TB, and the ESR and Mantoux tests were not helpful in the diagnosis. The Mantoux test was negative in 88.8% of the malnourished group compared to 62.5% in those malnourished with TB. The malnourished groups had significantly higher plasma levels of the 3 immunoglobulins. While the maramic group attained significantly higher levels of IgG and IgA compared to the marasmic -kwashiorkor and kwashiorkor groups, the 3 groups of PEM showed a uniformly higher level of the IgM. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation, the levels of the 3 immunoglobulins showed no significant changes, except for the IgA which significantly decreased in all malnourished and the oedematous groups, and the IgM which increased significantly in the oedematous group.

  11. Ku Protein Levels, Localization and Association to Replication Origins in Different Stages of Breast Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human origins of DNA replication are specific sequences within the genome whereby DNA replication is initiated. A select group of proteins, known as the pre-replication (pre-RC) complex, in whose formation the Ku protein (Ku70/Ku86) was shown to play a role, bind to replication origins to initiate DNA replication. In this study, we have examined the involvement of Ku in breast tumorigenesis and tumor progression and found that the Ku protein expression levels in human breast metastatic (MCF10AC1a) cells were higher in the chromatin fraction compared to hyperplastic (MCF10AT) and normal (MCF10A) human breast cells, but remained constant in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In contrast, in human intestinal cells, the Ku expression level was relatively constant for all cell fractions. Nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association of Ku70/86 revealed that the c-myc origin activity in MCF10AC1a is 2.5 to 5-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively, and Ku was bound to the c-myc origin more abundantly in MCF10AC1a, by approximately 1.5 to 4.2-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively. In contrast, similar nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association was found for all cell lines for the lamin B2 origin, associated with the constitutively active housekeeping lamin B2 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the nuclear extracts (NEs) of the three cell types revealed the presence of protein-DNA replication complexes on both the c-myc and lamin B2 origins, but an increase in binding activity was observed from normal, to transformed, to cancer cells for the c-myc origin, whereas no such difference was seen for the lamin B2 origin. Overall, the results suggest that increased Ku chromatin association, beyond wild type levels, alters cellular processes, which have been implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:23781282

  12. Ku protein levels, localization and association to replication origins in different stages of breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human origins of DNA replication are specific sequences within the genome whereby DNA replication is initiated. A select group of proteins, known as the pre-replication (pre-RC) complex, in whose formation the Ku protein (Ku70/Ku86) was shown to play a role, bind to replication origins to initiate DNA replication. In this study, we have examined the involvement of Ku in breast tumorigenesis and tumor progression and found that the Ku protein expression levels in human breast metastatic (MCF10AC1a) cells were higher in the chromatin fraction compared to hyperplastic (MCF10AT) and normal (MCF10A) human breast cells, but remained constant in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In contrast, in human intestinal cells, the Ku expression level was relatively constant for all cell fractions. Nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association of Ku70/86 revealed that the c-myc origin activity in MCF10AC1a is 2.5 to 5-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively, and Ku was bound to the c-myc origin more abundantly in MCF10AC1a, by approximately 1.5 to 4.2-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively. In contrast, similar nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association was found for all cell lines for the lamin B2 origin, associated with the constitutively active housekeeping lamin B2 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the nuclear extracts (NEs) of the three cell types revealed the presence of protein-DNA replication complexes on both the c-myc and lamin B2 origins, but an increase in binding activity was observed from normal, to transformed, to cancer cells for the c-myc origin, whereas no such difference was seen for the lamin B2 origin. Overall, the results suggest that increased Ku chromatin association, beyond wild type levels, alters cellular processes, which have been implicated in tumorigenesis.

  13. Effects of different levels of protein intake and physical training on growth and nutritional status of young rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; de Campos, Patrícia Lopes; Luz, Silmara dos Santos; Lancha, Antonio Herber; Tirapegui, Julio

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of physical training, and different levels of protein intake in the diet, on the growth and nutritional status of growing rats. Newly-weaned Wistar rats (n=48) were distributed into six experimental groups; three of them were subjected to physical swim training (1 h per day, 5 d per week, for 4 wk, after 2 wk of familiarization) and the other three were considered as controls (non-trained). Each pair of groups, trained and non-trained, received diets with a different level of protein in their composition: 14%, 21% or 28%. The animals were euthanized at the end of the training period and the following analyses were performed: proteoglycan synthesis as a biomarker of bone and cartilage growth, IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor-I) assay as a biomarker of growth and nutritional status, total RNA and protein concentration and protein synthesis measured in vivo using a large-dose phenylalanine method. As a main finding, increased dietary protein, combined with physical training, was able to improve neither tissue protein synthesis nor muscle growth. In addition, cartilage and bone growth seem to be deteriorated by the lower and the higher levels of protein intake. Our data allow us to conclude that protein enhancement in the diet, combined with physical exercise, does not stimulate tissue protein synthesis or muscle mass growth. Furthermore, physical training, combined with low protein intake, was not favorable to bone development in growing animals.

  14. Microbial production of virus-like particle vaccine protein at gram-per-litre levels.

    PubMed

    Liew, Mervyn W O; Rajendran, Aravindan; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2010-10-15

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale production of murine polyomavirus VP1 protein in recombinant Escherichia coli as pentamers which are able to subsequently self-assemble in vitro into virus-like particles (VLPs). High-cell-density pH-stat fed-batch cultivation was employed to produce glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-VP1 fusion protein in soluble form. The expression of recombinant VP1 was induced with IPTG at different cell optical densities (OD at 600 nm of 20, 60 or 100). GST-VP1 production was highest when the culture was induced at a cell density of OD 60, with volumetric yield reaching 4.38 gL⁻¹ in 31h, which we believe is the highest volumetric productivity for viral capsid protein reported to date. The induction cell density is shown to have a significant effect on the overall volumetric yield of recombinant VP1 and on final cell density, but not on VLP quality. VP1 yield was enhanced 15-fold by scaling-up from shake flask to pH-stat fed-batch cultivation in a bioreactor. Although numerous studies have expressed structural viral protein in E. coli, we believe this is the first report of translation to bioreactors yielding gram-per-litre levels. This VLP production technology overcomes major drawbacks associated with eukaryotic cell-based vaccine production technologies, and propounds the scope for large-scale commercially viable E. coli based VLP production by significantly reducing vaccine production time and cost. PMID:20797415

  15. Maternal High Fat Diet Affects Offspring’s Vitamin K-Dependent Proteins Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Stuart; Cagampang, Felino R.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest bone growth & development and susceptibility to vascular disease in later life are influenced by maternal nutrition, during intrauterine and early postnatal life. There is evidence for a role of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs) including Osteocalcin, Matrix-gla protein, Periostin, and Gas6, in bone and vascular development. This study extends the analysis of VKDPs previously conducted in 6 week old offspring, into offspring of 30 weeks of age, to assess the longer term effects of a maternal and postnatal high fat (HF) diet on VKDP expression. Overall a HF maternal diet and offspring diet exacerbated the bone changes observed. Sex specific and tissue specific differences were observed in VKDP expression for both aorta and femoral tissues. In addition, significant correlations were observed between femoral OCN, Periostin Gas6, and Vkor expression levels and measures of femoral bone structure. Furthermore, MGP, OCN, Ggcx and Vkor expression levels correlated to mass and fat volume, in both sexes. In summary the current study has highlighted the importance of the long-term effects of maternal nutrition on offspring bone development and the correlation of VKDPs to bone structure. PMID:26381752

  16. Blood parameters in growing pigs fed increasing levels of bacterial protein meal

    PubMed Central

    Hellwing, Anne Louise F; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The experiment investigated the effects of increasing dietary levels of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on various blood parameters reflecting protein and fat metabolism, liver function, and purine base metabolism in growing pigs. Sixteen barrows were allocated to four different experimental diets. The control diet was based on soybean meal. In the other three diets soybean meal was replaced with increasing levels of BPM, approximately 17%, 35%, and 50% of the nitrogen being derived from BPM. Blood samples from the jugular vein were taken when the body weights of the pigs were approximately 10 kg, 21 kg, 45 kg, and 77 kg. The blood parameters reflecting fat metabolism and liver function were not affected by diet. Both the plasma albumin and uric acid concentrations tended to decrease (P = 0.07 and 0.01, respectively) with increasing dietary BPM content, whereas the plasma glucose concentration tended to increase (P = 0.07) with increasing dietary BPM content. It was concluded that up to 50% of the nitrogen could be derived from BPM without affecting metabolic function, as reflected in the measured blood parameters. PMID:17996082

  17. Serum levels of protein oxidation products in patients with nickel allergy.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Ricciardi, Luisa; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Cristani, Mariateresa; Saitta, Salvatore; Chirafisi, Joselita; Spatari, Giovanna; Santoro, Giusy; Saija, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    Nickel sensitization can not only induce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but also can induce an overlapping disease referred to as "systemic nickel allergy syndrome" (SNAS), characterized by urticaria/angioedema and gastrointestinal symptoms correlated to the ingestion of nickel-containing foods. This study was designed to determine if oxidative stress occurs in patients with nickel allergy. Thirty-one female patients (mean age 31.26 + 13.04 years, range 16-64 years) with confirmed nickel CD underwent oral nickel challenge because of clinically suspected SNAS; serum concentrations of protein carbonyl groups (PCGs) and nitrosylated proteins (NPs; biomarkers of oxidative stress) were measured before and after oral nickel challenge as well as in healthy female controls. Twenty-three of these 31 patients were diagnosed with SNAS because they had a positive reaction to the oral nickel challenge, and 8 patients had no reaction and therefore were classified as patients with contact nickel allergy only. Although both nickel-allergic patients and controls presented similar serum levels of PCGs, NP values in nickel-allergic patients appeared higher than in controls and tended to decrease after the challenge; furthermore, serum levels of NPs in patients affected by SNAS were higher (although not significantly) than in patients with nickel ACD only. The involvement of specific biomarkers of oxidative stress such as NPs and the lack of involvement of other biomarkers such as PCGs may help to better understand the alteration of the redox homeostasis occurring in nickel ACD and particularly in SNAS.

  18. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  19. Emergence of tissue sensitivity to Hox protein levels underlies the evolution of an adaptive morphological trait.

    PubMed

    Refki, Peter Nagui; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Viala, Séverine; Khila, Abderrahman

    2014-08-15

    Growth control scales morphological attributes and, therefore, provides a critical contribution to the evolution of adaptive traits. Yet, the genetic mechanisms underlying growth in the context of specific ecological adaptations are poorly understood. In water striders, adaptation to locomotion on the water surface is associated with allometric and functional changes in thoracic appendages, such that T2-legs, used as propelling oars, are longer than T3-legs, used as steering rudders. The Hox gene Ubx establishes this derived morphology by elongating T2-legs but shortening T3-legs. Using gene expression assays, RNAi knockdown, and comparative transcriptomics, we demonstrate that the evolution of water surface rowing as a novel means of locomotion is associated with the evolution of a dose-dependent promoting-repressing effect of Ubx on leg growth. In the water strider Limnoporus dissortis, T3-legs express six to seven times higher levels of Ubx compared to T2-legs. Ubx RNAi shortens T2-legs and the severity of this phenotype increases with increased depletion of Ubx protein. Conversely, Ubx RNAi lengthens T3-legs but this phenotype is partially rescued when Ubx protein is further depleted. This dose-dependent effect of Ubx on leg growth is absent in non-rowing relatives that retain the ancestral relative leg length. We also show that the spatial patterns of expression of dpp, wg, hh, egfr, dll, exd, hth, and dac are unchanged in Ubx RNAi treatments. This indicates that the dose-dependent opposite effect of Ubx on T2- and T3-legs operates without any apparent effect on the spatial expression of major leg patterning genes. Our data suggest that scaling of adaptive allometries can evolve through changes in the levels of expression of Hox proteins early during ontogeny, and in the sensitivity of the tissues that express them, without any major effects on pattern formation.

  20. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  1. Heat Shock Proteins in Relation to Heat Stress Tolerance of Creeping Bentgrass at Different N Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on ‘Penn-A4’ creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha−1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  2. Emergence of tissue sensitivity to Hox protein levels underlies the evolution of an adaptive morphological trait

    PubMed Central

    Refki, Peter Nagui; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Viala, Séverine; Khila, Abderrahman

    2014-01-01

    Growth control scales morphological attributes and, therefore, provides a critical contribution to the evolution of adaptive traits. Yet, the genetic mechanisms underlying growth in the context of specific ecological adaptations are poorly understood. In water striders, adaptation to locomotion on the water surface is associated with allometric and functional changes in thoracic appendages, such that T2-legs, used as propelling oars, are longer than T3-legs, used as steering rudders. The Hox gene Ubx establishes this derived morphology by elongating T2-legs but shortening T3-legs. Using gene expression assays, RNAi knockdown, and comparative transcriptomics, we demonstrate that the evolution of water surface rowing as a novel means of locomotion is associated with the evolution of a dose-dependent promoting-repressing effect of Ubx on leg growth. In the water strider Limnoporus dissortis, T3-legs express six to seven times higher levels of Ubx compared to T2-legs. Ubx RNAi shortens T2-legs and the severity of this phenotype increases with increased depletion of Ubx protein. Conversely, Ubx RNAi lengthens T3-legs but this phenotype is partially rescued when Ubx protein is further depleted. This dose-dependent effect of Ubx on leg growth is absent in non-rowing relatives that retain the ancestral relative leg length. We also show that the spatial patterns of expression of dpp, wg, hh, egfr, dll, exd, hth, and dac are unchanged in Ubx RNAi treatments. This indicates that the dose-dependent opposite effect of Ubx on T2- and T3-legs operates without any apparent effect on the spatial expression of major leg patterning genes. Our data suggest that scaling of adaptive allometries can evolve through changes in the levels of expression of Hox proteins early during ontogeny, and in the sensitivity of the tissues that express them, without any major effects on pattern formation. PMID:24886828

  3. The performance of brown egg-type layers fed different protein and energy levels in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Olomu, J M; Offiong, S A

    1983-02-01

    The effects of feeding three protein levels (16, 18, and 20%), each at three metabolizable energy levels (2400, 2600, and 2800 kcal/kg diet), were studied with 990 caged Warren Studler Sex-Sal Link pullets over a 336-day laying period. Dietary protein had no significant effects on hen-day egg production, egg weight, Haugh units, feed intake, feed conversion, feed cost per dozen eggs, caloric intake, egg weights, and final body weight. Protein consumption on all levels of dietary protein was over 20 g per bird per day and increased significantly with increases in dietary protein. Mortality was lowest on the highest protein level. The highest energy level (2800 kcal/kg diet) significantly depressed egg production and feed and protein intake. The feed costs per dozen eggs increased significantly with increases in dietary energy level. Caloric intake and final body weights were similar for the medium (2600 kcal/kg diet) and highest energy levels (2800 kcal/kg diet) but significantly higher than that obtained on the lowest energy level (2400 kcal/kg diet). Egg weights, Haugh units, feed per dozen eggs, and mortality were not significantly affected by energy levels. In spite of the average maximum monthly temperatures, ranging from 26.8 to 35.2 C, annual egg production was about 71 to 73% for the best groups, figures comparable with those obtainable in temperate climates. Egg weight and Haugh units were similar to reported temperate zone values. This experiment supports the use of 16% protein and a metabolizable energy level of 2400 kcal/kg diet for brown egg-type layers.

  4. Increased Circulating Levels of Vitamin D Binding Protein in MS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arturo Ottavio; Sanseverino, Isabella; Purificato, Cristina; Cortese, Antonio; Mechelli, Rosella; Francisci, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Millefiorini, Enrico; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D (vitD) low status is currently considered a main environmental factor in multiple sclerosis (MS) etiology and pathogenesis. VitD and its metabolites are highly hydrophobic and circulate mostly bound to the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and with lower affinity to albumin, while less than 1% are in a free form. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the circulating levels of either of the two vitD plasma carriers and/or their relationship are altered in MS. We measured DBP and albumin plasma levels in 28 MS patients and 24 healthy controls. MS patients were found to have higher DBP levels than healthy subjects. Concomitant interferon beta therapy did not influence DBP concentration, and the difference with the control group was significant in both females and males. No significant correlation between DBP and albumin levels was observed either in healthy controls or in patients. These observations suggest the involvement of DBP in the patho-physiology of MS. PMID:25590278

  5. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  6. The extracellular protein regulator (xpr) affects exoprotein and agr mRNA levels in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M E; Smeltzer, M S; Iandolo, J J

    1993-01-01

    xpr, a regulatory element of exoprotein synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus, defined by an insertion of Tn551 into the chromosome of strain S6C, affects the expression of several exoproteins at the mRNA level. Drastic reduction in transcript levels for staphylococcal enterotoxin B (seb), lipase (geh), alpha-toxin (hla), and delta-toxin (hld) were detected, while mRNA levels for coagulase (coa) and protein A (spa) were elevated. Because the delta-toxin gene resides within the RNAIII transcript of the exoprotein regulator, agr, the reduction in hld message in the mutant strain of S6C is indicative of additional regulatory events in exoprotein gene expression. Northern (RNA) analysis of total cellular RNA hybridized with probes specific for RNAII and RNAIII (the two major transcripts of the agr operon) showed that both transcripts were reduced 16- to 32-fold at 3 h (late exponential phase) and 8- to 16-fold at 12 h (postexponential phase). These data confirm our original findings (M. S. Smeltzer, M. E. Hart, and J. J. Iandolo, Infect. Immun. 61:919-925, 1993) that two regulatory loci, agr and xpr, are interactive at the genotypic level. Images PMID:7504665

  7. Associations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia and comparison groups.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Daly, Rebecca E; Glorioso, Danielle K; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by physical (mainly metabolic and cardiovascular) comorbidity and shortened lifespan. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an inflammatory marker of hepatic origin linked to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population, has been reported to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. However, the relationship of hs-CRP to psychiatric and medical risk factors, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as smoking, is not well established in schizophrenia. We assessed hs-CRP levels along with various demographic, psychiatric, and metabolic measures in 88 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 age epoch-matched comparison subjects with no history of a major psychiatric illness. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in comparison subjects. Higher hs-CRP levels in the schizophrenia group were associated with female gender, more severe negative symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, and worse metabolic risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels. hs-CRP was not related to age, race, education, smoking status, antipsychotic dosage, or cognitive impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP and long-term health outcomes including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in schizophrenia. PMID:26341579

  8. ELEVATED LEVELS OF SOLUBLE ST2 PROTEIN IN DENGUE VIRUS INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Levels of the soluble form of the interleukin-1 receptor like 1 protein (IL-1RL-1 / ST2) are elevated in the serum of patients with diseases characterized by an inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of soluble ST2 (sST2) in dengue infected patients during the course of the disease. Twenty four patients with confirmed dengue infection, classified as dengue fever, and eleven patients with other febrile illness (OFI) were evaluated. Levels of sST2 in serum and laboratory variables usually altered during dengue infections were measured. Dengue infected patients had higher serum sST2 levels than OFI at the end of the febrile stage and at defervescence (p=0.0088 and p=0.0004 respectively). Patients with secondary dengue infections had higher serum sST2 levels compared with patients with primary dengue infections (p=0.047 at last day of fever and p=0.030 at defervescence). Furthermore, in dengue infected patients, we found a significant negative correlation of sST2 with platelet and WBC counts, and positive correlation with thrombin time and transaminases activity. We suggest that sST2 could be a potential marker of dengue infection, could be associated with severity or could play a role in the immune response in secondary dengue virus infection. PMID:18226917

  9. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase induction by retinobenzoic acids in relation to their binding affinities to cellular retinoid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Takagi, K; Suganuma, M; Kagechika, H; Shudo, K; Ninomiya, M; Muto, Y; Fujiki, H

    1988-01-01

    Retinobenzoic acids induce differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). Like retinoic acid, 14 retinobenzoic acids inhibited the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by teleocidin in mouse skin. The mechanism(s) of inhibition of ODC induction by 7 retinobenzoic acids, Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 was compared with those by all-trans-retinoic acid and the arotinoid compound 19. Application of 114 nmol of Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, or Ch 55, 10 min before 11.4 nmol of teleocidin, resulted in 76.7%, 82.0%, 76.2%, 28.3%, 48.4%, 58.6%, and 85.1% inhibition of ODC induction, respectively. Since all-trans-retinoic acid and compound 19 were also inhibitory, we determined whether retinobenzoic acids bind to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) isolated from bovine adrenal glands. Am 80 and Am 580 inhibited the specific binding of 3H-retinoic acid to CRABP, but also showed less affinity than authentic unlabeled retinoic acid and compound 19. Am 81, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 at up to 10 microM were not effective competitors of the binding of either 3H-retinoic acid or 3H-retinol. These results suggest that the inhibition of ODC induction can be mediated by pathways that do not involve CRABP or the cellular retinol-binding protein.

  10. Fish protein intake induces fast-muscle hypertrophy and reduces liver lipids and serum glucose levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Fuminori; Mizushige, Takafumi; Uozumi, Keisuke; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Han, Li; Tsuji, Tomoko; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, fish protein was proven to reduce serum lipids and body fat accumulation by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing basal energy expenditure in rats. In the present study, we examined the precise effects of fish protein intake on different skeletal muscle fiber types and metabolic gene expression of the muscle. Fish protein increased fast-twitch muscle weight, reduced liver triglycerides and serum glucose levels, compared with the casein diet after 6 or 8 weeks of feeding. Furthermore, fish protein upregulated the gene expressions of a fast-twitch muscle-type marker and a glucose transporter in the muscle. These results suggest that fish protein induces fast-muscle hypertrophy, and the enhancement of basal energy expenditure by muscle hypertrophy and the increase in muscle glucose uptake reduced liver lipids and serum glucose levels. The present results also imply that fish protein intake causes a slow-to-fast shift in muscle fiber type.

  11. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Auer, Paul L.; Bis, Joshua C.; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A.; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kim, Daniel S.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Gross, Myron D.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10−6). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10−15). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10−8), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10−4) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10−3) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10−3). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  12. Effects of Different Exercise Intensities with Isoenergetic Expenditures on C-Reactive Protein and Blood Lipid Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Te Hung; Yang, Chang Bin; Hsu, Chin Hsing

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on C-reactive protein (CRP), and whether changes in CRP levels correlated with blood lipid levels. Ten men exercised at 25%, 65%, and 85% of their maximum oxygen consumption rates. Participants' blood was analyzed for CRP and blood lipid levels before and after the exercise sessions.…

  13. Cumulative Depression Episodes Predicts Later C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with elevated levels of the inflammation marker C -reactive protein (CRP), yet the direction of this association remains unclear. This study tested bi-directional longitudinal associations between CRP and depression in a sample of adolescent and young adults. The study compared the effects of current depression to the cumulative episodes of depression over time. Methods Nine waves of data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community aged 9–16, 19, and 21 years old. Structured interviews were used to assess depressive symptoms, depression diagnosis, and cumulative depressive episodes. Bloodspots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. Results CRP levels were not associated with later depression status. In contrast, all depression-related variables displayed evidence of association with later CRP levels. The associations with depressive symptoms and diagnostic status were attenuated after controlling for covariates particularly body mass index, smoking, and medication use. The effect of cumulative depressive episodes, however, continued to be significant after accounting for a range of covariates. Body mass index, smoking behavior and recent infections may mediate a portion of the effect of cumulative episodes on later CRP, but cumulative depressive episodes continued to predict CRP levels independently. Conclusions The occurrence of multiple depressive episodes exerted the greatest effect on later CRP levels. This suggests that risk for the diseases of middle age - cardiovascular and metabolic disease – may begin in childhood and depend, in part, upon long-term emotional functioning. PMID:22047718

  14. Differential diagnosis of elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels: a rheumatology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bitik, Berivan; Mercan, Rıdvan; Tufan, Abdurrahman; Tezcan, Engin; Küçük, Hamit; İlhan, Mustafa; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Haznedaroğlu, Seminur; Göker, Berna

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the case of high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, the diagnosis of the underlying disease can be challenging especially in serologically unrevealing patients who have nonspecific clinical findings. We aimed to investigate the final distribution of definitive diagnoses in patients who initially presented with nonspecific clinical findings and sustained elevations in serum ESR/CRP levels. Material and Methods The medical records of patients hospitalized in a rheumatology clinic between January 2010 and January 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were classified into two main groups: those with previously diagnosed underlying rheumatic disease (RD) and those without. The groups were analyzed for the final distribution of definitive diagnoses. Results Out of 112 patients in the general study population, 47 had a previous RD and 65 had no previous history of RD. In these 65 patients, the most common etiology of nonspecific elevations in ESR/CRP levels was new onset RD (52.3%). Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) was the most common new onset RD (38% of all new onset RD) followed by seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. The incidences of infections and malignancies were 24.6% and 9.2%, respectively. CRP levels were significantly higher in infections when compared with new onset RD or malignancies (p<0.05). In patients with previous RD, the flare of the underlying disease was the most common etiology of nonspecific elevations in ESR/CRP levels (n=39, 83%, 20 female/19 male). Conclusion Extraordinarily high levels of serum CRP in a patient with nonspecific clinical findings should raise suspicion for non-rheumatic diagnoses, such as infection and malignancy, even in the presence of a previously diagnosed RD. Advanced radiological investigation is justified in these cases to rule out malignancy.

  15. Dietary protein level and ruminal degradability for mohair production in Angora goats.

    PubMed

    Sahlu, T; Fernandez, J M; Lu, C D; Manning, R

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-eight Angora goat doelings (average BW 22.1 kg) were used in a 150-d study to examine the effects of dietary CP level and degradability on mohair fiber production. A 2 x 2 factorial arrangement was instituted using conventional, solvent-extracted soybean meal (high degradability) or expelled, heat-treated soybean meal (low degradability) incorporated into low- (12%) or high- (19%) CP diets. Grease and clean mohair weights were greater (P less than .05) in goats fed the diets containing 19% CP. Mohair fiber diameter was not affected (P greater than .10) by dietary CP level. Clean mohair weight tended (P less than .08) to be higher in the goats fed diets containing expelled, heat-treated soybean meal. Body weight gains were not affected (P greater than .10) by CP level or degradability, whereas DMI increased (P less than .01) with increasing CP level. Ruminal fluid pH and total VFA concentrations were not affected (P greater than .10) by diet. Ruminal ammonia N concentration increased (P less than .05) as CP level in the diet increased, and postprandial changes in concentrations were less noticeable in the group fed expelled, heat-treated soybean meal. Plasma urea N (P less than .001) and total protein (P less than .01) concentration increased as dietary CP level increased. Plasma glucose was elevated (P less than .001) 2 h after feeding in the goats fed conventional, solvent-extracted soybean meal, whereas glucagon concentrations were greater at 0 and 4 h in the group fed expelled, heat-treated soybean meal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1526921

  16. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  17. Low Serum Level α-Synuclein and Tau Protein in Autism Spectrum Disorder Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Cetin, Ihsan; Tarakçıoğlu, Mahmut Cem; Özer, Ömer Faruk; Kaçar, Selma; Çimen, Behzat

    2015-12-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) and tau proteins are thought to be related with the synaptic loss and cell death underlying several important neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of our study was to investigate serum α-syn and tau levels in autism. Serum levels of α-syn and tau were measured, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) severity was assessed at admission using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) total score. The mean CARS score of the autism group on admission was 47.91 points (SD: 5.97). The results indicated that the mean serum α-syn and serum tau levels were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in children with ASD as compared with normal cases (33.01 ± 20.78 and 55.19 ± 15.34 ng/mL and 241.23 ± 290.5 and 509.78 ± 269.25 ng/mL, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between serum α-syn levels and serum levels of tau identified by Pearson correlation analysis (r = 0.922, n = 28, p < 0.001). Synaptic abnormality in autism may result from microglial activity. Furthermore, α-syn and tau aggregation may lead to synaptic dysfunction, and this may contribute to either neuronal or synaptic dysfunction or neurodegeneration. Our preliminary study suggests that low levels of serum α-syn and tau may be implicated in the relationship between synaptic activity and autism.

  18. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)phenylalanine. At both PF100 and PF85, fractional and absolute rates of mammary gland protein synthesis were two- to three-fold higher in rats fed C than in those fed WG. Pup weights showed similar treatment effects. Both mammary protein synthesis rates and pup weights were significantly higher in rats fed C at PF85 than rats fed WG ad libitum. Food restriction from PF100 to PF85 depressed pup weights and mammary protein synthesis rates in rats fed WGLT, but had no effect in rats fed WG. These results demonstrate that when food intake is restricted, improvement of protein quality of the maternal diet increases milk output in the rat in association with increased rates of mammary protein synthesis.

  19. Effects of Dietary Crude Protein Levels and Cysteamine Supplementation on Protein Synthetic and Degradative Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Finishing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Li, Jiaolong; Luo, Yiqiu; Zhang, Bolin; Xing, Shen; Zhu, Yuping; Sun, Hui; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein levels and cysteamine (CS) supplementation can affect growth performance and protein metabolism of pigs. However, the influence of dietary protein intake on the growth response of CS-treated pigs is unclear, and the mechanisms involved in protein metabolism remain unknown. Hence, we investigated the interactions between dietary protein levels and CS supplementation and the effects of dietary crude protein levels and CS supplementation on protein synthetic and degradative signaling in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs. One hundred twenty barrows (65.84 ± 0.61 kg) were allocated to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with five replicates of six pigs each. The primary variations were dietary crude protein (CP) levels (14% or 10%) and CS supplemental levels (0 or 700 mg/kg). The low-protein (LP) diets (10% CP) were supplemented with enough essential amino acids (EAA) to meet the NRC AA requirements of pigs and maintain the balanced supply of eight EAA including lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, and leucine. After 41 days, 10 pigs per treatment were slaughtered. We found that LP diets supplemented with EAA resulted in decreased concentrations of plasma somatostatin (SS) (P<0.01) and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) (P<0.001), while dietary protein levels did not affect other traits. However, CS supplementation increased the average daily gain (P<0.001) and lean percentage (P<0.05), and decreased the feed conversion ratio (P<0.05) and back fat (P<0.05). CS supplementation also increased the concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (P<0.001), and reduced the concentrations of leptin, SS, and PUN (P<0.001). Increased mRNA abundance of Akt1 and IGF-1 signaling (P<0.001) and decreased mRNA abundance of Forkhead Box O (FOXO) 4 (P<0.01) and muscle atrophy F-box (P<0.001) were observed in pigs receiving CS. Additionally, CS supplementation increased the protein levels for the phosphorylated mammalian target

  20. Levels of synthesis of primate-specific nuclear proteins differ between growth-arrested and proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celis, J.E.; Madsen, P.; Nielsen, S.; Ratz, G.P.; Lauridsen, J.B.; Celis, A.

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody that reacts specifically with the proliferation-sensitive nuclear proteins, isoelectric focusing (IEF) 8Z31 (molecular weight (MW), 76,000 charge variants, HeLa protein catalogue number) has been characterized. As determined by indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody stains the nucleolus and nucleoplasm of interphase-cultured cells of primate origin, but does not react with cells of other species. Proteins having similar MWs and isoelectric points as the human or monkey (primates) proteins were not observed in cultured cells of the following species: aves, bat, dog, dolphin, goat, hamster, mink, mouse, pisces, potoroo, rabbit and rat. Quantitative two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoretic analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labelled proteins synthesized by normal (quiescent, proliferating) and SV40-transformed human MRC-5 fibroblasts revealed significant differences in the levels of synthesis of both IEF 8Z30 and 8Z31. In quiescent cells the main labelled product corresponded to IEF 8Z31 (ratio IEF 8Z31/8Z30, 2.3), while in the transformed cells the major product was IEF 8Z30 (ratio, 0.62). Normal proliferating fibroblasts exhibited similar levels of both proteins (ratio, 1.21). Combined levels of synthesis of both proteins were 1.50 and 1.20 times as high in the transformed cells as in the quiescent and proliferating cells, respectively. Modulation of the levels of synthesis of these proteins may play a role in cell proliferation.

  1. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  2. Identification of a functional SNP in the 3'-UTR of caprine MTHFR gene that is associated with milk protein levels.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaopeng; Song, Yuxuan; Hou, Jinxing; Wang, Shan; Gao, Kexin; Cao, Binyun

    2016-08-01

    Xinong Saanen (n = 305) and Guanzhong (n = 317) dairy goats were used to detect SNPs in the caprine MTHFR 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. One novel SNP (c.*2494G>A) was identified in the said region. Individuals with the AA genotype had greater milk protein levels than did those with the GG genotype at the c.*2494 G>A locus in both dairy goat breeds (P < 0.05). Functional assays indicated that the MTHFR:c.2494G>A substitution could increase the binding activity of bta-miR-370 with the MTHFR 3'-UTR. In addition, we observed a significant increase in the MTHFR protein level of AA carriers relative to that of GG carriers. These altered levels of MTHFR protein may account for the association of the SNP with milk protein level. PMID:27062401

  3. Identification of a functional SNP in the 3'-UTR of caprine MTHFR gene that is associated with milk protein levels.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaopeng; Song, Yuxuan; Hou, Jinxing; Wang, Shan; Gao, Kexin; Cao, Binyun

    2016-08-01

    Xinong Saanen (n = 305) and Guanzhong (n = 317) dairy goats were used to detect SNPs in the caprine MTHFR 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. One novel SNP (c.*2494G>A) was identified in the said region. Individuals with the AA genotype had greater milk protein levels than did those with the GG genotype at the c.*2494 G>A locus in both dairy goat breeds (P < 0.05). Functional assays indicated that the MTHFR:c.2494G>A substitution could increase the binding activity of bta-miR-370 with the MTHFR 3'-UTR. In addition, we observed a significant increase in the MTHFR protein level of AA carriers relative to that of GG carriers. These altered levels of MTHFR protein may account for the association of the SNP with milk protein level.

  4. IgE antibody levels to ingested soya protein determined in a normal adult population.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B F

    1982-01-01

    Levels of soy protein-specific IgE were measured in a normal adult population (seventy-four males, and fifteen females) who ingested soya-containing and control diets during two 4-week periods. Increases in soya-specific IgE were observed for some individuals following ingestion of the soya-containing diet, and for the female group the increase in soya-specific IgE was statistically significant (P = 0.02). The increase of soya-specific IgE was small and led to lower levels than that associated with adverse effects. The increase in soya-specific IgE in the female group was accompanied by a significant increase (P = 0.02) in total immunoglobulin A. Changes in the level of soy-specific haemagglutinating antibody, soya-specific IgG, IgA and IgM as measured by ELISA and the immunoconglutinin titre could not be related to ingestion of the soya-containing diet.

  5. Measurement of pulmonary status and surfactant protein levels during dexamethasone treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Y.; Yeh, T. F.; Lin, Y. C.; Miyamura, K.; Holmskov, U.; Reid, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postnatal use of dexamethasone in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has been shown effectively to improve pulmonary status and to allow early weaning off mechanical ventilation. However, the mechanisms to explain the beneficial effects of dexamethasone in ventilatory dependent preterm infants remain unclear. METHODS: A double blind, placebo controlled study was performed to determine the change in pulmonary ventilation of premature infants with RDS as a result of dexamethasone treatment, and to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone on the levels of surfactant-associated proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) in the tracheal fluid from 34 premature infants with RDS and 29 control subjects. RESULTS: Dexamethasone treatment decreased fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2), arterial carbon dioxide tension (PCO2), mean airway pressure (MAP), and facilitated successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. SP-A concentrations in the tracheal aspirates were increased at days 7 and 14, and SP-D concentrations were increased during the period from days 3 to 14 in the dexamethasone treated group compared with the control group. However, albumin levels in the tracheal aspirate samples were decreased after dexamethasone treatment over the period from days 3 to 14. There was an inverse correlation between PCO2 values and SP-A concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that early use of dexamethasone can improve pulmonary status and also increase SP-A and SP-D levels in the tracheal fluid in premature infants with RDS. PMID:8984701

  6. Changes in the Expression and Protein Level of Matrix Metalloproteinases after Exposure to Waterpipe Tobacco Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Khabour, Omar; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Abu Thiab, Tuqa M.; Al-Husein, Belal A.; Eissenberg, Thomas; Shihadeh, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe smoking has become a worldwide epidemic with health consequences that only now are beginning to be understood fully. Because waterpipe use involves inhaling a large volume of toxicant-laden smoke that can cause inflammation, some health consequences may include inflammation-mediated lung injury. Excess matrix metalloproteinase expression is a key step in the etiology of toxicant exposure-driven inflammation and injury. In this study, changes in the level and mRNA of major matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -9 and -12) in the lungs of mice following exposure to waterpipe smoke were investigated. Balb/c mice were exposed to waterpipe smoke for one hour daily, over a period of two or eight weeks. Control mice were exposed to fresh air only. ELISA and Real-Time PCR techniques were used to determine the protein and mRNA levels of MMP1, 9 and 12 respectively in the lungs. Our findings showed that MMP1, 9 and 12 levels in the lung significantly increased after both two (P < 0.05) and eight weeks (P < 0.01) exposures. Similarly, RT-PCR findings showed that mRNA of those proteinases significantly increased following two (P < 0.01) and eight weeks (P < 0.001) exposures. In conclusion, waterpipe smoking is associated strongly with lung injury as measured by elevation in the expression of MMPs in the lung tissue. PMID:26484568

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HRpeak: 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak: 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO2VT: 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels. PMID:24760118

  8. Reduced levels of protein recoding by A-to-I RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khermesh, Khen; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Barak, Michal; Annese, Anita; Wachtel, Chaim; Levanon, Erez Y; Picardi, Ernesto; Eisenberg, Eli

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR enzyme family, acts on dsRNA structures within pre-mRNA molecules. Editing of the coding part of the mRNA may lead to recoding, amino acid substitution in the resulting protein, possibly modifying its biochemical and biophysical properties. Altered RNA editing patterns have been observed in various neurological pathologies. Here, we present a comprehensive study of recoding by RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of irreversible dementia. We have used a targeted resequencing approach supplemented by a microfluidic-based high-throughput PCR coupled with next-generation sequencing to accurately quantify A-to-I RNA editing levels in a preselected set of target sites, mostly located within the coding sequence of synaptic genes. Overall, editing levels decreased in AD patients' brain tissues, mainly in the hippocampus and to a lesser degree in the temporal and frontal lobes. Differential RNA editing levels were observed in 35 target sites within 22 genes. These results may shed light on a possible association between the neurodegenerative processes typical for AD and deficient RNA editing.

  9. Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels in Normal-Weight Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Young; Lee, Ji-Ah; Oh, Jee-Young; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Chung, Hyewon

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Serum levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a vascular inflammatory marker, may predict the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes and CVD. The aim of this study was to compare hsCRP levels between normal weight women with PCOS and controls with a normal menstrual cycle and to determine the factors associated with serum hsCRP levels. Methods Thirty-nine lean PCOS patients and 24 healthy, regular cycling women were enrolled in this study. We performed anthropometric measurements, fat computed tomography (CT), and blood sampling to determine blood chemistry and levels of hsCRP, gonadotropins, testosterone, and sex-hormone binding globulin. We also conducted 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to assess insulin sensitivity. Results Serum hsCRP concentrations were higher in women with PCOS than in women with regular mensturation. However, this difference was no longer significant after adjusting for body mass index (BMI). hsCRP levels were correlated with waist circumference (r=0.46, p<0.01), BMI (r=0.46, p<0.01), visceral fat area (r=0.45, p<0.01), and systolic (r=0.42, p<0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (r=0.39, p<0.05). hsCRP also tended to be negatively associated with insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU) (r=-0.31, p=0.07). A multiple regression analysis revealed that BMI (β=0.29, p<0.05), systolic blood pressure (β=0.39, p<0.01), and IMGU (β=-0.31, p<0.05) predicted serum hsCRP levels in women with PCOS. Conclusions PCOS by itself does not seem to be associated with increased hsCRP levels, whereas known CVD risk factors affect serum hsCRP levels in PCOS. PMID:19949734

  10. Ursolic acid regulates aging process through enhancing of metabolic sensor proteins level.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soroush Alaghehband; Bakhtiari, Nuredin

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Ursolic Acid (UA) ameliorates skeletal muscle performance through satellite cells proliferation and cellular energy status. In studying the potential role of the hypothalamus in aging, we developed a strategy to pursue UA effects on the hypothalamus anti-aging proteins such as; SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and α-Klotho. In this study, we used a model of aging animals (C57BL/6). UA dissolved in Corn oil (20mg/ml) and then administrated (200mg/Kg i.p injection) to mice, twice daily for 7days. After treatment times, the mice perfused and the hypothalamus isolated for preparing of tissue to Immunofluorescence microscopy. The data illustrated that UA significantly increased SIRT1 (∼3.5±0.3 folds) and SIRT-6 (∼1.5±0.2 folds) proteins overexpression (P<0.001). In addition, our results showed that UA enhanced α-Klotho (∼3.3±0.3) and PGC-1β (∼2.6±0.2 folds) proteins levels (P<0. 01). In this study, data were analyzed using SPSS 16 (ANOVA test). To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA through enhancing of anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and SIRT6) and PGC-1β in hypothalamus regulates aging-process and attenuates mitochondrial-related diseases. In regard to the key role of α-Klotho in aging, our data indicate that UA may be on the horizon to forestall diseases of aging. PMID:27470332

  11. Ursolic acid regulates aging process through enhancing of metabolic sensor proteins level.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soroush Alaghehband; Bakhtiari, Nuredin

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Ursolic Acid (UA) ameliorates skeletal muscle performance through satellite cells proliferation and cellular energy status. In studying the potential role of the hypothalamus in aging, we developed a strategy to pursue UA effects on the hypothalamus anti-aging proteins such as; SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and α-Klotho. In this study, we used a model of aging animals (C57BL/6). UA dissolved in Corn oil (20mg/ml) and then administrated (200mg/Kg i.p injection) to mice, twice daily for 7days. After treatment times, the mice perfused and the hypothalamus isolated for preparing of tissue to Immunofluorescence microscopy. The data illustrated that UA significantly increased SIRT1 (∼3.5±0.3 folds) and SIRT-6 (∼1.5±0.2 folds) proteins overexpression (P<0.001). In addition, our results showed that UA enhanced α-Klotho (∼3.3±0.3) and PGC-1β (∼2.6±0.2 folds) proteins levels (P<0. 01). In this study, data were analyzed using SPSS 16 (ANOVA test). To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA through enhancing of anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and SIRT6) and PGC-1β in hypothalamus regulates aging-process and attenuates mitochondrial-related diseases. In regard to the key role of α-Klotho in aging, our data indicate that UA may be on the horizon to forestall diseases of aging.

  12. Protein carbonyl levels correlate with performance in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Lima, Frederico Luis; Lannes, Luiz; Viana-Gomes, Diego; Pierucci, Anna Paola T R; Salerno, Verônica P

    2015-07-01

    Excess and incorrectly selected exercise can degrade athletic performance from an imbalance in redox homeostasis and oxidative stress, but well-planned training and nutrition can improve antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to investigate how nutrient intake could influence oxidative stress and cell lesion biomarkers after 5 days of training followed by a game. Blood was collected from 10 athletes at the start of training (basal), after training (pre-game), and postgame. Their acceleration capacity also was measured pre- and postgame. Blood analysis showed an increase in lactate concentration postgame (13%) and total antioxidant capacity increased both pre-game (13.1%) and postgame (12.7%), all in comparison with basal levels. An oxidative stress marker, protein carbonyl (PC), increased 3-fold over the course of the game, which correlated with a decreased acceleration (r = 0.749). For biomarkers of tissue damage, creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase (AST) increased postgame by 150% and 75%, respectively. The AST variation had a high negative correlation with energy and carbohydrate consumption and a moderate correlation with lipid and vitamin C intake. Protein intake had a positive but moderate correlation with reduced glutathione. The observed correlations suggest that nutritional monitoring can improve exercise physiological homeostasis and that PC serves as a good biomarker for oxidative stress and performance loss. PMID:25962716

  13. A decrease in protein level and a missense polymorphism of KIF17 are associated with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ratta-Apha, Woraphat; Mouri, Kentaro; Boku, Shuken; Ishiguro, Hiroki; Okazaki, Satoshi; Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Arinami, Tadao; Shirakawa, Osamu; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2015-12-15

    It has been shown that the dysfunction of N-methyl-d-asparate (NMDA) receptors-mediated neurotransmission plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Especially, GluN2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, associated trafficking complex is altered in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia. The kinesin superfamily motor protein 17 (KIF17) is known as a transporter of NR2B.Previous studies showed that a structural variant of KIF17 gene is associated with a schizophrenic phenotype. Therefore, here we investigated KIF17 levels in postmortem prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and the association of a missense polymorphism (Ile341Val) in KIF17 with schizophrenia. The protein expression of KIF17 in schizophrenic postmortem brains was significantly lower than that in controls. Next, the association of missense polymorphisms (rs631375, rs13375609, rs522496 and rs2296225) of KIF17 gene in 567 schizophrenia and 710 healthy subjects was examined. Both genotypic distribution and allelic frequency of rs2296225 polymorphism were significantly different between the chronic schizophrenia subjects and controls. However, our findings described above were not replicated with the independent subjects (555 schizophrenia and 814 healthy controls). Furthermore, the two alleles of rs2296225 polymorphism did not affect the mRNA expression of KIF17. These results suggest that the dysfunction of KIF17 might be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  14. Protein carbonyl levels correlate with performance in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Lima, Frederico Luis; Lannes, Luiz; Viana-Gomes, Diego; Pierucci, Anna Paola T R; Salerno, Verônica P

    2015-07-01

    Excess and incorrectly selected exercise can degrade athletic performance from an imbalance in redox homeostasis and oxidative stress, but well-planned training and nutrition can improve antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to investigate how nutrient intake could influence oxidative stress and cell lesion biomarkers after 5 days of training followed by a game. Blood was collected from 10 athletes at the start of training (basal), after training (pre-game), and postgame. Their acceleration capacity also was measured pre- and postgame. Blood analysis showed an increase in lactate concentration postgame (13%) and total antioxidant capacity increased both pre-game (13.1%) and postgame (12.7%), all in comparison with basal levels. An oxidative stress marker, protein carbonyl (PC), increased 3-fold over the course of the game, which correlated with a decreased acceleration (r = 0.749). For biomarkers of tissue damage, creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase (AST) increased postgame by 150% and 75%, respectively. The AST variation had a high negative correlation with energy and carbohydrate consumption and a moderate correlation with lipid and vitamin C intake. Protein intake had a positive but moderate correlation with reduced glutathione. The observed correlations suggest that nutritional monitoring can improve exercise physiological homeostasis and that PC serves as a good biomarker for oxidative stress and performance loss.

  15. ABI4 mediates antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and gibberellins at transcript and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Xiaofeng; Serino, Giovanna; Xie, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones which antagonistically mediate numerous physiological processes, and their optimal balance is essential for normal plant development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ABA and GA antagonism still needs to be determined. Here, we report that ABA-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) is a central factor in GA/ABA homeostasis and antagonism in post-germination stages. ABI4 overexpression in Arabidopsis (OE-ABI4) leads to developmental defects including a decrease in plant height and poor seed production. The transcription of a key ABA biosynthetic gene, NCED6, and of a key GA catabolic gene, GA2ox7, is significantly enhanced by ABI4 overexpression. ABI4 activates NCED6 and GA2ox7 transcription by directly binding to the promoters, and genetic analysis revealed that mutation in these two genes partially rescues the dwarf phenotype of ABI4 overexpressing plants. Consistently, ABI4 overexpressing seedlings have a lower GA/ABA ratio than the wild type. We further show that ABA induces GA2ox7 transcription while GA represses NCED6 expression in an ABI4-dependent manner; and that ABA stabilizes the ABI4 protein whereas GA promotes its degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA and GA antagonize each other by oppositely acting on ABI4 transcript and protein levels.

  16. Oxidative stress induces age-dependent changes in lymphocyte protein synthesis and second messenger levels.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Hellin, J; Garcia-Arumi, E; Schwartz, S

    1998-01-01

    Cumulative damage in cells from aged people could lead to a greater fragility against acute oxidative stress. The effects of acute oxidative stress on cell viability, cAMP and cGMP concentrations, and protein synthesis rates were studied in lymphocytes from 25 young and 26 elderly subjects. Lymphocytes were exposed to stress by hydrogen peroxide 25 micromol/l and incubated for 18 hours. Cell viability after stress was lower (p<0.0001, Student's t test) in cells from the elderly (63.4%) than in cells from the young donors (73.2%). The protein synthesis rate was also lower after stress (p<0.04, Mann-Whitney U test) in cells from the elderly (47.3% vs. non-stressed cells), than in cells from the young (82.19% vs. non-stressed cells). After oxidative stress, cAMP and cGMP concentrations showed no significant changes in cells from young subjects; there were, however, significant decreases in these cyclic nucleotides in cells from the elderly (p<0.008 for both nucleotides, paired Student's t test). There were no differences in basal cAMP or cGMP levels between the two groups. These results show that mortality and metabolic changes due to oxidative stress are greater in lymphocytes proceeding from elderly subjects than in those from young subjects.

  17. Fused kinase is stabilized by Cdc37/Hsp90 and enhances Gli protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kise, Yoshiaki; Takenaka, Kei; Tezuka, Tohru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroaki . E-mail: miki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Serine/threonine kinase Fused (Fu) is an essential component of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in Drosophila, but the biochemical functions of Fu remain unclear. Here, we have investigated proteins co-precipitated with mammalian Fu and identified a kinase-specific chaperone complex, Cdc37/Hsp90, as a novel-binding partner of Fu. Inhibition of Hsp90 function by geldanamycin (GA) induces rapid degradation of Fu through a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We next show that co-expression of Fu with transcription factors Gli1 and Gli2 significantly increases their protein levels and luciferase reporter activities, which are blocked by GA. These increases can be ascribed to Fu-mediated stabilization of Gli because co-expression of Fu prolongs half-life of Gli1 and reduces polyubiquitination of Gli1. Finally, we show that GA inhibits proliferation of PC3, a Hh signaling-activated prostate cancer cell line. This growth inhibition is partially rescued by expression of ectopic Gli1, suggesting that Fu may contribute to enhance Hh signaling activity in cancer cells.

  18. Altered CYP2C9 Activity Following Modulation of CYP3A4 Levels in Human Hepatocytes: an Example of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, Donald J.; Chan, Tom S.; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) protein-protein interactions resulting in modulation of enzyme activities have been well documented using recombinant isoforms. This interaction has been less clearly demonstrated in a more physiologic in vitro system such as human hepatocytes. As an expansion of earlier work (Subramanian et al., 2010), in which recombinant CYP2C9 activity decreased with increasing levels of CYP3A4, the current study modulated CYP3A4 content in human hepatocytes to determine the impact on CYP2C9. Modulation of CYP3A4 levels in situ was enabled by the use of a long-term human hepatocyte culture model (HepatoPac) shown to retain phenotypic hepatocyte function over a number of weeks. The extended period of culture allowed time for knockdown of CYP3A4 protein by small interfering RNA (siRNA) with subsequent recovery, as well as upregulation through induction with a recovery period. CYP3A4 gene silencing resulted in a 60% decrease in CYP3A4 activity and protein levels with a concomitant 74% increase in CYP2C9 activity, with no change in CYP2C9 mRNA levels. Upon removal of siRNA, both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 activities returned to pre-knockdown levels. Importantly, modulation of CYP3A4 protein levels had no impact on cytochrome P450 reductase activities or levels. However, the possibility for competition for limiting reductase cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, lowering CYP3A4 levels also increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 activity. These studies clearly demonstrate that alterations in CYP3A4 levels can modulate CYP2C9 activity in situ and suggest that further studies are warranted to evaluate the possible clinical consequences of these findings. PMID:25157098

  19. A Theoretical Lower Bound for Selection on the Expression Levels of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple models of the costs and benefits of microbial gene expression to show that changing a protein’s expression away from its optimum by 2-fold should reduce fitness by at least 0.2·P, where P is the fraction the cell’s protein that the gene accounts for. As microbial genes are usually expressed at above 5 parts per million, and effective population sizes are likely to be above 106, this implies that 2-fold changes to gene expression levels are under strong selection, as Ne·s≫1, where Ne is the effective population size and s is the selection coefficient. Thus, most gene duplications should be selected against. On the other hand, we predict that for most genes, small changes in the expression will be effectively neutral. PMID:27289091

  20. The Influence of Tobacco Smoke on Protein and Metal Levels in the Serum of Women during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wrześniak, Marta; Kepinska, Marta; Królik, Małgorzata; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking by pregnant women has a negative effect on fetal development and increases pregnancy risk by changing the oxidative balance and microelements level. Smoking affects the concentration, structure and function of proteins, potentially leading to various negative effects on pregnancy outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings The influence of tobacco smoke on key protein fractions in smoking and non-smoking healthy pregnant women was determined by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Concentrations of the proteins α1-antitrypsin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α2-macroglobulin and transferrin were determined by ELISA tests. Total protein concentration was measured by the Biuret method. Smoking status was established by cotinine levels. Cadmium (Cd) and Zinc (Zn) concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry and the Zn/Cd ratio was calculated based on these numbers. Smoking women had a 3.7 times higher level of Cd than non-smoking women. Zn levels decreased during pregnancy for all women. The Zn/Cd ratio was three times lower in smoking women. The differences between the changes in the protein profile for smoking and non-smoking women were noted. Regarding proteins, α1-antitrypsin and α2-macroglobulin levels were lower in the non-smoking group than in the smoking group and correlated with Cd levels (r = -0.968, p = 0.032 for non-smokers; r = −0.835, p = 0.019 for smokers). Zn/Cd ratios correlated negatively with α1-, α2- and β-globulins. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to tobacco smoke increases the concentration of Cd in the blood of pregnant women and may lead to an elevated risk of pregnancy disorders. During pregnancy alter concentrations of some proteins. The correlation of Cd with proteins suggests that it is one of the causes of protein aberrations. PMID:27548057

  1. Endogenous salicylic acid levels correlate with accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins and virus resistance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yalpani, N.; Shulaev, V.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is hypothesized to be an endogenous regulator of local and systemic disease resistance and an inducer of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins among plants. High levels of PR proteins have been observed in an uninoculated amphidiploid hybrid of Nicotiana glutinosa [times] N. debneyi, which is highly resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Fluoresence, UV, and mass spectral analysis established that the levels of SA in healthy N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi leaves were 30 times greater than in N. tabacum [open quotes]Xanthi-nc[close quotes] tobacco, which does not constitutively express PR proteins and is less resistant to TMV. Upon TMV-inoculation SA levels increased at least 70-fold leaves of Xanthi-nc but role only slightly in the hybrid. Phloem exudates of N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi contained at least 500 times more SA than those of Xanthi-nc. SA treatment caused the appearance of PR-1 protein in Xanthi-nc but did not affect constitutively high levels of PR-1 protein in N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi. In contrast to Xanthi-nc tobacco, TMV-inoculated N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi kept at 32 C accumulated more than 0.5 [mu]g SA/g fresh weight, maintained high levels of PR proteins, and developed a hypersensitive response to TMV. PR proteins have previously been shown to accumulate in the lower leaves of healthy, flowering Xanthi-nc tobacco, which exhibited increased resistance to TMV. These developmentally induced increases in resistance and PR-1 proteins positively correlated with tissue levels of SA. These results affirm the regulatory role of SA in disease resistance and PR protein production. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Influence of casein as a percentage of true protein and protein level on color and texture of milks containing 1 and 2% fat.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Noriko; Barbano, David M; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-07-01

    Combinations of fresh liquid microfiltration retentate of skim milk, ultrafiltered retentate and permeate produced from microfiltration permeate, cream, and dried lactose monohydrate were used to produce a matrix of 20 milks. The milks contained 5 levels of casein as a percentage of true protein of about 5, 25, 50, 75, and 80% and 4 levels of true protein of 3.0, 3.76, 4.34, and 5.0% with constant lactose percentage of 5%. The experiment was replicated twice and repeated for both 1 and 2% fat content. Hunter color measurements, relative viscosity, and fat globule size distribution were measured, and a trained panel documented appearance and texture attributes on all milks. Overall, casein as a percentage of true protein had stronger effects than level of true protein on Hunter L, a, b values, relative viscosity, and fat globule size when using fresh liquid micellar casein concentrates and milk serum protein concentrates produced by a combination of microfiltration and ultrafiltration. As casein as a percentage of true protein increased, the milks became more white (higher L value), less green (lower negative a value), and less yellow (lower b value). Relative viscosity increased and d(0.9) generally decreased with increasing casein as a percentage of true protein. Panelists perceived milks with increasing casein as a percentage of true protein as more white, more opaque, and less yellow. Panelists were able to detect increased throat cling and mouthcoating with increased casein as a percentage of true protein in 2% milks, even when differences in appearance among milks were masked.

  3. Effect of degradable intake protein level on finishing cattle performance and ruminal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shain, D H; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Herold, D W

    1998-01-01

    Two finishing trials and a metabolism trial were conducted to evaluate level of supplemental degradable intake (crude) protein (DIP) in finishing diets on cattle performance, carcass characteristics, and ruminal metabolism. Finishing trials were conducted in two consecutive years using 128 crossbred yearling steers (BW = 343+/-5 kg, Trial 1) and 176 crossbred yearling steers (BW = 375+/-4 kg, Trial 2) in a randomized complete block design. Steers were fed dry-rolled corn diets containing urea at 0, .88, 1.34, or 1.96% (DM basis). No differences in DMI, daily gain, or feed efficiency were noted among steers receiving diets containing supplemental urea. However, steers fed diets supplemented with urea were 5.4% more efficient (P < .01) and gained 6.6% faster (P < .01) than steers receiving no supplemental urea. Metabolizable protein (MP) content of all diets exceeded the steers' requirements. However, diets containing no urea were deficient in DIP. In the metabolism trial, four ruminally fistulated steers (BW = 380+/-22 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design and fed (ad libitum) diets similar to those used in the finishing trials. Nitrogen intake and ruminal ammonia N concentration increased linearly (P < .05) with increasing level of urea supplementation. Diets containing no supplemental urea were calculated to be deficient in DIP, resulting in reduced bacterial synthesis. Results indicate that dry-rolled corn finishing diets containing no supplemental N are deficient in ruminally degradable N. Supplementing these diets with an inexpensive source of ruminally degradable N improved animal performance. However, supplementation with urea above .88% was not beneficial. PMID:9464905

  4. Response of male buffalo calves to different levels of energy and protein in finishing diets.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh, H; Fazaeli, H; Kordnejad, I; Mirzaei, H R

    2007-05-01

    A factorial experiment with completely randomised design was conducted, using 27 heads of 15 month buffalo male calves with initial live weight of 287 +/- 15 kg. The animals were individually housed and randomly allocated into 9 treatment groups of three animals each. Three levels of energy (E1, E2, E3) with three levels of crude protein (P1, P2, P3) were formulated to provide 90, 100 and 110% requirement equivalents for 900 g, expected body weight gain of steers derived from NRC beef cattle requirements (1976). Live weight changes were obtained by direct weighing of the animals every month and ended by slaughtering the calves for carcass index measurements. Results indicated that Dry Matter Intake (DMI) was not significantly different between treatments. Average Daily Gain (ADG) ranged from 503 to 951 g/animal that was significantly varied among the diets (p < 0.05). The significantly higher daily gain was obtained (p < 0.05) when animals received medium energy diets that was similar to 100% beef cattle steer requirements. In addition the feed conversion ratio was significantly lower, when the animals received medium energy diets (p < 0.05). The dressing yield as well as the meat % age was not affected by the type of the diet, but abdominal fat was significantly higher in medium energy diets (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that the optimum fattening performance of 15 month old buffalo male calves may be obtained by providing around 10.42 MJ/kg of dietary metabolisable energy and about 10.22% of crude protein. PMID:19069949

  5. Involvement of decreased neuroglobin protein level in cognitive dysfunction induced by 1-bromopropane in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Yuan, Hua; Jiang, Lulu; Yang, Junlin; Zeng, Tao; Xie, Keqin; Zhang, Cuili; Zhao, Xiulan

    2015-03-10

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is used as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents (ODS) in industrial applications. 1-BP could display central nervous system (CNS) neurotoxicity manifested by cognitive dysfunction. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotectant and is predominantly expressed in the nervous system. The present study aimed to investigate Ngb involvement in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=14) and treated with 0, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg bw 1-BP, respectively, by gavage for consecutive 12 days. Rats displayed cognitive dysfunction dose-dependently through Morris water maze (MWM) test. Significant neuron loss in layer 5 of the prelimbic cortex (PL) was observed. Moreover, 1-BP decreased Ngb protein level in cerebral cortex and Ngb decrease was significantly positively correlated with cognitive dysfunction. Glutathione (GSH) content, GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) activity decreased in cerebral cortex, coupled with the increase in GSSG content. GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio decrease were significantly positively correlated with cortical Ngb decrease. Additionally, levels of N-epsilon-hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins in cerebral cortex of 1-BP-treated rats increased significantly. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1-BP resulted in decreased endogenous neuroprotectant Ngb in cerebral cortex, which might play an important role in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP and that 1-BP-induced oxidative stress in cerebral cortex might partly be responsible for Ngb decrease.

  6. Flotillin depletion affects ErbB protein levels in different human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Asp, Nagham; Pust, Sascha; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    The ErbB3 receptor is an important regulator of cell growth and carcinogenesis. Among breast cancer patients, up to 50-70% have ErbB3 overexpression and 20-30% show overexpressed or amplified ErbB2. ErbB3 has also been implicated in the development of resistance to several drugs used against cancers driven by ErbB1 or ErbB2. One of the main challenges in ErbB-targeting therapy is to inactivate signaling mediated by ErbB2-ErbB3 oncogenic receptor complexes. We analyzed the regulatory role of flotillins on ErbB3 levels and ErbB2-ErbB3 complexes in SKBR3, MCF7 and MDA-MB-134-VI human breast cancer cells. Recently, we described a mechanism for interfering with ErbB2 signaling in breast cancer and demonstrated a molecular complex of flotillin scaffolding proteins with ErbB2 and Hsp90. In the present study, flotillins were found to be in a molecular complex with ErbB3, even in cells without the presence of ErbB2 or other ErbB receptors. Depletion of either flotillin-1 or flotillin-2 resulted in downregulation of ErbB3 and a selective reduction of ErbB2-ErbB3 receptor complexes. Moreover, flotillin-2 depletion resulted in reduced activation of Akt and MAPK signaling cascades, and as a functional consequence of flotillin depletion, breast cancer cells showed an impaired cell migration. Altogether, we provide data demonstrating a novel and functional role of flotillins in the regulation of ErbB protein levels and stabilization of ErbB2-ErbB3 receptor complexes. Thus, flotillins are crucial regulators for oncogenic ErbB function and potential targets for cancer treatment.

  7. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents. PMID:24973585

  8. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents.

  9. Cold stress-induced protein Rbm3 binds 60S ribosomal subunits, alters microRNA levels, and enhances global protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dresios, John; Aschrafi, Armaz; Owens, Geoffrey C; Vanderklish, Peter W; Edelman, Gerald M; Mauro, Vincent P

    2005-02-01

    The expression of Rbm3, a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein, is enhanced under conditions of mild hypothermia, and Rbm3 has been postulated to facilitate protein synthesis at colder temperatures. To investigate this possibility, Rbm3 was overexpressed as a c-Myc fusion protein in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cells expressing this fusion protein showed a 3-fold increase in protein synthesis at both 37 degrees C and 32 degrees C compared with control cells. Although polysome profiles of cells expressing the fusion protein and control cells were similar, several differences were noted, suggesting that Rbm3 might enhance the association of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits at 32 degrees C. Studies to assess a direct interaction of Rbm3 with ribosomes showed that a fraction of Rbm3 was associated with 60S ribosomal subunits in an RNA-independent manner. It appeared unlikely that this association could explain the global enhancement of protein synthesis, however, because cells expressing the Rbm3 fusion protein showed no substantial increase in the size of their monosome and polysome peaks, suggesting that similar numbers of mRNAs were being translated at approximately the same rates. In contrast, a complex that sedimented between the top of the gradient and 40S subunits was less abundant in cells expressing recombinant Rbm3. Further analysis showed that the RNA component of this fraction was microRNA. We discuss the possibility that Rbm3 expression alters global protein synthesis by affecting microRNA levels and suggest that both Rbm3 and microRNAs are part of a homeostatic mechanism that regulates global levels of protein synthesis under normal and cold-stress conditions.

  10. Elevated urinary level of vitamin D-binding protein as a novel biomarker for diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, XIAO-QIN; ZHAO, LI-MIN; GE, JIA-PU; ZHANG, YAN; XU, YAN-CHENG

    2014-01-01

    Improving the early prediction and detection of diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains a great challenge in disease management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early detection power of urinary vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) for the diagnosis of DN. Urine samples were obtained from 45 healthy volunteers and 105 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (DM group), microalbuminuria (DN1 group) and macroalbuminuria (DN2 group) (n=35 per group). The VDBP expression patterns in urine from patients and controls were quantified by western blot analysis. The excretion levels of urinary VDBP were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The quantification results were obtained by correcting for creatinine expression and showed that urinary VDBP levels were significantly elevated in the patients of the DN1 and DN2 groups compared with those of the DM group and normal controls (1,011.33±325.30 and 1,406.34±239.66 compared with 466.54±213.63 and 125.48±98.27 ng/mg, respectively) (P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of urinary VDBP levels for the diagnosis of DN rendered an optimum cut-off value of 552.243 ng/mg corresponding to 92.86% sensitivity and 85.00% specificity, which also showed an area under the ROC curve of 0.966. In conclusion, the findings of the present study suggest that urinary VDBP may be a potential biomarker for the early detection and prevention of DN. Further studies are required to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of elevated VDBP levels and their role in the diagnosis of DN. PMID:24396416

  11. Levels of common salivary protein 1 in healthy subjects and periodontal patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human saliva, as a vital part of the immune defense system, contains a number of distinct proteins and peptides. Recently human common salivary protein 1 (CSP1) has been identified as an abundant salivary protein and may play a role in promoting the binding of cariogenic bacteria to salivary pellicles. However, nothing else is known regarding the role of CSP1 in periodontology. The aim of this study was to quantify and compare CSP1 levels between healthy subjects and periodontal patients. Methods This controlled clinical study was conducted in periodontally healthy individuals and patients with chronic periodontitis Chonbuk National University Hospital, with Institutional Review Board approval. Whole saliva samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects and 33 chronic periodontitis patients and analyzed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immune blotting were conducted to ensure that anti-CSP1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) binds to CSP1 in human saliva. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was house-fabricated using mAb-hCSP1#14 and mAb-hCSP1#4 as a capture and a detector mAb, respectively. The CSP1 concentrations in saliva from 36 healthy subjects and 33 periodontal patients were quantified using the CSP1 sandwich ELISA system, and the results were analyzed using the Student’s t-test. Results Immunoblot analysis using mAb-hCSP1 as a probe confirmed that CSP1 in human saliva existed as a single band with a molecular weight of approximately 27-kDa. The quantification of CSP1 concentrations by CSP1 ELISA showed that the median values (25th to 75th percentiles) of periodontal patients and healthy subjects were 9,474 ng/mL (range, 8,434–10,139 ng/mL) and 8,598 ng/mL (range, 7,421–9,877 ng/mL), respectively. The Student’s t-test indicated the presence of a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.024). Conclusions The presence of a significant difference in CSP1 levels between healthy

  12. Mass-tag labeling reveals site-specific and endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation.

    PubMed

    Percher, Avital; Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Xiaoqiu; Yount, Jacob S; Hang, Howard C

    2016-04-19

    Fatty acylation of cysteine residues provides spatial and temporal control of protein function in cells and regulates important biological pathways in eukaryotes. Although recent methods have improved the detection and proteomic analysis of cysteine fatty (S-fatty) acylated proteins, understanding how specific sites and quantitative levels of this posttranslational modification modulate cellular pathways are still challenging. To analyze the endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation in cells, we developed a mass-tag labeling method based on hydroxylamine-sensitivity of thioesters and selective maleimide-modification of cysteines, termed acyl-PEG exchange (APE). We demonstrate that APE enables sensitive detection of protein S-acylation levels and is broadly applicable to different classes of S-palmitoylated membrane proteins. Using APE, we show that endogenous interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 is S-fatty acylated on three cysteine residues and site-specific modification of highly conserved cysteines are crucial for the antiviral activity of this IFN-stimulated immune effector. APE therefore provides a general and sensitive method for analyzing the endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation and should facilitate quantitative studies of this regulated and dynamic lipid modification in biological systems.

  13. Mass-tag labeling reveals site-specific and endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation.

    PubMed

    Percher, Avital; Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Xiaoqiu; Yount, Jacob S; Hang, Howard C

    2016-04-19

    Fatty acylation of cysteine residues provides spatial and temporal control of protein function in cells and regulates important biological pathways in eukaryotes. Although recent methods have improved the detection and proteomic analysis of cysteine fatty (S-fatty) acylated proteins, understanding how specific sites and quantitative levels of this posttranslational modification modulate cellular pathways are still challenging. To analyze the endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation in cells, we developed a mass-tag labeling method based on hydroxylamine-sensitivity of thioesters and selective maleimide-modification of cysteines, termed acyl-PEG exchange (APE). We demonstrate that APE enables sensitive detection of protein S-acylation levels and is broadly applicable to different classes of S-palmitoylated membrane proteins. Using APE, we show that endogenous interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 is S-fatty acylated on three cysteine residues and site-specific modification of highly conserved cysteines are crucial for the antiviral activity of this IFN-stimulated immune effector. APE therefore provides a general and sensitive method for analyzing the endogenous levels of protein S-fatty acylation and should facilitate quantitative studies of this regulated and dynamic lipid modification in biological systems. PMID:27044110

  14. Proteins altered by elevated levels of palmitate or glucose implicated in impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sol, E-ri M; Hovsepyan, Meri; Bergsten, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by aberrant insulin secretory patterns, where elevated insulin levels at non-stimulatory basal conditions and reduced hormonal levels at stimulatory conditions are major components. To delineate mechanisms responsible for these alterations we cultured INS-1E cells for 48 hours at 20 mM glucose in absence or presence of 0.5 mM palmitate, when stimulatory secretion of insulin was reduced or basal secretion was elevated, respectively. Results After culture, cells were protein profiled by SELDI-TOF-MS and 2D-PAGE. Differentially expressed proteins were discovered and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Complimentary protein profiles were obtained by the two approaches with SELDI-TOF-MS being more efficient in separating proteins in the low molecular range and 2D-PAGE in the high molecular range. Identified proteins included alpha glucosidase, calmodulin, gars, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A3, lon peptidase, nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH) dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, proteasome p45, rab2, pyruvate kinase and t-complex protein. The observed glucose-induced differential protein expression pattern indicates enhanced glucose metabolism, defense against reactive oxygen species, enhanced protein translation, folding and degradation and decreased insulin granular formation and trafficking. Palmitate-induced changes could be related to altered exocytosis. Conclusion The identified altered proteins indicate mechanism important for altered β-cell function in T2DM. PMID:19607692

  15. Post-effort chances in C-reactive protein level among soccer players at the end of the training season.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa-Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Robert; Chamera, Tomasz; Buryta, Rafał; Moska, Waldemar; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Numerous literature data point out the differences in immunological parameters as a result of physical effort and the relation of those changes to the subject's fitness level. This study was aimed at the assessment of soccer players' condition and adaptation to physical effort based on the changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) blood level. C-reactive protein, total protein, and albumin plasma levels before and after 60-minute-long outdoor running were determined among 16 (8 men and 8 women) soccer players. Statistically significant increase in total blood protein level was observed in both studied groups. However, there were no statistically significant changes in albumin level in soccer players' blood. Determination of CRP showed that the exercise test caused changes in its level among both women and men; yet, statistically significant increase in CRP level was found only in women's blood. The different influence of effort on CRP plasma level may be explained by the involvement of various mechanisms in regulation of acute-phase responses in different conditions. It was found in our study that CRP level could be a valuable tool to assess the metabolic response to aerobic exercise.

  16. Elevated C-reactive protein levels and metabolic syndrome in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Volpato, Stefano; Galvani, Matteo; Blè, Alessandro; Bandinelli, Stefania; Corsi, Anna Maria; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Guralnik, Jack M.; Fellin, Renato; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and “low grade” systemic inflammation (LGSI) are very common findings in the older population. Although MS and LGSI have been associated in adults, it is not known what is the real contribution of MS, and its single components, to LGSI in older persons, due to the potential confounding effect of comorbidity and aging. We investigated the relationship between increased C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels, a marker of LGSI, and MS in 1044 older (≥65 years) community dwelling Italian individuals enrolled the InChianti study. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the NCEP-ATP III-AHA/NHLBI criteria. High sensitivity CRP (hs.CRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and defined as high when >3 mg/L. The overall prevalence of MS was 31%. The prevalence of high hs.CRP was 54.5% in subjects with, and 41.3% in those without MS (p < 0.001). MS was associated with high hs.CRP levels after adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.46-2.55). Compared to subjects with MS and no LGSI, individuals with MS and LGSI were characterized by higher waist circumference, BMI, and HOMA score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels in subjects with MS (waist circumference III vs. I tertile OR: 2.60, 95% CI: 1.79-3.77) independent of age, gender, and important confounding variables including comorbidity. Additional analyses, conducted with and without dichotomization of hs.CRP levels, confirmed the central role of waist circumference in the LGSI phenomenon, independent of gender and diagnosis of MS. We conclude that in older individuals, MS is associated with LGSI, but the association is mainly supported by a strong independent correlation between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels. In the absence of this specific MS component, it seems that the contribution of MS to LGSI would be modest at best. PMID:18845301

  17. Protein pheromone expression levels predict and respond to the formation of social dominance networks.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Cunningham, C B; Ruff, J S; Potts, W K

    2015-06-01

    Communication signals are key regulators of social networks and are thought to be under selective pressure to honestly reflect social status, including dominance status. The odours of dominants and nondominants differentially influence behaviour, and identification of the specific pheromones associated with, and predictive of, dominance status is essential for understanding the mechanisms of network formation and maintenance. In mice, major urinary proteins (MUPs) are excreted in extraordinary large quantities and expression level has been hypothesized to provide an honest signal of dominance status. Here, we evaluate whether MUPs are associated with dominance in wild-derived mice by analysing expression levels before, during and after competition for reproductive resources over 3 days. During competition, dominant males have 24% greater urinary MUP expression than nondominants. The MUP darcin, a pheromone that stimulates female attraction, is predictive of dominance status: dominant males have higher darcin expression before competition. Dominants also have a higher ratio of darcin to other MUPs before and during competition. These differences appear transient, because there are no differences in MUPs or darcin after competition. We also find MUP expression is affected by sire dominance status: socially naive sons of dominant males have lower MUP expression, but this apparent repression is released during competition. A requisite condition for the evolution of communication signals is honesty, and we provide novel insight into pheromones and social networks by showing that MUP and darcin expression is a reliable signal of dominance status, a primary determinant of male fitness in many species.

  18. Novel monoclonal antibodies against Pdx1 reveal feedback regulation of Pdx1 protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Galbo, T.; Pedersen, I.L.; Fløyel, T.; Bang-Berthelsen, C.H.; Serup, P.; Madsen, O.D.; Hald, J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize two monoclonal antibodies (F6A11 and F109-D12) generated against Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1), a homeodomain transcription factor, which is critical for pancreas formation as well as for normal pancreatic beta cell function. For production of monoclonal antibodies, we immunized Robertsonian POSF (RBF)mice with a GST-Pdx1 fusion protein containing a 68-amino acid C-terminal fragment of rat Pdx1. These monoclonal antibodies detect Pdx1 by western blotting and allow immunohistochemical detection of Pdx1 in both mouse and rat tissue. F6A11 and F109-D12 produce IHC staining patterns indistinguishable from that obtained with highly specific polyclonal Pdx1 antisera raised in rabbits and goats, when applied to embryonic or adult mouse pancreatic tissue. In contrast to previously generated polyclonal anti-Pdx1 antisera, we also demonstrate that F6A11 works for intracellular fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) staining of Pdx1. By using F6A11, we characterize the induction of Pdx1 in the Doxycycline (DOX) inducible insulinoma cell line INSrαβ-Pdx1 and follow the reduction of Pdx1 after removing Dox. Finally, we show that induction of exogenous Pdx1 leads to a reduction in endogenous Pdx1 levels, which suggests that a negative feedback loop is involved in maintaining correct levels of Pdx1 in the cell. PMID:20558340

  19. Bone GLA protein (BGP) levels and bone turnover in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Magaro, M; Altomonte, L; Mirone, L; Zoli, A; Corvino, G

    1989-06-01

    Bone GLA protein (BGP) and other biochemical indices of bone turnover were measured in 42 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in a group of normal subjects matched for sex and age. Mean serum BGP concentrations were significantly higher in patients with active arthritis than in patients with mild activity (p less than 0.01) and controls (p less than 0.01). No significant difference was found in serum BGP levels and in other parameters of bone turnover when the patients were stratified according to functional class or duration of disease. There was a correlation between BGP and alkaline phosphatase levels only in RA patients with high activity of disease. Our data suggest an accelerated bone turnover in patients with active RA. We infer that in such patients the impairment of bone metabolism is a determinant of RA-associated osteopenia. Disease activity rather than functional impairment or duration of arthritis should be regarded as a factor in the bone loss of RA.

  20. Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins Level in Neonates Predicts Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Hala; Shin, Michael; Sirya, Edward; Lim, Yow-Pin; Caplan, Michael; Padbury, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We compared Inter alpha Inhibitor proteins (LALP) levels in infants with proven necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and with infants who had other, non-specific abdominal disorders. Study design A prospective observational study of infants in the NICU. NEC was diagnosed according to Bell’s staging criteria. Infants in the control group had non-specific abdominal disorders but no radiographic evidence of NEC and no disease progression. All infants with radiographic NEC were included. Plasma IaIp was quantitated using ELISA. Results Seventeen infants had confirmed NEC and 34 infants had non-specific disorders that improved rapidly. Gestational age, postnatal age, weight, sex, maternal obstetric variables, rupture of membranes and mode of delivery did not differ. Mean IaIp level in the NEC group was significantly lower (137±38 mg/L, 95% CI=118–157) than the control group (258±53 mg/L, 95%CI: 238–277), p < 0.0001. Conclusions The demonstration that IaIp are significantly reduced in neonates with NEC suggests LALP serve useful as a sensitive biomarker, allowing patients to be placed on appropriate therapy and reducing antibiotic overuse in infants with suspected but unproven NEC. Administration of LALP may significantly reduce the severity of systemic inflammation and associated tissue injury. PMID:20955849

  1. Insulin-like growth factor levels during pregnancy in the cow are affected by protein supplementation in the maternal diet.

    PubMed

    Perry, V E A; Norman, S T; Daniel, R C W; Owens, P C; Grant, P; Doogan, V J

    2002-07-15

    To determine if dietary protein supplementation in early pregnancy alters total circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) levels, genetically similar heifers were fed diets containing different levels of protein in the first and second trimesters of gestation. The groups were: low/low (L/L), fed a diet containing 7% crude protein (CP) per kg/DM (low protein) in the first and second trimesters; high/high (H/H), fed a diet containing 14% CP per kg/DM (high protein) in the first and second trimesters; low/high (L/H), fed low protein in the first trimester and high in the second trimester and vice versa for the high/low (H/L) group. At day 62 of gestation, there was a significant difference (P<0.01) in IGF I concentrations between the high and low protein groups (149 versus 119 ng/ml, S.E. 5.9). There was a strong effect (P<0.001) of protein levels in the second trimester on IGF I levels on days 119, 153, and 183 of gestation but not at day 257. Mean IGF I levels for high and low nutrition in the second trimester were 157 and 97 (S.E. 6.6) for days 119, 191, and 88 (S.E. 12.6) for days 153 and 160, and 67 (S.E. 7.7) for day 183. At day 257, there was a significant interaction (P<0.01) between treatments with the means being 98(ab), 110(b), 116(b) and 79(a gamma) (means followed by a letter in common do not differ significantly, P<0.05) (S.E. 7.5) for H/H, H/L, L/H, and L/L, respectively. There was a significant (P<0.05) effect of protein supplementation in the first trimester on calf IGF I levels at birth with means being 42 and 25 (S.E. 5.2) for high and low protein supplementation, respectively. There was a significant (P<0.01) effect of protein supplementation in second trimester upon IGF II levels and a significant (P<0.05) negative correlation between calf birth weight and IGF II levels.

  2. A Pelargonium ARGONAUTE4 gene shows organ-specific expression and differences in RNA and protein levels.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Gray, John; Leisner, Scott

    2010-03-01

    RNAi-induced gene silencing plays a role in plant DNA methylation and defense. While most gene silencing studies have been performed on annuals, little is known about the expression of key components of this process (like ARGONAUTE proteins) in ornamentals. Using a combination of polymerase chain reaction techniques, an ARGONAUTE4 gene, PhAGO4, was isolated from Pelargonium. PhAGO4 encodes a predicted product of 934 amino acids that contains the PAZ and PIWI domains typical of ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that PhAGO4 clusters with other plant AGO4 proteins. Organ expression patterns of the AGO4 genes in Pelargonium and Arabidopsis show intriguing differences. AGO4 RNA levels decline with leaf age in both Arabidopsis and Pelargonium. In contrast AGO4 RNA levels in roots relative to leaves are higher in Pelargonium than in Arabidopsis. Both Arabidopsis and Pelargonium AGO4 showed higher RNA levels in flowers than leaves or roots. Even though flowers show higher levels of PhAGO4 RNA when compared to leaves and roots, protein gel blot analysis shows that at the protein level, the reverse is true. This suggests that PhAGO4 expression may be regulated at the translational or post-translational level in Pelargonium flowers.

  3. [Relationship between the included levels of coffee pulp and the protein content in rations for monogastric animals].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Brenes, R A; Bendaña, G; González, J M; Braham, J E; Bressani, R

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of including fresh and ensilaged coffee pulp in rations for monogastric animals, and find the best protein and coffee pulp levels in rations for rats. Fresh coffee pulp and pulp ensilaged for 12 months were used; both kinds of pulp were sun-dried before incorporating them into the rations. The chemical analyses of the pulps revealed a lower content in caffeine, tannins, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in the ensilaged pulp than in fresh coffee pulp. Thirty-two experimental rations were prepared, 16 with fresh coffee pulp and 16 with the ensilaged by-product, distributed into four different protein levels (10, 15, 20 and 25%), and three levels of pulp (15, 30 and 45%) for each protein level. The rations thus prepared were fed to Wistar albino rats for a six-week period. The parameters used to measure the effect of the two types of pulp were mortality rate, food consumption, weight gain, food conversion and apparent digestibility of the rations. Ensilaged pulp had a higher nutritive value, lower toxicity and better digestibility than fresh pulp. The increase in the protein level of the ration resulted in partial protection against the negative effects of coffee pulp on the performance of animals, since this improved as the protein level of the ration increased.

  4. Baseline C-Reactive Protein Levels and Life Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Hideyuki; Oeda, Tomoko; Umemura, Atsushi; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Yamamoto, Kenji; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, and high levels of CRP correlate with vascular death. Chronic inflammation is considered to be involved in neurodegeneration, although there is no evidence linking it with the process of neurodegenerative diseases. Objective To determine the role of baseline CRP levels in the prognosis of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods A cohort of 313 patients with a mean age of 69.1 and mean PD duration of 7.9 years was retrospectively followed for a mean observation time of 1,753 days. CRP was measured when patients were not diagnosed with any infections, and levels were repetitively measured to investigate a tendency of “regression to mean.” The primary outcome measure was a survival time from study enrollment to death. Results During the observation period 56 patients died. Baseline CRP was log-linearly associated with a risk of death in PD. Mean survival time was 3,149 (95% confidence interval; 3,009-3,289) days in patients with CRP ≤ 0.8mg/L (lower two thirds) and 2,620 (2,343-2,897) days in those with CRP > 0.8 mg/L (top third, p < 0.001, log-rank test). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per two-fold higher CRP concentration for all deaths was 1.29 (1.10-1.52), and after excluding PD-unrelated deaths, such as cancer or stroke, HR was 1.23 (1.01-1.49) (adjusted for age, sex, PD duration, modified Hohen-Yahr stages, MMSE scores, and serum albumin). Conclusions Baseline CRP concentrations were associated with the risk of death and predicted life prognosis of patients with PD. The associations were independent from PD duration, PD severity, cognitive function, ages, and nutritional conditions, suggesting the possibility that subclinical chronic inflammation is associated with a neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26218286

  5. Neuron-Specific Enolase, S100 Calcium-Binding Protein B, and Heat Shock Protein 70 Levels in Patients With Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Alatas, Ömer Doğan; Gürger, Mehtap; Ateşçelik, Metin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Demir, Caner Feyzi; Kalayci, Mehmet; Ilhan, Nevin; Acar, Ethem

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors evaluated neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) levels and their relationships with in-hospital mortality, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores. In total, 35 patients older than 18 years were presented to our emergency department and were diagnosed with non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) and 32 healthy controls were included. Blood samples were drawn on days 0 and 5. S100 calcium-binding protein B and HSP levels were significantly higher in patients than in controls on days 0 and 5. Neuron-specific enolase levels were higher in patients than in controls on day 0, but there was no significant difference on day 5. S100 calcium-binding protein B was negatively correlated with GCS, whereas it was positively correlated with NIHSS and bleeding volume. There was also a negative correlation between NSE and GCS, but it was not statistically significant. In addition, no significant correlation was found in terms of bleeding volume or NIHSS. Heat shock protein 70 was negatively correlated with GCS and positively correlated with bleeding volume and NIHSS, but these results were not statistically significant. S100 calcium-binding protein B and HSP 70 levels were significantly higher in those who died compared with survivors. The areas under the curve of S100 B, NSE, and HSP 70 for mortality were 0.635, 0.477, and 0.770, respectively. Neuron-specific enolase, S100B, and HSP 70 levels are simple, inexpensive, and objective measures in cases of ICH. These tests can be used to support an assessment for screening ICH patients with clinical scoring systems, such as GCS and NIHSS. PMID:26559295

  6. The effects of dietary protein levels on the population growth, performance, and physiology of honey bee workers during early spring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Benle; Wu, Zaifu; Xu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on honey bee colonies, specifically the population growth, physiology, and longevity of honey bee workers during early spring. Diets containing four different levels of crude protein (25.0, 29.5, 34.0, or 38.5%) and pure pollen (control) were evaluated. Twenty-five colonies of honey bees with sister queens were used in the study. We compared the effects of the different bee diets by measuring population growth, emergent worker weight, midgut proteolytic enzyme activity, hypopharyngeal gland development, and survival. After 48 d, the cumulative number of workers produced by the colonies ranged from 22,420 to 29,519, providing a significant fit to a quadratic equation that predicts the maximum population growth when the diet contains 31.7% crude protein. Significantly greater emergent worker weight, midgut proteolytic enzyme activity, hypopharyngeal gland acini, and survival were observed in the colonies that were fed diets containing 34.0% crude protein compared with the other crude protein levels. Although higher emergent worker weight and survival were observed in the colonies that were fed the control diet, there were no significant differences between the control colonies and the colonies that were fed 34.0% crude protein. Based on these results, we concluded that a dietary crude protein content of 29.5-34.0% is recommended to maximize the reproduction rate of honey bee colonies in early spring.

  7. The effects of dietary protein levels on the population growth, performance, and physiology of honey bee workers during early spring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Benle; Wu, Zaifu; Xu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on honey bee colonies, specifically the population growth, physiology, and longevity of honey bee workers during early spring. Diets containing four different levels of crude protein (25.0, 29.5, 34.0, or 38.5%) and pure pollen (control) were evaluated. Twenty-five colonies of honey bees with sister queens were used in the study. We compared the effects of the different bee diets by measuring population growth, emergent worker weight, midgut proteolytic enzyme activity, hypopharyngeal gland development, and survival. After 48 d, the cumulative number of workers produced by the colonies ranged from 22,420 to 29,519, providing a significant fit to a quadratic equation that predicts the maximum population growth when the diet contains 31.7% crude protein. Significantly greater emergent worker weight, midgut proteolytic enzyme activity, hypopharyngeal gland acini, and survival were observed in the colonies that were fed diets containing 34.0% crude protein compared with the other crude protein levels. Although higher emergent worker weight and survival were observed in the colonies that were fed the control diet, there were no significant differences between the control colonies and the colonies that were fed 34.0% crude protein. Based on these results, we concluded that a dietary crude protein content of 29.5-34.0% is recommended to maximize the reproduction rate of honey bee colonies in early spring. PMID:25368092

  8. An investigation on the interaction modes of a single-strand DNA aptamer and RBP4 protein: a molecular dynamic simulations approach.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Raheleh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud

    2016-09-14

    Type two diabetes is one of the primary health issues threatening public well-being worldwide. One of the pre-diagnosis biomarkers of this disease, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), has been demonstrated to be detected with a 76-mer ssDNA aptamer instead of conventional antibodies. However, there is no structural information on the RBP4 binding aptamer (RBA) and the mechanism of its binding to RBP4 still remains unexplored. The objective of the present study is to achieve a better understanding of specific binding interactions of the target protein (RBP4) and RBA, employing Molecular Dynamics simulations (MDs) to provide detailed information on fluctuations, conformational changes, critical bases and effective forces to develop regulated aptamers to be employed in designing new aptamers for many useful recognition applications. RBA was designed according to its reported base pair sequence and secondary structure. The HADDOCK on line docking program was used to predict a suitable RBP4-RBA mode of interaction to start MDs with. MDs methodology was used to analyze the final complex stability and detect interacting residues. Eventually, we conclude that single strand located bases are the key components that conduct the intercalation phenomenon with big targets rather than those involving loops and folded motifs, to encompass targets and probably inhibit their activity. Also, UV-visible, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements confirmed the interactions between RBA and RBP4 and RBP4-RBA complex formation.

  9. An investigation on the interaction modes of a single-strand DNA aptamer and RBP4 protein: a molecular dynamic simulations approach.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Raheleh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud

    2016-09-14

    Type two diabetes is one of the primary health issues threatening public well-being worldwide. One of the pre-diagnosis biomarkers of this disease, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), has been demonstrated to be detected with a 76-mer ssDNA aptamer instead of conventional antibodies. However, there is no structural information on the RBP4 binding aptamer (RBA) and the mechanism of its binding to RBP4 still remains unexplored. The objective of the present study is to achieve a better understanding of specific binding interactions of the target protein (RBP4) and RBA, employing Molecular Dynamics simulations (MDs) to provide detailed information on fluctuations, conformational changes, critical bases and effective forces to develop regulated aptamers to be employed in designing new aptamers for many useful recognition applications. RBA was designed according to its reported base pair sequence and secondary structure. The HADDOCK on line docking program was used to predict a suitable RBP4-RBA mode of interaction to start MDs with. MDs methodology was used to analyze the final complex stability and detect interacting residues. Eventually, we conclude that single strand located bases are the key components that conduct the intercalation phenomenon with big targets rather than those involving loops and folded motifs, to encompass targets and probably inhibit their activity. Also, UV-visible, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements confirmed the interactions between RBA and RBP4 and RBP4-RBA complex formation. PMID:27511589

  10. Visualization of a protein-protein interaction at a single-molecule level by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonazza, Klaus; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Seyfried, Birgit K; Schrenk, Gerald; Allmaier, Günter; Turecek, Peter L; Friedbacher, Gernot

    2014-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy is unmatched in terms of high-resolution imaging under ambient conditions. Over the years, substantial progress has been made using this technique to improve our understanding of biological systems on the nanometer scale, such as visualization of single biomolecules. For monitoring also the interaction between biomolecules, in situ high-speed imaging is making enormous progress. Here, we describe an alternative ex situ imaging method where identical molecules are recorded before and after reaction with a binding partner. Relocation of the identical molecules on the mica surface was thereby achieved by using a nanoscale scratch as marker. The method was successfully applied to study the complex formation between von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII), two essential haemostatic components of human blood. FVIII binding was discernible by an appearance of globular domains appended to the N-terminal large globular domains of VWF. The specificity of the approach could be demonstrated by incubating VWF with FVIII in the presence of a high salt buffer which inhibits the interaction between these two proteins. The results obtained indicate that proteins can maintain their reactivity for subsequent interactions with other molecules when gently immobilized on a solid substrate and subjected to intermittent drying steps. The technique described opens up a new analytical perspective for studying protein-protein interactions as it circumvents some of the obstacles encountered by in situ imaging and other ex situ techniques. PMID:24363113

  11. Extracellular matrix controls tubulin monomer levels in hepatocytes by regulating protein turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, D. J.; Hansen, L. K.; Langer, R.; Vacanti, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Cells have evolved an autoregulatory mechanism to dampen variations in the concentration of tubulin monomer that is available to polymerize into microtubules (MTs), a process that is known as tubulin autoregulation. However, thermodynamic analysis of MT polymerization predicts that the concentration of free tubulin monomer must vary if MTs are to remain stable under different mechanical loads that result from changes in cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). To determine how these seemingly contradictory regulatory mechanisms coexist in cells, we measured changes in the masses of tubulin monomer and polymer that resulted from altering cell-ECM contacts. Primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in chemically defined medium on bacteriological petri dishes that were precoated with different densities of laminin (LM). Increasing the LM density from low to high (1-1000 ng/cm2), promoted cell spreading (average projected cell area increased from 1200 to 6000 microns2) and resulted in formation of a greatly extended MT network. Nevertheless, the steady-state mass of tubulin polymer was similar at 48 h, regardless of cell shape or ECM density. In contrast, round hepatocytes on low LM contained a threefold higher mass of tubulin monomer when compared with spread cells on high LM. Furthermore, similar results were obtained whether LM, fibronectin, or type I collagen were used for cell attachment. Tubulin autoregulation appeared to function normally in these cells because tubulin mRNA levels and protein synthetic rates were greatly depressed in round cells that contained the highest level of free tubulin monomer. However, the rate of tubulin protein degradation slowed, causing the tubulin half-life to increase from approximately 24 to 55 h as the LM density was lowered from high to low and cell rounding was promoted. These results indicate that the set-point for the tubulin monomer mass in hepatocytes can be regulated by altering the density of ECM contacts and

  12. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation