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Sample records for retinol-binding protein levels

  1. Retinol-binding protein-4 and hs-CRP levels in patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Tanik, Nermin; Celikbilek, Asuman; Metin, Aslı; Gocmen, Ayse Yesim; Inan, Levent Ertugrul

    2015-10-01

    Retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels are associated with inflammation in patients with migraine. The release of proinflammatory cytokines during migraine results in recurrent sterile neurogenic inflammation. This study aimed to determine the correlation between RBP4 and hs-CRP levels, and migraine, which is considered an inflammatory disease. The study included 48 migraine patients and 40 age- and gender-matched controls. Migraine was diagnosed according to International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. The serum RBP4 level was measured using a commercial ELISA kit and hs-CRP was measured using an enzyme immunoassay test kit. The serum RBP4 level was significantly lower in the migraine patients than in the controls (P < 0.001), whereas the hs-CRP level was significantly higher in the migraine patients (P < 0.001). RBP4 and hs-CRP levels did not differ between the migraine patients with and without aura (P > 0.05). Migraine headache severity, frequency and duration were not correlated with serum RBP or hs-CRP levels (P > 0.05). The observed high hs-CRP level and low RBP4 level in migraine patients suggest that vitamin A might play a major role in the pathogenesis of migraine. It is known that inflammation is a key factor in many diseases. Additional research might result in a better understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin A.

  2. Serum retinol-binding protein 4 is independently associated with pediatric NAFLD and fasting triglyceride level.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ching; Yang, Yao-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is identified as a major liver disease in children. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence and predictors of pediatric NAFLD and the correlation between serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels and metabolic characteristics in children. A total of 748 schoolchildren, ages 6 to 12 years, were enrolled in 2009. The body weight and height were measured in the morning before intake. Laboratory tests included overnight fasting serum lipids, insulin, liver enzymes, and RBP4 levels. Hepatic steatosis was determined by ultrasound in 219 volunteers. The rates of NAFLD were 3% in the normal-weight, 25% in the overweight, and 76% in the obese children. Twenty (22%) of obese children had abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. In children with NAFLD, younger age and higher body mass index (BMI), insulin/homeostasis model of assessment, and male sex rate were associated with abnormal liver function. Stepwise increments in BMI, insulin, homeostasis model of assessment, and ALT were found in children with normal livers to simple steatosis, and to steatosis with abnormal ALT. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that serum RBP4 levels (P = 0.048), ALT (P = 0.048), and BMI (P < 0.001) were independently predictors of pediatric NAFLD. Moreover, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that only serum triglycerides levels were positively related to RBP4 levels (P < 0.001). Higher RBP4 and ALT levels as well as BMI are independently associated with pediatric NAFLD in Taiwan. In addition, an increment in RBP4 levels was positively correlated to hypertriglyceridemia in children.

  3. Increased plasma retinol binding protein 4 levels in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Peter; Weithäuser, Alice; Andres, Janin; Bobbert, Thomas; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz Peter; Rauch, Ursula; Skurk, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a higher risk for diabetes mellitus. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP 4) is an adipose tissue-derived protein with pro-diabetogenic effects. A complete understanding of the association of CHF and insulin resistance remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between CHF and diabetes mellitus. Plasma levels of RBP 4, insulin, and interleukins (IL) 2, 8, and 10, were assessed in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, n = 53), dilated inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi, n = 54), and controls (n = 20). In addition, a possible mechanism of RBP 4 regulation was examined in adipocytes in vitro. Plasma levels of RBP 4 and insulin were measured by a specific ELISA. Interleukin concentrations were obtained by multiplex ELISA. Cell culture with 3T3-L1 adipocytes was performed to measure RBP 4 mRNA expression after stimulation with IL-8. RBP 4 levels were significantly increased in patients with DCMi (52.95 +/- 20.42 microg/mL) compared with DCM (35.54 +/- 23.08 microg/mL) and the control group (27.3 +/- 18.51 microg/mL). RBP 4 was positively correlated with IL-8 (r=0.416, P < 0.05) in human plasma in patients with DCMi. Moreover, increased insulin resistance was observed in patients with DCMi compared with the control and DCM groups. In vitro, IL-8 induced a significant upregulation of RBP 4 mRNA expression in adipocytes. Elevated RBP 4 plasma concentrations, induced by IL-8, might be one mechanism leading to a higher incidence of diabetes in patients with DCMi.

  4. Low Serum Levels of Prealbumin, Retinol Binding Protein, and Retinol Are Frequent in Adult Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bolado, Federico; Goñi, María José; Tamayo, Ibai; Ibáñez, Berta; Prieto, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine the serum prealbumin (PA), retinol binding protein (RBP), and retinol levels in adult patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to analyze some factors related to those levels. Methods. A total of 93 patients (47 women) were studied. Age, gender, BMI, duration of diabetes, chronic complications, HbA1c, lipid profile, creatinine, albumin, PA, RBP, and retinol were recorded. High and low parameter groups were compared by Mann–Whitney U and χ2 tests. Correlation between parameters was analyzed by Spearman's test. Odds of low levels were analyzed by univariate logistic regression and included in the multivariate analysis when significant. Results. 49.5%, 48.4%, and 30.1% of patients displayed serum PA, RBP, and retinol levels below normal values, respectively. A high correlation (Rho > 0.8) between PA, RBP, and retinol serum levels was found. Patients presenting low levels of any of them were predominantly women, normal-weighted, and with lower levels of triglycerides and serum creatinine. No differences in age, macrovascular complications, duration of diabetes, or HbA1c values were observed when comparing low and normal parameter groups. Conclusion. Low serum levels of PA, RBP, and retinol are frequent in T1D adult patients. This alteration is influenced by female sex and serum creatinine and triglyceride levels. PMID:28018921

  5. Elevated Serum Triglyceride and Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Levels Associated with Fructose-Sweetened Beverages in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Te-Fu; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Yang, Wei-Zeng; Lee, Chun-Ying; Chen, Meng-Hsueh; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Chun-Chi; Tsai, Sharon; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lee, Chien-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Background The metabolic effect of fructose in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) has been linked to de novo lipogenesis and uric acid (UA) production. Objectives This study investigated the biological effects of SSB consumption on serum lipid profiles and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) among Taiwanese adolescents. Methods We evaluated the anthropometric parameters and biochemical outcomes of 200 representative adolescents (98 boys and 102 girls) who were randomly selected from a large-scale cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using multiple regression models adjusted for covariates. Results Increased SSB consumption was associated with increased waist and hip circumferences, body mass index (BMI) values and serum UA, triglyceride (TG) and RBP4 levels. Adolescents who consumed >500 ml/day of beverages half-to-heavily sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) exhibited TG and RBP4 levels 22.7 mg/dl and 13.92 ng/ml higher than non-drinkers, respectively. HFCS drinkers with hyperuricemia had higher TG levels than HFCS drinkers with normal UA levels (98.6 vs. 81.6 mg/dl). The intake of HFCS-rich SSBs and high value of BMI (≥24) interactively reinforced RBP4 levels among overweight/obese adolescents. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly correlated with weight-related outcomes and TG and UA concentration among HFCS drinkers (r = 0.253 to 0.404), but not among non-drinkers. Conclusions High-quantity HFCS-rich beverage consumption is associated with higher TG and RBP4 levels. Hyperuricemia is likely to intensify the influence of HFCS-rich SSB intake on elevated TG levels, and in overweight and obese adolescents, high BMI may modify the action of fructose on higher circulating levels of RBP4. PMID:24475021

  6. Elevated Serum Levels of Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Are Associated with Breast Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Aiguo; Li, Na; Si, Hongzong

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a recently identified adipokine that is elevated in patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes. A growing body of research has shown that RBP4 is associated with several types of cancer. However, no studies have investigated the relationship between serum RBP4 levels and breast cancer risk. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association between serum RBP4 levels and the risk of breast cancer. Methods From August 2012 to December 2013, four-hundred subjects including 200 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and 200 matched healthy women were consecutively enrolled from Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College. Blood samples were collected from healthy controls and breast cancer patients before commencement of treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate the serum RBP4 levels in separated serum samples. Meanwhile, the characteristics of breast cancer cases and controls were collected from medical records and pathological data. Results The serum levels of RBP4 were significantly higher in patients with breast cancer than that in the healthy control group (33.77±9.92 vs. 28.77±6.47μg/ml, P < 0.05). Compared to the subjects in the lowest quartile of serum RBP4 level, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) is 2.16(1.01–4.61) and 2.07 (1.07–4.00) for women in the second and highest RBP4 tertile, respectively. For breast cancer patients, patients with PR or ER negative displayed significantly higher serum RBP4 levels than those with PR or ER positive. Conclusion Our results for the first time suggested serum RBP4 levels could be associated with the risk of breast cancer. However, further prospective studies are essential to confirm these observed results. PMID:28002423

  7. Retinol Binding Protein-4 Levels and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A community-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuechen; Shen, Tianran; Li, Qing; Chen, Xu; Li, Yanping; Li, Dan; Chen, Gengdong; Ling, Wenhua; Chen, Yu-ming

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports on the association between retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were controversial. This study aimed to investigate the association between the serum RBP4 levels and occurrence of NAFLD in Chinese population. In total, 2938 participants aged 40–75 years were involved in this community-based cross-sectional study. General information, lifestyle factors, serum levels of RBP4 and the presence of NAFLD were determined. Patients with NAFLD had significantly higher concentrations of RBP4 (37.9 ± 6.8 μg/ml) than did non-NAFLD controls (35.0 ± 6.7 μg/ml) (P < 0.001). The odds ratios (ORs) of NAFLD for the highest (vs. lowest) quartile of RBP4 were 1.884 (95% CI: 1.391, 2.551) for females (P < 0.001), and 2.107 (95% CI: 1.357, 3.273) for male participants (P < 0.01) after adjusting for related factors. The serum RBP4 levels were positively associated with the prevalence of NAFLD in middle-aged and elderly Chinese people, and Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), trunk fat, the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), fasting insulin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) might be implicated in the pathogenesis of RBP4 in NAFLD. PMID:28332619

  8. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  13. Serum level and polymorphisms of retinol-binding protein-4 and risk for gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shimin; Liu, Qian; Huang, Xin; Tan, Hongzhuan

    2016-03-14

    Retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) has been reported to be potentially involved in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM); however, the findings are inconsistent. Our aims were to review the studies that investigated the association of serum levels and polymorphisms of RBP4 with GDM risk, and to provide recommendations for future research. The databases PubMed, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, and Web of Knowledge were searched up to October 2015 to find out studies evaluating the relationship between serum RBP4 level/ RBP4 polymorphisms and GDM risk. In the meta-analysis of serum RBP4 levels the key inclusion was that studies were designed as BMI-matched studies or had observed non-significant differences in BMI between cases and controls. Fourteen case-control studies (647 cases and 620 controls) reporting the association between serum RBP4 level and GDM risk, and three studies (1012 cases and 1605 controls) investigating the association between RBP4 polymorphisms and GDM risk were involved. Our results showed that high serum RBP4 levels represent a risk factor for GDM (pooled standardized mean difference =0.758, 95% confidence interval [0.387, 1.128]). The results of subgroup analyses based on "gestational age at blood sampling" or "diagnostic criteria" are consistent with the overall results. However, the postpartum subgroup and "before 24 weeks" subgroup both only include one article and indicate no association between serum RBP4 level and GDM risk. The meta-analysis on the association between rs3758539 polymorphism and GDM risk shows that RBP4 rs3758539 polymorphism is not associated with the development of GDM. The results of this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that RBP4 is a modest independent risk factor for GDM (i.e., nonobese patients with GDM might express RBP4 at abnormal levels). The serum RBP4 level is associated with the risk of GDM. However, the association in the first-trimester and postpartum period should be validated by further

  14. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  15. [Blood prealbumin: comparison of 2 methods of assay and correlation with the retinol binding protein].

    PubMed

    Romette, J; Mallet, B; Di Constanzo, J

    1984-01-01

    Prealbumin was determined by radial immunodiffusion and laser immunonephelometry methods in serum or plasma from 86 adult subjects. Both methods were reliable in physiologic prealbumin range but immunonephelometry only was reliable for lower levels. Physiologic prealbumin level was 346 +/- 67 mg/l in adult males and 319 +/- 48 mg/l in adult females; no difference was noted for retinol binding protein (60 +/- 14 mg/l). When prealbumin and retinol binding protein levels were low, no close correlation was noted in their variations.

  16. Plasma Levels of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 4, Retinol-Binding Protein 4, High-Molecular-Weight Adiponectin, and Cardiovascular Mortality Among Men With Type 2 Diabetes: A 22-Year Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Ding, Ming; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Rimm, Eric B; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Sun, Qi

    2016-11-01

    To examine select adipokines, including fatty acid-binding protein 4, retinol-binding protein 4, and high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plasma levels of fatty acid-binding protein 4, retinol-binding protein 4, and HMW adiponectin were measured in 950 men with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. After an average of 22 years of follow-up (1993-2015), 580 deaths occurred, of whom 220 died of CVD. After multivariate adjustment for covariates, higher levels of fatty acid-binding protein 4 were significantly associated with a higher CVD mortality: comparing extreme tertiles, the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of CVD mortality was 1.78 (1.22-2.59; P trend=0.001). A positive association was also observed for HMW adiponectin: the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.07 (1.42-3.06; P trend=0.0002), comparing extreme tertiles, whereas higher retinol-binding protein 4 levels were nonsignificantly associated with a decreased CVD mortality with an hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.73 (0.50-1.07; P trend=0.09). A Mendelian randomization analysis suggested that the causal relationships of HMW adiponectin and retinol-binding protein 4 would be directionally opposite to those observed based on the biomarkers, although none of the Mendelian randomization associations achieved statistical significance. These data suggest that higher levels of fatty acid-binding protein 4 and HMW adiponectin are associated with elevated CVD mortality among men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Biological mechanisms underlying these observations deserve elucidation, but the associations of HMW adiponectin may partially reflect altered adipose tissue functionality among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Retinol binding protein-4 circulating levels were higher in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease vs. histologically normal liver from morbidly obese women.

    PubMed

    Terra, Ximena; Auguet, Teresa; Broch, Montserrat; Sabench, Fàtima; Hernández, Mercè; Pastor, Rosa M; Quesada, Isabel M; Luna, Anna; Aguilar, Carmen; del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles in adipose tissues and liver of morbidly obese (MO) women with or without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and to study the relationships with other pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines in vivo and in vitro. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver samples from four lean and 45 MO women with or without NAFLD by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR. We also studied RBP4 expression in HepG2 hepatocytes under various inflammatory stimuli. Circulating RBP4 levels were higher in MO women, and specifically, in MO subjects with NAFLD compared with normal liver controls (lean and MO). RBP4 liver expression was higher in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-moderate/severe than in NASHmild. Overall RBP4 gene expression was higher in liver than in adipose tissues. Among them, the higher expression corresponded to SAT. VAT expression was lower in the MO cohort. In HepG2, RBP4 mRNA expression was reduced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and increased by adiponectin treatment. The results obtained in MO women with NAFLD, brings up the use of RBP4 and other adipokines as a panel of noninvasive molecular biomarkers when NAFLD is suspected. Further studies are needed with other obesity groups. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  18. [Serum retinol and retinol binding protein-4 levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their relationship to nutritional status.].

    PubMed

    Mai, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Qiu-Yue; Han, Li-Ping; Kang, Jian; Yu, Run-Jiang

    2009-12-01

    To explore the serum retinol and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP(4)) levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to investigate their relationship with the nutritional status. The serum retinol level was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 110 outpatients with stable COPD during Sept. 2006 to Sept. 2007, and 90 healthy volunteers served as the controls. The serum RBP(4) level in 62 stable COPD outpatients and 20 healthy controls was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Associated factors with the serum retinol and RBP(4) levels were analyzed. t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for the statistic analysis. The serum retinol and RBP(4) levels in COPD patients [(275 +/- 11) microg/L and (7.4 +/- 2.6) mg/L respectively] were significantly lower than those in the healthy controls [(338 +/- 13) microg/L and (11.4 +/- 4.1) mg/L respectively, t = 3.650, t = 4.155 and all P < 0.01]. The serum retinol and RBP(4) levels in COPD patients with malnutrition [(246 +/- 18) microg/L and (6.4 +/- 1.0) mg/L individually] were significantly lower than those in COPD patients without malnutrition [(290 +/- 14) microg/L and (8.2 +/- 3.2) mg/L individually, q = 3.35, P < 0.05 and q = 10.22, P < 0.01 respectively], but the levels of serum retinol and RBP(4) in COPD patients without malnutrition were significantly lower than those in the healthy controls [(338 +/- 13) microg/L and (11.4 +/- 4.1) mg/L respectively, q = 2.26, P < 0.05 and q = 4.82, P < 0.01 respectively]. In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, only body mass index and mid arm circumference were independently associated with the serum retinal level. In patients with stable COPD, the levels of serum retinol and RBP(4) were significantly decreased, which was associated with the nutritional status.

  19. Impact of Type 1 Diabetes and Insulin Treatment on Plasma Levels and Fractional Synthesis Rate of Retinol-Binding Protein 4

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Marion; Jaleel, Abdul; Karakelides, Helen; Ford, G. Charles; Kahn, Barbara B.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2009-01-01

    Context: Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels are elevated in insulin-resistant states and reduced in type 1 diabetes (T1D), but it is unknown whether changes in insulin levels and glycemic control alter RBP4 levels. In vivo synthesis rates of RBP4 and their relationship to RBP4 levels remain to be determined. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether the synthesis rate of RBP4 is altered in people with T1D during both insulin deficiency and insulin treatment. Design: Seven T1D participants were studied on two occasions, during 8 h of insulin deprivation and during insulin treatment, and compared with nondiabetic (ND) controls. Main Outcome Measures: We measured in vivo fractional synthesis rate of RBP4 using [ring-13C6]phenylalanine as a tracer and RBP4 concentration in plasma by nephelometric assay and Western blot analyses. Results: Plasma RBP4 levels were lower (P < 0.01) in insulin-treated T1D than in ND but were not different between insulin-deprived T1D and ND participants. Synthesis rates of RBP4 in ND (2.46 ± 0.29%/h) were higher than in insulin-treated T1D (1.45 ± 0.21) (P = 0.02), but there was no difference between ND and insulin-deprived T1D (2.24 ± 0.24). Glucose levels were not different between ND and insulin-treated T1D, but insulin levels were higher in insulin-treated T1D (82.8 ± 2 pmol/liter) than in ND (28.7 ± 6) and insulin-deprived T1D (4.6 ± 1.6) (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Insulin treatment that achieved normoglycemia but relative hyperinsulinemia was associated with lower RBP4 synthesis and levels in T1D. Short-term insulin deprivation and hyperglycemia had no effect on RBP4 levels and synthesis rates in T1D. PMID:19850685

  20. Native disulfide bonds in plasma retinol-binding protein are not essential for all-trans-retinol-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Gabriel O; Yu, Yong; Tarr, George E; Cantor, Charles R

    2003-01-01

    A human plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) mutant, named RBP-S, has been designed and produced in which the six native cysteine residues, involved in the formation of three disulfide bonds, have been replaced with serine. A hexa-histidine tag was also added to the C-terminus of RBP for ease of purification. The removal of the disulfide bonds led to a decrease in the affinity of RBP for all trans-retinol. Data indicates all-trans-retinol binds RBP and RBP-S with Kd = 4 x 10(-8) M and 1 x 10(-7) M, respectively, at approximately 20 degrees C. RBP-S has reduced stability as compared to natural RBP below pH 8.0 and at room temperature. Circular dichroism in the far-UV shows that there is a relaxation of the RBP structure upon the removal of its disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism in the near-UV shows that in the absence of the disulfide bonds, the optical activity of RBP is higher in the 310-330 nm than in the 280-290 nm range. This work suggests that the three native disulfide bonds aid in the folding of RBP but are not essential to produce a soluble, active protein.

  1. Evaluation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and retinol binding protein (RBP-4) levels in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Barbara; Gasiorowska, Anita; Borkowska, Anna; Malecka-Panas, Ewa

    The elevation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and adipokine retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP-4) is known to be associated with the risk of many cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum concentrations of IGF-1 and RBP-4 in patients with PDAC and chronic pancreatitis (CP). The study included 43 patients with PDAC, 39 patients with CP and 10 controls. The concentrations of IGF-1 and RBP-4 were obtained using the ELISA method (Corgenix UK Ltd R&D Systems). The study protocol was approved by the Bioethics Committee at the Medical University of Lodz. In PDAC patients the serum IGF-1 level was significantly higher than in patients with CP (107.79 ± 66.40 ng/ml vs 89.91 ± 74.06 ng/ml; P < 0.05). Patients with both CP and diabetes mellitus (DM) were noted to have a significantly lower level of IGF-1 compared with those who only had CP (51.33 ± 24.30 ng/ml vs 108.42 ± 82.39 ng/ml; P = 0.01). The same result was obtained for men with and without DM (58.05 ± 32.44 ng/ml vs 98.79 ± 79.47 ng/ml, P = 0.05). As regards the serum level of RBP-4, the PDAC and CP groups were not significantly different from each other. Diabetes accompanying PDAC does not influence the level of IGF-1 as opposed to diabetes in the course of CP. The IGF-1 level can be useful for early diagnosis of PDAC. High concentration of RBP-4 is not specific to pancreatic cancer, so it does not appear to be a useful biomarker for PDAC. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunonephelometry and radial immunodiffusion compared for measuring serum retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Malvy, D J; Povéda, J D; Debruyne, M; Burtschy, B; Dostalova, L; Amédée-Manesme, O

    1993-01-01

    We compared a nephelometric method and a radial immunodiffusion (RID) assay for the measurement of retinol-binding protein in samples of serum from children with malignancies. The mean (+/- standard deviation) retinol-binding protein concentration as measured by the Behring Nephelometer was 31.0 +/- 15.6 mg/l; the mean by RID was 31.2 +/- 15.7 mg/l. This difference was not statistically significant by Student's t test (P = 0.6), and the correlation coefficient (r) was 0.87. Thus, the Behring Nephelometer method measures retinol-binding protein rapidly and as accurately as radial immunodiffusion.

  3. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  4. Inverse association between intelligence quotient and urinary retinol binding protein in Chinese school-age children with low blood lead levels: results from a cross-sectional investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Chen, Wen; Wang, Dongyue; Jin, Yinlong; Chen, Xiaodong; Xu, Yan; Huang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Examine the relationship between blood lead concentration and children's intelligence quotient (IQ) in Chinese children 8-12 years old. This is a cross-sectional study, and participants included 446 children from three primary schools in Jiangsu, China. We collected environmental and genetic information from questionnaires. Blood lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd) and selenium (Se) concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). IQ was assessed using the Combined Raven's Test and then converted to a standard IQ score according to Chinese children's norm. Morning urine samples were collected to measure retinol binding protein (RBP). The average blood lead concentration was 33.13 μg L(-1) (geometric mean), and the blood lead concentration (BoxCox transform) was inversely and significantly associated with IQ (r=-0.11, p=0.02). The geometric mean of blood Mn, Cd and Se was 7.02 μg L(-1), 0.18 μg L(-1) and 94.77 μg L(-1), respectively. Blood Mn, Cd and Se showed no association with IQ, but all of them associated with urinary RBP. Urinary RBP was identified as a new factor associated with IQ (β=-6.49, p=0.011). Urinary RBP was recognized as a new indicated factor associated with children's IQ. Mn, Cd and Se exposure might affect urinary RBP concentration and further IQ. Findings also support that blood lead concentrations in 8-12 years old children, even <44 μg L(-1), have a negative association with IQ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of supplemental, dietary vitamin A on retinol-binding protein concentrations in the plasma of preruminant calves.

    PubMed

    Nonnecke, B J; Roberts, M P; Godkin, J D; Horst, R L; Hammell, D C; Franklin, S T

    2001-03-01

    Transport of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) from retinoid stores in the liver to target tissues is accomplished exclusively by a specific plasma protein, retinol-binding protein. Within individuals, retinol-binding protein concentrations in plasma are regulated and remain constant except in extremes of vitamin A nutriture or in disease. In the present study, retinol-binding protein concentrations in plasma from preruminant calves supplemented with 0, 1700 (i.e., current NRC requirement), 34,000, or 68,000 IU of vitamin A daily from birth to 27 d of age (n = 6/treatment) were quantified. Retinol-binding protein concentrations at birth averaged 21 microg/ml (n = 24) or approximately 50% of concentrations in dairy heifers and cows. Plasma retinol and retinol-binding protein concentrations were correlated positively, corroborating the role of vitamin A nutriture in the regulation of retinol-binding protein secretion from the liver. In this regard, dietary vitamin A influenced positively retinol and retinol-binding protein concentrations and, as a consequence, the degree of saturation of retinol-binding protein with retinol. At 27 d of age, calves fed > or = 34,000 IU of vitamin A had substantially higher retinol and retinol-binding protein concentrations than did calves fed < or = 1700 IU of vitamin A, indicating that dietary vitamin A effects positively vitamin A status. The data also suggest that the current NRC requirement may not be sufficient to assure vitamin A adequacy in preruminant calves. Percent saturation of retionol-binding protein with retinol in all calves was < 35%, much lower than anticipated and suggests that the retinol requirement of vitamin A-responsive tissues exceeded vitamin A availability.

  6. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  7. Male mice are susceptible to high fat diet-induced hyperglycaemia and display increased circulatory retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels and its expression in visceral adipose depots.

    PubMed

    Asha, G V; Raja Gopal Reddy, M; Mahesh, M; Vajreswari, A; Jeyakumar, S M

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A and its metabolites are known to modulate adipose tissue development and its associated complications. Here, we assessed the vitamin A status and its metabolic pathway gene expression in relation to sexual dimorphism by employing 35 days old C57BL/6J male and female mice, which were fed either stock or high fat (HF) diet for 26 weeks. HF diet feeding increased body weight/weight gain and white adipose tissue (WAT) of visceral and subcutaneous regions, however, increase in vitamin A levels observed only in subcutaneous WAT. Further, the expression of most of the vitamin A metabolic pathway genes showed no sexual dimorphism. The observed HF diet-induced hyperglycaemia in male corroborates with increased retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels in plasma and its expression in visceral adipose depots. In conclusion, the male mice are susceptible to high fat diet-induced hyperglycaemia and display higher plasma RBP4 levels, possibly due to its over-expression in visceral adipose depots.

  8. Determination of retinol-binding protein in serum by kinetic immunonephelometry with polyethylene glycol pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, M J; Calvin, J; Price, C P

    1984-11-01

    This work describes the use of polyethylene glycol as a pretreatment reagent to remove endogenous light scattering material from serum samples prior to automated immunonephelometric analysis on a centrifugal analyser. An assay system for retinol-binding protein is described, which allows rapid (10 minutes) quantitation of retinol-binding protein in serum samples with a detection limit of 5 mg/L and between-assay coefficients of variation ranging from 2.9% to 4.0%. The assay range is 5-80 mg/L and accuracy comparisons with a Mancini single radial immunodiffusion method yield a regression line y = 0.89 x + 0.52 (r = 0.98, n = 22). The problem of analyte precipitation associated with use of pretreatment regimes is discussed.

  9. Retinol Binding Protein 4 in Relation to Diet, Inflammation, Immunity, and Cardiovascular Diseases12

    PubMed Central

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine. PMID:26567199

  10. Retinol binding protein 4 in relation to diet, inflammation, immunity, and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine.

  11. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-01-01

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03206.001 PMID:25073702

  12. Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.

    PubMed

    Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A.

  13. Urinary {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, and retinol-binding protein levels in general populations in Japan with references to cadmium in urine, blood, and 24-hour food duplicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Moon, Chan-Seok; Zhang, Zuo-Wen

    1995-07-01

    Possible cadmium (Cd) exposure-associated changes in urinary levels of low-molecular-weight proteins were studied in nonsmoking and nondrinking female members of the general Japanese population (378 subjects with no known occupational heavy metal exposure) who lived at 19 study sites (all without any known environmental heavy metal pollution) in 13 prefectures throughout Japan. The external Cd dose was evaluated in terms of daily Cd intake via food (Cd-F), whereas Cd levels in blood (Cd-B) and urine (Cd-U) were taken as internal dose indicators. When the subjects were classified according to Cd-F into three groups with {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} (20.4 {mu}g/day as a geometric mean of 97 women), {open_quotes}middle{close_quotes} (35.0 {mu}g/day, 120 women) and {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} (67.0 {mu}g/day, 66 women) exposure, both Cd-B and Cd-U increased in parallel with the changes in Cd-F. However, there were no dose-dependent changes in {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin or retinol-binding protein levels in urine. {alpha}{sub 1}-Microglobulin levels appeared to increase, but the distribution of the cases above the two cutoff levels of 9.6 and 15.8 {mu}g/mg creatinine among the three Cd-F groups did not show any bias. Overall, it was concluded that there was no apparent Cd exposure-associated elevation in urinary low-molecular-weight protein levels in the study population. 41 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Retinol binding protein 4 and incident diabetes – the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC Study)

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Vivian C.; Pereira, Mark; Pankow, James S.; Ballantyne, Christie; Couper, David; Heiss, Gerardo; Duncan, Bruce B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been described as a link between impaired glucose uptake in adipocytes and systemic insulin sensitivity. Objective To determine whether RBP4 fasting levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes. Methods Using a case-cohort design, we followed 543 middle-aged individuals who developed diabetes and 537 who did not over ~9 years within the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Weighted Cox proportional hazards analyses permitted statistical inference of the RBP4 – incident diabetes associations to the entire cohort. Results Women in the highest tertile of RBP4 presented greater risk of developing diabetes (HR=1.74; 95%CI 1.03–2.94) in analyses adjusted for age, ethnicity, study center, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, nonesterified fatty acids, adiponectin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL-C. When additionally adjusted for fasting insulin, this association’s significance became borderline (HR=1.68; 95%CI 1.00–2.82). No association between RBP4 levels and incident diabetes was found in men. Conclusion These findings suggest that RBP4 levels may be directly involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in women. PMID:24142010

  15. Synthesis and secretion of interstitial retinol-binding protein by the human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Fliesler, S.J.; Rayborn, M.E.; Fong, S.L.; Landers, R.A.; Bridges, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) is a soluble glycoprotein present between the retina and pigmented epithelium, which may function to shuttle vitamin A derivatives between these tissues. While previous studies have shown that the retina is solely responsible for IRBP synthesis, the specific retinal cell(s) in which this occurs has not been established. Since the carbohydrate moiety of IRBP contains fucose, the authors have analyzed the sites of incorporation of /sup 3/H-fucose in the human retina in vitro, using autoradiography. Following a 30-min pulse incubation, all retinal layers exhibited incorporation of label; however, the rod photoreceptor inner segments contained one- to two-fold more radioactivity than was present in any other retinal compartment. In autoradiographs of retinas recovered following a 4 hr chase incubation, all retinal layers retained similar levels of radioactivity with the exception of the rod photoreceptors, cone photoreceptors and cells in the inner nuclear layer, which lost 75, 11, and 14 percent, respectively of the radioactivity present immediately following the 30-min pulse. Proteins present in the chase incubation medium were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. The principal labeled component in the chase medium was identified as IRBP by immunoprecipitation with antibovine-IRBP immunoglobulins.

  16. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Li-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1) and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3), are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE), age at first egg (AFE), weight at first egg (WFE) and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN). The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken. PMID:25083100

  17. Macrophages are novel sites of expression and regulation of retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4).

    PubMed

    Broch, M; Ramírez, R; Auguet, M T; Alcaide, M J; Aguilar, C; Garcia-Espana, A; Richart, C

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is linked to a low-level chronic inflammatory state that may contribute to the development of associated metabolic complications. Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is an adipokine associated with parameters of obesity including insulin resistance indices, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile, and recently, with circulating inflammatory factors. Due to the infiltration of adipose tissue in obesity by macrophages derived from circulating monocytes and, on the other hand, the existence of a close genetic relationship between adipocytes and macrophages, we decided to examine if RBP4 is expressed in monocytes and/or primary human macrophages. While we did not detect expression of RBP4 in undifferentiated monocytes, RBP4 expression became evident during the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and was highest in differentiated macrophages. Once we demonstrated the expression of RBP4 in macrophages, we checked if RBP4 expression could be regulated by inflammatory stimuli such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed that while RBP4 expression was strongly inhibited by TNF-alpha and LPS, it was not affected by IL-6. Our results highlight the complexity behind the regulation of this adipokine and demonstrate that RBP4 expression in macrophages could be modulated by inflammatory stimuli.

  18. Plasma visfatin and retinol binding protein-4 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their relationship to adiposity and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Olfat; El-Shehaby, Amal; Zakaria, Abir; Mostafa, Naglaa; Talaat, Soha; Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-12-01

    We investigated whether plasma visfatin and binding protein-4 (RBP-4) levels correlate with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Two groups were enrolled: Group 1: 40 patients with T2DM and Group 2: 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Both groups were subdivided according to body mass index (BMI) into non-obese (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) and obese subjects (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) (20 each). Plasma visfatin and RBP-4 levels were significantly increased in T2DM patients compared with controls with similar BMI values (for both p<0.001). Plasma visfatin and RBP-4 concentrations correlated with BMI, waist/hip ratio, insulin and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)). Visfatin and RBP-4 correlated with visceral fat and liver fat in diabetic patients (for both p<0.001). Visfatin level was increased in T2DM, possibly related to hyperglycemia. Plasma RBP-4 correlated positively with liver fat and HOMA(IR) which may reflect its effects on hepatic insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) with lipid parameters in obese women.

    PubMed

    Broch, Montserrat; Gómez, José Manuel; Auguet, Ma Teresa; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Pastor, Rosa; Elio, Iñaki; Olona, Montserrat; García-España, Antonio; Richart, Cristóbal

    2010-09-01

    Although the adipokine retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) has been implicated in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance, its role in human obesity is still unclear. Our objectives were to find out the effect on RBP4 systemic levels of a weight loss induced by gastric bypass surgery and to analyze RBP4 relationships with insulin resistance, parameters of body composition, lipid metabolism, and inflammation. Sixty-three obese women were analyzed before and 12 months after surgery of systemic concentrations of RBP4, fasting glucose, insulin, lipid profile molecules, and inflammation-related proteins (C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptors 1 and 2, interleukin-18, and adiponectin), and waist and hip circumference measurements, body mass index calculation, and insulin resistance index by homeostasis model assessment were also made. We found that RBP4 levels were lower after weight reduction by gastric bypass surgery (p < 0.0001). We found RBP4 associated with triglycerides before (beta = 0.37, p = 0.02) and after surgery (beta = 0.59, p < 0.0001) and negatively with weight loss after surgery (beta = -0.37, p = 0.003). When expressed as a percentage of change, the decrease of RBP4 was related to the reduction in the levels of triglycerides and with the increase in HDL-cholesterol (beta = 0.73, p = 0.02 and beta = 0.62, p = 0.04, respectively). Others parameters analyzed, including inflammatory markers, were not related to RBP4. This study shows that, in obese women and after a substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery, RBP4 was related to weight status and lipid parameters rather than to insulin sensitivity or inflammatory markers.

  20. Retinol-binding protein 4 expression in visceral and subcutaneous fat in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Bajzová, M; Kováciková, M; Vítková, M; Klimcáková, E; Polák, J; Kovácová, Z; Viguerie, N; Vedral, T; Mikulásek, L; Srámková, P; Srp, A; Hejnová, J; Langin, D; Stich, V

    2008-01-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine which might be involved in the development of insulin resistance. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of RBP4 mRNA in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots and the relationship between RBP4 plasma and mRNA levels relative to indices of adiposity and insulin resistance. In 59 Caucasian women (BMI 20 to 49 kg/m(2)) paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral fat were obtained for RBP4, leptin and GLUT 4 mRNA analysis using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and computed tomography scans were performed. RBP4 mRNA levels as well as GLUT 4 mRNA and leptin mRNA levels were lower (P<0.001, P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) in visceral compared to subcutaneous fat. No differences were found in RBP4 mRNA expression in the two fat depots or in RBP4 plasma levels between subgroups of non-obese subjects (n=26), obese subjects without metabolic syndrome (n=17) and with metabolic syndrome (n=16). No correlations between RBP4 mRNA or plasma levels relative to adiposity, glucose disposal rate and GLUT 4 mRNA expression in adipose tissue were found. There was a weak positive correlation between plasma RBP4 and plasma triglycerides (r = 0.30, p<0.05) and between plasma RBP4 and blood glucose (r = 0.26, p<0.05). Regardless of the state of adiposity or insulin resistance, RBP4 expression in humans was lower in visceral than in subcutaneous fat. We found no direct relationship between either RBP4 mRNA or its plasma levels and the adiposity or insulin resistance.

  1. Real-time analyses of retinol transport by the membrane receptor of plasma retinol binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Riki; Zhong, Ming; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-28

    Vitamin A is essential for vision and the growth/differentiation of almost all human organs. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principle and specific carrier of vitamin A in the blood. Here we describe an optimized technique to produce and purify holo-RBP and two real-time monitoring techniques to study the transport of vitamin A by the high-affinity RBP receptor STRA6. The first technique makes it possible to produce a large quantity of high quality holo-RBP (100%-loaded with retinol) for vitamin A transport assays. High quality RBP is essential for functional assays because misfolded RBP releases vitamin A readily and bacterial contamination in RBP preparation can cause artifacts. Real-time monitoring techniques like electrophysiology have made critical contributions to the studies of membrane transport. The RBP receptor-mediated retinol transport has not been analyzed in real time until recently. The second technique described here is the real-time analysis of STRA6-catalyzed retinol release or loading. The third technique is real-time analysis of STRA6-catalyzed retinol transport from holo-RBP to cellular retinol binding protein I (CRBP-I). These techniques provide high sensitivity and resolution in revealing RBP receptor's vitamin A uptake mechanism.

  2. Vitamin A and retinol-binding protein deficiency among chronic liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela Villaça; Peres, Wilza Arantes Ferreira; Gonçalves, José Carlos; Ramalho, Andréa

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is associated with the progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim in this study was to assess levels of serum retinol and retinol-binding protein (RBP) as well as liver vitamin A stores in the presence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We ascertained the serum retinol and RBP levels of randomly selected CLD patients divided into two groups, one given 1500 UI (n = 89) and the other receiving 2500 UI (n = 89) doses of retinyl palmitate for the relative dose response test. Blood samples were collected in a fasting state and 5 and 7 h after supplementation. The prevalence of VAD was 62.4%. There was a progressive drop in serum retinol (P < 0.001) and RBP (P = 0.002) according to the severity of the liver disease, and a greater prevalence of severe VAD was noted in cirrhosis Child & Pugh C (52.8%). Fifty percent of the patients presented a low availability of RBP relative to retinol concentration, and there was no peak in RBP levels regardless of the dose of retinyl palmitate administered. Our findings suggest serum retinol and RBP are relevant as indicators of vitamin A nutritional status in the presence of CLD. Liver vitamin A store cannot be evaluated using the RDR test because CLD causes a reduction in RBP synthesis and interferes with the mobilization of endogenous vitamin A. Considering how the patients already showed a drop in RBP relative to retinol concentrations, it is reasonable to assume vitamin A supplementation may trigger harmful effects in CLD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Urinary retinol binding protein is a marker of the extent of interstitial kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Chauvet, Sophie; Chassé, Jean-François; Vincent, Marc; Avillach, Paul; Levi, Charlene; Meas-Yedid, Vannary; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Nga-Matsogo, Diane; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Karras, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Currently, a non-invasive method to estimate the degree of interstitial fibrosis (IF) in chronic kidney disease is not available in routine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the measurement of urinary low molecular weight (LMW) protein concentrations as a method to determine the extent of IF. The urines specimen from 162 consecutive patients who underwent renal biopsy were used in the analysis. Numerical quantification software based on the colorimetric analysis of fibrous areas was used to assess the percentage IF. Total proteinuria, albuminuria, and the urinary levels of retinol binding protein (RBP), alpha1-microglobulin (α1MG), beta 2-microglobulin (β2MG), transferrin, and IgG immunoglobulins were measured. There was a significant correlation between the degree of IF and the RBP/creatinine (creat) ratio (R2: 0.11, p<0.0001). IF was associated to a lesser extent with urinary β2MG and α1MG; however, there was no association with total proteinuria or high molecular weight (HMW) proteinuria. The correlation between IF and RBP/creat remained significant after adjustment to the estimated glomerular filtration rate, age, body mass index, α1MG, and β2MG. The specificity of the test for diagnosing a fibrosis score of >25% of the parenchyma was 95% when using a threshold of 20 mg/g creat. In conclusion, RBP appears to be a quantitative and non-invasive marker for the independent prediction of the extent of kidney IF. Because methods for the measurement of urinary RBP are available in most clinical chemistry departments, RBP measurement is appealing for implementation in the routine care of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  4. Cellular retinol binding protein 1 could be a tumor suppressor gene in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Rodriguez, Mónica; Arreola, Hugo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Peralta, Raúl; Serna, Humberto; Villegas, Vanessa; Romero, Pablo; Alvarado-Hernández, Beatriz; Paniagua, Lucero; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Meraz, Marco A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the most important health problems in women. It frequently presents genetic changes at chromosome region 3q21. This region contains the Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 gene (CRBP1) which has been implicated as an important element in the development of other types of cancer. The main goal of the present work was to determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 and its relationship to CC. Methods: To determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 gene in CC; twenty-six CC and twenty-six healthy cervix samples were evaluated for: 1) Copy number gain by real-time PCR analysis, 2) expression levels by an immunohistochemistry assay on tissue microarray, and 3) the methylation status of the CRBP1 promoter region. Results: The increase in CRBP1 copy number was observed in 10 out of the 26 CC samples analyzed, while healthy cervices samples showed no changes in the copy number. In addition, there was a lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene in an important number of the CC samples (17/26), and the CRBP1 gene promoter was methylated in 15/26 of the CC samples. Interestingly, there was a significant association between the lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene and its methylation status. Conclusions: The data indicates that, both activating and inactivating changes in the CRBP1 gene could be significant events in the development and progression of CC, and the lack of expression of the CRBP1 protein could be related with to the development of CC. We believe that there is enough evidence to consider to CRBP1 gene as a tumor suppressor gene for CC. PMID:24040446

  5. Immunoassay of urinary retinol binding protein as a putative renal marker in cats.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Ingrid; Daminet, Sylvie; Notebaert, Sofie; Janssens, Isabel; Meyer, Evelyne

    2008-01-01

    The presence of low molecular weight retinol binding protein (RBP) in urine reflects tubular damage. Therefore, RBP has been used as a renal marker in humans and dogs. Using an anti-human RBP antibody (Ab), this study first demonstrates feline urinary RBP by Western blot analysis and then evaluates its potential as a renal marker in cats by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Urine was taken by cystocentesis, centrifuged and stored at -80 degrees C until analysis. Urinary RBP levels were compared in clinically healthy cats (H), chronic renal failure patients (CRF) and cats with hyperthyroidism (HT). The detection of a band at the same position as the human RBP standard with Western blot analysis, indicated that RBP was present in the urine of CRF and HT patients but minimally present in H cats. The data obtained with ELISA were in accordance with these observations. RBP levels were expressed as RBP:creatinine (RBP:c) ratios following normalisation with urinary creatinine. The functional assay sensitivity was 1.37 microg/l RBP. Parallelism between the trend lines of the human RBP standard curve and the curves obtained from sequentially diluted urine samples indicated that feline RBP was recovered. The mean intra-assay coefficient of variance was 7% and the standardised agreement index revealed satisfactory day-to-day repeatability. The RBP:c ratio in all H cats (n=10) was below the assay sensitivity. The groups of CRF and HT patients had increased mean RBP:c ratios of 1.6+/-0.5x10(-2) microg/mg (mean+/-SEM, n=10) and 1.4+/-0.4x10(-2) microg/mg (n=13), respectively. Both groups showed a large variation in the relative RBP concentrations of individual cats. In conclusion, RBP is demonstrated for the first time in urine from most CRF and HT patients and the validated ELISA allows its evaluation as a putative renal marker in cats.

  6. Circulating Retinol-Binding Protein-4 Concentration Might Reflect Insulin Resistance–Associated Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Moreno, José María; Ricart, Wifredo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The mechanisms behind the association between retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and insulin resistance are not well understood. An interaction between iron and vitamin A status, of which RBP4 is a surrogate, has long been recognized. We hypothesized that iron-associated insulin resistance could be behind the impaired insulin action caused by RBP4. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Serum ferritin and RBP4 concentration and insulin resistance were evaluated in a sample of middle-aged men (n = 132) and in a replication independent study. Serum RBP4 was also studied before and after iron depletion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Finally, the effect of iron on RBP4 release was evaluated in vitro in adipose tissue. RESULTS—A positive correlation between circulating RBP4 and log serum ferritin (r = 0.35 and r = 0.61, respectively; P < 0.0001) was observed in both independent studies. Serum RBP4 concentration was higher in men than women in parallel to increased ferritin levels. On multiple regression analyses to predict serum RBP4, log serum ferritin contributed significantly to RBP4 variance after controlling for BMI, age, and homeostasis model assessment value. Serum RBP4 concentration decreased after iron depletion in type 2 diabetic patients (percent mean difference −13.7 [95% CI −25.4 to −2.04]; P = 0.024). The iron donor lactoferrin led to increased dose-dependent adipose tissue release of RBP4 (2.4-fold, P = 0.005) and increased RBP4 expression, while apotransferrin and deferoxamine led to decreased RBP4 release. CONCLUSIONS—The relationship between circulating RBP4 and iron stores, both cross-sectional and after iron depletion, and in vitro findings suggest that iron could play a role in the RBP4–insulin resistance relationship. PMID:18426863

  7. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its potential roles in hypercholesterolemia revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jugnam-ang, Watcharapong; Pannengpetch, Supitcha; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Thippakorn, Chadinee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lawung, Ratana; Prachayasittiku, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of hypercholesterolemia on alterations of serum proteins have not been fully elucidated. Herein, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in conjunction with LC-MS searching has successfully been carried out to investigate the change of protein expression profiles as consequences of raised blood cholesterol at different levels (normal group: total cholesterol 200 mg/dL; borderline high group: total cholesterol 200-239 mg/dL; and high group: total cholesterol ≥ 240 mg/dL) (n = 45). Results revealed that down-regulation of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) (-2.26 fold), transthyretin (-1.25 fold) and gelsolin (-1.47 fold) was observed in the high group. Meanwhile, the other proteins such as haptoglobin, complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein were up-regulated upto +3.24, +1.96 and +2.04 fold, respectively. Confirmation by Western blotting revealed a significant reduction of RBP4 (approximately 50 %) in individual samples derived from the high group. Presumptive conclusion can be drawn that down-regulation of RBP4 might be attributable to the inflammation of adipocytes caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) from adipose tissues. Moreover, the decrease of transthyretin might also be taken into accounts since it is known that the transthyretin usually forms complex with RBP4 to prevent glomerular filtration and excretion through the kidney. The suppressing effect on RBP4 should be potentiated by the increase of complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein, which rendered the adipose tissues to overwhelm the liberation of RBP4 to blood circulation by metabolic and inflammatory processes. Such inflammation could further modulate the induction of cytokine release (e.g. IL-6 and IL-1β), resulting in the synthesis of acute phase protein, in particular, haptoglobin and C-reactive proteins from hepatocytes. However, the mechanism of gelsolin reduction remains unclear. Among these

  8. Molecular Characterization and Tissue Distribution of Feline Retinol-Binding Protein 4

    PubMed Central

    SASAKI, Noriyasu; ISHIBASHI, Miwa; SOETA, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a specific transporter of retinol and was recently identified as an adipokine potentially involved in type 2 diabetes in humans and rodents. However, the function and structure of feline RBP4 have not been reported. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning and expression analysis of feline RBP4. The complete feline RBP4 cDNA encodes a precursor protein comprising an 18 amino acid signal peptide and a 183 amino acid mature protein. Feline RBP4 was mapped to chromosome D2. Mature feline RBP4 is 83–94% homologous to the RBPs of humans, cows and rodents. RT-PCR analysis revealed feline RBP4 expression in liver and adipose tissues. PMID:23719693

  9. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  10. Serum concentrations of retinol-binding protein 4 in women with and without gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zemany, L.; Krugluger, W.; Schernthaner, G. H.; Mittermayer, F.; Schnack, C.; Rahman, R.; Brix, J.; Kahn, B. B.; Schernthaner, G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pregnancy is characterised by temporarily increased insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes occurs when pancreatic beta cell function is unable to compensate for this insulin resistance. Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) could be related to insulin resistance. We hypothesised that RBP4 is elevated in gestational diabetes. Methods Serum RBP4, transthyretin and retinol were cross-sectionally measured in 42 women with gestational diabetes and 45 pregnant controls. Of these, 20 women with and 22 without gestational diabetes were included in an additional longitudinal study. RBP4 was determined by enzyme immunometric assay (EIA) and western blot. Results Women with gestational diabetes had lower RBP4 EIA and western blot levels than controls (median 6.8 [interquartile range, 3.9–14.3] vs 11.3 [7.8–19.9] μg/ml, p<0.001 and 25.1 [21.7–29.6] vs 26.6 [23.5–32.2] μg/ml, p=0.026). Transthyretin and the RBP4:transthyretin molar ratio were comparable between the groups. Serum retinol was lower (p<0.001) and the RBP4 Western blot level: retinol molar ratio was higher in women with gestational diabetes (p=0.044). RBP4 was not associated with the glucose or homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), but in gestational diabetes the RBP4:retinol molar ratio correlated with blood glucose and negatively with 2 h post-load insulin. The RBP4:transthyretin ratio correlated with HOMA-IR and fasting insulin in controls. In women with gestational diabetes RBP4 EIA and western blot levels increased after delivery. Retinol increased in both groups, while transthyretin and the RBP4:transthyretin ratio were not altered after parturition. Conclusions/interpretation RBP4 measured by two different techniques is not elevated, but the RBP4:retinol molar ratio is higher and correlates with fasting blood glucose in women with gestational diabetes. Thus, the RBP4:retinol ratio and the RBP4:transthyretin ratio are more informative than RBP4 levels alone when

  11. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein–albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug. PMID:25864124

  12. Chick neural retina adhesion and survival molecule is a retinol-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, D.; LaCorbiere, M.; Esch, F.

    1986-01-01

    A 20,000-D protein called purpurin has recently been isolated from the growth-conditioned medium of cultured embryonic chick neural retina cells. Purpurin is a constituent of adherons and promotes cell-adheron adhesion by interacting with a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It also prolongs the survival of cultured neural retina cells. This paper shows that purpurin is a secretory protein that has sequence homology with a human protein synthesized in the liver that transports retinol in the blood, the serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). Purpurin binds (/sup 3/H)retinol, and both purpurin and chick serum RBP stimulate the adhesion of neural retina cells, although the serum protein is less active than purpurin. Purpurin and the serum RBP are, however, different molecules, for the serum protein is approx.3.000 D larger than purpurin and has different silver-staining characteristics. Finally, purpurin supports the survival of dissociated ciliary ganglion cells, indicating that RBPs can act as ciliary neurotrophic factors.

  13. Characterization of a cellular retinol-binding protein from lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Yoshino, Hiroaki; Senoo, Haruki

    2012-03-01

    Lampreys are ancestral representatives of vertebrates known as jawless fish. The Japanese lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum, is a parasitic member of the lampreys known to store large amounts of vitamin A within its body. How this storage is achieved, however, is wholly unknown. Within the body, the absorption, transfer and metabolism of vitamin A are regulated by a family of proteins called retinoid-binding proteins. Here we have cloned a cDNA for cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) from the Japanese lamprey, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that lamprey CRBP is an ancestor of both CRBP I and II. The lamprey CRBP protein was expressed in bacteria and purified. Binding of the lamprey CRBP to retinol (Kd of 13.2 nM) was identified by fluorimetric titration. However, results obtained with the protein fluorescence quenching technique indicated that lamprey CRBP does not bind to retinal. Northern blot analysis showed that lamprey CRBP mRNA was ubiquitously expressed, although expression was most abundant in the intestine. Together, these results suggest that lamprey CRBP has an important role in absorbing vitamin A from the blood of host animals.

  14. Retinol binding protein 4 induces mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wenjing; Sun, Ruifang; Xia, Min

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Elevation of serum retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) in patients has been linked to cardiovascular disease. However, the role of RBP4 on mitochondrial oxidative stress and vascular oxidative damage is not well demonstrated. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of RBP4 on the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dynamics in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. RBP4 treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide generation in a dose-dependent manner in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Exposure to RBP4 also promoted mitochondrial dysfunction as determined by decreased mitochondrial content and integrity as well as membrane potential in HAECs. Incubation with RBP4 suppressed mitofusin (Mfn)-1 protein expression, but enhanced dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) and fission-1 (Fis1) protein expression in HAECs, suggesting an impairment of mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics. Moreover, RBP4 treatment significantly induced endothelial apoptosis, increased the expression of Cytochrome C and Bax, but decreased the expression of Bcl-2. Furthermore, RBP4 stimulation suppressed phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in HAECs. Finally, RBP4-Tg mice exhibited severe mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular oxidative damage in aorta compared with wide-type C57BL/6J mice. The present study uncovers a novel mechanism through which RBP4 induces vascular oxidative damage and accelerates the development of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  16. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range ( 1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  17. Characterization of a fatty acid and retinol binding protein orthologue from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum✯

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Keke C.; Vermeire, Jon J.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Bungiro, Richard D.; Grant, Wayne; Husain, Sohail Z.; Cappello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hookworms, bloodfeeding intestinal nematodes, infect nearly one billion people in resource limited countries and are a leading cause of anemia and malnutrition. Like other nematodes, hookworms lack the capacity to synthesize essential fatty acids de novo and therefore must acquire those from exogenous sources. The cDNA corresponding to a putative Ancylostoma ceylanicum fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1 (AceFAR-1) was amplified from adult hookworm mRNA. Studies using quantitative reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrate that AceFAR-1 transcripts are most abundant in the earliest developmental stages of the parasite, and greater in females than males. Using in vitro assays, the recombinant AceFAR-1 (rAceFAR-1) was shown to bind individual fatty acids with equilibrium dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. The pattern of fatty acid uptake by live adult worms cultured ex vivo was similar to the in vitro binding profile of rAceFAR-1, raising the possibility that the native protein may be involved in acquisition of fatty acids by A. ceylanicum. Animals vaccinated orally with rAceFAR-1 and the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin exhibited a statistically significant (40–47%) reduction in intestinal worm burden compared with controls immunized with antigen or adjuvant alone. Together, these data suggest a potential role for AceFAR-1 in hookworm biology, making it a potentially valuable target for drug and vaccine development. PMID:19591834

  18. Characterisation of a fatty acid and retinol binding protein orthologue from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Keke C; Vermeire, Jon J; Harrison, Lisa M; Bungiro, Richard D; Grant, Wayne; Husain, Sohail Z; Cappello, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Hookworms, bloodfeeding intestinal nematodes, infect nearly one billion people in resource limited countries and are a leading cause of anaemia and malnutrition. Like other nematodes, hookworms lack the capacity to synthesise essential fatty acids de novo and therefore must acquire those from exogenous sources. The cDNA corresponding to a putative Ancylostoma ceylanicum fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1 (AceFAR-1) was amplified from adult hookworm mRNA. Studies using quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR demonstrate that AceFAR-1 transcripts are most abundant in the earliest developmental stages of the parasite, and greater in females than males. Using in vitro assays, the recombinant AceFAR-1 (rAceFAR-1) was shown to bind individual fatty acids with equilibrium dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. The pattern of fatty acid uptake by live adult worms cultured ex vivo was similar to the in vitro binding profile of rAceFAR-1, raising the possibility that the native protein may be involved in acquisition of fatty acids by A. ceylanicum. Animals vaccinated orally with rAceFAR-1 and the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin exhibited a statistically significant (40-47%) reduction in intestinal worm burden compared with controls immunized with antigen or adjuvant alone. Together, these data suggest a potential role for AceFAR-1 in hookworm biology, making it a potentially valuable target for drug and vaccine development.

  19. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  20. Relation between retinol, retinol-binding protein 4, transthyretin and carotid intima media thickness.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Thomas; Raila, Jens; Schwarz, Franziska; Mai, Knut; Henze, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Schweigert, Florian J; Spranger, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Retinol is transported in a complex with retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and transthyretin (TTR) in the circulation. While retinol is associated with various cardiovascular risk factors, the relation between retinol, RBP4, TTR and carotid intima media thickness (IMT) has not been analysed yet. Retinol, RBP4 and TTR were measured in 96 individuals and their relation to mean and maximal IMT was determined. Mean IMT correlated with RBP4 (r=0.335, p<0.001), retinol (r=-0.241, p=0.043), RBP/TTR ratio (r=0.254, p=0.025) and retinol/RBP4 ratio (r=-0.549, p<0.001). Adjustment for age, sex, BMI, blood pressure, HDL/total cholesterol ratio, triglyceride, diabetes and smoking revealed that the retinol/RBP4 ratio was strongly and independently associated with mean IMT. Similar results were found for maximal IMT, which included the measurement of plaques. The data support that the transport complex of vitamin A is associated with the IMT, an established parameter of atherosclerosis. Changes in RBP4 saturation with retinol may link renal dysfunction and insulin resistance to atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Liver Retinol Transporter and Receptor for Serum Retinol-binding Protein (RBP4)*

    PubMed Central

    Alapatt, Philomena; Guo, Fangjian; Komanetsky, Susan M.; Wang, Shuping; Cai, Jinjin; Sargsyan, Ashot; Rodríguez Díaz, Eduardo; Bacon, Brandon T.; Aryal, Pratik; Graham, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) is absorbed in the small intestine, stored in liver, and secreted into circulation bound to serum retinol-binding protein (RBP4). Circulating retinol may be taken up by extrahepatic tissues or recycled back to liver multiple times before it is finally metabolized or degraded. Liver exhibits high affinity binding sites for RBP4, but specific receptors have not been identified. The only known high affinity receptor for RBP4, Stra6, is not expressed in the liver. Here we report discovery of RBP4 receptor-2 (RBPR2), a novel retinol transporter expressed primarily in liver and intestine and induced in adipose tissue of obese mice. RBPR2 is structurally related to Stra6 and highly conserved in vertebrates, including humans. Expression of RBPR2 in cultured cells confers high affinity RBP4 binding and retinol transport, and RBPR2 knockdown reduces RBP4 binding/retinol transport. RBPR2 expression is suppressed by retinol and retinoic acid and correlates inversely with liver retinol stores in vivo. We conclude that RBPR2 is a novel retinol transporter that potentially regulates retinol homeostasis in liver and other tissues. In addition, expression of RBPR2 in liver and fat suggests a possible role in mediating established metabolic actions of RBP4 in those tissues. PMID:23105095

  2. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  3. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A.; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  4. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  5. Signaling by vitamin A and retinol-binding protein in regulation of insulin responses and lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Berry, Daniel C; Noy, Noa

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A, retinol, circulates in blood bound to serum retinol binding protein (RBP) and is transported into cells by a membrane protein termed stimulated by retinoic acid 6 (STRA6). It was reported that serum levels of RBP are elevated in obese rodents and humans, and that increased level of RBP in blood causes insulin resistance. A molecular mechanism by which RBP can exert such an effect is suggested by the recent discovery that STRA6 is not only a vitamin A transporter but also functions as a surface signaling receptor. Binding of RBP-ROH to STRA6 induces the phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue in the receptor C-terminus, thereby activating a JAK/STAT signaling cascade. Consequently, in STRA6-expressing cells such as adipocytes, RBP-ROH induces the expression of STAT target genes, including SOCS3, which suppresses insulin signaling, and PPARγ, which enhances lipid accumulation. RBP-retinol thus joins the myriad of cytokines, growth factors and hormones which regulate gene transcription by activating cell surface receptors that signal through activation of Janus kinases and their associated transcription factors STATs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism.

  6. Retinol Binding Protein 4 in children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a negative correlation with the disease activity.

    PubMed

    Roma, E; Krini, M; Hantzi, E; Sakka, S; Panayiotou, I; Margeli, A; Papassotiriou, I; Kanaka-Gantenbein, C

    2012-10-01

    Retinol Binding Protein-4 (RBP-4), the action of which was initially thought to be only the transport of vitamin A, is a major circulating adipocytokine involved in the inflammation. We evaluated the serum RBP-4 levels in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and correlated them with transthyretin (TTR), inflammation markers, disease activity, and body mass index (BMI). In 41 children of mean age 11.9 ± 3.6 years (range 5-17.7 y) with IBD (19 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 22 with Ulcerative colitis (UC) serum RBP-4, TTR, Amyloid A (SAA), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), disease activity and BMI were prospectively determined and compared with those of 42 matched controls. No difference in the RBP-4 and TTR serum levels, between patients and controls as well as between active and remission state of the disease was noticed. A negative correlation of serum RBP-4 with the disease activity, SAA and ESR and a positive correlation with TTR was found, but no significant correlation with CRP or BMI was found. Inflammation markers were significantly increased in patients compared to controls and had a positive correlation with the disease activity. RBP-4 negatively correlated with disease activity of children with IBD probably indicating a protective anti-inflammatory mechanism of action in addition to transport of vitamin A.

  7. Retinol binding protein 4 as a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes and prediabetic intermediate traits.

    PubMed

    Craig, Rebekah L; Chu, Winston S; Elbein, Steven C

    2007-03-01

    Serum retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) was recently described as a new adipokine that reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. The RBP4 gene maps to 10q23-24, near a region linked to T2DM in Caucasian and Mexican American populations. Hence, sequence variants that alter RBP4 expression or function could increase T2DM susceptibility and reduce insulin sensitivity. We screened the 6 exons, flanking intronic sequence, and 5' and 3' flanking sequences in 48 Caucasian and 48 African American subjects. We identified 21 SNPs, of which 8 were unique to the African American population. Additional public database SNPs were chosen for regions not screened. We selected SNPs for typing based on frequency, linkage disequilibrium, and location in a putative functional or conserved region. We typed 10 SNPs in 191 Caucasians with T2DM and a family history of T2DM, and 188 euglycemic controls with no family history of diabetes. We similarly typed 14 variants in 182 controls and 353 diabetic individuals of African American ancestry. No single variant was associated with type 2 diabetes in either population (p>0.15 in African Americans, p>0.09 in Caucasians), but a haplotype of 8 common SNPs in Caucasians was significantly increased in type 2 diabetics compared with controls (0.137 vs. 0.076, p=0.008). Furthermore, SNPs -804 and +9476 were associated with reduced insulin secretion, (p=0.01 and 0.001, respectively), and SNP +390 with reduced insulin sensitivity (p=0.0005) in Caucasians. Our data suggest that noncoding SNPs may increase diabetes susceptibility in Caucasians and may contribute to insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion.

  8. Maternal Plasma Retinol Binding Protein 4 in Acute Pyelonephritis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Sun Kwon; Ogge, Giovanna; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Adipokines have been implicated in metabolic regulation and the immune response thus providing a molecular mechanism for the interaction between these two systems. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a novel adipokine that plays a role in the pathophysiology of obesity-induced insulin resistance, as well as in the modulation of inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are changes in maternal plasma concentrations of RBP4 in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis. Study design This cross-sectional study included pregnant women in the following groups: 1) normal pregnancy (n=80); 2) pyelonephritis (n=39). Maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Non-parametric statistics were used for analyses. Results 1) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration was lower in patients with acute pyelonephritis than in those with a normal pregnancy (3709.6 ng/mL, IQR 2917.7-5484.2 vs. 9167.6 ng/mL, IQR 7496.1-10384.1, p<0.001; 2) the median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration did not differ significantly between patients with acute pyelonephritis who had a positive blood culture and those with a negative culture (3285.3 ng/mL, IQR 2274.1-4741.1 vs. 3922.6 ng/mL, IQR 3126.8-5547.1, respectively, p=0.2); and 3) lower maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were independently associated with pyelonephritis after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusions In contrast to what has been reported in preeclampsia, acute pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with lower maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations than in normal pregnancy. This finding suggests that the acute maternal inflammatory process associated with pyelonephritis is fundamentally different from that of the chronic systemic inflammatory process suggested in preeclampsia, in which RBP4 concentrations were found to be elevated. PMID:20163326

  9. The retinol esterifying enzyme LRAT supports cell signaling by retinol-binding protein and its receptor STRA6.

    PubMed

    Marwarha, Gurdeep; Berry, Daniel C; Croniger, Colleen M; Noy, Noa

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A, retinol, circulates in blood bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP). At some tissues, holo-RBP is recognized by a plasma membrane receptor termed STRA6, which serves a dual role: it mediates transport of retinol from RBP into cells, and it functions as a cytokine receptor that, on binding holo-RBP, activates JAK2/STAT5 signaling. As STAT target genes include SOCS3, an inhibitor of insulin receptor, holo-RBP suppresses insulin responses in STRA6-expressing cells. We have shown previously that the two functions of STRA6 are interdependent. These observations suggest factors that regulate STRA6-mediated retinol transport may also control STRA6-mediated cell signaling. One such factor is retinol metabolism, which enables cellular uptake of retinol by maintaining an inward-directed concentration gradient. We show here that lecithin:retinol acyl transferase (LRAT), which catalyzes esterification of retinol to its storage species retinyl esters, is necessary for activation of the STRA6/JAK2/STAT5 cascade by holo-RBP. In accordance, LRAT-null mice are protected from holo-RBP-induced suppression of insulin responses. Hence, STRA6 signaling, which requires STRA6-mediated retinol transport, is supported by LRAT-catalyzed retinol metabolism. The observations demonstrate that STRA6 regulates key cellular processes by coupling circulating holo-RBP levels and intracellular retinol metabolism to cell signaling.

  10. Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase is critical for cellular uptake of vitamin A from serum retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; von Lintig, Johannes

    2012-07-13

    Vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) must be adequately distributed within the mammalian body to produce visual chromophore in the eyes and all-trans-retinoic acid in other tissues. Vitamin A is transported in the blood bound to retinol-binding protein (holo-RBP), and its target cells express an RBP receptor encoded by the Stra6 (stimulated by retinoic acid 6) gene. Here we show in mice that cellular uptake of vitamin A from holo-RBP depends on functional coupling of STRA6 with intracellular lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). Thus, vitamin A uptake from recombinant holo-RBP exhibited by wild type mice was impaired in Lrat(-/-) mice. We further provide evidence that vitamin A uptake is regulated by all-trans-retinoic acid in non-ocular tissues of mice. When in excess, vitamin A was rapidly taken up and converted to its inert ester form in peripheral tissues, such as lung, whereas in vitamin A deficiency, ocular retinoid uptake was favored. Finally, we show that the drug fenretinide, used clinically to presumably lower blood RBP levels and thus decrease circulating retinol, targets the functional coupling of STRA6 and LRAT to increase cellular vitamin A uptake in peripheral tissues. These studies provide mechanistic insights into how vitamin A is distributed to peripheral tissues in a regulated manner and identify LRAT as a critical component of this process.

  11. Structure-function studies on human retinol-binding protein using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprasadarao, A; Findlay, J B

    1994-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) transports vitamin A in the plasma. It consists of eight anti-parallel beta-strands (A to H) that fold to form an orthogonal barrel. The loops connecting the strands A and B, C and D, and E and F form the entrance to the binding site in the barrel. The retinol molecule is found deep inside this barrel. Apart from its specific interaction with retinol, RBP is involved in two other molecular-recognition properties, that is it binds to transthyretin (TTR), another serum protein, and to a cell-surface receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, specific changes were made to the loop regions of human RBP and the resultant mutant proteins were tested for their ability to bind to retinol, to TTR and to the RBP receptor. While all the variants retained their ability to bind retinol, that in which residues 92 to 98 of the loop E-F were deleted completely lost its ability to interact with TTR, but retained some binding activity for the receptor. In contrast, the double mutant in which leucine residues at positions 63 and 64 of the loop C-D were changed to arginine and serine respectively partially retained its TTR-binding ability, but completely lost its affinity for the RBP receptor. Mutation of Leu-35 of loop A-B to valine revealed no apparent effect on any of the binding activities of RBP. However, substitution of leucine for proline at position 35 markedly reduced the affinity of the protein for TTR, but showed no apparent change in its receptor-binding activity. These results demonstrate that RBP interacts with both TTR and the receptor via loops C-D and E-F. The binding sites, however, are overlapping rather than identical. RBP also appears to make an additional contact with TTR via its loop A-B. A further implication of these results is that RBP, when bound to TTR, cannot bind simultaneously to the receptor. This observation is consistent with our previously proposed mechanism for delivery of retinol to target tissues [Sivaprasadarao and

  12. Alpha 1-microglobulin, beta 2-microglobulin and retinol binding protein in childhood febrile illness and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, M D; Chambers, R E; Woolridge, M W; Whicher, J T

    1990-07-01

    Serum and urinary levels of alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) and retinol binding protein (RBP) were measured using a Mancini radial immunodiffusion technique in 52 children with renal disease, 36 with non-renal febrile illness and 29 controls. In controls the mean serum level for A1M was 25 +/- 4.6 (SD) mg/l for B2M 1.7 +/- 0.5 mg/l and for RBP 31 +/- 8 mg/l. A1M levels were not significantly altered by febrile illness while B2M was elevated and RBP markedly depressed. Serum A1M and B2M were elevated in the nephrotic syndrome, while serum B2M was also raised during infancy. Coefficients of log-transformed data with creatinine-derived glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were -0.87 for B2M, -0.71 for RBP, and -0.62 for A1M. In the urine A1M was always measurable in controls while B2M and RBP were undetectable in all but a small number. The urine levels of all three proteins increased in response to non-renal febrile illness, and rose invariably when GFR fell to below 40-50 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Of the three proteins A1M was most frequently elevated in the urine with febrile and renal illness. RBP was rarely detectable when the other two proteins were not. Urinary A1M was consistently elevated in the nephrotic syndrome in contrast to B2M, possibly as a reflection of the increased glomerular permeability. We conclude that serum B2M is superior to A1M and RBP as an index of glomerular filtration, although its levels should be interpreted with caution in febrile disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Hepatic uptake of (TH)retinol bound to the serum retinol binding protein involves both parenchymal and perisinusoidal stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.

    1985-11-05

    We have studied the hepatic uptake of retinol bound to the circulating retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. Labeled complex was obtained from the plasma of donor rats that were fed radioactive retinol. When labeled retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex was injected intravenously into control rats, about 45% of the administered dose was recovered in liver after 56 h. Parenchymal liver cells were responsible for an initial rapid uptake. Perisinusoidal stellate cells initially accumulated radioactivity more slowly than did the parenchymal cells, but after 16 h, these cells contained more radioactivity than the parenchymal cells. After 56 h, about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in liver was present in stellate cells. For the first 2 h after injection, most of the radioactivity in parenchymal cells was recovered as unesterified retinol. The radioactivity in the retinyl ester fraction increased after a lag period of about 2 h, and after 5 h more than 60% of the radioactivity was recovered as retinyl esters. In stellate cells, radioactivity was mostly present as retinyl esters at all time points examined. Uptake of retinol in both parenchymal cells and stellate cells was reduced considerably in vitamin A-deficient rats. Less than 5% of the injected dose of radioactivity was found in liver after 5-6 h (as compared to 25% in control rats), and the radioactivity recovered in liver from these animals was mostly in the unesterified retinol fraction. Studies with separated cells in vitro suggested that both parenchymal and stellate cells isolated from control rats were able to take up retinol from the retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. This uptake was temperature dependent.

  14. Changes in Retinol-Binding Protein Concentrations and Thyroid Homeostasis with Nonoccupational Exposure to DDT

    PubMed Central

    Delport, Rhena; Bornman, Riana; MacIntyre, Una E.; Oosthuizen, Nicholette M.; Becker, Piet J.; Aneck-Hahn, Natalie H.; de Jager, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background The insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used for malaria vector control in the northern and eastern parts of the Vhembe District of Limpopo Province, South Africa, since 1945. Bioaccumulation of DDT raises concern because it reportedly affects thyroid function. Objective Our objective was to investigate the association between DDT uptake (as reflected in plasma concentrations) and thyroid homeostasis while considering related factors. Methods We compared dietary intake, serum retinol-binding protein (RBP), transthyretin (TTR) and albumin concentrations, and liver and thyroid function between cases with evidence of a body burden of DDT in the circulation (concentration of any DDT isomer ≥ 0.02 μg/g lipid; n = 278) and controls (concentration of all DDT isomers < 0.02 μg/g lipid; n = 40) in a cross-sectional study. Further analyses were performed to assess the relevance of changes in RBP status associated with DDT uptake. Results RBP concentrations below the reference range were more prevalent in cases (54% vs. 10% in controls; χ2 = 27.4; p < 0.001), which could not be explained by nutrient intake. We observed significantly lower thyroid hormone concentrations among cases (p ≤ 0.01). We also observed a significant linear trend for serum concentrations of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine (p < 0.001) and a significant quadratic trend for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (p = 0.025) and TTR (p < 0.001) across the control group and case groups with normal and relatively low RBP concentrations. Relatively low RBP concentrations were associated with significantly higher DDT and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE) isomer concentrations and with a higher DDE/DDT ratio (p ≤ 0.01), which signifies long-term exposure. Inadequate intake of vitamin A and zinc were observed in 84% and 58%, respectively, of the total study population. Conclusion RBP concentrations appear to decrease in the presence of long-term DDT

  15. Retinol Binding Protein 4 – A Novel Association with Early-Onset Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Erez, Offer; Kim, Sun Kwon; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Gotsch, Francesca; Than, Nandor Gabor; Dong, Zhong; Pacora, Percy; Lamont, Ronald; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Objective Dysregulation of maternal circulating adipokines has been implicated in several “great obstetrical syndromes” including preeclampsia (PE), small-for-gestational age (SGA) neonate and fetal death (FD). It has been suggested that adipokines provide a molecular link between metabolic derangements and inflammatory response in complicated pregnancies. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), a novel adipokine, plays a role in obesity-related disorders, as well as in the regulation of the immune response. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are changes in maternal plasma concentrations of RBP4 in patients with PE and in those with an SGA neonate or FD. Study design This cross-sectional study included patients in the following groups: 1) normal pregnancy (n=134); 2) PE (n=104); 3) SGA neonate (n=28); and 4) FD (n=37). Maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations were determined by ELISA. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration was higher among patients with PE than in those with a normal pregnancy (p=0.03); 2) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations of patients with preterm PE (<37 weeks) was higher than that of those with term PE (p=0.017) and than that of those with a normal pregnancy (p=0.002); 3) The median maternal plasma RBP4 concentration did not differ significantly between patients with a normal pregnancy and those with an SGA neonate or with an FD; 4) Among normal pregnant women, the maternal plasma RBP4 concentrations did not correlate with pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational age at blood sampling and neonatal birthweight. Conclusions 1) Preeclampsia, but not pregnancy with an SGA neonate or an FD, is associated with a higher median maternal plasma concentration of RBP4 than normal pregnancy; 2) Preterm PE, and specifically early-onset PE, is associated with higher median RBP4 concentrations in maternal plasma compared to term PE. These findings suggest a role for

  16. Prognostic Importance of Vitamins A, E and Retinol-binding Protein 4 in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Roman; Čapoun, Otakar; Kalousová, Marta; Hanuš, Tomáš; Zima, Tomáš; Koštířová, Milada; Soukup, Viktor

    2017-07-01

    To assess the prognostic importance of serum levels of retinol, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and vitamin E at the time of diagnosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this prospective study, in a cohort of 102 renal cell carcinoma patients, relationships between serum levels of the aforementioned markers and recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), as well as cancer-specific survival (CSS), were evaluated. The vitamin A and vitamin E levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while the RBP4 level by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The median follow-up period was 39 months. Renal cell carcinoma recurred in 9 patients; 23 patients died with 12 of them from RCC. The preoperative vitamin E level was associated to RFS (p=0.02). We found a significant relationship between OS and the level of RBP4 (p=0.002), retinol (p=0.037) and vitamin E (p=0.007). The CSS period was significantly associated with the level of RBP4 (p=0.0001) and retinol (p=0.0003). Patients with an RBP4 level less than 21.0 mg/l at the time of diagnosis had a 13.5-times higher risk of death due to RCC progression; this risk was up to 7.7-times higher with vitamin A levels under 0.52 mg/l. Low levels of vitamin A, E and RBP4 at the time of RCC diagnosis are associated with a poorer prognosis after surgery. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Retinol binding protein 4 concentrations are influenced by renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Takayuki; Anan, Futoshi; Tsubone, Tetsuo; Gotoh, Koro; Chiba, Seiichi; Katsuragi, Isao; Nawata, Tomoko; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2008-10-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4), a newly discovered adipocytokine, has been involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. We assess the impacts of renal function on plasma RBP-4 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with a wide range of nephropathy. Plasma RBP-4 levels were measured using the enzyme immunoassay method in 38 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with nephropathy and were compared with those in 20 patients with normoalbuminuria. The levels of plasma RBP-4 were increased by 1.4- and 3.3-fold in patients with renal disease with macroalbuminuria (P = .04) and end-stage renal disease (plasma creatinine level >2.0 mg/dL) (P < .0001) compared with those in patients with normal renal function. In addition, RBP-4 levels were correlated with the creatinine level and 24-hour creatinine clearance (Ccr) on simple and multiple regression analyses in all patients. Furthermore, in patients having Ccr of more than 60 mL/min, RBP-4 levels were correlated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-r index and triglyceride (TGL) both on simple and multiple regression analyses. Interestingly, in patients having Ccr of less than 60 mL/min, RBP-4 levels were not correlated with the HOMA-r index and TGL on simple regression analysis. The RBP-4 concentrations are influenced by renal function in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. In addition, RBP-4 levels were correlated with HOMA-r and TGL in diabetic subjects without end-stage renal disease.

  18. Role of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in cell viability, lipogenesis, and retinol-binding protein 4 expression in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye-Young; Hong, Chae-Geun; Suh, Young-Sung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Park, Won-Kyun; Han, Jin; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2010-10-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a bioactive compound of green tea, is known to combat obesity by reducing the viability and lipid accumulation of adipocytes. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism and clinical relevance on those actions of EGCG. We measured the viability of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and adipocytes by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Lipid accumulation was measured by Oil Red O staining. Intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a flow cytometer. Cellular glucose uptake was determined with 2-deoxy-[(3)H]-glucose. The protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as well as the protein level and secretion of plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP4) in human adipocytes, were measured by western blot. EGCG at concentrations higher than 10 μM induced ROS generation and decreased the viability and lipid accumulation of adipocytes. It also decreased the expression of PPAR-γ and adiponectin. At concentrations readily achievable in human plasma via green tea intake (≤10 μM), EGCG inhibited cellular glucose uptake and enhanced the expression and secretion of RBP4 in adipocytes. Pharmacological doses of EGCG showed cytotoxic effects in preadipocytes and adipocytes. EGCG-mediated glucose uptake inhibition in adipocytes may be clinically relevant and is probably linked to the increase in the expression and secretion of RBP4. Because secreted RBP4 from adipocytes inhibits muscular glucose uptake and enhance hepatic glucose output, the systemic effect of EGCG associated with its effect on RBP4 secretion should be further determined, as it may negatively regulate whole-body insulin sensitivity, contrary to general belief.

  19. Prompt increases in retinol-binding protein 4 and endothelial progenitor cells during acute exercise load in diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Atsushi; Murata, Miho; Asano, Tomoko; Ikoma, Aki; Sasaki, Masami; Saito, Tomoyuki; Otani, Taeko; Jinbo, Sachimi; Ikeda, Nahoko; Kawakami, Masanobu; Ishikawa, San-E

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether acute exercise load alters serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in diabetic subjects. Sixty-two subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the present study. They were 50 males and 12 females with the ages of 65.1±8.1 (mean ± SD) years. Cardio-pulmonary exercise stress test (CPX) was carried out, and the numbers of EPC and serum RBP4 levels before and after the CPX were measured. RBP4 is a cytokine synthesized in hepatocytes, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, and serum RBP4 was determined by ELISA. EPC was determined as CD34(+)/133(+) cells by FACS. The subjects were subgrouped into two groups with or without nephropathy. Serum RBP4 levels promptly increased from 48.2±4.3 (mean±SEM) to 54.3±4.2 μg/mL after the CPX (mean exercise time of 8 min) in the diabetic subjects without nephropathy (p=0.0006), but did not in those with nephropathy. There was a positive correlation between changes in serum RBP4 during the exercise and estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=0.30, p=0.018). Also, an acute exercise load promptly increased the number of EPCs in the diabetic subjects with and without nephropathy. These findings suggest that a prompt increase in exercise-induced RBP4 is retarded by progression of nephropathy, and that an exercise-induced mobilization of EPCs could maintain endothelial cells in diabetic subjects.

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Wide Photoabsorption Spectral Shifts of Color Variants of Human Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kamiya, Motoshi; Uchida, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2015-10-21

    Color variants of human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) created by protein engineering were recently shown to exhibit anomalously wide photoabsorption spectral shifts over ∼200 nm across the visible region. The remarkable phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the molecular basis of the color tuning of retinal binding proteins for understanding of color vision as well as for engineering of novel color variants of retinal binding photoreceptor proteins employed in optogenetics. Here, we report a theoretical investigation of the molecular mechanism underlying the anomalously wide spectral shifts of the color variants of hCRBPII. Computational modeling of the color variants with hybrid molecular simulations of free energy geometry optimization succeeded in reproducing the experimentally observed wide spectral shifts, and revealed that protein flexibility, through which the active site structure of the protein and bound water molecules is altered by remote mutations, plays a significant role in inducing the large spectral shifts.

  1. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Serum Retinol Binding Protein4, Insulin Resistance and Blood Lipids in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    TAGHIAN, Farzaneh; ZOLFAGHARI, Maryam; HEDAYATI, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Retinol binding protein4 (RBP4) is a type of adipokine which transports vitamin A to serum. RBP4 could be a bridge between obesity and insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aerobic exercises on RBP4 serum’s concentration and metabolic syndrome risk factors in obese women. Methods Twenty obese women with body max index 35.81±3.67Kg/m2, fat percentage 43.98±4.02, and waist to hip ratio 1.03±0.05 were included and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received aerobic exercises for a period of 12 weeks each three sessions on treadmill workout. The treadmill speed were based on a 60-65 and 80-85 maximal heart rate percentage and duration of 15-20 and 45-50 minutes, at the beginning and the end of exercise, respectively. Body composition, serum glucose, insulin, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, total cholesterol, and RBP4, were measured in both groups before and after the treatment by ELISA method. Insulin resistance was measured by HOMA-IR. To compare within group differences and between group comparisons t-correlated and t-independent tests were used, respectively. Results After 12 week aerobic exercises; weight, fat percentage, WHR, and BMI in the experimental group was significantly decreased (P<0.05). RBP4, insulin, insulin resistance, TG and HDL-C had significant differences between two groups. The cholesterol level, LDL-C and glucose did not have any significant changes. Conclusion The aerobic exercises can decrease body composition, insulin resistance, TG, and RBP4, so it can be beneficial for obese women’s health, because it. PMID:26060767

  2. Serum retinol-binding protein-induced endothelial inflammation is mediated through the activation of toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Martin, Ashley; Hays, Franklin; Johnson, Jennifer; Farjo, Rafal A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elevation of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) induces inflammation in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) via a retinol-independent mechanism; thus, it may play a causative role in the development and progression of vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since HRECs do not express the classical RBP4 receptor, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 (STRA6), this study focuses on identifying the endothelial cell receptor and signaling that mediate RBP4-induced inflammation. Methods HRECs were treated with a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small molecule inhibitor (Cli95, also known as TAK-242), TLR4 neutralizing antibody, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors before treatment with purified recombinant RBP4. The HREC inflammatory response was quantified by in vitro leukostasis assays, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To understand how the serum binding partner for RBP4, transthyretin (TTR), may affect RBP4 activity, we also measured RBP4 and TTR levels in serum and retinal lysates from RBP4-Tg and wild-type mice. Results TLR4 inhibition significantly reduced RBP4-induced expression of pro-inflammatory proteins and in vitro leukostasis. RBP4 treatment significantly increased phosphoactivation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). The p38 inhibitor (SB203580) attenuated RBP4-stimulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production, while the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) reduced RBP4-stimulated sICAM-1, endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), and MCP-1 production. The MAPK inhibitors only showed partial (50–70%) suppression of the RBP4-stimulated proinflammatory response. Moreover, TLR4 inhibition did not decrease RBP4-induced MAPK phosphoactivation, suggesting that RBP4-mediated MAPK activation is TLR4 independent and occurs through a secondary unknown

  3. The association of retinol-binding protein 4 with metabolic syndrome and obesity in adolescents: the effects of gender and sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Jung; Chu, Nain Feng; Hung, Yi-Jen; Chang, Jin-Biou; He, Chih-Tsueng; Hsiao, Fone-Ching; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) has a role in the development of insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome among adults. However, data among adolescents are limited, and the effects of gender and sex hormones on RBP4 are not well defined. A total of 1082 adolescents were enrolled and categorized based on their body mass index. Blood samples were collected, and biochemical characteristics, sex hormones, RBP4 concentrations, and IR were determined. Testosterone and estradiol were not directly correlated with RBP4 concentrations in both genders. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG), and testosterone levels were independently associated with RBP4 concentrations in boys; also, there was a trend of increasing RBP4 levels with the severity of obesity. Plasma RBP4 concentrations correlated with obesity and cardiovascular risk factors, predominantly evident in boys. Testosterone, FPG, and TG levels were independent predictors of RBP4 concentrations.

  4. Carotenoid and retinoid transport to fish oocytes and eggs: what is the role of retinol binding protein?

    PubMed

    Lubzens, E; Lissauer, L; Levavi-Sivan, B; Avarre, J-C; Sammar, M

    2003-12-01

    Fish eggs contain carotenoids, retinals (retinal and dehydroretinal) and retinols (retinol, dehydroretinol and retinyl-esters) that are utilized during embryonic development, after fertilization. The carotenoids (mainly astaxanthins) are transported in the plasma by the low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins, and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and were found to be associated also with serum albumin. Retinals were found to be associated vitellogenin (VTG), a component of the plasma VHDL fraction that is internalized by oocytes during vitellogenesis. However, the transport of retinols and retinyl-esters that were located in the oil droplet fraction of homogenized eggs, has yet to be elucidated. Retinols are more abundant in freshwater fish eggs than in eggs of marine fish species. Since retinol is transported in the plasma of vertebrates in association with retinol binding protein (RBP), recent studies on the molecular characterization and expression sites of RBP, could contribute to determining the involvement of RBP in transporting retinol to developing oocytes in vertebrates.Recently, results from our laboratory show that RBP mRNA levels in the liver and RBP plasma levels did not significantly change with the onset and during vitellogenesis in the Rainbow trout. These results were in contrast with a dramatic elevation in the mRNA levels of VTG in the liver and an increase in VTG plasma levels that was observed in the same females. Moreover, 17beta-estradiol treatment of immature fish, resulted in relatively lower mRNA levels of RBP in the liver, concomitantly with an increase in the level of VTG transcripts and the appearance of VTG in the plasma of treated fish. In addition, RBP was localized in the cytosol of ovulated oocytes. These results for Rainbow trout are similar to those reported for the chicken but differ from those of Xenopus, where an increase in RBP mRNA was reported in the liver and higher levels of retinal and retinol were found

  5. Rescue of retinal morphology and function in a humanized mouse at the mouse retinol-binding protein locus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shen, Jingling; Wakana, Shigeharu; Araki, Kimi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Lei, Lei; Li, Zhenghua

    2017-01-30

    Retinol-binding protein RBP4 is the specific carrier for retinol in the blood. We previously produced a Rbp4-deficient (Rbp4(-/-)) mouse that showed electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities, accompanied by histological and electron-microscopic changes such as fewer synapses in the inner plexiform layer in the central retina. To address whether human RBP4 gene expression can rescue the phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice, we produced a humanized (Rbp4(hRBP4orf/ hRBP4orf)) mouse with a human RBP4 open reading frame in the mouse Rbp4 locus using a Cre-mutant lox recombination system. In Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice, the tissue-specific expression pattern of hRBP4orf was roughly the same as that of mouse Rbp4. ERG and morphological abnormalities observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice were rescued in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice as early as 7 weeks of age. The temporal expression pattern of hRBP4orf in the liver of Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice was similar to that of mouse Rbp4 in Rbp4(+/+)mice. In contrast, hRBP4orf expression levels in eyes were significantly lower at 6 and 12 weeks of age compared with mouse Rbp4 but were restored to the control levels at 24 weeks. The serum hRBP4 levels in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice were approximately 30% of those in Rbp4(+/+) at all ages examined. In accordance with this finding, the plasma retinol levels remained low in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Retinol accumulation in the liver occurred in control and Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice but was higher in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice at 30 weeks of age. Mouse transthyretin expression was not altered in Rbp4(-/-) or Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Taken together, 30% of the serum RBP4 level was sufficient to correct the abnormal phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 30 January 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2016.156.

  6. Thiazolidinedione addition reduces the serum retinol-binding protein 4 in type 2 diabetic patients treated with metformin and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Der; Chang, Yu-Hung; Wang, Chiao-Ling; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Li, Tzu-Hui; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2008-06-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been found to induce insulin resistance and to be increased in type 2 diabetes. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) can improve insulin sensitivity through the activation of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) and have been suggested as an adjunct to metformin (MF) and sulfonylurea (SU) in type 2 diabetes in a consensus statement from the ADA and EASD. Therefore, we investigated whether TZD could affect serum RBP4 level in type 2 diabetes already treated with MF and/or SU. Eighty-one type 2 diabetic patients were divided into 2 groups: (1) TZD group (n = 55): Pioglitazone 30 mg/day was given as an add-on medication; (2) SU group (n = 26): Gliclazide MR 30-120 mg or glimepiride 2-8 mg/day was prescribed. The average period of study was 97.1 days. Serum RBP4 and adiponectin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The addition of pioglitazone (TZD group) markedly decreased homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = 0.021) compared with the SU group (P = 0.688). The change of RBP4 in the TZD group (-3.87 +/- 11.27 microg/mL) significantly differed from that in the SU group (2.52 +/- 8.24 microg/mL, P < 0.012). The increase of adiponectin in the TZD group (11.49 +/- 7.85 microg/mL) was apparently higher than that in the SU group (1.54 +/- 5.62 microg/mL, P < 0.001). Despite the change of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) did not differ (-0.77 +/- 1.3 vs -0.50 +/- 1.7, P = 0.446), the addition of pioglitazone could significantly lower serum RBP4 and HOMA-IR values, whereas an increased dosage of sulfonylurea agents did not alter HOMA-IR, RBP4, or adiponectin in type 2 diabetic patients who had been treated with metformin and/or sulfonylurea.

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin, retinol binding protein and keratin 10 alterations in patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Sadegh; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sepehrimanesh, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that appears on the skin. Although psoriasis is clinically and histologically well characterized, its pathogenesis is unknown in detail. The aims of this study were to evaluate the proteome of psoriatic patients' sera and to compare them with those of normal healthy human to find valuable biomarkers. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, twenty cases of white patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 10 males and 10 females and sixteen healthy controls, 8 males and 8 females were enrolled in the study. The serum protein expression patterns obtained after depletion of albumin were compared by using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to MALDI/TOF-TOF to identify disease associated proteins. Results: Differential expression of nine protein spots representing four unique proteins including alpha-1 antitrypsin, retinol binding protein, keratin 10 and an unknown protein (with pI 6.47 and molecular weight of 19941 Da), between psoriatic and healthy human serum were found. Furthermore, expression of four new alpha-1 antitrypsin isoforms with different molecular weight and isoelectric point were observed in psoriatic serums in this research for the first time. Conclusion: A unique proteomic profiling with abnormal expression of alpha-1 antitrypsin and presence of keratin 10 in sera of psoriasis patients were observed that may constitute new and useful findings of psoriasis and offer a clue to a better understanding of the inflammatory pathway. PMID:25691940

  8. Comparative Analysis of Glycosylated and Nonglycosylated Filarial Homologues of the 20-Kilodalton Retinol Binding Protein from Onchocerca volvulus (Ov20)

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalan, Niroshini; Cordeiro, N. J. V.; Kläger, Sabine L.; Bradley, Janette E.; Allen, Judith E.

    1999-01-01

    Ov20 is a structurally novel 20-kDa retinol binding protein secreted by Onchocerca volvulus. Immunological and biological investigation of this protein has been hampered by the inability to maintain O. volvulus in a laboratory setting. In an effort to find a system more amenable to laboratory investigation, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed cDNA encoding homologues of Ov20 from two closely related filarial species, Brugia malayi (Bm20) and Acanthocheilonema viteae (Av20). Sequence comparisons have highlighted differences in glycosylation of the homologues. We present here an analysis of mouse immune responses to Ov20, Bm20, and Av20. The results suggest a strong genetic restriction in response to native Bm20 that is overcome when recombinant, nonnative material is used. Reactivity of human filarial sera to the three recombinant proteins confirmed previous specificity studies with Ov20 but highlighted important differences in the reactivity patterns of the O. volvulus and B. malayi homologues that may be due to differences in glycosylation patterns. Ov20 is a dominant antigen in infected individuals, while Bm20 is not. The availability of the B. malayi homologue enabled us to use defined murine reagents and inbred strains for genetic analysis of responsiveness in a way that is not possible for Ov20. However, the close sequence similarity between Ov20 and Av20 suggests that the A. viteae model may be more suited to the investigation of the biological functions of Ov20. PMID:10569745

  9. Effects of nutritional and hormonal factors on the metabolism of retinol-binding protein by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.L.; Goodman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to explore hormonal and nutritional factors that might be involved in the regulation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis and secretion by the liver. The studies employed primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats. When cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium alone, a high rate of RBP secretion was observed initially, which declined and became quite low by 24 hr. Supplementing the medium with amino acids maintained RBP and albumin secretion at moderate (but less than initial) rates for at least 3 days. Further addition of dexamethasone maintained the production and secretion rates of RBP, transthyretin, and albumin close to the initial rates for up to 3-5 days in culture as measured by radioimmunoassay. Hormonally treated hepatocytes produced and secreted RBP, transthyretin, and albumin at both absolute and relative rates similar to physiological values, as estimated from rates reported by others from studies in vivo and with perfused livers. Glucagon addition partially maintained the secretion rates of these 3 proteins, but less effectively than did dexamethasone. A number of other hormones, added singly or in combination, did not affect RBP production or secretion. Addition of retinol to the cultured normal hepatocytes was without effect upon RBP secretion. These studies show that supplementing the culture medium of hepatocytes with amino acids and dexamethasone maintains RBP production and secretion for several days. In normal hepatocytes, with ample supply of retinol available within the cell, addition of exogenous retinol does not appear to influence RBP metabolism or secretion by the cells.

  10. Ontogenic expression pattern and genetic polymorphisms of the retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) gene in Erlang mountainous chickens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua-Dong; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Chen, Shi-Yi; Li, Di-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing

    2013-09-10

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the only circulatory transport protein for vitamin A. Based on the essential role of vitamin A in chicken reproduction, we measured RBP4 mRNA abundance in Erlang mountainous chickens. We also identified and analyzed the gene polymorphism and its effect on reproduction traits among 349 chickens. The expression of RBP4 mRNA showed specific developmental changes and striking differences among tissues. The mRNA abundance was greatest (P<0.05) in the liver, intermediate in the ovary, kidney, small intestine, oviduct and heart, and lowest in the hypothalamus and pituitary, as compared to all other tissues (P<0.05). We detected one single nucleotide polymorphism (g.19942455C>G) in intron 2 of the RBP4 gene. Three genotypes (CC, CG and GG) were identified, with a significant effect of genotype on the age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), total eggs at 300 days (TE300), highest continuous laying days (HCLD) and average laying interval (ALI). The GG genotype, where chickens display earlier AFE, more TE300, longer HCLD and shorter ALI, would be genetically advantageous and its selection may improve reproduction traits. These results suggested that the RBP4 gene might play an important role in reproduction traits in chickens.

  11. Bovine hepatic and adipose retinol-binding protein gene expression and relationship with tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Rezamand, P; Watts, J S; Hunt, K M; Bradford, B J; Mamedova, L K; Morey, S D

    2012-12-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is the main transport system for retinol in circulation, is a relatively small protein with one binding site for retinol in the all-trans form, and is bound to transthyretin. The objectives of this study were to characterize the temporal pattern of bovine hepatic mRNA expression of RBP during the periparturient period and to determine if a relationship exists between the expression of RBP and that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in dairy cows. In experiment 1, we assessed hepatic mRNA expression of RBP during the periparturient period. Liver tissues were sampled from periparturient dairy cows (n=9) at -21, -4, +1, +7, and +21 relative to parturition and frozen in liquid N(2). Total RNA was extracted from each tissue sample and cDNA was generated. Gene expressions of RBP and β-actin (as a housekeeping gene) were measured as relative quantity using reverse transcription-PCR. Data were analyzed using cycle threshold values, adjusted to β-actin, and significance was determined at P<0.05. Serum samples (-21, -4, +1, +7, and +21 relative to parturition) were analyzed for retinol concentration using a standard HPLC-based method. Cows had variable expression of hepatic RBP and serum retinol over the transition period, with a decline near parturition and a rebound toward prepartum levels later in lactation. In experiment 2, liver and visceral (intestinal) adipose tissues were sampled from dairy cows (n=28) at slaughter. Expression of RBP and TNF-α was detected in all samples and variations among cows were highly significant for both genes. Across tissues, expression of RBP was positively correlated with that of TNF-α (r=0.60). Within adipose tissue, expression of RBP and TNF-α was weakly correlated (r=0.23), whereas in hepatic tissue, expression was strongly correlated (r=0.62). In experiment 3, late-lactation dairy Holstein cows were blocked by parity and feed intake, and randomly assigned to control, recombinant bovine (rb

  12. The Relationship of Retinol Binding Protein 4 to Changes in Insulin Resistance and Cardiometabolic Risk in Overweight Black Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Timothy E; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Daniels, Stephen R.; Goodman, Eric R.; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess, among overweight non-Hispanic black adolescents the relationship of changes in plasma retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) over three years to changes in insulin resistance (IR) and four associated cardiometabolic risks. Design Nested, retrospective study of 51 overweight, post-pubertal non-Hispanic black participants in the Princeton School District Study. Participants were in the top (worsening IR) or bottom (improved IR) quartile for 3-year change in IR. RBP4 was measured by quantitative western blot using frozen plasma. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, adiposity (baseline and change). Three measures of adiposity were assessed (waist circumference, BMI, weight) in separate regression models. Results RBP4 increased in one-third (N=17). In logistic regression analyses, increased RBP4 was associated with significantly higher odds of worsening as opposed to improved IR independent of age, gender, or adiposity. Odds ratios were 5.6 (weight, p=0.024), 6.0 (BMI, p=0.025) and 7.4 (waist circumference, p=0.015). Initial RBP4 (β=0.81,p=0.005) and Δ RBP4 (β=0.56, p=0.046) also predicted Δ triglycerides, but not Δ HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol or fibrinogen. Conclusion This retrospective cohort study provides evidence that RBP4 may be a mechanism through which obesity influences insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia in overweight post-pubertal black youth and suggests utility of RBP4 as a biomarker of risk. PMID:18783798

  13. Retinol-binding protein 7 is an endothelium-specific PPARγ cofactor mediating an antioxidant response through adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunyan; Keen, Henry L.; Lu, Ko-Ting; Liu, Xuebo; Davis, Deborah R.; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita C.; Vogel, Silke; Quelle, Frederick W.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2017-01-01

    Impaired PPARγ activity in endothelial cells causes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction which causes a predisposition to hypertension, but the identity of key PPARγ target genes that protect the endothelium remain unclear. Retinol-binding protein 7 (RBP7) is a PPARγ target gene that is essentially endothelium specific. Whereas RBP7-deficient mice exhibit normal endothelial function at baseline, they exhibit severe endothelial dysfunction in response to cardiovascular stressors, including high-fat diet and subpressor angiotensin II. Endothelial dysfunction was not due to differences in weight gain, impaired glucose homeostasis, or hepatosteatosis, but occurred through an oxidative stress–dependent mechanism which can be rescued by scavengers of superoxide. RNA sequencing revealed that RBP7 was required to mediate induction of a subset of PPARγ target genes by rosiglitazone in the endothelium including adiponectin. Adiponectin was selectively induced in the endothelium of control mice by high-fat diet and rosiglitazone, whereas RBP7 deficiency abolished this induction. Adiponectin inhibition caused endothelial dysfunction in control vessels, whereas adiponectin treatment of RBP7-deficient vessels improved endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced oxidative stress. We conclude that RBP7 is required to mediate the protective effects of PPARγ in the endothelium through adiponectin, and RBP7 is an endothelium-specific PPARγ target and regulator of PPARγ activity. PMID:28352663

  14. Plasmatic retinol-binding protein 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein as biomarkers to differentiate ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Llombart, Víctor; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Bustamante, Alejandro; Giralt, Dolors; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Muchada, Marian; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    A rapid differentiation of acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is essential for an adequate treatment and to promote a better outcome. Our aim was to identify new plasma biomarkers to differentiate stroke subtypes and to combine their diagnostic ability with other biomarkers already described for this clinical indication. Plasma samples of ischemic stroke patients (36) and ICH patients (10) were screened using a 177 antibodies library, and 11 showed different concentrations among stroke subtypes (p < 0.05), mainly chemokines, growth factors and angiogenic factors. Five proteins were selected for replication in 16 ischemic stroke patients and 16 ICH patients, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RPB4), apolipoprotein B100 and pigment epithelial-derived factor were replicated (p < 0.05). These proteins, together with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and receptor for advanced glycation end product, were tested in 38 ischemic stroke and 28 ICH samples. Finally, RBP4 >61 μg/mL and GFAP <0.07 ng/mL showed a specificity of 100% for both subtypes. Moreover, after multivariate logistic regression analysis, RBP4 >48.75 μg/mL (ORadj : 6.09 (1.3-28.57), p = 0.02) and GFAP <0.07 ng/mL (ORadj : 0.03 (0.003-0.31), p = 0.003) resulted in independent predictors of stroke subtype, improving discrimination by 29% (p < 0.0001). Both biomarkers might be useful as diagnostic biomarkers to differentiate ischemic stroke and ICH. A rapid differentiation of ischemic stroke from intracerebral hemorrhage is essential to provide the appropriate treatment. We describe the discovery and subsequent replications of RBP4 and its combination with circulating GFAP as plasmatic biomarkers for hyperacute stroke subtype differentiation. The combination of these biomarkers and others might aid to speed up the discrimination of both stroke subtypes improving the outcome of patients.

  15. Antenatal retinoic acid administration increases trophoblastic retinol-binding protein dependent retinol transport in the nitrofen model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Kutasy, Balazs; Friedmacher, Florian; Pes, Lara; Coyle, David; Doi, Takashi; Paradisi, Francesca; Puri, Prem

    2016-04-01

    Low pulmonary retinol levels and disrupted retinoid signaling pathway (RSP) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and associated pulmonary hypoplasia (PH). It has been demonstrated that nitrofen disturbs the main retinol-binding protein (RBP)-dependent trophoblastic retinol transport. Several studies have demonstrated that prenatal treatment with retinoic acid (RA) can reverse PH in the nitrofen-induced CDH model. We hypothesized that maternal administration of RA can increase trophoblastic RBP-dependent retinol transport in a nitrofen model of CDH. Pregnant rats were treated with nitrofen or vehicle on gestational day 9 (D9) and sacrificed on D21. RA was given i.p. on D18, D19, and D20. Retinol and RA levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate trophoblastic expression of RBP. Expression levels of the primary RSP genes were determined using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Markedly increased trophoblastic RBP immunoreactivity was observed in CDH+RA compared to CDH. Significantly increased serum and pulmonary retinol and RA levels were detected in CDH+RA compared to CDH. Pulmonary expression of RSP genes and proteins were increased in CDH+RA compared to CDH. Increased trophoblastic RBP expression and retinol transport after antenatal administration of RA suggest that retinol-triggered RSP activation may attenuate CDH-associated PH by elevating serum and pulmonary retinol levels.

  16. Photoperiodic regulation of cellular retinol binding protein, CRBP1 [corrected] and nestin in tanycytes of the third ventricle ependymal layer of the Siberian hamster.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Perry; Ivanova, Elena; Graham, E Scott; Ross, Alexander W; Wilson, Dana; Plé, Helene; Mercer, Julian G; Ebling, Francis J; Schuhler, Sandrine; Dupré, Sandrine M; Loudon, Andrew; Morgan, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Tanycytes in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle act both as a barrier and a communication gateway between the cerebrospinal fluid, brain and portal blood supply to the pituitary gland. However, the range, importance and mechanisms involved in the function of tanycytes remain to be explored. In this study, we have utilized a photoperiodic animal to examine the expression of three unrelated gene sequences in relation to photoperiod-induced changes in seasonal physiology and behaviour. We demonstrate that cellular retinol binding protein [corrected] (CRBP1), a retinoic acid transport protein, GPR50, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor and nestin, an intermediate filament protein, are down-regulated in short-day photoperiods. The distribution of the three sequences is very similar, with expression located in cells with tanycyte morphology in the region of the ependymal layer where tanycytes are located. Furthermore, CRBP1 expression in the ependymal layer is shown to be independent of a circadian clock and altered testosterone levels associated with testicular regression in short photo-period. Pinealectomy of Siberian hamsters demonstrates CRBP1 expression is likely to be dependent on melatonin output from the pineal gland. This provides evidence that tanycytes are seasonally responsive cells and are likely to be an important part of the mechanism to facilitate seasonal physiology and behaviour in the Siberian hamster.

  17. Evidence for a specific cell membrane retinol-binding protein transport mechanism in a human keratinocyte line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janet; Vieira, Amandio

    2006-04-01

    The epidermis is highly sensitive to retinoids, and vitamin A (retinol) is a critical factor in the regulation of skin cell differentiation and proliferation. Despite extensive knowledge of retinoid-mediated gene transcription effects on epidermal cells and evidence for retinoid-mediated suppression of carcinogenesis in skin, basic transport events, especially cellular uptake, of this vitamin remain poorly understood and controversial. Herein, evidence is presented for receptor-mediated uptake of retinol-binding protein, RBP, the specific circulatory vitamin A carrier, in the A431 human epidermal cell line. Cellular RBP uptake was significantly inhibited by anti-RBP IgG. Addition of transthyretin (TTR), a circulatory protein that can interact with RBP, to the internalization assay also significantly reduced RBP uptake to 49.4+/-4.6% (+/- SEM) of control values (p<0.01). RBP uptake was impaired by sucrose, a known inhibitor of early endocytosis, but not significantly affected by a disruptor of later trafficking events, chlorpromazine. Binding analysis indicated saturable RBP binding to the cell surface and a total of about 94,000 binding sites/cell. Based on dissociation constants, two RBP binding sites were detected with a 50-fold affinity difference: 0.7 and 35.0 nM, with 12,000 and 82,000 receptors/cell, respectively. These results indicate that high affinity RBP receptors capable of internalizing RBP independently of TTR exist in these malignant keratinocytes, and that TTR influences binding of RBP to its putative receptor(s). Overall, the data establish membrane transport parameters for RBP, and provide a basis for examining modulation of vitamin A endocytosis that may accompany changes in proliferation or differentiation state of epidermal cells.

  18. Sitagliptin downregulates retinol-binding protein 4 and upregulates glucose transporter type 4 expression in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honglin; Xu, Min; Qi, Renjuan; Wang, Youmin; Wang, Changjiang; Liu, Jiongjiong; Luo, Li; Xia, Li; Fang, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sitagliptin on metabolic parameters as well as the expression levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of low-dose streptozotocin. Rats were divided into three groups: normal control group, diabetes group, and diabetes + sitagliptin group. Body weight, glycemic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting insulin (FINS) and serum RBP4 levels were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of therapy. Western blotting was used to detect the tissue RBP4 and GLUT4 expression levels. After treatment for 6 weeks, the diabetes + sitagliptin group displayed significantly improve levels of blood sugar, blood grease, and insulin sensitizing functions (P < 0.05) than the diabetes group. Sitagliptin markedly down regulated RBP4 expression levels and up-regulated GLUT4 expression levels in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. The results indicate that sitagliptin can modulate the RBP4-GLUT4 system in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Modulation of the RBP4-GLUT4 system may be one of the mechanisms by which sitagliptin ameliorates the symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Fenretinide derivatives act as disrupters of interactions of serum retinol binding protein (sRBP) with transthyretin and the sRBP receptor.

    PubMed

    Campos-Sandoval, José Angel; Redondo, Clara; Kinsella, Gemma K; Pal, Akos; Jones, Geraint; Eyre, Gwen S; Hirst, Simon C; Findlay, John B C

    2011-07-14

    Serum retinol binding protein (sRBP) is released from the liver as a complex with transthyretin (TTR), a process under the control of dietary retinol. Elevated levels of sRBP may be involved in inhibiting cellular responses to insulin and in generating first insulin resistance and then type 2 diabetes, offering a new target for therapeutic attack for these conditions. A series of retinoid analogues were synthesized and examined for their binding to sRBP and their ability to disrupt the sRBP-TTR and sRBP-sRBP receptor interactions. A number inhibit the sRBP-TTR and sRBP-sRBP receptor interactions as well as or better than Fenretinide (FEN), presenting a potential novel dual mechanism of action and perhaps offering a new therapeutic intervention against type 2 diabetes and its development. Shortening the chain length of the FEN derivative substantially abolished binding to sRBP, indicating that the strength of the interaction lies in the polyene chain region. Differences in potency against the sRBP-TTR and sRBP-sRBP receptor interactions suggest variant effects of the compounds on the two loops of sRBP guarding the entrance of the binding pocket that are responsible for these two protein-protein interactions.

  20. The STRA6 receptor is essential for retinol-binding protein-induced insulin resistance but not for maintaining vitamin A homeostasis in tissues other than the eye.

    PubMed

    Berry, Daniel C; Jacobs, Hugues; Marwarha, Gurdeep; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; O'Byrne, Sheila M; DeSantis, David; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Feret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Blaner, William S; Croniger, Colleen M; Mark, Manuel; Noy, Noa; Ghyselinck, Norbert B

    2013-08-23

    The plasma membrane protein STRA6 is thought to mediate uptake of retinol from its blood carrier retinol-binding protein (RBP) into cells and to function as a surface receptor that, upon binding of holo-RBP, activates a JAK/STAT cascade. It was suggested that STRA6 signaling underlies insulin resistance induced by elevated serum levels of RBP in obese animals. To investigate these activities in vivo, we generated and analyzed Stra6-null mice. We show that the contribution of STRA6 to retinol uptake by tissues in vivo is small and that, with the exception of the eye, ablation of Stra6 has only a modest effect on retinoid homeostasis and does not impair physiological functions that critically depend on retinoic acid in the embryo or in the adult. However, ablation of Stra6 effectively protects mice from RBP-induced suppression of insulin signaling. Thus one biological function of STRA6 in tissues other than the eye appears to be the coupling of circulating holo-RBP levels to cell signaling, in turn regulating key processes such as insulin response.

  1. Effect of rosiglitazone on visfatin and retinol-binding protein-4 plasma concentrations in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Haider, D G; Schindler, K; Mittermayer, F; Müller, M; Nowotny, P; Rieger, A; Luger, A; Ludvik, B; Wolzt, M

    2007-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZD) may improve insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and HIV. The novel adipocytokines visfatin and retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4) have been proposed to influence the development of impaired glucose tolerance. The impact of TZD on these cytokines is yet unknown. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study, 37 lean HIV-positive subjects aged 19-50 years were treated with 8 mg/day rosiglitazone (n=20) or placebo (n=17) for 6 months. Insulin sensitivity was estimated from the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Fasting visfatin, RBP-4, leptin, and adiponectin plasma concentrations were analyzed by immunoassays. Rosiglitazone had no effect on impaired insulin sensitivity, but increased median plasma visfatin from 6.2 ng/ml (95% CI: 5.9; 6.5) to 13.7 ng/ml (12.6; 19.1) (P<0.001) and adiponectin from 3.2 ng/ml (2.2; 4.0) to 4.0 ng/ml (3.3; 8.5; P<0.001). RBP-4 was lowered from 21.0 ng/ml (19.6; 23.1) to 16.3 ng/ml (15.2; 17.0; P<0.001), and leptin concentrations were unchanged. Adipocytokine concentrations were stable in subjects receiving placebo, where a deterioration in insulin sensitivity was detectable (P<0.05). Changes in visfatin and RBP-4 were correlated in subjects receiving rosiglitazone (r=-0.64, P<0.01) but not placebo (r=0.12, P=0.15). TZD treatment affects circulating adipocytokine concentrations in subjects with HIV. Reductions in RBP-4 and increases in visfatin may contribute to the pharmacodynamic action of TZD on glucose homeostasis. Quantification of adipocytokines might be useful to assess TZD treatment effectiveness in insulin-resistant subjects with HIV.

  2. Vitamin A transport and the transmembrane pore in the cell-surface receptor for plasma retinol binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Kawaguchi, Riki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Kassai, Miki; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) play diverse and crucial functions from embryogenesis to adulthood and are used as therapeutic agents in human medicine for eye and skin diseases, infections and cancer. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principal and specific vitamin A carrier in the blood and binds vitamin A at 1:1 ratio. STRA6 is the high-affinity membrane receptor for RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. STRA6 null mice have severely depleted vitamin A reserves for vision and consequently have vision loss, even under vitamin A sufficient conditions. STRA6 null humans have a wide range of severe pathological phenotypes in many organs including the eye, brain, heart and lung. Known membrane transport mechanisms involve transmembrane pores that regulate the transport of the substrate (e.g., the gating of ion channels). STRA6 represents a new type of membrane receptor. How this receptor interacts with its transport substrate vitamin A and the functions of its nine transmembrane domains are still completely unknown. These questions are critical to understanding the molecular basis of STRA6's activities and its regulation. We employ acute chemical modification to introduce chemical side chains to STRA6 in a site-specific manner. We found that modifications with specific chemicals at specific positions in or near the transmembrane domains of this receptor can almost completely suppress its vitamin A transport activity. These experiments provide the first evidence for the existence of a transmembrane pore, analogous to the pore of ion channels, for this new type of cell-surface receptor.

  3. Circulating retinol-binding protein-4, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and insulin disposition index in obese and nonobese subjects.

    PubMed

    Broch, Montserrat; Vendrell, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Richart, Cristóbal; Fernández-Real, José-Manuel

    2007-07-01

    Recent investigations disclosed an upregulation of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) in the adipose tissue of several insulin-resistant mouse models and increased serum RBP4 concentration in subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes in association with insulin resistance. There is some experimental evidence that RBP4 also could been linked to insulin secretion. We aimed to evaluate insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, insulin disposition index (minimal model analysis), and circulating RBP4 (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in nondiabetic men with a wide range of obesity (n = 107). Serum RBP4 concentration was nonsignificantly different among lean, overweight, and obese subjects. Circulating RBP4 was not associated with age, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, or metabolic parameters, including insulin sensitivity (r = -0.03, P = 0.6). On the contrary, circulating RBP4 was negatively associated with insulin secretion, especially in obese subjects (r = -0.48, P = 0.007), in whom RBP4 also was linked to insulin disposition index (r = -0.44, P = 0.01). On multiple regression analyses to predict insulin secretion (acute insulin response [AIR(g)]), insulin sensitivity was the only factor that contributed to 17% of AIR(g) variance in nonobese subjects. In obese subjects, however, RBP4 emerged as an independent factor that contributed independently to AIR(g) variance (23%). Our results suggest that oversecretion of RBP4 may negatively affect beta-cell function directly or by preventing the binding of transthyretin to its receptor. These mechanisms could be behind the association between increased circulating RBP4 and type 2 diabetes. RBP4 could be one signal from insulin-resistant tissues that impacts on beta-cell secretion.

  4. Sitagliptin down-regulates retinol-binding protein 4 and reduces insulin resistance in gestational diabetes mellitus: a randomized and double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Zhendong; Ning, Hui; Sun, Hong; Ji, Xianghong

    2017-02-17

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition that affects increasing number of pregnant women worldwide. Sitagliptin was reported to alleviate symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus by reducing serum levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP-4). We investigated the effectiveness of sitagliptin on insulin sensitivity parameters in GDM patients. Pregnant GDM women in the 2nd trimester were recruited for this study. Participants were then assigned randomly to sitagliptin treatment group or placebo treatment group, and administered sitagliptin or placebo daily for 16 weeks. Glucose and insulin profiles, as well as serum RBP-4 level, were measured at both baseline and end of the study. After 16 weeks of treatment, participants in the STL group exhibited significantly improved levels of fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin, homeostasis model of assessment of β cell function (HOMA-β) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), compared with those in the placebo group. Serum levels of RBP-4 were also markedly decreased in the sitagliptin treatment group, and more importantly it was positively correlated with improved insulin resistance parameters. Our study supports a potentially promising role of sitagliptin in improving insulin resistance by decreasing RBP-4 in GDM-affected women.

  5. High fat diet induced insulin resistance and elevated retinol binding protein 4 in female rats; treatment and protection with Berberis vulgaris extract and vitamin A.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mohamed Mohammed; Ghareeb, Doaa Ahmad; Talat, Heba Allah; Sarhan, Eman Mohammed

    2013-11-01

    This research was conducted to investigate two main aims; the first aim was to find if there is a relationship between insulin resistance (IR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4). The second aim was to use berberis vulgaris extract and vitamin A as protective and/or curative agents against insulin resistance. IR was developed by feeding the female rats a high fat diet (HFD) for six weeks then treating or protecting them with b. vulgaris extract (0.2 g/Kg body weight) or vitamin A (12.8μg/Kg/day) for two weeks. HFD intake elevated insulin level and RBP4 expression that associated with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Co-administration of vitamin A and B. vulgaris extracts reduced blood glucose level, insulin, body weight and RBP4 expression before, during and after HFD. Furthermore, vitamin A reduced the blood glucose, triglycerides (TG) and cholesterol levels. IR syndrome associated with the RBP 4 alteration that gives high indication about the role of RBP4 expression in the IR progression and development. Furthermore, the treatment with vitamin A and/or b. vulgaris alleviated the IR syndrome through the action on RBP4 and Insulin secretion. On the other hand, vitamin A must be avoided for the predisposed IR and prediabetic patients.

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of Aerobic and Intense Exercise on the Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Marker Adipokines, Adiponectin and Retinol Binding Protein-4

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Amy; Cobbold, Christian

    2014-01-01

    With a more sedentary population comes growing rates of obesity and increased type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk. Exercise generally induces positive changes in traditional T2DM risk markers such as lipids, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity; however alterations in concentrations of many circulating cytokines and their respective receptors are also becoming apparent. These cytokines may be early-response health risk factors otherwise overlooked in traditional T2DM risk marker analysis. Plasma levels of two adipocyte-originating cytokines, adiponectin and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4), alter following exercise. Adiponectin has anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, and anti-insulin resistance roles and its secretion increases with physical activity, whilst elevated RBP-4 leads to increased insulin resistance, and secretion decreases with increasing physical activity; thus these plasma adipokine levels alter favourably following exercise. Although current data are limited, they do suggest that the more intense the exercise, the greater the positive effect on plasma RBP-4 levels, whilst lower intensity aerobic exercise may positively improve adiponectin concentrations. Therefore short-duration, high intensity training may provide a time-efficient alternative to the recommended 150 min moderate aerobic exercise per week in providing positive changes in RBP-4 and other traditional T2DM risk markers and due to increased compliance give greater health benefits over the longer term. PMID:26464853

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Nonretinoid Retinol Binding Protein 4 Antagonists for the Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4–/– mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%. PMID:25210858

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  9. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its membrane receptor STRA6 control adipogenesis by regulating cellular retinoid homeostasis and retinoic acid receptor α activity.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Matthias; Tuvia, Neta; Deutschmann, Claudia; Witte, Nicole; Tolkachov, Alexander; Valai, Atijeh; Henze, Andrea; Sander, Leif E; Raila, Jens; Schupp, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Retinoids are vitamin A (retinol) derivatives and complex regulators of adipogenesis by activating specific nuclear receptors, including the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Circulating retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and its membrane receptor STRA6 coordinate cellular retinol uptake. It is unknown whether retinol levels and the activity of RAR and RXR in adipocyte precursors are linked via RBP4/STRA6. Here, we show that STRA6 is expressed in precursor cells and, dictated by the apo- and holo-RBP4 isoforms, mediates bidirectional retinol transport that controls RARα activity and subsequent adipocyte differentiation. Mobilization of retinoid stores in mice by inducing RBP4 secretion from the liver activated RARα signaling in the precursor cell containing the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue. Retinol-loaded holo-RBP4 blocked adipocyte differentiation of cultured precursors by activating RARα. Remarkably, retinol-free apo-RBP4 triggered retinol efflux that reduced cellular retinoids, RARα activity, and target gene expression and enhanced adipogenesis synergistically with ectopic STRA6. Thus, STRA6 in adipocyte precursor cells links nuclear RARα activity to the circulating RBP4 isoforms, whose ratio in obese mice was shifted toward limiting the adipogenic potential of their precursors. This novel cross talk identifies a retinol-dependent metabolic function of RBP4 that may have important implications for the treatment of obesity.

  10. Retinol binding protein and vitamin D associations with serum antibody isotypes, serum influenza virus-specific neutralizing activities and airway cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Jones, B G; Oshansky, C M; Bajracharya, R; Tang, L; Sun, Y; Wong, S S; Webby, R; Thomas, P G; Hurwitz, J L

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A supports the induction of immunoglobulin (Ig)A responses at mucosal surfaces in mice, but much less is known about the influence of vitamins on antibody isotype expression in humans. To address this knowledge gap, we examined 46 residual blood samples from adults and children, some of whom were experiencing influenza virus infections of the respiratory tract. Assays were performed for retinol binding protein (RBP, a surrogate for vitamin A), vitamin D (a related vitamin) and antibody isotypes. Results showed that all but two tested samples exhibited RBP and/or vitamin D insufficiencies or deficiencies. Vitamin D correlated with blood IgM and IgG3, while RBP correlated with IgG4 and IgA. RBP also correlated positively with age and with influenza virus-specific antibody neutralization titres. Individuals with low blood RBP levels exhibited the highest frequencies of over-expressed cytokines and growth factors in nasal wash samples, an indication of inflamed mucosal tissues. While cause-effect relationships were not discerned, results support a hypothesis that vitamins directly influence B cell isotype expression in humans, and by so doing may help protect mucosal surfaces from respiratory viral disease.

  11. Parallel downregulation of retinol-binding protein-4 and adiponectin expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue of non-morbidly obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Broch, Montserrat; Auguet, Maria Teresa; Ramírez, Rafael; Olona, Montserrat; Aguilar, Carmen; Megia, Ana; Alcaide, Maria José; Pastor, Rosa; Martínez, Salomé; Caubet, Enric; Garcia-España, Antonio; Richart, Cristóbal

    2009-07-01

    Adipokines are involved in the etiopathology of obesity-related disorders. Since the role of adipokine retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) in obesity remains uncertain and its relationship with other adipokines and inflammatory markers has not been examined in detail, we investigated the relationships of RBP4 mRNA expression and circulating protein levels with obesity, anthropometric and metabolic variables, as well as with obesity-related inflammatory markers adiponectin and C-reactive protein. One-hundred and twenty-five subjects participated, 36 lean (body mass index (BMI): <25 kg/m(2)) and 89 obese (overweight/obese; BMI: > or =25<40) whose anthropometric and metabolic variables were assessed. mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR in subcutaneous adipose tissue (s.c.-AT) of 46 subjects. There was a tendency for circulating RBP4 levels to positively correlate with waist circumference (beta=0.29, P=0.08; R(2)=0.08), but there was no significant association with the obesity-related parameters analysed. RBP4 and adiponectin mRNA expression levels were similarly downregulated in the s.c.-AT of obese subjects (0.5-fold); however, RBP4 downregulation did not affect its circulating protein levels. The expression of RBP4 and adiponectin was positively correlated even after controlling for confounding factors (beta=0.59, P<0.0001; R(2)=0.40). In our population, RBP4 circulating levels were not significantly correlated with obesity-related parameters, although a tendency to correlate with waist circumference suggests a relationship with insulin resistance and other metabolic disorders. In addition, our results suggest that the production of RBP4 by other tissues such as liver, rather than s.c.-AT, may be involved in regulating RBP4 circulating levels.

  12. Adjusting retinol-binding protein concentrations for inflammation: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

    PubMed

    Larson, Leila M; Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Williams, Anne M; Engle-Stone, Reina; Addo, O Yaw; Suchdev, Parminder S; Wirth, James P; Temple, Victor; Serdula, Mary; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A

    2017-07-01

    Background: The accurate estimation of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is important in planning and implementing interventions. Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is often used in population surveys to measure vitamin A status, but its interpretation is challenging in settings where inflammation is common because RBP concentrations decrease during the acute-phase response.Objectives: We aimed to assess the relation between RBP concentrations and inflammation and malaria in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6-59 mo) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15-49 y) and to investigate adjustment algorithms to account for these effects.Design: Cross-sectional data from 8 surveys for PSC (n = 8803) and 4 surveys for WRA (n = 4191) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis. Several approaches were explored to adjust RBP concentrations in PSC in inflammation and malaria settings as follows: 1) the exclusion of subjects with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations >5 mg/L or α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations >1 g/L, 2) the application of arithmetic correction factors, and 3) the use of a regression correction approach. The impact of adjustment on the estimated prevalence of VAD (defined as <0.7 μmol/L) was examined in PSC.Results: The relation between estimated VAD and CRP and AGP deciles followed a linear pattern in PSC. In women, the correlations between RBP and CRP and AGP were too weak to justify adjustments for inflammation. Depending on the approach used to adjust for inflammation (CRP+AGP), the estimated prevalence of VAD decreased by a median of 11-18 percentage points in PSC compared with unadjusted values. There was no added effect of adjusting for malaria on the estimated VAD after adjusting for CRP and AGP.Conclusions: The use of regression correction (derived from internal data), which accounts for the

  13. Adjusting retinol-binding protein concentrations for inflammation: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Victor; Serdula, Mary; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A

    2017-01-01

    Background: The accurate estimation of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is important in planning and implementing interventions. Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is often used in population surveys to measure vitamin A status, but its interpretation is challenging in settings where inflammation is common because RBP concentrations decrease during the acute-phase response. Objectives: We aimed to assess the relation between RBP concentrations and inflammation and malaria in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) and to investigate adjustment algorithms to account for these effects. Design: Cross-sectional data from 8 surveys for PSC (n = 8803) and 4 surveys for WRA (n = 4191) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis. Several approaches were explored to adjust RBP concentrations in PSC in inflammation and malaria settings as follows: 1) the exclusion of subjects with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations >5 mg/L or α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations >1 g/L, 2) the application of arithmetic correction factors, and 3) the use of a regression correction approach. The impact of adjustment on the estimated prevalence of VAD (defined as <0.7 μmol/L) was examined in PSC. Results: The relation between estimated VAD and CRP and AGP deciles followed a linear pattern in PSC. In women, the correlations between RBP and CRP and AGP were too weak to justify adjustments for inflammation. Depending on the approach used to adjust for inflammation (CRP+AGP), the estimated prevalence of VAD decreased by a median of 11–18 percentage points in PSC compared with unadjusted values. There was no added effect of adjusting for malaria on the estimated VAD after adjusting for CRP and AGP. Conclusions: The use of regression correction (derived from internal data), which

  14. Urinary Retinol-Binding Protein: Relationship to Renal Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Maria Alice Muniz; Moreira, Silvia Regina; Gomez, Luz; Goulart, Alessandra; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela; Titan, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The role of urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) as a biomarker of CKD in proximal tubular diseases, glomerulopathies and in transplantation is well established. However, whether urinary RBP is also a biomarker of renal damage and CKD progression in general CKD is not known. In this study, we evaluated the association of urinary RBP with renal function and cardiovascular risk factors in the baseline data of the Progredir Study, a CKD cohort in Sao Paulo, Brazil, comprising 454 participants with stages 3 and 4 CKD. In univariate analysis, urinary RBP was inversely related to estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD-EPI eGFR) and several cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustments, however, only CKD-EPI eGFR, albuminuria, systolic blood pressure, anemia, acidosis, and left atrium diameter remained significantly related to urinary RBP. The inverse relationship of eGFR to urinary RBP (β-0.02 ± 95CI -0.02; -0.01, p<0.0001 for adjusted model) remained in all strata of albuminuria, even after adjustments: in normoalbuminuria (β-0.008 ± 95CI (-0.02; -0.001, p = 0.03), in microalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.02, p<0,0001) and in macroalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.01, p<0,0001). Lastly, urinary RBP was able to significantly increase the accuracy of a logistic regression model (adjusted for sex, age, SBP, diabetes and albuminuria) in diagnosing eGFR<35 ml/min/1.73m2 (AUC 0,77, 95%CI 0,72–0,81 versus AUC 0,71, 95%CI 0,65–0,75, respectively; p = 0,05). Our results suggest that urinary RBP is significantly associated to renal function in CKD in general, a finding that expands the interest in this biomarker beyond the context of proximal tubulopathies, glomerulopathies or transplantation. Urinary RBP should be further explored as a predictive marker of CKD progression. PMID:27655369

  15. Retinol to Retinol-Binding Protein (RBP) is Low in Obese Adults due to Elevated apo-RBP

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jordan P.; Furr, Harold C.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated serum retinol-binding protein (RBP) concentration has been associated with obesity and insulin resistance, but accompanying retinol values have not been reported. Assessment of retinol is required to discriminate between apo-RBP, which may act as an adipokine, and holo-RBP, which transports vitamin A. The relations between serum RBP, retinol, retinyl esters, BMI, and measures of insulin resistance were determined in obese adults. Fasting blood (≥8 h) was collected from obese men and women (n = 76) and blood chemistries were obtained. Retinol and retinyl esters were quantified by HPLC and RBP by ELISA. RBP and retinol were determined in age and sex-matched, nonobese individuals (n = 41) for comparison. Serum apo-RBP was two-fold higher in obese (0.90 ± 0.62 µM) than nonobese subjects (0.44 ± 0.56 µM) (P < 0.001). The retinol to RBP ratio (retinol:RBP) was significantly lower in obese (0.73 ± 0.13) than nonobese subjects (0.90 ± 0.22) (P < 0.001) and RBP was strongly associated with retinol in both groups (r = 0.71 and 0.90, respectively, P < 0.0001). In obese subjects, RBP was associated with insulin (r = 0.26, P < 0.05), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (r = 0.29, P < 0.05), and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (r = −0.27, P < 0.05). RBP was associated with BMI only when obese and nonobese subjects were combined (r = 0.25, P < 0.01). Elevated serum RBP, derived in part from apo-RBP, was more strongly associated with retinol than with BMI or measures of insulin resistance in obese adults. Investigations into the role of RBP in obesity and insulin resistance should include retinol to facilitate the measurement of apo-RBP and retinol:RBP. When evaluating the therapeutic potential of lowering serum RBP, consideration of the consequences on vitamin A metabolism is paramount. PMID:18641048

  16. Retinol binding protein 4 and retinol in steatotic and nonsteatotic rat livers in the setting of partial hepatectomy under ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Elias-Miró, Maria; Massip-Salcedo, Marta; Raila, Jens; Schweigert, Florian; Mendes-Braz, Mariana; Ramalho, Fernando; Jiménez-Castro, Mónica B; Casillas-Ramírez, Araní; Bermudo, Raquel; Rimola, Antoni; Rodes, Juan; Peralta, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Steatotic livers show increased hepatic damage and impaired regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) under ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which is commonly applied in clinical practice to reduce bleeding. The known function of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is to transport retinol in the circulation. We examined whether modulating RBP4 and/or retinol could protect steatotic and nonsteatotic livers in the setting of PH under I/R. Steatotic and nonsteatotic livers from Zucker rats were subjected to PH (70%) with 60 minutes of ischemia. RBP4 and retinol levels were measured and altered pharmacologically, and their effects on hepatic damage and regeneration were studied after reperfusion. Decreased RBP4 levels were observed in both liver types, whereas retinol levels were reduced only in steatotic livers. RBP4 administration exacerbated the negative consequences of liver surgery with respect to damage and liver regeneration in both liver types. RBP4 affected the mobilization of retinol from steatotic livers, and this revealed actions of RBP4 independent of simple retinol transport. The injurious effects of RBP4 were not due to changes in retinol levels. Treatment with retinol was effective only for steatotic livers. Indeed, retinol increased hepatic injury and impaired liver regeneration in nonsteatotic livers. In steatotic livers, retinol reduced damage and improved regeneration after surgery. These benefits of retinol were associated with a reduced accumulation of hepatocellular fat. Thus, strategies based on modulating RBP4 could be ineffective and possibly even harmful in both liver types in the setting of PH under I/R. In terms of clinical applications, a retinol pretreatment might open new avenues for liver surgery that specifically benefit the steatotic liver.

  17. Induction of insulin resistance by the adipokines resistin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and retinol binding protein 4 in human megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Anja J.; Gitz, Eelo; Koekman, Cornelis A.; Visseren, Frank L.; van Haeften, Timon W.; Akkerman, Jan Willem N.

    2012-01-01

    Background In normal platelets, insulin inhibits agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization by raising cyclic AMP. Platelet from patients with type 2 diabetes are resistant to insulin and show increased Ca2+ mobilization, aggregation and procoagulant activity. We searched for the cause of this insulin resistance. Design and Methods Platelets, the megakaryocytic cell line CHRF-288-11 and primary megakaryocytes were incubated with adipokines and with plasma from individuals with a disturbed adipokine profile. Thrombin-induced Ca2+ mobilization and signaling through the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 were measured. Abnormalities induced by adipokines were compared with abnormalities found in platelets from patients with type 2 diabetes. Results Resistin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and retinol binding protein 4 left platelets unchanged but induced insulin resistance in CHRF-288-11 cells. Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and visfatin had no effect. These results were confirmed in primary megakaryocytes. Contact with adipokines for 2 hours disturbed insulin receptor substrate 1 Ser307-phosphorylation, while contact for 72 hours caused insulin receptor substrate 1 degradation. Plasma with a disturbed adipokine profile also made CHRF-288-11 cells insulin-resistant. Platelets from patients with type 2 diabetes showed decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 expression. Conclusions Adipokines resistin, leptin, plasminogen activator-1 and retinol binding protein 4 disturb insulin receptor substrate 1 activity and expression in megakaryocytes. This might be a cause of the insulin resistance observed in platelets from patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22491740

  18. The association of carotid intima media thickness with retinol binding protein-4 and total and high molecular weight adiponectin in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Masoumeh; Heshmat, Ramin; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Sharifi, Farshad; Badamchizadeh, Zohreh; Alatab, Sudabeh; Omidfar, Kobra; Fakhrzadeh, Hossein; Larijani, Bagher

    2012-08-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) is associated with serum level of retinol- binding protein-4 (RBP4) and total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) without clinical symptom of atherosclerotic disease. 101 type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 53.63 ± 8.42 years) and 42 body mass index (BMI) matched control (mean age 50.1 ± 8.4) were recruited. The CIMT was assessed by using B-mode ultrasonography, while serum levels of RBP4 and total and HMW adiponectin were measured by using enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Linear regression analysis was performed with CIMT as dependent variable and adipokines and cardio metabolic risk factors as independent variables. The CIMT was higher in diabetic group compared to control group (p <0.05). The mean concentration of RBP4 and total and HMW adiponectin did not differ between two groups.Age (B = 0.44 P <0.05), blood pressure (B = 0.37 P = <0.05), waist circumference (B = -0.21 P <0.05) and TG (B = 0.1 P <0.05) were identified as independent predictors for CIMT in diabetic group, while RBP4 and adiponectin were not associated with CIMT neither in diabetic group nor in control group. In conclusion, the present study showed that serum levels of RBP4 or total and HMW adiponectin were not potential predictors of CIMT in type 2 diabetic patients who exposed to this risk factor at least for nine years.

  19. The relationship between retinol-binding protein 4 and apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins is attenuated in patients with very high serum triglycerides: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Christou, Georgios A; Tellis, Constantinos C; Elisaf, Moses S; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Kiortsis, Dimitrios N

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the association between retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and lipoproteins in subjects with hypertriglyceridemia. Forty-six obese or overweight hypertriglyceridemic patients were studied at baseline and 20 of them underwent a hypocaloric low-fat diet for 3 months. Plasma RBP4 levels were positively correlated with serum triglycerides (TG) in the subgroup of patients with TG <200 mg/dL (r=0.453, p=0.039) and negatively correlated with TG in patients with TG ≥200 mg/dL (r=-0.487, p=0.019). In the subgroup with TG <200 mg/ dL, subjects with circulating RBP4 above the median 46 mg/L had higher levels of intermediate density lipoprotein-cholesterol (IDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), while these differences were absent in patients with TG ≥200 mg/dL. The associations of percentage changes of circulating RBP4 with the percentage changes of LDL-C, very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and ApoB were positive after the first month and 3 months of diet for patients with baseline TG <200 mg/dL, while no correlations existed for patients with TG ≥200 mg/dL. The positive association between circulating RBP4 and ApoB-containing lipoproteins in a steady metabolic state, as well as during a hypocaloric diet, appears to be attenuated in patients with very high TG.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  1. IRBP-like proteins in the eyes of six cephalopod species--immunochemical relationship to vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) and cephalopod retinal-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fong, S L; Lee, P G; Ozaki, K; Hara, R; Hara, T; Bridges, C D

    1988-01-01

    SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting were used to examine soluble proteins from the eyes of six species of cephalopods i.e. Lolliguncula brevis, Sepia officinalis, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides, Rossia pacifica and Loligo opalescens. All species had a protein ("IRBP") with molecular weight virtually identical with vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) averaging 132,400 +/- 700 (n = 6). "IRBP" reacted on nitrocellulose blot transfers with rabbit antibovine IRBP and rabbit antifrog IRBP antibodies. Unlike vertebrate IRBP, cephalopod "IRBP" (from L. brevis) did not bind exogenous retinol or concanavalin A. The N-terminal amino acid appeared to be blocked in samples electroeluted from SDS gels. The antifrog IRBP antibodies also reacted with a series of proteins with molecular weights between 46,000 and 47,000, identified as retinal-binding protein (RALBP) with anti-RALBP antibodies. Anti-IRBP also reacted with pure RALBP prepared from Todarodes pacificus. Occasionally, anti-RALBP antibodies were seen to react weakly with "IRBP" in some cephalopods. We conclude that RALBP, cephalopod "IRBP" and vertebrate IRBP share a common but distant ancestry, and that a protein resembling IRBP appeared before the vertebrates diverged from the invertebrates. Both RALBP and IRBP appear to have analogous functions in shuttling retinoids between rhodopsin and the corresponding isomerizing system, retinochrome in the cephalopods and retinol isomerase in the vertebrates. The function of cephalopod "IRBP" is unknown.

  2. Cellular retinol-binding protein-1 is transiently expressed in granulation tissue fibroblasts and differentially expressed in fibroblasts cultured from different organs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G.; Redard, M.; Gabbiani, G.; Neuville, P.

    1997-01-01

    We have reported that cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) is transiently expressed by arterial smooth muscle cells during experimental intimal repair (P. Neuville, A. Geinoz, G. Benzonana, M. Redard, F. Gabbiani, P. Ropraz, G. Gabbiani: Am J Pathol 1997, 150:509-521). We have examined here the expression of CRBP-1 during wound healing after a full-thickness rat skin wound. CRBP-1 was transiently expressed by a significant proportion of fibroblastic cells including myofibroblasts. Expression started 4 days after wounding, reached a maximum at 12 days, and persisted up to 30 days when a scar was formed. After wound closure, most CRBP-1-containing fibroblastic cells underwent apoptosis. We have further investigated CRBP-1 expression in rat fibroblasts cultured from different organs. CRBP-1 was abundant in lung and heart fibroblasts and was detected in decreasing amounts in muscle, tendon, subcutaneous tissue, and granulation tissue fibroblasts. Dermis fibroblasts contained no detectable levels of CRBP-1. All-trans retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibited cell proliferation and increased CRBP-1 expression in fibroblastic populations except dermis fibroblasts. We demonstrate that during granulation tissue formation a subpopulation of fibroblastic cells express CRBP-1 de novo. We also demonstrate that CRBP-1 expression by fibroblasts is regulated in vitro by retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1. Our results suggest that CRBP-1 and possibly retinoic acid play a role in the evolution of granulation tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9403724

  3. Expression of retinol binding protein 4 and nuclear factor-κB in diabetic rats with atherosclerosis and the intervention effect of pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wan; Ye, Shandong; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the expression of retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in diabetic rats with atherosclerosis, and to evaluate the intervention effect of pioglitazone. A total of 75 Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Normal control (NC), diabetic rats (DM1), diabetic rats with atherosclerosis (DM2) and diabetic rats treated with pioglitazone (DM + Pio). The activity of NF-κB, the levels of serum and adipose tissue RBP4, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), triglycerides (TG) and arteria caudilis systolic blood pressure (SBP) were measured. Percentage of fat mass (PFM), atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were calculated. Compared with the NC and DM + Pio groups, all the parameters mentioned above increased significantly in the DM1 and DM2 groups, with the exception that HDL-c decreased. Pearson analysis showed that RBP4 in serum and adipose tissue were positively associated with TG, LDL-c, FINS, PFM, AIP, HOMA-IR, NF-κB, SBP and negatively associated with HDL-c. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that serum RBP4 and TG were predictors for the presence of diabetic atherosclerosis. In conclusion, RBP4 may be an effective predictor for diabetic atherosclerosis; pioglitazone is able to decrease RBP4 and NF-κB, which may partly contribute to its protective effect against diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27446311

  4. Associations between retinol-binding protein 4 and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in recently postmenopausal women: cross-sectional analyses from the KEEPS study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gary; Wang, Dan; Khan, Unab I; Zeb, Irfan; Manson, JoAnn E; Miller, Virginia; Hodis, Howard N; Budoff, Matthew J; Merriam, George R; Harman, Mitchell S; Brinton, Eliot A; Cedars, Marcelle I; Su, Yali; Lobo, Rogerio A; Naftolin, Frederick; Santoro, Nanette; Taylor, Hugh S; Wildman, Rachel P

    2012-05-15

    The published literature regarding the relationships between retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis is conflicting, likely due, in part, to limitations of frequently used RBP4 assays. Prior large studies have not utilized the gold-standard western blot analysis of RBP4 levels. Full-length serum RBP4 levels were measured by western blot in 709 postmenopausal women screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Cross-sectional analyses related RBP4 levels to cardiometabolic risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), and coronary artery calcification (CAC). The mean age of women was 52.9 (± 2.6) years, and the median RBP4 level was 49.0 (interquartile range 36.9-61.5) μg/mL. Higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with higher triglycerides (age, race, and smoking-adjusted partial Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.10; P = 0.01), but were unrelated to blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, and CIMT levels (all partial Spearman correlation coefficients ≤0.06, P > 0.05). Results suggested a curvilinear association between RBP4 levels and CAC, with women in the bottom and upper quartiles of RBP4 having higher odds of CAC (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.10 [1.07-4.09], 2.00 [1.02-3.92], 1.64 [0.82-3.27] for the 1st, 3rd, and 4th RBP4 quartiles vs. the 2nd quartile). However, a squared RBP4 term in regression modeling was non-significant (P = 0.10). In these healthy, recently postmenopausal women, higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with elevations in triglycerides and with CAC, but not with other risk factors or CIMT. These data using the gold standard of RBP4 methodology only weakly support the possibility that perturbations in RBP4 homeostasis may be an additional risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00154180.

  5. Associations between retinol-binding protein 4 and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in recently postmenopausal women: cross-sectional analyses from the KEEPS study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The published literature regarding the relationships between retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis is conflicting, likely due, in part, to limitations of frequently used RBP4 assays. Prior large studies have not utilized the gold-standard western blot analysis of RBP4 levels. Methods Full-length serum RBP4 levels were measured by western blot in 709 postmenopausal women screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Cross-sectional analyses related RBP4 levels to cardiometabolic risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Results The mean age of women was 52.9 (± 2.6) years, and the median RBP4 level was 49.0 (interquartile range 36.9-61.5) μg/mL. Higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with higher triglycerides (age, race, and smoking-adjusted partial Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.10; P = 0.01), but were unrelated to blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, and CIMT levels (all partial Spearman correlation coefficients ≤0.06, P > 0.05). Results suggested a curvilinear association between RBP4 levels and CAC, with women in the bottom and upper quartiles of RBP4 having higher odds of CAC (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.10 [1.07-4.09], 2.00 [1.02-3.92], 1.64 [0.82-3.27] for the 1st, 3rd, and 4th RBP4 quartiles vs. the 2nd quartile). However, a squared RBP4 term in regression modeling was non-significant (P = 0.10). Conclusions In these healthy, recently postmenopausal women, higher RBP4 levels were weakly associated with elevations in triglycerides and with CAC, but not with other risk factors or CIMT. These data using the gold standard of RBP4 methodology only weakly support the possibility that perturbations in RBP4 homeostasis may be an additional risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00154180 PMID:22587616

  6. Fatty acid-and retinol-binding protein, Mj-FAR-1 induces tomato host susceptibility to root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Iberkleid, Ionit; Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Firester, Kalia; Spiegel, Yitzhak; Horowitz, Sigal Brown

    2013-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes produce at least one structurally unique class of small helix-rich retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins that have no counterparts in their plant hosts. Herein we describe a protein of the plant-parasitic root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica, which is a member of the nematode-specific fatty-acid- and retinol-binding (Mj-FAR-1) family of proteins. The mj-far-1 mRNA was detected through M. javanica pre-parasitic J2s, migratory and sedentary parasitic stages by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Immunolocalization assays demonstrate that the FAR protein of Meloidogyne is secreted during sedentary stages, as evidenced by the accumulation of FAR at the nematode cuticle surface and along the adjacent host root tissues. Tomato roots constitutively expressing mj-far-1 demonstrated an increased susceptibility to root-knot nematodes infection as observed by accelerated gall induction and expansion, accompanied by a higher percentage of nematodes developing into mature females compared to control roots. RNA interference assays that expressed double-stranded RNA complementary to mj-far-1 in transgenic tomato lines specifically reduced nematode infection levels. Histological analysis of nematode-infested roots indicated that in roots overexpressing mj-far-1, galls contained larger feeding cells and might support a faster nematode development and maturation. Roots overexpressing mj-far-1 suppressed jasmonic acid responsive genes such as the proteinase inhibitor (Pin2) and γ-thionin, illustrating the possible role of Mj-FAR-1 in manipulating the lipid based signaling in planta. This data, suggests that Meloidogyne FAR might have a strategic function during the interaction of the nematode with its plant host. Our study present the first demonstration of an in planta functional characterization and localization of FAR proteins secreted by plant-parasitic nematodes. It provides evidence that Mj-FAR-1 facilitates

  7. Fatty Acid-and Retinol-Binding Protein, Mj-FAR-1 Induces Tomato Host Susceptibility to Root-Knot Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Iberkleid, Ionit; Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Firester, Kalia; Spiegel, Yitzhak; Horowitz, Sigal Brown

    2013-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes produce at least one structurally unique class of small helix-rich retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins that have no counterparts in their plant hosts. Herein we describe a protein of the plant-parasitic root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica, which is a member of the nematode-specific fatty-acid- and retinol-binding (Mj-FAR-1) family of proteins. The mj-far-1 mRNA was detected through M. javanica pre-parasitic J2s, migratory and sedentary parasitic stages by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Immunolocalization assays demonstrate that the FAR protein of Meloidogyne is secreted during sedentary stages, as evidenced by the accumulation of FAR at the nematode cuticle surface and along the adjacent host root tissues. Tomato roots constitutively expressing mj-far-1 demonstrated an increased susceptibility to root-knot nematodes infection as observed by accelerated gall induction and expansion, accompanied by a higher percentage of nematodes developing into mature females compared to control roots. RNA interference assays that expressed double-stranded RNA complementary to mj-far-1 in transgenic tomato lines specifically reduced nematode infection levels. Histological analysis of nematode-infested roots indicated that in roots overexpressing mj-far-1, galls contained larger feeding cells and might support a faster nematode development and maturation. Roots overexpressing mj-far-1 suppressed jasmonic acid responsive genes such as the proteinase inhibitor (Pin2) and γ-thionin, illustrating the possible role of Mj-FAR-1 in manipulating the lipid based signaling in planta. This data, suggests that Meloidogyne FAR might have a strategic function during the interaction of the nematode with its plant host. Our study present the first demonstration of an in planta functional characterization and localization of FAR proteins secreted by plant-parasitic nematodes. It provides evidence that Mj-FAR-1 facilitates

  8. All-trans retinol and retinol-binding protein from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid exhibit dynamic behaviour during early central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2008-06-11

    Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) is involved in the regulation of survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of neuroectodermal progenitor cells, as well as in the control of mesencephalic gene expression in collaboration with the isthmic organizer. Recently, we showed the presence of retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the E-CSF proteome. RBP is an all-trans retinol carrier, a molecule that can be metabolized into retinoic acid, a morphogen involved in central nervous system (CNS) morphogenesis and patterning. Here we demonstrate the presence of all-trans retinol within the E-CSF and analyse the dynamics of RBP and all-trans retinol within this fluid, as well as the expression of retinoic acid-synthesizing enzymes during early CNS development. Our results suggest a relationship between the dynamics of these molecules and the early events of CNS patterning.

  9. Serum retinol binding protein 4 is negatively related to beta cell function in Chinese women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To observe the relationship between serum retinol binding protein 4(RBP4) and β cell function in Chinese subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and without known diabetes. Methods 106 patients diagnosed as fatty liver by ultrasonography (M/F: 61/45; aged 47.44 ± 14.16 years) were enrolled in our current cross-sectional study. Subjects with known diabetes, chronic virus hepatitis and excessive alcohol consumption were excluded. Serum RBP4 was detected by ELISA and validated by quantitative Western blotting. β cell function were assessed by HOMA in all subjects and by hyperglycemic clamp in 17 normal glucose tolerance subjects (M = 6, F = 11). Results The levels of serum RBP4 in men were higher than that in women (55.96 ± 11.14 vs 45.87 ± 10.31 μg/ml, p < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation analysis demonstrated that in women, serum RBP4 levels were significantly associated with fasting blood glucose (FBG), HOMA-β, and increment of first phase insulin secretion (1PH), but not associated with age, BMI, waist circumference, WHR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), TC, TG, HDL-c, LDL-c, 2 h blood glucose, HOMA-IR, ALT, AST, γ-GT, hepatic fat content (HFC), and insulin sensitivity index (ISI). However, in men, serum RBP4 levels were significantly associated with HDL-c, ALT, AST, but not associated with any other parameters as mentioned above. A stepwise multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that in women, HOMA-IR and RBP4 were significantly associated with HOMA-β, while in men, HOMA-IR and BMI were significantly variables associated with HOMA-β. Conclusions Serum RBP4, secreted mainly by liver and adipose tissue, may involve in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in Chinese women patients with NAFLD. PMID:24160775

  10. Combined measurement of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, retinol binding protein, and C-reactive protein by an inexpensive, sensitive, and simple sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Juergen G; Estes, John E; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Biesalski, Hans K; Craft, Neal E

    2004-11-01

    The measurement of vitamin A (VA) and iron status is very important in the assessment of nutritional deficiencies. The objective of this research was to develop a sandwich ELISA technique for the simultaneous measurement of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, retinol binding protein, and C-reactive protein (CRP) as indicators for VA and iron status. The inclusion of CRP as marker of infection allows for more accurate interpretation of VA and iron status. This is accomplished in a 30-microL serum or plasma sample using an ELISA with different capture and detection antibodies and different dilutions of the sample. Commercially available clinical serum controls were used for calibration purposes. The developed assays were compared to commercially available traditional tests. Regression coefficients comparing both assays were better than 0.84 (P < 0.001). Using a limited sample set, the sandwich ELISA assay produced very similar specificity and sensitivity compared to traditional methods when common cutoff values were applied. Intra- and interassay variability was between 5 and 14% for all tests. The cost of the materials for all 5 measurements decreases to less than $1/sample if a large number of samples is analyzed. Due to the low cost, high throughput, and comparability to traditional tests, this procedure has several advantages for assessing VA and iron status in population surveys.

  11. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Inhibits Insulin Signaling in Adipocytes by Inducing Proinflammatory Cytokines in Macrophages through a c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase- and Toll-Like Receptor 4-Dependent and Retinol-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Norseen, Julie; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Hammarstedt, Ann; Yore, Mark M.; Kant, Shashi; Aryal, Pratik; Kiernan, Urban A.; Phillips, David A.; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Kraus, Bettina J.; Usheva, Anny; Davis, Roger J.; Smith, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), the sole retinol transporter in blood, is secreted from adipocytes and liver. Serum RBP4 levels correlate highly with insulin resistance, other metabolic syndrome factors, and cardiovascular disease. Elevated serum RBP4 causes insulin resistance, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that RBP4 induces expression of proinflammatory cytokines in mouse and human macrophages and thereby indirectly inhibits insulin signaling in cocultured adipocytes. This occurs through activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways independent of the RBP4 receptor, STRA6. RBP4 effects are markedly attenuated in JNK1−/− JNK2−/− macrophages and TLR4−/− macrophages. Because RBP4 is a retinol-binding protein, we investigated whether these effects are retinol dependent. Unexpectedly, retinol-free RBP4 (apo-RBP4) is as potent as retinol-bound RBP4 (holo-RBP4) in inducing proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Apo-RBP4 is likely to be physiologically significant since RBP4/retinol ratios are increased in serum of lean and obese insulin-resistant humans compared to ratios in insulin-sensitive humans, indicating that higher apo-RBP4 is associated with insulin resistance independent of obesity. Thus, RBP4 may cause insulin resistance by contributing to the development of an inflammatory state in adipose tissue through activation of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. This process reveals a novel JNK- and TLR4-dependent and retinol- and STRA6-independent mechanism of action for RBP4. PMID:22431523

  12. Vinculin and cellular retinol-binding protein-1 are markers for quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human liver.

    PubMed

    Van Rossen, Elke; Vander Borght, Sara; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Reynaert, Hendrik; Bruggeman, Veerle; Blomhoff, Rune; Roskams, Tania; Geerts, Albert

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. As response to chronic injury HSCs are activated and change from quiescent into myofibroblast-like cells. Several HSC-specific markers have been described in rat or mouse models. The aim of our work was to identify the best marker(s) for human HSCs. To this end we used the automated high throughput NexES IHC staining device (Ventana Medical Systems) to incubate sections under standardized conditions. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) normal and diseased human livers were studied. With immunohistochemistry we examined the expression of synemin, desmin, vimentin, vinculin, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cysteine- and glycine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), and cytoglobin/stellate cell activation-associated protein (cygb/STAP). This is the first study in which a series of HSC markers is compared on serial FFPE human tissues. CRBP-1 clearly stains lobular HSCs without reacting with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and shows variable cholangiocyte positivity. Vinculin has a similar staining pattern as CRBP-1 but additionally stains SMCs, and (myo)fibroblasts. In conclusion, we therefore propose to use CRBP-1 and/or vinculin to stain HSCs in human liver tissues.

  13. The complex between retinol and retinol-binding protein is formed in the rough microsomes of liver following repletion of vitamin A-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; DeMoor, L M; Handler, C E; Green, E L; Ritter, S J

    1998-03-12

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP), the plasma transport protein for vitamin A, is primarily synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of the liver. RBP then passes through the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and into the Golgi apparatus where vesicles form and transport the protein to the cell membrane. When rats were depleted of their vitamin A stores, RBP accumulated in the liver microsomes, particularly in the rough microsomes. To identify the organelle(s) where retinol initially binds to RBP, vitamin A-depleted rats were given an i.v. injection of [3H]retinol suspended in Tween 40. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 15 and 20 min, liver fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. The retinol/RBP complex (holoRBP) was detected in the rough microsomes within 3 min post injection. HoloRBP later appeared in the smooth microsomes and Golgi fraction, and then the serum at time intervals consistent with the known secretion rate for RBP. HoloRBP was detected in the rough microsomes at all times after 3 min, whether or not the complex was present in the other subcellular fractions. Thus, the holoRBP complex can form in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of the liver.

  14. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Induces Inflammation in Human Endothelial Cells by an NADPH Oxidase- and Nuclear Factor Kappa B-Dependent and Retinol-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Farjo, Rafal A.; Halsey, Stacey; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Ma, Jian-xing

    2012-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific vitamin A (retinol) transporter in blood. Elevation of serum RBP4 in patients has been linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetic retinopathy. However, the significance of RBP4 elevation in the pathogenesis of these vascular diseases is unknown. Here we show that RBP4 induces inflammation in primary human retinal capillary endothelial cells (HRCEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by stimulating expression of proinflammatory molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment and adherence to endothelium, including vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). We demonstrate that these novel effects of RBP4 are independent of retinol and the RBP4 membrane receptor STRA6 and occur in part via activation of NADPH oxidase and NF-κB. Importantly, retinol-free RBP4 (apo-RBP4) was as potent as retinol-bound RBP4 (holo-RBP4) in inducing proinflammatory molecules in both HRCEC and HUVEC. These studies reveal that RBP4 elevation can directly contribute to endothelial inflammation and therefore may play a causative role in the development or progression of vascular inflammation during cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications of diabetes. PMID:23071093

  15. Deletion of the Androgen Receptor in Adipose Tissue in Male Mice Elevates Retinol Binding Protein 4 and Reveals Independent Effects on Visceral Fat Mass and on Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Kerry J.; Smith, Lee B.; Hunger, Nicole I.; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is epidemic in obese ageing males with type 2 diabetes, but the direction of causality remains unclear. Testosterone-deficient males and global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice are insulin resistant with increased fat, but it is unclear whether AR signaling in adipose tissue mediates body fat redistribution and alters glucose homoeostasis. To investigate this, mice with selective knockdown of AR in adipocytes (fARKO) were generated. Male fARKO mice on normal diet had reduced perigonadal fat but were hyperinsulinemic and by age 12 months, were insulin deficient in the absence of obesity. On high-fat diet, fARKO mice had impaired compensatory insulin secretion and hyperglycemia, with increased susceptibility to visceral obesity. Adipokine screening in fARKO mice revealed a selective increase in plasma and intra-adipose retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) that preceded obesity. AR activation in murine 3T3 adipocytes downregulated RBP4 mRNA. We conclude that AR signaling in adipocytes not only protects against high-fat diet–induced visceral obesity but also regulates insulin action and glucose homeostasis, independently of adiposity. Androgen deficiency in adipocytes in mice resembles human type 2 diabetes, with early insulin resistance and evolving insulin deficiency. PMID:22415878

  16. Regulation of retinol-binding protein metabolism by glucocorticoid hormones in cultured H/sub 4/II EC/sub 3/ liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, C.; Smith, J.E.; Soprano, D.R.; Goodman, D.S.

    1981-08-01

    Studies were conducted to explore the effects of glucocorticoid hormones on the regulation of the metabolism of retinol-binding protein (RBP) by H/sub 4/II EC/sub 4/ rat hepatoma cells in culture. Cortisol, corticosterone, and the synthetic glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone all induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in the accumulation of RBP. Half-maximal stimulation occurred at concentrations of dexamethasone in the range of 1 to 5 nM. Progesterone in the concentration range of 1 to 10 ..mu..M, inhibited the stimulatory effect of dexamethasone. Progesterone alone in this concentration range had no effect on RBP metabolism. The addition of retinol over a range from 3.5 nM to 3.5 ..mu..M stimulated a dose-dependent secretion of RBP from the cells into the medium. When studied over a wide range of concentrations, retinol and dexamethasone incubated together produced approximately additive increases in the accumulation of RBP. Dexamethasone, moreover, did not affect the retinol-induced secretion of RBP. Thus, retinol and dexamethasone appear to function via different and independent mechanisms to regulate the metabolism of RBP by the liver cell.

  17. Comparison of plasma pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for the identification of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Toloza, F J K; Pérez-Matos, M C; Ricardo-Silgado, M L; Morales-Álvarez, M C; Mantilla-Rivas, J O; Pinzón-Cortés, J A; Pérez-Mayorga, M; Arévalo-García, M L; Tolosa-González, G; Mendivil, C O

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the association of four potential insulin resistance (IR) biomarkers (pigment-epithelium-derived factor [PEDF], retinol-binding-protein-4 [RBP-4], chitinase-3-like protein 1 [YKL-40] and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]) with objective measures of IR. We studied 81 subjects with different metabolic profiles. All participants underwent a 5-point OGTT with calculation of multiple IR indexes. A subgroup of 21 participants additionally underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. IR was defined as belonging to the highest quartile of incremental area under the insulin curve (iAUCins), or to the lowest quartile of the insulin sensitivity index (ISI). PEDF was associated with adiposity variables. PEDF and RBP4 increased linearly across quartiles of iAUCins (for PEDF p-trend=0.029; for RBP-4 p-trend=0.053). YKL-40 and BDNF were not associated with any adiposity or IR variable. PEDF and RBP-4 levels identified individuals with IR by the iAUCins definition: A PEDF cutoff of 11.9ng/mL had 60% sensitivity and 68% specificity, while a RBP-4 cutoff of 71.6ng/mL had 70% sensitivity and 57% specificity. In multiple regression analyses simultaneously including clinical variables and the studied biomarkers, only BMI, PEDF and RBP-4 remained significant predictors of IR. Plasma PEDF and RBP4 identified IR in subjects with no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R.; Roe, Andrew J.; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein–ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  19. Long-term impact of vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) on plasma concentration of leptin, soluble leptin receptor, ghrelin, omentin-1, obestatin, and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) in patients with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Siejka, Agnieszka; Jankiewicz-Wika, Joanna; Kołomecki, Krzysztof; Cywiński, Jacek; Piestrzeniewicz, Katarzyna; Swiętosławski, Jacek; Stępień, Henryk; Komorowski, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Restrictive type bariatric surgery is an effective therapeutic approach that decreases overall mortality in patients with severe obesity. Several new cytokines, including adipocytokines that control energy metabolism, have been discovered recently, but their role in obesity is not fully recognized. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), one of restrictive type bariatric surgery, on peripheral blood concentrations of some adipocytokines and hormones involved in the control of food intake and energy turnover. The studied group comprised 12 females and 2 males aged from 31 to 59years (46.6±7.4) with simple obesity (BMI: 44.9±7.2) and metabolic syndrome. The patients were examined both before and 3, 6, 12, 24months after bariatric surgery (eight patients were also checked after 36 and six patients after 48months). Measurements of peripheral blood concentration of glucose, insulin, leptin, soluble leptin receptor, obestatin, ghrelin, omentin-1, and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) by ELISA method have been performed. After the surgery body weight, BMI and waist circumference significantly decreased. Positive changes considering the components of metabolic syndrome have been noted. Namely glucose, insulin and triglycerides' levels decreased, accompanied by the significantly lower HOMA index. Conversely, HDL cholesterol concentrations increased. Furthermore, peripheral blood concentration of leptin decreased, but the blood levels of soluble leptin receptor and ghrelin gradually increased. The positive correlations between leptin and body weight and BMI were noted as well as between the RBP4 and total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. We did not observe significant differences in levels of obestatin, omentin-1 and RBP4 after surgery. In conclusion, VBG is an effective type of bariatric surgery. Fast decrease of body weight in morbidly obese patients treated by restrictive bariatric surgery leads to significant

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-α and -γ, and cAMP-mediated pathways, control retinol-binding protein-4 gene expression in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Meritxell; Hondares, Elayne; Iwamoto, Sadahiko; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wabitsch, Martin; Staels, Bart; Olmos, Yolanda; Monsalve, Maria; Giralt, Marta; Iglesias, Roser; Villarroya, Francesc

    2012-03-01

    Retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) is a serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin A. It is known to be produced by the liver and white adipose tissue. RBP4 release by white fat has been proposed to induce insulin resistance. We analyzed the regulation and production of RBP4 in brown adipose tissue. RBP4 gene expression is induced in brown fat from mice exposed to cold or treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists. In brown adipocytes in culture, norepinephrine, cAMP, and activators of PPARγ and PPARα induced RBP4 gene expression and RBP4 protein release. The induction of RBP4 gene expression by norepinephrine required intact PPAR-dependent pathways, as evidenced by impaired response of the RBP4 gene expression to norepinephrine in PPARα-null brown adipocytes or in the presence of inhibitors of PPARγ and PPARα. PPARγ and norepinephrine can also induce the RBP4 gene in white adipocytes, and overexpression of PPARα confers regulation by this PPAR subtype to white adipocytes. The RBP4 gene promoter transcription is activated by cAMP, PPARα, and PPARγ. This is mediated by a PPAR-responsive element capable of binding PPARα and PPARγ and required also for activation by cAMP. The induction of the RBP4 gene expression by norepinephrine in brown adipocytes is protein synthesis dependent and requires PPARγ-coactivator-1-α, which acts as a norepinephine-induced coactivator of PPAR on the RBP4 gene. We conclude that PPARγ- and PPARα-mediated signaling controls RBP4 gene expression and releases in brown adipose tissue, and thermogenic activation induces RBP4 gene expression in brown fat through mechanisms involving PPARγ-coactivator-1-α coactivation of PPAR signaling.

  1. GC Gene Polymorphism and Unbound Serum Retinol-Binding Protein 4 Are Related to the Risk of Insulin Resistance in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Muñoz, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Torrejón, María J.; Devesa-Medina, María J.; Esguevillas, Gara; Cárdenas, María C.; Fernández, Cristina; Carballo, Miguel; Agúndez, José A.; Ladero, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance (IR) is found in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) more frequently than in other chronic liver diseases. Prospective cross-sectional study to evaluate a wide multitest panel to identify factors related with IR in CHC and their possible interactions. In 76 patients with CHC we performed a series of routine laboratory analysis as well as specifically designed serum biochemical tests [retinol, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), 25-OH vitamin D, Vitamin E, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cystatin C]. The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs7041 and rs4588 GC-DBP (group-specific component-Vitamin D-binding protein), rs738409 PNPLA3 (patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3), and rs12979860 IL28B (interleukin-28 B) genes were determined. Insulin sensitivity was established with the HOMA-IR and IR was diagnosed when HOMA-IR > 3. Fibrosis staging was assessed with liver biopsy or transient elastography. After backward logistic regression analysis, independent variables associated with IR were Gc1s/Gc1s DBP phenotype, that results from the homozygous carriage of the rs7041G/rs4588C haplotype (P = 0.033); low retinol/RBP4 ratio, reflecting a greater rate of unbound RBP4 (P = 0.005); older age (P = 0.01); high serum tryglicerides (P = 0.026); and advanced (F3–F4) fibrosis stage. The AUROC provided by the multivariate model was 0.950 (95% CI = 0.906–0.993). In addition to previously known ones, the Gc1s/Gc1s phenotype variant of DBP and the unbound fraction of plasma RBP4 may be considered as factors related with the incidence, and possibly the risk, of IR in CHC patients. PMID:26962819

  2. Accounting for the influence of inflammation on retinol-binding protein in a population survey of Liberian preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Larson, Leila Margaret; Addo, O Yaw; Sandalinas, Fanny; Faigao, Katherine; Kupka, Roland; Flores-Ayala, Rafael; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is an important contributor to child morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of VAD, measured by retinol-binding protein (RBP) or retinol, is overestimated in populations with a high prevalence of inflammation. We aimed to quantify and adjust for the effect of inflammation on VAD prevalence in a nationally representative survey of Liberian children 6 to 35 months of age. We compared five approaches to adjust RBP for inflammation and estimate VAD prevalence (defined as RBP < 0.7 µmol/L): (1) ignoring inflammation; (2) excluding individuals with inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP) >5 mg/L or alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) >1 g/)L; (3) multiplying each individual's RBP by an internal correction factor; (4) by an external correction factor; and (5) using regression (corrected RBP = exp(InRBP - β1 (lnCRPobs -lnCRPref ) - β2 (lnAGPobs -lnAGPref )). Corrected RBP was based on a regression model where reference lnCRP and lnAGP were set to the maximum of the lowest decile. The unadjusted prevalence of VAD was 24.7%. Children with elevated CRP and/or AGP had significantly lower RBP concentrations than their apparently healthy peers (geometric mean RBP 0.79 µmol/L (95% CI: 0.76, 0.82) vs. 0.95 µmol/L (95% CI: 0.92, 0.97), P < 0.001). Using approaches 2-5 resulted in a prevalence of VAD of 11.6%, 14.3%, 13.5% and 7.3%, respectively. Depending on the approach, the VAD prevalence is reduced 10-17 percentage points when inflammation is taken into account. Further quantification of the influence of inflammation on biomarkers of vitamin A status from other national surveys is needed to compare and recommend the preferred adjustment approach across populations.

  3. Elevated plasma retinol-binding protein 4 is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Qi, Qibin; Zong, Geng; Ye, Xingwang; Li, Huaixing; Liu, Xin; Zheng, He; Hu, Frank B; Liu, Yong; Lin, Xu

    2014-05-01

    The association between circulating retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and risk of type 2 diabetes has been inconsistent in cross-sectional studies, but prospective evidence is limited. We aimed to investigate whether plasma RBP4 is associated with future development of type 2 diabetes and whether the association could be explained by iron or other risk factors. A total of 2091 Chinese adults aged 50-70 y were followed up for 6 y. Baseline dietary intakes and fasting plasma RBP4, ferritin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, and erythrocyte fatty acids were determined. Self-reported doctor-diagnosed diabetes, or usage of antidiabetic agents, or fasting plasma glucose concentration at the follow-up visit ≥7.0 mmol/L was defined as an incident diabetes case. Plasma RBP4 concentration was significantly associated with dietary heme iron intake, plasma ferritin concentration, and other established risk factors. After multivariate adjustment for demographic and lifestyle variables, relative risk (RR) for type 2 diabetes when the extreme quartiles of RBP4 were compared was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.30, 2.37; P-trend < 0.001). This association remained significant when the extreme quartiles were compared (RR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.05; P-trend = 0.036) after further controlling for ferritin and dietary factors, as well as other risk factors, including body mass index, adiponectin, CRP, lipids, liver and kidney function, insulin resistance, and hypertension. A threshold effect of RBP4 concentrations on incident diabetes was suggested by restricted quadratic spline analysis (P = 0.026 for nonlinearity). Our study indicates that plasma RBP4 is independently associated with the 6-y risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

  4. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 and Lipids Prospectively Measured During Early to Mid-Pregnancy in Relation to Preeclampsia and Preterm Birth Risk.

    PubMed

    Mendola, Pauline; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Mills, James L; Zhang, Cuilin; Tsai, Michael Y; Liu, Aiyi; Yeung, Edwina H

    2017-06-01

    Maternal retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and lipids may relate to preeclampsia and preterm birth risk but longitudinal data are lacking. This study examines these biomarkers longitudinally during pregnancy in relation to preeclampsia and preterm birth risk. Maternal serum samples from the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention (CPEP) trial were analyzed at baseline: average 15 gestational weeks; mid-pregnancy: average 27 weeks; and at >34 weeks. We measured RBP4, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides and lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)). Cross-sectional logistic regression analyses estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for preterm preeclampsia (n = 63), term preeclampsia (n = 104), and preterm delivery (n = 160) associated with RBP4 and lipids at baseline and mid-pregnancy compared with controls (n = 136). Longitudinal trajectories across pregnancy were assessed using mixed linear models with fixed effects. Adjusted models included clinical and demographic factors. RBP4 concentrations at baseline and mid-pregnancy were associated with a 4- to 8-fold increase in preterm preeclampsia risk but were not associated with term preeclampsia. RBP4 measured mid-pregnancy was also associated with preterm birth (OR = 6.67, 95% CI: 1.65, 26.84). Higher triglyceride concentrations in mid-pregnancy were associated with a 2- to 4-fold increased risk for both preeclampsia and preterm birth. Longitudinal models demonstrate that both preterm preeclampsia and preterm birth cases had elevated RBP4 throughout gestation. Elevated RBP4 is detectable early in pregnancy and its strong relation with preterm preeclampsia merits further investigation and confirmation to evaluate its potential use as a predictor, particularly among high-risk women.

  5. Decreased circulating 25-(OH) Vitamin D concentrations in obese female children and adolescents: positive associations with Retinol Binding Protein-4 and Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Metheniti, Dimitra; Sakka, Sophia; Dracopoulou, Maria; Margeli, Alexandra; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Chrousos, George P; Pervanidou, Panagiota

    2013-01-01

    Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with adult as well as childhood obesity. Retinol-binding-protein-4 (RBP-4) and Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) are altered in obese individuals. The aim of this study was to examine circulating 25-(OH) Vitamin D (25-(OH) D) concentrations according to BMI and its associations with RBP-4 and NGAL in female children and adolescents. Seventy-nine (79) children, aged 8-16 years, were studied and divided into four groups: 19 control (BMI z-score range -2.15 - 1.24), 20 overweight (1.34 - 2.49), 20 obese (2.50 - 2.87) and 20 ultra-obese (3 - 4.37). Patients were derived from a Pediatric Obesity Clinic. Plasma 25-(OH) D, RBP-4 and NGAL concentrations were measured with specific assays. Plasma 25-(OH) D concentrations were decreased significantly in the ultra-obese (p=0.005) and marginally in the obese group (p=0.05) compared to the control group. In the entire BMI range, Spearman correlations revealed strong positive associations between 25-(OH) D and RBP-4 (r=0.349, p=0.002) and between 25-(OH) D and NGAL (r=0.338, p=0.003). 25-(OH) D is deficient in a clinical population of obese female children and adolescents, whereas in the entire BMI range 25-(OH) D is associated with RBP4 and NGAL concentrations. Longitudinal studies are needed to reveal the role of these associations in metabolic alterations related to childhood and adolescent obesity and associated metabolic morbidities.

  6. α-Retinol is distributed through serum retinol-binding protein-independent mechanisms in the lactating sow-nursing piglet dyad.

    PubMed

    Dever, Joseph T; Surles, Rebecca L; Davis, Christopher R; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2011-01-01

    α-Retinol (αR) is a structural isomer of retinol [vitamin A (VA)] that does not bind to serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). In this study, α-retinyl acetate (αRA) was synthesized and given orally (35 μmol) to VA-deficient lactating sows (n = 11) to assess its potential to trace RBP-independent retinol transport and tissue uptake. The αRA dose primarily appeared in sow serum as 4 α-retinyl esters (αRE) with peak serum total αR concentrations (the sum of the alcohol and ester forms) detected at 2 h (70 ± 23 nmol/L, mean ± SEM) postdose. From 0 to 40 h postdose, the percentage of serum total αR in the alcohol form did not increase. Rapid αR uptake into sow milk was observed with peak concentrations (371 ± 83 nmol/L) at 7.5 h postdose, consistent with the uptake of αRE from chylomicra. A high percentage of the αRA dose (62 ± 15%, mean ± SD) was present in the livers of sows (n = 6) killed 22-28 d postdose. Approximately 15-26% of the sow αRA dose was transferred to the livers of the nursing piglets (n = 17) after 3 d. In piglets and sows, a similar percentage of hepatic total αR was detected in the ester form as that of hepatic total retinol. Taken together, these data suggest that an oral dose of αRA effectively traces the uptake, esterification, chylomicron transport, and hepatic storage of retinol and may be useful for deciphering the role of RBP-independent delivery of retinol to other tissues.

  7. Promotion of Orange-Fleshed Sweet Potato Increased Vitamin A Intakes and Reduced the Odds of Low Retinol-Binding Protein among Postpartum Kenyan Women.

    PubMed

    Girard, Amy Webb; Grant, Frederick; Watkinson, Michelle; Okuku, Haile Selassie; Wanjala, Rose; Cole, Donald; Levin, Carol; Low, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Background: Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) improves vitamin A (VA) status of young children; research with pregnant and lactating women is limited.Objective: We examined the effectiveness of the Mama SASHA (Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa) program to improve nutrition knowledge, diets, and nutritional status of pregnant and lactating women (PLW) in Western Kenya.Methods: Eight health facilities were allocated to the Mama SASHA intervention or comparison arms. PLW in intervention facilities received enhanced nutrition counseling at health clinics, were linked with community-based maternal support groups, and received vouchers for OFSP vine cuttings. Control PLW received clinic-based nutrition counseling only. A total of 505 women in early and midpregnancy, attending their first antenatal care visit, and with no previous engagement in project activities were enrolled from the 8 facilities. Nutrition and health-seeking knowledge, food security, dietary patterns, and anthropometric measurements were collected at 4 time points at ≤9 mo postpartum. VA intakes were assessed with multipass 24-h recalls in a subsample of 206 mothers at 8-10 mo postpartum. VA status was assessed by using serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). Impacts were estimated with multilevel mixed models adjusted for clustering and differences at enrollment.Results: At enrollment, 22.9% of women had RBP <1.17 μmol/L. By 9 mo postpartum, intervention women had significantly higher intakes of VA [adjusted difference = 297.0 retinol activity equivalent (RAE) units; 95% CI: 82, 513 RAE units; P = 0.01; n = 206], greater consumption of VA-rich fruit and vegetables in the previous 7 d (difference-in-difference estimate: 0.40 d; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.56 d; P < 0.01), and a 45% reduction in the odds of RBP <1.17 μmol/L (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.92; P = 0.01).Conclusion: Promotion of OFSP to PLW through health services is a feasible strategy to improve women's nutrition knowledge, VA

  8. Promotion of Orange-Fleshed Sweet Potato Increased Vitamin A Intakes and Reduced the Odds of Low Retinol-Binding Protein among Postpartum Kenyan Women123

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Amy Webb; Watkinson, Michelle; Okuku, Haile Selassie; Wanjala, Rose; Cole, Donald; Levin, Carol; Low, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) improves vitamin A (VA) status of young children; research with pregnant and lactating women is limited. Objective: We examined the effectiveness of the Mama SASHA (Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa) program to improve nutrition knowledge, diets, and nutritional status of pregnant and lactating women (PLW) in Western Kenya. Methods: Eight health facilities were allocated to the Mama SASHA intervention or comparison arms. PLW in intervention facilities received enhanced nutrition counseling at health clinics, were linked with community-based maternal support groups, and received vouchers for OFSP vine cuttings. Control PLW received clinic-based nutrition counseling only. A total of 505 women in early and midpregnancy, attending their first antenatal care visit, and with no previous engagement in project activities were enrolled from the 8 facilities. Nutrition and health-seeking knowledge, food security, dietary patterns, and anthropometric measurements were collected at 4 time points at ≤9 mo postpartum. VA intakes were assessed with multipass 24-h recalls in a subsample of 206 mothers at 8–10 mo postpartum. VA status was assessed by using serum retinol-binding protein (RBP). Impacts were estimated with multilevel mixed models adjusted for clustering and differences at enrollment. Results: At enrollment, 22.9% of women had RBP <1.17 μmol/L. By 9 mo postpartum, intervention women had significantly higher intakes of VA [adjusted difference = 297.0 retinol activity equivalent (RAE) units; 95% CI: 82, 513 RAE units; P = 0.01; n = 206], greater consumption of VA-rich fruit and vegetables in the previous 7 d (difference-in-difference estimate: 0.40 d; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.56 d; P < 0.01), and a 45% reduction in the odds of RBP <1.17 μmol/L (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.92; P = 0.01). Conclusion: Promotion of OFSP to PLW through health services is a feasible strategy to improve women’s nutrition knowledge

  9. High dietary fat-induced obesity in Wistar rats and type 2 diabetes in nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rats differentially affect retinol binding protein 4 expression and vitamin A metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomomi; Shichi, Yuta; Sato, Miyuki; Tanioka, Yuri; Furusho, Tadasu; Ota, Toru; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which is caused mainly by insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the only specific transport protein for retinol in the serum. RBP4 level is increased in the diabetic state and high-fat condition, indicating that retinol metabolism may be affected under these conditions. However, the precise effect of diabetes and high fat-induced obesity on retinol metabolism is unknown. In this study, we examined differences in retinol metabolite levels in rat models of diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes (Goto-Kakizaki [GK] rat). Four-week-old male Wistar and GK rats were given either a control diet (AIN-93G) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% fat kJ). After 15 weeks of feeding, the RBP4 levels increased by 2-fold in the serum of GK rats but not HFD-fed rats. The hepatic retinol concentration of HFD-fed rats was approximately 50% that of the controls (P < .01). In contrast, the renal retinol concentrations of GK rats increased by 70% (P < .01). However, expression of RARβ in the kidney, which was induced in a retinoic acid-dependent manner, was downregulated by 90% (P < .01) in GK rats. In conclusion, diabetes and obesity affected retinol metabolism differently, and the effects were different in different peripheral tissues. The impact of HFD may be limited to the storage of hepatic vitamin A as retinyl palmitate. In particular, our data indicate that renal retinoic acid production might represent an important target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Serum retinol-binding protein 4 is not increased in obesity or obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus, but is reduced after relevant reductions in body fat following gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ambrosi, J; Rodríguez, A; Catalán, V; Ramírez, B; Silva, C; Rotellar, F; Gil, M J; Salvador, J; Frühbeck, G

    2008-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding the elevation of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In the present study, we have compared serum RBP4 in lean and obese patients with or without T2DM, and analysed the effect of weight loss on serum RBP4. Forty-two Caucasian subjects were included in the study. Serum RBP4 was measured by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, serum RBP4 was measured in 21 morbidly obese patients before and after 4, 8 and 15 months of weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). No significant effect of either obesity or diabetes on serum RBP4 was observed. Serum RBP4 concentrations (measured by either ELISA or Western blot) did not correlate with body mass index (BMI), body fat or any indicator of glucose metabolism or insulin resistance. Weight loss following RYGBP did not modify serum RBP4 at 15 months (P = 0.472). However, the variations in serum RBP4 were significantly associated with the reduction in body fat (r = 0.48; P = 0.026). Patients loosing over 20% of fat mass (n = 11) showed significantly different RBP4 concentrations compared to those individuals exhibiting smaller adiposity reductions (n = 10) (-11.0 +/- 6.4 vs.+5.8 +/- 3.6 mg/l; P = 0.036). Furthermore, RBP4 levels were significantly reduced at 4 (P = 0.006) and 8 (P = 0.015) months only in those patients loosing over 20% of fat mass. Serum RBP4 concentrations are not increased in obese patients with or without T2DM. A decrease in RBP4 levels was only observed after surgically induced weight loss accompanied by relevant reductions in body fat. RBP4 might be considered as a dynamic marker of negative energy balance being reduced during weight loss when a negative energy balance threshold is reached. Furthermore, RBP4 variation in the first month after RYGBP may be a predictor of weight loss success.

  11. Sensitive ECL immunosensor for detection of retinol-binding protein based on double-assisted signal amplification strategy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Ru(bpy)3(2+) doped mesoporous silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Beina; Hu, Chenyi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Cao, Hongmei; Huang, Chusen; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2013-12-15

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy based on the sandwich-type immunosensor for sensitive detection of retinol-binding protein (RBP) was developed. The primary antibody anti-RBP was immobilized onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which have large surface area and high electrical conductivity. The RBP antigen and Ru-Nafion@SiO2-labeled secondary antibody were then successively conjugated to form sandwich-type immunocomplexes through the specific interaction between antigen and antibody. The ECL signal amplification was significantly improved due to the synergistic effect of MWCNTs and mesoporous silica nanospheres (mSiO2). The developed ECL immunosensor exhibited high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of RBP and responded linearly to the clinically-relevant concentration of RBP from 78 to 5000 ng mL(-1). Moreover, the MWCNT-based ECL immunosensor displayed excellent stability and reproducibility, as well as successfully achieved the detection of RBP in patient urine samples with desirable results. The present work provided a promising technique for the clinical screening of RBP and point-of-care diagnostics.

  12. Retinoid Content, Visual Responses, and Ocular Morphology Are Compromised in the Retinas of Mice Lacking the Retinol-Binding Protein Receptor, STRA6

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Alberto; Mark, Manuel; Jacobs, Hugues; Klopfenstein, Muriel; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Habib, Samer; Tosha, Chinatsu; Radu, Roxana A; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Nusinowitz, Steven; Bok, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We report generation of a mouse model in which the STRA6 gene has been disrupted functionally to facilitate the study of visual responses, changes in ocular morphology, and retinoid processing under STRA6 protein deficiency. Methods. A null mouse line, stra6 −/−, was generated. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry were used to determine expression of STRA6 protein. Visual responses and morphological studies were performed on 6-week, 5-month and 10-month-old mice. The retinoid content of eye tissues was evaluated in dark-adapted mice by high performance liquid chromatography. Results. STRA6 protein was not detectable in stra6 −/− null mice, which had a consistent reduction, but not total ablation of their visual responses. The mice also showed significant depletion of their retinoid content in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neurosensory retina, including a 95% reduction in retinyl esters. At the morphological level, a reduction in thickness of the neurosensory retina due to shortening of the rod outer and inner segments was observed when compared to control litter mates with a commensurate reduction in rod a- and b-wave amplitudes. In addition, there was a reduction in cone photoreceptor cell number and cone b-wave amplitude. A typical hallmark in stra6 −/− null eyes was the presence of a persistent primary hypertrophic vitreous, an optically dense vascularized structure located in the vitreous humor between the posterior surface of the lens and neurosensory retina. Conclusions. Our studies of stra6 −/− null mice established the importance of the STRA6 protein for the uptake, intracellular transport, and processing of retinol by the RPE. In its absence, rod photoreceptor outer and inner segment length was reduced, and cone cell numbers were reduced, as were scotopic and photopic responses. STRA6 also was required for dissolution of the primary vitreous. However, it was clear from these studies that STRA6 is not the only pathway for

  13. Transcriptional activity of the murine retinol-binding protein gene is regulated by a multiprotein complex containing HMGA1, p54 nrb/NonO, protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1)/liver receptor homologue 1 (LRH-1).

    PubMed

    Bianconcini, Adriana; Lupo, Angelo; Capone, Silvana; Quadro, Loredana; Monti, Maria; Zurlo, Diana; Fucci, Alessandra; Sabatino, Lina; Brunetti, Antonio; Chiefari, Eusebio; Gottesman, Max E; Blaner, William S; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2009-11-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP4) transports retinol in the circulation from hepatic stores to peripheral tissues. Since little is known regarding the regulation of this gene, we analysed the cis-regulatory sequences of the mouse RBP4 gene. Our data show that transcription of the gene is regulated through a bipartite promoter: a proximal region necessary for basal expression and a distal segment responsible for cAMP-induction. This latter region contains several binding sites for the structural HMGA1 proteins, which are important to promoter regulation. We further demonstrate that HMGA1s play a key role in basal and cAMP-induction of Rbp4 transcription and the RBP4 and HMGA1 genes are coordinately regulated in vitro and in vivo. HMGA1 acts to recruit transcription factors to the RBP4 promoter and we specifically identified p54(nrb)/NonO and protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as components that interact with this complex. Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) or the related liver receptor homologue 1 (LRH-1) are also associated with this complex upon cAMP-induction. Depletion of SF1/LRH-1 by RNA interference resulted in a dramatic loss of cAMP-induction. Collectively, our results demonstrate that basal and cAMP-induced Rbp4 transcription is regulated by a multiprotein complex that is similar to ones that modulate expression of genes of steroid hormone biosynthesis. Since genes related to glucose metabolism are regulated in a similar fashion, this suggests that Rbp4 expression may be regulated as part of a network of pathways relevant to the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Biochemical Properties of Purified Human Retinol Dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12): Catalytic Efficiency toward Retinoids and C9 Aldehydes and Effects of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein Type I (CRBPI) and Cellular Retinaldehyde-Binding Protein (CRALBP) on the Oxidation and Reduction of Retinoids†

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Korkina, Olga V.; Stetsenko, Anton V.; Kim, Tom; Nelson, Peter S.; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2008-01-01

    Retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) is a novel member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of proteins that was recently linked to Leber’s congenital amaurosis 3 (LCA). We report the first biochemical characterization of purified human RDH12 and analysis of its expression in human tissues. RDH12 exhibits ~2000-fold lower Km values for NADP+ and NADPH than for NAD+ and NADH and recognizes both retinoids and lipid peroxidation products (C9 aldehydes) as substrates. The kcat values of RDH12 for retinaldehydes and C9 aldehydes are similar, but the Km values are, in general, lower for retinoids. The enzyme exhibits the highest catalytic efficiency for all-trans-retinal (kcat/Km ~900 min−1 μM−1), followed by 11-cis-retinal (450 min−1 mM−1) and 9-cis-retinal (100 min−1 mM−1). Analysis of RDH12 activity toward retinoids in the presence of cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) type I or cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) suggests that RDH12 utilizes the unbound forms of all-trans- and 11-cis-retinoids. As a result, the widely expressed CRBPI, which binds all-trans-retinol with much higher affinity than all-trans-retinaldehyde, restricts the oxidation of all-trans-retinol by RDH12, but has little effect on the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde, and CRALBP inhibits the reduction of 11-cis-retinal stronger than the oxidation of 11-cis-retinol, in accord with its higher affinity for 11-cis-retinal. Together, the tissue distribution of RDH12 and its catalytic properties suggest that, in most tissues, RDH12 primarily contributes to the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde; however, at saturating concentrations of peroxidic aldehydes in the cells undergoing oxidative stress, for example, photoreceptors, RDH12 might also play a role in detoxification of lipid peroxidation products. PMID:15865448

  15. Biochemical properties of purified human retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12): catalytic efficiency toward retinoids and C9 aldehydes and effects of cellular retinol-binding protein type I (CRBPI) and cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) on the oxidation and reduction of retinoids.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Korkina, Olga V; Stetsenko, Anton V; Kim, Tom; Nelson, Peter S; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2005-05-10

    Retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) is a novel member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of proteins that was recently linked to Leber's congenital amaurosis 3 (LCA). We report the first biochemical characterization of purified human RDH12 and analysis of its expression in human tissues. RDH12 exhibits approximately 2000-fold lower K(m) values for NADP(+) and NADPH than for NAD(+) and NADH and recognizes both retinoids and lipid peroxidation products (C(9) aldehydes) as substrates. The k(cat) values of RDH12 for retinaldehydes and C(9) aldehydes are similar, but the K(m) values are, in general, lower for retinoids. The enzyme exhibits the highest catalytic efficiency for all-trans-retinal (k(cat)/K(m) approximately 900 min(-)(1) microM(-)(1)), followed by 11-cis-retinal (450 min(-)(1) mM(-)(1)) and 9-cis-retinal (100 min(-)(1) mM(-)(1)). Analysis of RDH12 activity toward retinoids in the presence of cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) type I or cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) suggests that RDH12 utilizes the unbound forms of all-trans- and 11-cis-retinoids. As a result, the widely expressed CRBPI, which binds all-trans-retinol with much higher affinity than all-trans-retinaldehyde, restricts the oxidation of all-trans-retinol by RDH12, but has little effect on the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde, and CRALBP inhibits the reduction of 11-cis-retinal stronger than the oxidation of 11-cis-retinol, in accord with its higher affinity for 11-cis-retinal. Together, the tissue distribution of RDH12 and its catalytic properties suggest that, in most tissues, RDH12 primarily contributes to the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde; however, at saturating concentrations of peroxidic aldehydes in the cells undergoing oxidative stress, for example, photoreceptors, RDH12 might also play a role in detoxification of lipid peroxidation products.

  16. Consumption of fructose- but not glucose-sweetened beverages for 10 weeks increases circulating concentrations of uric acid, retinol binding protein-4, and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity in overweight/obese humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective studies in humans examining the effects of fructose consumption on biological markers associated with the development of metabolic syndrome are lacking. Therefore we investigated the relative effects of 10 wks of fructose or glucose consumption on plasma uric acid and RBP-4 concentrations, as well as liver enzyme (AST, ALT, and GGT) activities in men and women. Methods As part of a parallel arm study, older (age 40–72), overweight and obese male and female subjects (BMI 25–35 kg/m2) consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 wks. Fasting and 24-h blood collections were performed at baseline and following 10 wks of intervention and plasma concentrations of uric acid, RBP-4 and liver enzyme activities were measured. Results Consumption of fructose, but not glucose, led to significant increases of 24-h uric acid profiles (P < 0.0001) and RBP-4 concentrations (P = 0.012), as well as plasma GGT activity (P = 0.04). Fasting plasma uric acid concentrations increased in both groups; however, the response was significantly greater in subjects consuming fructose (P = 0.002 for effect of sugar). Within the fructose group male subjects exhibited larger increases of RBP-4 levels than women (P = 0.024). Conclusions These findings suggest that consumption of fructose at 25% of energy requirements for 10 wks, compared with isocaloric consumption of glucose, may contribute to the development of components of the metabolic syndrome by increasing circulating uric acid, GGT activity, suggesting alteration of hepatic function, and the production of RBP-4. PMID:22828276

  17. Retinol binding proteinuria and phosphaturia: markers of paracetamol-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Florkowski, C M; Jones, A F; Guy, J M; Husband, D J; Stevens, J

    1994-07-01

    The occurrence of hypophosphataemia in paracetamol overdose suggests that nephrotoxicity is common, impaired renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate indicating renal damage. To investigate the potential nephrotoxicity of paracetamol, we studied 148 consecutive patients with paracetamol overdose. Serial clinical and biochemical measurements were made, and a fasting overnight urine collection was obtained for creatinine (Cr), phosphate and retinol-binding protein (RBP) determination. Renal threshold phosphate concentration (TmPO4/GFR) was determined from urinary parameters by an established nomogram. The degree of hypophosphataemia correlated with the severity of overdose, and with TmPO4/GFR. The median RBP/Cr ratio was higher in those patients exhibiting biochemical hepatotoxicity compared with those without hepatotoxicity, in whom median RBP/Cr was not significantly higher than controls. Within the group of patients showing biochemical hepatotoxicity, there was a correlation between log RBP/Cr and TmPO4/GFR. RBP/Cr ratio is a less sensitive marker of renal tubular toxicity than phosphaturia in these patients, and may indicate a different mechanism of toxicity.

  18. Advanced Developments of Electron Spin Labeling as High-Resolution Sensors of Protein Structure and Conformational Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Myoglobin (Myb) and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein (CRBP) were prepared, and the corresponding EPR spectra analyzed by simulation techniques. In...unprecedented level of sophistication in interpretation of the EPR spectra of labeled proteins, and establish the feasibility of separating structural and...protein as well as local structure, but to date the level of interpretation has been largely qualitative and it has not been possible to separate the

  19. Novel retinoid-binding proteins from filarial parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, B P; Vaid, A; Comley, J C; Montgomery, J A

    1985-01-01

    The present study deals with the discovery and partial characterization of specific binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid from filarial parasites (worms of the superfamily Filarioidea), including those from two species of Onchocerca. These binding proteins, which are distinct in their physicochemical properties and in the mode of ligand interactions from the host-tissue retinoid-binding proteins, may be involved in the mediation of the putative biological roles of retinoids in the control of parasitic growth, differentiation and reproduction. Parasite retinol-binding protein and retinoic acid-binding protein exhibited specificity for binding retinol and retinoic acid respectively. Both the binding proteins showed an s20,w value of 2.0 S. On gel filtration, both proteins were retarded to a position corresponding to the same molecular size (19.0 kDa). On preparative columns, the parasite binding proteins exhibited isoelectric points at pH 5.7 and 5.75. Unlike the retinoid-binding proteins of mammalian and avian origin, the parasite retinoid-binding proteins showed a lack of mercurial sensitivity in ligand binding. The comparative amounts of retinoic acid-binding protein in five parasites, Onchocerca volvulus, Onchocerca gibsoni, Dipetalonema viteae, Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis, were between 2.7 and 3.1 pmol of retinoic acid bound/mg of extractable protein. However, the levels of parasite retinol-binding protein were between 4.8 and 5.8 pmol/mg, which is considerably higher than the corresponding levels of cellular retinol-binding protein of mammalian and avian origin. Both retinol- and retinoic acid-binding-protein levels in O. volvulus-infected human nodules and O. gibsoni-infected bovine nodules were similar to their levels in mammalian tissues. Also, these nodular binding proteins, like the host-binding proteins, exhibited mercurial sensitivity to ligand interactions. PMID:3004410

  20. Disruption of the transthyretin gene results in mice with depressed levels of plasma retinol and thyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Episkopou, V; Maeda, S; Nishiguchi, S; Shimada, K; Gaitanaris, G A; Gottesman, M E; Robertson, E J

    1993-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is thought to play a major role in vitamin A metabolism and thyroid hormone transport in mammals. To investigate the physiological role of the TTR protein in development of the embryo and in the adult, we used gene targeting techniques to generate a null mutation at the mouse ttr locus. The resultant mutant animals are phenotypically normal, viable, and fertile. However, levels of serum retinol, retinol-binding protein, and thyroid hormone are significantly depressed in the mutant animals. These observations demonstrate that the TTR protein maintains normal levels of these metabolites in the circulating plasma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8384721

  1. Blood profiling of proteins and steroids during weight maintenance with manipulation of dietary protein level and glycaemic index.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Holst, Claus; Astrup, Arne; Bouwman, Freek G; van Otterdijk, Sanne; Wodzig, Will K W H; Andersen, Malene R; van Baak, Marleen A; Rasmussen, Lone G; Martinez, J Alfredo; Jebb, Susan A; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Kafatos, Anthony; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Hlavaty, Petr; Saris, Wim H M; Mariman, Edwin C M

    2012-01-01

    Weight regain after weight loss is common. In the Diogenes dietary intervention study, a high-protein and low-glycaemic index (GI) diet improved weight maintenance. The objective of the present study was to identify (1) blood profiles associated with continued weight loss and weight regain (2) blood biomarkers of dietary protein and GI levels during the weight-maintenance phase. Blood samples were collected at baseline, after 8 weeks of low-energy diet-induced weight loss and after a 6-month dietary intervention period from female continued weight losers (n 48) and weight regainers (n 48), evenly selected from four dietary groups that varied in protein and GI levels. The blood concentrations of twenty-nine proteins and three steroid hormones were measured. The changes in analytes during weight maintenance largely correlated negatively with the changes during weight loss, with some differences between continued weight losers and weight regainers. Increases in leptin (LEP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were significantly associated with weight regain (P < 0·001 and P = 0·005, respectively), and these relationships were influenced by the diet. Consuming a high-protein and high-GI diet dissociated the positive relationship between the change in LEP concentration and weight regain. CRP increased during the weight-maintenance period only in weight regainers with a high-protein diet (P < 0·001). In addition, testosterone, luteinising hormone, angiotensinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, resistin, retinol-binding protein 4, insulin, glucagon, haptoglobin and growth hormone were also affected by the dietary intervention. The blood profile reflects not only the weight change during the maintenance period, but also the macronutrient composition of the dietary intervention, especially the protein level.

  2. Transport proteins and acute phase reactant proteins in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, R. P.; Kuvibidila, S.; Gordon, L.; Humbert, J.

    1994-01-01

    Transport proteins, acute-phase reactant proteins (APRP), hematology, and anthropometry were studied in 34 sickle cell disease (SCD) children (20 boys, 14 girls) and 27 controls without growth deficits (13 boys, 14 girls) [corrected]. The age range was 1/2 to 16 1/2 years. Weight deficits (< 80%) by Waterlow's classification were observed in 41% of SCD boys and 25% of SCD girls, and height deficits (< 90%) were observed in 25% SCD boys and 25% girls. Mean white blood cell counts were significantly higher (P < .001) and hematocrit and hemoglobin (Hb) lower (P < .005) in SCD children than in controls. Although both groups had similar mean levels of albumin, transferrin, and APRP, SCD children had significantly lower mean levels of retinol-binding protein (RBP) (P < .001) and retinol-prealbumin (P < .001). Retinol-binding protein levels were abnormal in 18 (53%) SCD children and in only 23% controls (chi 2 = 14.06; P < 0.005); transferrin levels were abnormal in 20% of SCD children and in none of the controls. Children with SC and SF Hb phenotype had normal mean levels of RBP, whereas those with S beta thal and SS phenotype had levels below normal. Growth-retarded children by weight and height had reduced mean levels of RBP and prealbumin compared with growth-normal SCD children. The implication of primary protein-energy malnutrition on growth retardation in SCD children is under study. PMID:7512147

  3. Prevalence of protein calorie malnutrition in general surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y S; Nambiar, R; Yo, S L

    1992-05-01

    The prevalence of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) based on ten nutritional parameters was studied in 307 patients undergoing major elective surgical operations. These parameters included anthropometric measurements (weight/height, triceps skin fold thickness, arm muscle circumference) and biochemical (serum total proteins, albumin, transferrin, prealbumin, retinol binding protein) and immunological tests (total lymphocyte count and delayed hypersensitivity test). Using these criteria, the prevalence of PCM was high. Eighty-six percent of patients had at least one abnormal parameter. The prevalence of PCM as judged by weight/height and arm muscle circumference was 49% and 62% respectively. The incidence was higher in cancer than non cancer patients (63% vs 43%). Although serum albumin and total protein levels were normal in 93.5% of patients, acute serum protein markers such as transferrin, prealbumin and retinol binding protein were low in 20-30%. Lymphopenia of 1500 cells/cu mm or less was found in 18% and abnormal delayed hypersensitivity test in 60%. We found that only weight/height, serum protein, transferrin and lymphopenia had predictive values in postoperative morbidity and mortality. By identifying PCM patients early, adequate nutritional support can be given in order to reduce the risk of major surgical complications.

  4. Changes in serum adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and normal pregnant women during mid- and late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hao-Hang; Lu, Jia-Hui; Zheng, Si-Yuan; Long, Tao; Li, Ying-Tao; Wu, Wei-Zhen; Wang, Fang

    2016-09-01

    To observe the longitudinal changes in serum adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP), carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism parameters in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during mid- and late pregnancy periods, as well as to identify whether there is any association between AFABP and development of GDM. A total of 40 GDM and 240 normal glucose tolerance participants were enrolled at 24-28 weeks and completed the study. The clinical features, serum AFABP, other adipocytokines (leptin, adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and lipid profiles were measured in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Compared with the normal glucose tolerance group, the GDM group showed greater levels of AFABP, leptin and retinol-binding protein 4; and a decreased level of adiponectin (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) during mid- and late pregnancy periods. Prepregnancy body mass index was the independent factor impacting serum AFABP levels in the second (β = 0.567, P = 0.004) and third trimesters (β = 0.619, P = 0.001). Furthermore, GDM was independently associated with AFABP concentrations in multiple regression analysis in the second and third trimester (all P < 0.01). Serum AFABP, leptin and retinol-binding protein 4 are risk factors for GDM; adiponectin is a protective factor for GDM (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The GDM group had a higher level of AFABP during mid- and late stages of pregnancy; prepregnancy body mass index and GDM were the independent factors with respect to serum AFABP. AFABP might be closely related to obesity, insulin resistance and leptin resistance in pregnancy, and is a major risk factor for GDM. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Decreased levels of aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doppler, Kathrin; Schütt, Morten; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by increased intracranial pressure. Its pathogenesis is largely unknown. Aquaporins may play a role in the homeostasis of cerebrospinal fluid. We aimed to elucidate the role of aquaporins in idiopathic intracranial hypertension by measuring the level of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of 28 patients and 29 controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adipokines leptin and retinol-binding protein 4 were also measured. We found a reduction in aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Leptin levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients and were correlated with weight, body mass index and body fat. There was no difference between patients and controls in the levels of aquaporin-4 and retinol-binding protein 4. Our data suggest that an imbalance of aquaporin-4 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension may contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder. © International Headache Society 2016.

  6. Uterocalin, a lipocalin provisioning the preattachment equine conceptus: fatty acid and retinol binding properties, and structural characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Suire, S; Stewart, F; Beauchamp, J; Kennedy, M W

    2001-01-01

    The equine conceptus is surrounded by a fibrous capsule that persists until about day 20 of pregnancy, whereupon the capsule is lost, the conceptus attaches to the endometrium and placentation proceeds. Before attachment, the endometrium secretes in abundance a protein of the lipocalin family, uterocalin. The cessation of secretion coincides with the end of the period during which the conceptus is enclosed in its capsule, suggesting that uterocalin is essential for the support of the embryo before direct contact between maternal and foetal tissues is established. Using recombinant protein and fluorescence-based assays, we show that equine uterocalin binds the fluorescent fatty acids 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid, dansyl-D,L-alpha-amino-octanoic acid and cis-parinaric acid, and, by competition, oleic, palmitic, arachidonic, docosahexaenoic, gamma-linolenic, cis-eicosapentaenoic and linoleic acids. Uterocalin also binds all-trans-retinol, the binding site for which is coincident or interactive with that for fatty acids. Molecular modelling and intrinsic fluorescence analysis of the wild-type protein and a Trp-->Glu mutant protein indicated that uterocalin has an unusually solvent-exposed Trp side chain projecting from its large helix directly into solvent. This feature is unusual among lipocalins and might relate to binding to, and uptake by, the trophoblast. Uterocalin therefore has the localization and binding activities for the provisioning of the equine conceptus with lipids including those essential for morphogenesis and pattern formation. The possession of a fibrous capsule surrounding the conceptus might be an ancestral condition in mammals; homologues of uterocalin might be essential for early development in marsupials and in eutherians in which there is a prolonged preimplantation period. PMID:11368763

  7. Effects of a Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program on C1q/TNF-Related Protein-3 (CTRP-3) and CTRP-5 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hae Yoon; Park, Ji Woo; Lee, Namseok; Hwang, Soon Young; Cho, Geum Ju; Hong, Ho Cheol; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hwang, Taek Geun; Kim, Seon Mi; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Kyong Soo; Youn, Byung-Soo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of a combined exercise program on C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) 3 and CTRP-5 levels and novel adiponectin paralogs suggested to be links between metabolism and inflammation and to evaluate sex differences and association with cardiometabolic risk factors in humans with use of a newly developed ELISA. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This cross-sectional study explored the implications of CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 on cardiometabolic parameters in 453 nondiabetic Korean adults. In addition, we evaluated the impact of a 3-month combined exercise program on CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 levels in 76 obese women. The exercise program consisted of 45 min of aerobic exercise at an intensity of 60–75% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate (300 kcal/session) and 20 min of resistance training (100 kcal/session) five times per week. RESULTS Both CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 concentrations were significantly higher in women (P < 0.001) than in men (P = 0.030). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, CTRP-3 levels were independently associated with age, sex, and triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, adiponectin, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels (R2 = 0.182). After 3 months of a combined exercise program, cardiometabolic risk factors, including components of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and RBP4 levels, decreased significantly. In particular, CTRP-3 levels decreased significantly (median [interquartile range] 444.3 [373.8–535.0] to 374.4 [297.2–435.9], P < 0.001), whereas CTRP-5 levels were slightly increased (34.1 [28.6–44.3] to 38.4 [29.8–55.1], P = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS A 3-month combined exercise program significantly decreased CTRP-3 levels and modestly increased CTRP-5 levels in obese Korean women. PMID:23780948

  8. Specificity of Odor Recognition: The Three-Dimensional Structure of an Odorant Binding Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    results so far with molecular replacement with Insecto - cyanin did not look hopeful. Hence, we are proceeding with the methods that use heavy-atom...proteins -Retinol binding Protein (RBP), a-lactoglobulin and Insecto - cyanin- have known three-dimensional structures. In tracing the polypeptide chain

  9. Chlormethiazole treatment prevents reduced hepatic vitamin A levels in ethanol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chung, Jayong; Seitz, Helmut K; Russell, Robert M; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2002-11-01

    Chronic ethanol intake results in decreased hepatic vitamin A levels through both enhanced degradation of vitamin A via a cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP)-dependent process and increased mobilization of vitamin A from the liver into the circulation. This study investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole, a CYP inhibitor, restores vitamin A in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol-exposed and non-ethanol-exposed rats were treated with or without chlormethiazole (10 and 100 mg/kg body weight) for 1 month. Liver and plasma levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Expressions of hepatic lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and cellular retinol-binding protein were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Hepatic retinol esterification by LRAT was examined by using incubations of the microsomal fractions of livers with exogenous sources of retinol. Ethanol-feeding in rats for a month resulted in lower hepatic levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate than those found in controls and the occurrence of several polar retinoid metabolites. In contrast, treatment with chlormethiazole at two different doses in ethanol-fed rats completely blocked the formation of hepatic retinoid polar metabolites and restored hepatic levels of retinol and hepatic retinyl palmitate in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increased plasma concentrations of retinyl palmitate in rats fed with ethanol, which indicate increased mobilization of vitamin A, were partially inhibited by chlormethiazole treatment. However, neither ethanol nor chlormethiazole treatment altered the expression and activity of LRAT in the liver of rats. Hepatic expression of cellular retinol-binding protein increased significantly in ethanol-fed rats with or without chlormethiazole treatment compared with control rats. These data suggest that chlormethiazole can restore both hepatic retinol and retinyl ester concentrations to normal levels

  10. All-trans-retinoic acid and retinol binding to the FA1 site of human serum albumin competitively inhibits heme-Fe(III) association.

    PubMed

    Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; di Masi, Alessandra; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2016-01-15

    Retinoids are a class of chemicals derived from vitamin A metabolism, playing important and diverse functions. Vitamin A, also named all-trans-retinol (all-trans-ROL), is coverted into two classes of biologically active retinoids, i.e. 11-cis-retinoids and acidic retinoids. Among acidic retinoids, all-trans-retinoic acid (all-trans-RA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) represent the main metabolic products. Specific and aspecific proteins solubilize, protect, and detoxify retinoids in the extracellular environment. The retinoid binding protein 4 (RBP4), the epididymal retinoid-binding protein (ERBP), and the interphotoreceptor matrix retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) play a central role in ROL transport, whereas lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (also named β-trace) and human serum albumin (HSA) transport preferentially all-trans-RA. Here, the modulatory effect of all-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL on ferric heme (heme-Fe(III)) binding to HSA is reported. All-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL binding to the FA1 site of HSA competitively inhibit heme-Fe(III) association. Docking simulations and local structural comparison of HSA with all-trans-RA- and all-trans-ROL-binding proteins support functional data indicating the preferential binding of all-trans-RA and all-trans-ROL to the FA1 site of HSA. Present results may be relevant in vivo, in fact HSA could act as a secondary carrier of retinoids in human diseases associated with reduced levels of RBP4 and IRBP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of vitreous proteins in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Koji; Saito, Akio; Kusaka, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2017-07-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disorder of blood vessels in the retina developed in premature infants and the leading cause of the blindness in children. Proteomic analysis was performed to identify vitreous proteins specific to patients with ROP. Vitreous humor samples were obtained from three patients with ROP and two patients with congenital cataract, the latter included as a control group. The vitreous samples were separated by 2D-PAGE and the proteins running as definitive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry. We identified 13 and 6 proteins in the vitreous from ROP and cataract patients, respectively. Albumin, transferrin, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and transthyretin were found in both patient groups. In the samples from ROP patients, PEDF and transthyretin levels were lower than in those from cataract patients, and retinol binding protein 3 and prostaglandin D synthase were not detected. Of the 13 proteins, 9 proteins including α-2-macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, α-fetoprotein, vitamin D-binding protein, α-1-antitrypsin, α-1-β-glycoprotein, hemopexin, apolipoprotein A-1 and A-lV were found in vitreous samples of only the ROP patients. PEDF has anti-angiogenic and neurotrophic functions. Whether PEDF is increased or decreased in diabetic retinopathy has been controversial but we observed lower PEDF in the ROP samples than in the controls. The proteins specific to or decreased in ROP, if confirmed in future studies, may provide clue to understanding its pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamic parameters of the binding of retinol to binding proteins and to membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, N.; Xu, Z.J. )

    1990-04-24

    Retinol (vitamin A alcohol) is a hydrophobic compound and distributes in vivo mainly between binding proteins and cellular membranes. To better clarify the nature of the interactions of retinol with these phases which have a high affinity for it, the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions were studied. The temperature-dependence profiles of the binding of retinol to bovine retinol binding protein, bovine serum albumin, unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, and plasma membranes from rat liver were determined. It was found that binding of retinol to retinol binding protein is characterized by a large increase in entropy and no change in enthalpy. Binding to albumin is driven by enthalpy and is accompanied by a decrease in entropy. Partitioning of retinal into unilamellar vesicles and into plasma membranes is stabilized both by enthalpic and by entropic components. The implications of these finding are discussed.

  13. [Protein profile and vitamin A in children of school age in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Yapi, H F; Ahiboh, H; Ago, K; Aké, M; Monnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this transverse prospective study was to determine blood nutritional, immunity and inflammatory proteins change in vitamin A deficiency in children of school-age (262 children, aged 7 to 15 years). Blood vitamin A has been determined by HPLC with UV detection. Proteins have been measured by radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. Results showed that 96 children (36.6%) presented a vitamin A deficiency (vitamin A < 200 microg/L with a retinol binding protein/transthyretin molar ratio = 0.29 +/- 0.06) while 166 (63.3%) children presented normal blood concentrations of vitamin A (vitamin A > or = 200 microg/L with a Retinol Binding Protein/Transthyretin molar ratio = 0.40 +/- 0.08). This study showed that the retinol binding protein and the immunoglobulin A are lower in children with vitamin A deficiency. On the other hand, an isolated increase of alpha-1 glycoprotein acid has been observed in boys with vitamin A deficiency. The vitamin A deficiency observed in this survey is due to a micronutrients deficiency in the diet which is essentially based on glucides. The positive correlation between vitamin A and immunoglobulin A concentrations might be the result of the vitamin A inductive effect during immunoglobulins A synthesis. The isolated increasing of alpha-1 glycoprotein acid in boys with vitamin A deficiency has been assigned to the ecosensitiveness of the unfavourable environment. We therefore concluded that, in Ivorian primary-school-aged children with vitamin A deficiency, nutritional, immunity and inflammatory proteins which are modified are respectively retinol binding protein, immunoglobulin A and alpha-1 glycoprotein acid.

  14. Urinary proteins in children with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Lena; Preda, Iulian; Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana; Hanson, Lars A; Jodal, Ulf; Sixt, Rune; Barregard, Lars; Hansson, Sverker

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that the urinary excretion of C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha 1-microglobulin (A1M), retinol-binding protein (RBP) and Clara cell protein (CC16) is increased in children with urinary tract infection (UTI) and relates to renal damage as measured by acute dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy. Fifty-two children <2 years of age with UTI were enrolled in the study, 44 of whom were febrile. The control group consisted of 23 patients with non-UTI infection and elevated serum CRP (s-CRP) levels. Thirty-six patients had abnormal DMSA uptake, classified as mild, moderate or severe damage (DMSA class 1, 2, 3, respectively). There was a significant association between DMSA class and the excretion of urinary RBP (u-RBP) and u-CC16. There was also a significant difference in u-CRP levels between children with UTI and control children with non-UTI infections, although u-CRP excretion was not significantly correlated to DMSA class. In conclusion, the urinary excretion of the low-molecular-weight proteins RBP and CC16 showed a strong association with uptake defects on renal DMSA scans. The urinary level of CRP seems to distinguish between children with UTI and other febrile conditions. A combination of these biomarkers may be useful in the clinical assessment of children with UTI.

  15. Genome-wide association study of circulating retinol levels.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Hong; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Major, Jacqueline M; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Männistö, Satu; Hazra, Aditi; Hsing, Ann W; Jacobs, Kevin B; Eliassen, Heather; Tanaka, Toshiko; Reding, Douglas J; Hendrickson, Sara; Ferrucci, Luigi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-12-01

    Retinol is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin A and is hypothesized to influence a wide range of human diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 5006 Caucasian individuals drawn from two cohorts of men: the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We identified two independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating retinol levels, which are located near the transthyretin (TTR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) genes which encode major carrier proteins of retinol: rs1667255 (P =2.30× 10(-17)) and rs10882272 (P =6.04× 10(-12)). We replicated the association with rs10882272 in RBP4 in independent samples from the Nurses' Health Study and the Invecchiare in Chianti Study (InCHIANTI) that included 3792 women and 504 men (P =9.49× 10(-5)), but found no association for retinol with rs1667255 in TTR among women, thus suggesting evidence for gender dimorphism (P-interaction=1.31× 10(-5)). Discovery of common genetic variants associated with serum retinol levels may provide further insight into the contribution of retinol and other vitamin A compounds to the development of cancer and other complex diseases.

  16. Mapping the interactions of dengue virus NS1 protein with human liver proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system: identification of C1q as an interacting partner.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emiliana M; Conde, Jonas N; Allonso, Diego; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    Dengue constitutes a global health concern. The clinical manifestation of this disease varies from mild febrile illness to severe hemorrhage and/or fatal hypovolemic shock. Flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a secreted glycoprotein that is displayed on the surface of infected cells but is absent in viral particles. NS1 accumulates at high levels in the plasma of dengue virus (DENV)-infected patients, and previous reports highlight its involvement in immune evasion, dengue severity, liver dysfunction and pathogenesis. In the present study, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to search for DENV2 NS1-interacting partners using a human liver cDNA library. We identified fifty genes, including human complement component 1 (C1q), which was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, ELISA and immunofluorescence assays, revealing for the first time the direct binding of this protein to NS1. Furthermore, the majority of the identified genes encode proteins that are secreted into the plasma of patients, and most of these proteins are classified as acute-phase proteins (APPs), such as plasminogen, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, retinol binding protein 4, transferrin, and C4. The results presented here confirm the direct interaction of DENV NS1 with a key protein of the complement system and suggest a role for this complement protein in the pathogenesis of DENV infection.

  17. Functions of Intracellular Retinoid Binding-Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Multiple binding and transport proteins facilitate many aspects of retinoid biology through effects on retinoid transport, cellular uptake, metabolism, and nuclear delivery. These include the serum retinol binding protein sRBP (aka Rbp4), the plasma membrane sRBP receptor Stra6, and the intracellular retinoid binding-proteins such as cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP). sRBP transports the highly lipophilic retinol through an aqueous medium. The major intracellular retinol-binding protein, CRBP1, likely enhances efficient retinoid use by providing a sink to facilitate retinol uptake from sRBP through the plasma membrane or via Stra6, delivering retinol or retinal to select enzymes that generate retinyl esters or retinoic acid, and protecting retinol/retinal from excess catabolism or opportunistic metabolism. Intracellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP1 and 2, and FABP5) seem to have more diverse functions distinctive to each, such as directing retinoic acid to catabolism, delivering retinoic acid to specific nuclear receptors, and generating non-canonical actions. Gene ablation of intracellular retinoid binding-proteins does not cause embryonic lethality or gross morphological defects. Metabolic and functional defects manifested in knockouts of CRBP1, CRBP2 and CRBP3, however, illustrate their essentiality to health, and in the case of CRBP2, to survival during limited dietary vitamin A. Future studies should continue to address the specific molecular interactions that occur between retinoid binding-proteins and their targets and their precise physiologic contributions to retinoid homeostasis and function. PMID:27830500

  18. Retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins in methionine-choline deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Koh, Maki; Inoue, Akiko; Kishi, Kanta; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Retinol and its derivative, retinoic acid, have pleiotropic functions including vision, immunity, hematopoiesis, reproduction, cell differentiation/growth, and development. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common diseases in developed countries and encompasses a broad spectrum of forms, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis, which develops further to cirrhosis. Retinol status has an important role in liver homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins, including enzymes and binding proteins, in methionine-choline deficient (MCD) rats as a model of NAFLD. We examined retinol levels in the plasma and liver and gene expression for β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), lecithIn: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), ALDH1A2, and cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)-I in MCD rats. The plasma retinol levels in MCD rats were lower than those in the controls, whereas hepatic retinol levels in MCD rats were higher. BCMO expression in the intestine and liver in MCD rats was lower, whereas that in the testes and the kidneys was higher than in control rats. Expression of LRAT, CRBP-I, ALDH1A1, and ALDH1A2 in the liver of MCD rats was also higher. Altered expression of retinol-related proteins may affect retinol status in NAFLD.

  19. ProteinArchitect: protein evolution above the sequence level.

    PubMed

    Haimel, Matthias; Pröll, Karin; Rebhan, Michael

    2009-07-15

    While many authors have discussed models and tools for studying protein evolution at the sequence level, molecular function is usually mediated by complex, higher order features such as independently folding domains and linear motifs that are based on or embedded in a particular arrangment of features such as secondary structure elements, transmembrane domains and regions with intrinsic disorder. This 'protein architecture' can, in its most simplistic representation, be visualized as domain organization cartoons that can be used to compare proteins in terms of the order of their mostly globular domains. Here, we describe a visual approach and a webserver for protein comparison that extend the domain organization cartoon concept. By developing an information-rich, compact visualization of different protein features above the sequence level, potentially related proteins can be compared at the level of propensities for secondary structure, transmembrane domains and intrinsic disorder, in addition to PFAM domains. A public Web server is available at www.proteinarchitect.net, while the code is provided at protarchitect.sourceforge.net. Due to recent advances in sequencing technologies we are now flooded with millions of predicted proteins that await comparative analysis. In many cases, mature tools focused on revealing hits with considerable global or local similarity to well-characterized proteins will not be able to lead us to testable hypotheses about a protein's function, or the function of a particular region. The visual comparison of different types of protein features with ProteinArchitect will be useful when assessing the relevance of similarity search hits, to discover subgroups in protein families and superfamilies, and to understand protein regions with conserved features outside globular regions. Therefore, this approach is likely to help researchers to develop testable hypotheses about a protein's function even if is somewhat distant from the more

  20. Associations between proteins and heavy metals in urine at low environmental exposures: evidence of reverse causality.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Agnès; Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier; Lundh, Thomas; Skerfving, Staffan; Bernard, Alfred

    2012-05-05

    Heavy metals can cause renal effects on vulnerable populations but it is uncertain whether these metals still pose health risks at the low exposure levels now prevailing in most industrialized countries. In a cross-sectional study performed on 736 adolescents, we assessed the associations between the concentrations of cadmium and lead in blood and urine and the urinary concentrations of albumin and of low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteins, retinol-binding protein (RBP) and β(2)-microglobulin. Multiple regression analyses were tested using urinary markers normalized to urinary creatinine or specific gravity. Median metal concentrations were in blood (μg/L): lead, 15.1, cadmium, 0.18 and in urine (μg/g creatinine): cadmium, 0.09 and lead, 0.82. Multivariate analyses revealed significant associations in urine between RBP and cadmium as well as between β(2)-microglobulin and lead whereas no associations were seen with metals in blood. These associations were completely abolished in subjects with increased urinary albumin, which may be explained by the competitive inhibition of LMW protein reabsorption by albumin. Given the evidence that cadmium and lead circulate mainly bound to LMW proteins, these associations observed at low exposure might simply reflect the interindividual variations in the renal uptake of proteins sharing the same affinity for tubular binding sites.

  1. Plasma protein changes in horse after prolonged physical exercise: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Scoppetta, Fausto; Tartaglia, Micaela; Renzone, Giovanni; Avellini, Luca; Gaiti, Alberto; Scaloni, Andrea; Chiaradia, Elisabetta

    2012-07-19

    Physical exercise induces various stress responses and metabolic adaptations that have not yet been completely elucidated. Novel biomarkers are needed in sport veterinary medicine to monitor training levels and to detect subclinical conditions that can develop into exercise-related diseases. In this study, protein modifications in horse plasma induced by prolonged, aerobic physical exercise were investigated by using a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and combined mass spectrometry procedures. Thirty-eight protein spots, associated with expression products of 13 genes, showed significant quantitative changes; spots identified as membrane Cu amine oxidase, α-1 antitrypsin, α-1 antitrypsin-related protein, caeruloplasmin, α-2 macroglobulin and complement factor C4 were augmented in relative abundance after the race, while haptoglobin β chain, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin, retinol binding protein 4, fibrinogen γ chain, complement factor B and albumin fragments were reduced. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise affects plasma proteins involved in pathways related to inflammation, coagulation, immune modulation, oxidant/antioxidant activity and cellular and vascular damage, with consequent effects on whole horse metabolism.

  2. Redox proteomic analysis of serum from aortic anerurysm patients: insights on oxidation of specific protein target.

    PubMed

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Pupo, Gilda; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Giorgi, Alessandra; Blarzino, Carla; Nappi, Francesco; Sutherland, Fraser W; Chello, Massimo; Di Domenico, Fabio

    2016-06-21

    oxidative stress is undoubtedly one of the main players in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. Recent studies in AAA patients reported an increase in the indices of oxidative damage at the tissue level and in biological fluids coupled with the loss of counter-regulatory mechanisms of protection from oxidative stress. We recently reported, in a proteomic analysis of AAA patient sera, changes in the expression of several proteins exerting important modulatory activities on cellular proliferation, differentiation and response to damage. This study aimed to explore the involvement of protein oxidation, at peripheral levels, in AAA. a redox proteomic approach was used to investigate total and specific protein carbonylation and protein-bound 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in the serum of AAA patients compared with age-matched controls. our results show increased oxidative damage to protein as indexed by the total carbonyl levels and total protein-bound HNE. By redox proteomics we identified specific carbonylation of three serum proteins: serum retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein and fibrinogen α-chain HNE. We also identified increased protein-bound HNE levels for hemopexin, IgK chain C region and IgK chain V-III region SIE. In addition we found a high correlation between specific protein carbonylation and protein-bound HNE and the aortic diameter. Moreover the analysis of serum proteins with antioxidant activity demonstrates the oxidation of albumin together with the overexpression of transferrin, haptoglobin and HSPs 90, 70, 60 and 32. this study support the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AAA and might provide a further degree of knowledge in the cause-effect role of oxidative stress shedding new light on the molecular candidates involved in the disease.

  3. Protein-energy status and 15N-glycine kinetic study of child a cirrhotic patients fed low- to high-protein energy diets.

    PubMed

    Dichi, I; Dichi, J B; Papini-Berto, S J; Angeleli, A Y; Bicudo, M H; Rezende, T A; Burini, R C

    1996-01-01

    In five male cirrhotic patients (Child A) and in four age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, whole-body protein turnover was measured using a single oral dose of 15N-glycine as a tracer and urinary ammonia as end product. Subjects were studied in the fasting and feeding state, with different levels of protein and energy intake. The patients were underweight and presented lower plasma transthyretin and retinol-binding protein levels. When compared with controls, the kinetic studies showed patients to be hypometabolic in the fasting (D0) state and with the control diet [D1 = (0.85 g of protein/ 154 kJ) x kg-1.day-1]. However, when corrected by body weight, the kinetic differences between groups disappeared, whereas the N-retention in the feeding state showed better results for the patients due mainly to their efficient breakdown decrease. When fed high-level protein or energy diets [D1 = (0.9 g protein/195 kJ) and D3 = (1.56 g protein/158 kJ) x kg-1.day-1], the patients showed D0 = D1 = D2 < D3 for N-flux and (D0 = D1) < D3 (D2 is intermediary) for protein synthesis. Thus, the present data suggest that the remaining mass of the undernourished mild cirrhotic patients has fairly good protein synthesis activity and also that protein, rather than energy intake, would be the limiting factor for increasing their whole-body protein synthesis.

  4. Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers for the rapid extraction of proteins from urine matrices prior to detection with MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Manard, Benjamin T; Jones, Sarah M H; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    While MS is a powerful tool for biomarker determinations, the high salt content and the small molecules present in urine poses incredible challenges. Separation/extraction methods must be employed for the isolation of target species at relevant concentrations. Micropipette tips packed with capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are employed for the SPE of proteins from a synthetic and a certified urine matrix. Extractions are performed utilizing a very simple centrifugation method to spin-down species through the C-CP fiber tips. Proteins adsorb to the hydrophobic polypropylene fibers and are eluted in a solvent suitable for MALDI-MS analysis. Figures of merit are determined for representative compounds β2-microglobulin, retinol binding protein, and transferrin. The optimum protein processing included a 100 μL aqueous rinse and an elution solvent composition was 10 μL of 55:45 ACN:water (with triflouroacetic acid). MALDI-MS responses for the target proteins are improved from nondetectable levels to eventually yield LOD ranging from 5 to 180 nM in 1 μL aliquots. C-CP fiber tips offer a plethora of advantages including low materials costs, high throughput, microvolume processing, and the determination of sub-nanogram quantities of analyte; allowing determination of biomarkers that are otherwise undetectable in urine matrices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Renal and Neurologic Effects of Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in Children: Evidence of Early Effects and Multiple Interactions at Environmental Exposure Levels

    PubMed Central

    de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Leroyer, Ariane; Nisse, Catherine; Haguenoer, Jean-Marie; Mutti, Antonio; Smerhovský, Zdenek; Cikrt, Miroslav; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Malgorzata; Razniewska, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Marek; Bernard, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic are common environmental pollutants in industrialized countries, but their combined impact on children’s health is little known. We studied their effects on two main targets, the renal and dopaminergic systems, in > 800 children during a cross-sectional European survey. Control and exposed children were recruited from those living around historical nonferrous smelters in France, the Czech Republic, and Poland. Children provided blood and urine samples for the determination of the metals and sensitive renal or neurologic biomarkers. Serum concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, and β2-microglobulin were negatively correlated with blood lead levels (PbB), suggesting an early renal hyperfiltration that averaged 7% in the upper quartile of PbB levels (> 55 μg/L; mean, 78.4 μg/L). The urinary excretion of retinol-binding protein, Clara cell protein, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was associated mainly with cadmium levels in blood or urine and with urinary mercury. All four metals influenced the dopaminergic markers serum prolactin and urinary homovanillic acid, with complex interactions brought to light. Heavy metals polluting the environment can cause subtle effects on children’s renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, which reinforces the need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by heavy metals. PMID:16581550

  6. Effects of regular exercise on obesity and type 2 diabete mellitus in Korean children: improvements glycemic control and serum adipokines level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Soo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to clarify the effects of regular exercise on lipid profiles and serum adipokines in Korean children. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were divided into controls (n=10), children who were obese (n=10), and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=10). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), body composition, lipid profiles, glucagon, insulin and adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin and retinol binding protein 4) were measured before to and after a 12-week exercise program. [Results] Body weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat were significantly higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control levels were significantly decreased after the exercise program in the obese and diabetes groups, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased. Adipokines were higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group prior to the exercise program, and were significantly lower following completion. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular exercise has positive effects on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korean children by improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, thereby lowering cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels.

  7. Low-level cadmium exposure and effects on kidney function.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Maria; Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Barregard, Lars

    2014-12-01

    The nephrotoxicity of cadmium at low levels of exposure, measured by urinary cadmium, has recently been questioned since co-excretion of cadmium and proteins may have causes other than cadmium toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore the relation between kidney function and low or moderate cadmium levels, measured directly in kidney biopsies. We analysed cadmium in kidney biopsies (K-Cd), blood (B-Cd) and urine (U-Cd) from 109 living kidney donors in a cross-sectional study. We measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR), cystatin C in serum, albumin, β-2-microglobulin (B2M), retinol-binding protein (RBP), α-1-microglobulin (A1M), N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) in 24 h and overnight urine. We found significant positive associations between A1M excretion and K-Cd in multiple regression models including age, sex, weight, smoking and urinary flow rate. This association was also present in never-smokers. A1M was also positively associated with B-Cd and U-Cd. GFR and the other biomarkers of kidney function were not associated with K-Cd. GFR estimated from serum cystatin C showed a very poor correlation with measured GFR. KIM-1, RBP and possibly albumin were positively associated with U-Cd, but only in overnight urine. No associations were found with B2M. Our results suggest that A1M in urine is a sensitive biomarker for effects of low-level cadmium exposure. A few associations between other renal biomarkers and U-Cd, but not K-Cd, were probably caused by physiological co-excretion or chance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Low-level cadmium exposure and effects on kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Maria; Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Barregard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The nephrotoxicity of cadmium at low levels of exposure, measured by urinary cadmium, has recently been questioned since co-excretion of cadmium and proteins may have causes other than cadmium toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore the relation between kidney function and low or moderate cadmium levels, measured directly in kidney biopsies. Methods We analysed cadmium in kidney biopsies (K-Cd), blood (B-Cd) and urine (U-Cd) from 109 living kidney donors in a cross-sectional study. We measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR), cystatin C in serum, albumin, β-2-microglobulin (B2M), retinol-binding protein (RBP), α-1-microglobulin (A1M), N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) in 24 h and overnight urine. Results We found significant positive associations between A1M excretion and K-Cd in multiple regression models including age, sex, weight, smoking and urinary flow rate. This association was also present in never-smokers. A1M was also positively associated with B-Cd and U-Cd. GFR and the other biomarkers of kidney function were not associated with K-Cd. GFR estimated from serum cystatin C showed a very poor correlation with measured GFR. KIM-1, RBP and possibly albumin were positively associated with U-Cd, but only in overnight urine. No associations were found with B2M. Conclusions Our results suggest that A1M in urine is a sensitive biomarker for effects of low-level cadmium exposure. A few associations between other renal biomarkers and U-Cd, but not K-Cd, were probably caused by physiological co-excretion or chance. PMID:25286916

  9. Specific protein content of pools of plasma for fractionation from different sources: impact of frequency of donations

    PubMed Central

    Laub, R; Baurin, S; Timmerman, D; Branckaert, T; Strengers, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Plasma pools for the production of human plasma medicinal products are distinguished according to the collection method (recovered or apheresis plasma) and the donor remuneration status. National regulations and the physical status of the donor determine the donation frequency and plasma volume per session. Relevant protein contents of different types of pools have not fully been compared. Materials and Methods We compared the levels of total protein, 15 main relevant plasma protein markers, and anti-B19 and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae IgG in single-type pools of donations from different countries (Belgium, Finland, France, the Netherlands, Germany, United States). Both recovered plasma from non-remunerated donors and apheresis plasma from remunerated and non-remunerated donors were studied. Results Pools from paid US high-frequency, high-volume plasmapheresis donors showed significantly lower total protein (−9%), albumin (−15%), total IgG (−24%), IgM (−28%), hemopexin (−11%) and retinol-binding protein (−10%) but higher C1-inhibitor, pre-albumin and C-reactive protein contents than pools from unpaid European Union (EU) or US whole-blood or plasmapheresis donors. In contrast to pools from compensated EU plasmapheresis donors, pools from unpaid whole-blood or plasmapheresis donors showed no significant differences, whatever the collection method or country. Reductions in specific protein contents correlated well with protein half-life. Conclusion These results should be taken into account with regard to donor health management and protein recovery. PMID:20840337

  10. Transthyretin Antisense Oligonucleotides Lower Circulating RBP4 Levels and Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zemany, Laura; Bhanot, Sanjay; Peroni, Odile D.; Murray, Susan F.; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.; Castoldi, Angela; Manchem, Prasad; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating transthyretin (TTR) is a critical determinant of plasma retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels. Elevated RBP4 levels cause insulin resistance, and the lowering of RBP4 levels improves glucose homeostasis. Since lowering TTR levels increases renal clearance of RBP4, we determined whether decreasing TTR levels with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in obesity. TTR-ASO treatment of mice with genetic or diet-induced obesity resulted in an 80–95% decrease in circulating levels of TTR and RBP4. Treatment with TTR-ASOs, but not control ASOs, decreased insulin levels by 30–60% and improved insulin sensitivity in ob/ob mice and high-fat diet–fed mice as early as after 2 weeks of treatment. The reduced insulin levels were sustained for up to 9 weeks of treatment and were associated with reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Body weight was not changed. TTR-ASO treatment decreased LDL cholesterol in high-fat diet–fed mice. The glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was increased by 50% in high-fat diet–fed mice treated with TTR-ASOs, demonstrating improved insulin sensitivity. This was also demonstrated by 20% greater inhibition of hepatic glucose production, a 45–60% increase of glucose uptake into skeletal and cardiac muscle, and a twofold increase in insulin signaling in muscle. These data show that decreasing circulating TTR levels or altering TTR-RBP4 binding could be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25524914

  11. Can protein levels be economically increased?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One result from the 2010 hard red winter wheat harvest was an increase of discussions on protein values across the southern great plains. The crop garnered relatively low protein values for several reasons, many of which were directly related to the weather patterns and environmental conditions. T...

  12. Cinnamon extract regulates plasma levels of adipose-derived factors and expression of multiple genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and lipogenesis in adipose tissue of fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, B; Polansky, M M; Anderson, R A

    2010-03-01

    We reported earlier that dietary cinnamon extract (CE) improves systemic insulin sensitivity and dyslipidemia by enhancing insulin signaling. In the present study, we have examined the effects of CE on several biomarkers including plasma levels of adipose-derived adipokines, and the potential molecular mechanisms of CE in epididymal adipose tissue (EAT). In Wistar rats fed a high-fructose diet (HFD) to induce insulin resistance, supplementation with a CE (Cinnulin PF, 50 mg/kg daily) for 8 weeks reduced blood glucose, plasma insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, chylomicron-apoB48, VLDL-apoB100, and soluble CD36. CE also inhibited plasma retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) levels. CE-induced increases in plasma adiponectin were not significant. CE did not affect food intake, bodyweight, and EAT weight. In EAT, there were increases in the insulin receptor ( IR) and IR substrate 2 ( IRS2) mRNA, but CE-induced increases in mRNA expression of IRS1, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, AKT1, glucose transporters 1 and 4 , and glycogen synthase 1 expression and decreased trends in mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta were not statistically significant. CE also enhanced the mRNA levels of ADIPOQ, and inhibited sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c mRNA levels. mRNA and protein levels of fatty acid synthase and FABP4 were inhibited by CE and RBP4, and CD36 protein levels were also decreased by CE. These results suggest that CE effectively ameliorates circulating levels of adipokines partially mediated via regulation of the expression of multiple genes involved in insulin sensitivity and lipogenesis in the EAT.

  13. Role of human lipocalin proteins in abdominal obesity after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruma G; Pendharkar, Sayali A; Plank, Lindsay D; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-07

    Lipocalin proteins are small regulatory peptides implicated in metabolism, inflammation, and immunity. Although lipocalin proteins have been linked to various clinical conditions, their role in the acute inflammatory setting, such as acute pancreatitis (AP), has only been sparsely investigated. Two members of the lipocalin family, lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) and retinol binding protein -4 (RBP-4), play an important role in obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we analysed circulating levels of LCN-2 and RBP-4 in 92 individuals after AP, of whom 41 individuals had abdominal obesity and 51 did not. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to determine whether abdominal obesity was associated with the two lipocalin proteins. Lipocalin-2 was significantly associated with abdominal obesity in the unadjusted model (Odds ratio (OR)=1.014 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.000, 1.028], P=0.05) and after adjusting for patient related (age, ethnicity, and diabetes mellitus) and pancreatitis related (aetiology, severity, recurrence, and duration of AP) characteristics (OR=1.018 [95% CI: 1.001, 1.036], p=0.04). Further, the association of LCN-2 with waist circumference was significant in individuals with alcohol aetiology of AP (β=1.082 [95% CI: 1.011, 1.158], p=0.02]. The association between RBP-4 and abdominal obesity was not significant in both unadjusted and adjusted models. These findings indicate that circulating levels of LCN-2 in patients after AP may play a role in chronic low grade inflammation associated with abdominal adiposity and that alcohol consumption may further exacerbate adipose tissue dysfunction.

  14. Determinants of the serum concentrations of low molecular weight proteins in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kabanda, A; Jadoul, M; Pochet, J M; Lauwerys, R; van Ypersele de Strihou, C; Bernard, A

    1994-06-01

    Factors influencing the serum concentrations of low molecular weight proteins (LMWP) during long-term hemodialysis were studied in 112 patients undergoing dialysis for an average of 61.1 months (range 1 to 243). These patients were treated with AN69, cellulose acetate, cuprophan or polysulfone membranes. The following proteins were measured in serum before and after a four hour dialysis session: cystatin C (CYST C), beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2 m), Clara cell protein (CC16) and retinol-binding protein (RBP). Predialysis levels of the four proteins were markedly elevated. In simple regression analysis, pre-dialysis serum concentrations of beta 2 m and CC16 weakly correlated with the duration of dialysis treatment, but these relations completely disappeared when a stepwise regression analysis was performed using as predictors age, sex, residual diuresis, body weight loss (BWL), duration of hemodialysis and the type or ultrafiltration coefficient (UFC) of the membranes. The only significant determinants which emerged from this analysis were the residual diuresis and age which negatively correlated with CYST C, beta 2m and CC16 (residual diuresis only), and sex which influenced CYST C. During the dialysis session, the microproteins underwent changes that were related to their molecular radius, the membrane UFC and the BWL. After adjustment for the latter, high flux membranes (UFC > or = 15 ml/h.m2.mm Hg) allowed up to 50% of CYST C and 25% of beta 2m to be removed. No significant elimination of CC16 and RBP was evident. On the basis of these results, we estimated the effective pore radius of high flux membranes between 1.5 and 1.7 nm and that of low flux membranes as below 1.5 nm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern results in significant reductions in C-reactive protein levels in adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neale, E P; Batterham, M J; Tapsell, L C

    2016-05-01

    Consumption of healthy dietary patterns has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary intervention targets disease prevention, so studies increasingly use biomarkers of underlying inflammation and metabolic syndrome progression to examine the diet-health relationship. The extent to which these biomarkers contribute to the body of evidence on healthy dietary patterns is unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of healthy dietary patterns on biomarkers associated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammation in adults. A systematic search of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all years to April 2015) was conducted. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials; effects of dietary patterns assessed on C-reactive protein (CRP), total adiponectin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin:leptin, resistin, or retinol binding protein 4. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess the weighted mean differences in change or final mean values for each outcome. Seventeen studies were included in the review. These reflected research on dietary patterns associated with the Mediterranean diet, Nordic diet, Tibetan diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern was associated with significant reductions in CRP (weighted mean difference, -0.75 [-1.16, -0.35]; P = .0003). Non-significant changes were found for all other biomarkers. This analysis found evidence for favorable effects of healthy dietary patterns on CRP, with limited evidence for other biomarkers. Future research should include additional randomized controlled trials incorporating a greater range of dietary patterns and biomarkers.

  16. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  17. Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166903.html Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease Scientists find enhanced protein level is required to trigger ...

  18. Rapid control of protein level in the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Herm-Götz, Angelika; Agop-Nersesian, Carolina; Münter, Sylvia; Grimley, Joshua S; Wandless, Thomas J; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Meissner, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of gene function in apicomplexan parasites is limited by the absence of reverse genetic tools that allow easy and rapid modulation of protein levels. The fusion of a ligand-controlled destabilization domain (ddFKBP) to a protein of interest enables rapid and reversible protein stabilization in T. gondii. This allows an efficient functional analysis of proteins that have a dual role during host cell invasion and/or intracellular growth of the parasite. PMID:17994029

  19. Analysis of the expression pattern of the carrier protein transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human scalp skin and hair follicles: hair cycle-associated changes.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A

    2010-12-01

    Transthyretin is a serum and cerebrospinal fluid protein synthesized early in development by the liver, choroid plexus and several other tissues. It is a carrier protein for the antioxidant vitamins, retinol, and thyroid hormones. Transthyretin helps internalize thyroxine and retinol-binding protein into cells by binding to megalin, which is a multi-ligand receptor expressed on the luminal surface of various epithelia. We investigated the expression of transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human skin; however, their expression pattern in the hair follicle is still to be elucidated. This study addresses this issue and tests the hypothesis that "the expression of transthyretin and megalin undergoes hair follicle cycle-dependent changes." A total of 50 normal human scalp skin biopsies were examined (healthy females, 53-62 years) using immunofluorescence staining methods and real-time PCR. In each case, 50 hair follicles were analyzed (35, 10, and 5 follicles in anagen, catagen, and telogen, respectively). Transthyretin and megalin were prominently expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles, on both gene and protein levels. The concentrations of transthyretin and megalin were 0.12 and 0.03 Ul/ml, respectively, as indicated by PCR. The expression showed hair follicle cycle-associated changes i.e., strong expression during early and mature anagen, very weak expression during catagen and moderate expression during telogen. The expression values of these proteins in the anagen were statistically significantly higher than those of either catagen or telogen hair follicles (P ≤ 0.001). This study provides the first morphologic indication that transthyretin and megalin are variably expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles. It also reports variations in the expression of these proteins during hair follicle cycling. The clinical ramifications of these findings are open for further investigations.

  20. A Nanogram Level Colloidal Gold Single Reagent Quantitative Protein Assay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Gerald; Haffey, Patrick; Golub, Ellis E.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a nanogram level quantitative protein assay based on the binding of colloidal gold to proteins adhered to nitrocellulose paper. The protein-gold complex produces a purple color proportional to the amount of protein present, and the intensity of the stain is quantified by densitometry. Typical assays require minimal starting material (10 – 20 μl) containing 2 – 5 μg protein. A small volume (2 μl) of protein solution is applied to nitrocellulose paper in a grid array, and dried. The nitrocellulose is incubated in colloidal gold suspension with gentle agitation (4–16 h), rinsed with water and scanned. Densitometric analysis of the scanned images allows quantitation of the unknown sample protein concentration by comparison with protein standards placed on the same nitrocellulose grid. The assay requires significantly less sample than conventional protein assays. In this report, the Golddots assay is calibrated against weighed protein samples, and compared with the Pierce Micro BCA protein assay kit. In addition, the assay is evaluated with several known proteins with different physical properties. PMID:18539124

  1. A contact map matching approach to protein structure similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Raquel C; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo R; Fernandes, Fernando A; da Silveira, Carlos Henrique; Santoro, Marcelo M; Carceroni, Rodrigo L; Meira, Wagner; Araújo, Arnaldo de A

    2006-06-30

    We modeled the problem of identifying how close two proteins are structurally by measuring the dissimilarity of their contact maps. These contact maps are colored images, in which the chromatic information encodes the chemical nature of the contacts. We studied two conceptually distinct image-processing algorithms to measure the dissimilarity between these contact maps; one was a content-based image retrieval method, and the other was based on image registration. In experiments with contact maps constructed from the protein data bank, our approach was able to identify, with greater than 80% precision, instances of monomers of apolipoproteins, globins, plastocyanins, retinol binding proteins and thioredoxins, among the monomers of Protein Data Bank Select. The image registration approach was only slightly more accurate than the content-based image retrieval approach.

  2. Identification of proteins with increased levels in ameloblastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, Alejandro; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz; Licéaga-Escalera, Carlos; Montoya-Pérez, Luis A; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2014-06-01

    The comparative proteomic approach by a combination of 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is an attractive strategy for the discovery of cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The identification of protein biomarkers associated with ameloblastic carcinoma (AC), a malignant epithelial odontogenic tumor, will potentially improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy for this malignant neoplasm. The aim of the present study was to identify highly expressed proteins in AC that could be considered as potential biomarkers. The protein profile of an AC was compared with the protein profiles of 3 cases of benign ameloblastoma. Proteins that showed increased levels in AC were identified using MS, and the augmented amount of some of these proteins in the malignant lesion was confirmed by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. We detected a total of 782 spots in the protein profile of AC, and 19 of them, showing elevated levels compared with benign ameloblastoma, were identified using MS. These proteins have been implicated in several cellular functions, such as cell structure, metabolism, stress response, and signal transduction. The increased expression of the identified proteins and the minor expression of some proteins that might inhibit tumor progression could be involved in the evolution from a benign lesion to carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiotonic steroids stabilize regulator of G protein signaling 2 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Heath, Lauren J; Atkins, Kevin B; Xie, Zie-Jian; Neubig, Richard R

    2012-09-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a G(q)-specific GTPase-activating protein, is strongly implicated in cardiovascular function. RGS2(-/-) mice are hypertensive and prone to heart failure, and several rare human mutations that accelerate RGS2 degradation have been identified among patients with hypertension. Therefore, pharmacological up-regulation of RGS2 protein levels might be beneficial. We used a β-galactosidase complementation method to screen several thousand compounds with known pharmacological functions for those that increased RGS2 protein levels. Several cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), including ouabain and digoxin, increased RGS2 but not RGS4 protein levels. CTSs increased RGS2 protein levels through a post-transcriptional mechanism, by slowing protein degradation. RGS2 mRNA levels in primary vascular smooth muscle cells were unaffected by CTS treatment, whereas protein levels were increased 2- to 3-fold. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was required for the increase in RGS2 protein levels, because the effect was lost in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-knockdown cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CTS-induced increases in RGS2 levels were functional and reduced receptor-stimulated, G(q)-dependent, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that in vivo treatment with digoxin led to increased RGS2 protein levels in heart and kidney. CTS-induced increases in RGS2 protein levels and function might modify several deleterious mechanisms in hypertension and heart failure. This novel CTS mechanism might contribute to the beneficial actions of low-dose digoxin treatment in heart failure. Our results support the concept of small-molecule modulation of RGS2 protein levels as a new strategy for cardiovascular therapy.

  4. Cardiotonic Steroids Stabilize Regulator of G Protein Signaling 2 Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Heath, Lauren J.; Atkins, Kevin B.; Xie, Zie-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a Gq-specific GTPase-activating protein, is strongly implicated in cardiovascular function. RGS2(−/−) mice are hypertensive and prone to heart failure, and several rare human mutations that accelerate RGS2 degradation have been identified among patients with hypertension. Therefore, pharmacological up-regulation of RGS2 protein levels might be beneficial. We used a β-galactosidase complementation method to screen several thousand compounds with known pharmacological functions for those that increased RGS2 protein levels. Several cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), including ouabain and digoxin, increased RGS2 but not RGS4 protein levels. CTSs increased RGS2 protein levels through a post-transcriptional mechanism, by slowing protein degradation. RGS2 mRNA levels in primary vascular smooth muscle cells were unaffected by CTS treatment, whereas protein levels were increased 2- to 3-fold. Na+/K+-ATPase was required for the increase in RGS2 protein levels, because the effect was lost in Na+/K+-ATPase-knockdown cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CTS-induced increases in RGS2 levels were functional and reduced receptor-stimulated, Gq-dependent, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that in vivo treatment with digoxin led to increased RGS2 protein levels in heart and kidney. CTS-induced increases in RGS2 protein levels and function might modify several deleterious mechanisms in hypertension and heart failure. This novel CTS mechanism might contribute to the beneficial actions of low-dose digoxin treatment in heart failure. Our results support the concept of small-molecule modulation of RGS2 protein levels as a new strategy for cardiovascular therapy. PMID:22695717

  5. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. "Tainong 57"] starch improves insulin sensitivity in high-fructose diet-fed rats by ameliorating adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Yen; Lai, Ming-Hoang; Hung, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-glycemic index (GI) sweet potato starch on adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling in the high-fructose diet-induced insulin-resistant rat. We randomly divided 24 insulin-resistant rats and 16 normal rats into two groups fed a diet containing 575 g/kg of starch: a low-GI sweet potato starch (S) or a high-GI potato starch (P). The four experimental groups were labeled as follows: insulin-resistant P (IR-P), insulin-resistant S (IR-S), normal P (N-P) and normal S (N-S). After 4 wk on the experimental diets, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted, and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, and insulin signaling-related protein expression were measured. The homeostasis model assessment values were significantly lower in the IR-S than in the IR-P group, suggesting that insulin sensitivity was improved among sweet potato starch-fed rats. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, resistin, and retinol binding protein-4 were significantly lower in the IR-S versus the IR-P group, indicating an improvement of pro-inflammatory status in sweet potato starch-fed rats. The sweet potato starch diet also significantly enhanced the protein expression of phospho-Tyr-insulin receptor substrate-1 and improved the translocation of glucose transporter 4 in the skeletal muscle. Our results illustrated that sweet potato starch feeding for 4 wk can improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant rats, possibly by improving the adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

  6. Dietary protein level and performance of growing Baladi kids

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, M. M.; Aljumaah, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of protein to black Baladi breed kids. Weanling Baladi kids (n=18; 75 to 90 days old) were selected and individually housed at our experimental farm. Kids were divided randomly to one of the three treatments for 12 weeks. The three dietary treatments were: T1: control ration, formulated according to NRC to cover the protein (level 1) and other nutrients requirements. T2: ration formulated to cover only 75% of protein (level 2) recommended by NRC. T3: control diet + 2.4 g undegradable methionine (Smartamine®)/day/kid (level 3). Feed intake, initial and monthly body weights were recorded. Blood samples were collected monthly and analyzed for metabolites and Co, Zn and Cu levels. Decreasing the dietary level of protein (T2) negatively affected (P<0.05) the total live weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio when compared with the control and T3 groups. Moreover, treatment, time and time × treatment caused a significant change on Co concentration in blood serum with higher value at the end of the experiment. Treatments had a significant effect (P<0.05) on blood serum cholesterol and protein levels. Undegradable methionine supplementation (T3) significantly increased longissimus dorsi weight, fat thickness and omental fat%. In conclusion, feeding Baladi kids below the NRC requirements of protein negatively affect the growth performance and feed efficiency. The recommended protein level by NRC for growing kids cover the requirements of growing black Baladi kids for maximum growth and productivity. PMID:27175130

  7. Dietary protein level and performance of growing Baladi kids.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, M M; Aljumaah, R S

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of protein to black Baladi breed kids. Weanling Baladi kids (n=18; 75 to 90 days old) were selected and individually housed at our experimental farm. Kids were divided randomly to one of the three treatments for 12 weeks. The three dietary treatments were: T1: control ration, formulated according to NRC to cover the protein (level 1) and other nutrients requirements. T2: ration formulated to cover only 75% of protein (level 2) recommended by NRC. T3: control diet + 2.4 g undegradable methionine (Smartamine®)/day/kid (level 3). Feed intake, initial and monthly body weights were recorded. Blood samples were collected monthly and analyzed for metabolites and Co, Zn and Cu levels. Decreasing the dietary level of protein (T2) negatively affected (P<0.05) the total live weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio when compared with the control and T3 groups. Moreover, treatment, time and time × treatment caused a significant change on Co concentration in blood serum with higher value at the end of the experiment. Treatments had a significant effect (P<0.05) on blood serum cholesterol and protein levels. Undegradable methionine supplementation (T3) significantly increased longissimus dorsi weight, fat thickness and omental fat%. In conclusion, feeding Baladi kids below the NRC requirements of protein negatively affect the growth performance and feed efficiency. The recommended protein level by NRC for growing kids cover the requirements of growing black Baladi kids for maximum growth and productivity.

  8. [Effects of low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid on micro-inflammation and the relationship between micro-inflammation and nutritional status in patients performing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Hao; Sun, Li-Jing; Cai, Li-Li; Xu, Hai-Yan

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the effects of the combination of alpha-keto acid and low-protein diet on the levels of serum cytokines in patients performing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and to explore the relationship between inflammation and malnutrition in CAPD patients. Eighty-nine CAPD patients were randomized into three groups, and 78 cases completed a one-year follow-up and with complete data. There were 31 cases in low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid group, 26 cases in low-protein diet group and 21 cases in routine-protein diet group. The levels of serum albumin (Alb), prealbumin (PA), retinol-binding protein (RBP), transferrin (TRF), cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), leptin, and triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), body mass index (BMI) were measured. The changes of serum interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were also detected. Compared with low-protein diet group, serum levels of PA, RBP and TRF were significantly increased both in low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid and routine-protein diet groups ( P<0.01), however, there was no significant difference in the levels of PA, RBP and TRF between low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid group and routine-protein diet group. There was an increased tendency in the content of Alb, TC, TG, BMI, TSF and MAMC, but there were no significant differences. The plasma levels of IL-1alpha, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid group were decreased as compared with the routine-protein diet group, but there were no significant differences. The plasma level of CRP in low-protein diet plus alpha-keto acid group was lower than that in the routine-protein diet group ( P<0.01). The combination of alpha-keto acid and low-protein diet can ameliorate malnutrition and micro-inflammation in CAPD patients.

  9. The effect of total starvation and very low energy diet in lean men on kinetics of whole body protein and five hepatic secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Paul R; Jahoor, Farook; Jackson, Alan A; Stubbs, James; Johnstone, Alexander M; Faber, Peter; Lobley, Gerald; Gibney, Eileen; Elia, Marinos

    2007-12-01

    It is unclear whether the rate of weight loss, independent of magnitude, affects whole body protein metabolism and the synthesis and plasma concentrations of specific hepatic secretory proteins. We examined 1) whether lean men losing weight rapidly (starvation) show greater changes in whole body protein kinetics, synthesis, and circulating concentrations of selected hepatic secretory proteins than those losing the same amount of weight more slowly [very low energy diet (VLED)]; and 2) whether plasma concentrations and synthetic rates of these proteins are related. Whole body protein kinetics were measured using [1-(13)C]leucine in 11 lean men (6 starvation, 5 VLED). Fractional and absolute synthetic rates of HDL-apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), retinol binding protein, transthyretin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT), and transferrin were measured using a prime-constant intravenous infusion of [(13)C(2)]glycine. Compared with VLED group, the starvation group showed greater increases (at a 5% weight loss) in whole body protein oxidation (P < 0.05); fractional synthetic rates of HDL-apoA1 (25.3 vs. -1.52%; P = 0.003) and retinol binding protein (30.6 vs. 7.1%; P = 0.007); absolute synthetic rates of HDL-apoA1 (7.1 vs. -3.8 mg.kg(-1).day(-1); P = 0.003) and alpha(1)-AT (17.8 vs. 3.6 mg.kg(-1).day(-1); P = 0.02); and plasma concentration of alpha(1)-AT (P = 0.025). Relationships between synthetic rates and plasma concentrations varied between the secreted proteins. It is concluded that synthetic rates of hepatic secreted proteins in lean men are more closely related to the rate than the magnitude of weight loss. Changes in concentration of these secreted proteins can occur independently of changes in synthetic rates, and vice versa.

  10. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  11. Plasma amino acid response to graded levels of escape protein.

    PubMed

    Gibb, D J; Klopfenstein, T J; Britton, R A; Lewis, A J

    1992-09-01

    A trial was conducted to examine the potential of using plasma amino acid responses to graded levels of escape protein to determine limiting amino acids in cattle. Growing calves (n = 120; mean BW = 220 +/- 21 kg) were fed a basal diet of corncob:sorghum silage (61:39) and were individually supplemented with distillers' dried grains (DDG), heat-damaged DDG (H-DDG), feather meal (FTH), or urea. The urea supplement was mixed with DDG and H-DDG to allow 0, 20, 35, 50, 65, or 80% of the supplemental CP to come from distillers' protein and maintain an 11.5% CP diet. Urea supplement was mixed with FTH to allow 0, 22, 39, 56, 73, or 90% of the supplemental CP to come from FTH. Dietary CP ranged from 11.5% at the 0% level to 17.3% at the 90% level. Plasma concentration of most essential plasma amino acids responded (P less than .10) linearly and(or) quadratically to increased escape protein. The broken-line response of plasma methionine at low DDG intake suggested that methionine was limiting at low levels of escape protein. An initial decrease followed by a plateau fit by a broken line indicated that histidine became limiting in FTH diets, and lysine eventually became limiting for DDG, H-DDG, and FTH diets before maximum BW gain was reached. Results indicate that plasma amino acid responses may identify amino acids that become limiting with increasing escape protein.

  12. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins' biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein-protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein-protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent).

  13. Secreted Proteins Defy the Expression Level-Evolutionary Rate Anticorrelation.

    PubMed

    Feyertag, Felix; Berninsone, Patricia M; Alvarez-Ponce, David

    2017-03-01

    The rates of evolution of the proteins of any organism vary across orders of magnitude. A primary factor influencing rates of protein evolution is expression. A strong negative correlation between expression levels and evolutionary rates (the so-called E-R anticorrelation) has been observed in virtually all studied organisms. This effect is currently attributed to the abundance-dependent fitness costs of misfolding and unspecific protein-protein interactions, among other factors. Secreted proteins are folded in the endoplasmic reticulum, a compartment where chaperones, folding catalysts, and stringent quality control mechanisms promote their correct folding and may reduce the fitness costs of misfolding. In addition, confinement of secreted proteins to the extracellular space may reduce misinteractions and their deleterious effects. We hypothesize that each of these factors (the secretory pathway quality control and extracellular location) may reduce the strength of the E-R anticorrelation. Indeed, here we show that among human proteins that are secreted to the extracellular space, rates of evolution do not correlate with protein abundances. This trend is robust to controlling for several potentially confounding factors and is also observed when analyzing protein abundance data for 6 human tissues. In addition, analysis of mRNA abundance data for 32 human tissues shows that the E-R correlation is always less negative, and sometimes nonsignificant, in secreted proteins. Similar observations were made in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Escherichia coli, and to a lesser extent in Drosophila melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our observations contribute to understand the causes of the E-R anticorrelation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Smoking, COPD and 3-Nitrotyrosine Levels of Plasma Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Peterson, Elena S.; Tan, Ruimin; Bigelow, Diana J.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Hoidal, John R.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide is a physiologically regulator of endothelial function and hemodynamics. Oxidized products of nitric oxide can form nitrotyrosine, which is a marker of nitrative stress. Cigarette smoking decreases exhaled nitric oxide, and the underlying mechanism may be important in the cardiovascular toxicity of cigarette smoke, although it is not clear if this effect results from decreased nitric oxide production or oxidation of nitric oxide to reactive, nitrating, species. These processes would be expected to have opposite effects on nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of nitrative stress. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we determine the effects of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, and thereby gain insight into the processes regulating nitrotyrosine formation. METHODS: A custom antibody microarray platform was used to analyze the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine modifications on 24 proteins in plasma. Plasma samples from 458 individuals were analyzed. RESULTS: Nitrotyrosine levels in circulating proteins were uniformly reduced in smokers but increased in COPD patients. We also observed a persistent suppression of nitrotyrosine in former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking broadly suppresses the levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma proteins, suggesting that cigarette smoke suppresses endothelial nitric oxide production. In contrast, the increase in nitrotyrosine levels in COPD patients most likely results from inflammatory processes. This study provides the first evidence that smoking has irreversible effects on endothelial production of nitric oxide, and provides insight into how smoking could induce a loss of elasticity in the vasculature and a long-term increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Proteomic Investigation of Falciparum and Vivax Malaria for Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan; Renu, Durairaj; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Taur, Santosh; Jhaveri, Tulip; Dhali, Snigdha; Chennareddy, Srinivasarao; Potla, Ankit; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Srikanth, Rapole; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM) (n = 20), vivax malaria (VM) (n = 17) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 20) were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC). Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05) serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2%) of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC) were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates

  16. Proteomic investigation of falciparum and vivax malaria for identification of surrogate protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Renu, Durairaj; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Taur, Santosh; Jhaveri, Tulip; Dhali, Snigdha; Chennareddy, Srinivasarao; Potla, Ankit; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Srikanth, Rapole; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM) (n = 20), vivax malaria (VM) (n = 17) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 20) were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC). Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05) serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2%) of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC) were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates the

  17. Renal pathology and urinary protein excretion in a 14-month-old Bernese mountain dog with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Raila, J; Aupperle, H; Raila, G; Schoon, H-A; Schweigert, F J

    2007-04-01

    The renal pathology and urinary protein pattern of a 14-month-old female Bernese mountain dog with chronic renal failure was investigated. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis and subsequent Western blot analysis of urine showed the presence of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin, transferrin, albumin, vitamin D-binding protein, transthyretin and retinol-binding protein (RBP), but no excretion of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP). Histopathological examinations of the kidneys revealed severe membranous glomerulonephritis accompanied by tubular dilatation, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The renal expression of megalin, the main endocytic receptor for the re-uptake of proteins in proximal tubules, RBP and THP was reduced or completely absent, indicating severe tubular dysfunction. The identified urinary proteins may be of interest as additional markers for the diagnosis of juvenile nephropathy in Bernese mountain dogs.

  18. Tuning the Electronic Absorption of Protein-Embedded All-trans-Retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjing; Nossoni, Zahra; Berbasova, Tetyana; Watson, Camille T.; Yapici, Ipek; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-10-02

    Protein-chromophore interactions are a central component of a wide variety of critical biological processes such as color vision and photosynthesis. To understand the fundamental elements that contribute to spectral tuning of a chromophore inside the protein cavity, we redesigned human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) to fully encapsulate all-trans-retinal and form a covalent bond as a protonated Schiff base. The system, using rational mutagenesis designed to alter the electrostatic environment within the binding pocket of the host protein, enabled regulation of the absorption maximum of the pigment in the range of 425 to 644 nanometers. Moreover, with only nine point mutations, the hCRBPII mutants induced a systematic shift in the absorption profile of all-trans-retinal of more than 200 nanometers across the visible spectrum.

  19. Correlation of secretion of retinol and protein by the lacrimal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ubels, J.L.; Rismondo, V.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol, which is present in tears, is secreted by the lacrimal gland. Retinol secretion is stimulated by cholinergic drugs and vasoactive intestinal peptide with characteristics very similar to the exocytotic secretion of protein by the lacrimal gland, suggesting that retinol and protein are secreted by similar mechanisms. The authors investigated this by cannulating the lacrimal gland ducts of rabbits and collecting lacrimal gland fluid (LGF) under conditions of maximal flow stimulated by IV injection of pilocarpine (400 ..mu..g/kg) every 20 min for 4.5 hr. Over this period LGF protein concentration decreased 36.4% from 22.8 +/- 1.94 mg/ml to 8.29 1.86 mg/ml while retinol decreased 37% from 55.1 +/- 16.2 ng/ml to 20.4 +/- 6.5 ng/ml. The retinol/protein ratio remained constant at 2.88 ng/mg. This demonstrates a strong correlation between retinol and protein secretion, suggesting that retinol may be protein bound. To investigate binding of retinol to LGF protein, LGF was incubated with /sup 3/H-retinol. The bound and unbound retinol were separated on a Lipidex 1000 column. Retinol binding was linear over a range of 1.25-200 nM /sup 3/H-retinol. Binding was not inhibited by PCMBS or addition of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled retinol and was not increased by prior extraction of endogenous retinol from the LGF. This indicates that the binding of retinol to LGF protein is non-specific. Retinol therefore appears to be secreted by the lacrimal gland cells in non-specific association with protein.

  20. Statistical measures on residue-level protein structural properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Bonett, Stephen; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert; Wu, Zhijun

    2011-07-01

    The atomic-level structural properties of proteins, such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles, have been well studied and understood based on either chemistry knowledge or statistical analysis. Similar properties on the residue-level, such as the distances between two residues and the angles formed by short sequences of residues, can be equally important for structural analysis and modeling, but these have not been examined and documented on a similar scale. While these properties are difficult to measure experimentally, they can be statistically estimated in meaningful ways based on their distributions in known proteins structures. Residue-level structural properties including various types of residue distances and angles are estimated statistically. A software package is built to provide direct access to the statistical data for the properties including some important correlations not previously investigated. The distributions of residue distances and angles may vary with varying sequences, but in most cases, are concentrated in some high probability ranges, corresponding to their frequent occurrences in either α-helices or β-sheets. Strong correlations among neighboring residue angles, similar to those between neighboring torsion angles at the atomic-level, are revealed based on their statistical measures. Residue-level statistical potentials can be defined using the statistical distributions and correlations of the residue distances and angles. Ramachandran-like plots for strongly correlated residue angles are plotted and analyzed. Their applications to structural evaluation and refinement are demonstrated. With the increase in both number and quality of known protein structures, many structural properties can be derived from sets of protein structures by statistical analysis and data mining, and these can even be used as a supplement to the experimental data for structure determinations. Indeed, the statistical measures on various types of

  1. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  2. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months.

    PubMed

    Reinbott, Anika; Jordan, Irmgard; Herrmann, Johannes; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3-23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and retinol binding protein (RBP) were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI) was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored. Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%). Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF) significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin. Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young children. German Clinical Trials Register

  3. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months

    PubMed Central

    Reinbott, Anika; Jordan, Irmgard; Herrmann, Johannes; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3–23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and retinol binding protein (RBP) were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI) was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored. Results Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%). Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF) significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin. Conclusion Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young

  4. Specific serum protein levels in women using intrauterine contraceptive device.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, D; Kríz, J; Cídl, K

    1980-01-01

    The report is concerned with the levels of 17 specific serum proteins in 46 women using plastic nonmedicated intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) Dana-Super. Blood samplings were carried out three times: just before the IUCD introduction, 30 and 54 weeks after the insertion of IUCD. The following proteins except haptoglobin were quantitatively determined by radial immunodiffusion: prealbumin, albumin, orosomucoid, alpha 1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, alpha 2-macroglobulin, hemopexin, C3-component, transferrin, beta 2-glycoprotein I, C-reactive protein and immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD. Moderately increased values were found for alpha 2HS-glycoprotein and beta 2-glycoprotein I in sera taken 30 weeks after the insertion of IUCD. AT the same time the augmentation of alpha 1-antitrypsin was established. This might be evoked by the raised protease activity in biological fluids of genital region. The raise in consequence of IUCD application of transferrin and the decrease of haptoglobin at the first postinsertion examination and the decrease of hemopexin and albumin at the second may be associated with higher menstrual bleeding followed by iron deficiency. All other proteins as well as the acute phase proteins showed only minor if any differences as compared with the corresponding start values. Similarly, there is no evidence of a systemic immunoglobulin response to IUCD use.

  5. ORMDL proteins regulate ceramide levels during sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Oyeniran, Clement; Biswas, Debolina D; Allegood, Jeremy; Milstien, Sheldon; Kordula, Tomasz; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, ceramide, regulates physiological processes important for inflammation and elevated levels of ceramide have been implicated in IL-1-mediated events. Although much has been learned about ceramide generation by activation of sphingomyelinases in response to IL-1, the contribution of the de novo pathway is not completely understood. Because yeast ORM1 and ORM2 proteins negatively regulate ceramide levels through inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase, the first committed step in ceramide biosynthesis, we examined the functions of individual mammalian ORM orthologs, ORM (yeast)-like (ORMDL)1-3, in regulation of ceramide levels. In HepG2 liver cells, downregulation of ORMDL3 markedly increased the ceramide precursors, dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide, primarily from de novo biosynthesis based on [U-(13)C]palmitate incorporation into base-labeled and dual-labeled dihydroceramides, whereas downregulation of each isoform increased dihydroceramides [(13)C]labeled in only the amide-linked fatty acid. IL-1 and the IL-6 family cytokine, oncostatin M, increased dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in HepG2 cells and concomitantly decreased ORMDL proteins. Moreover, during irritant-induced sterile inflammation in mice leading to induction of the acute-phase response, which is dependent on IL-1, expression of ORMDL proteins in the liver was strongly downregulated and accompanied by increased ceramide levels in the liver and accumulation in the blood. Together, our results suggest that ORMDLs may be involved in regulation of ceramides during IL-1-mediated sterile inflammation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Effect of protein level and protein source on zinc absorption in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.A.; Almgren, A.; Kivistoe, B.C.; Cederblad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing levels of various protein sources on zinc absorption from a legume-based meal was studied in humans with the use of a radionuclide technique. The meals were extrinsically labelled with 65Zn and absorption was determined from measurements of the whole-body retention of the isotope. The mean fractional zinc absorption for the 13 meals was 24.7 +/- 6.9% and was only influenced by the protein content of the meal to a limited extent (r = 0.45). However, the amount of zinc absorbed from the meals was strongly correlated with both the protein (r = 0.85) and zinc content (r = 0.86): 5.9 +/- 1.7 mumol of zinc was absorbed from the basal bean meal which had the lowest protein content; the addition of low zinc chicken doubled the protein content and increased zinc absorption to 10.3 +/- 2.0 mumol; the addition of zinc-rich beef also doubled the protein content, however, zinc absorption was increased to 15.9 +/- 4.7 mumol. It is concluded that the zinc content of the main protein source of the diet determines the amount of zinc absorbed to a large extent. However, relatively small amounts of animal protein can significantly improve the value of a legume-based meal as a source of zinc.

  7. Effect of Crude Protein Levels in Concentrate and Concentrate Levels in Diet on In vitro Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Van Dung, Dinh; Shang, Weiwei; Yao, Wen

    2014-06-01

    The effect of concentrate mixtures with crude protein (CP) levels 10%, 13%, 16%, and 19% and diets with roughage to concentrate ratios 80:20, 60:40, 40:60, and 20:80 (w/w) were determined on dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility, and fermentation metabolites using an in vitro fermentation technique. In vitro fermented attributes were measured after 4, 24, and 48 h of incubation respectively. The digestibility of DM and OM, and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) increased whereas pH decreased with the increased amount of concentrate in the diet (p<0.001), however CP levels of concentrate did not have any influence on these attributes. Gas production reduced with increased CP levels, while it increased with increasing concentrate levels. Ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and microbial CP production increased significantly (p<0.05) by increasing CP levels and with increasing concentrate levels in diet as well, however, no significant difference was found between 16% and 19% CP levels. Therefore, 16% CP in concentrate and increasing proportion of concentrate up to 80% in diet all had improved digestibility of DM and organic matter, and higher microbial protein production, with improved fermentation characteristics.

  8. Confounders in the assessment of the renal effects associated with low-level urinary cadmium: an analysis in industrial workers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Associations of proteinuria with low-level urinary cadmium (Cd) are currently interpreted as the sign of renal dysfunction induced by Cd. Few studies have considered the possibility that these associations might be non causal and arise from confounding by factors influencing the renal excretion of Cd and proteins. Methods We examined 184 healthy male workers (mean age, 39.5 years) from a zinc smelter (n = 132) or a blanket factory (n = 52). We measured the concentrations of Cd in blood (B-Cd) and the urinary excretion of Cd (U-Cd), retinol-binding protein (RBP), protein HC and albumin. Associations between biomarkers of metal exposure and urinary proteins were assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. Results The medians (interquartile range) of B-Cd (μg/l) and U-Cd (μg/g creatinine) were 0.80 (0.45-1.16) and 0.70 (0.40-1.3) in smelter workers and 0.66 (0.47-0.87) and 0.55 (0.40-0.90) in blanket factory workers, respectively. Occupation had no influence on these values, which varied mainly with smoking habits. In univariate analysis, concentrations of RBP and protein HC in urine were significantly correlated with both U-Cd and B-Cd but these associations were substantially weakened by the adjustment for current smoking and the residual influence of diuresis after correction for urinary creatinine. Albumin in urine did not correlate with B-Cd but was consistently associated with U-Cd through a relationship, which was unaffected by smoking or diuresis. Further analyses showed that RBP and albumin in urine mutually distort their associations with U-Cd and that the relationship between RBP and Cd in urine was almost the replicate of that linking RBP to albumin Conclusions Associations between proteinuria and low-level urinary Cd should be interpreted with caution as they appear to be largely driven by diuresis, current smoking and probably also the co-excretion of Cd with plasma proteins. PMID:21569589

  9. Autophagy supports survival and phototransduction protein levels in rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z; Doggett, T A; Sene, A; Apte, R S; Ferguson, T A

    2015-01-01

    Damage and loss of the postmitotic photoreceptors is a leading cause of blindness in many diseases of the eye. Although the mechanisms of photoreceptor death have been extensively studied, few studies have addressed mechanisms that help sustain these non-replicating neurons for the life of an organism. Autophagy is an intracellular pathway where cytoplasmic constituents are delivered to the lysosomal pathway for degradation. It is not only a major pathway activated in response to cellular stress, but is also important for cytoplasmic turnover and to supply the structural and energy needs of cells. We examined the importance of autophagy in photoreceptors by deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg5 specifically in rods. Loss of autophagy led to progressive degeneration of rod photoreceptors beginning at 8 weeks of age such that by 44 weeks few rods remained. Cone photoreceptor numbers were only slightly diminished following rod degeneration but their function was significantly decreased. Rod cell death was apoptotic but was not dependent on daily light exposure or accelerated by intense light. Although the light-regulated translocation of the phototransduction proteins arrestin and transducin were unaffected in rods lacking autophagy, Atg5-deficient rods accumulated transducin-α as they degenerated suggesting autophagy might regulate the level of this protein. This was confirmed when the light-induced decrease in transducin was abolished in Atg5-deficient rods and the inhibition of autophagy in retinal explants cultures prevented its degradation. These results demonstrate that basal autophagy is essential to the long-term health of rod photoreceptors and a critical process for maintaining optimal levels of the phototransduction protein transducin-α. As the lack of autophagy is associated with retinal degeneration and altered phototransduction protein degradation in the absence of harmful gene products, this process may be a viable therapeutic target where rod

  10. Purification of a NF1-like DNA-binding protein from rat liver and cloning of the corresponding cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, G; Gounari, F; Frank, R; Cortese, R

    1988-01-01

    NF1-like proteins play a role in transcription of liver-specific genes. A DNA-binding protein, recognizing half of the canonical NF1 binding site (TGGCA) present on the human albumin and retinol-binding protein genes, has been purified from rat liver. Several peptides deriving from a tryptic digest of the purified protein were sequenced and the sequence was used to synthesize specific oligonucleotides. Two overlapping cDNA clones were obtained from a rat-liver cDNA library; their sequence reveals an open reading frame coding for 505 amino acids, including all the peptides sequenced from the purified protein. The DNA-binding domain, most likely located within the first 250 amino acids, is highly homologous to the sequence of CTF/NF1 purified from HeLa cells. Northern analysis reveals several mRNA species present in different combinations in various rat tissues. Images PMID:3053160

  11. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  12. Hepatitis B virus X protein is capable of down-regulating protein level of host antiviral protein APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruidong; Zhao, Xue; Wang, Yongxiang; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) family proteins bind RNA and single-stranded DNA, and create C-to-U base modifications through cytidine deaminase activity. APOBEC3G restricts human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection by creating hypermutations in proviral DNA, while HIV-1-encoded vif protein antagonizes such restriction by targeting APOBEC3G for degradation. APOBEC3G also inhibits hepatitis B virus (HBV): APOBEC3G co-expression inhibits HBV replication and evidences exist indicating APOBEC3G-mediated HBV hypermutations in patients. HBV encodes a small non-structural X protein (HBx) with a recognized activating effect on HBV life cycle. In this work, we report the discovery that HBx selectively and dose-dependently decreases the protein level of co-expressed APOBEC3G in transfected Huh-7 cells. The effect was shown to take place post-translationally, but does not rely on protein degradation via proteasome or lysosome. Further work demonstrated that intracellular APOBEC3G is normally exported via exosome secretion and inhibition of exosome biogenesis causes retention of intracellular APOBEC3G. Finally, HBx co-expression specifically enhanced externalization of APOBEC3G via exosomes, resulting in decrease of intracellular APOBEC3G protein level. These data suggest the possibility that in addition to other mechanisms, HBx-mediated activation of HBV might also involve antagonizing of intracellular restriction factor APOBEC3G through promotion of its export. PMID:28098260

  13. Level of supplemental protein does not influence the ruminally undegradable protein value.

    PubMed

    Legleiter, L R; Mueller, A M; Kerley, M S

    2005-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether elevating the percentage of ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) in the diet would influence the RUP value of the protein feedstuff. A single-effluent, continuous-culture study was designed to test the effect of RUP inclusion rate in the diet on ruminal degradability of the protein. Treatments consisted (DM basis) of a control diet with no supplemental protein, control + 2.5% bloodmeal (BM-L), control + 5% bloodmeal (BM-H), control + 4.45% soybean meal (SBM-L), and control + 8.89% soybean meal (SBM-H). Proteolytic activity and total VFA concentration were not affected (P = 0.73 and P = 0.13) by treatment. Within protein source, dietary RUP value was not affected (P = 0.94) by level of inclusion. When corrected for control diet RUP flow, the RUP value of the blood meal (BM) protein was higher (P = 0.01) than soybean meal (SBM); however, level of supplementation did not affect (P = 0.07) the RUP value of BM or SBM. In Exp. 2, 32 British x Continental crossbred steers (276 +/- 26.3 kg) were fed for 72 d to examine the effects of balancing the AA:energy ratio, using BM as a RUP source, on ADG, G:F, and lean tissue deposition. Diets were formulated to provide increasing levels of arginine, while ruminally degradable protein and energy were held constant. Four dietary treatments provided 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2x the required amount of arginine, whereas the control diet had no BM included. Daily DMI averaged 7.6 kg/steer and did not differ (P = 0.71) among treatments. Steers gained an average of 1.9 kg/d and average G:F was 0.260, with no differences (P = 0.60 and P = 0.97, respectively) among treatments. There was no difference (P = 0.48) in the change in 12th-rib fat depth during the study; however, change in LM area was affected quadratically as the level of BM increased in the diet, with the greatest increase in LM area occurring in steers fed the 1x and 1.5x required arginine treatments. Balancing the AA:energy ratio did

  14. Effects of soy protein and calcium levels on mineral bioaccessibility and protein digestibility from enteral formulas.

    PubMed

    Galán, María Gimena; Drago, Silvina Rosa

    2014-09-01

    Enteral formulas (EF) are complex food systems which have all the nutrients in their matrix for the complete human nourishment. However, there are components in EF which can interact with minerals, reducing their absorption, and thereof the EF nutritional quality. The effect of soy protein (SP) and Ca content on Fe, Zn, and Ca bioaccessibility and protein digestibility (%DP) was assessed using a response surface design in EF. Tested SP levels were 2.5-5.0 g/100 mL of total protein. Ca levels were adjusted with Ca citrate within a range between 50 and 100 mg/100 mL. SP content negatively influenced %DP and Fe, Zn and Ca bioaccessibility. As SP content increased, mineral bioaccessibility and %DP decreased, probably due to the increased levels of phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors from SP. Ca content only affected %DCa, which had a direct relationship with Ca levels, while did not affect Fe and Zn bioaccessibility or %DP. Since Ca citrate did not impair Fe and Zn bioaccessibility, it could be an appropriate Ca source for EF fortification.

  15. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie W.T.; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed. PMID:23878156

  16. Honey bee protein atlas at organ-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Queenie W T; Chan, Man Yi; Logan, Michelle; Fang, Yuan; Higo, Heather; Foster, Leonard J

    2013-11-01

    Genome sequencing has provided us with gene lists but cannot tell us where and how their encoded products work together to support life. Complex organisms rely on differential expression of subsets of genes/proteins in organs and tissues, and, in concert, evolved to their present state as they function together to improve an organism's overall reproductive fitness. Proteomics studies of individual organs help us understand their basic functions, but this reductionist approach misses the larger context of the whole organism. This problem could be circumvented if all the organs in an organism were comprehensively studied by the same methodology and analyzed together. Using honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) as a model system, we report here an initial whole proteome of a complex organism, measuring 29 different organ/tissue types among the three honey bee castes: queen, drone, and worker. The data reveal that, e.g., workers have a heightened capacity to deal with environmental toxins and queens have a far more robust pheromone detection system than their nestmates. The data also suggest that workers altruistically sacrifice not only their own reproductive capacity but also their immune potential in favor of their queen. Finally, organ-level resolution of protein expression offers a systematic insight into how organs may have developed.

  17. Tumor protein D52 represents a negative regulator of ATM protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuyan; Kamili, Alvin; Hardy, Jayne R; Groblewski, Guy E; Khanna, Kum Kum; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is a coiled-coil motif bearing hydrophilic polypeptide known to be overexpressed in cancers of diverse cellular origins. Increased TPD52 expression is associated with increased proliferation and invasive capacity in different cell types. Recent studies have reported a correlation between TPD52 transcript levels and G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity in lymphocytes of women at risk of hereditary breast cancer, and that TPD52 knockdown significantly reduced the radiation sensitivity of multiple cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated possible roles for TPD52 in DNA damage response, and found that increased TPD52 expression in breast cancer and TPD52-expressing BALB/c 3T3 cells compromised ATM-mediated cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks induced by γ-ray irradiation, which was associated with downregulation of steady-state ATM protein, but not transcript levels, regardless of irradiation status. TPD52-expressing 3T3 cells also showed significantly increased radiation sensitivity compared with vector cells evaluated by clonogenic assays. Furthermore, direct interactions between exogenous and endogenous ATM and TPD52 were detected by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. We also identified the interaction domains involved in this binding as TPD52 residues 111–131, and ATM residues 1–245 and 772–1102. Taken together, our results suggest that TPD52 may represent a novel negative regulator of ATM protein levels. PMID:23974097

  18. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from h-invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset.

    PubMed

    Kikugawa, Shingo; Nishikata, Kensaku; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Mami; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the assigned protein complexes. We

  19. Imaging proteins at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Abb, Sabine; Escher, Conrad; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Kern, Klaus; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2017-01-01

    Imaging single proteins has been a long-standing ambition for advancing various fields in natural science, as for instance structural biology, biophysics, and molecular nanotechnology. In particular, revealing the distinct conformations of an individual protein is of utmost importance. Here, we show the imaging of individual proteins and protein complexes by low-energy electron holography. Samples of individual proteins and protein complexes on ultraclean freestanding graphene were prepared by soft-landing electrospray ion beam deposition, which allows chemical- and conformational-specific selection and gentle deposition. Low-energy electrons do not induce radiation damage, which enables acquiring subnanometer resolution images of individual proteins (cytochrome C and BSA) as well as of protein complexes (hemoglobin), which are not the result of an averaging process. PMID:28087691

  20. Secretion and transfer of the thyroid hormone binding protein transthyretin by human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, R H; Landers, K A; Balakrishnan, B; Li, H; Mitchell, M D; Patel, J; Richard, K

    2012-04-01

    The thyroid hormone and retinol binding protein transthyretin (TTR) is synthesised by human trophoblasts. Polarised JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells grown in bicameral chambers secrete TTR predominantly apically but also basally and these cells and human trophoblasts also take up TTR suggesting that there may be a placental TTR shuttle that participates in materno-fetal transfer of thyroid hormones and retinol. Our objective was to investigate TTR secretion into the maternal and fetal circuits of the ex vivo dually perfused placental lobule to confirm that placenta secretes TTR into the fetal circulation. We also investigated translocation of Alexa Fluor-594 labelled TTR from incubation medium into the fetal placental capillaries in early (14-15 weeks) and term placental villus explants. The perfused placental lobule secretes TTR into the maternal and fetal circuits. Secretion in both circuits is linear with time and is predominantly into the maternal circuit (mean maternal/fetal ratio 99.4 ± 25.6). The mean data fitted well to a three compartment mathematical model (maternal circuit, placenta and fetal circuit, constant secretion of TTR and return of maternal circuit TTR to the placental compartment). Explants from early (14-15 weeks) and late (38-40 weeks) placentas translocated fluorescently labelled TTR from medium to villus (fetal) capillaries. Our results confirm that human placenta secretes TTR into maternal and fetal circulations and supports the hypothesis that placental TTR secreted into the maternal placental circulation can be taken up by trophoblasts and translocated to the fetal circulation, forming a TTR shuttle system. This may have important implications for materno-fetal transfer of thyroid hormones, retinol/retinol binding protein and xenobiotics (such as polychlorinated biphenyls) all of which bind to TTR. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Independent Effects of Protein Core Size and Expression on Residue-Level Structure-Evolution Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Xia, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that yeast protein evolutionary rate at the level of individual amino acid residues scales linearly with degree of solvent accessibility. This residue-level structure-evolution relationship is sensitive to protein core size: surface residues from large-core proteins evolve much faster than those from small-core proteins, while buried residues are equally constrained independent of protein core size. In this work, we investigate the joint effects of protein core size and expression on the residue-level structure-evolution relationship. At the whole-protein level, protein expression is a much more dominant determinant of protein evolutionary rate than protein core size. In contrast, at the residue level, protein core size and expression both have major impacts on protein structure-evolution relationships. In addition, protein core size and expression influence residue-level structure-evolution relationships in qualitatively different ways. Protein core size preferentially affects the non-synonymous substitution rates of surface residues compared to buried residues, and has little influence on synonymous substitution rates. In comparison, protein expression uniformly affects all residues independent of degree of solvent accessibility, and affects both non-synonymous and synonymous substitution rates. Protein core size and expression exert largely independent effects on protein evolution at the residue level, and can combine to produce dramatic changes in the slope of the linear relationship between residue evolutionary rate and solvent accessibility. Our residue-level findings demonstrate that protein core size and expression are both important, yet qualitatively different, determinants of protein evolution. These results underscore the complementary nature of residue-level and whole-protein analysis of protein evolution. PMID:23056364

  2. Auxin acts independently of DELLA proteins in regulating gibberellin levels.

    PubMed

    Reid, James B; Davidson, Sandra E; Ross, John J

    2011-03-01

    Shoot elongation is a vital process for plant development and productivity, in both ecological and economic contexts. Auxin and bioactive gibberellins (GAs), such as GA1, play critical roles in the control of elongation, along with environmental and endogenous factors, including other hormones such as the brassinosteroids. The effect of auxins, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), is at least in part mediated by its effect on GA metabolism, since auxin up-regulates biosynthesis genes such as GA 3-oxidase and GA 20-oxidase and down regulates GA catabolism genes such as GA 2-oxidases, leading to elevated levels of bioactive GA 1. In our recent paper, we have provided evidence that this action of IAA is largely independent of DELLA proteins, the negative regulators of GA action, since the auxin effects are still present in the DELLA-deficient la cry-s genotype of pea. This was a crucial issue to resolve, since like auxin, the DELLAs also promote GA 1 synthesis and inhibit its deactivation. DELLAs are deactivated by GA, and thereby mediate a feedback system by which bioactive GA regulates its own level. However, our recent results, in themselves, do not show the generality of the auxin-GA relationship across species and phylogenetic groups or across different tissue types and responses. Further, they do not touch on the ecological benefits of the auxin-GA interaction. These issues are discussed below as well as the need for the development of suitable experimental systems to allow this process to be examined.

  3. Protein body-inducing fusions for high-level production and purification of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Richman, Alex; Menassa, Rima

    2011-05-01

    For the past two decades, therapeutic and industrially important proteins have been expressed in plants with varying levels of success. The two major challenges hindering the economical production of plant-made recombinant proteins include inadequate accumulation levels and the lack of efficient purification methods. To address these limitations, several fusion protein strategies have been recently developed to significantly enhance the production yield of plant-made recombinant proteins, while simultaneously assisting in their subsequent purification. Elastin-like polypeptides are thermally responsive biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the purification of recombinant proteins. Hydrophobins are small fungal proteins capable of altering the hydrophobicity of their respective fusion partner, thus enabling efficient purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase systems. Zera, a domain of the maize seed storage protein γ-zein, can induce the formation of protein storage bodies, thus facilitating the recovery of fused proteins using density-based separation methods. These three novel protein fusion systems have also been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins, while concurrently inducing the formation of protein bodies. The packing of these fusion proteins into protein bodies may exclude the recombinant protein from normal physiological turnover. Furthermore, these systems allow for quick, simple and inexpensive nonchromatographic purification of the recombinant protein, which can be scaled up to industrial levels of protein production. This review will focus on the similarities and differences of these artificial storage organelles, their biogenesis and their implication for the production of recombinant proteins in plants and their subsequent purification.

  4. Effects of two types of soy protein isolates, native and preheated whey protein isolates on emulsified meat batters prepared at different protein levels.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Barbut, S

    2011-01-01

    The effects of substituting 1.5% of the meat proteins with low gelling soy protein isolate (LGS), high gelling soy protein isolate (HGS), native whey protein isolate (NWP), and preheated whey protein isolate (PWP) were compared at varying levels of proteins (12, 13 and 14%), with all meat control batters prepared with canola oil. Cooking losses were lower for all the non-meat protein treatments compared to the all meat controls. When raising the protein level from 12 to 14%, cooking losses increased in all treatments except for the NWP treatments. Using LGS increased emulsification and resulted in a more stable meat batters at the 13 and 14% protein treatments. Textural profile analysis results showed that elevating protein level increased hardness and cohesiveness. The highest hardness values were obtained for the PWP treatments and the lowest for the HGS, indicating a strong non-meat protein effect on texture modification. Non-meat protein addition resulted in lighter and less red products (i.e., lower red meat content) compared to the all meat controls; color affected by non-meat protein type. Light microscopy revealed that non-meat proteins decreased the frequency of fat globules' agglomeration and protein aggregation. The whey protein preparations and HGS formed distinct "islands" within the meat batters' matrices, which appeared to interact with the meat protein matrix. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Microsecond protein dynamics observed at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-01-01

    How polypeptide chains acquire specific conformations to realize unique biological functions is a central problem of protein science. Single-molecule spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence resonance energy transfer, is utilized to study the conformational heterogeneity and the state-to-state transition dynamics of proteins on the submillisecond to second timescales. However, observation of the dynamics on the microsecond timescale is still very challenging. This timescale is important because the elementary processes of protein dynamics take place and direct comparison between experiment and simulation is possible. Here we report a new single-molecule technique to reveal the microsecond structural dynamics of proteins through correlation of the fluorescence lifetime. This method, two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy, is applied to clarify the conformational dynamics of cytochrome c. Three conformational ensembles and the microsecond transitions in each ensemble are indicated from the correlation signal, demonstrating the importance of quantifying microsecond dynamics of proteins on the folding free energy landscape. PMID:26151767

  6. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  7. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables.

  8. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  9. Protein Z variants associated with protein Z plasma levels and with risk of idiopathic recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaikh, Fatima S; Sater, Mai S; Finan, Ramzi R; Racoubian, Eddie; Abu-Hijleh, Tala M; Mustafa, Fekria E; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2013-09-01

    Protein Z (PZ) deficiency due to anti-PZ autoantibodies and/or mutations in PZgene was linked with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (IRM). We investigated the association of rs3024718, rs3024719, rs3024731, rs3024778, rs3024772, and rs3024735 (G79A) PZ variants and changes in PZ levels in 287 women with IRM, and 308 control women. Of the 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyzed, higher minor allele frequency of rs3024735 (G79A) and rs3024731 were seen in IRM cases than in control women. Significantly higher frequencies of rs3024735/G79A G/A and A/A (P< .001), rs3024719 G/A (P= .009), and rs3024731 A/A (P = .012), but not rs3024718 (P= .12), rs3024778 (P = .76), or rs3024772 (P= .27) genotype carriers were seen between IRM cases versus control women, respectively, and was linked with reduced PZ levels. Six-locus (rs3024718/rs3024719/rs3024778/rs3024731/rs3024735/rs3024772) PZhaplotypes analysis demonstrated increased frequency of GAGAAG and AGGTAG and reduced frequency of AGGTGC haplotypes in IRM cases, thereby conferring disease susceptibility and protective nature to these haplotypes, respectively. These results demonstrate that specific PZSNPs and haplotypes are significantly associated with IRM.

  10. Conserved chemosensory proteins in the proboscis and eyes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiao; Iovinella, Immacolata; Dani, Francesca Romana; Liu, Yu-Ling; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chen-Zhu; Pelosi, Paolo; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are endowed with several different functions besides being carriers for pheromones and odorants. Based on a previous report of a CSP acting as surfactant in the proboscis of the moth Helicoverpa armigera, we revealed the presence of orthologue proteins in two other moths Plutella xylostella and Chilo suppressalis, as well as two butterflies Papilio machaon and Pieris rapae, using immunodetection and proteomic analysis. The unusual conservation of these proteins across large phylogenetic distances indicated a common specific function for these CSPs. This fact prompted us to search for other functions of these proteins and discovered that CSPs are abundantly expressed in the eyes of H. armigera and possibly involved as carriers for carotenoids and visual pigments. This hypothesis is supported by ligand-binding experiments and docking simulations with retinol and β-carotene. This last orange pigment, occurring in many fruits and vegetables, is an antioxidant and the precursor of visual pigments. We propose that structurally related CSPs solubilise nutritionally important carotenoids in the proboscis, while they act as carriers of both β-carotene and its derived products 3-hydroxyretinol and 3-hydroxyretinal in the eye. The use of soluble olfactory proteins, such as CSPs, as carriers for visual pigments in insects, here reported for the first time, parallels the function of retinol-binding protein in vertebrates, a lipocalin structurally related to vertebrate odorant-binding proteins. PMID:27877091

  11. Proteomic analysis of proteins bound to adsorption units of extracorporeal liver support system under clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Mares, Jan; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Tuma, Zdenek; Moravec, Jiri; Karvunidis, Thomas; Matejovic, Martin

    2009-04-01

    Fractionated Plasma Separation, Adsorption and Dialysis (Prometheus) has a well-documented capacity to remove protein-bound organic toxins in patients with liver failure. However, the compositions of adsorbed proteins remain unknown. Elution of both adsorbers constituting Prometheus system was performed following a 6-h session in a patient with acute on chronic liver failure. Sodium dodecylsulphate was employed to elute proteins from the neutral adsorber (P1), while acetic acid was applied to the cationic one (P2). Eluted proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 4113 and 8280 mg of proteins were obtained from P1 and P2 eluates, 2-DE yielded 148 and 163 protein fractions in P1 and P2, respectively. MS identified 18 unique proteins in P1, and 30 unique proteins in P2 sample. Proteins with the highest selective adsorption (as determined by eluate to plasma ratio) included transthyretin (37), trypsin-2 (29), prothrombin (23), hyaluronan-binding protein 2 (13) and plasma retinol-binding protein (8.7), all of which adsorbed to P2. We identified a large number of proteins removed by extracorporeal liver support system. A selective adsorption was demonstrated in a subset of proteins depending on the type of adsorber and proteins' characteristics.

  12. Association of protein S p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with plasma protein S levels in normal individuals and patients with inherited protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaman, G; Biguzzi, E; Razzari, C; Tosetto, A; Fontana, G; Asti, D; Brancaccio, V; Castori, D; Lane, D A; Faioni, E M

    2007-01-01

    A dimorphism in PROS1 gene (c.A2,001G, p.Pro667Pro) has been associated with significantly reduced levels of both free and total protein S in carriers of the GG genotype. It is not known how the GG genotype could influence PS levels in normals, whether it could influence the levels of protein S in carriers of mutations in PROS1 gene and whether this genotype acts as an isolated or additive risk factor for venous thrombosis. With this as background, we evaluated the association of p.Pro667Pro dimorphism with free and total protein S centrally measured in a panel of 119 normal controls, 222 individuals with low protein S and 137 individuals with normal PS levels belonging to 76 families with protein S deficiency enrolled in the ProSIT study. Transient expression of recombinant wild type protein S and p.Pro667Pro protein S was performed to evaluate the role of the A to G transition at position 2001 in vitro. The p.Pro667Pro polymorphism was also expressed together with a p.Glu67Ala variant to assess a possible influence on protein S levels in protein S deficient subjects. Free and total protein S levels were significantly lower in normal women. In normal women only was the GG genotype associated with significantly lower free protein S levels in comparison to AA and AG genotypes (P=0.032). No significant influence of GG genotype was observed in patients, either with known mutations or with low protein S levels. These data were confirmed by in vitro transient expression, showing no difference in secretion levels of the p.Pro667Pro variant (even in association with the p.Glu67Ala mutation), compared to the wild type protein S. The genotype in itself was neither a significant risk factor for venous thrombosis nor a risk modifier in patients with known mutations.

  13. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  14. Progranulin Protein Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Primary Neurodegenerative Dementias.

    PubMed

    Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Cervera-Carles, Laura; Vilaplana, Eduard; Alcolea, Daniel; Carmona-Iragui, María; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Ribosa-Nogué, Roser; Muñoz-Llahuna, Laia; Sala, Isabel; Belén Sánchez-Saudinós, M; Blesa, Rafael; Clarimón, Jordi; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin is implicated in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but its role in other neurodegenerative disorders is unknown. To investigate the levels of progranulin (PGRN) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in different neurodegenerative dementias and their correlation with levels in plasma in cognitively normal subjects. We measured PGRN in CSF in 229 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, sporadic FTD, dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal syndrome, or progressive supranuclear palsy. We also measured PGRN in CSF and plasma in 74 cognitively normal individuals. We examined the correlation between PGRN levels in CSF and diagnosis, cortical thickness, genetic factors and other CSF biomarkers. We also investigated the correlation between plasma and CSF levels of PGRN in cognitively normal individuals. CSF levels did not differ across diagnoses or correlate with cortical thickness. Polymorphism rs5848 in GRN influenced CSF PGRN levels, but APOEɛ4 allele did not. Amyloid-β42, t-tau, p-tau, and YKL-40 levels correlated weakly with PGRN in CSF. We found a weak correlation (r = 0.362) between plasma and CSF PGRN levels in cognitively normal individuals. Our findings do not support a diagnostic value of CSF PGRN in neurodegenerative diseases. Our data confirm that levels of PGRN in plasma do not reflect accurately levels in CSF in cognitively normal controls. These data should be considered in clinical trials aiming to increase PGRN.

  15. Associations between pre-eclampsia and protein C and protein S levels among pregnant Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Helen C; Eweputanna, Lisa I; Okpani, Anthony O U; Ejele, Oseikhuemen A

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate levels of protein C and free protein S among women with pre-eclampsia, and determine whether there is a relationship between deficiencies and pre-eclampsia. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a hospital in Nigeria from July 2013 to March 2014 among 90 pregnant women with pre-eclampsia (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, proteinuria ≥300 mg in 24 hours) and 90 normotensive pregnant women (control group). Plasma levels of protein C and free protein S were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and protein C activity by a chromogenic method. Mean protein C antigen and activity levels did not differ between groups (P=0.639 and P=0.444, respectively). The incidence of protein C antigen and activity deficiency also did not differ (P=0.288 and P>0.99, respectively). The mean free protein S antigen level was higher among women with pre-eclampsia (54.48%±19.58%) than in the control group (47.23%±10.27%; P=0.004). No woman in the control group had protein S deficiency, as compared with 2 (2%) of the women with pre-eclampsia (P=0.497). No association was found between deficiencies of these proteins and pre-eclampsia. Deficiencies of protein C and free protein S are unlikely to be etiopathogenetic for pre-eclampsia; therefore, therapeutic intervention should focus on other potential pathogenetic pathways. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. High serum levels of soluble Fas (sFas) in CKD patients: effects of renal clearance, reabsorption and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dalboni, M A; Cenedeze, M A; Manfredi, S R; Cruz Andreoli, M C; Pavao Dos Santos, O; Canziani, M E; Boim, M A; Goes, M A; Draibe, S A; Balakrishnan, V; Cendoroglo, M

    2008-05-01

    Increased serum concentrations of soluble Fas (sFas) have been reported in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, little is known about the renal clearance of sFas, whether sFas is reabsorbed in the renal tubules, or the behavior of sFas synthesis in CKD. We studied 69 patients with CKD (60+/-15 years old, creatinine clearance 37+19 ml/min/1.73 m2) and 14 healthy subjects (61+/-17 years, creatinine clearance 79+/-24 ml/min/1.73 m2). ELISA was used to measure the levels of sFas (pg/mL) and retinol binding protein (RBP - mg/L). RT-PCR was used to quantify sFasmRNA of leukocytes. Serum sFas levels were significantly higher in patients with CKD (2781+/-1214 vs. 2196+/-773, p=0.02). The concentrations of sFas in 24-hour urine samples (23+/-27 vs. 40+/-17, p=0.006) and sFas Clearance (0.019+/-0.022 vs. 0.036+/-0.020, p=0.01) were significantly lower in patients with CKD. sFas clearance correlated with creatinine clearance (r=0.25, p=0.02). Urine concentrations of RBP correlated with sFas concentrations in the urine (r=0.80, p<0.001). sFasmRNA were higher in patients with CKD (3.9+/-1.8 vs. 2.5+/-0.9, p<0.001). In CKD patients, the decrease in renal function is followed by a decrease in sFas clearance and an increase in serum sFas. In patients with proximal tubule dysfunction (high urinary RBP concentrations), urinary sFas is also increased, suggesting that sFas is reabsorbed by the proximal tubule. It is possible that an increase in sFas synthesis also contributes to the increase of serum sFas concentrations in uremia.

  17. Activated protein C levels and outcome in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Barbara; Rohla, Miklos; Jarai, Rudolf; Smetana, Peter; Freynhofer, Matthias K; Egger, Florian; Zorn, Gerlinde; Weiss, Thomas W; Huber, Kurt; Geppert, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    In patients with severe sepsis, low levels of activated protein C are associated with high morbidity and mortality. In an observational study we investigated whether patients with cardiogenic shock have decreased circulatory levels of activated protein C, and if these are associated with increased mortality. We measured serum activated protein C and interleukin-6 levels in 43 patients with cardiogenic shock following acute myocardial infarction and in 15 control patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction at days 0-5 and 7 after the onset of shock/myocardial infarction. Activated protein C levels were significantly lower in patients with cardiogenic shock compared to controls. In cardiogenic shock patients, there was no difference in activated protein C levels at baseline, whereas activated protein C levels significantly declined in 28-day non-survivors at day 2, compared with 28-day survivors. Lower levels of activated protein C were associated with a higher degree of vasopressor need, whereas there was no significant association with multiple organ failure in the first days. Regarding the inflammatory response, a strong inverse correlation was observed between interleukin-6 and activated protein C levels. Patients with cardiogenic shock who did not survive up to 28 days showed a decline in activated protein C levels during the course of the disease, which was inversely correlated with interleukin-6. This study underlines sustained inflammatory mechanisms in the development and persistence of cardiogenic shock, highlighting a potential effect of anti-inflammatory interventions early during cardiogenic shock.

  18. Protein metabolism in growing pigs fed corn or cassava peel based diets containing graded protein levels.

    PubMed

    Tewe, O O

    1985-05-01

    Sixty-four Large White cross Landrace weanling pigs were randomly allotted to eight treatments in a two by four factorial arrangement. The two dietary variables were cassava peel (0 and 40 per cent) and crude protein (20, 15, 10 and 5 per cent). Total serum protein concentration was significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced by protein deficiency and by its interaction with cassava peel. The multiple coefficient of determination (R2) showed that protein intake was the primary factor determining changes in serum protein. R2 values for cyanide intake (independent variable) on serum protein (dependent variable) increased from day 30 to 90 of the trial. Serum urea was increased on the 5 per cent protein diets on days 60 and 90 of the trial. The R2 values for cyanide and protein intake on serum urea concentration increased from day 30 to day 90 of the trial. Serum creatinine increased (P less than 0.05) on the 5 per cent protein diet on day 90 of the trial. The R2 value for the effects of protein intake on serum creatinine was higher than for cyanide intake on days 30 and 90. The results confirm the progressive and pronounced effects of long term cyanide intake on serum nitrogenous metabolites in pigs consuming between 110 and 120 ppm hydrocyanic acid, especially in diets containing 10 per cent or less protein.

  19. Multifactorial level of extremostability of proteins: can they be exploited for protein engineering?

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Debamitra; Khan, Mohd Faheem; Patra, Sanjukta

    2017-03-10

    Research on extremostable proteins has seen immense growth in the past decade owing to their industrial importance. Basic research of attributes related to extreme-stability requires further exploration. Modern mechanistic approaches to engineer such proteins in vitro will have more impact in industrial biotechnology economy. Developing a priori knowledge about the mechanism behind extreme-stability will nurture better understanding of pathways leading to protein molecular evolution and folding. This review is a vivid compilation about all classes of extremostable proteins and the attributes that lead to myriad of adaptations divulged after an extensive study of 6495 articles belonging to extremostable proteins. Along with detailing on the rationale behind extreme-stability of proteins, emphasis has been put on modern approaches that have been utilized to render proteins extremostable by protein engineering. It was understood that each protein shows different approaches to extreme-stability governed by minute differences in their biophysical properties and the milieu in which they exist. Any general rule has not yet been drawn regarding adaptive mechanisms in extreme environments. This review was further instrumental to understand the drawback of the available 14 stabilizing mutation prediction algorithms. Thus, this review lays the foundation to further explore the biophysical pleiotropy of extreme-stable proteins to deduce a global prediction model for predicting the effect of mutations on protein stability.

  20. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere.

  1. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  2. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, Paolo; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  3. The Hsp90-Dependent Proteome Is Conserved and Enriched for Hub Proteins with High Levels of Protein–Protein Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Krishna B.S.; Yu, Jau-Song; Schuyler, Scott C.; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 is one of the most abundant and conserved proteins in the cell. Reduced levels or activity of Hsp90 causes defects in many cellular processes and also reveals genetic and nongenetic variation within a population. Despite information about Hsp90 protein–protein interactions, a global view of the Hsp90-regulated proteome in yeast is unavailable. To investigate the degree of dependency of individual yeast proteins on Hsp90, we used the “stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture” method coupled with mass spectrometry to quantify around 4,000 proteins in low-Hsp90 cells. We observed that 904 proteins changed in their abundance by more than 1.5-fold. When compared with the transcriptome of the same population of cells, two-thirds of the misregulated proteins were observed to be affected posttranscriptionally, of which the majority were downregulated. Further analyses indicated that the downregulated proteins are highly conserved and assume central roles in cellular networks with a high number of protein interacting partners, suggesting that Hsp90 buffers genetic and nongenetic variation through regulating protein network hubs. The downregulated proteins were enriched for essential proteins previously not known to be Hsp90-dependent. Finally, we observed that downregulation of transcription factors and mating pathway components by attenuating Hsp90 function led to decreased target gene expression and pheromone response, respectively, providing a direct link between observed proteome regulation and cellular phenotypes. PMID:25316598

  4. The level of Yop proteins secreted by Yersinia enterocolitica is changed in maltose mutants.

    PubMed

    Brzostek, K; Raczkowska, A

    2001-10-16

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains express a set of plasmid-encoded proteins called Yops, involved in pathogenicity. We studied the influence of the maltose system on the production of Yop proteins and found that the level of Yop proteins of Y. enterocolitica O:9 was reduced in the presence of maltose. Transposon insertion mutants impaired with the maltose transport activity showed a decreased level in the production of Yop proteins. The transcription of the yopH gene for YopH phosphatase in these maltose mutants was unchanged and revealed a maltose mutation impaired in the secretion of Yop proteins instead of their expression.

  5. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-04-21

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise.

  6. Reduced alternative complement pathway control protein levels in anorexia nervosa: response to parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, R J; Farrell, M; Berry, P L; Forristal, J; Maloney, M J; West, C D

    1982-05-01

    Serum levels of 16 proteins, including 11 component and control proteins of the complement system were determined before and after nutritional repletion in five female patients with severe malnutrition secondary to anorexia nervosa. Before parenteral alimentation significantly decreased serum levels were found for IgG, IgM, transferrin, Clq, C2, C3, factor B, beta lH, C3b inactivator, properdin, and C4 binding protein. A significant increase in posttreatment serum levels compared with pretreatment levels were found for transferrin, C3, factor B, beta lH, and C3b inactivator. Of the proteins measured, the C3b amplification loop control and component proteins, beta lH, C3b inactivator, C3, and factor B rose to the normal range in response to therapy most rapidly. In the absence of an acute phase reaction, these proteins appear to be particularly good indices of malnutrition and its response to therapy.

  7. Impact of genetic variation on synaptic protein levels in genetically diverse mice.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Li, Ka Wan; van der Schors, Roel; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; van der Loo, Rolinka; Williams, Robert W; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    The relative abundance of synaptic proteins shapes protein complex formation and is essential for synapse function and behavioral fitness. Here, we have used a panel of highly diverse inbred strains of mice-NOD/LtJ, A/J, 129S1/SvImJ, FVB/NJ, C57BL/6J, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ, and CAST/EiJ-to quantify the effects of genetic variation on the synaptic proteome between strains. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteome analyses, we detected significant differences in ∼20% of 400 core synaptic proteins. Surprisingly, the differentially abundant proteins showed a modest range of variation across strains, averaging about 1.3-fold. Analysis of protein abundance covariation across the eight strains identified known protein-protein relations (proteins of Arp2/3 complex), as well as novel relations (e.g. Dlg family, Fscn1). Moreover, covariation of synaptic proteins was substantially tighter (∼fourfold more dense than chance level) than corresponding networks of synaptic transcripts (∼twofold more dense than chance). The tight stoichiometry and coherent synaptic protein covariation networks suggest more intense evolutionary selection at this level of molecular organization. In conclusion, genetic diversity in the mouse genome differentially affects the transcriptome and proteome, and only partially penetrates the synaptic proteome. Protein abundance correlation analyses in genetically divergent strains can complement protein-protein interaction network analyses, to provide insight into protein interactomes.

  8. Protein Requirement of Elderly Women: Nitrogen Balance Responses to Three Levels of Protein Intake

    PubMed Central

    Morse, M. Hannah; Haub, Mark D.; Evans, William J.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2008-01-01

    Background For elderly women, insufficient data exist to assess the accuracy of the assumed mean protein requirement of 0.6 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1, and the adequacy of the current Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of 0.8 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1. The aims of this study were to assess the mean protein requirement and suggested safe and adequate protein intake (protein allowance) of elderly women using a shorter-term nitrogen balance protocol. Methods During three separate 18-day trials, 11 elderly women (age range, 70–81 years) were randomly fed eucaloric diets designed to provide either 0.50, 0.75, or 1.00 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1. Nitrogen balance was determined at Weeks 2 and 3 (Days 7–10 and 14–17, respectively) of each trial using data from total nitrogen analyses of duplicate food composites, 24-hour urine collections, and stool collections. The mean protein requirement was calculated using linear regression of individual women's data from all three trials and inverse prediction. Results At protein intakes of 0.53 ± 0.02, 0.76 ± 0.02, or 1.06 ± 0.05 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1, net nitrogen balances during Week 2 were −14.5 ± 3.1, 3.8 ± 2.5 and 23.4 ± 3.3 mg of nitrogen · kg−1 · day−1, respectively, for these body weight– and body composition–stable women. At Week 3, the net nitrogen balances were −0.1 ± 2.7, 8.5 ± 3.6 and 42.0 ± 3.0 mg of nitrogen · kg−1 · day−1. From Week 2 to Week 3, shifts to more positive nitrogen balances occurred due to decreases in urinary nitrogen excretion. The mean protein requirement at Week 2 was calculated to be 0.70 ± 0.09 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1 (coefficient of variation [CV] = 13%) and at Week 3 was calculated to be 0.56 ± 0.09 g of protein · kg−1 · day−1 (CV = 17%). From these data, an adequate protein allowance was estimated to be greater than the RDA at Week 2 (0.90 g of protein · kg−1 · day [d]−1), and not different than the RDA

  9. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  10. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  11. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  12. Effects of the SpoVT Regulatory Protein on the Germination and Germination Protein Levels of Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Peralta, Arturo; Stewart, Kerry-Ann V.; Thomas, Stacy K.; Setlow, Barbara; Chen, Zhan; Li, Yong-qing

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis isolates lacking the SpoVT protein, which regulates gene expression in developing forespores, gave spores that released their dipicolinic acid (DPA) via germinant receptor (GR)-dependent germination more rapidly than wild-type spores. Non-GR-dependent germination via dodecylamine was more rapid with spoVT spores, but germination via Ca-DPA was slower. The effects of a spoVT mutation on spore germination were seen with spores made in rich and poor media, and levels of SpoVT-LacZ were elevated 2-fold in poor-medium spores; however, elevated SpoVT levels were not the only cause of the slower GR-dependent germination of poor-medium spores. The spoVT spores had ≥5-fold higher GerA GR levels, ∼2-fold elevated GerB GR levels, wild-type levels of a GerK GR subunit and the GerD protein required for normal GR-dependent germination, ∼2.5-fold lower levels of the SpoVAD protein involved in DPA release in spore germination, and 30% lower levels of DNA protective α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins. With one exception, the effects on protein levels in spoVT spores are consistent with the effects of SpoVT on forespore transcription. The spoVT spores were also more sensitive to UV radiation and outgrew slowly. While spoVT spores' elevated GR levels were consistent with their more rapid GR-dependent germination, detailed analysis of the results suggested that there is another gene product crucial for GR-dependent spore germination that is upregulated in the absence of SpoVT. Overall, these results indicate that SpoVT levels during spore formation have a major impact on the germination and the resistance of the resultant spores. PMID:22522895

  13. Calcium, phosphorus and protein levels as factors in the distribution of the pheasant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1958-01-01

    Summary of work on pheasant nutrition conducted since 1949 at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Pheasant chicks fed experimental diets failed to develop normally on protein levels of 15 and 18%. With 22% protein they grew at a reduced rate as compared to those on 28%. Protein level of the reproductive diet was shown to be important; low production of eggs and young resulted from levels below 25%. Calcium was found to be even more critical than protein level for reproduction; birds on a winter diet that furnished 145 mg./kg. per day had poor reproductive success the following spring. About 600 mg./kg. of Ca per day was necessary in the reproduction diet. Birds on an intermediate level of Ca (about 0.5% of diet) showed evidence of cumulative deficiency. It was concluded that pheasants receiving levels of Ca no higher than 0.5% in nature might display 'straggling failure' such as has been observed in several midwestern areas.

  14. Differential protein levels and post-translational modifications in spinal cord injury of the rat.

    PubMed

    Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Brejnikow, Mika; Kang, Sung Ung; Vishwanath, Vinay; Walder, Nadja; Herkner, Kurt; Redl, Heinz; Lubec, Gert

    2010-03-05

    Although changes in protein expression in spinal cord injury (SCI) would be of pivotal interest, information so far is limited. It was therefore the aim of the study to determine protein levels and post-translational modifications in the early phase following SCI in the rat. SCI was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats and sham operated rats served as controls. A gel-based proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by quantification with specific software and subsequent identification of differentially expressed proteins by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS was applied. Proteins of several pathways and cascades were dysregulated in SCI: 14-3-3 epsilon protein, dynein light chain 1, and tubulin beta-5 chain showed higher levels in SCI, whereas adenylyl cyclase associated protein 1, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, F-actin capping protein subunit beta, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and transthyretin showed lower levels in the injured tissue. Post-translational modifications indicated free oxygen radical attack on proteins in SCI. The occurrence of stress is indicated by deranged stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and signaling abnormalities are reflected by adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and 14-3-3 epsilon protein. The findings propose the involvement of the corresponding cascades and challenge further work into aberrant signaling and oxidative stress in SCI, which may form the basis for experimental intervention for spinal cord trauma.

  15. The influence of protein level in the diet on cannibalism and quality of plumage of layers.

    PubMed

    Ambrosen, T; Petersen, V E

    1997-04-01

    A factorial experiment, with seven levels of protein and seven strains of layers, was conducted to determine the effect of protein level on plumage condition and mortality due to cannibalism. The experiment was carried out with a total of 3,136 layers. The protein content of the feed varied from 11.1 to 19.3%. The experiment revealed that protein levels had an effect (P < 0.0001) on plumage condition, and that the plumage condition also varies (P < 0.01) with strain of layers. A strain by protein levels interaction occurred (P < 0.01) between strains of Leghorn layers, but not between strains of layers of medium body size. The requirement for energy to maintenance was reduced by 10.8 kcal ME per bird per d each time the plumage condition was improved by one point. Mortality due to cannibalism was influenced by protein level (P < 0.001) and strains of layers (P < 0.001). No significant improvement in plumage condition or reduction in cannibalism was obtained with 15.2% or more protein in the feed. The reason for the unsatisfactory plumage condition and the high mortality rate due to cannibalism for the diets low in protein could be inadequate lysine, methionine, and threonine in the diets. But the possibility of an amino acid imbalance in that protein, which is available for the birds after the egg production has taken place, may not be ignored.

  16. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G.; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago – TNRC6 levels. PMID:26170235

  17. Effect of the level of dietary protein on the utilization of alpha-ketoisocaproate for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.W.; Tungsanga, K.; Walser, M.

    1986-04-01

    The efficiency of alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC) as a dietary substitute for leucine in rats on varying protein intake was estimated by an isotopic method, previously shown to yield the same results as comparative growth experiments. /sup 14/C-KIC and /sup 3/H-leucine are injected orally. Six hours later the ratio, R, of /sup 14/C//sup 3/H in isolated proteins, divided by the same ratio in the injectate is measured. This ratio has been shown to be approximately equal to nutritional efficiency of KIC relative to leucine. As dietary protein increased from 6.3% to 48.3%, whole body protein R decreased from 0.515 +/- 0.045 to 0.299 +/- 0.016. Variations with protein intake were noted in R of protein isolated from individual organs. The magnitude of R in these organs varied two-fold, in the following sequence: brain greater than heart greater than or equal to skeletal muscle greater than or equal to salivary gland greater than or equal to kidney greater than liver. Whole body protein R could be confidently predicted (r2 = 0.992) from R in the protein of kidney and muscle. Thus, the nutritional efficiency of KIC as a dietary substitute for leucine in individual organs as well as in the whole animal is strongly dependent on the level of protein intake.

  18. Discordance between protein and transcript levels detected by selected reaction monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Expression levels between transcript and protein are not always correlated. In the present study, the abundance of protein PDR9/ABCG37 in 3 Arabidopsis pdr9/abcg37 mutant alleles was evaluated using selected reaction monitoring analysis. The results showed that protein and mRNA expression levels were similar in 2 mutant alleles. The mRNA expression levels in another mutant, determined by both semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR, were similar to the wild-type, although the abundance of protein was about half the abundance of the wild-type. These results suggested that using only mRNA expression levels to infer protein abundance, compare mutants or responses to various stimuli may lead to incorrect interpretation and conclusions. PMID:26039477

  19. Association of serum protein levels with egg productivity in Taiwan red-feathered country chickens.

    PubMed

    Liou, M L; Huang, S Y; Liu, Y C; Lin, J H; Chuang, C K; Lee, W C

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between serum protein levels and egg productivity in Taiwan red-feathered country chickens (TRFCC). The total egg numbers of TRFCC (n=157) were recorded from 25 to 48 weeks of age. Serum samples were collected at 24 and 35 weeks of age, then classified by total egg number into four groups according to mean+/-1S.D. Serum X protein levels were evaluated by protein chip technology and with an insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) immunoassay. Other serum proteins (apolipoprotein A-I, ovotransferrin and vitellogenin) were found at different levels between the most productive and the least productive groups of TRFCC, were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and were quantified by age. The results showed that levels of vitellogenin were positively correlated with total egg number at 24 and at 35 weeks old (p<0.01). Levels of apolipoprotein A-I and an IGF-1-related marker (termed X protein) in serum at 35 weeks old were correlated with total egg number (p<0.01). Serum ovotransferrin levels remained constant regardless of total egg number. To investigate the concentration differences among the four groups of TRFCC, serum protein levels of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The results showed that those protein levels, except for ovotransferrin, in the least productive group significantly differed from the other three groups (p<0.05). Although the correlation between those protein levels and the total egg number was not significant at the time of initial egg production, the selection strategy of those protein levels at later stages of egg production should provide a screening model to improve selection.

  20. A Bayesian framework for cell-level protein network analysis for multivariate proteomics image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacheva, Violet N.; Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent development of multivariate imaging techniques, such as the Toponome Imaging System (TIS), has facilitated the analysis of multiple co-localisation of proteins. This could hold the key to understanding complex phenomena such as protein-protein interaction in cancer. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for cell level network analysis allowing the identification of several protein pairs having significantly higher co-expression levels in cancerous tissue samples when compared to normal colon tissue. It involves segmenting the DAPI-labeled image into cells and determining the cell phenotypes according to their protein-protein dependence profile. The cells are phenotyped using Gaussian Bayesian hierarchical clustering (GBHC) after feature selection is performed. The phenotypes are then analysed using Difference in Sums of Weighted cO-dependence Profiles (DiSWOP), which detects differences in the co-expression patterns of protein pairs. We demonstrate that the pairs highlighted by the proposed framework have high concordance with recent results using a different phenotyping method. This demonstrates that the results are independent of the clustering method used. In addition, the highlighted protein pairs are further analysed via protein interaction pathway databases and by considering the localization of high protein-protein dependence within individual samples. This suggests that the proposed approach could identify potentially functional protein complexes active in cancer progression and cell differentiation.

  1. Effects of dietary protein level on growth and utilization of protein and energy by juvenile mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, Abbas; Khalid, Jamil; Rukhsana, Akhtar; Lin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted in a recirculating water system to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on growth, feed utilization, hepatosomatic index and liver lipid deposition of juvenile red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (average initial wet weight 8.0 ± 0.39 g and total length 3.14 ± 0.3 cm). In the experiment, six fishmeal-based diets were formulated to contain various protein levels (20% to 45% in 5% increments), with dietary energy ranging from 2210.7kJ lOOg to 2250.2kJlOOg dry matter. The protein to energy ratios of diets ranged from 8.58 mg protein kJ-1 to 20.03 mg protein kJ-1. Diets were fed for 90d to triplicate groups of fish stocked in 0.128m3 seawater tanks, 25 individuals each. The daily ration of 2% wet body weight was offered to the fish thrice a day. The fish at the end of the study had more than ten-fold (77.0g) increase in weight compared to the initial (8.0g). Fish fed diets of 40% and 45% protein produced significantly (P<0.05) higher weight gain of 77.2g and 76.5g, and specific growth rate (SGR) of 2.65% and 2.62% than those of 67.0 g and 68.3g, and 2.49% and 2.51% of the other diets. The broken-line regression of SGR against dietary protein level yielded an optimum dietary protein requirement of 42.6% (Y=-1.6295 + 0.1114 X 2,P<0.05). Survival remained 100% among groups. Feed conversion ratio decreased from 0.45 for fish fed 20% dietary protein to 0.35 for fish fed 45% dietary protein. Nitrogen intake increased with an increase in dietary protein, which in turn resulted in an increase in nitrogen gain of fish whole body. Fish fed 40% and 45% protein diets showed higher (P<0.05) nitrogen gain (0.27g and 0.26g) than those (0.23g and 025g) fed all other diets. Gross energy intake (GEI) in fish fed 45% protein was lower (600.67kJ) than that (607.97 kJ) of 40% protein diet, though the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05); GEI ranging from 677.31 kJ to 663.20 kJ at remaining four diets (20% to 35% protein

  2. COPS5 (Jab1) protein increases β site processing of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid β peptide generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjie; Dey, Debleena; Carrera, Ivan; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2013-09-13

    Increased processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the identification of molecules that regulate Aβ generation is crucial for future therapeutic approaches for AD. We demonstrated previously that RanBP9 regulates Aβ generation in a number of cell lines and primary neuronal cultures by forming tripartite protein complexes with APP, low-density lipoprotein-related protein, and BACE1, consequently leading to increased amyloid plaque burden in the brain. RanBP9 is a scaffold protein that exists and functions in multiprotein complexes. To identify other proteins that may bind RanBP9 and regulate Aβ levels, we used a two-hybrid analysis against a human brain cDNA library and identified COPS5 as a novel RanBP9-interacting protein. This interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells and mouse brain. Colocalization of COPS5 and RanBP9 in the same subcellular compartments further supported the interaction of both proteins. Furthermore, like RanBP9, COPS5 robustly increased Aβ generation, followed by increased soluble APP-β (sAPP-β) and decreased soluble-APP-α (sAPP-α) levels. Most importantly, down-regulation of COPS5 by siRNAs reduced Aβ generation, implying that endogenous COPS5 regulates Aβ generation. Finally, COPS5 levels were increased significantly in AD brains and APΔE9 transgenic mice, and overexpression of COPS5 strongly increased RanBP9 protein levels by increasing its half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that COPS5 increases Aβ generation by increasing RanBP9 levels. Thus, COPS5 is a novel RanBP9-binding protein that increases APP processing and Aβ generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

  3. Influence of protein level and supplemental methionine in practical rations for young endangered masked bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the protein requirement of young endangered masked Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi). Five practical starting rations containing 24 to 32% protein were fed alone and supplemented with methionine for 5 weeks. Supplemental methionine significantly improved growth of quail fed diets containing 24 and 26% protein. Increasing the protein level improved growth of quail fed unsupplemented diets but did not do so when diets contained supplemental methionine. A methionine-supplemented ration containing 24% protein appeared adequate for supporting rapid growth of masked Bobwhite quail.

  4. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase.

  5. Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Identification through Quantitative Proteomics at Both the Protein and Peptide Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kimberly A.; Hammerle, Lisa P.; Andrews, Paul S.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Mustelin, Tomas; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Black, Roy A.; Doedens, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a key regulatory process essential to life at a cellular level; significant efforts have been made to identify ubiquitinated proteins through proteomics studies, but the level of success has not reached that of heavily studied post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. HRD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis, but no disease-relevant substrates have been identified. To identify these substrates, we have taken both peptide and protein level approaches to enrich for ubiquitinated proteins in the presence and absence of HRD1. At the protein level, a two-step strategy was taken using cells expressing His6-tagged ubiquitin, enriching proteins first based on their ubiquitination and second based on the His tag with protein identification by LC-MS/MS. Application of this method resulted in identification and quantification of more than 400 ubiquitinated proteins, a fraction of which were found to be sensitive to HRD1 and were therefore deemed candidate substrates. In a second approach, ubiquitinated peptides were enriched after tryptic digestion by peptide immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for the diglycine-labeled internal lysine residue indicative of protein ubiquitination, with peptides and ubiquitination sites identified by LC-MS/MS. Peptide immunoprecipitation resulted in identification of over 1800 ubiquitinated peptides on over 900 proteins in each study, with several proteins emerging as sensitive to HRD1 levels. Notably, significant overlap exists between the HRD1 substrates identified by the protein-based and the peptide-based strategies, with clear cross-validation apparent both qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating the effectiveness of both strategies and furthering our understanding of HRD1 biology. PMID:21987572

  6. Protein levels and colony development of Africanized and European honey bees fed natural and artificial diets.

    PubMed

    Morais, M M; Turcatto, A P; Pereira, R A; Francoy, T M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, K R; Gonçalves, L S; de Almeida, J M V; Ellis, J D; De Jong, D

    2013-12-19

    Pollen substitute diets are a valuable resource for maintaining strong and health honey bee colonies. Specific diets may be useful in one region or country and inadequate or economically unviable in others. We compared two artificial protein diets that had been formulated from locally-available ingredients in Brazil with bee bread and a non-protein sucrose diet. Groups of 100 newly-emerged, adult workers of Africanized honey bees in Brazil and European honey bees in the USA were confined in small cages and fed on one of four diets for seven days. The artificial diets included a high protein diet made of soy milk powder and albumin, and a lower protein level diet consisting of soy milk powder, brewer's yeast and rice bran. The initial protein levels in newly emerged bees were approximately 18-21 µg/µL hemolymph. After feeding on the diets for seven days, the protein levels in the hemolymph were similar among the protein diet groups (~37-49 µg/µL after seven days), although Africanized bees acquired higher protein levels, increasing 145 and 100% on diets D1 and D2, respectively, versus 83 and 60% in the European bees. All the protein diets resulted in significantly higher levels of protein than sucrose solution alone. In the field, the two pollen substitute diets were tested during periods of low pollen availability in the field in two regions of Brazil. Food consumption, population development, colony weight, and honey production were evaluated to determine the impact of the diets on colony strength parameters. The colonies fed artificial diets had a significant improvement in all parameters, while control colonies dwindled during the dearth period. We conclude that these two artificial protein diets have good potential as pollen substitutes during dearth periods and that Africanized bees more efficiently utilize artificial protein diets than do European honey bees.

  7. A novel method for increasing the expression level of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Clapper, Jonathan; Guderian, Jeffery A; Foy, Teresa M; Fanger, Gary R; Retter, Marc W; Skeiky, Yasir A W

    2003-07-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins is an important step towards elucidating the functions of many genes discovered through genomic sequencing projects. It is also critical for validating gene targets and for developing effective therapies for many diseases. Here we describe a novel method to express recombinant proteins that are extremely difficult to produce otherwise. The increased protein expression level is achieved by using a fusion partner, MTB32-C, which is the carboxyl terminal fragment of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, MTB32 (Rv0125). By fusing MTB32-C to the N-termini of target genes, we have demonstrated significant enhancement of recombinant protein expression level in Escherichia coli. The inclusion of a 6xHis tag and the 128-amino acid of MTB32-C will add 13.5 kDa to the fusion molecule. Comparison of the mRNA levels of the fusion and non-fusion proteins indicated that the increased fusion protein expression may be regulated at translational or post-translational steps. There are many potential applications for the generated fusion proteins. For example, MTB32-C fusion proteins have been used successfully as immunogens to generate both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies have been used to characterize cellular localization of the proteins and to validate gene targets at protein level. In addition, these antibodies may be useful in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for many diseases. If desired, the MTB32-C portion in the fusion protein can be removed after protein expression, making it possible to study protein structure and function as well as to screen for potential drugs. Thus, this novel fusion expression system has become a powerful tool for many applications.

  8. Physicochemical effects of the lipid phase and protein level on meat emulsion stability, texture, and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Barbut, S

    2010-03-01

    The effects of beef fat (25%) substitution with rendered beef fat, canola oil, palm oil, or hydrogenated palm oil at varying meat protein levels (8%, 11%, and 14%) were studied in emulsified beef meat batters. There was no significant difference in fat loss among meat batters made with beef fat, rendered beef fat, or palm oil. Hydrogenated palm oil provided the most stable batters at all protein levels. Increasing meat protein to 14% resulted in high fat loss in batters prepared with canola oil, which did not occur in the other formulations. This indicates that the physicochemical characteristics of fat/oil affect emulsion stability. Cooked batter hardness was higher (P < 0.05) when protein level was raised; highest in hydrogenated palm oil batters when compared at similar protein levels. As protein level was raised springiness values were increased in all the meat treatments. Springiness was higher in the canola oil treatments. Light microscopy revealed fat globule coalescence in canola oil meat batters prepared with 14% protein, as well as the development of fat channels and more protein aggregation; both seem to result in lower emulsion stability. Hydrogenated palm oil batters showed fat particles with sharp edges as opposed to the round ones seen in all other treatments.

  9. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels.

  10. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-Macarthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-04-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry.

  11. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  12. Evolutionary tuning of protein expression levels of a positively autoregulated two-component system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong; Stock, Ann M

    2013-10-01

    Cellular adaptation relies on the development of proper regulatory schemes for accurate control of gene expression levels in response to environmental cues. Over- or under-expression can lead to diminished cell fitness due to increased costs or insufficient benefits. Positive autoregulation is a common regulatory scheme that controls protein expression levels and gives rise to essential features in diverse signaling systems, yet its roles in cell fitness are less understood. It remains largely unknown how much protein expression is 'appropriate' for optimal cell fitness under specific extracellular conditions and how the dynamic environment shapes the regulatory scheme to reach appropriate expression levels. Here, we investigate the correlation of cell fitness and output response with protein expression levels of the E. coli PhoB/PhoR two-component system (TCS). In response to phosphate (Pi)-depletion, the PhoB/PhoR system activates genes involved in phosphorus assimilation as well as genes encoding themselves, similarly to many other positively autoregulated TCSs. We developed a bacteria competition assay in continuous cultures and discovered that different Pi conditions have conflicting requirements of protein expression levels for optimal cell fitness. Pi-replete conditions favored cells with low levels of PhoB/PhoR while Pi-deplete conditions selected for cells with high levels of PhoB/PhoR. These two levels matched PhoB/PhoR concentrations achieved via positive autoregulation in wild-type cells under Pi-replete and -deplete conditions, respectively. The fitness optimum correlates with the wild-type expression level, above which the phosphorylation output saturates, thus further increase in expression presumably provides no additional benefits. Laboratory evolution experiments further indicate that cells with non-ideal protein levels can evolve toward the optimal levels with diverse mutational strategies. Our results suggest that the natural protein expression

  13. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  14. Acute effects of very-low-protein diet on FGF23 levels: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Biagio; Di Micco, Lucia; Torraca, Serena; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Russo, Luigi; Pota, Andrea; Mirenghi, Francesco; Russo, Domenico

    2012-04-01

    High levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 are associated with mortality, CKD progression, and calcification in CKD patients. The aim of this pilot study is to assess whether a very-low-protein diet (0.3 g/kg per day) with a consequent low intake of phosphorus would reduce fibroblast growth factor 23 compared with a low-protein diet (0.6 g/kg per day) in CKD patients not yet on dialysis. A prospective, randomized, controlled crossover study was performed in which 32 patients were randomized into two groups. Group A (16 patients) received a very-low-protein diet (0.3 g/kg body wt per day) supplemented with ketoanalogues during the first week and a low-protein diet during the second week, and group B (16 patients) received a low-protein diet during the first week and a very-low-protein diet during the second week. Fibroblast growth factor 23, seric, and urinary phosphate levels were measured at baseline and the end of each study period. After only 1 week of the very-low-protein diet, reductions in fibroblast growth factor 23 levels (33.5%), serum phosphate (12%), and urinary phosphate (34%) with the very-low-protein diet compared with the low-protein diet were observed. Serum and urinary phosphate levels and protein intake were significant determinants of fibroblast growth factor 23 (95% confidence interval=1.04-1.19, 1.12-1.37, and 1.51-2.23, respectively). A very-low-protein diet supplemented with ketoanalogues reduced fibroblast growth factor 23 levels in CKD patients not yet on dialysis.

  15. Fasting Lipoprotein Lipase Protein Levels Can Predict a Postmeal Increment of Triglyceride Levels in Fasting Normohypertriglyceridemic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakane, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Although a postprandial increment in triglyceride (TG) levels is considered to be a risk factor for atherogenesis, tests (e.g., fat load) to assess postprandial changes in TG levels cannot be easily applied to clinical practice. Therefore, fasting markers that predict postprandial TG states are needed to be developed. One current candidate is lipoprotein lipase (LPL) protein, a molecule that hydrides TGs. This study investigated whether fasting LPL levels could predict postprandial TG levels. A total of 17 subjects (11 men, 6 women, mean age 52 ± 11 years) with normotriglyceridemia during fasting underwent the meal test. Several fasting parameters, including LPL, were measured for the area under the curve of postprandial TGs (AUC-TG). The subjects' mean fasting TG level was 1.30 mmol/l, and their mean LPL level was 41.6 ng/ml. The subjects' TG levels increased after loading (they peaked after two postprandial hours). Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that fasting TG levels were a predictor of the AUC-TG. In addition, fasting LPL mass levels were found to be a predictor of the AUC-TG (β = 0.65, P < 0.01), and this relationship was independent of fasting TG levels. Fasting LPL levels may be useful to predict postprandial TG increment in this population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stable, high-level expression of a type I antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R G; Appels, R

    1999-06-01

    The type I antifreeze proteins are simple amphipathic helical proteins found in abundance in polar fish species, where they act to prevent freezing of internal fluids by a mechanism of noncolligative freezing point depression. Large-scale production of these proteins for research and biotechnological purposes has been hampered by their apparent instability when expressed in heterologous host systems. This has necessitated their production as fusion proteins, in polymeric form, or as proproteins for secretion, with the concomitant necessity for postpurification processing to generate the mature form of the protein. We have successfully expressed a recombinant variant of type I antifreeze protein (rAFP) in Escherichia coli using the inducible T7 polymerase transcription expression system. The rAFP contains five copies of the 11 amino acid ice-binding repeat motif found in all type I antifreeze proteins. The protein accumulates to high levels intracellularly in the form of inclusion bodies, with no apparent degradation by the cellular proteolytic machinery. We have devised a simple and rapid purification protocol for this recombinant type I antifreeze protein which does not require cellular fractionation, purification of the inclusion bodies, or chromatographic steps. This protocol may be of general use for this class of protein. The protein displays all three activities common to these proteins: recrystallization inhibition, noncolligative freezing point depression, and modification of the morphology of single ice crystals in solution.

  17. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  18. Optogenetic Stimulation Increases Level of Antiapoptotic Protein Bcl-xL in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lanshakov, D A; Drozd, U S; Dygalo, N N

    2017-03-01

    The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL is associated with several neuroplastic processes such as formation of synapses, regulation of spontaneous and evoked synaptic responses, and release of neurotransmitters. Dependence of expression on activity of neurons is characteristic for many proteins participating in regulation of neuroplasticity. Whether such property is exhibited by the Bcl-xL protein was analyzed using in vivo optogenetic stimulation of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons expressing channelrhodopsin ChR2H134 under CAMKIIa promoter in the adeno-associated viral vector, followed by immunohistochemical determination of the level of Bcl-xL protein in these neurons and surrounding cells. Increase in the level of early response c-Fos protein following illumination with blue light was indicative of activation of these hippocampal neurons. The optogenetic activation of hippocampus resulted in a significant increase in the level of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the photosensitive neurons as well as in the surrounding cells. The dependence of the level of expression of Bcl-xL protein on the activity of neurons indicates that this protein possesses one more important property that is essential for participation in neuroplastic processes in the brain.

  19. Less is More: Membrane Protein Digestion Beyond Urea–Trypsin Solution for Next-level Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of next-level bottom-up membrane proteomics is protein function investigation, via high-coverage high-throughput peptide-centric quantitation of expression, modifications and dynamic structures at systems scale. Yet efficient digestion of mammalian membrane proteins presents a daunting barrier, and prevalent day-long urea–trypsin in-solution digestion proved insufficient to reach this goal. Many efforts contributed incremental advances over past years, but involved protein denaturation that disconnected measurement from functional states. Beyond denaturation, the recent discovery of structure/proteomics omni-compatible detergent n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside, combined with pepsin and PNGase F columns, enabled breakthroughs in membrane protein digestion: a 2010 DDM-low-TCEP (DLT) method for H/D-exchange (HDX) using human G protein-coupled receptor, and a 2015 flow/detergent-facilitated protease and de-PTM digestions (FDD) for integrative deep sequencing and quantitation using full-length human ion channel complex. Distinguishing protein solubilization from denaturation, protease digestion reliability from theoretical specificity, and reduction from alkylation, these methods shifted day(s)-long paradigms into minutes, and afforded fully automatable (HDX)-protein-peptide-(tandem mass tag)-HPLC pipelines to instantly measure functional proteins at deep coverage, high peptide reproducibility, low artifacts and minimal leakage. Promoting—not destroying—structures and activities harnessed membrane proteins for the next-level streamlined functional proteomics. This review analyzes recent advances in membrane protein digestion methods and highlights critical discoveries for future proteomics. PMID:26081834

  20. Altered protein levels in the isolated extracellular matrix of failing human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DeAguero, Joshua L; McKown, Elizabeth N; Zhang, Liwen; Keirsey, Jeremy; Fischer, Edgar G; Samedi, Von G; Canan, Benjamin D; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Delfín, Dawn A

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is associated with extensive pathological cardiac remodeling and involves numerous changes in the protein expression profile of the extracellular matrix of the heart. We obtained seven human, end-stage, failing hearts with DCM (DCM-failing) and nine human, nonfailing donor hearts and compared their extracellular matrix protein profiles. We first showed that the DCM-failing hearts had indeed undergone extensive remodeling of the left ventricle myocardium relative to nonfailing hearts. We then isolated the extracellular matrix from a subset of these hearts and performed a proteomic analysis on the isolated matrices. We found that the levels of 26 structural proteins were altered in the DCM-failing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix compared to nonfailing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix. Overall, most of the extracellular matrix proteins showed reduced levels in the DCM-failing hearts, while all of the contractile proteins showed increased levels. There was a mixture of increased and decreased levels of cytoskeletal and nuclear transport proteins. Using immunoprobing, we verified that collagen IV (α2 and α6 isoforms), zyxin, and myomesin protein levels were reduced in the DCM-failing hearts. We expect that these data will add to the understanding of the pathology associated with heart failure with DCM.

  1. Modulation of GDP-fucose level for generating proteins with reduced rate of fucosylation (WO2010141855).

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The application (WO2010141855) is in the field of glycobiology, and involves the control of the rate of fucosylation of proteins by exogenous factors. It aims at controlling the rate of protein fucosylation with inhibitors (drugs or nucleic acid antagonists) of enzymes involved in the synthesis of GDP-fucose. Mammalian cell lines were cultured in the presence of inhibitors, for example, siRNA. The rates of GDP-fucose in cells and during protein fucosylation were characterized. The level of protein fucosylation decreases rapidly in response to a decrease in GDP-fucose level. The relationship between the rate of fucosylation of proteins and the level of GDP-fucose in a cell is non-linear. Reduction in the rate of protein fucosylation can be achieved with a minimal reduction of the level of GDP-fucose in cells. The paradigm may be used to synthesize proteins and antibodies, with a reduced rate of fucosylation. The application claims that the use of drugs or nucleic acid antagonists that inhibit the enzymes involved in GDP-fucose biosynthesis optimizes the level of GDP-fucose present in cells, and reduces the rate of fucosylation of glycoproteins.

  2. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  3. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates the levels of scaffold proteins and glutamate receptors in postsynaptic densities.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Janin; Falley, Katrin; Richter, Dietmar; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Kindler, Stefan

    2009-09-18

    Functional absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes the fragile X syndrome, a hereditary form of mental retardation characterized by a change in dendritic spine morphology. The RNA-binding protein FMRP has been implicated in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis. Here we have analyzed whether the abundance of scaffold proteins and neurotransmitter receptor subunits in postsynaptic densities (PSDs) is altered in the neocortex and hippocampus of FMRP-deficient mice. Whereas the levels of several PSD components are unchanged, concentrations of Shank1 and SAPAP scaffold proteins and various glutamate receptor subunits are altered in both adult and juvenile knock-out mice. With the exception of slightly increased hippocampal SAPAP2 mRNA levels in adult animals, altered postsynaptic protein concentrations do not correlate with similar changes in total and synaptic levels of corresponding mRNAs. Thus, loss of FMRP in neurons appears to mainly affect the translation and not the abundance of particular brain transcripts. Semi-quantitative analysis of RNA levels in FMRP immunoprecipitates showed that in the mouse brain mRNAs encoding PSD components, such as Shank1, SAPAP1-3, PSD-95, and the glutamate receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B, are associated with FMRP. Luciferase reporter assays performed in primary cortical neurons from knock-out and wild-type mice indicate that FMRP silences translation of Shank1 mRNAs via their 3'-untranslated region. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors relieves translational suppression. As Shank1 controls dendritic spine morphology, our data suggest that dysregulation of Shank1 synthesis may significantly contribute to the abnormal spine development and function observed in brains of fragile X syndrome patients.

  4. Using Peptide-Level Proteomics Data for Detecting Differentially Expressed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Tomi; Corthals, Garry L; Nevalainen, Olli S; Elo, Laura L

    2015-11-06

    The expression of proteins can be quantified in high-throughput means using different types of mass spectrometers. In recent years, there have emerged label-free methods for determining protein abundance. Although the expression is initially measured at the peptide level, a common approach is to combine the peptide-level measurements into protein-level values before differential expression analysis. However, this simple combination is prone to inconsistencies between peptides and may lose valuable information. To this end, we introduce here a method for detecting differentially expressed proteins by combining peptide-level expression-change statistics. Using controlled spike-in experiments, we show that the approach of averaging peptide-level expression changes yields more accurate lists of differentially expressed proteins than does the conventional protein-level approach. This is particularly true when there are only few replicate samples or the differences between the sample groups are small. The proposed technique is implemented in the Bioconductor package PECA, and it can be downloaded from http://www.bioconductor.org.

  5. Comparison of total protein and phospholipase A(2) levels in individual coralsnake venoms.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Randall A; Harper, George R; Zimmerman, Sloane; Hook, Jessica

    2013-12-15

    Studies of differences or changes in venom protein levels or enzymatic activities have significance only if contrasted to the normal variations between individual snakes. This study involves the analysis and comparison of venom from 13 individual Texas coralsnakes (Micrurus tener tener) in order to detect differences in the volume, total protein concentration, electrophoretic profile, and PLA2 enzyme activity. A significant inverse correlation between venom volume and total protein concentration was found. Although the 13 venoms were indistinguishable from their electrophoretic protein profiles, phospholipase A2 enzymatic activities varied considerably.

  6. Increased serum G72 protein levels in patients with schizophrenia: a potential candidate biomarker.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Esra Soydaş; Albayrak, Yakup; Aksoy, Nurkan; Şahin, Başak; Beyazyüz, Murat; Kuloğlu, Murat; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    The product of the G72 gene is an activator of d-amino acid oxidase and has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Increased G72 protein levels may be associated with disturbed glutamatergic transmission and increased reactive oxygen species. Only one pilot study by Lin et al. has investigated the potential role of serum G72 protein levels as a biomarker for schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to compare serum G72 protein levels between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and to retest the results of the previous pilot study. Materials and methods In total, 107 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and 60 age-sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. The groups were compared regarding serum G72 protein levels. The mean serum G72 protein values were 495.90±152.03 pg/ml in the schizophrenia group and 346.10±102.08 pg/ml in the healthy control group. The mean serum G72 protein level was significantly increased in the schizophrenia group compared with the healthy control group (t=-3.89, p<0.001). A receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to compare the schizophrenia and healthy control groups. It was determined that the cut-off value was 141.51 pg/ml with a sensitivity of 0.991 and a specificity of 0.821. We suggest that serum G72 protein levels may represent a candidate biomarker for schizophrenia and have confirmed the results of the previous preliminary study. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and the inclusion of first episode schizophrenia patients are required to clarify the reliability and validity of serum G72 protein levels as a biomarker for schizophrenia.

  7. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  8. How to talk about protein-level false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; Tasnim, Ayesha; Käll, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    A frequently sought output from a shotgun proteomics experiment is a list of proteins that we believe to have been present in the analyzed sample before proteolytic digestion. The standard technique to control for errors in such lists is to enforce a preset threshold for the false discovery rate (FDR). Many consider protein-level FDRs a difficult and vague concept, as the measurement entities, spectra, are manifestations of peptides and not proteins. Here, we argue that this confusion is unnecessary and provide a framework on how to think about protein-level FDRs, starting from its basic principle: the null hypothesis. Specifically, we point out that two competing null hypotheses are used concurrently in today's protein inference methods, which has gone unnoticed by many. Using simulations of a shotgun proteomics experiment, we show how confusing one null hypothesis for the other can lead to serious discrepancies in the FDR. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the same simulations can be used to verify FDR estimates of protein inference methods. In particular, we show that, for a simple protein inference method, decoy models can be used to accurately estimate protein-level FDRs for both competing null hypotheses. © 2016 The Authors. Proteomics Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High protein pre-term infant formula: effect on nutrient balance, metabolic status and growth.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard; Embleton, Nick; Rigo, Jacques; Carrie, Annelise; Haschke, Ferdinand; Ziegler, Ekhard

    2006-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that formula with protein content of 3.0 g/100 kcal does not fully meet the protein needs of very-low-birth weight infants. Our purpose was to compare nitrogen balance, metabolic status and growth in infants fed a standard (3.0 g/100 kcal; RegPro) and high (3.6 g/100 kcal; HiPro) protein infant formula. Infants were fed both formulas, each formula for one week in balanced cross-over design. Metabolic status was monitored throughout. Nutrient balance and plasma amino acids were determined at the end of each week. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model. Eighteen infants were studied. Nine infants received the RegPro and nine received HiPro formula first. Nitrogen intake, absorption and retention were greater with the HiPro formula. None of the infants developed uremia or metabolic acidosis but retinol-binding-protein and weight gain were greater with the HiPro formula. Increased protein accretion paralleled by better weight gain without evidence of metabolic stress indicates that a formula with a protein content of 3.6 g/100 kcal better meets protein needs in these rapidly-growing infants. Further studies are needed to determine whether these short-term outcomes will be translated into long-term benefits.

  10. Assessment of urinary protein 1 and transferrin as early markers of cadmium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, A M; Roels, H; Cardenas, A; Lauwerys, R

    1990-01-01

    Transferrin and protein 1, a sex linked alpha 2-microprotein, were assayed in urine from 58 workers exposed to cadmium (Cd) in a non-ferrous smelter and from 58 age matched referents. These two new markers of nephrotoxicity were compared with urinary beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin, and beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG). The response of protein 1 to Cd tubulotoxicity was similar to that of beta 2-m, RBP, and NAG. In Cd workers, protein 1 had a correlation with urinary Cd (r = 0.56) similar to beta 2-m (r = 0.48), RBP (r = 0.58), and NAG (r = 0.49). Values of these three low molecular weight proteins and of NAG were increased only in workers with urinary Cd higher than 10 micrograms/g creatinine. Urinary transferrin and albumin were similarly affected by exposure to Cd. Their response, however, was clearly more sensitive than that of low molecular weight proteins. Prevalences of positive values of these two high molecular weight proteins were not only higher but also tended to rise at lower concentrations of Cd in urine or blood. This finding suggests that in some subjects subtle defects in glomerular barrier function may precede the onset of proximal tubular impairment after chronic exposure to Cd. It remains to be assessed whether these subjects are more at risk of developing renal insufficiency. PMID:2203466

  11. Protein C levels in beta-thalassemia major patients in the east Nile delta of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer H; Elbehedy, Rabab M; Youssef, Doaa M; Amr, Ghada E

    2010-01-01

    Thalassemic patients have an increased risk for thromboembolic complications. To determine if this might be due to a deficiency in protein C, we investigated the status of the protein C anticoagulant pathway in thalassemia major patients and its relationship to the hypercoagulable state. Fifty patients with beta-thalassemia major (30 non-splenectomized and 20 splenectomized) and 20 healthy children as a control group were tested for levels of serum ferritin, liver enzymes, serum albumin, fibrinogen, protein C and protein S, thrombin antithrombin complex (TAT) and D-dimer. Thalassemic patients had lower levels of protein C and S and higher levels of D-dimer and TAT than the control group. These findings were more obvious in splenectomized patients and in those with infrequent blood transfusion. Protein C plays a major role in the hypercoagulable state in thalassemic patients. These findings raise the issue as to whether it would be cost-beneficial to recommend prophylactic antithrombotic therapy in high-risk thalassemic patients. A wider prospective study is necessary to delineate under which circumstances therapy might be needed, and at what level of protein C deficiency to start prophylactic antithrombotic therapy.

  12. Possible role for increased C4b-binding-protein level in acquired protein S deficiency in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Lefebvre, P

    1990-04-01

    In this study, total protein S (PS) immunological levels, free-PS and C4b-binding-protein (C4bBP) concentrations, and PS functional activity were investigated in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients and compared with nondiabetic subjects. Mean total PS antigen concentration was not different between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, whereas free-PS levels and PS functional activity were significantly reduced in diabetic patients. C4bBP was increased in diabetic patients and correlated with HbA1 levels. This study shows that type I diabetic patients have depressed free PS and PS activity despite the presence of normal total PS concentration and suggests that this phenomenon is probably linked to the increase of circulating C4bBP.

  13. Elevated Levels of Protein Disulfide Isomerase and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein Implicated in Spinal Cord Injury Paraplegia Patients with Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyan; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Cuijiang; Li, Zengjun; Liu, Ting

    2016-07-01

    To explore the associations between two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP), and the development and progression of pressure ulcers (PUs) in spinal cord injury (SCI) paraplegia patients. ELISA kits were used to measure the levels of serum PDI and BIP in 67 SCI paraplegia patients with PUs and 61 SCI paraplegia patients without PUs. The associations between PDI and BIP, PU formation, PU staging, and pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) score were analyzed. The patients in the PU group had higher levels of PDI and BIP than those in the non-PU group (both p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of PDI were positively correlated with those of BIP (r = 0.707, p < 0.0001). There were significant differences in the PDI and BIP levels among the different stages of PU (all p < 0.05). As the PU stages progressed, the levels of PDI and BIP first increased, then decreased, and finally peaked at stage III of the PUs. The PUSH scores significantly declined 7 days after debridement for the PU stage II (p < 0.01) but showed no significant difference between stages III and IV at 7 days after debridement (p > 0.05). The PUSH scores also decreased at 28 days after debridement for stages II, III, and IV (all p < 0.01). Higher PUSH scores indicated a longer time of debridement accompanied by a longer wound surface healing time (p < 0.05). ER stress proteins may be involved in the process of PU formation and healing; moreover, the levels of PDI and BIP were also associated with the severity of the PUs. Finally, we found that the PUSH scores can be used as a reference to evaluate PU severity and healing.

  14. Association between protein C levels and mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilts, I T; Hutten, B A; Meijers, J C M; Spek, C A; Büller, H R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2017-06-01

    Procoagulant factors promote cancer progression and metastasis. Protein C is involved in hemostasis, inflammation and signal transduction, and has a protective effect on the endothelial barrier. In mice, administration of activated protein C reduced experimental metastasis. We assessed the association between protein C and mortality in patients with three types of cancer. The study population consisted of patients with advanced prostate, non-small cell lung or pancreatic cancer, who participated in the INPACT trial (NCT00312013). The trial evaluated the addition of nadroparin to chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancy. Patients were divided into tertiles based on protein C at baseline. The association between protein C levels and mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models. We analysed 477 patients (protein C tertiles: <97, 97-121 and ≥121%). Mean age was 65±9years; 390 (82%) were male; 191 patients (40%) had prostate cancer, 161 (34%) had lung cancer, and 125 (26%) pancreatic cancer. During a median follow-up of 10.4months, 291 patients (61%) died. Median protein C level was 107% (IQR 92-129). In the lowest tertile, 75 patients per 100 patient-years died, as compared to 60 and 54 in the middle and high tertile, respectively. Lower levels of protein C were associated with increased mortality (in tertiles: HR for trend 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.36, adjusted for age, sex and nadroparin use; as a continuous variable: HR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.008, p=0.07). Protein C seems inversely associated with mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Further research should validate protein C as a biomarker for mortality, and explore the effects of protein C on progression of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of energy and protein levels on nutrient utilization and their requirements in growing Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Sonali; Kundu, Shivlal Singh; Mondal, Goutam; Sontakke, Umesh; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate different levels of energy and protein for optimum growth of Murrah male buffalo calves, a growth trial (150 days) was conducted on 30 calves (body weight 202.5 ± 6.8 kg). Six diets were formulated to provide 90, 100 and 110% protein level and 90 and 110% energy level requirements for buffalo calves, derived from ICAR 2013 recommendations for buffaloes. The crude protein (CP) intake was increased with higher dietary CP, whereas no effect of energy levels or interaction between protein and energy was observed on CP intake. There were significant effects (P < 0.01) of the interaction between protein and energy (P < 0.05) on metabolizable energy (ME) intake. The digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) was higher (P < 0.0001) in high-energy groups compared to low-energy groups. The CP digestibility increased with the increased CP and ME of the rations. The absorbed N was improved linearly with an increased level of dietary CP, whereas the N retention was similar among all the groups distributed as per different energy or protein levels. The nutrient intake (protein or energy) per kg body weight (BW)(0.75) at various fortnight intervals was regressed linearly from the average daily gain (ADG) per kg BW(0.75). By setting the average daily gain at zero in the developed regression equation, a maintenance requirement was obtained, i.e. 133.1 kcal ME, 6.45 g CP and 3.95 g metabolizable protein (MP) per kg BW(0.75). Requirement for growth was 6.12 kcal ME, 0.46 g CP and 0.32 g MP per kg BW(0.75) per day. Metabolizable amino acid requirement was estimated from partitioning of MP intake and ADG. The ME requirements were lower, whereas the MP requirement of Murrah buffaloes was higher than ICAR (2013) recommendations.

  16. A longitudinal study on urinary cadmium and renal tubular protein excretion of nickel-cadmium battery workers after cessation of cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhua; Zhang, Yanfang; Yi, Juan; Zhou, Jinpeng; Huang, Xianqing; Shi, Xinshan; Xiao, Shunhua; Lin, Dafeng

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to predict the outcome of urinary cadmium (Cd) excretion and renal tubular function by analyzing their evolution through 10 years after Cd exposure ceased. Forty-one female, non-smoking workers were recruited from the year 2004 to 2009 when being removed from a nickel-cadmium battery factory, and they were asked to provide morning urine samples on three consecutive days at enrollment and in every follow-up year until 2014. Urinary Cd and renal tubular function biomarkers including urinary β2-microglobulin (β2-m) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) concentrations were determined with the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. The medians of baseline Cd, β2-m and RBP concentrations at enrollment were 6.19, 105.38 and 71.84 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Urinary β2-m and RBP concentrations were both related to Cd concentrations over the years (β absolute-β2-m = 9.16, P = 0.008 and β absolute-RBP = 6.42, P < 0.001, respectively). Cd, β2-m and RBP concentrations in the follow-up years were all associated with their baseline concentrations (β absolute-Cd = 0.61, P < 0.001; β absolute-β2-m = 0.64, P < 0.001; and β absolute-RBP = 0.60, P < 0.001, respectively), and showed a decreasing tendency with the number of elapsed years relative to their baseline concentrations (β relative-Cd = -0.20, P = 0.010; β relative-β2-m = -17.19, P = 0.002; and β relative-RBP = -10.66, P < 0.001, respectively). Urinary Cd might eventually decrease to the general population level, and Cd-related tubular function would improve under the baseline conditions of this cohort.

  17. Proteomic analysis of day-night variations in protein levels in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Sparre, Thomas; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter; Vorum, Henrik

    2007-06-01

    The pineal gland secretes the hormone melatonin. This secretion exhibits a circadian rhythm with a zenith during night and a nadir during day. We have performed proteome analysis of the superficial pineal gland in rats during daytime and nighttime. The proteins were extracted and subjected to 2-DE. Of 1747 protein spots revealed by electrophoresis, densitometric analysis showed the up-regulation of 25 proteins during nighttime and of 35 proteins during daytime. Thirty-seven of the proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The proteins up-regulated during the night are involved in the Krebs cycle, energy transduction, calcium binding, and intracellular transport. During the daytime, enzymes involved in glycolysis, electron transport, and also the Krebs cycle were up-regulated as well as proteins taking part in RNA binding and RNA processing. Our data show a prominent day-night variation of the protein levels in the rat pineal gland. Some proteins are up-regulated during the night concomitant with the melatonin secretion of the gland. Other proteins are up-regulated during the day indicating a pineal metabolism not related to the melatonin synthesis.

  18. Exploring DNA-protein interactions on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic tools.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2017-08-14

    DNA-protein interactions are at the core of the cellular machinery and single molecule methods have revolutionized the possibilities to study, and our understanding of these interactions on the molecular level. Nanofluidic channels have been extensively used for studying single DNA molecules during the last twelve years and in this review, we discuss how this experimental platform has been extended to studies of DNA-protein interactions. We first present how the design of the device can be tailored for the specific DNA-protein system studied and how the channels can be passivated to avoid non-specific binding of proteins. We then focus on describing the different kinds of DNA-interacting proteins that have been studied in nanofluidic devices, including proteins that compact DNA and proteins that form filaments on DNA. Our main objective is to highlight the diverse functionalities of DNA-protein systems that have been characterized using nanofluidic structures and hence demonstrate the versatility of these experimental tools. We finally discuss potential future directions studies of DNA-protein complexes in nanochannels might take, including specific DNA-protein systems that are difficult to analyze with traditional techniques, devices with increased complexity, and fully integrated lab-on-a-chip devices for analysis of material extracted from (single) cells.

  19. A Ketogenic Diet Increases Brown Adipose Tissue Mitochondrial Proteins and UCP1 Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Baxa, Ulrich; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding a ketogenic diet (KD) for a month on general physiology with emphasis on brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mice. KD did not reduce the caloric intake, or weight or lipid content of BAT. Relative epididymal fat pads were 40% greater in the mice fed the KD (P = 0.06) while leptin was lower (P < 0.05). Blood glucose levels were 30% lower while D-β-hydroxybutyrate levels were about 3.5-fold higher in the KD group. Plasma insulin and leptin levels in the KD group were about half of that of the mice fed NIH-31 pellets (chow group). Median mitochondrial size in the inter-scapular BAT (IBAT) of the KD group was about 60% greater, whereas the median lipid droplet size was about half of that in the chow group. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteins were increased (1.5–3-fold) and the uncoupling protein 1 levels were increased by threefold in mice fed the KD. The levels of PPARγ, PGC-1α, and Sirt1 in KD group were 1.5–3-fold while level of Sirt3 was about half of that in the chow-fed group. IBAT cyclic AMP levels were 60% higher in the KD group and cAMP response element binding protein was 2.5-fold higher, suggesting increased sympathetic system activity. These results demonstrate that a KD can also increase BAT mitochondrial size and protein levels. PMID:23233333

  20. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches.

  1. Protein carbonyl levels in serum and gingival crevicular fluid in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Baltacioğlu, Esra; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Alver, Ahmet; Değer, Orhan; Karabulut, Erdem

    2008-08-01

    Evidence reveals the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in many pathologies including periodontitis. Protein carbonylation is the most widely used biomarker for oxidative damage to proteins, and reflects cellular damage induced by ROS. In this study protein carbonyl (PC) levels in serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) was evaluated. Thirty-three patients with CP and 24 healthy controls were included in the study. Following the clinical measurements and samplings, total protein levels in serum and GCF were determined by Bradford method, and serum and GCF PC levels were measured by modified Levine method. PC levels in serum and GCF were significantly higher in the CP group compared to the control group (p<0.05). In all subjects, serum and GCF PC levels showed statistically significant positive correlations with all clinical parameters (p<0.05). The results suggest that both systemic and local/periodontal protein carbonylation increase in CP compared to health and that elevated levels of PCs may be a sign of oxidative damage in periodontitis and correlate well with the periodontal status.

  2. Seroprofiling at the Candida albicans protein species level unveils an accurate molecular discriminator for candidemia.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2016-02-16

    Serum antibodies to specific Candida proteins have been reported as potential diagnostic biomarkers for candidemia. However, their diagnostic usefulness at the protein species level has hardly been examined. Using serological proteome analysis, we explored the IgG-antibody responses to Candida albicans protein species in candidemia and control patients. We found that 87 discrete protein species derived from 34 unique proteins were IgG-targets, although only 43 of them were differentially recognized by candidemia and control sera. An increase in the speciation of the immunome, connectivity and modularity of antigenic species co-recognition networks, and heterogeneity of antigenic species recognition patterns was associated with candidemia. IgG antibodies to certain discrete protein species were better predictors of candidemia than those to their corresponding proteins. A molecular discriminator delineated from the combined fingerprints of IgG antibodies to two distinct species of phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase accurately classified candidemia and control patients. These results provide new insight into the anti-Candida IgG-antibody response development in candidemia, and demonstrate that an immunoproteomic signature at the molecular level may be useful for its diagnosis. Our study further highlights the importance of defining pathogen-specific antigens at the chemical and molecular level for their potential application as immunodiagnostic reagents or even vaccine candidates.

  3. Enteral glutamine stimulates protein synthesis and decreases ubiquitin mRNA level in human gut mucosa.

    PubMed

    Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; Hecketsweiler, Bernadette; Lavoinne, Alain; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2003-08-01

    Effects of glutamine on whole body and intestinal protein synthesis and on intestinal proteolysis were assessed in humans. Two groups of healthy volunteers received in a random order enteral glutamine (0.8 mmol.kg body wt(-1)x h(-1)) compared either to saline or isonitrogenous amino acids. Intravenous [2H5]phenylalanine and [13C]leucine were simultaneously infused. After gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, whole body protein turnover was estimated from traced plasma amino acid fluxes and the fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of gut mucosal protein was calculated from protein and intracellular phenylalanine and leucine enrichments in duodenal biopsies. mRNA levels for ubiquitin, cathepsin D, and m-calpain were analyzed in biopsies by RT-PCR. Glutamine significantly increased mucosal protein FSR compared with saline. Glutamine and amino acids had similar effects on FSR. The mRNA level for ubiquitin was significantly decreased after glutamine infusion compared with saline and amino acids, whereas cathepsin D and m-calpain mRNA levels were not affected. Enteral glutamine stimulates mucosal protein synthesis and may attenuate ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and thus improve protein balance in human gut.

  4. Exceptionally high heterologous protein levels in transgenic dicotyledonous seeds using Phaseolus vulgaris regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Geert; Angenon, Geert; Depicker, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Seeds are concentrated sources of protein and thus may be ideal 'bioreactors' for the production of heterologous proteins. For this application, strong seed-specific expression signals are required. A set of expression cassettes were designed using 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of the seed storage protein gene arcelin 5-I (arc5-I) from Phaseolus vulgaris, and evaluated for the production of heterologous proteins in dicotyledonous plant species. A murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was chosen as model protein because of the current industrial interest to produce antibodies and derived fragments in crops. Because the highest scFv accumulation in seed had previously been achieved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the scFv-encoding sequence was provided with signal sequences for accumulation in the ER. Transgenic Arabidopsis seed stocks, expressing the scFv under control of the 35S promoter, contained scFv accumulation levels in the range of 1% of total soluble protein (TSP). However, the seed storage promoter constructs boosted the scFv to exceptionally high levels. Maximum scFv levels were obtained in homozygous seed stocks, being 12.5% of TSP under control of the arc5-I regulatory sequences and even up to 36.5% of TSP upon replacing the arc5-I promoter by the beta-phaseolin promoter of Phaseolus vulgaris. Even at such very high levels, the scFv proteins retain their full antigen-binding activity. Moreover, the presence of very high scFv levels has only minory effects on seed germination and no effect on seed production. These results demonstrate that the expression levels of arcelin 5-I and beta-phaseolin seed storage protein genes can be transferred to heterologous proteins, giving exceptionally high levels of heterologous proteins, which can be of great value for the molecular farming industry by raising production yield and lowering bio-mass production and purification costs. Finally, the feasibility of heterologous protein production using the

  5. Zinc transporters protein level in postmortem brain of depressed subjects and suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Rafalo-Ulinska, Anna; Piotrowska, Joanna; Kryczyk, Agata; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Misztak, Paulina; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Stockmeier, Craig A; Datka, Wojciech; Nowak, Gabriel; Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious psychiatric illness, associated with an increasing rate of suicide. The pathogenesis of depression may be associated with the disruption of zinc (Zn) homeostasis. In the brain, several proteins that regulate Zn homeostasis are present, including Zn transporters (ZnTs) which remove Zn from the cytosol. The present study was designed to investigate whether depression and suicide are associated with alterations in the expression of the ZnTs protein. Protein levels of ZnT1, ZnT3, ZnT4, ZnT5 and ZnT6 were measured in postmortem brain tissue from two different cohorts. Cohort A contained 10 subjects diagnosed with MDD (7 were suicide victims) and 10 psychiatrically-normal control subjects and cohort B contained 11 non-diagnosed suicide victims and 8 sudden-death control subjects. Moreover, in cohort A we measured protein level of NMDA (GluN2A subunit), AMPA (GluA1 subunit) and 5-HT1A receptors and PSD-95. Proteins were measured in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) using Western blotting. In addition, Zn concentration was measured using a voltammetric method. There was a significant increase in protein levels of ZnT1, ZnT4, ZnT5 in the PFC in MDD, relative to control subjects, while ZnT3 protein level was decreased in MDD. There was no significant difference in the Zn concentration in the PFC between control and MDD subjects. Similarly, in the PFC of suicide victims (non-diagnosed), an increase in protein levels of ZnT1, ZnT4, ZnT5 and ZnT6 was observed. Conversely, protein levels of ZnT3 were decreased in both suicide victims and subjects with MDD, in comparison with control subjects. There was also a significant decrease in the protein level of GluA1, GluN2A, PSD-95 and 5-HT1A in MDD. Our studies suggest that alterations in Zn transport proteins are associated with the pathophysiology of MDD and suicide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells.

  7. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  8. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    DOE PAGES

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; ...

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety usingmore » an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.« less

  9. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety using an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.

  10. Differential Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 (PBP5) Levels in the Enterococcus faecium Clades with Different Levels of Ampicillin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Rae, Meredith; Davlieva, Milya G; Singh, Kavindra V; Shamoo, Yousif; Murray, Barbara E

    2017-01-01

    Ampicillin resistance in Enterococcus faecium is a serious concern worldwide, complicating the treatment of E. faecium infections. Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) is considered the main ampicillin resistance determinant in E. faecium The three known E. faecium clades showed sequence variations in the pbp5 gene that are associated with their ampicillin resistance phenotype; however, these changes alone do not explain the array of resistance levels observed among E. faecium clinical strains. We aimed to determine if the levels of PBP5 are differentially regulated between the E. faecium clades, with the hypothesis that variations in PBP5 levels could help account for the spectrum of ampicillin MICs seen in E. faecium We studied pbp5 mRNA levels and PBP5 protein levels as well as the genetic environment upstream of pbp5 in 16 E. faecium strains that belong to the different E. faecium clades and for which the ampicillin MICs covered a wide range. Our results found that pbp5 and PBP5 levels are increased in subclade A1 and A2 ampicillin-resistant strains compared to those in clade B and subclade A2 ampicillin-susceptible strains. Furthermore, we found evidence of major clade-associated rearrangements in the region upstream of pbp5, including large DNA fragment insertions, deletions, and single nucleotide polymorphisms, that may be associated with the differential regulation of PBP5 levels between the E. faecium clades. Overall, these findings highlight the contribution of the clade background to the regulation of PBP5 abundance and point to differences in the region upstream of pbp5 as likely contributors to the differential expression of ampicillin resistance. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. LmbJ and LmbIH protein levels correlate with lincomycin production in Streptomyces lincolnensis.

    PubMed

    Hola, K; Janata, J; Kopecky, J; Spizek, J

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the expression of two overlapping genes lmbJ and lmbIH in Streptomyces lincolnensis and to document LmbJ and LmbIH protein levels during the lincomycin production phase. To analyse presumable function of the LmbIH protein. Lincomycin production was monitored by thin-layer chromatography, proteins LmbJ and LmbIH were assayed in the cell-free extracts of S. lincolnensis by immunodetection. LmbJ occurred at stable level (2-4 mg x g(-1) of total proteins) for a long time period (36-96 h of cultivation) covering the whole production phase. This fairly corresponds to the catalytic function of the protein in the antibiotic biosynthesis (N-demethyllincomycin methyltransferase). On the contrary, LmbIH reached the detectable level (0.1 and 0.7 mg x g(-1)) just for a short period at 60-72 h. The absence of LmbIH protein at a detectable level during the major part of the antibiotic production phase casts doubt on its possible catalytic function. Rather a different connection with the final biosynthetic steps, e.g. regulatory, can be envisaged. Expression of a newly found putative regulatory gene was demonstrated during production of industrial antibiotic, lincomycin.

  12. High levels of protein expression using different mammalian CMV promoters in several cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Bringmann, Peter; McClary, John; Jones, Patrick P; Manzana, Warren; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Soujuan; Liu, Yi; Harvey, Susan; Madlansacay, Mary Rose; McLean, Kirk; Rosser, Mary P; MacRobbie, Jean; Olsen, Catherine L; Cobb, Ronald R

    2006-01-01

    With the recent completion of the human genome sequencing project, scientists are faced with the daunting challenge of deciphering the function of these newly found genes quickly and efficiently. Equally as important is to produce milligram quantities of the therapeutically relevant gene products as quickly as possible. Mammalian expression systems provide many advantages to aid in this task. Mammalian cell lines have the capacity for proper post-translational modifications including proper protein folding and glycosylation. In response to the needs described above, we investigated the protein expression levels driven by the human CMV in the presence or absence of intron A, the mouse and rat CMV promoters with intron A, and the MPSV promoter in plasmid expression vectors. We evaluated the different promoters using an in-house plasmid vector backbone. The protein expression levels of four genes of interest driven by these promoters were evaluated in HEK293EBNA and CHO-K1 cells. Stable and transient transfected cells were utilized. In general, the full-length human CMV, in the presence of intron A, gave the highest levels of protein expression in transient transfections in both cell lines. However, the MPSV promoter resulted in the highest levels of stable protein expression in CHO-K1 cells. Using the CMV driven constitutive promoters in the presence of intron A, we have been able to generate >10 microg/ml of recombinant protein using transient transfections.

  13. Multi-level machine learning prediction of protein–protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zubek, Julian; Tatjewski, Marcin; Boniecki, Adam; Mnich, Maciej; Basu, Subhadip

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein–protein interactions (PPI) is the key step in understanding proteins’ biological functions, which are typically context-dependent. Many existing PPI predictors rely on aggregated features from protein sequences, however only a few methods exploit local information about specific residue contacts. In this work we present a two-stage machine learning approach for prediction of protein–protein interactions. We start with the carefully filtered data on protein complexes available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database. First, we build linear descriptions of interacting and non-interacting sequence segment pairs based on their inter-residue distances. Secondly, we train machine learning classifiers to predict binary segment interactions for any two short sequence fragments. The final prediction of the protein–protein interaction is done using the 2D matrix representation of all-against-all possible interacting sequence segments of both analysed proteins. The level-I predictor achieves 0.88 AUC for micro-scale, i.e., residue-level prediction. The level-II predictor improves the results further by a more complex learning paradigm. We perform 30-fold macro-scale, i.e., protein-level cross-validation experiment. The level-II predictor using PSIPRED-predicted secondary structure reaches 0.70 precision, 0.68 recall, and 0.70 AUC, whereas other popular methods provide results below 0.6 threshold (recall, precision, AUC). Our results demonstrate that multi-scale sequence features aggregation procedure is able to improve the machine learning results by more than 10% as compared to other sequence representations. Prepared datasets and source code for our experimental pipeline are freely available for download from: http://zubekj.github.io/mlppi/ (open source Python implementation, OS independent). PMID:26157620

  14. Acute Exercise Decreases Tribbles Homolog 3 Protein Levels in the Hypothalamus of Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Barbara De Almeira; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; DE Souza, Claudio Teodoro; DA Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa; Marinho, Rodolfo; DE Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eloize Cristina Chiarreotto; Botezelli, José Diego; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on tribbles homolog 3 (TRB3) protein levels and on the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins in the hypothalamus of obese rats. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TRB3 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and verified whether an acute exercise session influences them. In the first part of the study, the rats were divided into three groups: control (lean), fed standard rodent chow; DIO, fed a high-fat diet; and DIO-EXE, fed a high-fat diet and submitted to a swimming acute exercise protocol. In the second part of the study, we used three other groups: control (lean) group receiving an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of vehicle, lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin, and lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin and performing an acute exercise session. Four hours after the exercise session, food intake was measured, and the hypothalamus was dissected and separated for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The acute exercise session reduced TRB3 protein levels, disrupted the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins, increased the phosphorylation of Foxo1, and restored the anorexigenic effects of insulin on the hypothalamus of DIO rats. Interestingly, the suppressive effects of acute exercise on TRB3 protein levels may be related, at least in part, to decreased ER stress (evaluated though pancreatic ER kinase phosphorylation and C/EBP homologous protein levels) in the hypothalamus. Exercise-mediated reduction of hypothalamic TRB3 protein levels may be associated with reduction of ER stress. These data provide a new mechanism by which an acute exercise session improves insulin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and restores food intake control in obesity.

  15. A two level hierarchical model of protein retention in ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Paloni, Matteo; Guelat, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-09-11

    Predicting protein retention in ion exchange chromatography (IEX) from first principles is a fascinating perspective. In this work a two level hierarchical modeling strategy is proposed in order to calculate protein retention factors. Model predictions are tested against experimental data measured for Lysozyme and Chymotrypsinogen A in IEX columns as a function of ionic strength and pH. At the highest level of accuracy Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water are used to determine the interaction free energy between each of the two proteins and the IEX stationary phase for a reference pH and ionic strength. At a lower level of accuracy a linear response model based on an implicit treatment of solvation and adopting a static protein structure is used to calculate interaction free energies for the full range of pHs and ionic strengths considered. A scaling coefficient, determined comparing MD and implicit solvent simulations, is then introduced in order to correct the linear response model for errors induced by the adoption of a static protein structure. The calculated free energies are then used to compute protein retention factors, which can be directly compared with experimental data. The possibility to introduce a third level of accuracy is explored testing the predictions of a semiempirical model. A quantitative agreement between the predicted and measured protein retention factors is obtained using the coupled MD-linear response models, supporting the reliability of the proposed approach. The model allows quantifying the electrostatic, van der Waals, and conformational contributions to the interaction free energies. A good agreement between experiments and model is obtained also using the semiempirical model that, although requiring parameterization over higher level models or experimental data, proves to be useful in order to rapidly determine protein retention factors across wide pH and ionic strength ranges as it is computationally inexpensive

  16. Activity and circadian rhythm influence synaptic Shank3 protein levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Tasnuva; Chhabra, Resham; Vilella, Antonietta; Boeckers, Tobias M; Zoli, Michele; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    Various recent studies revealed that the proteins of the Shank family act as major scaffold organizing elements in the post-synaptic density of excitatory synapses and that their expression level is able to influence synapse formation, maturation and ultimately brain plasticity. An imbalance in Shank3 protein levels has been associated with a variety of neuropsychological and neurodegenerative disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Given that sleep disorders and low melatonin levels are frequently observed in autism spectrum disorders, and that circadian rhythms may be able to modulate Shank3 signaling and thereby synaptic function, here, we performed in vivo studies on CBA mice using protein biochemistry to investigate the synaptic expression levels of Shank3α during the day in different brain regions. Our results show that synaptic Shank3 protein concentrations exhibit minor oscillations during the day in hippocampal and striatal brain regions that correlate with changes in serum melatonin levels. Furthermore, as circadian rhythms are tightly connected to activity levels in mice, we increased physical activity using running wheels. The expression of Shank3α increases rapidly by induced activity in thalamus and cortex, but decreases in striatum, superimposing the circadian rhythms of different brain regions. We conclude that synaptic Shank3 proteins build highly dynamic platforms that are modulated by the light:dark cycles but even more so driven by activity. Using wild-type CBA mice, we show that Shank3 is a highly dynamic and activity-regulated protein at synapses. In the hippocampus, changes in synaptic Shank3 levels are influenced by circadian rhythm/melatonin concentration, while running activity increases and decreases levels of Shank3 in the cortex and striatum respectively.

  17. Reduced Activity-Dependent Protein Levels in a Mouse Model of the Fragile X Premutation

    PubMed Central

    von Leden, Ramona E.; Curley, Lindsey C.; Greenberg, Gian D.; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Willemsen, Rob; Berman, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment results in increased levels of Fmrp in brain and increased dendritic complexity. The present experiment evaluated activity-dependent increases in Fmrp levels in the motor cortex in response to training on a skilled forelimb reaching task in the CGG KI mouse model of the fragile X premutation. Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels were quantified by Western blot in the contralateral motor cortex of mice following training to reach for sucrose pellets with a non-preferred paw and compared to levels in the ipsilateral motor cortex. After training, all mice showed increases in Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels in the contralateral compared to the ipsilateral hemisphere; however, the increase in CGG KI mice was less than wildtype mice. Increases in Fmrp and Arc proteins scaled with learning, whereas this relationship was not observed with the c-Fos levels. These data suggest the possibility that reduced levels of activity-dependent proteins associated with synaptic plasticity such as Fmrp and Arc may contribute to the neurocognitive phenotype reported in the CGG KI mice and the fragile X premutation. PMID:24462720

  18. Reduced activity-dependent protein levels in a mouse model of the fragile X premutation.

    PubMed

    von Leden, Ramona E; Curley, Lindsey C; Greenberg, Gian D; Hunsaker, Michael R; Willemsen, Rob; Berman, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    Environmental enrichment results in increased levels of Fmrp in brain and increased dendritic complexity. The present experiment evaluated activity-dependent increases in Fmrp levels in the motor cortex in response to training on a skilled forelimb reaching task in the CGG KI mouse model of the fragile X premutation. Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels were quantified by Western blot in the contralateral motor cortex of mice following training to reach for sucrose pellets with a non-preferred paw and compared to levels in the ipsilateral motor cortex. After training, all mice showed increases in Fmrp, Arc, and c-Fos protein levels in the contralateral compared to the ipsilateral hemisphere; however, the increase in CGG KI mice was less than wildtype mice. Increases in Fmrp and Arc proteins scaled with learning, whereas this relationship was not observed with the c-Fos levels. These data suggest the possibility that reduced levels of activity-dependent proteins associated with synaptic plasticity such as Fmrp and Arc may contribute to the neurocognitive phenotype reported in the CGG KI mice and the fragile X premutation.

  19. Do infants with cow's milk protein allergy have inadequate levels of vitamin D?

    PubMed

    Silva, Cristiane M; Silva, Silvia A da; Antunes, Margarida M de C; Silva, Gisélia Alves Pontes da; Sarinho, Emanuel Sávio Cavalcanti; Brandt, Kátia G

    2017-06-17

    To verify whether infants with cow's milk protein allergy have inadequate vitamin D levels. This cross-sectional study included 120 children aged 2 years or younger, one group with cow's milk protein allergy and a control group. The children were recruited at the pediatric gastroenterology, allergology, and pediatric outpatient clinics of a university hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. A questionnaire was administered to the caregiver and blood samples were collected for vitamin D quantification. Vitamin D levels <30ng/mL were considered inadequate. Vitamin D level was expressed as mean and standard deviation, and the frequency of the degrees of sufficiency and other variables, as proportions. Infants with cow's milk protein allergy had lower mean vitamin D levels (30.93 vs.35.29ng/mL; p=0.041) and higher deficiency frequency (20.3% vs.8.2; p=0.049) than the healthy controls. Exclusively or predominantly breastfed infants with cow's milk protein allergy had higher frequency of inadequate vitamin D levels (p=0.002). Regardless of sun exposure time, the groups had similar frequencies of inadequate vitamin D levels (p=0.972). Lower vitamin D levels were found in infants with CMPA, especially those who were exclusively or predominantly breastfed, making these infants a possible risk group for vitamin D deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Validated age-specific reference values for CSF total protein levels in children.

    PubMed

    Kahlmann, V; Roodbol, J; van Leeuwen, N; Ramakers, C R B; van Pelt, D; Neuteboom, R F; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; de Wit, M C Y; Jacobs, B C

    2017-07-01

    To define age-specific reference values for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total protein levels for children and validate these values in children with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Reference values for CSF total protein levels were determined in an extensive cohort of diagnostic samples from children (<18 year) evaluated at Erasmus Medical Center/Sophia Children's Hospital. These reference values were confirmed in children diagnosed with disorders unrelated to raised CSF total protein level and validated in children with GBS, ADEM and MS. The test results of 6145 diagnostic CSF samples from 3623 children were used to define reference values. The reference values based on the upper limit of the 95% CI (i.e. upper limit of normal) were for 6 months-2 years 0.25 g/L, 2-6 years 0.25 g/L, 6-12 years 0.28 g/L, 12-18 years 0.34 g/L. These reference values were confirmed in a subgroup of 378 children diagnosed with disorders that are not typically associated with increased CSF total protein. In addition, the CSF total protein levels in these children in the first 6 months after birth were highly variable (median 0.47 g/L, IQR 0.26-0.65). According to these new reference values, CSF total protein level was elevated in 85% of children with GBS, 66% with ADEM and 23% with MS. More accurate age-specific reference values for CSF total protein levels in children were determined. These new reference values are more sensitive than currently used values for diagnosing GBS and ADEM in children. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol-binding sites in distinct brain proteins: the quest for atomic level resolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rebecca J; Slesinger, Paul A; Davies, Daryl L; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2011-09-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a "molecular lubricant" for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol.

  3. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  4. Evolutionary Tuning of Protein Expression Levels of a Positively Autoregulated Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Stock, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular adaptation relies on the development of proper regulatory schemes for accurate control of gene expression levels in response to environmental cues. Over- or under-expression can lead to diminished cell fitness due to increased costs or insufficient benefits. Positive autoregulation is a common regulatory scheme that controls protein expression levels and gives rise to essential features in diverse signaling systems, yet its roles in cell fitness are less understood. It remains largely unknown how much protein expression is ‘appropriate’ for optimal cell fitness under specific extracellular conditions and how the dynamic environment shapes the regulatory scheme to reach appropriate expression levels. Here, we investigate the correlation of cell fitness and output response with protein expression levels of the E. coli PhoB/PhoR two-component system (TCS). In response to phosphate (Pi)-depletion, the PhoB/PhoR system activates genes involved in phosphorus assimilation as well as genes encoding themselves, similarly to many other positively autoregulated TCSs. We developed a bacteria competition assay in continuous cultures and discovered that different Pi conditions have conflicting requirements of protein expression levels for optimal cell fitness. Pi-replete conditions favored cells with low levels of PhoB/PhoR while Pi-deplete conditions selected for cells with high levels of PhoB/PhoR. These two levels matched PhoB/PhoR concentrations achieved via positive autoregulation in wild-type cells under Pi-replete and -deplete conditions, respectively. The fitness optimum correlates with the wild-type expression level, above which the phosphorylation output saturates, thus further increase in expression presumably provides no additional benefits. Laboratory evolution experiments further indicate that cells with non-ideal protein levels can evolve toward the optimal levels with diverse mutational strategies. Our results suggest that the natural protein

  5. Heavy metals chromium and neodymium reduced phosphorylation level of heat shock protein 27 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Xue; Su, Zhijian; Zou, Ping; Hu, Hao; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Heavy metals may exert their acute and chronic effects on the human skin through stress signals. In the present study, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to heavy metals, chromium and neodymium, and 10 proteins with altered expression were identified. Among these proteins, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was up-regulated significantly and the up-regulation was validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, the mRNA expression level of HSP27 markedly increased as detected by quantitative PCR. More interestingly, the ratio of phosphorylated HSP27 and total HSP27 significantly decreased in keratinocytes treated with the heavy metals. These findings suggested that heavy metals reduced the phosphorylation level of HSP27, and that the ratio of p-HSP27 and HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products.

  6. Glycosylated serum protein level as a screening and diagnostic test for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, F J; Harbert, G M; Paulsen, E P; Thiagarajah, S

    1986-09-01

    Glycosylated serum protein assay was examined as an alternative to standard glucose screening and glucose tolerance testing. In a comparison of two groups of gravid women having abnormal 1-hour 50 gm glucose screening tests, there was no difference in glycosylated protein level in the group with abnormal glucose tolerance test results (9.4% +/- 2.0%, mean +/- SD; n = 8) versus normal results (9.2% +/- 1.07%, mean +/- SD; n = 11). Furthermore, correlation of glycosylated serum protein level with glucose screening test results was poor (r = 0.185, p = 0.23, n = 17). Glycosylated serum protein assay is not useful in detecting mild metabolic aberrations associated with gestational diabetes.

  7. Reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cause changes in neuronal amyloid precursor protein processing and protein kinase C level in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pakaski, M; Rakonczay, Z; Kasa, P

    2001-03-01

    The alternative routes of cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) result in the generation and secretion of both soluble APP and beta-amyloid, the latter being the main component of the amyloid deposits in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined the question of whether acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors can alter the processing of APP and the level of protein kinase C (PKC) in primary rat basal forebrain cultures. Western blotting was used to test two AChE inhibitors (reversible and irreversible) for their ability to enhance the release of APP and PKC content. These inhibitors were ambenonium (AMB) and metrifonate (MTF), at different concentrations. A significant increase was found in the cell-associated APP level in a basal forebrain neuronal culture, and there was an elevation of the APP release into the medium. Increases were similarly observed in the PKC levels after AMB or MTF treatment. The results suggest that these AChE inhibitors promote the non-amyloidogenic route of APP processing, which may be due to their stimulatory effects on PKC. The PKC activation may enhance the alpha-secretase activity and consequently the production of the N-terminal APP. Since both a decreased level of APP secretion and a low activity and level of PKC may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it is concluded that the administration of AChE inhibitors to AD patients may facilitate the memory processes and exert a neuroprotective effect.

  8. Isobaric protein-level labeling strategy for serum glycoprotein quantification analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Lo, Andy; Zhu, Jianhui; Wu, Jing; Ruffin, Mack T; Lubman, David M

    2013-06-04

    While peptide-level labeling using isobaric tag reagents has been widely applied for quantitative proteomics experiments, there are comparatively few reports of protein-level labeling. Intact protein labeling could be broadly applied to quantification experiments utilizing protein-level separations or enrichment schemes. Here, protein-level isobaric labeling was explored as an alternative strategy to peptide-level labeling for serum glycoprotein quantification. Labeling and digestion conditions were optimized by comparing different organic solvents and enzymes. Digestions with Asp-N and trypsin were found highly complementary; combining the results enabled quantification of 30% more proteins than either enzyme alone. Three commercial reagents were compared for protein-level labeling. Protein identification rates were highest with iTRAQ 4-plex when compared to TMT 6-plex and iTRAQ 8-plex using higher-energy collisional dissociation on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. The compatibility of isobaric protein-level labeling with lectin-based glycoprotein enrichment was also investigated. More than 74% of lectin-bound labeled proteins were known glycoproteins, which was similar to results from unlabeled and peptide-level labeled serum samples. Finally, protein-level and peptide-level labeling strategies were compared for serum glycoprotein quantification. Isobaric protein-level labeling gave comparable identification levels and quantitative precision to peptide-level labeling.

  9. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L; Schepmoes, Athena A; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y; Smith, Richard D; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM), for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion. Limits of quantification (LOQ) at low ng/mL levels with a median coefficient of variation (CV) of ∼12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum. PRISM-SRM provided >100-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional LC-SRM measurements. PRISM-SRM was then applied to measure several low-abundance endogenous serum proteins, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA), in clinical prostate cancer patient sera. PRISM-SRM enabled confident detection of all target endogenous serum proteins except the low pg/mL-level cardiac troponin T. A correlation coefficient >0.99 was observed for PSA between the results from PRISM-SRM and immunoassays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can successfully quantify low ng/mL proteins in human plasma or serum without depletion. We anticipate broad applications for PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance proteins in candidate biomarker verification and systems biology studies.

  10. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50–100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion. Limits of quantification (LOQ) at low ng/mL levels with a median coefficient of variation (CV) of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum. PRISM-SRM provided >100-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional LC-SRM measurements. PRISM-SRM was then applied to measure several low-abundance endogenous serum proteins, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA), in clinical prostate cancer patient sera. PRISM-SRM enabled confident detection of all target endogenous serum proteins except the low pg/mL-level cardiac troponin T. A correlation coefficient >0.99 was observed for PSA between the results from PRISM-SRM and immunoassays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can successful quantify low ng/mL proteins in human plasma or serum without depletion. We anticipate broad applications for PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance proteins in candidate biomarker verification and systems biology studies. PMID:23763644

  11. ProFET: Feature engineering captures high-level protein functions.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Dan; Linial, Michal

    2015-11-01

    The amount of sequenced genomes and proteins is growing at an unprecedented pace. Unfortunately, manual curation and functional knowledge lag behind. Homologous inference often fails at labeling proteins with diverse functions and broad classes. Thus, identifying high-level protein functionality remains challenging. We hypothesize that a universal feature engineering approach can yield classification of high-level functions and unified properties when combined with machine learning approaches, without requiring external databases or alignment. In this study, we present a novel bioinformatics toolkit called ProFET (Protein Feature Engineering Toolkit). ProFET extracts hundreds of features covering the elementary biophysical and sequence derived attributes. Most features capture statistically informative patterns. In addition, different representations of sequences and the amino acids alphabet provide a compact, compressed set of features. The results from ProFET were incorporated in data analysis pipelines, implemented in python and adapted for multi-genome scale analysis. ProFET was applied on 17 established and novel protein benchmark datasets involving classification for a variety of binary and multi-class tasks. The results show state of the art performance. The extracted features' show excellent biological interpretability. The success of ProFET applies to a wide range of high-level functions such as subcellular localization, structural classes and proteins with unique functional properties (e.g. neuropeptide precursors, thermophilic and nucleic acid binding). ProFET allows easy, universal discovery of new target proteins, as well as understanding the features underlying different high-level protein functions. ProFET source code and the datasets used are freely available at https://github.com/ddofer/ProFET. michall@cc.huji.ac.il Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  12. High MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 protein levels in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G Q; Chen, A B; Li, W; Song, J H; Gao, C Y

    2015-11-23

    Our study examined the relationship between the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 proteins and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). We employed rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria in computer-based bibliographic databases to extract published studies relevant to this investigation. The STATA 12.0 software was used for the statistical analyses. A total of 1408 studies were initially searched, and 10 studies with 458 OA patients and 295 healthy controls were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis results suggested that the protein levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were higher in patients with OA than those in the control group. A subgroup analysis according to ethnicity showed that the protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2 were higher in Asian patients with OA than in controls. Caucasians showed no statistically significant differences in protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2 between the OA patient group and the control group. Interestingly, the protein levels of MMP-9 in patients with OA were higher than those in the control group in both Asians and Caucasians. A sample-source analysis suggested that the serum levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins were higher in patients with OA than in controls, while MMP-1 and MMP-9 protein expressions were higher in the synovial joint fluid of patients with OA than in controls. In conclusion, our meta-analysis results suggested that the increased expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 proteins might be associated with the pathogenesis of OA.

  13. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione.

  14. Inverse association linking serum levels of potential antioxidant vitamins with C-reactive protein levels using a novel analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui G; Alshaarawy, Omayma; Cantave, Marven D; Anthony, James C

    2016-10-01

    Exposures to antioxidants (AO) are associated with levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the pattern of evidence is mixed, due in part to studying each potential AO, one at a time, when multiple AO exposures might affect CRP levels. By studying multiple AO via a composite indicator approach, we estimate the degree to which serum CRP level is associated with serum AO level. Standardised field survey protocols for the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006 yielded nationally representative cross-sectional samples of adults aged 20 years and older (n 8841). NHANES latex-enhanced nephelometry quantified serum CRP levels. Liquid chromatography quantified serum concentrations of vitamins A, E and C and carotenoids. Using structural equations, we regressed CRP level on AO levels, and derived a summary estimate for a composite of these potential antioxidants (CPA), with covariates held constant. The association linking CPA with CRP was inverse, stronger for slightly elevated CRP (1·8≤CRP<10 mg/l; slope= -1·08; 95 % CI -1·39, -0·77) and weaker for highly elevated CRP (≥10 mg/l; slope= -0·52; 95 % CI -0·68, -0·35), with little change when covariates were added. Vitamins A and C, as well as lutein+zeaxanthin, were prominent contributors to the composite. In these cross-sectional data studied via a composite indicator approach, the CPA level and the CRP level were inversely related. The stage is set for more confirmatory longitudinal or intervention research on multiple vitamins. The composite indicator approach might be most useful in epidemiology when several exposure constructs are too weakly inter-correlated to be studied via formal measurement models for underlying latent dimensions.

  15. The Common Inhalational Anesthetic Sevoflurane Induces Apoptosis and Increases β-Amyloid Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Guohua; Zhang, Bin; Moir, Robert D.; Xia, Weiming; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of sevoflurane, the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic, on apoptosis and β-amyloid protein (Aβ) levels in vitro and in vivo. Subjects: Naive mice, H4 human neuroglioma cells, and H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein. Interventions: Human H4 neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein were exposed to 4.1% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Mice received 2.5% sevoflurane for 2 hours. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, and Aβ levels were assessed. Results: Sevoflurane induced apoptosis and elevated levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in vitro and in vivo. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD decreased the effects of sevoflurane on apoptosis and Aβ. Sevoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by the γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458 and was potentiated by Aβ. These results suggest that sevoflurane induces caspase activation which, in turn, enhances β-site amyloid precursor protein–cleaving enzyme and Aβ levels. Increased Aβ levels then induce further rounds of apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane may promote Alzheimer disease neuropathogenesis. If confirmed in human subjects, it may be prudent to caution against the use of sevoflurane as an anesthetic, especially in those suspected of possessing excessive levels of cerebral Aβ. PMID:19433662

  16. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  17. The significance of C-reactive protein levels in women with premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M A; Zinaman, M J; Lowensohn, R I; Moawad, A H

    1985-02-15

    In a prospective study of 100 patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes, clinical chorioamnionitis was present in 18 and histologic chorioamnionitis was present in 63. Patients who were managed conservatively for premature rupture of membranes were monitored by C-reactive protein determination, white blood cell and differential counts, maternal temperature, and fetal heart tone. C-reactive protein was measured nephelometrically (Immuno-chemistry Analyzer II, Beckman). Elevated C-reactive protein levels correlated well with both the pathologic and the clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis. Elevated C-reactive protein levels (at least 12 to 24 hours before delivery) were more sensitive than other standard laboratory or clinical tests in predicting chorioamnionitis both by clinical and pathologic criteria. When C-reactive protein values were normal, clinical chorioamnionitis was rarely found, whereas pathologically diagnosed chorioamnionitis was found half of the time. We conclude that although the C-reactive protein level is a very sensitive predictor of infectious morbidity in premature rupture of membranes, its specificity is not high.

  18. Bimodal gold nanoparticle therapeutics for manipulating exogenous and endogenous protein levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Kogot, Joshua M; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2012-12-05

    A new advance in cell transfection protocol using a bimodal nanoparticle agent to selectively manipulate protein expression levels within mammalian cells is demonstrated. The nanoparticle based transfection approach functions by controlled release of gene regulatory elements from a 6 nm AuNP (gold nanoparticle) surface. The endosomal release of the regulatory elements from the nanoparticle surface results in endogenous protein knockdown simultaneously with exogenous protein expression for the first 48 h. The use of fluorescent proteins as the endogenous and exogenous signals for protein expression enables the efficiency of codelivery of siRNA (small interfering RNA) for GFP (green fluorescent protein) knockdown and a dsRed-express linearized plasmid for induction to be optically analyzed in CRL-2794, a human kidney cell line expressing an unstable green fluorescent protein. Delivery of the bimodal nanoparticle in cationic liposomes results in 20% GFP knockdown within 24 h of delivery and continues exhibiting knockdown for up to 48 h for the bimodal agent. Simultaneous dsRed expression is observed to initiate within the same time frame with expression levels reaching 34% after 25 days although cells have divided approximately 20 times, implying daughter cell transfection has occurred. Fluorescence cell sorting results in a stable colony, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis. The simultaneous delivery of siRNA and linearized plasmid DNA on the surface of a single nanocrystal provides a unique method for definitive genetic control within a single cell and leads to a very efficient cell transfection protocol.

  19. Oxidative Stress Modifies the Levels and Phosphorylation State of Tau Protein in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Chi-Ahumada, Erika; Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Since the tau protein is closely involved in the physiopathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), studying its behavior in cellular models might lead to new insights on understanding this devastating disease at molecular levels. In the present study, primary cultures of human fibroblasts were established and used to determine the expression and localization of the tau protein in distinct phosphorylation states in both untransfected and tau gene-transfected cells subjected to oxidative stress. Higher immunopositivity to phospho-tau was observed in cell nuclei in response to oxidative stress, while the levels of total tau in the cytosol remained unchanged. These findings were observed in both untransfected cells and those transfected with the tau gene. The present work represents a useful model for studying the physiopathology of AD at the cellular level in terms of tau protein implications.

  20. Low levels of protein Z are associated with HELLP syndrome and its severity.

    PubMed

    Kaygusuz, Isik; Firatli-Tuglular, Tulin; Toptas, Tayfur; Ugurel, Vedat; Demir, Muzaffer

    2011-04-01

    Protein Z (PZ) was found to be associated with pregnancy complications. There are no data implying an association between hemolysis (H), elevated liver enzymes (EL), and low platelet counts (LP) (HELLP) syndrome and changes in plasma levels of PZ. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HELLP syndrome is associated with plasma concentrations of PZ. Protein Z levels in 29 women with HELLP syndrome were compared with 29 healthy, nulliparous and 25 normal pregnant women. The median PZ levels in patients with HELLP syndrome were found to be significantly lower than those of pregnant women. No significant difference was found between HELLP and healthy groups. Protein Z levels correlated with platelet counts, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in patients with HELLP syndrome. Median PZ level was higher in partial HELLP than in complete HELLP. We calculated 1330 ng/mL as a cutoff value for PZ level to discriminate HELLP syndrome from normal pregnancy. Low PZ levels are associated with the pathobiology of HELLP syndrome.

  1. Temperature and dietary starch level affected protein but not starch digestibility in gilthead sea bream juveniles.

    PubMed

    Couto, A; Enes, P; Peres, H; Oliva-Teles, A

    2012-06-01

    A study was carried out with gilthead sea bream juveniles to assess the effect of water temperature (18 and 25°C) and dietary pregelatinized starch level (10, 20 and 30%) on digestibility of protein and starch and on the activity of proteolytic and amylolytic enzymes. ADC of pregelatinized starch was very high (>99%) irrespectively of dietary inclusion level, and it was not affected by water temperature. ADC of protein was also high (>90%) but improved at the higher water temperature. Dietary starch interacted with protein digestibility, which decreased as dietary starch level increased. Temperature affected both acid and basic protease activities, with acid protease activity being higher at 25°C and basic protease activity being higher at 18°C. However, total proteolytic activity and amylase activities were not affected by water temperature. Dietary carbohydrate exerted no effect on proteolytic or amylolitic activities. It is concluded that gilthead sea bream juveniles digest pregelatinized starch very efficiently irrespective of water temperature, due to adjustments of amylase activity to cope with temperature differences. Pregelatinized starch interacts negatively with protein digestibility, with the ADC of protein decreasing as dietary starch levels increase.

  2. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  3. 24h Urinary Protein Levels and Urine Protein/Creatinine Ratios Could Probably Forecast the Pathological Classification of HSPN

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Shang, Shi-qiang; Liu, Ai-min; Zhang, Ting; Shen, Hong-qiang; Chen, Xue-jun; Mao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relevance of laboratory tests in Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) classification, and determine accurate classification factors. This prospective study included 694 HSPN patients who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB). Renal specimens were scored according to International Study of Kidney Disease in Children (ISKDC) classification. Meanwhile, blood samples were immediately collected for laboratory examination. The associations between laboratory parameters and HSPN classification were assessed. Significant differences in levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines, immunoglobulins, T-lymphocyte subsets, complement, and coagulation markers were obtained between HSPN patients and healthy children. Interestingly, 24h urinary protein (24h-UPRO) levels and urine protein/urine creatinine ratios could determine HPSN grade IIb, IIIa, and IIIb incidences, with areas under ROC curve of 0.767 and 0.731, respectively. At 24h-UPRO >580.35mg/L, prediction sensitivity and specificity were 75.2% and 70.0%, respectively. These values became 53.0% and 82.3%, respectively, with 24h-UPRO exceeding 1006.25mg/L. At urine protein/urine creatinine > 0.97, prediction sensitivity and specificity were 65.5% and 67.2%, respectively, values that became 57.4% and 80.0%, respectively, at ratios exceeding 1.2. Cell and humoral immunity, coagulation and fibrinolytic systems are all involved in the pathogenesis of HSPN, and type I hypersensitivity may be the disease trigger of HSPN. 24h-UPRO levels and urine protein/creatinine ratios could probably forecast the pathological classification of HSPN. PMID:25996387

  4. Stochastic protein expression in individual cells at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Long; Friedman, Nir; Xie, X. Sunney

    2006-03-01

    In a living cell, gene expression-the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA followed by translation to protein-occurs stochastically, as a consequence of the low copy number of DNA and mRNA molecules involved. These stochastic events of protein production are difficult to observe directly with measurements on large ensembles of cells owing to lack of synchronization among cells. Measurements so far on single cells lack the sensitivity to resolve individual events of protein production. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic-based assay that allows real-time observation of the expression of β-galactosidase in living Escherichia coli cells with single molecule sensitivity. We observe that protein production occurs in bursts, with the number of molecules per burst following an exponential distribution. We show that the two key parameters of protein expression-the burst size and frequency-can be either determined directly from real-time monitoring of protein production or extracted from a measurement of the steady-state copy number distribution in a population of cells. Application of this assay to probe gene expression in individual budding yeast and mouse embryonic stem cells demonstrates its generality. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, and are thus inaccessible by current genomic and proteomic techniques. This microfluidic single cell assay opens up possibilities for system-wide characterization of the expression of these low copy number proteins.

  5. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of dietary levels of protein on nitrogenous metabolism of Rhamdia quelen (Teleostei: Pimelodidae).

    PubMed

    Bibiano Melo, José Fernando; Lundstedt, Lícia Maria; Metón, Isidoro; Baanante, Isabel Vázquez; Moraes, Gilberto

    2006-10-01

    This manuscript reports changes in key enzymes and metabolites related to protein metabolism and nitrogen excretion in the liver of juveniles jundiá (Rhamdia quelen) fed on isocaloric diets containing 20%, 27%, 34% and 41% of crude protein. The hepatic activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and arginase (ARG) increased with the content of protein in the diet, and the ratios among the aminotransferases and GDH allowed evaluating metabolic preference. The concentration of free amino acids, ammonia and urea also rose with the dietary protein content. Increase of plasma urea and ammonia was the resultant effect of over amino acids catabolism as consequence of dietary protein surplus. Since the increase of protein in the diets resulted in weight gain, the rise in the hepatic activity of protein-metabolising enzymes in the fish fed high protein diets denoted effective use of dietary amino acids for growth and as a substrate for gluconeogenesis. Analysis of changes on metabolite levels and key enzyme activities in amino acid metabolism is proposed as a tool for assessing the proper balance of diet macronutrients.

  7. The Regulation of Human Cyclin E Protein Levels by the Ubiquitin Proteolytic Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Nguyen, K.V., Lo, J., Gstaiger, M., Krek, W., Elson, D., lated by ubiquitin- proteasome pathway . Oncogene 18, 3290-3302. Arbeit, J., Kipreos, E.T., and...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8085 TITLE: The Regualtion of Human Cyclin E Protein Levels by the Ubiquitin Proteolytic Pathway PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Aug 00) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Regualtion of Human Cyclin E Protein Levels by the Ubiquitin DAMD17-98-1-8085 Proteolytic Pathway

  8. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  9. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ground level environmental protein concentrations in various ecuadorian environments: potential uses of aerosolized protein for ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staton, Sarah J.R.; Woodward, Andrea; Castillo, Josemar A.; Swing, Kelly; Hayes, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of free protein in the environment and other bioaerosols are ubiquitous throughout terrestrial ground level environments and may be integrative indicators of ecosystem status. Samples of ground level bioaerosols were collected from various ecosystems throughout Ecuador, including pristine humid tropical forest (pristine), highly altered secondary humid tropical forest (highly altered), secondary transitional very humid forest (regrowth transitional), and suburban dry montane deforested (suburban deforested). The results explored the sensitivity of localized aerosol protein concentrations to spatial and temporal variations within ecosystems, and their value for assessing environmental change. Ecosystem specific variations in environmental protein concentrations were observed: pristine 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3, highly altered 0.07 ± 0.05 μg/m3, regrowth transitional 0.17 ± 0.06 μg/m3, and suburban deforested 0.09 ± 0.04 μg/m3. Additionally, comparisons of intra-environmental differences in seasonal/daily weather (dry season 0.08 ± 0.03 μg/m3 and wet season 0.10 ± 0.04 μg/m3), environmental fragmentation (buffered 0.19 ± 0.06 μg/m3 and edge 0.15 ± 0.06 μg/m3), and sampling height (ground level 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3 and 10 m 0.24 ± 0.04 μg/m3) demonstrated the sensitivity of protein concentrations to environmental conditions. Local protein concentrations in altered environments correlated well with satellite-based spectral indices describing vegetation productivity: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (r2 = 0.801), net primary production (NPP) (r2 = 0.827), leaf area index (LAI) (r2 = 0.410). Moreover, protein concentrations distinguished the pristine site, which was not differentiated in spectral indices, potentially due to spectral saturation typical of highly vegetated environments. Bioaerosol concentrations represent an inexpensive method to increase understanding of environmental changes, especially in densely vegetated

  11. [Serum Protein Expression Level in 47 Patients with Megaloblastic Anemia and Its Clinical Significance].

    PubMed

    Ke, Yong

    2016-08-01

    To study the clinical significance of serum protein expression level in patients with megaloblastic anemia(MA). A total of 47 patients with MA were enrolled in this study between November 2013 and November 2015, and 50 healthy people in the same period were selected as controls. The levels of total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), ferritin (FER), transferrin (TRF) and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were compared between 2 groups, and the serum protein expression levels in different types of MA, varous anemia degrees of MA were analyzed. The leves of TP, Alb and FER in MA patients were significantly lower than those in control group, the levels of TRF and sTfR were statistically significantly higher than those in control group(P<0.05); the levels of TP, Alb and FER in the patients with mild anemia were significantly higher than those in the patients with moderate and severe anemia, the levels of TRF and sTfR were statistically significantly lower(P<0.05), while the levels of TP, Alb and FER in patients with moderate anemia were significantly higher than those in the patients with severe anemia, the levels of TRF and sTfR were significantly lower(P<0.05). Compared with levels before treatment, the levels of TP, Alb and FER significantly increased after treatment, while the TRF and sTfR levels significantly decreased (P<0.05). Serum levels of TP, Alb, FER, TRF and sTfR can provide a basis for the diagnosis of MA, and contribute to predict the disease to some extent.

  12. Determination of protein levels in soy and peanut oils by colorimetric assay and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Joseph E; Fu, Tong-Jen; Jackson, Lauren S; Gendel, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Analytical methods are needed for measuring the levels of protein from allergenic food transferred into cooking oil. A simple method for determination of total protein in cooking oils was developed. Oil was extracted with phosphate-buffered saline with 0.05% Tween (PBST) and the extracts were partitioned with hexane to remove residual oil. Total protein in the PBST extracts was assayed with bicinchoninic acid (BCA), micro-BCA, reducing-agent compatible BCA and CB-XT kits. These methods were used to measure recovery of protein from peanut butter spikes of soy and peanut oil in the range of 50-1000 ppm. Recoveries were generally above 70%. However, the BCA and micro-BCA assays were subject to interference and enhanced color formation which were probably due to co-extracted antioxidants present in oil. The reducing agent-compatible BCA and CB-X protein assays reduced interference and gave lower protein values in crude, cold-pressed, and refined peanut oils. Heating oil to 180 degrees C before extraction also reduced interference-induced color enhancement. A commercial ELISA test kit was also used to measure peanut protein in oil spiked with peanut butter. Recovery of peanut residues measured by ELISA was significantly decreased when the peanut butter-spiked oil was heated to 180 degrees C compared to unheated oil. Recovery of spiked peanut butter protein measured by the buffer extraction-colorimetric method was not decreased in heated oil. The method developed here could be used to determine protein levels in crude and refined oil, and to assess the potential for allergen cross-contact from reused cooking oil.

  13. mRNA and Protein levels of rat pancreas specific protein disulphide isomerase are downregulated during Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajani; Bhar, Kaushik; Sen, Nandini; Bhowmick, Debajit; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Panda, Koustubh; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes (Type I and Type II) which affects nearly every organ in the body is a multi-factorial non-communicable disorder. Hyperglycemia is the most characteristic feature of this disease. Loss of beta cells is common in both types of diabetes whose detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. As this disease is complex, identification of specific biomarkers for its early detection, management and devising new therapies is challenging. Based on the fact that functionally defective proteins provide the biochemical basis for many diseases, in this study, we tried to identify differentially expressed proteins during hyperglycemia. For that, hyperglycemia was induced in overnight fasted rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The pancreas was isolated from control and treated rats for subsequent analyses. The 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-MS-MS analyses revealed several up- and down-regulated proteins in hyperglycemic rat pancreas including the downregulation of a pancreas specific isoform of protein disulphide isomerase a2 (Pdia2).This observation was validated by western blot. Quantitative PCR experiments showed that the level of Pdia2 mRNA is also proportionally reduced in hyperglycemic pancreas.

  14. C-Reactive Protein Genotypes Affect Baseline, but not Exercise Training–Induced Changes, in C-Reactive Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Obisesan, Thomas O.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Phillips, Tracey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Phares, Dana A.; Prior, Steven J.; Hagberg, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to determine whether C-reactive protein (CRP) gene variants affect baseline and training-induced changes in plasma CRP levels. Methods and Results Sixty-three sedentary men and women aged 50 to 75 years old underwent baseline testing (VOmax, body composition, CRP levels). They repeated these tests after 24 weeks of exercise training while on a low-fat diet. The CRP +219G/A variant significantly associated with CRP levels before and after training after accounting for the effects of demographic and biological variables. CRP −732A/G genotype was significantly related on a univariate basis to CRP levels after training. The CRP +29T/A variant did not affect CRP levels before or after training. In regression analyses, the +219 and −732 variants each had significant effects on CRP levels before and after training. Subjects homozygous for the common A/G −732/+219 haplotype exhibited the highest CRP levels, and having the rare allele at either site was associated with significantly lower CRP levels. CRP levels decreased significantly with training (−0.38±0.18 mg/L; P=0.03). However, none of the CRP variants was associated with the training-induced CRP changes. Conclusion CRP +219G/A and −732A/G genotypes and haplotypes and exercise training appear to modulate CRP levels. However, training-induced CRP reductions appear to be independent of genotype at these loci. PMID:15271790

  15. Frailty in the elderly: contributions of sarcopenia and visceral protein depletion.

    PubMed

    Vanitallie, Theodore B

    2003-10-01

    administering GH to the frail elderly will outweigh the disadvantages. The poor appetite and weight loss that occur in many frail individuals are likely to be accompanied by a degree of visceral protein depletion (with its attendant morbidity), which can be estimated by making serial measurements of indicators of visceral protein status such as transthyretin (TTR), retinol-binding protein (RBP), and albumin. One characteristic of the frailty syndrome that distinguishes it from the effects of aging per se is the potential reversibility of many of its features. Progressive resistance training is feasible for many elderly individuals-even the oldest old-and, by increasing muscle mass and strength, can ameliorate or reverse important aspects of physical frailty. To the extent that visceral protein depletion has been caused by an inadequate intake of calories and protein, consumption of a more adequate diet can result in betterment of the frail patient's nutritional status, as determined by clinical improvement and favorable changes in TTR, RBP, and albumin.

  16. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  17. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression. PMID:28083102

  18. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  19. Flour sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extractable protein level as a cookie flour quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Pareyt, Bram; Bruneel, Charlotte; Brijs, Kristof; Goesaert, Hans; Delcour, Jan A

    2010-01-13

    Flour characteristics of laboratory-milled flour fractions of two wheat cultivars were related to their cookie-baking performance. Cultivar (cv.) Albatros wheat milling yielded fractions with lower damaged starch (DS) and arabinoxylan levels and higher sodium dodecyl sulfate-extractable protein (SDSEP) levels than did cv. Meunier wheat milling. During baking, cv. Albatros flour doughs spread faster and set later than their cv. Meunier counterparts and, hence, resulted in larger cookie diameters. DS levels negatively affected spread rate during both cv. Albatros (R2=0.68) and cv. Meunier (R2=0.51) cookie baking. SDSEP levels also influenced cookie quality. The use of flour heat-treated to reduce its SDSEP levels to different degrees led to reduction of the set time (R2=0.90). It was deduced that larger gluten polymer sizes limit dough spread time during baking and that, apart from DS level, the SDSEP level is an indicator for cookie flour quality.

  20. Effects of nutritional supplementation on periodontal parameters, carotenoid antioxidant levels, and serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Cheema, Abida T; Zingale, Joseph A; Chambers, David W; Lundergan, William P

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of nutrition in periodontal disease. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of a nutritional supplement on gingival inflammation, bleeding, probing depth, clinical attachment level, carotenoid antioxidant level, and C-reactive protein. The test supplement, consisting of a standard multivitamin formula, as well as several phytonutrients associated with antiinflammatory/antioxidant effects, provided modest benefits in reducing inflammation; however, further studies with larger populations and longer intervention are warranted.

  1. Prenatal protein level impacts homing behavior in Long-Evans rat pups.

    PubMed

    Fischer, L K; McGaughy, J A; Bradshaw, S E; Weissner, W J; Amaral, A C; Rosene, D L; Mokler, D J; Fitzmaurice, G M; Galler, J R

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of varying prenatal protein levels on the development of homing behavior in rat pups. Long-Evans rats were fed one of the four isocaloric diets containing 6% (n = 7 litters), 12% (n = 9), 18% (n = 9), or 25% (n = 10) casein prior to mating and throughout pregnancy. At birth, litters were fostered to well-nourished control mothers fed a 25% casein diet during pregnancy, and an adequate protein diet (25% casein) was provided to weaning. On postnatal days 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13, homing behaviors, including activity levels, rate of successful returns to the nest quadrant and latencies to reach the nest over a 3-minute test period were recorded from two starting positions in the home cage. Adult body and brain weights were obtained at sacrifice (postnatal day 130 or 200). Growth was impaired in pups whose mothers were fed a 6% or, to a lesser extent, a 12% casein diet relative to pups whose mothers were fed the 18 and 25% casein diets. The 6 and 12% prenatal protein levels resulted in lower activity levels, with the greatest reduction on postnatal day 13. However, only the 6% pups had reduced success and higher latencies in reaching the nest quadrant when compared with pups from the three other nutrition groups. Latency in reaching the nest quadrant was significantly and negatively associated with adult brain weight. Home orientation is a sensitive measure of developmental deficits associated with variations in prenatal protein levels, including levels of protein deficiency that do not lead to overt growth failure.

  2. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in increasing maspin protein levels and its cytoplasmic accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tamazato Longhi, Mariana; Cella, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Maspin is a tumor suppressor with many biological activities, multiple ligands and different subcellular localizations. Its underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. We hypothesized that phosphorylation might regulate maspin localization and function. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with different focusing power followed by Western blot we identified four different maspin forms with the same molecular weight (42 kDa), but different isoelectric points. Three of these forms were sensitive to acidic phosphatase treatment, suggesting that they are phosphorylated. Sodium peroxidovanadate treatment, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, resulted in a rapid increase in maspin protein levels and cytoplasmic accumulation. These data show that there are three different maspin tyrosine phosphoforms. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases increased maspin protein levels and leads to its cytoplasmic accumulation. PMID:23650586

  4. Protein phylogenies robustly resolve the deep-level relationships within Euglenozoa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; Roger, Andrew J

    2004-01-01

    The deepest-level relationships amongst Euglenozoa remain poorly resolved, despite a rich history of morphological examination and numerous molecular phylogenetic studies of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) data. We address this question using two nuclear-encoded proteins, the cytosolic isoforms of heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70). For both proteins we examined sequences from the three primary groups within Euglenozoa (euglenids, diplonemids, and kinetoplastids), and from their close relatives, Heterolobosea. Maximum likelihood (ML) and ML distance analyses of these proteins support a close relationship between diplonemids and kinetoplastids to the exclusion of the euglenid Euglena gracilis. In hsp90 and combined protein analyses bootstrap support is very strong and alternative topologies are generally rejected by 'approximately unbiased' (AU) tests. This result is consistent with recent molecular biological and morphological data, but contradicts early structural accounts and many SSU rRNA analyses that favour a closer relationship between diplonemids and euglenids. However, a re-examination of an important SSU rRNA data set highlights the instability of the inferences from this marker. The protein analyses also suggest that bodonids are paraphyletic, with trypanosomatids grouping with 'clade 2' and 'clade 3' bodonids to the exclusion of 'clade 1' bodonids.

  5. Over-production of proteins in Escherichia coli: mutant hosts that allow synthesis of some membrane proteins and globular proteins at high levels.

    PubMed

    Miroux, B; Walker, J E

    1996-07-19

    We have investigated the over-production of seven membrane proteins in an Escherichia coli-bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase expression system. In all seven cases, when expression of the target membrane protein was induced, most of the BL21(DE3) host cells died. Similar effects were also observed with expression vectors for ten globular proteins. Therefore, protein over-production in this expression system is either limited or prevented by bacterial cell death. From the few survivors of BL21(DE3) expressing the oxoglutarate-malate carrier protein from mitochondrial membranes, a mutant host C41(DE3) was selected that grew to high saturation cell density, and produced the protein as inclusion bodies at an elevated level without toxic effect. Some proteins that were expressed poorly in BL21(DE3), and others where the toxicity of the expression plasmids prevented transformation into this host, were also over-produced successfully in C41(DE3). The examples include globular proteins as well as membrane proteins, and therefore, strain C41(DE3) is generally superior to BL21(DE3) as a host for protein over-expression. However, the toxicity of over-expression of some of the membrane proteins persisted partially in strain C41(DE3). Therefore, a double mutant host C43(DE3) was selected from C41(DE3) cells containing the expression plasmid for subunit b of bacterial F-ATPase. In strain C43(DE3), both subunits b and c of the F-ATPase, an alanine-H(+) symporter, and the ADP/ATP and the phosphate carriers from mitochondria were all over-produced. The transcription of the gene for the OGCP and subunit b was lower in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3), respectively, than in BL21(DE3). In C43(DE3), the onset of transcription of the gene for subunit b was delayed after induction, and the over-produced protein was incorporated into the membrane. The procedure used for selection of C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) could be employed to tailor expression hosts in order to overcome other toxic effects associated

  6. Absorption of vitamin A and carotenoids by the enterocyte: focus on transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2013-09-12

    Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet), and thus all carotenoids, were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, and that preformed vitamin A (retinol) absorption occurred via an unidentified energy-dependent transporter. The discovery of proteins able to facilitate carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte during the past decade has challenged established assumptions, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of retinol intestinal absorption is in progress. After an overview of vitamin A and carotenoid fate during gastro-duodenal digestion, our focus will be directed to the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal membrane and cellular transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte (i.e., Scavenger Receptors or Cellular Retinol Binding Proteins, among others). Further progress in the identification of the proteins involved in intestinal transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of major importance for optimizing their bioavailability.

  7. Absorption of Vitamin A and Carotenoids by the Enterocyte: Focus on Transport Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet), and thus all carotenoids, were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, and that preformed vitamin A (retinol) absorption occurred via an unidentified energy-dependent transporter. The discovery of proteins able to facilitate carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte during the past decade has challenged established assumptions, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of retinol intestinal absorption is in progress. After an overview of vitamin A and carotenoid fate during gastro-duodenal digestion, our focus will be directed to the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal membrane and cellular transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte (i.e., Scavenger Receptors or Cellular Retinol Binding Proteins, among others). Further progress in the identification of the proteins involved in intestinal transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of major importance for optimizing their bioavailability. PMID:24036530

  8. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stress such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin in transduced mammalian cells or 1% reconstituted milk enhances transcription and increases production of the foll...

  9. Modeling of DNA and Protein Organization Levels with Cn3D Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasinakis, Panagiotis K.; Nicolaou, Despoina

    2017-01-01

    The molecular structure of living organisms and the complex interactions amongst its components are the basis for the diversity observed at the macroscopic level. Proteins and nucleic acids are some of the major molecular components, and play a key role in several biological functions, such as those of development and evolution. This article…

  10. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  11. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  12. Effect of gestation length on the levels of five innate defence proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Marita; Beddis, Keryn; Black, Janet; Henderson, Harold; Nair, Arun; Wheeler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Human milk contains a range of host defence proteins that appear to contribute to health and wellbeing, but their variability in abundance among individuals has not been very well characterised. Milk from mothers of premature infants has altered composition, but the effect of gestation length on the host-defence properties of milk is not known. A study was therefore undertaken to determine the variability and effect of gestation length on the abundance of five host-defence proteins in milk; lactoferrin, secretory IgA, IgG, secretory component, and complement C3. Milk was obtained from 30 mothers at their second and fifth week of lactation. These were from three groups of ten mothers having had very premature (V; 28-32 weeks gestation), premature (P; 33-36 weeks) or full term deliveries (T; 37-41 weeks). The concentration of each of the five proteins was measured in each milk sample by either ELISA or quantitative western blotting. The concentration of IgG, and complement C3 ranged 22- and 17-fold respectively between mothers, while lactoferrin, secretory IgA, and secretory component ranged 7-, 9-, and 4-fold, respectively. The V group had significantly lower concentrations of four of the five proteins, the exception being IgG. Levels of these four proteins also decreased between weeks 2 and 5 of lactation in the P and T groups. Significant correlation was found between the concentrations of the host defence proteins within individual mothers, indicating some degree of co-ordinate regulation. Mothers vary widely in the levels of host defence proteins in milk. Very short gestation length results in decreased abundance of host-defence proteins in milk. This may have functional implications for very premature infants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of prebiotic, protein level, and stocking density on performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, M; Azhar, K; Zulkifli, I; Bejo, M H; Kamyab, A

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of period on the performance, immunity, and some stress indicators of broilers fed 2 levels of protein and stocked at a normal or high stocking density. Experimental treatments consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 levels of prebiotic (with or without prebiotic), 2 levels of dietary CP [NRC-recommended or low CP level (85% of NRC-recommended level)], and 2 levels of stocking density (10 birds/m(2) as the normal density or 16 birds/m(2) as the high density), for a total of 8 treatments. Each treatment had 5 replicates (cages). Birds were reared in 3-tiered battery cages with wire floors in an open-sided housing system under natural tropical conditions. Housing and general management practices were similar for all treatment groups. Starter and finisher diets in mash form were fed from 1 to 21 d and 22 to 42 d of age, respectively. Supplementation with a prebiotic had no significant effect on performance, immunity, and stress indicators (blood glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio). Protein level significantly influenced broiler performance but did not affect immunity or stress indicators (except for cholesterol level). The normal stocking density resulted in better FCR and also higher antibody titer against Newcastle disease compared with the high stocking density. However, density had no significant effect on blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Significant interactions between protein level and stocking density were observed for BW gain and final BW. The results indicated that, under the conditions of this experiment, dietary addition of a prebiotic had no significant effect on the performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

  14. Effect of chronic protein ingestion on tyrosine and tryptophan levels and catecholamine and serotonin synthesis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, SuJean; DiSilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that brain tyrosine (TYR) levels and catecholamine synthesis rate increase in rats as chronic dietary protein content increases from 2 to 10% (% weight). A single protein, casein, was examined. The present study explores how TYR levels and catecholamine synthesis (and tryptophan (TRP) levels and serotonin synthesis) change when different proteins are ingested chronically over the same range of dietary protein contents. Male rats ingested for 8 days diets contain 2 or 10% protein (zein, gluten, casein, soy protein, or alpha-lactalbumin). On the last day, they were killed 2.5 hours into the dark period, 30 minutes after receiving an injection of m-hydroxybenzylhydrazine, an inhibitor of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Brain samples were analyzed for amino acids, including 5-hydroxytryptophan (index of serotonin synthesis rate) and dihydroxyphenylalanine (index of catecholamine synthesis rate), by HPLC-electrochemical detection. TYR levels and catecholamine synthesis rate in brain were unaffected by the particular protein ingested. However, TRP levels and serotonin synthesis rate varied markedly, depending on the protein ingested, with effects being most prominent in the 10% protein groups. The effect of dietary protein on brain TRP correlated very highly with its effect on serotonin synthesis. The results indicate that the protein ingested can chronically modify TRP levels and serotonin synthesis in brain, but not TYR levels or catecholamine synthesis, with effects most distinct at an adequate level of protein intake (10%).

  15. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  16. The Protein-disulfide Isomerase ERp57 Regulates the Steady-state Levels of the Prion Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Mauricio; Medinas, Danilo B.; Matamala, José Manuel; Woehlbier, Ute; Cornejo, Víctor Hugo; Solda, Tatiana; Andreu, Catherine; Rozas, Pablo; Matus, Soledad; Muñoz, Natalia; Vergara, Carmen; Cartier, Luis; Soto, Claudio; Molinari, Maurizio; Hetz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Although the accumulation of a misfolded and protease-resistant form of the prion protein (PrP) is a key event in prion pathogenesis, the cellular factors involved in its folding and quality control are poorly understood. PrP is a glycosylated and disulfide-bonded protein synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER foldase ERp57 (also known as Grp58) is highly expressed in the brain of sporadic and infectious forms of prion-related disorders. ERp57 is a disulfide isomerase involved in the folding of a subset of glycoproteins in the ER as part of the calnexin/calreticulin cycle. Here, we show that levels of ERp57 increase mainly in neurons of Creutzfeldt-Jacob patients. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in cell culture, we demonstrate that ERp57 expression controls the maturation and total levels of wild-type PrP and mutant forms associated with human disease. In addition, we found that PrP physically interacts with ERp57, and also with the closest family member PDIA1, but not ERp72. Furthermore, we generated a conditional knock-out mouse for ERp57 in the nervous system and detected a reduction in the steady-state levels of the mono- and nonglycosylated forms of PrP in the brain. In contrast, ERp57 transgenic mice showed increased levels of endogenous PrP. Unexpectedly, ERp57 expression did not affect the susceptibility of cells to ER stress in vitro and in vivo. This study identifies ERp57 as a new modulator of PrP levels and may help with understanding the consequences of ERp57 up-regulation observed in human disease. PMID:26170458

  17. Anti-carbamylated Protein Antibody Levels Correlate with Anti-Sa (Citrullinated Vimentin) Antibody Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Challener, Gregory J; Jones, Jonathan D; Pelzek, Adam J; Hamilton, B JoNell; Boire, Gilles; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur José; Masetto, Ariel; Carrier, Nathalie; Ménard, Henri A; Silverman, Gregg J; Rigby, William F C

    2016-02-01

    The presence of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) indicates a breach in immune tolerance. Recent studies indicate that this breach extends to homocitrullination of lysines with the formation of anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies. We analyzed the clinical and serologic relationships of anti-CarP in 2 RA cohorts. Circulating levels of immunoglobulin G anti-CarP antibodies were determined by ELISA in established (Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) and early (Sherbrooke University Hospital Center) cohorts and evaluated for anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), specific ACPA, and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels using the Student t test and correlation analysis. We identified elevated anti-CarP antibodies titers in 47.0% of seropositive patients (Dartmouth, n = 164), with relationships to anti-CCP (p < 0.0001) and IgM-RF (p = 0.001). Similarly, 38.2% of seropositive patients from the Sherbrooke cohort (n = 171) had elevated anti-CarP antibodies; titers correlated to anti-CCP (p = 0.01) but not IgM-RF (p = 0.09). A strong correlation with anti-Sa was observed: 47.9% anti-Sa+ patients were anti-CarP antibodies+ versus only 25.4% anti-Sa- in the Sherbrooke cohort (p = 0.0002), and 62.6% anti-Sa+ patients versus 26.9% anti-Sa- were anti-CarP antibodies+ in Dartmouth (p < 0.0001). We found a more variable response for reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen or to citrullinated peptides from fibrinogen and α enolase. In 2 North American RA cohorts, we observed a high prevalence of anti-CarP antibody positivity. We also describe a surprising and unexpected association of anti-CarP with anti-Sa antibodies that could not be explained by cross-reactivity. Further, considerable heterogeneity exists between anti-CarP reactivity and other citrullinated peptide reactivity, raising the question of how the pathogenesis of antibody responses for carbamylated proteins and citrullinated proteins may be linked in vivo.

  18. [Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein in patients with high estrogen levels].

    PubMed

    Ricoux, R; Pontet, M; Tresca, J P; Engler, R

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of inflammatory activity in patients with a high level of estrogen is controversial because the significance of a raised estradiol level on C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations is a debated question. This prompted us to assay CRP by a sensitive Elisa in a sample of 30 patients with ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization, thus with high levels of estradiol. For 15 of these women, six to nine plasma samples were analyzed allowing a kinetic study of plasma levels of CRP, estradiol and sex steroid-binding plasma protein (SBP). No significant correlation was found between the concentrations of estradiol and CRP for the 30 patients. In the kinetic study, as mean estradiol levels rose exponentially from 50 to 1400 ng/l between day 5 and 14, the CRP level tended to vary markedly from one patient to another and sometimes from day to day, but there was never any relation with estradiol level. Furthermore, CRP did not significantly modify the slope of the regression line between estradiol concentration and the day of the menstrual cycle. In contrast, the effect of estradiol on SBP was clear, which supports the absence of estradiol effect on CRP level.

  19. Case series: CSF LDH, proteins and electrolyte levels in patients of acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepa; Ghalaut, Veena S; Ghalaut, P S; Rao, Shashi

    2012-07-11

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is common in hemoncologic diseases especially in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Currently available modalities have limitations in diagnosing CNS involvement in early stages of disease and have a limited prognostic value. Raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels can predict CNS involvement in patients with various neurological disorders including CNS leukemia. This study was conducted in 23 consecutive freshly diagnosed patients of ALL without any previous CNS disease. Analysis of CSF was done for total LDH, proteins and electrolytes in all the patients before the start of chemotherapy and when the patients were in remission or 6 weeks after chemotherapy whichever was earlier. Twenty-three age and sex matched controls were also studied to set the normal reference range. The results were analyzed statistically by Student's t test and coefficient of co-relation between CSF LDH and protein in patients with raised CSF LDH at the time of presentation was also calculated. CSF LDH was increased in 4 out of 6 patients with signs and symptoms of CNS involvement (Group A) and 3 of these patients also had increased CSF protein levels. 2 out of 17 patients without signs and symptoms of CNS involvement (Group B) had both elevated CSF LDH and protein levels. The increased levels came down to normal reference values after chemotherapy except in one Group A patient in whom CSF LDH remained high. However, no significant change in CSF electrolytes was noted in these patients. Raised CSF LDH and CSF protein levels may indicate CNS involvement in patients with ALL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of saliva contamination on induced sputum cell counts, IL-8 and eosinophil cationic protein levels.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J L; Timmins, N L; Fakes, K; Talbot, P I; Gibson, P G

    2004-05-01

    Excessive salivary contamination of induced sputum samples prevents the satisfactory examination of lower airway inflammation. The effects of salivary contamination on different sputum fluid phase measures and the levels of salivary contamination preventing analysis are not defined. The present study sought to examine this by investigating the effect of increasing salivary contamination on induced sputum samples. Sputum and saliva samples from subjects with asthma and healthy controls were collected, and treated with dithiothreitol (DTT). Saliva was then added to aliquots of dispersed sputum in increasing proportions (0% to 100%). The effect of increasing saliva contamination was assessed on sputum total cell count, viability, differential cell count and fluid phase levels of interleukin (IL)-8, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and total protein. The addition of saliva to induced sputum reduced total cell counts and absolute cell counts but did not change the differential cell count. Levels of fluid phase ECP and IL-8 were significantly reduced with increased salivary contamination. There was a progressive reduction in ECP and IL-8, which reached significance at 70% and 80% saliva contamination, respectively. IL-8 levels corrected for total protein showed no change with increasing saliva concentrations. Induced sputum differential cell counts expressed as the proportion of nonsquamous cells are robust measures that are not influenced by salivary contamination. Studies reporting total and absolute cell counts and fluid phase mediator levels require control for squamous contamination.

  1. Association of MASP2 polymorphisms and protein levels with rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Sandra Jeremias dos Santos; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2014-12-01

    MASP-2 is a key protein of the lectin pathway of complement system. Several MASP2 polymorphisms were associated with MASP-2 serum levels or functional activity. Here we investigated a possible association between MASP2 polymorphisms and MASP-2 serum levels with the susceptibility to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We haplotyped 11 MASP2 polymorphisms with multiplex sequence-specific PCR in 145 patients with history of RF from south Brazil (103 with RHD and 42 without cardiac lesion [RFo]) and 342 healthy controls. MASP-2 levels were determined by ELISA. The low MASP-2 producing p.377A and p.439H variants were negatively associated with RF (P=0.02, OR=0.36) and RHD (P=0.01, OR=0.25). In contrast, haplotypes that share the intron 9 - exon 12 g.1961795C, p.371D, p.377V and p.439R polymorphisms increased the susceptibility to RHD (P=0.02, OR=4.9). MASP-2 levels were associated with MASP2 haplotypes and were lower in patients (P<0.0001), which may reflect protein consumption due to complement activation. MASP2 gene polymorphisms and protein levels seem to play an important role in the development of RF and establishment of RHD.

  2. Perinatal nicotine treatment induces transient increases in NACHO protein levels in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wichern, Franziska; Jensen, Majbrit M; Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Thomsen, Morten S

    2017-03-27

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) regulator chaperone (NACHO) was recently identified as an important regulator of nAChR maturation and surface expression. Here we show that NACHO levels decrease during early postnatal development in rats. This decrease occurs earlier and to a greater degree in the frontal cortex (FC) compared with the hippocampus (HIP). We further show that rats exposed to nicotine during pre- and postnatal development exhibit significantly higher NACHO levels in the FC at postnatal day (PND) 21, but not at PND60. Repeated exposure to nicotine selectively during early (PND8-14) or late (PND54-60) postnatal stages did not affect NACHO protein levels in the FC or HIP, neither did exposure to high doses of the selective α7 nAChR agonists SSR180711, A-582941, or PNU-282987. However, we found significantly increased NACHO protein levels in the FC of PND36 rats after a single exposure to a combination of nicotine and the type II α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulator (PAM) PNU-120596, but not the type I PAM AVL-3288. These findings suggest that exposure to nAChR agonism affects NACHO protein levels, and that this effect is more pronounced during pre- or early postnatal development. The effect of PNU-120596 further suggests that the increase in NACHO expression is caused by activation rather than desensitization of nAChRs. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  3. [Relationship between serum S100B protein level and brain damage in preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Juan; Li, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Jian-Xing

    2012-07-01

    To study changes of serum S100B protein level in preterm infants with brain damage and its role. Forty-seven preterm infants were classified into 3 groups based on the results of brain ultrasound and MRI: brain white matter damage (WMD; n=13), brain but not white matter damage (non-WMD; n=14) and control (no brain damage; n=20). Blood samples were collected within 24 hrs, 72 hrs and 7 days after birth. S100B protein level was measured using ELISA. Serum levels of S100B in the WMD and non-WMD groups were significantly higher than in the control group within 24 hours, 72 hours and 7 days after birth (P<0.05). More increased serum S100B levels were observed in the WMD group compared with the non-WMD group (P<0.05). Serum S100B protein level increases in preterm infants with brain damage within 7 days after birth, suggesting that it may be used as an early sensitive marker for the diagnosis of brain damage, especially WMD.

  4. [S100B protein serum level as a biomarker of minor head injury].

    PubMed

    Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Laribi, Said

    2013-11-01

    S100B is a small protein selectively synthesized by cerebral astroglial cells. S100B participates physiologically in the regulation of intracellular free calcium levels, and exerts a neurotrophic activity on cerebral cells. The interest of S100B protein in clinical biology results from its physiological presence in biological fluids (cerebrospinal fluid, blood, urine) and from significant increased levels when an acute brain injury occurred, from vascular (intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic stroke) or traumatic (traumatic brain injury) origins. Thus, elevated plasma concentrations of S100B were significantly increased in patients with a minor, moderate and of course severe traumatic brain injury. By contrast, serum S100B levels remained unchanged in patients with negative craniocerebral tomography results, confirming the diagnostic value of this biomarker. A prognostic value of the biomarker in the context of minor head injury is also reported.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs can selectively increase protein levels.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Sun, Hong; Shen, Wen; Wang, Shiyu; Yao, Joyee; Migawa, Michael T; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Damle, Sagar S; Riney, Stan; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T

    2017-09-19

    A variety of diseases are caused by deficiencies in amounts or activity of key proteins. An approach that increases the amount of a specific protein might be of therapeutic benefit. We reasoned that translation could be specifically enhanced using trans-acting agents that counter the function of negative regulatory elements present in the 5' UTRs of some mRNAs. We recently showed that translation can be enhanced by antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target upstream open reading frames. Here we report the amount of a protein can also be selectively increased using ASOs designed to hybridize to other translation inhibitory elements in 5' UTRs. Levels of human RNASEH1, LDLR, and ACP1 and of mouse ACP1 and ARF1 were increased up to 2.7-fold in different cell types and species upon treatment with chemically modified ASOs targeting 5' UTR inhibitory regions in the mRNAs encoding these proteins. The activities of ASOs in enhancing translation were sequence and position dependent and required helicase activity. The ASOs appear to improve the recruitment of translation initiation factors to the target mRNA. Importantly, ASOs targeting ACP1 mRNA significantly increased the level of ACP1 protein in mice, suggesting that this approach has therapeutic and research potentials. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Phenobarbital specifically reduces gap junction protein mRNA level in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mesnil, M; Fitzgerald, D J; Yamasaki, H

    1988-01-01

    The gene expression of liver major gap junction (GJ) protein was studied in rats systemically administered phenobarbital, a rat liver tumor promoter. Using a GJ protein cDNA and northern blot analysis, the level of GJ protein mRNA in liver was observed to be markedly reduced at 4 and 11 wk of phenobarbital exposure (0.1% in drinking water). However, the level of GJ protein mRNA was not altered in kidney at 11 wk of exposure. In liver, phenobarbital did not induce expression of the neoplasm-associated marker genes glutathione S-transferase (placental form) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, while in kidney the observed expression of these genes was not changed. These in vivo results indicate that phenobarbital reduces GJ protein gene expression specifically in rat liver without altering expression of genes often altered during liver carcinogenesis, and they support assigning a role for the impairment of gap junctional intercellular communication in phenobarbital-mediated liver tumor promotion.

  7. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  8. Lipid and protein fingerprinting for Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense strain-level classification.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Daniele F O; Cunha, Cristiane M S; Belaz, Katia Roberta A; Dos Santos, Fábio N; Hinz, Robert H; Pereira, Adriana; Wicket, Ester; Andrade, Lidiane M; Nascimento, Claudio A O; Visconti, Alexandre; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2017-09-25

    Banana is one of the most popular fruits in the world but has been substantially impaired by Panama disease in the last years. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is the causal agent and colonizes banana cultivars from many subgroups with different aggressiveness levels, often leading to plant death while compromising new crops in infested areas. This study has evaluated the ability of MALDI-MS protein and lipid fingerprinting to provide intraspecies classification of Foc isolates and to screen biomolecules related to host-pathogen relationship. The MS data, when inspected via partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), distinguished the isolates by aggressiveness as well as by specific location and host. Although both lipids and proteins show discriminating tendencies, these differences were more clearly perceived via the protein profiles. Considering that Cavendish cultivar is the more resistant option to endure Foc presence in the field, the lipids and proteins related to this subgroup might have an important role in pathogen adaptation. This study reports a new application of MALDI-MS for the analysis of a banana pathogen with intraspecies classification ability. Graphical abstract MALDI-MS classified Foc isolates by aggressiveness level on banana revealing the additional influence of location and host cultivar on the expression of lipids and proteins.

  9. Understanding epigenetic regulation: Tracking protein levels across multiple generations of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowat, A. C.; Weitz, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Cells and organisms are remarkably robust: they alter the variety and levels of expressed genes and proteins in response to environmental stimuli, including temperature, chemicals, and the stiffness of their surroundings. Ultimately changes in gene and protein expression can result in a distinct phenotypic state, which in some cases is maintained over multiple generations; the ability to pass on a particular phenotypic state to progeny cells is critical for differentiation. Moreover, epigenetic regulation of phenotype is also thought to provide an evolutionary advantage for a population of cells adapting to a fluctuating environment on faster timescales than the occurrence of genetic mutations. However, simple methods to study patterns of gene and protein expression on multi-generational timescales are sparse. Here we describe a technique to study lineages of single cells over multiple generations using a microfluidic device; this reveals patterns of expression where protein levels are correlated across multiple generations. Such quantitative information of protein expression in the context of pedigree remains hidden when studying the population as an ensemble.

  10. Randomized controlled trial of a protein substitute with prolonged release on the protein status of children with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Marcello; Riva, Enrica; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Cefalo, Graziella; Radaelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether a phenylalanine-free protein substitute with prolonged release may be beneficial to the protein status of children with phenylketonuria (PKU) compared to conventional substitutes. Sixty children with PKU, 7 to 16 years of age, were randomly allocated to receive either a prolonged-release (test) or the current conventional protein substitute for 30 days. Subjects were additionally sex and age matched with 60 subjects with mild hyperphenylalaninemia and 60 unaffected subjects. The protein status in children with PKU was assessed by albumin, transthyretin, and retinol-binding protein (RBP), and changes throughout the trial period were the primary outcome measures. Children with PKU did not differ in anthropometry from children with mild hyperphenylalaninemia or unaffected children but they ingested lower amounts of proteins (p < 0.01). No differences occurred throughout the trial between or within children with PKU who received the test or conventional substitute for macronutrient intake. Albumin and RBP concentrations were within the age-specific reference range for all children. The rate of protein insufficiency (transthyretin concentration less than 20 mg/dL) did not differ statistically between children receiving test or conventional substitute (recruitment 51.8% vs 53.6%; end of the trial 44.4% vs 50.0%) but mean transthyretin recovered over 20 mg/dL in children who received the test substitute, increasing from 19.1 to 20.7 mg/dL (mean change, 1.6 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 2.8 mg/dL). In children receiving conventional substitute mean transthyretin changed from 19.0 to 19.2 mg/dL (0.2; -0.2 to 0.6) mg/dL. Protein substitutes with prolonged release might be beneficial to protein status in children with phenylketonuria.

  11. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  12. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detec