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Sample records for retort pouches

  1. Retort pouch processing of Chettinad style goat meat curry - a heritage meat product.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, V; Dushyanthan, K; Das, Arun K

    2010-08-01

    Chettinad style goat meat curry, a heritage meat product, was thermal processed in retort pouches having 4 layer configurations. Physical properties of retort pouches indicated that they are suitable for processing. Pouches filled with 150 g of goat meat and 100 g of curry medium were retorted to a F O value of 12.1 min. Retort cooked products were tested for sterility and quality characteristics. Retorting decreased the product pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and shear force values. Retort processed products had significantly lower L*, a*, b* and chroma values. Product was superior in all sensory attributes. It is concluded that Chettinad style goat meat product retorted to a F O value of 12.1 min, had acceptable sensory quality characteristics.

  2. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K.

    1981-12-01

    An assessment is made of the possibilities of using geothermal energy and an aseptic retortable pouch in the food processing industry. The focus of the study is on the production of frozen broccoli in the Imperial Valley, California. Background information on the current status of the frozen food industry, the nature of geothermal energy as a potential substitute for conventional fossil fuels, and the engineering details of the retortable pouch process are covered. The analytical methodology by which the energy and process substitution were evaluated is described. A four-way comparison of the economics of the frozen product versus the pouched product and conventional fossil fuels versus geothermal energy was performed. A sensitivity analysis for the energy substitution was made and results are given. Results are summarized. (MCW)

  3. Determination of thermal process schedule for emulsion type buffalo meat block in retort pouch.

    PubMed

    Devadason, I Prince; Anjaneyulu, A S R; Mendirtta, S K; Murthy, T R K

    2014-11-01

    The process temperature for buffalo met blocks processed in retort pouches calculated based on the heat resistance of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 in Phosphate buffer saline (PBS- Ph 7.0) as reference medium and in buffalo meat block (pH 6.28) was in the range of 110-121°C. The D values and Z values calculated for C.sporogenes PA 3679 confirmed that the suspension was best suited for conducting thermal resistance studies. The experiment for indirect confirmation of microbial safety of the products involving inoculating the buffalo meat emulsion filled in pouches with C.sporogenes PA 3679 and processed at Fo 12.13 min showed no growth of microorganisms.

  4. Optimization of process conditions for Rohu fish in curry medium in retortable pouches using instrumental and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ranendra K; Dhar, Bahni; Roy, Deepayan; Saha, Apurba

    2015-09-01

    'Kalia', a popular preparation of Rohu fish, packed in four-layered laminated retort pouch was processed in a steam/air mixture over-pressure retort at 121.1 °C to three different F 0 values of 7, 8 and 9 min. Time-temperature data were collected during heat processing using an Ellab Sterilization Monitoring System. Texture profile such as hardness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness decreased as the F 0 value increased. The L* values decreased whereas a* and b* values increased with increasing F 0 value. Based on the commercial sterility, sensory evaluation, colour and texture profile analysis, F 0 value of 8 min and cook value of 66 min, with a total process time of 41.7 min at 121.1 °C was found satisfactory for the preparation of Rohu fish curry (Kalia) in retort pouches.

  5. Processing and storage of restructured surimi stew product in retortable pouches.

    PubMed

    Hema, K; Shakila, R Jeya; Shanmugam, S A; Jeevithan, E

    2015-03-01

    Restructured surimi gel product was prepared using short nosed white tripod (Triacanthus brevirosterus) with egg white as additive at 1 %. Heat setting was done initially at 45 °C for 30 min followed by heat processing 90 °C for 45 min. Restructured surimi gel in stew was standardized using four most popular recipes available in local cuisine based on the sensory acceptance and the Kerala fish stew was considered best. Restructured surimi gel in Kerala fish stew was then heat processed in 4 ply laminated retort pouch of dimension 150× 200 mm, at 15 psi gauge pressure for varying time duration and the Fo values ranged from 13.10 to 22.58 min. Products examined of their organoleptic and microbial qualities showed those processed with Fo value of 13.10 min was acceptable with excellent eating quality with no fishy flavour and was microbial sterile until the storage period of 6 months.

  6. Quality and shelf life of buffalo meat blocks processed in retort pouches.

    PubMed

    Devadason, I Prince; Anjaneyulu, A S R; Mendirtta, S K; Murthy, T R K

    2014-12-01

    The shelf life of buffalo meat blocks processed in 3-ply retort pouches at Fo = 12.13 in a stock sterilizer were evaluated at 15 days interval for physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory attributes for a period of 3 months. The pH of the product was 6.28 at 0 day and a gradual decline was noticed during storage. Texture of the product as indicated by shear force values had decreased slowly. The residual nitrite content had significantly declined from 82.67 ppm at 0 day to 45.00 ppm on 90th day of storage. The TBARS values were 0.24 and 0.67 mg malonaldehyde/kg, respectively at 0 day and 90 days of storage. Tyrosine value had significantly increased from 0.37 mg/100 g at 0 day to 0.58 mg/100 g during storage. Free aminoacid content increased gradually from an initial level of 124.32 to 217.51 at 90(th) day of storage. The SDS-PAGE hydrolysis pattern showed barely discernible 205 KDa protein and presence of subfragments in the molecular range of 63 KDa to 29 KDa protein. The sensory studies indicated that the products were well acceptable up to a period of 90 days. As the storage period increased pH, reidual nitrite, sensory attributes declined significantly and TBARS value, tyrosine value and free aminoacid content significantly increased. Mesophillic aerobes and anerobes were found to be absent. The shelf life study indicated that the products were well acceptable up to a period of 90 days based on the assessment of physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory attributes.

  7. Effect of different binders on the physico-chemical, textural, histological, and sensory qualities of retort pouched buffalo meat nuggets.

    PubMed

    Devadason, I Prince; Anjaneyulu, A S R; Babji, Y

    2010-01-01

    The functional properties of 4 binders, namely corn starch, wheat semolina, wheat flour, and tapioca starches, were evaluated to improve the quality of buffalo meat nuggets processed in retort pouches at F(0) 12.13. Incorporation of corn starch in buffalo meat nuggets produced more stable emulsion than other binders used. Product yield, drip loss, and pH did not vary significantly between the products with different binders. Shear force value was significantly higher for product with corn starch (0.42 +/- 0.0 Kg/cm(3)) followed by refined wheat flour (0.36 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)), tapioca starch (0.32 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)), and wheat semolina (0.32 +/- 0.010 Kg/cm(3)). Type of binder used had no significant effect on frying loss, moisture, and protein content of the product. However, fat content was higher in products with corn starch when compared to products with other binders. Texture profile indicated that products made with corn starch (22.17 +/- 2.55 N) and refined wheat flour (21.50 +/- 0.75 N) contributed firmer texture to the product. Corn starch contributed greater chewiness (83.8 +/- 12.51) to the products resulting in higher sensory scores for texture and overall acceptability. Products containing corn starch showed higher sensory scores for all attributes in comparison to products with other binders. Panelists preferred products containing different binders in the order of corn starch (7.23 +/- 0.09) > refined wheat flour (6.48 +/- 0.13) > tapioca starch (6.45 +/- 0.14) > wheat semolina (6.35 +/- 0.13) based on sensory scores. Histological studies indicated that products with corn starch showed dense protein matrix, uniform fat globules, and less number of vacuoles when compared to products made with other binders. The results indicated that corn flour is the better cereal binder for developing buffalo meat nuggets when compared to all other binders based on physico-chemical and sensory attributes.

  8. Retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, B.A.

    1984-06-19

    Fines in the overhead vapors from an oil shale retort process in which fresh shale together with hot recycle combusted shale from a combustor are fed to a retort and at least partly fluidized by a countercurrent stripping gas stream are handled by removing a portion of the fines in a vapor-solid separation optionally subjecting the portion of fines to additional retorting in a fines retort condensing the partially dedusted gas separating the condensate into a substantially finesfree liquid oil and a wet solids and recycling at least a portion of the wet solids to the retort, fines retort, and/or combustor whereby the liquid on the wet solids is recovered and/or burned and the wet solids are dried.

  9. RETORT. Oil Shale Retorting Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1992-02-26

    RETORT is a one-dimensional mathematical model for simulating the chemical and physical processes involved in the vertical retorting of a fixed or moving rubbled bed of oil shale. The model includes those processes believed to have the most important effects in either the hot-gas retorting mode or the forward combustion retorting mode. The physical processes are: axial convective transport of heat and mass, axial thermal dispersion, axial pressure drop, gas-solid heat transfer, intraparticle thermal conductivity, water evaporation and condensation, wall heat loss, and movement of shale countercurrent to flow of gas. The chemical reactions within the shale particles are: release of bound water, pyrolysis of kerogen, coking of oil, pyrolysis of char, decomposition of carbonate minerals, and gasification of residual organic carbon with CO2, H2O, and O2. The chemical reactions in the bulk-gas stream are: combustion and cracking of oil vapor, combustion of H2, CH4, CHx, and CO, and the water-gas shift. The RETORT model is meant to simulate adiabatic laboratory retorts and in situ retorts that have been prepared with fairly uniform lateral distribution of shale particle sizes, void volume, and permeability. The model`s main role is to calculate, as a function of time and axial location in the retort, the flow rate of the bulk-gas stream and the composition and temperature of both the fluid stream and the shale particles.

  10. RETORT. Oil Shale Retorting Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.

    1992-02-26

    RETORT is a one-dimensional mathematical model for simulating the chemical and physical processes involved in the vertical retorting of a fixed or moving rubbled bed of oil shale. The model includes those processes believed to have the most important effects in either the hot-gas retorting mode or the forward combustion retorting mode. The physical processes are: axial convective transport of heat and mass, axial thermal dispersion, axial pressure drop, gas-solid heat transfer, intraparticle thermal conductivity, water evaporation and condensation, wall heat loss, and movement of shale countercurrent to flow of gas. The chemical reactions within the shale particles are: release of bound water, pyrolysis of kerogen, coking of oil, pyrolysis of char, decomposition of carbonate minerals, and gasification of residual organic carbon with CO2, H2O, and O2. The chemical reactions in the bulk-gas stream are: combustion and cracking of oil vapor, combustion of H2, CH4, CHx, and CO, and the water- gas shift. The RETORT model is meant to simulate adiabatic laboratory retorts and in situ retorts that have been prepared with fairly uniform lateral distribution of shale particle sizes, void volume, and permeability. The model`s main role is to calculate, as a function of time and axial location in the retort, the flow rate of the bulk-gas stream and the composition and temperature of both the fluid stream and the shale particles.

  11. Determining Permissible Oxygen and Water Vapor Transmission Rate for Non-Retort Military Ration Packaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    oxygen transmission rate ( OTR ) and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), for the non-retort pouch found in the Meal, Ready to EatTM (MRETM) individual...water vapor ingress is 0.004 g/pouch/d. Cracker samples used to determine permissible OTR did not fall below the overall quality requirement for...sensory attributes during the 32-week study. Thus, an allowable OTR for the non-retort pouch cannot be calculated from the results obtained. 15

  12. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  13. Retort process modelling for Indian traditional foods.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, S V; Lele, S S

    2014-11-01

    Indian traditional staple and snack food is typically a heterogeneous recipe that incorporates varieties of vegetables, lentils and other ingredients. Modelling the retorting process of multilayer pouch packed Indian food was achieved using lumped-parameter approach. A unified model is proposed to estimate cold point temperature. Initial process conditions, retort temperature and % solid content were the significantly affecting independent variables. A model was developed using combination of vegetable solids and water, which was then validated using four traditional Indian vegetarian products: Pulav (steamed rice with vegetables), Sambar (south Indian style curry containing mixed vegetables and lentils), Gajar Halawa (carrot based sweet product) and Upama (wheat based snack product). The predicted and experimental values of temperature profile matched with ±10 % error which is a good match considering the food was a multi component system. Thus the model will be useful as a tool to reduce number of trials required to optimize retorting of various Indian traditional vegetarian foods.

  14. Retorting hydrocarbonaceous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Styring, R.E.

    1980-08-19

    Mined, crushed hydrocarbonaceous solids are pyrolyzed in a retort with a gas containing hydrocarbons. The gas is heated to a suitable temperature of at least 600/sup 0/F. Thereafter, a relatively small amount of oxygen is added to the heated gas outside the retort. The resulting mixture is then flowed into the retort. The amount of oxygen is theoretically sufficient to raise the temperature of the heated gas at least 100/sup 0/F., but is less than the amount theoretically sufficient to react with all of the hydrocarbons in the heated gas. The process is applicable to any type of retort wherein a retort recycle gas containing hydrocarbons is heated outside the retort and is then injected into the retort to provide a source of heat for pyrolyzing hydrocarbonaceous solids in the retort. The advantages of this modified indirect heated retorting method depends on the type of retort. This method provides added control over carbonate decomposition, coking or carbonization of the gas during heating, total gas flow, process variations, and the heat requirements and thermal efficiency of the process.

  15. Oil shale retorting and retort water purification process

    SciTech Connect

    Venardos, D.G.; Grieves, C.G.

    1985-01-22

    An oil shale process is provided to retort oil shale and purify oil shale retort water. In the process, raw oil shale is retorted in an in situ underground retort or in an above ground retort to liberate shale oil, light hydrocarbon gases and oil shale retort water. The retort water is separated from the shale oil and gases in a sump or in a fractionator or quench tower followed by an API oil/water separator. After the retort water is separated from the shale oil, the retort water is steam stripped, carbon adsorbed and biologically treated, preferably by granular carbon adsorbers followed by activated sludge treatment or by activated sludge containing powdered activated carbon. The retort water can be granularly filtered before being steam stripped. The purified retort water can be used in various other oil shale processes, such as dedusting, scrubbing, spent shale moisturing, backfilling, in situ feed gas injection and pulsed combustion.

  16. The study of heat penetration of kimchi soup on stationary and rotary retorts.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Il; Park, Eun-Ji; Cheon, Hee Soon; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the heat-penetration characteristics using stationary and rotary retorts to manufacture Kimchi soup. Both heat-penetration tests and computer simulation based on mathematical modeling were performed. The sterility was measured at five different positions in the pouch. The results revealed only a small deviation of F 0 among the different positions, and the rate of heat transfer was increased by rotation of the retort. The thermal processing of retort-pouched Kimchi soup was analyzed mathematically using a finite-element model, and optimum models for predicting the time course of the temperature and F 0 were developed. The mathematical models could accurately predict the actual heat penetration of retort-pouched Kimchi soup. The average deviation of the temperature between the experimental and mathematical predicted model was 2.46% (R(2)=0.975). The changes in nodal temperature and F 0 caused by microbial inactivation in the finite-element model predicted using the NISA program were very similar to that of the experimental data of for the retorted Kimchi soup during sterilization with rotary retorts. The correlation coefficient between the simulation using the NISA program and the experimental data was very high, at 99%.

  17. The Study of Heat Penetration of Kimchi Soup on Stationary and Rotary Retorts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Il; Park, Eun-Ji; Cheon, Hee Soon; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the heat-penetration characteristics using stationary and rotary retorts to manufacture Kimchi soup. Both heat-penetration tests and computer simulation based on mathematical modeling were performed. The sterility was measured at five different positions in the pouch. The results revealed only a small deviation of F0 among the different positions, and the rate of heat transfer was increased by rotation of the retort. The thermal processing of retort-pouched Kimchi soup was analyzed mathematically using a finite-element model, and optimum models for predicting the time course of the temperature and F0 were developed. The mathematical models could accurately predict the actual heat penetration of retort-pouched Kimchi soup. The average deviation of the temperature between the experimental and mathematical predicted model was 2.46% (R2=0.975). The changes in nodal temperature and F0 caused by microbial inactivation in the finite-element model predicted using the NISA program were very similar to that of the experimental data of for the retorted Kimchi soup during sterilization with rotary retorts. The correlation coefficient between the simulation using the NISA program and the experimental data was very high, at 99%. PMID:25866751

  18. Recovery of retorted shale from an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Deering, R.F.; Duir, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Retorted shale particles are recovered from a retort and delivered to a gas lift for transport to a fluidized combustor by passage, serially, through a sealing vessel, a crusher preferably operating at retort pressure, and a surge vessel. In the sealing vessel, a sealing gas is introduced, and after commingling with the shale, the gas passes counter-currently to the shale and enters the retort, thus sealing the retort gases in the retort while separating the retorted shale from the retort gases. Retorted shale from the sealing vessel is transported to a crusher, wherein the shale is reduced in size to that suitable for combustion under fluidized conditions. To prevent the crushed shale from packing, the shale is passed to a surge vessel, wherein the crushed shale is held as a fluidized bed, from which the crushed shale is continuously withdrawn at a regulated rate and introduced into the gas lift leading to the fluidized combustor.

  19. Solar retorting of oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, David W.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for retorting oil shale using solar radiation. Oil shale is introduced into a first retorting chamber having a solar focus zone. There the oil shale is exposed to solar radiation and rapidly brought to a predetermined retorting temperature. Once the shale has reached this temperature, it is removed from the solar focus zone and transferred to a second retorting chamber where it is heated. In a second chamber, the oil shale is maintained at the retorting temperature, without direct exposure to solar radiation, until the retorting is complete.

  20. Thermal cracking of retort oil

    SciTech Connect

    Dearth, J.D.; Smith, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    The thermal cracking of retort oil vapors in an elongated reactor is improved by passing the effluent oil vapors and gases from a retort to a thermal cracking unit before the temperature of the retort effluent falls below 680* F. This encourages the more desirable cracking reactions, increases the thermal efficiency of the process, and avoids preheater coking.

  1. Method for fully retorting an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Zahradnik, R.L.; Jacobson, C.L.; Shen, J.-C.

    1986-06-17

    A method is described for operating an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, the retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale within top, bottom and side boundaries of unfragmented formation and having a drift in communication with a lower region of the fragmented mass for withdrawal of liquid products of retorting and an off-gas comprising gaseous products of retorting. The method consists of: introducing a retort inlet mixture into an upper region of the fragmented mass in the retort for advancing a retorting zone downwardly through the retort for producing liquid and gaseous products of retorting; withdrawing retort off-gas comprising gaseous products of retorting through the product withdrawal drift; monitoring the temperature of the off-gas in the product withdrawal drift; and when the temperature of the off-gas exceeds a first selected temperature, spraying a sufficient amount of water into the off-gas stream in the withdrawal drift for contacting formation surrounding the drift with cooling water and for maintaining the temperature of the off-gas at no more than a second selected temperature.

  2. Oil shale retorting and retort water purification process

    SciTech Connect

    Venardos, D.G.; Grieves, C.G.

    1986-04-29

    An in situ oil shale process is described comprising the steps of: retorting raw oil shale in situ to liberate light hydrocarbon gases, shale oil and shale-laden retort water containing suspended and dissolved impurities including raw and spent oil shale particulates, shale oil, organic carbon, carbonates, ammonia and chemical oxygen demand; separating the light hydrocarbon gases and a substantial portion of the shale oil from the shale-laden retort water by sedimentation in an underground sump; removing a substantial portion of the remaining shale oil and a substantial portion of the suspended raw and spent oil shale particulates from the shale-laden retort water by filtering the shale-laden retort water through a granular filter; steam stripping a substantial amount of the ammonia and carbonates from the shale-laden retort water; and carbon adsorbing and biologically treating the shale-laden retort water to remove a substantial amount of the total and dissolved organic carbon from the shale-laden retort water and simultaneously substantially lower the chemical oxygen demand of the shale-laden retort water so as to substantially purify the shale-laden retort water.

  3. Lip-hung retort furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1986-08-05

    A fluidized bed furnace is described which consists of: a furnace housing including an outer shell; a furnace base and an outer top plate secured to the respective lower and upper ends of the furnace housing; a vertical retort having an opened upper end and an opened lower end, the retort being disposed in an opening formed in the outer top plate and extending downwardly into the center of the furnace housing; heat insulating material disposed between the outer shell and the vertical retort; a retort base assembly being adapted for closing the lower end of the vertical retort; upper support means for supporting the upper end of the vertical retort on top of the outer top plate so as to permit downward growth only during thermal expansion; the upper support means including an annular flange formed integrally with the sidewalls of the retort at the upper end thereof and being adapted to be fixedly mounted to the outer surface of the outer top plate; lower support means interposed between the lower surface of the retort base assembly and the upper surface of the furnace base for supporting substantially all the weight of the retort, the weight of the load of a fluidizable media, and the weight of a load of material to be heat treated.

  4. Oil shale retort apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Adam A.; Mast, Earl L.; Greaves, Melvin J.

    1990-01-01

    A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

  5. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  6. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  7. Changing your urostomy pouch

    MedlinePlus

    ... can stand over a toilet or use rolled up gauze or paper towels below your stoma to absorb the urine. When you remove the old pouch, push down on your skin to loosen it. DO NOT pull the pouch off your skin. Before you put ...

  8. In situ oil shale retort system

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, N.M.; Kvapil, R.; Ricketts, T.E.; Studebaker, I.G.

    1984-04-10

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in spaced apart rows, with adjacent rows of such retorts being separated by load-bearing barrier pillars of unfragmented formation sufficiently strong for preventing substantial subsidence at the ground surface. Each retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. Separate air level drifts are excavated on an upper level of the retorts within alternating barrier pillars, and separate production level drifts are excavated at a lower production level of the retorts within intervening barrier pillars between the barrier pillars having the air level drifts. Each air level drift extends between a pair of adjacent rows of retorts adjacent upper edges of the retorts in the adjacent rows, and each production level drift extends between a pair of adjacent rows of retorts adjacent lower edges of the retorts on sides of the retorts opposite the air level drifts. During retorting operations, air is introduced along the upper edge of each retort through lateral air inlet passages extending from the adjacent air level drift. Off gas and liquid products are withdrawn from each retort through one or more lateral production level passages extending from the lower edge of the retort to the adjacent production level drift. Withdrawal of off gas along the lower edge of each retort opposite the upper edge where air is introduced causes a generally diagonal flow pattern of combustion gas through the fragmented mass from one upper edge toward the opposite lower edge of the retort.

  9. Water mist injection in oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

    1980-07-30

    Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

  10. Preparation and storage stability of retort processed Chettinad chicken.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S; Kulkarni, V V; Chandirasekaran, V

    2014-01-01

    Chettinad chicken was prepared using boneless meat derived from spent hen and boiler breeder packed in retort pouches (250 g) and processed in retort at the product temperature of 121.1 °C and the corresponding F0 value of 5.2. The product was stored at ambient temperature (35 ± 2 °C) up to 180 days. The sensory scores for texture of the Chettinad chicken prepared from spent hen and broiler breeder meat decreased significantly however the scores were rated very acceptable even on 180th day. The thiobarbituric acid (TBA), tyrosine values and acid value increased gradually during storage but E. coli, Salmonella spp, Clostridium spp, Staphylococci spp, Streptococci spp, yeast and mould could not be detected during the entire storage period. The cost of production of Chettinad chicken (250 g) prepared from spent hen meat and broiler breeder meat was Rs.37 and Rs.50, respectively. It was concluded that the retort processed Chettinad chicken prepared from spent hen and broiler breeder meat can be safely stored up to 180 days at ambient temperature.

  11. In-situ retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, G.G.; West, R.C.

    1984-11-20

    Fluid, such as liquid water, is injected into the rock surrounding an in situ oil shale retort at sufficient pressure and flow rate so that the injected fluid flows toward the retort to block the path of hot liquid and gaseous kerogen decomposition products escaping from the retort and to return heat to the retort. The successful conduct of an oil shale retorting operation usually requires that the retort temperature be maintained at a temperature sufficient to decompose efficiently the kerogen contained in the oil shale. By reducing the heat loss from an active retort, the amount of energy required to maintain a desired temperature therein is reduced. The fluid injection method also maintains pressure in an in-situ oil shale retort, allowing in-situ oil shale retorting to be efficiently conducted at a desired pressure. The method also reduces the danger to mineworkers who may be engaged in adjacent mining operations due to the escape of hazardous gases from an active retort. The method allows a series of sequential in-situ oil shale retorts in an oil shale formation to be placed more closely together than previously practical by reducing hot fluid leakage from each active retort to one or more abandoned retorts adjacent thereto, thus improving the recovery factor from the formation. The method also minimizes contamination of the formation surrounding an active in-situ retort due to hazardous chemicals which may be contained in the kerogen decomposition products leaking from the retort.

  12. Oil shale retort apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, A.A.; Mast, E.L.; Greaves, M.J.

    1990-08-14

    A retorting apparatus is described including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or rock chimneys'', through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln. 29 figs.

  13. Ileostomy - changing your pouch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pouch. Push the skin away from the seal. DO NOT pull the ostomy away from your skin. Wash your stoma and the skin around it carefully with soapy water. Use mild soap, such as Ivory, Safeguard, or ...

  14. Consolidation of in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, O.A.; Matthews, C.W.

    1980-11-04

    Shale oil is recovered from an underground oil shale deposit by in-situ retorting of rubblized shale in a retort formed in the deposit. Oil shale in a volume in the range of ten to fifty percent of the volume of the retort is mined from the deposit and delivered to the surface to provide void space for the expansion of the shale that occurs on rubblization to form the in-situ retort. The oil shale delivered to the surface is retorted at the surface. After completion of the in-situ retorting, boreholes are drilled downwardly through the retorted shale and a pipe lowered through the borehole to a level near the bottom of the retort. Spent shale from the surface retorting operation is slurried and pumped into the lower end of the in-situ retort. Pumping is continued to squeeze the slurry into the fissures between blocks of spent shale. The slurry is delivered into successively higher levels of the retort and the pumping and squeezing operation repeated at each level. In a preferred operation, slurry discharged into the retort is allowed to set before discharging slurry into the retort at a higher level to avoid excessive hydrostatic pressures on the retort.

  15. Rapid Retort Processing of Eggs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-04

    England Avenue in Piscataway, New Jersey. The facility is equipped with commercial packaging lines (Tiromat for MRE’s, Fresco GL-90 for...Heat Sealer ( Fresco ) Fresco supplied the MRE pouches and their impulse sealer for this test without charge. The sealer made by American...10.3 Packaging Description Pouches for this experiment were supplied without cost by Fresco , ….. These pouches were sealed manually, without vacuum

  16. Process for retorting oil shale with fluidized retorting of shale fines

    SciTech Connect

    Deering, R. F.

    1985-05-07

    Hot particles removed from a retort, preferably retort-sized particles of oil shale removed from a retort operating at superatmospheric pressure, are crushed and fed to a fluidized surge zone maintained under non-oxidizing conditions at substantially the pressure of the retort to forestall escape of retort gases. Raw fines are introduced into the surge zone and retorted without agglomeration by heat transferred from the hot retorted particles and/or a heated fluidizing gas stream to educe hydrocarbonaceous vapors. Educed vapors are scrubbed, condensed and separated into liquid and gaseous product streams, a portion of the latter being recycled to provide fluidizing process gas streams.

  17. Proposed operating strategy for a field mis oil shale retorting experiment (RBOSC Retort O)

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.; Campbell, J.H.; McKenzie, D.R.; Raley, J.H.; Gregg, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    A possible operating strategy for a field scale retort (similar to Retort 0) proposed by the Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company (RBOSC)) is discussed. This retorting strategy was developed based on model calculations, pilot retort experiments, and laboratory work carried out at LLL. From these calculations a set of operating conditions are derived that appear to give the best overall retort performance. A performance monitoring strategy is being developed based solely on the exit gas and oil composition.

  18. Method for bulking full a retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Tw.E.; Sass, A.

    1984-05-22

    A method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is provided. The in situ oil shale retort has top, bottom, and generally vertically extending side boundaries of unfragmented formation and contains a body of expanded oil shale formation that completely fills the retort to its top boundary. The retort is bulked full by explosively expanding a layer above a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles forming part of the body of expanded formation in the retort. The layer is expanded with an available void fraction of no more than about ten percent.

  19. Apparatus for oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  20. [Simulation of migration from a multi-layer laminated film intended for retort foods].

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yoko; Ogimoto, Mami; Kabashima, Junichiro; Suzuki, Kumi; Kaneko, Reiko; Funayama, Keiichi; Haneishi, Nahoko; Yasuno, Tetsuko; Ogino, Shuzo

    2005-08-01

    Migration from multi-layer laminated film pouches intended for retort foods was investigated through HPLC analysis with a fluorescence detector, and measurements of residue on evaporation, consumption of potassium permanganate and total organic carbon. HPLC analysis revealed that the levels of migrants in oil and the water which were heated in the pouches (121 degrees C, 30 min) were ten times of those in the corresponding official simulants under the official conditions; n-heptane (25 degrees C, 60 min), and water (95 degrees C, 30 min). Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and related compounds were found in the oil and the water heated in the pouches, as well as in the simulants. These compounds were thought to have been present in the adhesive between the laminated films, and migrated through the food-contact film of the package. Consumption of potassium permanganate and residue on evaporation of the heated water were ten times of those of the water simulant, while the total organic carbon level of the heated water was several-hold greater than that of the water simulant. In addition, migrant levels per surface area of the pouch were one-fourth of the concentrations per content volume of the pouch. Since compliance with the legal limits is evaluated based on the concentration per surface area, real migration into foods would be underestimated by a factor of another four.

  1. Postprocess contamination of flexible pouches challenged by in situ immersion biotest.

    PubMed

    Song, Y S; Hargraves, W A

    1998-12-01

    Packages were evaluated for leaks by determining microbial penetration through microchannels as a function of test organism concentration, location in a retort, and microchannel diameter and length. A flexible pouch was used in an in situ immersion biotest coupled with a state-of-the-art retort. Microchannel diameters of 10 to 661 microm with 3- and 6-mm lengths were created by placing tungsten wires in vacuum heat-sealed flexible pouches. After removing the wires, these pouches were subsequently heat processed under pressure. They were then biotested in cooling water containing 10(3) and 10(6) CFU of motile Enterobacter aerogenes per ml for 30 min and were dried immediately after manual unloading. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 3 days, they were visually examined for contamination. The high-temperature retorting process was shown to decrease microchannel diameters by an average of 20%. Generally, the smaller the microchannel diameter, the greater the percent shrinkage. Statistical analysis of the biotesting data showed that microchannel diameter and length had strong effects on microbial penetration (P < 0.01). Microbial concentration had a borderline significant effect (P < 0.05), but the effect of package location in the retort was not significant. At conservative conditions, such as a 3-mm microchannel length and a cooling water contamination level of 10(6) CFU/ml, the selected microorganism can penetrate microchannels with diameters as small as 7 microm. However, the minimum microchannel diameter for penetration could be as large as 46 microm at practical conditions of 6-mm microchannel length and contamination levels of 10(3) CFU/ml.

  2. 4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF AREA EXCAVATED FOR ACCESS TO MERCURY RETORT. VIEW SOUTH FROM RETORT. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  3. Huff and puff process for retorting oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Russum, L. W.

    1984-06-05

    Greater product yield and quality as well as simplified gas recovery can be attained by a huff and puff process for retorting oil shale. The process can be advantageously carried out in in situ retorts under ground as well as in surface retorts above ground. In the process, an active retort of raw oil shale is retorted without prior combustion of oil shale therein with retort off gases, which have been heated in a spent shale retort. In the preferred mode, retort off gases from the active retort and air are alternately injected into the spent retort to cyclically heat the off gases and combust the coked shale. The retort off gases can be deoiled and optionally scrubbed of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide before being heated in the spent retort.

  4. Modeling of oil shale compaction during retorting

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    A model of oil shale compacting during retorting has been developed and incorporated into a one-dimensional retorting model. The model calculates the vertical stress distribution in a column of oil shale rubble and the degree of compaction that these stresses cause. A correlation was developed that relates shale grade, initial void volume, and vertical stress to the final compaction of the shale bed. The model then determines the gas pressure drip through the retort and the effects of the varying pressure on the retorting process. The model has been tested by simulating the Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's Tract C-a Retort 1. The model calculates 8.1% compaction, whereas 12 to 16 compaction was measured in the retort; causes of the discrepancy between calculated and measured values are discussed. 14 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Horizontal oil shale and tar sands retort

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.

    1982-08-31

    A horizontal retorting apparatus and method are disclosed designed to pyrolyze tar sands and oil shale, which are often found together in naturally occurring deposits. The retort is based on a horizontal retorting tube defining a horizontal retort zone having an upstream and a downstream end. Inlet means are provided for introducing the combined tar sands and oil shale into the upstream end of the retort. A screw conveyor horizontally conveys tar sands and oil shale from the upstream end of the retort zone to the downstream end of the retort zone while simultaneously mixing the tar sands and oil shale to insure full release of product gases. A firebox defining a heating zone surrounds the horizontal retort is provided for heating the tar sands and oil shale to pyrolysis temperatures. Spent shale and tar sands residue are passed horizontally beneath the retort tube with any carbonaceous residue thereon being combusted to provide a portion of the heat necessary for pyrolysis. Hot waste solids resulting from combustion of spent shale and tar sands residue are also passed horizontally beneath the retort tube whereby residual heat is radiated upward to provide a portion of the pyrolysis heat. Hot gas inlet holes are provided in the retort tube so that a portion of the hot gases produced in the heating zone are passed into the retort zone for contacting and directly heating the tar sands and oil shale. Auxiliary heating means are provided to supplement the heat generated from spent shale and tar sands residue combustion in order to insure adequate pyrolysis of the raw materials with varying residual carbonaceous material.

  6. Process for oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.; Kunchal, S. Kumar

    1981-10-27

    Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

  7. In situ retorting of oil shale with pulsed water purge

    SciTech Connect

    Forgac, J.M.; Hoekstra, G.R.

    1987-01-20

    A process is described for retorting oil shale, comprising the steps of: heating a portion of a rubblized mass of oil shale in a retorting zone of an underground retort to a retorting temperature to liberate shale oil and retort water from the oil shale leaving retorted shale containing residual carbon; combusting the residual carbon in the oil shale in a combustion zone behind the retorting zone in the underground retort with a flame front fed by an oxygen-containing, combustion-sustaining, feed gas to provide a substantial portion of the heating, the flame front advancing generally in the direction of flow of the feed gas; injecting a purge liquid comprising retort water in the absence of the oxygen-containing, combustion-sustaining, feed gas into the underground retort to quench the flame front while substantially stopping and blocking the flow of the oxygen-containing, combustion-sustaining, feed gas into the retort while simultaneously continuing to liberate shale oil and retort water in the underground retort; the retort water liberated from the retort and injected into the underground retort as the purge liquid, comprising raw, retorted and spent oil shale particulates ranging in size from less than 1 micron to 1000 microns, water, shale oil, phenols, organic carbon, ammonia, sodium, iron, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, nitrogen, nickel, copper, phosphorus, zinc, and arsenic; reigniting the flame front with the oxygen-containing, combustion-sustaining, feed gas by feeding the oxygen-containing feed gas into the retort in the absence of the retort water purge liquid while simultaneously substantially stopping and preventing the flow of the retort water purge liquid into the retort; and withdrawing the liberated shale oil and retort water from the underground retort.

  8. Apparatus for the selective retorting of carbonaceous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.

    1985-02-26

    A staged retort is provided for the retorting of certain types of carbonaceous materials such as oil shale, coal or lignite, wherein the staged retort includes a number of separate retort chambers arranged in a modular configuration, with one retort chamber above the other, and mounted transversely within the staged retort. Each retort chamber is heated to a different temperature, and carbonaceous material is moved from a given retort chamber to a retort chamber having a higher temperature, whereby heavier fractions of liquid and/or gaseous hydrocarbons are formed as the carbonaceous materials undergo pyrolysis. Arrangements such as pressure regulating valves are provided to reduce mixing of the various fractions between the individual retort chambers to nearly zero, and conduits are provided to separately withdraw the hydrocarbon gases and/or liquids from each retort chamber. The carbonaceous material leaving the last retort where the final pyrolysis reactions occur, is routed to a combustion compartment wherein it is burned to produce heat used to heat the retort chambers. The staged retort also includes arrangements for heating a predetermined portion of the gases formed in the retort chambers, to mix the heated portion with a predetermined unheated portion to arrive at a controlled temperature, and then to inject this controlled temperature gas and/or any other substances into the retort chamber interiors to control the temperatures and/or the reaction therein so that each retort chamber can be maintained at the proper temperature and conditions chosen for pyrolysis therein.

  9. Cyclone oil shale retorting concept. [Use it all retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Harak, A.E.; Little, W.E.; Faulders, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    A new concept for above-ground retorting of oil shale was disclosed by A.E. Harak in US Patent No. 4,340,463, dated July 20, 1982, and assigned to the US Department of Energy. This patent titled System for Utilizing Oil Shale Fines, describes a process wherein oil shale fines of one-half inch diameter and less are pyrolyzed in an entrained-flow reactor using hot gas from a cyclone combustor. Spent shale and supplemental fuel are burned at slagging conditions in this combustor. Because of fines utilization, the designation Use It All Retorting Process (UIARP) has been adopted. A preliminary process engineering design of the UIARP, analytical tests on six samples of raw oil shale, and a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of the process were performed. The results of these investigations are summarized in this report. The patent description is included. It was concluded that such changes as deleting air preheating in the slag quench and replacing the condenser with a quench-oil scrubber are recognized as being essential. The addition of an entrained flow raw shale preheater ahead of the cyclone retort is probably required, but final acceptance is felt to be contingent on some verification that adequate reaction time cannot be obtained with only the cyclone, or possibly some other twin-cyclone configuration. Sufficient raw shale preheating could probably be done more simply in another manner, perhaps in a screw conveyor shale transporting system. Results of the technical and economic evaluations of Jacobs Engineering indicate that further investigation of the UIARP is definitely worthwhile. The projected capital and operating costs are competitive with costs of other processes as long as electric power generation and sales are part of the processing facility.

  10. Crohn's Disease of the Ileoanal Pouch.

    PubMed

    Lightner, Amy L; Pemberton, John H; Loftus, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) of the pouch is an increasingly recognized diagnosis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This post-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis diagnosis in conjunction with pouchitis remains the leading reason for pouch excision. Unfortunately, CD of the pouch remains a difficult diagnosis with lack of a uniform definition largely because of its similarity to common postoperative pouch complications, including pouchitis, abscess formation, or stricture at the anastomosis. Once diagnosed, treatment algorithms largely include multimodal therapy including biologics. This review focuses on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for CD of the pouch, a postoperative de novo diagnosis of CD.

  11. STBRSIM. Oil Shale Retorting Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.; Diaz, J.C.

    1992-03-02

    STBRSIM simulates an aboveground oil-shale retorting process that utilizes two reactors; a staged, fluidized-bed retort and a lift-pipe combustor. The model calculates the steady-state operating conditions for the retorting system,taking into account the chemical and physical processes occurring in the two reactors and auxiliary equipment. Chemical and physical processes considered in modeling the retort include: kerogen pyrolysis, bound water release, fluidization of solids mixture, and bed pressure drop. Processes accounted for by the combustor model include: combustion of residual organic carbon and hydrogen, combustion of pyrite and pyrrhotite, combustion of nonpyrolized kerogen, decomposition of dolomite and calcite, pneumatic transport, heat transfer between solids and gas streams, pressure drop and change in void fraction, and particle attrition. The release of mineral water and the pyrolysis of kerogen take place in the retort when raw shale is mixed with hot partially-burned shale, and the partial combustion of residual char and sulfur takes place in the combustor as the shale particles are transported pneumatically by preheated air. Auxiliary equipment is modeled to determine its effect on the system. This equipment includes blowers and heat-exchangers for the recycle gas to the retort and air to the combustor, as well as a condensor for the product stream from the retort. Simulation results include stream flow rates, temperatures and pressures, bed dimensions, and heater, cooling, and compressor power requirements.

  12. STBRSIM. Oil Shale Retorting Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1992-03-02

    STBRSIM simulates an aboveground oil-shale retorting process that utilizes two reactors - a staged, fluidized-bed retort and a lift-pipe combustor. The model calculates the steady-state operating conditions for the retorting system, taking into account the chemical and physical processes occurring in the two reactors and auxiliary equipment. Chemical and physical processes considered in modeling the retort include: kerogen pyrolysis, bound water release, fluidization of solids mixture, and bed pressure drop. Processes accounted for by the combustor model include: combustion of residual organic carbon and hydrogen, combustion of pyrite and pyrrhotite, combustion of nonpyrolized kerogen, decomposition of dolomite and calcite, pneumatic transport, heat transfer between solids and gas streams, pressure drop and change in void fraction, and particle attrition. The release of mineral water and the pyrolysis of kerogen take place in the retort when raw shale is mixed with hot partially-burned shale, and the partial combustion of residual char and sulfur takes place in the combustor as the shale particles are transported pneumatically by preheated air. Auxiliary equipment is modeled to determine its effect on the system. This equipment includes blowers and heat-exchangers for the recycle gas to the retort and air to the combustor, as well as a condensor for the product stream from the retort. Simulation results include stream flow rates, temperatures and pressures, bed dimensions, and heater, cooling, and compressor power requirements.

  13. Apparatus for retorting comminuted oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Strumskis, L.

    1982-04-20

    A continuously operable retort-type processing system for the recovery of petroleum-like products from comminuted oil-bearing shale and other oil-yielding particulate solid materials. The retort portion of the system includes an insulated retort outer shell for a wall jacket-type heat exchanger. Disposed within the retort, all driven from a common axially disposed motor-driven shaft, are a plurality of stirring fingers, wall scrapers and discharge shovels, the latter for use in discharge of spent solid material from the retort. The system envisions burning gases from the process to provide a fluid heat exchange medium as a source of the heat required for the process. The system further includes means for the admixture of steam and acetic acid with the starting particulate materials prior to its introduction into the retort. An additional instrumentality is included at an intermediate position along the reaction path of the materials as they pass through the retort for the addition of additional quantities of steam and acetic acid.

  14. Method for retorting oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Lui, A.P.

    1985-08-16

    The recovery of oil from oil shale is provided in a fluidized bed by using a fluidizing medium of a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and 5 steam. The mixture with a steam concentration in the range of about 20 to 75 volume percent steam provides an increase in oil yield over that achievable by using a fluidizing gas of carbon dioxide or steam alone when the mixture contains higher steam concentrations. The operating parameters for the fluidized bed retorted are essentially the same as those utilized with other gaseous fluidizing mediums with the significant gain being in the oil yield recovered which is attributable solely to the use of the binary mixture of carbon dioxide and steam. 2 figs.

  15. 3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR EXTRACTING MERCURY VISIBLE IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  16. Reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileoanal pouches.

    PubMed Central

    Fonkalsrud, E W; Bustorff-Silva, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A retrospective review was performed to determine the results after surgical reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileal pouch-anal procedures for ulcerative colitis and familial colonic polyposis at a university medical center. METHODS: During the 20-year period from 1978 to 1998, 601 patients underwent colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis, familial colonic polyposis, or Hirschsprung's disease. A J pouch was used for 351 patients, a lateral pouch for 221, an S pouch for 6, and a straight pull-through for 23. Acute complications after pouch construction have been detailed in previous publications and are not included in this study. Chronic pouch stasis with diarrhea, frequency, urgency, and soiling gradually became more severe in 164 patients (27.3%), associated with pouch enlargement, an elongated efferent limb, and obstruction to pouch outflow, largely related to the pouch configuration used during the authors' early clinical experience. These patients were sufficiently symptomatic to be considered for reconstruction (mean 68 months after IPAA). Transanal resection of an elongated IPAA spout was performed on 58 patients; abdominoperineal mobilization of the pouch with resection and tapering of the lower end (AP reconstruction) and ileoanal anastomosis on 83; pouch removal and new pouch construction on 7; and conversion of a straight pull-through to a pouch on 16. RESULTS: Good long-term results (mean 7.7 years) with improvement in symptoms occurred in 98% of transanal resections, 91.5% of AP reconstructions, 86% of new pouch constructions, and 100% of conversions of a straight pull-through to a pouch. The average number of bowel movements per 24 hours at 6 months was 4.8. Complications occurred in 11.6% of reconstructed patients. Five of the 164 patients (3.1%) required eventual pouch removal and permanent ileostomy. The high rate of pouch revision in this series of patients undergoing IPAA is due to a policy of

  17. Obstacles encountered in VMIS retort blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, R.D.; Fourney, W.L.; Young, C.

    1986-01-01

    During 1981 and 1982, an extensive oil shale fragmentation research program was conducted at the Anvil Points Mine near Rifle, Colorado. The primary goals were to investigate factors involved for adequate fragmentation of oil shale and to evaluate the feasibility of using the vertical modified in situ (VMIS) retort method for recovery of oil from oil shale. The field test program included single-deck, single-borehole experiments to obtain basic fragmentation data; multiple-deck, multiple-borehole experiments to evaluate some practical aspects for developing an in situ retort; and the development of a variety of instrumentation techniques to diagnose the blast event. This paper discusses some explosive engineering problems encountered, such as electric cap performance in complex blasting patterns, explosive and stem performance in a variety of configurations from the simple to the complex, and the difficulties experienced when reversing the direction of throw of the oil shale in a subscale retort configuration. These problems need solutions before an adequate VMIS retort can be created in a single-blast event and even before a experimental mini-retort can be formed.

  18. Quenching and stabilization of MIS retorts: Bench-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.; Boysen, J.E.

    1991-04-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate in situ retort stabilization methods. The objective of the bench-scale simulations was to evaluate possible post-retorting operations procedures for the optimum cleaning of spent retorts. After simulating conditions of modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the time retorting had ended, procedures to accelerate retort cleanup without using large volumes of water were investigated. Samples from various levels of the retort were used to determine the amount of water-soluble constituents in the spent shale and the rehydration characteristics of the spent shale. The organic material that remained after retorting was most effectively removed from the retort by the use of reverse combustion. The removal of the organic material in this manner cracked the oil on the unretorted shale and removed heat from the bottom of the retort. Both were then transported toward the top of the retort. Unretorted kerogen was coked as it emerged from the shale near the reverse-combustion front. The reverse-combustion technique had an additional benefit in that the carbon deposited on the spent shale in the combusted zone appeared to provide a barrier to rehydration of the shale on introduction of water into the retorts. A hot quench immediately following retorting was also relatively effective in removing organic material from the retort. However, the quench did leave some organic material on the unretorted shale. This material was not readily removed by water leaching during laboratory testing. A deluge of water on a cool retort did not efficiently remove the organic material from the unretorted shale nor did the addition of a biodegradable detergent.

  19. Oil shale retorting and combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Pitrolo, Augustine A.; Mei, Joseph S.; Shang, Jerry Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the extraction of energy values from l shale containing considerable concentrations of calcium carbonate in an efficient manner. The volatiles are separated from the oil shale in a retorting zone of a fluidized bed where the temperature and the concentration of oxygen are maintained at sufficiently low levels so that the volatiles are extracted from the oil shale with minimal combustion of the volatiles and with minimal calcination of the calcium carbonate. These gaseous volatiles and the calcium carbonate flow from the retorting zone into a freeboard combustion zone where the volatiles are burned in the presence of excess air. In this zone the calcination of the calcium carbonate occurs but at the expense of less BTU's than would be required by the calcination reaction in the event both the retorting and combustion steps took place simultaneously. The heat values in the products of combustion are satisfactorily recovered in a suitable heat exchange system.

  20. Fluid bed retorting process with multiple feed lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, G.B.

    1983-11-15

    Solid hydrocarbon-containing material, such as oil shale, coal or tar sand, is fed into a retort through a multiplicity of feed lines to enhance retorting efficiency, throughout and product yield. In the preferred form, larger particles of hydrocarbon-containing material gravitate downwardly through the retort in countercurrent relationship to an upward fluidized stream of smaller particles of hydrocarbon-containing material. This arrangement is especially useful to retort larger particles of hydrocarbon-containing material. One or more streams of intermediate size particles of hydrocarbon-containing material can also be fed into the retort.

  1. Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1983-01-11

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, a horizontally extending void is excavated within the boundaries of the retort site leaving a zone of unfragmented formation above and/or below such a void. A crack is propagated in at least one of the zones of unfragmented formation along the side boundaries of the retort site and thereafter the zone of unfragmented formation is explosively expanded towards such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the retort. Such a fragmented permeable mass is retorted in situ to produce shale oil.

  2. Combined fluidized bed retort and combustor

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Notestein, John E.; Mei, Joseph S.; Zeng, Li-Wen

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combined fluidized bed retorting and combustion system particularly useful for extracting energy values from oil shale. The oil-shale retort and combustor are disposed side-by-side and in registry with one another through passageways in a partition therebetween. The passageways in the partition are submerged below the top of the respective fluid beds to preclude admixing or the product gases from the two chambers. The solid oil shale or bed material is transported through the chambers by inclining or slanting the fluidizing medium distributor so that the solid bed material, when fluidized, moves in the direction of the downward slope of the distributor.

  3. Surge bin retorting solid feed material

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Krambeck, F.J.

    1984-11-06

    An improved surge bin for a Lurgi-Ruhrgas process has baffles which promote uniform flow of feed material through the surge bin. Improved retorting of kerogen from oil shale is obtained. Stripping gas such as steam, is supplied to the surge bin. A separator has a large disengaging volume to remove entrained solid particles and improve the quality of the hydrocarbon product.

  4. Male issues of the ileal pouch.

    PubMed

    Kani, Haluk T; Shen, Bo

    2015-03-01

    : Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the standard surgical treatment modality for patients with ulcerative colitis who require colectomy. There are special issues related to male gender. We performed systemic literature review on the topic, incorporating the experience in our specialized Center for Ileal Pouch Disorders, and provide recommendations for the identification and management for the gender-specific issues in male patients with ileal pouches. Chronic pouchitis, particularly ischemic pouchitis, anastomotic leak, and presacral sinus are more common in male patients than their female counterparts. Sexual dysfunction can occur after pouch surgery, particularly in those with pouch failure. Diagnosis and management of benign and malignant prostate diseases can be challenging due to the altered pelvic anatomy from the surgery. Digital rectal examination for prostate cancer screening is not reliable. Transpouch biopsy of prostate may lead to pouch fistula or abscess. Pelvic radiation therapy may have an adverse impact on the pouch function. In conclusion, sexual dysfunction and enlarged prostate can occur in patients with the ileal pouch. The measurement of serum prostate-specific antigen is a preferred method for the screening of prostate cancer. If biopsy of the prostate is needed, the perineal route is recommended. The risk for pouch dysfunction and the benefit for oncologic survival of pelvic radiation for prostate cancer should be carefully balanced.

  5. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  6. Underground oil-shale retort monitoring using geotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.

    1984-10-01

    Geophysical tomographs (geotomographs) were made of two underground oil-shale retorts: (1) the Occidental Oil Shale Inc. miniretort constructed for ignition tests at the demonstration mine at Logan Wash, Colorado; and (2) the Geokinetics Oil Shale Inc. Retort 25 near Vernal, Utah. These experiments demonstrate that geotomography may be a valuable diagnostic tool for underground oil-shale retorting processes. At the Geokinetics in-situ retort, the technique delineated the zones of high permeability in a cross-section of the retort. At the Occidental modified in-situ miniretort, the technique imaged the high temperature zone of the retort with a spatial resolution of about 2 m, and showed its temporal development over a period of eleven days.

  7. Two-stage oil shale retorting process and disposal of spent oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Tassoney, J.P.

    1983-04-12

    Formation is excavated from an in situ oil shale retort site for forming at least one void within the retort site, leaving at least one remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent such a void. The remaining zone is explosively expanded toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. Oil shale in the in situ retort is retorted to produce liquid and gaseous products, leaving a mass of spent oil shale particles in the in situ retort. Oil shale particles excavated from the in situ retort site are separately retorted, such as in a surface retorting operation, producing liquid and gaseous products and spent surface retorted oil shale particles. The spent surface retorted particles are disposed of by forming an aqueous slurry of the particles, and pumping the slurry into a spent in situ retort. In one embodiment, the aqueous slurry is introduced into a hot lower portion of the spent retort where contact with hot spent oil shale particles generates steam which, in turn, is withdrawn from the spent retort in usable form. In another embodiment, water from the aqueous slurry introduced into a spent in situ retort collects at a level within the retort. The water can be recovered by drilling a drainage hole upwardly from a lower level drift into the level within the spent retort where the water collects and draining the water through the drainage hole to the lower level drift for recovery.

  8. Process for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Knepper, J.C.

    1984-05-08

    A process is provided for forming an in situ oil shale retort which minimizes channeling, explosion gas turbulence and flame front tilting. In the process, explosives are detonated in an underground formation of oil shale to blast the oil shale into a permeable rubblized mass defining a retort, and gases emitted from the explosion are symmetrically vented. In the preferred form, the gases are vented through vertical vent holes and blast holes which extend through the top of the retort, as well as through a lateral access tunnel which extends into the bottom of the retort.

  9. Metallorganic, organic, and mutagenic properties of oil shale retort waters

    SciTech Connect

    Toste, A.P.; Myers, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the mutagenic, organic, and metallorganic properties of oil shale retort waters. Four retort water samples were analyzed in the mutagenesis/organics study: a storage water and a condensate water from the Paraho aboveground retort; a retort water from the Occidental vertical, modified in situ retort; and a retort water from a horizontal, true in situ retort near Vernal, Utah. A second goal of this study was to develop and evaluate improved methods of chemically fractionating the complex organic content of retort waters to facilitate their chemical and mutagenic characterization. To begin the mutagenesis study, we tested several methods for extracting hydrophobic organics from the retort waters: (1) solvent extraction with pH adjustment; (2) XAD-4 partition chromatography; and (3) C/sub 18/-partition chromatography. We then tested the usefulness of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for fractionating the hydrophobic organic fraction. Each method was evaluated both chemically and biologically. For the metallorganics/organics study we decided to test steric-exclusion chromatography as a means of fractionating metal-organic chelates.

  10. Method of forming a rubblized in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.

    1980-03-25

    An in-situ retort is formed in an oil shale deposit by a sublevel caving method in which the starting slot for the sublevel caving is at opposite ends of the retort on adjacent sublevels. Any zones of high permeability that are formed adjacent to the starting slots are limited in vertical extent to the vertical spacing of the sublevels and are spaced from the zones of high permeability in adjacent sublevels by the length of the retort. A source of channeling through the retort that is caused by the usual sublevel caving mining method is thereby eliminated.

  11. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort through a well in the formation adjacent the retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, R.D.

    1982-08-17

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring in a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort, for condition in the retort affected by the advancement of such a processing zone through the retort. Monitoring can be effected by placing means for monitoring such a condition in such a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort.

  12. Pressure drops during low void volume combustion retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    Stacks of cut oil shale bricks were combustion retorted in a batch, pilot scale sized retort at low void volumes (overall voids ranged from 8.4% to 18.4%). Retort pressure drops increased during retorting at least one order of magnitude. The Ergun equation and Darcy's law have been used by several researchers and organizations as diagnostic tools on oil shale retorts. These equations were tested on the uniformly packed retort reported in this paper to evaluate how well the equations represented the experimental conditions. Use of the Ergun equation to estimate the average particle size from retort pressure drops gave answers that were only approximately correct. Calculation of retort pressure drops from Darcy's law during retorting at low void volumes will probably give answers that are several times too small. Thermal expansion of the shale during retorting decreases retort permeability greatly and calculation of the decreased permeability is not possible at the present level of technology.

  13. Formation of in situ oil shale retort in plural steps

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, R.J.

    1984-07-10

    A subterranean formation containing oil shale is prepared for in situ retorting by forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ retort site. The retort is formed by excavating a lower level drift adjacent to a lower portion of the retort site and excavating an undercut within the retort site below a zone of unfragmented formation remaining within the retort site above the undercut. The bottom of the undercut slopes downwardly toward the lower level drift which opens into one side of the undercut, the slope being generally at the natural angle of slide of oil shale particles. The remaining zone of unfragmented formation is blasted downwardly toward the undercut in a series of lifts in sequence progressing upwardly in the retort site. The mass of formation particles formed during such blasting in lifts tends to slope downwardly toward the side of the retort adjacent the lower level drift. Formation particles are withdrawn from the fragmented mass between lifts through the lower level drift to provide void space toward which each lift is blasted. Such withdrawal of formation particles can create relatively higher permeability in the fragmented mass along the side above the lower level drift and relatively lower permeability in the fragmented mass along the opposite side of the retort. During retorting operations, to compensate for such permeability gradient, oxygen supplying gas is introduced into the upper low permeability region of the fragmented mass, and off gas is withdrawn through the lower level drift at the lower high permeability region for producing a generally diagonal gas flow pattern through the retort.

  14. Improved retort for cleaning metal powders with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1969-01-01

    Improved cleaning retort produces uniform temperature distribution in the heated zone and minimizes hydrogen channeling through the powder bed. Retort can be used for nonmetallic powders, sintering in a reducing atmosphere, and for cleaning powders in reduction atmospheres other than hydrogen.

  15. Ileal J-Pouch Perforation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dogan, U; Dogan, B; Habibi, M; Erol, M K; Mayir, B; Aslaner, A; Bulbuller, N

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old male patient who had undergone total colectomy and J-pouch ileanal anastomosis subsequent to diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis five years previously was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of severe abdominal pain of a four-day duration. Physical examination revealed widespread tenderness throughout the abdomen, especially in the lower quadrant. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed fluid between intestinal loops and computed tomography revealed free air and fluid in the abdomen. During laparotomy to expand the ileal J-pouch to approximately 12 cm in diameter, a 2-mm perforation was detected in the blind end of the ileal J-pouch. The perforation was repaired primarily and protective ileostomy was performed. During postoperative endoscopy, neither obstruction nor stasis was observed, but pouchitis was observed in the ileal J-pouch. The patient was postoperatively discharged on the 20th day and followed endoscopically. The endoscopic findings were normal in the sixth month postsurgery.

  16. Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

  17. Stabilizing in situ oil shale retorts with injected grout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-03-01

    A retort grouting process has been developed which would solve certain problems associated with in situ recovery of crude oil by retorting oil shale, such as surface subsidence, disturbance of groundwater flow, and accumulation of spent shale at the surface. Essentially, the process consists of using the spent shale to make a grout that can be injected into the retort after processing is completed. Bench-scale experiments using a high-temperature process show that grout can be prepared with sufficient strength, mobility, and permeability to stabilize processed in situ oil shale retorts. By reducing the need for surface disposal of spent shale and by increasing the quantity of shale that can be retorted in a given area, the grouting method should significantly improve the economics of the oil recovery process while also offering environmental advantages over surface processing of the shale.

  18. Stress distribution and pillar design in oil shale retorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. S.; Thill, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design of retort interchamber pillars is important in determining surface stability over in situ retort mines and to the health and safety of miners, particularly with respect to possible escape of heat and toxic gases from retort chambers. Stress distribution in retort interchamber pillars, roof, and floor was examined with the aid of linear, finite-element analysis using data from experimentally determined mechanical properties. Properties determined included elastic moduli, strength, and creep constants in laboratory tests on core covering a 100-foot depth interval in the oil shale from the Piceance Basin in Colorado. The most critical stress concentration was found in the rib side of the interchamber pillar at a height above the floor line of 1.25 times the width. Guidelines for pillar design that consider pillar strength, creep, and retorting temperature effects are proposed.

  19. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts § 57.22401 Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). (a) Retorts shall be provided with— (1) Two independent power...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts § 57.22401 Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). (a) Retorts shall be provided with— (1) Two independent power...

  1. Method for controlling void fraction distribution in an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1984-04-17

    A method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a retort site in a subterranean formation is provided. The in situ oil shale retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of oil shale particles formed within top, bottom, and side boundaries of the retort site. At least one void is excavated in the subterranean formation within the boundaries of the retort site, while a zone of unfragmented formation is left within the boundaries of the retort site adjacent such a void. An inlet is formed in a zone of the retort adjacent the intersection of a first side boundary of the retort site and the top boundary of the retort site and an outlet is formed in a zone of the retort adjacent the intersection of a second side boundary of the retort site and the bottom boundary of the retort site. The second side boundary is on the opposite side of the retort site from the first side boundary. An array of explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation and the charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of formation toward the void for forming the fragmented mass within the boundaries of the retort site. The explosive charge pattern and detonation sequence are provided so that the fragmented mass formed has a lower void fraction in a center region of the retort and a higher void fraction in regions of the retort adjacent the side boundaries.

  2. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts § 57.22401 Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). (a) Retorts shall be provided with— (1) Two independent power...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts § 57.22401 Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). (a) Retorts shall be provided with— (1) Two independent power...

  4. Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

    1986-09-16

    A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

  5. Models of inflammation: carrageenan air pouch.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2012-03-01

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, and the oxidative stress response. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. Technical aspects of ileoanal pouch surgery.

    PubMed

    Carne, Peter W G; Pemberton, John H

    2004-02-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical procedure of choice for chronic ulcerative colitis. Since the initial description of the technique, various modifications have facilitated its evolution into a safe operation with excellent long-term outcomes. However, some aspects of the operation remain contentious. Our aim is to describe the technical aspects of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and review the current literature in the areas of controversy.

  7. Method and apparatus for retorting a substance containing organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, B.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of an apparatus for converting a substance containing organic matter into hydrocarbon vapors and solids residue comprising: (A) a fluidized bed housing having an upstream end and a downstream end; (B) a substantially cylindrical retort, extending through and stationary relative to said fluidized bed housing and having an upstream end and a downstream end, each end being outside of said housing, the longitudinal axis of said retort being substantially parallel to a horizontal plane; (C) feeding means for feeding the substance containing organic matter into said retort, said feeding means communicating with the upstream portion of said retort; (D) means located within said retort for moving the substance containing organic matter from the upstream portion of said retort to the downstream portion thereof; (E) solids residue removing means for removing solids residue from said retort, said solids residue removing means communicating with the downstream portion of said retort; (F) solids residue introducing means for introducing said solids residue removed from said retort into said fluidized bed housing to employ said solids residue as particles of a fluidized bed, one end of said introducing means communicating with said solids residue removing means and the other end therof communicating with the upper upstream portion of said fluidized bed housing; (G) solids residue extracting means for extracting solids residue from said fluidized bed housing and communicating with the lower downstream portion fluidized bed housing; (H) fluidizing menas for maintaining within said fluidized bed housing a fluidized bed of heated particles of solids residue with which to heat said retort; (I) heating means for heating the particles; (J) hydrocarbon vapors removing means.

  8. Antimicrobial Protection of Marsupial Pouch Young

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Marsupials diverged from eutherian mammals about 148 million years ago and represent a unique lineage of mammals with distinctive morphological and reproductive characteristics. Marsupials have significantly shorter gestation periods than eutherians. Pregnancy typically ranges from 15 to 35 days, with young being born at a very early developmental stage and lacking differentiated lymphoid tissues and mature effector cells. Recent microbiome studies of the marsupial pouch revealed that marsupial young can face intense microbial challenges after birth, as the pouch contains a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobials are believed to play a significant role in the immune protection of marsupial newborns during their pouch life. The skin of the post-reproductive pouch secretes antimicrobial lysozyme and dermcidin, which may contribute to the decreased density of certain bacteria in the pouch. A range of antimicrobial agents, such as immunoglobulins, lysozyme, transferrin, and cathelicidins, have been identified in marsupial milk. Antimicrobial assays have revealed that marsupial cathelicidins have broad-spectrum activity against a variety of bacteria and fungi, including several multi-drug resistant strains. In this article, we will review the action mechanisms of these antimicrobial compounds and discuss how they protect marsupial newborns from potentially pathogenic bacteria inside the pouch. We will also discuss the potential of marsupial antimicrobial compounds as a source of novel antibiotics. PMID:28326070

  9. Bench-scale simulation of quenching and stabilization of MIS retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.; Boysen, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate in situ retort stabilization methods. The objective of the bench-scale simulations was to evaluate possible post-retorting operating procedures for the optimum cleaning of spent retorts. After simulating conditions of modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the time retorting had ended, procedures to accelerate retort cleanup without using large volumes of water were investigated. Samples from various levels of the retort were used to determine the amount of water-soluble constituents in the spent shale and the rehydration characteristics of the spent shale.

  10. Bench-scale simulation of quenching and stabilization of MIS retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A. ); Boysen, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate in situ retort stabilization methods. The objective of the bench-scale simulations was to evaluate possible post-retorting operating procedures for the optimum cleaning of spent retorts. After simulating conditions of modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the time retorting had ended, procedures to accelerate retort cleanup without using large volumes of water were investigated. Samples from various levels of the retort were used to determine the amount of water-soluble constituents in the spent shale and the rehydration characteristics of the spent shale.

  11. Combuston method of oil shale retorting

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., John B.; Reeves, Adam A.

    1977-08-16

    A gravity flow, vertical bed of crushed oil shale having a two level injection of air and a three level injection of non-oxygenous gas and an internal combustion of at least residual carbon on the retorted shale. The injection of air and gas is carefully controlled in relation to the mass flow rate of the shale to control the temperature of pyrolysis zone, producing a maximum conversion of the organic content of the shale to a liquid shale oil. The parameters of the operation provides an economical and highly efficient shale oil production.

  12. Fluid outlet at the bottom of an in-situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, N.M.

    1984-04-03

    Formation is excavated from within the boundaries of a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming at least one retort level void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving at least one remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site. A production level drift is excavated below the retort level void, leaving a lower zone of unfragmented formation between the retort level void and the production level drift. A plurality of raises are formed between the production level drift and the retort level void for providing product withdrawal passages distributed generally uniformly across the horizontal cross section of the retort level void. The product withdrawal passages are backfilled with a permeable mass of particles. Explosive placed within the remaining zone of unfragmented formation above the retort level void is detonated for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward at least the retort level void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale within the boundaries of the retort site. During retorting operations products of retorting are conducted from the fragmented mass in the retort through the product withdrawal passages to the production level void. The products are withdrawn from the production level void.

  13. Fluid outlet at the bottom of an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Hutchins, Ned M.

    1984-01-01

    Formation is excavated from within the boundaries of a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming at least one retort level void extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving at least one remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site. A production level drift is excavated below the retort level void, leaving a lower zone of unfragmented formation between the retort level void and the production level drift. A plurality of raises are formed between the production level drift and the retort level void for providing product withdrawal passages distributed generally uniformly across the horizontal cross section of the retort level void. The product withdrawal passages are backfilled with a permeable mass of particles. Explosive placed within the remaining zone of unfragmented formation above the retort level void is detonated for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward at least the retort level void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale within the boundaries of the retort site. During retorting operations products of retorting are conducted from the fragmented mass in the retort through the product withdrawal passages to the production level void. The products are withdrawn from the production level void.

  14. Characterization and treatment of oil shale retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Torpy, M.F.; Raphaelian, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's research in the treatment and environmental control of oil shale retort waste water is described. It consists of 3 tasks: characterization, treatment, and engineering design and cost analysis. The comprehensive study is pragmatic to the extent it addresses critical issues that the oil shale industry must ultimately address for its production planning and permit acquisition. Results indicate that total organic carbon can be reduced by at least 90% in the Oxy-6 retort water. Retort water quality varies, and proven methods in the case of treating Oxy-6 retort water should be tested with other retort waters before generalized biological treatment techniques are adopted. The problem of maintaining sample quality over short and long periods of time may be an additional variable in treatment studies and should be minimized, when possible. Reuse of the biologically treated retort water for some purposes may require additional treatment to reduce the high concentrations of inorganic residual and organic constituents. The extent of reuse after organic carbon and inorganic residual reduction can be identified only by evaluating the necessary quality required for particular reuse purposes. A continued research program in water treatment, and especially in retort water reuse, is essential to the acceptability of the oil shale industry in the arid and relatively undeveloped region of the western states.

  15. Plant for retorting oil products contained in shales and sands

    SciTech Connect

    Roma, C.

    1982-07-20

    A plant is described for continuously retorting oil products contained in shales and sands comprising a substantially horizontal retort furnace into which said shales and sands are introduced by means of hoppers and metering devices and placed on metal conveyors moving in counter-current to gases. Means are provided for placing shales and sands onto conveyors with a suitable thickness and for stirring the shales and sands. One or more combustion chambers are arranged outside the retort furnace for producing hot gases, and one or more input zones are located along the retort furnace for admitting hot gases into the retort furnace, causing the hot gases to mix with circulating gases which have been preheated by removing sensible heat from the exhausted shale and sand material. A direct contact condenser at the furnace head utilizes cold fluid to condense distilled oil products, and a decantation tank is arranged beneath the condenser for freeing the process gases from the dust. Uncondensed gases containing carbon dioxide, hydrogen, high hydrocarbon fractions, nitrogen and steam are recycled into the retort. Condensed oils from said distillation step, as well as oil drawn from the tunnel retort in liquid phase, are decanted and submitted to successive treatments.

  16. Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Thomas F.; Moore, Dennis F.

    1984-01-01

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  17. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  18. Mathematical modeling of oil mist formation, deposition, and drainage during oil shale retorting

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    A mathematical model of oil mist formation and deposition, and liquid oil drainage during retorting has been formulated. The model was incorporated into the one-dimensional model of oil shale retorting developed by Braun. In this report a description of the development of the model is given. Results of a simulation of a batch retort are presented and compared with results from Braun's original model. The model predicts the expected physical behavior of liquid oil in a retort: accumulation in the cooler sections of the retort by deposition of mist, downward flow by gravity after a residual saturation is reached, and evaporation of residual oil as the retort front moves through the retort. The model is applicable both to modified in situ retorts and to surface batch retorts. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Disconnection, pouch revision and reconnection of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, P M; Dozois, R R; Wolff, B G; Kelly, K A

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the outcome of patients with a dysfunctional pelvic ileal reservoir in whom disconnection of an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA), pouch revision and reanastomosis had been carried out. There were 23 patients (15 women). At the revision operation functional problems were found to be due to a long efferent spout (nine patients), sepsis and/or fistula (four), a redundant blind limb (three), a twisted pouch (three), anastomotic problems (three) or no reservoir (one). The pouch was salvaged in 16 patients and a new pouch was constructed in seven. The pouch-anal anastomosis was resutured in 22 patients and stapled in one. Postoperative complications (all minor) occurred in six patients. Two patients underwent two revision of IPAA. At a median follow-up of 5 (range 1-10) years, 11 patients reported good to excellent function, five reported fair function and one reported recurrent pouchitis. Revision surgery was unsuccessful in six of 23 patients (three had gross incontinence, two excessive bowel movements and one Crohn's disease), and they subsequently underwent pouch excision. It is concluded that revision of an ileal reservoir and IPAA can be undertaken safely with good results in carefully selected patients.

  20. Method for controlling void in an in-situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.

    1984-04-03

    Liquid and gaseous products are recovered from an in-situ oil shale retort formed in a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. A void is excavated in the subterranean formation within the boundaries of the retort site and a zone of unfragmented formation is left in the retort site adjacent the void. A retort inlet is at one upper edge of the retort site and a retort outlet is at the lower edge of the retort site opposite the retort inlet. Explosive charges are placed in the zone of unfragmented formation and detonated in an asymmetrical time delay sequence for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles which substantially fills the retort to the top boundary in the region of the retort inlet. A combustion zone is formed in the fragmented permeable mass adjacent the inlet and a retort inlet mixture comprising an oxygen-supplying gas is introduced into the fragmented mass for sustaining the combustion zone and advancing the combustion zone diagonally through the fragmented mass from the inlet toward the outlet. A retorting zone is on the advancing side of the combustion zone for producing liquid and gaseous products and the liquid and gaseous products are withdrawn through the retort outlet.

  1. In vivo cytogenetic effects of oil shale retort process waters.

    PubMed

    Meyne, J; Deaven, L L

    1982-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic effects by oil shale retort process waters from 3 types of pilot plant retorts were examined in murine bone marrow. Each of the process waters induced increased frequencies of structural aberrations in mice treated with 3 daily intraperitoneal injections of the waters. The same treatment had no effect on the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. Mice given a 1% solution of an above-ground retort water ad libitum for 8 weeks consumed about 1 ml/kg per day of the process water and had a frequency of aberrations comparable to mice given the same dose intraperitoneally for 3 days. Transplacental exposure of C3H mouse embryos indicated that clastogenic compounds in the above-ground retort process water can cross the placenta and induce chromosomal aberrations in embryonic tissues.

  2. Fourth branchial pouch sinus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, R M; Biller, H F

    1991-07-01

    The fourth branchial pouch sinus (FBPS) is a rare translaryngeal anomaly with diverse manifestations, including neonatal stridor and recurrent deep neck infection. Review of the world literature reveals 23 reports of sinuses consistent with fourth pouch origin. We present two additional cases, including the only example of a right-sided FBPS. Retrograde excision, beginning at the piriform apex, ensures complete removal of the tract and protection of the recurrent nerve. The posterior border of the thyroid ala must be resected or retracted for adequate exposure. Failure to remove the translaryngeal portion of the tract almost guarantees recurrence.

  3. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan Air Pouch.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-03-18

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study the components of acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, the oxidative stress response, and potential therapeutic targets for treating inflammation. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. 2. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. THE RETORT HOUSE IS LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. THE RETORT HOUSE IS LOCATED DIRECTLY BEHIND THE GABLED PORTION OF OF THE 1859 FACADE ADDITION. THE COAL STORAGE FACILITY/BOILER HOUSE IS TO THE RIGHT OF THE RETORT HOUSE. THE OFFICES ARE IN THE THE THREE STORY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, TO THE RIGHT OF THE 1859 FACADE. - Buffalo Gas Light Company, 249 West Genesee Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  5. Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Kvapil, R.

    1983-05-31

    A retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is prepared for in situ retorting by excavating a void space in the retort site and then explosively expanding at least a portion of the remainder of the formation within the retort site toward the void space. The resultant fragmented mass explosively expanded toward the void space will be permeabilized by the void volume of the void space. The void space is initially formed by excavating at least three substantially parallel drifts through the retort site. At least two of the drifts are along opposed outside edges of the retort site and at least one drift is intermediate the two outside drifts. Excavation of the void space is conducted from the two outside drifts. A vertically extending slot is first excavated from each such drift upwardly into the proposed void space at one end of the retort site. The slot may be fanned above the drift so that the slots from the two outside drifts meet near the top of the void space. Upwardly extending shot holes are then drilled from each of the outside drifts parallel to the vertical slot. If the vertical slot is fanned, it is desirable to also drill the upwardly extending shot holes in a fanned pattern. The shot holes are then loaded with explosive and blasted and the resultant rubble excavated through the outside drifts. By gradually working along the length of the outside drifts, excavation of the void space can proceed with men and equipment safely within the outside drifts. The substantially triangular prism remaining in the void space intermediate the edges of the retort site can then be fragmented by means of shot holes drilled from the third intermediate drift extending through such prism.

  6. Organic solute profile of water from Rio Blanco Retort 1

    SciTech Connect

    Poulson, R.E.; Clark, J.A.; Borg, H.M.

    1985-12-01

    Two water samples were taken from the Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's Retort 1 more than three years after shutdown of the retort burn. The retort had received considerable flushing. These water samples were screened and profiled chromatographically to ascertain the character of the 20 to 30 ppM total organic carbon remaining in each. The waters were found to contain only organophilic solutes above the one-part-per-billion level. Special detection methods with part-per-billion detection limits for selected hydrophilic indicators proved negative for those indicators. Selected indicators ranged from the most hydrophilic (alkanoic acids, alkylamines, and amides) to the least (phenol). The principal species readily identified by either gas chromatography or reversed-phase liquid chromatography were the light polyalkylpyridines and the polyalkylphenols. The two principal individual compounds detected in each water were 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol. The approximate concentrations of each were 200 ppb for a sample taken from the retort center and 400 ppb for a sample taken from the bottom level. It appears that there is a residual oil reservoir in the retort serving as a source of organophilic solutes. Any organic material now passing out of the retort would be highly organophilic and predisposed to deposit on even slightly hydrophobic surfaces such as oil shale or retorted oil shale. Based on the observations in this report, hydrophilic organic solutes may be presumed to be the key indicators for the interaction between oil shale in situ retort effluent and the surrounding environment. Timely monitoring of such sites and development of highly sensitive detection techniques for this class of materials would permit accurate description of migration pathways. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Modifications to a cyclone oil shale retorting concept

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, H.C.; Harak, A.E.

    1989-10-01

    A system for utilizing oil shale fines, in which the fines, instead of being rejected as wastes, are crushed even finer and then are used in a cyclone retort is described. This patented process uses high combustion temperature that removes all of the organic material from the spent shale and converts it into an inert, granulated slag. The primary advantages of this retorting system over more conventional aboveground retorting processes are the ability to use finely divided oil shales as charge stock and the production of an essentially inert slag from the retorted shale. A series of calculations were made to evaluate variations of the original concept. The original process design was based on a cyclone furnace temperature of 2800{degree}F and the use of hot combustion gases as the retorting medium. A recent study of retorted and burned oil shale properties showed that molten slag could be produced at temperatures lower than 2800{degree}F; therefore, additional calculations were made using a furnace temperature of 2300{degree}F. 11 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Method of forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Studebaker, I.G.

    1984-01-03

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale and having a substantially vertically extending first cleavage plane set and a substantially vertically extending second cleavage plane set intersecting the first set. The dispersion of the individual cleavage planes in the first and second cleavage plane sets is determined. The in situ retort is formed by excavating a vertical slot-shaped void within the boundaries of the retort site, leaving a remaining portion of the unfragmented formation within the retort site which is to be explosively expanded toward the slot. The unfragmented formation adjacent the slot has a pair of longer vertical free faces substantially aligned with the cleavage plane set having the lower dispersion. A pair of shorter vertical side walls of the slot can extend substantially perpendicular to the cleavage plane set having the lower dispersion. Explosive placed in such remaining formation adjacent the slot is detonated to fracture formation along cleavage planes in the first and second cleavage plane sets and to expand such remaining formation within the retort site toward the slot, forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale within the retort site.

  9. Triangular blasting into limited voids for vertical free face retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1981-04-21

    Oil shale formation is explosively expanded toward a limited void volume for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. In one embodiment, the retort is formed by excavating a narrow vertical slot diagonally across a retort site of rectangular horizontal crosssection, leaving separate triangular zones of unfragmented formation within the retort site on opposite sides of the diagonal slot. Explosive is placed in a plurality of vertical blasting holes drilled in each triangular zone of formation, and such explosive is detonated for explosively expanding formation within the triangular zones toward vertical free faces adjacent the slot for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. Detonation of explosive in the blasting holes expands separate wedge-shaped segments of formation toward the diagonal slot, owing to the natural cratering effect of each blast, causing the wedge-shaped segments being expanded to conform generally to the side boundaries of each triangular zone, and producing reasonably good fragmentation and movement of expanded formation toward the slot from formation throughout the retort site. Several such slots can be employed in forming a retort.

  10. True in-situ oil retort: the role of intrashale transport and char gasification and an analysis of retort performance

    SciTech Connect

    Louvar, J.F.; Crowl, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    This study expands the theoretical understanding of the true in situ crack retort process for Eastern oil shale by (a) establishing the role of intrashale 2-dimensional transport on the performance of the retort, (b) determining the significance of the intrashale char gasification reactions with water and carbon dioxide, and (c) analyzing the performance characteristics of a theoretical true in-situ retort process for Eastern oil shale and establishing conditions for improving the retort performance. Two computer simulation models were developed and evaluated, one with 1-D mass transport and another with 2-D mass transport. The 1-D transport model featured instantaneous 1-D transfer of the pyrolysis products to the crack. The 2-D transport model featured 2-D species transport within the oil shale, and pyrolysis, gasification, and oxidation reactions within the oil shale.

  11. Method for forming a module of in-situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, N.M.

    1984-04-03

    A module of in-situ oil shale retorts are formed in a row of retort sites in a subterranean formation. Each retort has top, bottom, and side boundaries of unfragmented formation and contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles. Two cross drifts are excavated through the retort sites along the row. One of the drifts is at a lower elevation near the floor of voids to be formed in the retort sites and along one side boundary of the retort sites. The other drift ramps upwardly at an end of the row for extending through the retort sites at a higher elevation near the roof of the voids excavated in the retort sites and along the opposite side boundaries of the retort sites. A horizontally extending slice is excavated at the elevation of the higher drift extending substantially to the side boundaries of a retort site for commencing a void within the retort site. The balance of the void is formed by benching from the slice to the elevation of the lower drift. This leaves at least one zone of unfragmented formation remaining in the retort site with a horizontally extending free face adjacent to the void. Such a zone of formation is explosively expanded toward the void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the retort.

  12. Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, A.E.

    1984-04-10

    A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

  13. Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Alex E.

    1984-01-01

    A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

  14. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or reexportation... technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to Sudan via...

  15. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or reexportation... technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to Sudan via...

  16. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or reexportation... technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to Sudan via...

  17. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or reexportation... technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to Sudan via...

  18. 31 CFR 538.516 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Sudan, or the exportation from the United States to Sudan, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation or reexportation... technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to Sudan via...

  19. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale, or... goods or technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to...

  20. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale, or... goods or technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to...

  1. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale, or... goods or technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to...

  2. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale, or... goods or technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to...

  3. 31 CFR 560.521 - Diplomatic pouches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorized: (a) The importation into the United States from Iran, or the exportation from the United States to Iran, of diplomatic pouches and their contents; and (b) The exportation, reexportation, sale, or... goods or technology to a third-country government, or to its contractors or agents, for shipment to...

  4. Inflammatory pouch disease: The spectrum of pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    Zezos, Petros; Saibil, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the operation of choice for medically refractory ulcerative colitis (UC), for UC with dysplasia, and for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). IPAA can be a treatment option for selected patients with Crohn’s colitis without perianal and/or small bowel disease. The term “pouchitis” refers to nonspecific inflammation of the pouch and is a common complication in patients with IPAA; it occurs more often in UC patients than in FAP patients. This suggests that the pathogenetic background of UC may contribute significantly to the development of pouchitis. The symptoms of pouchitis are many, and can include increased bowel frequency, urgency, tenesmus, incontinence, nocturnal seepage, rectal bleeding, abdominal cramps, and pelvic discomfort. The diagnosis of pouchitis is based on the presence of symptoms together with endoscopic and histological evidence of inflammation of the pouch. However, “pouchitis” is a general term representing a wide spectrum of diseases and conditions, which can emerge in the pouch. Based on the etiology we can sub-divide pouchitis into 2 groups: idiopathic and secondary. In idiopathic pouchitis the etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, while in secondary pouchitis there is an association with a specific causative or pathogenetic factor. Secondary pouchitis can occur in up to 30% of cases and can be classified as infectious, ischemic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced, collagenous, autoimmune-associated, or Crohn’s disease. Sometimes, cuffitis or irritable pouch syndrome can be misdiagnosed as pouchitis. Furthermore, idiopathic pouchitis itself can be sub-classified into types based on the clinical pattern, presentation, and responsiveness to antibiotic treatment. Treatment differs among the various forms of pouchitis. Therefore, it is important to establish the correct diagnosis in order to select the appropriate treatment and further

  5. Retortable Laminate/Polymeric Food Tubes for Specialized Feeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    11  4.3  Spouted Pouch Packaging Equipment...13  Spouted Pouch Packaging Equipment...phenolic resin to prevent food particles from reacting with the aluminum tube resulting in spoilage or degradation. The bottom end of the tubes has a

  6. Characterization of Commercial Li-ion Cells in Pouch Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The li-ion pouch design cells exhibit similar behavior under off-nominal conditions as those in metal cans that do not have the internal safety devices. Safety should be well characterized before batteries are designed. Some of the li-ion pouch cell designs studied in this program reacted most violently to overcharge conditions at the medium rates but were tolerant to overcharge at very low rates. Some pouch cell designs have higher tolerance to vacuum exposures than some others. A comparison of the pouch material itself does not show a correlation between this tolerance and the number of layers or composition of the pouch indicating that this is a property of the electrode stack design inside the pouch. Reduced pressure (8 to 10 psi) test environments show that the extent of capacity degradation under reduced pressure environments is much less than that observed under vacuum conditions. Lithium-ion Pouch format cells are not necessarily true polymer cells.

  7. 77 FR 25206 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Underground Retorts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Retorts AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Request for public comments. SUMMARY... safety and health of miners. Title 30 CFR 57.22401 sets forth the safety requirements for using a retort.... The standard requires that prior to ignition of underground retort; mine operators must submit...

  8. Apparatus for controlling condensate level in steam retort

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, E.D.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for controlling the level of steam condensate in a steam retort comprising: drain valve means operable to regulate drainage of the condensate from the retort; and control means for operating the drain valve means in response to the condensate level in the retort, the control means comprising: sensing means for providing a first signal when condensate rises to a predetermined level to effect opening of the drain valve means and for providing a second signal when condensate falls below the predetermined level to effect closing of the drain valve means; the sensing means comprising magnetic float switch means comprising: a non-magnetic steam having a chamber therein and extendable into the steam retort in a fixed position; a magnetic reed switch disposed within the chamber in the stem; means for mounting the reed switch in a fixed position within the stem; a float movably mounted exteriorly of the steam and movable in response to the level of the condensate in the steam retort; and a magnet connected to the float and movable in response thereto for effecting operation of the reed switch.

  9. Method for igniting an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1983-01-25

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale which is ignited by introducing fuel and air through a passage leading to the fragmented mass. The amount of air provided is in the range of from about 1/3 more than the amount of air required to stoichiometrically combine with the fuel to about twice the amount of air required to stoichiometrically combine with the fuel. The fuel/air mixture is ignited and hot combustion gases pass downwardly into the fragmented mass. The hot combustion gases heat oil shale particles above the self-ignition temperature of such particles, thereby forming a primary combustion zone in the fragmented mass. Introduction of fuel is discontinued when the concentration of oxygen in off gas from the retort decreases to below a first selected value. The surface of the fragmented mass is cooled and then fuel is re-introduced into the retort, forming a secondary combustion zone below the surface of the fragmented mass for spreading the primary combustion zone. When the concentration of oxygen in off gas from the retort decreases below a second selected value, the secondary combustion zone is extinguished.

  10. [J-pouch after total gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Prete, F; Montemurro, S; Rucci, A; Rinaldi, S; Liguori, P

    1992-04-01

    The Authors report their initial experience with the construction of a J-pouch as restorative surgery following total gastrectomy (TG) for malignant neoplasms. In the last 10 months of the 1990 upon 52 interventions for gastric cancer 31 TG were performed, and in 13 cases a J-pouch on the proximal end of the jejunal segment was constructed. No mortality or specific morbidity was registered using the totally stapled technique. Within one month 3/4 of the patients had normal meals as far as quantity and quality; also the foamy regurgitation seemed to be minimal. The ease of the reconstructive technique and the short term results obtained encourage the use of such approach.

  11. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The burn of Retort 17 was terminated December 10. Retort 18 was ignited November 12. Retort 17 produced 510 bbl during the quarter for the total of 3,775 bbl, while Retort 18 produced 1,187 bbl. The shale oil was analyzed. Environmental studies were done.

  12. Application of HTGR process heat to oil shale retorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadekamper, D. C.; Taylor, I. N.; Gleason, T. E.

    The currently developed oil shale retorting processes depend on some portion of their product to provide heat energy for process operation. In an attempt to increase the fossil fuel reserves of the United States, as well as decrease environmental pollution, it has been suggested that an High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) be used to supply the heat necessary for the retorting oil shale thus freeing additional petroleum products for sale. The TOSCO II process was selected as a typical oil shale retorting process and a detailed evaluation of the energy requirements was made. Various scenarios to replace selected portions of the process energy requirements with HTGR generated heat are described. The improvements in product yields and reductions in environmental pollution levels associated with a HTGR process heat scheme are summarized.

  13. Control technology for in-situ oil-shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1983-03-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate control technologies for groundwater pollution resulting from leaching of modified in-situ spent shale. Preliminary engineering analysis was used to identify control technologies which were technically feasible and cost-effective. Process modification, intentional leaching, and retort grouting were further evaluated using numerical modeling and experimental techniques. Numerical simulation of the geohydrology at tracts C-a and C-b was used to determine the flow regime during and after processing, the amount of water available from dewatering, and the time scale of groundwater reinvasion. It was found that reinvasion would take over 200 years and that dewatering flows would probably be insufficient to satisfy water requirements for retort grouting. The formulation of low-cost grouts based on surface-retorted spent shale was studied experimentally. A high-strength hydraulic cement was produced by calcining Lurgi spent shale with an equal amount of CaCO/sub 3/ at 1000 C for 1 h. Electrical conductivity measurements indicated that the leachate from a grouted retort would be more concentrated than that from an ungrouted retort, but the increase in concentration would be more than offset by the reduction in flow. A standard flow-cone test used for grouting of preplaced aggregate concrete was used as the criterion for grout fluidity. This criterion was achieved by inclusion of either 33 percent sand or 0.25 percent lignosulfonate fluidizer in the grout. These grouts were found to be Casson fluids with yield stress values about 60 dyne/cm/sup 2/. Intentional leaching of MIS retorts was evaluated by developing a mass-transfer model of the leaching process. The model was experimentally verified for total organic carbon and used to calculate that 2.1 to 3.4 pore volumes would be needed to reduce leachate concentrations to 10 percent of their initial value.

  14. Testing and performance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg retort

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Girvin, D.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Nelson, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes and discusses the design, construction, calibration and operations of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) 6-kg retort. Use of this retort will help determine the distribution and speciation of Hg, As, Se, and Cd compounds as a function of retorting parameters in shale oil, retort water, and offgas. The first test consisted of heating the oil shale to 500/sup 0/C with a 100% nitrogen (N/sub 2/) sweep gas. Results of this test demonstrated that the system operates as designed; only two minor modifications were necessary to achieve satisfactory operation of the retort. 2 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  15. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in-situ oil-shale-retorting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costimiris, E. C.

    1982-07-01

    The objective of the Geokinetics in situ shale oil project is to develop a true in situ process for recovering shale oil using a fire front moving in a horizontal direction. The project is conducted at a field site, Kamp Kerogen, Utah. During 1981, one full sized retort was blasted and the following three retorts were processed: (1) retort No. 24 operations were continued until July 23; (2) retort No. 23 was ignited and processed during the calendar year; (3) retort No. 25 was ignited and burned for 77 days during 1981.

  16. Reaction kinetics and diagnostics for oil-shale retorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, A. K.

    1981-10-01

    The advances in pyrolysis chemistry and kinetics and the resulting diagnostic methods based on effluent products for determining retort performance were reviewed. Kerogen pyrolysis kinetics and stoichiometry were generalized by further measurements on a larger number of samples. Analysis by capillary colunn gas chromatography of shale oil samples produced under a variety of field and laboratory conditions resulted in a method for determining the oil yield from a combustion retort. Measurement of sulfur products under a variety of conditions led to an understanding sulfur reactions both those of processing and environmental importance. Equations for estimating the heat of combustion of spent shale were developed by understanding oil shale composition and reactions.

  17. In-situ laser retorting of oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Oil shale formations are retorted in situ and gaseous hydrocarbon products are recovered by drilling two or more wells into an oil shale formation underneath the surface of the ground. A high energy laser beam is directed into the well and fractures the region of the shale formation. A compressed gas is forced into the well that supports combustion in the flame front ignited by the laser beam, thereby retorting the oil shale. Gaseous hydrocarbon products which permeate through the fractured region are recovered from one of the wells that were not exposed to the laser system.

  18. Heat penetration characteristics and physico-chemical properties of in-pouch processed dairy dessert (kheer).

    PubMed

    Jha, Alok; Patel, A A; Gopal, T K Srinivasa; Ravishankar, C N

    2014-10-01

    Kheer, a traditional milk product of South East Asia, containing cooked rice grains in a creamy sweetened concentrated milk, has no large-scale production due to its poor shelf life. Shelf-life was improved by development of a process based on in-pouch thermal processing employing a rotary retort. Product development included optimization of rice-to-milk solids ratio (0.18-0.52) and total milk solids levels (16-26 %) to simulate the conventional product in taste, appearance and textural attributes. Various Fo values (12.4-14.8) were examined with regard to product quality. While the TBA value tended to increase (0.073-0.081) the reflectance value (35.3-43.4) declined with increasing Fo. The pH of the product (6.04-6.10) showed a slight tendency to increase with Fo. Sensorily, the product was found to be acceptable for a period of 150 days at 37 °C.

  19. Pollution control technical manual: modified 'in situ' oil shale retorting combined with Lurgi surface retorting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The oil shale PCTM for Modified In Situ Oil Shale Retorting combined with Lurgi Surface Retorting addresses the application of this combination of technologies to the development of oil shale resources in the western United States. This manual describes the combined plant using Lurgi surface retorting technology (developed by Lurgi Kohle and Mineralotechnik GmbH, West Germany) and the Modified In Situ process (developed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.) proposed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. and Tenneco Shale Oil Company for use in the development of their Federal oil shale lease Tract C-b in western Colorado. Since details regarding waste streams and control technologies for the Lurgi process are presented in a separate PCTM, this document focuses principally on the Modified In Situ process.

  20. Stability control in underground working adjacent an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Th. E.

    1985-07-30

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in spaced-apart rows, with adjacent rows of such retorts being separated by load-bearing inter-retort pillars of unfragmented formation sufficiently strong for preventing substantial subsidence. Each retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. An air level drift is excavated in formation directly above the inter-retort pillar so that the roof and/or floor of the air level drift is spaced above the upper boundaries of the retorts in such adjacent rows. This causes the roof of the air level drift to be in compression, rather than in tension, which stabilizes the roof and avoids dangerous rock falls. During retorting operations, air is introduced at the upper edge of each retort through lateral air inlet passages sloping downwardly from the air level drift. Off gas and liquid products are withdrawn from each retort through a production level passage at the bottom of each report at the edge opposite the air inlet. The production level passages connect to a main production level drift extending between adjacent rows of retors. The roof of the main production level drift is excavated in fgormation directly below the inter-retort pillar so that the roof of of the production level drift is spaced below the lower boundaries of the retorts in adjacent rows. This places the roof of the production level drift in compression, avoiding the likelihood of rock falls.

  1. In situ oil shale retorting: water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.A.

    1981-03-10

    Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company completed the first burn on their modified in-situ system located in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Gas stream analyses were performed using a small computerized mass spectrometer. These analyses were made continuously from a sample line originating at the off-gas knockout drum. In addition, the feasibility of determining trace sulfur gases in this mixture was tested. The mass spectrometer has a detection limit of about 5 ppM for a typical trace component in air or other simple gas matrix. However, because of the complex organic matrix composing the oil shale gas, it becomes very difficult to positively identify most trace components at this low ppM level. The sulfur gases which have the fewest interferences include H/sub 2/S, COS, CH/sub 3/SH and SO/sub 2/. These gases can be determined at approximatey the 15 to 25 ppM level. Mass spectrometric analysis of low- or sub-ppM level trace components in complex gas mixture would require pre-treatment of the gas such as concentration or separation to be effective. Positive identifications were made on H/sub 2/S, CH/sub 3/SH, COS and SO/sub 2/. Water samples were taken from five points in the Rio Blanco MIS process for organic characterization and toxicity screening. There was considerable variation in the toxicity of the retort waters relative to both time into the burn and the location of the sampling point. The scrubber water samples were more toxic than the other samples. This is most likely due to the higher pH of these samples. The east holding pond samples were not toxic. These samples represent an integrated sample set as all process waters are finally discharged into this holding pond.

  2. Static mixer retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    York, E.D.; Knepper, J.C.; Forgac, J.M.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a system for retorting oil shale, comprising: a static mixer having an upper free-fall section with a domed roof and a lower elongated deflector section. The deflector section having a greater diameter than the upper section, the static mixer having a vertical axis and having only stationary parts and components consisting of six vertically spaced tiers of triangular-shaped internals having upwardly pointing apexes in the deflector section, alternate tiers of the internals being spaced substantially parallel and at about right angles to adjacent tiers as viewed from the roof, the tiers extending substantially horizontally across the deflector section, the six tiers, as viewed from the roof, consisting of first and second tiers having only three triangular-shaped internals of substantially the same size, and third, fourth, fifth and sixth tiers positioned beneath the first and second tiers and having similarly sized triangular-shaped internals, the internals in the first and second tiers being smaller than the internals in the third through sixth tiers, the third and fourth tiers each having three triangular-shaped internals, the first through fourth tiers each having a center internal with an apex positioned substantially along the vertical axis, the first through fourth tiers each having outer internals with the apexes of the outer internals of the third and fourth tiers spaced laterally inwardly of the outer internals in the first and second tiers, the fifth and sixth tiers each having two intermediate triangular-shaped internals and two downwardly and inwardly sloping outer internals with the apexes of the intermediate internals being spaced outwardly and offset from the apexes of the center internals of the first through fourth tiers, the outer internals in the firth and sixth tiers being spaced outwardly from the outer internals in the third and fourth tiers.

  3. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... collection of fecal material or urine following an ileostomy, colostomy, or ureterostomy (a surgically... colostomy appliance, ostomy collector, colostomy pouch, urinary ileostomy bag, urine collecting...

  4. Method for assuring uniform combustion in an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1981-04-28

    A substantially flat combustion zone is established in a fragmented mass of particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. By igniting a portion of the mass of particles, a heated zone including a combustion zone is established in the retort. For a first period of time, an oxidizing gas is introduced into the retort and heated zone at a rate sufficient to advance the heated zone through the fragmented mass. The locus of the combustion zone is monitored to determine if the combustion zone is substantially flat. If the combustion zone is not substantially flat, introduction of oxidizing gas into the retort is reduced temporarily for a second period of time to a rate such that the flow of heated gas through the retort for retorting oil shale in a retorting zone on the advancing side of the combustion zone is substantially reduced for a sufficient time to appreciably flatten the heated zone. Thereafter, introduction of gas comprising an oxidizing gas to the retort is resumed at a sufficient rate to advance the heated zone through the fragmented mass. Off gas withdrawn from the retort during the second period of time can be enriched having a heating value of at least about 75 btu/scf, and often in excess of about 150 btu/scf. To produce such enriched off gas, introduction of gas into the retort can be temporarily reduced even when it is not necessary to establish a substantially flat combustion zone in the retort. This enriched off gas can be withdrawn from the top of the retort and can be used for igniting another retort or for sustaining a secondary combustion zone in another retort.

  5. Method of design for vertical oil shale retorting vessels and retorting therewith

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1978-01-03

    A method of designing the gas flow parameters of a vertical shaft oil shale retorting vessel involves determining the proportion of gas introduced in the bottom of the vessel and into intermediate levels in the vessel to provide for lateral distribution of gas across the vessel cross section, providing mixing with the uprising gas, and determining the limiting velocity of the gas through each nozzle. The total quantity of gas necessary for oil shale treatment in the vessel may be determined and the proportion to be injected into each level is then determined based on the velocity relation of the orifice velocity and its feeder manifold gas velocity. A limitation is placed on the velocity of gas issuing from an orifice by the nature of the solid being treated, usually physical tests of gas velocity impinging the solid.

  6. Repeat ileal pouch-anal anastomosis to salvage septic complications of pelvic pouches: clinical outcome and quality of life assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, V W; Wu, J S; Lavery, I C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of repeat ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for septic complications of pelvic pouch surgery; to assess the relationship between diagnosis and outcome; to assess quality of life after surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pelvic and perineal sepsis due to ileal pouch-anal anastomotic leaks frequently results in pouch loss. Many surgeons believe that pelvic sepsis and/or dense pelvic fibrosis makes salvage surgery unsafe or that pouches salvaged under these circumstances may not function well. As a result, there are few studies of pouch salvage procedures for septic indications. METHODS: The authors reviewed records of Cleveland Clinic Foundation patients who had undergone repeat IPAA surgery after septic complications from previous pelvic pouch surgery and who had completed at least 6 months of follow-up. Final diagnoses included ulcerative colitis (n = 22), Crohn's disease (n = 10), indeterminate colitis (n = 1), and familial polyposis (n = 2). Patients with functioning pouches were interviewed about functional problems and quality of life using an in-house questionnaire and the validated SF-36 Health Survey. RESULTS: Of 35 patients, 30 (86%) had a functioning pouch 6 months after repeat IPAA. In 4 patients, complications led to pouch removal or fecal diversion. One patient declined stoma closure. Of the patients with mucosal ulcerative colitis (MUC), 95% (21/22) had a functioning pouch 6 months after surgery. For patients with Crohn's disease (CD) 60% (6/10) have maintained a functioning pouch. Of the 30 patients with functioning pouches, 17 (57%) rated their quality of life as either "good" or "excellent," the remaining 13 (43%) selected "fair" or "poor." All said they would choose repeat IPAA surgery again. An SF-36 Health Survey completed by all patients with a functioning pouch at follow-up showed a mean physical component scale of 46.4 and a mean mental component scale of 47.6, scores well within the normal limit. CONCLUSIONS

  7. 1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort rings in foreground were once located in Engine Room Building. See photo WA-131-A-2. Building on left is Machine Shop. Boiler Building is in front of stack. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  8. Prenatal toxicology of shale oil retort water in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregg, C T; Tietjen, G; Hutson, J Y

    1981-01-01

    Shale oil retort water, a by-product of the production of oil from shale, potentially amounts to tens of millions of gallons per year and must be treated or recycled with regard for public health. Such retort water was given to 98 female ICR/DUB mice in their drinking water at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0% for periods up to 203 d. Seven of 75 treated animals developed adenomalike lesions that were not seen in the control animals. These ranged from adenomas and an adenomatoid nodule in the lung to the rectal adenocarcinoma. Although the incidence of adenomalike lesions was not statistically significant, this appearance of neoplasia requires further investigation. Eighty-five animals became pregnant. The proportion of animals pregnant, weights of nonpregnant animals, weight gain during pregnancy, average fetal weight, number of live fetuses per liter, and proportion of male fetuses were unaffected by drinking retort water. Early and late fetal deaths and preimplantation losses were likewise unaffected, except for a significant increase in preimplantation losses in animals consuming 1.0% retort water. A variety of palatal defects were seen in treated animals, however, including single and multiple cleft palates and a defect, to our knowledge not previously reported, in which the posterior portion of one or both palatal shelves appeared not to have formed. The palatal defects, as a group, were dose-dependent and statistically significant.

  9. 4. STRAIGHT ON VIEW OF CASTIRON RETORTS AT TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STRAIGHT ON VIEW OF CAST-IRON RETORTS AT TOP OF FURNACE SHOWING PORTION OF HOT BLAST STOVE AND TURNED HEAD. - Nassawango Iron Furnace, Furnace Road, 1.2 miles west of Maryland Route 12, Snow Hill, Worcester County, MD

  10. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR FLASHING MERCURY OFF OF GOLD TO CREATE SOFT INGOTS CALLED "SPONGES." AT RIGHT ARE SAFES FOR STORING 22-POUND SPONGES WORTH OVER $60,000 EACH, CA. 1985. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  11. Application of laboratory results to the design of a high yield VMIS oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, T.C.; Ricketts, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    In situ oil shale retorts have typically been designed to process a rubble bed having uniform cross-sectional rubble properties. Edge effects during rock fragmentation commonly produce increased void at the perimeter of these low-void retorts. Previous laboratory and field results have demonstrated this void variation normal to the direction of flow causes non-uniform retort front velocities that result in significantly lower oil yield. It is unlikely that process control parameters (e.g., multiple injection points, steam, etc.) can provide any significant yield improvement in these non-uniform retorts. Any large improvement would come from modified rubblization concepts. This paper describes a modification to the retort blast design to achieve a uniform retorting front velocity in rubble with non-uniform properties (void fraction and particle size). This concept requires the creation of an anisotropic rubble bed with varying particle size and void fraction normal to the direction of flow. The unavoidable increased void at the retort perimeter is offset by modifying the ratio of the effective particle size of the rubble in the central to the perimeter regions of the retort. The results of laboratory-scale pressure drop and retorting experiments with an empirical blast design technique are used to describe how a high-yield, second generation in situ retort would be designed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Care of patients with stomas: the pouch change procedure.

    PubMed

    Rust, Julie

    This article discusses basic stoma care in relation to management of the pouch change procedure in a ward-based setting immediately following planned stoma-forming surgery. The article highlights psychological and practical preparation of the patient. It describes the equipment that is needed to change a pouch and examines the rationale and evidence base for the procedure.

  13. Congenital pouch colon: is it really a rare pathology?

    PubMed

    Atabek, Cüneyt; Demirbağ, Suzi; Sürer, Ilhami; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Ongürü, Onder; Calişkan, Bahadir; Oztürk, Haluk

    2007-12-01

    Congenital pouch colon is a condition of a shortened and pouch-like dilated colon and it is usually associated with an anorectal malformation. The pathogenesis and embryology of congenital pouch colon are not well understood, but dietary, environmental factors and familial inheritance may be contributing factors in this pathology. Most of the cases in the literature have been reported from India. This increased regional incidence may be attributed to the lack of awareness of this pathology or its mislabeling rather than regional distribution. Congenital pouch colon is classified into four types based on the length of the abnormal colon. A variable dilatation of the rectum and sigmoid is always present in anorectal malformation. However, there is no clear definition of a limit for the dilatation of the rectum and sigmoid observed in anorectal malformation. Furthermore, many surgeons do not routinely take a biopsy from a dilated rectum or sigmoid during a colostomy procedure in anorectal malformation cases. For these reasons, type IV congenital pouch colon can be easily underdiagnosed. Surgical treatment options in type IV congenital pouch colon include resection of the affected sites of the colon or excisional tapering coloplasty. In the undiagnosed cases, congenital pouch colon results in severe constipation and overflow incontinence. We herein report two additional new cases of type IV congenital pouch colon.

  14. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ostomy pouch and accessories. 876.5900 Section 876.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., but excludes ostomy pouches which incorporate arsenic-containing compounds. (b) Classification....

  15. Postburn characterization of a modified in situ oil shale retort, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.; Trudell, L.G. . Western Research Inst.)

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide information about post processing mineralogical and lithological characteristics of a modified in situ (MIS) oil shale retort. Samples of retort contents and overburden were obtained from three core holes drilled into the Rio Blanco Tract C-a retort 1 in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. Drilling and logging records indicate 35 to 40 feet of roof rock had collapsed into the retort since the burn was completed four years earlier. A water filled cavity 46 to 62 feet high existed at the topp and 374 feet of rubble was encountered in the bottom of the retort. Material from the retort was determined to be a highly altered, fused, vesicular rock with lessor amounts of carbonized, oxidized, and moderately heat altered oil shale. Thermal alteration produced high temperature silicate minerals from the original mixture of carbonate and silicate minerals.

  16. Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort with controlled seismic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1983-09-06

    An array of explosive charges is formed in a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The explosive charges that are located around the perimeter of the retort site are smaller than the explosive charges located more remote from the perimeter. Formation within the retort site is explosively expanded toward a void formed in the site by detonating the explosive charges. This explosive expansion of formation results in a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the retort. Damage to objects near the retort site, which is caused by seismic shock from the detonations, is minimized by using smaller explosive charges around the perimeter than in the center of the retort site.

  17. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Seventh annual report, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-08-01

    In the Geokinetics process, a pattern of blast holes is drilled from the surface, through the overburden, and into the oil shale bed. The holes are loaded with explosives and fired using a carefully planned blast system. The blast produces a fragmented mass of oil shale with high permeability. The fragmented zone constitutes an in situ retort. The project site is in the Mahogany Zone oil shale in Utah. During 1983 significant milestones were achieved. The burn of Retort No. 26 was completed on February 22, 1983, having produced 22,889 barrels of oil. By the end of July, 1983, all preparations were complete for the ignition of Retort No. 27. However, ignition was delayed until August 11, 1983, pending completion of the retort off gas processing facility. By early October, final preparations for the ignition of Retort No. 28 were completed and the retort was ignited on October 18, 1983. A facility to remove ammonia and hydrogen sulfide contaminants from Retorts No. 27 and No. 28 off gas was constructed at the site. Numerous environmental tests and experiments were conducted, primarily to gather data for permitting purposes. A pond to hold water produced by Retorts No. 27 and No. 28 was completed during August, 1983. The pond was put into service at the same time as the ignition of Retort No. 27.

  18. Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Mallon, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

  19. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in-situ oil-shale-retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S.

    1982-10-01

    The Retort No. 25 burn was terminated on June 15, 1982. Total oil production for the second quarter was 6506 barrels during a 76 day production period. Final oil production for Retort No. 25 was 20,956 barrels. Final oil recovery was calculated to be 59% of the total in-place oil. Fugitive emissions, stack and process gas data indicated that all Retort No. 25 pollutants, except NO/sub x/, were below the allowable PSD limits. The Retort No. 25 process water characterization study was completed in April to determine the changes in retort produced water as the retort burn progressed. Results of the study are pending the completion of laboratory analysis. Retort No. 26 was prepared for ignition during the second quarter. Process manifolding and instrumentation were being completed so that ignition might occur shortly after the termination of the Retort No. 25 burn. Post blast core drilling and analysis was completed on Retort No. 27 during early April. The core samples indicated improved fracturing over previous retorts, especially near the bottom. Increasing the size of Retort No. 27 from one acre to two acres showed an increase in blast efficiency based on the criteria of fragmentation, quantity of explosives used per volume of void induced and percent void when compared with Retort No. 24. In June initial site preparation began on Retort No. 28 for blast hole drilling which will start in July. 17 figures, 16 tables.

  20. The toxicity of Rio Blanco Tract C-a groundwater samples before and after the pumpdown of retort 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.L.

    1986-09-01

    In 1984, the Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company received permission from the US Bureau of Land Management/Oil Shale Projects Office to proceed with retort abandonment activities at its Tract C-a modified in situ retort site. One of the first abandonment activities undertaken was to flood the retort with groundwater to dissolve soluble contaminants associated with the retorting operation. Saline water was then pumped from the retort into evaporation ponds during two pumpdown operations in May of 1985 and June of 1986. The principal objective of the pumpdown operations was to remove contaminated groundwater from the retort area and to prevent the migration of contaminants beyond the retort. A toxicological evaluation of groundwaters collected from within the retort and outside the retort is currently in progress. Acute and chronic toxicity tests have been performed using the freshwater invertebrate Ceriodaphnia affinis/dubia with groundwater samples collected before and after the first pumpdown of the retort. The objectives of these tests have been to evaluate the success of the pumpdown operation, to assess the effect of the pumping operations on groundwater quality both within and outside the retort, and to evaluate the toxicity of groundwater within the retort relative to local groundwater that has not been affected by the retorting operation. This report presents the results of toxicity tests performed before and after the first pumpdown operation. Additional toxicity tests are planned for samples collected after the second pumpdown operation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Mechanistic model for the leaching of retorted rundle oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Krol, A.A.; Bell, P.R.F.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1985-12-09

    The mechanisms involved in the leaching of inorganic components from oil shale mined at the Rundle deposit, Queensland, Australia, and retorted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process were examined. The phenomena of most significance were found to be solute dissolution, cation exchange, solution speciation and hydrodynamic and unsaturated flow effects. To check on the completeness of this characterization, a model was developed which describes the generation and transport of the major components (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl and SO/sub 4/) in the leachate as it infiltrates a column of dry retorted shale. Model predictions compare well with experimental results. It is concluded that the dominant mechanisms which control the rate of leaching have been recognized. 8 references, 11 figures.

  2. Embryo oxygenation in pipefish brood pouches: novel insights.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ines Braga; Ahnesjö, Ingrid; Kvarnemo, Charlotta

    2015-06-01

    The pipefish brood pouch presents a unique mode of parental care that enables males to protect, osmoregulate, nourish and oxygenate the developing young. Using a very fine O2 probe, we assessed the extent to which males of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle) oxygenate the developing embryos and are able to maintain pouch fluid O2 levels when brooding in normoxia (100% O2 saturation) and hypoxia (40% O2 saturation) for 24 days. In both treatments, pouch fluid O2 saturation levels were lower compared with the surrounding water and decreased throughout the brooding period, reflecting greater offspring demand for O2 during development and/or decreasing paternal ability to provide O2 to the embryos. Male condition (hepatosomatic index) was negatively affected by hypoxia. Larger males had higher pouch fluid O2 saturation levels compared with smaller males, and levels were higher in the bottom section of the pouch compared with other sections. Embryo size was positively correlated with O2 availability, irrespective of their position in the pouch. Two important conclusions can be drawn from our findings. First, our results highlight a potential limitation to brooding within the pouch and dismiss the notion of closed brood pouches as well-oxygenated structures promoting the evolution of larger eggs in syngnathids. Second, we provide direct evidence that paternal care improves with male size in this species. This finding offers an explanation for the documented strong female preference for larger partners because, in terms of oxygenation, the brood pouch can restrict embryo growth.

  3. Ileal pouch surgery for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Simon P; Mortensen, Neil J

    2007-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting disease characterised by chronic mucosal and submucosal inflammation of the colon and rectum. Treatment may vary depending upon the extent and severity of inflammation. Broadly speaking medical treatments aim to induce and then maintain remission. Surgery is indicated for inflammatory disease that is refractory to medical treatment or in cases of neoplastic transformation. Approximately 25% of patients with UC ultimately require colectomy. Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) has become the standard of care for patients with ulcerative colitis who ultimately require colectomy. This review will examine indications for IPAA, patient selection, technical aspects of surgery, management of complications and long term outcome following this procedure. PMID:17659667

  4. Anaerobic biological treatment of in-situ retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Ossio, E.; Fox, P.

    1980-03-01

    Anaerobic fermentation was successfully used in a laboratory-scale batch digester to remove soluble organics from retort water. Required pretreatment includes reduction of ammonia levels to 360 mg-N/l, pH adjustment to 7.0, sulfide control, and the addition of the nutrients, calcium, magnesium, and phoshorus. If the prescribed pretreatment is used, BOD/sub 5/ and COD removal efficiencies of 89 to 90% and 65 to 70% are achieved, respectively.

  5. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1983-01-01

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  6. A convex urostomy pouch with adhesive border: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Jacqueline; Nichols, Thom; Menier, Melissa

    Patients previously using a standard-wear convex skin barrier urostomy pouch were invited by letter from a Dispensing Appliance Contractor to evaluate a similar pouching system, but with the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border. A total of 47 patients agreed to take part. Patients were asked to try three pouches and complete one evaluation form. Study participants found the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border, was easy to use, provided them with security and the potential for longer wear time.

  7. Efficient Heat and Mass Transfer Formulations for Oil Shale Retorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; Zhang, F.

    2007-12-01

    A mathematical model for oil shale retorting is described that considers kerogen pyrolysis, oil coking, residual carbon gasification, carbonate mineral decomposition, water-gas shift, and phase equilibria reaction. Reaction rate temperature-dependence is described by Arrhenius kinetics. Fractured rock is modeled as a bi-continuum consisting of fracture porosity in which advective and dispersive gas and heat transport occur, and rock matrix in which diffusive mass transport and thermal conduction occur. Heat transfer between fracture and matrix regions is modeled either by a partial differential equation for spherical conduction or by a linear first-order heat transfer formulation. Mass transfer is modeled in an analogous manner or assuming local equilibrium. First-order mass and heat transfer coefficients are computed by a theoretical model from fundamental rock matrix properties. The governing equations are solved using a 3-D finite element formulation. Simulations of laboratory retort experiments and hypothetical problems indicated thermal disequilibrium to be the dominant factor controlling retort reactions. Simulation accuracy was unaffected by choice of mass transfer formulation. However, computational effort to explicitly simulate diffusive mass transfer in the rock matrix increased computational effort by more than an order of magnitude compared with first-order mass transfer or equilibrium analyses. A first-order heat transfer approximation of thermal conduction can be used without significant loss of accuracy if the block size and/or heating rate are not too large, as quantified by a proposed dimensionless heating rate.

  8. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Oil production from Retort No. 23 began on April 6, 1981. The retort burn front remained uniform with good vertical distribution as it advanced through the retort. During the burn various amounts of recycled off gas were introduced into the inlet injection stream. This was done to observe the effect on the retort burn. Preliminary indications are that the gas recycling had no obvious effect on the burn. Further evaluation from Sandia National Laboratories will be forthcoming. After burning 106 days, Retort No. 23 shut in at 9:30 A.M. on June 30, 1981. Total production for the life of Retort No. 23 was 991 barrels of shale oil. Total shale oil production from Retort No. 24 to date is 11,233 barrels. Retort No. 24 produced a total of 4701 barrels during the second quarter, an average of 52 barrels per day. Retort No. 24 has now burned for 211 days. On June 26, a new production well was drilled on Retort No. 24. This well was drilled slightly outside the retort boundary on the off gas end. The purpose of this action was to increase production life of the retort. During June the fire front advanced to the far off gas wells. Shale oil production totaled 5523 barrels during the second quarter. Blasthole drilling began on Retort No. 26. By the end of June 202 blastholes had been drilled. Four additional instrumentation wells were drilled on Retort No. 25. These wells will be used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory personnel during electromagnetic testing which will assist in monitoring the burn front. Fabrication of the Retort No. 25 process equipment proceeded. Design of the Retort No. 25 instrumentation system was finalized and physical work began.

  9. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, July, August, September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    Retort No. 27 was ignited using a new procedure and 47 days of operation were completed in the quarter. For retort No. 28 air injection and off gas piping and manifolding was completed along with the installation of electrical and instrumentation wiring. The off gas processing plant for the two retorts was completed and an initial shakedown run made.

  10. Occurrence and structure of epipharyngeal pouches in bears (Ursidae)

    PubMed Central

    WEISSENGRUBER, G. E.; FORSTENPOINTNER, G.; KÜBBER-HEISS, A.; RIEDELBERGER, K.; SCHWAMMER, H.; GANZBERGER, K.

    2001-01-01

    The infrequent mention of epipharyngeal pouches occurring in some species of bears indicates the scarcity of morphological and functional knowledge about these structures. In order to provide precise morphological data on the structure of these remarkable formations and to verify their taxonomic utility, the pharyngeal regions of 1 spectacled bear and 3 brown bears were examined. All these individuals possessed epipharyngeal pouches, which are tubular, blind-ending outpouchings of the caudodorsal pharyngeal wall equipped with respiratory epithelium and a thick layer of elastic fibres. While the spectacled bear and Ursus arctos syriacus possessed a single pouch on the caudodorsal wall of the nasopharynx, in Ursus arctos and Ursus arctos beringianus 2 unequally sized pouches were present. Two additional sacs of smaller size, representing outpouchings of the lateral pharyngeal wall, occurred in the spectacled bear. These findings prove epipharyngeal pouches to be constant and unique morphological features of the family Ursidae, the anatomical features suggesting involvement in the respiratory system most probably in important aspects of ursid phonation. This is the first description of epipharyngeal pouches in the spectacled bear. PMID:11322723

  11. Brazing retort manifold design concept may minimize air contamination and enhance uniform gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing retort manifold minimizes air contamination, prevents gas entrapment during purging, and provides uniform gas flow into the retort bell. The manifold is easily cleaned and turbulence within the bell is minimized because all manifold construction lies outside the main enclosure.

  12. Production of shale oil by in-situ retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.

    1983-04-05

    A modified in-situ retort for the retorting of oil shale is constructed by mining an open space having a volume of twentyfive to thirty-five percent of the volume of the retort in the bottom of the retort and thereafter blasting the oil shale that is to remain in the retort as rubble in a manner to cause random free fall of the shale particles onto the rubblized bed. Blasting occurs sequentially from the bottom of the unfragmented shale immediately above the open space to the top of the retort. At each blast, there is an open space below the shale to be broken in the blast having a volume at least one-third the volume of that shale, and the timing of the blasts is such that movement of the broken shale is not interfered with by shale broken in the preceding blast. There is no withdrawal of oil shale that would cause downward movement of the rubble that is to be retorted insitu. The resultant in-situ retort is characterized by a high and uniform permeability.

  13. Report on 10-ton retort tracer testing: tests S76 through S79

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    An oil shale retort with contrasting permeability regions has been studied using gas tracer techniques. The Western Research Institute's 10-ton retort was loaded with oil shale of various size ranges resulting in different void fractions. Four retorting and tracer runs were performed on the retort. For each run, tracer injections were made into the main air flow inlet and into taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps were located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level in tests S76 through S78. There were six taps on each level in run S79. The oil shale rubble bed was configured with a cylindrical nonuniform region on the center line of the retort in tests S76 through S78. In run S79 two side-by-side regions with differing bed properties were tracer tested and retorted. Response times were calculated from the tracer response curves. The tracer response times from in-bed tracer tests correlate with oil yield and with bed properties. Response times from the inlet-to-outlet tracer tests correlate with total oil yield through a first-order relationship with sweep efficiencies. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effects of retorting factors on combustion properties of shale char. 3. Distribution of residual organic matters.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangxin; Jiang, Xiumin; Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Junwei

    2010-03-15

    Shale char, formed in retort furnaces of oil shale, is classified as a dangerous waste containing several toxic compounds. In order to retort oil shale to produce shale oil as well as treat shale char efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way, a novel kind of comprehensive utilization system was developed to use oil shale for shale oil production, electricity generation (shale char fired) and the extensive application of oil shale ash. For exploring the combustion properties of shale char further, in this paper organic matters within shale chars obtained under different retorting conditions were extracted and identified using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Subsequently, the effects of retorting factors, including retorting temperature, residence time, particle size and heating rate, were analyzed in detail. As a result, a retorting condition with a retorting temperature of 460-490 degrees C, residence time of <40 min and a middle particle size was recommended for both keeping nitrogenous organic matters and aromatic hydrocarbons in shale char and improving the yield and quality of shale oil. In addition, shale char obtained under such retorting condition can also be treated efficiently using a circulating fluidized bed technology with fractional combustion.

  15. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WEATHERING ON A 50-YEAR OLD RETORTED OIL-SHALE WASTE PILE, RULISON EXPERIMENTAL RETORT, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Dean, Walter E.; Ackerman, Daniel J.; ,

    1985-01-01

    An oil-shale mine and experimental retort were operated near Rulison, Colorado by the U. S. Bureau of Mines from 1926 to 1929. Samples from seven drill cores from a retorted oil-shale waste pile were analyzed to determine 1) the chemical and mineral composition of the retorted oil shale and 2) variations in the composition that could be attributed to weathering. Unweathered, freshly-mined samples of oil shale from the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation and slope wash collected away from the waste pile were also analyzed for comparison. The waste pile is composed of oil shale retorted under either low-temperature (400-500 degree C) or high-temperature (750 degree C) conditions. The results of the analyses show that the spent shale within the waste pile contains higher concentrations of most elements relative to unretorted oil shale.

  16. Trace element partitioning during the retorting of Julia Creek oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.H.; Dale, L.S.; Chapman, J.f.

    1987-05-01

    A bulk sample of oil shale from the Julia Creek deposit in Queensland was retorted under Fischer assay conditions at temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 /sup 0/C. The distributions of the trace elements detected in the shale oil and retort water were determined at each temperature. Oil distillation commenced at 300 /sup 0/C and was essentially complete at 500 /sup 0/C. A number of trace elements were progressively mobilized with increasing retort temperature up to 450 /sup 0/C. The following trace elements partitioned mainly to the oil: vanadium, arsenic, selenium, iron, nickel, titanium, copper, cobalt, and aluminum. Elements that also partitioned to the retort waters included arsenic, selenium, chlorine, and bromine. Element mobilization is considered to be caused by the volatilization of organometallic compounds, sulfide minerals, and sodium halides present in the oil shale. The results have important implications for shale oil refining and for the disposal of retort waters. 22 references, 5 tables.

  17. Investigation of the Geokinetics Horizontal In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Process. Quarterly report, July, August, September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported on developing an in-situ process for recovering shale oil. On July 23, Retort No. 24 was shut-in. Production for the life of Retort No. 24 totaled 12,741 barrels of crude shale oil. A contract was made with the United States Defense Fuel Supply Center to furnish them with 5000 barrels of crude shale oil. Shipments were made by tanker trucks to the Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Facility near Rifle, Colorado to fulfill this contractual agreement. A shipment of 120 barrels of crude shale oil was made to Mobil Research Company. Retort No. 26 was loaded with explosives on August 5 and 6. This operation was carried out totally by Geokinetics' personnel. On August 7, Retort No. 26 was detonated. Again all blasting operations were carried out by Geokinetics personnel. According to initial indications the Retort No. 26 blast was highly successful. Following the blast of Retort No. 26 all efforts were turned to the ignition of Retort No. 25. Equipment and piping were set in place and the instrumentation systems were wired in. Ignition for Retort No. 25 is scheduled for mid to late October. The Retort No. 26 Post-blast Coring Program continued through the end of this quarter. With the ignition of Retort No. 25 the analytical lab began constant monitoring of the retort burn.

  18. Spent shale as a control technology for oil shale retort water. Annual report, October 1, 1978 - September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.P.; Jackson, D.E.; Sakaji, R.H.; Daughton, C.G.; Selleck, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This program is investigating two potential uses of the spent shale for treatment of retort waters. In the first application, the abandoned in-situ retorts would be directly used as part of a treatment system. Water generated in one retort would be circulated through spent shale in an adjacent retort to reduce contaminants in the water and to cool the in-situ spent shale in preparation for retort abandonment and grouting. In the second application, spent shale produced in surface retorts would be used in packed columns similar to powdered activated carbon columns. The exhausted spent shale would be disposed of along with other solid wastes in the on-site solid waste disposal facility. The work summarized here indicated that spent shales are effective in removing color, odor, inorganic carbon, and certain classes of organic compounds, and in elevating the pH of retort water and gas condensates so that NH/sub 3/ may be readily stripped.

  19. Potential role of mast cells in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Heber, Elisa M; Trivillin, Verónica A; Tomasi, Víctor H; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, María E

    2008-11-01

    During the process of activation, mast cells release products stored in their granules. Tryptase, a protease released from mast cell granules after activation, induces tumor cell proliferation through the activation of PAR-2 (protease activated receptor 2) on the plasma membrane of carcinoma cells. Chemical cancerization (DMBA) of the hamster cheek pouch is the most accepted model of oral cancer. However, there are no reports on the activation of mast cells during experimental carcinogenesis or on the correlation between mast cell activation and cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential effect of mast cells on the proliferation of epithelial cells at different times during the cancerization process. Paraffin serial sections of cancerized, tumor-bearing pouches were stained with Alcian Blue-Safranin to identify the different degrees of mast cell activation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify BrdU-positive cells to study tumor cell proliferation. Mast cells were counted and grouped into two categories: inactive mast cells AB-S+++ (red) and active mast cells AB+++S- (blue). Mast cell counts were performed in tumor stroma, base of the tumor (connective tissue immediately below the exophytic tumor), connective and muscle tissue underlying the cancerized epithelium (pouch wall) and adventitious tissue underlying the pouch wall. There was a significant increase in the number of mast cells at the base of tumors (p<0.001) compared to the number of mast cells in the wall of the pouch and in tumor stroma. In normal non-cancerized pouches, inactive mast cells were prevalent both in the wall (AB:S=1:2.15; p<0.001) and in the adventitious tissue (AB:S=1:1.6; p<0.004) of the hamster cheek pouch. At most of the experimental times examined, the ratio of active/inactive mast cells (AB/S) in the wall approximated unity and even reverted. The ratio of mast cells was AB:S 1:1.05 at the base of the tumor and 1:0.24 in tumor stroma (p<0

  20. Left Atrial Septal Pouch in Cryptogenic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jonathan M.; Lombardo, Dawn M.; Barseghian, Ailin; Dhoot, Jashdeep; Hundal, Harkawal S.; Salcedo, Jonathan; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Wong, Nathan D.; Fisher, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: The left atrial septal pouch (LASP), an anatomic variant of the interatrial septum, has uncertain clinical significance. We examined the association between LASP and ischemic stroke subtypes in patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Methods: We determined the prevalence of LASP among consecutive patients who underwent TEE at our institution. Patients identified with ischemic strokes were further evaluated for stroke subtype using standard and modified criteria from the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST). We compared the prevalence of LASP in ischemic stroke, cryptogenic stroke, and non-stroke patients using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: The mean age of all 212 patients (including stroke and non-stroke patients) was 57 years. The overall prevalence of LASP was 17% (n = 35). Of the 75 patients who were worked-up for stroke at our institution during study period, we classified 31 as cryptogenic using standard TOAST criteria. The prevalence of LASP among cryptogenic stroke patients (using standard and modified TOAST criteria) was increased compared to the prevalence among other ischemic stroke patients (26 vs. 9%, p = 0.06; PR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–3.1, and 30 vs. 10%, p = 0.04; PR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2–4.1, respectively). Conclusion: In this population of relatively young patients, prevalence of LASP was increased in cryptogenic stroke compared to stroke patients of other subtypes. These findings suggest LASP is associated with cryptogenic stroke, which should be verified by future large-scale studies. PMID:25852636

  1. Characterization of in-situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1984-07-17

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in-situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  2. Jetting out weak areas for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, J.

    1981-07-21

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. A void can be formed in formation within the retort site by directing fluid under pressure against a zone of relatively weakened formation, such as tuffs, gravel beds, or fractured oil shale, to erode such weakened formation into particle form, leaving a void space adjacent a remaining zone of unfragmented formation within the retort site. The void space can be formed by drilling a bore hole into the zone of weakened formation, placing a jet nozzle in the bore hole, and forcing a fluid such as water through the nozzle against the weakened formation for eroding it to form the void space. Eroded formation particles are passed to the bottom of the bore hole. Such water jetting techniques can be used to form voids in zones of weakened formation interspersed throughout the retort site. Remaining formation within the retort site is explosively expanded toward such a void space for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. The amount of eroded formation particles jetted from the retort site can be measured prior to explosive expansion for providing a selected void fraction in the resulting fragmented mass. Explosive also can be placed in voids excavated by such jetting for such explosive expansion.

  3. Determination of polar organic solutes in oil-shale retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Stuber, H.A.

    1982-10-01

    A variety of analytic methods were used to quantitatively determine polar organic solutes in process retort water and a gas-condensate retort water produced in a modified in situ oil-shale retort. Specific compounds accounting for 50% of the dissolved organic carbon were identified in both retort waters. In the process water, 42% of the dissolved organic carbon consisted of a homologous series of fatty acids from C/sub 2/ to C/sub 10/. Dissolved organic carbon percentages for other identified compound classes were as follows: aliphatic dicarboxylic acids, 1.4%; phenols, 2.2%; hydroxypyridines, 1.1%; aliphatic amides, 1.2%. In the gas-condensate retort water, aromatic amines were most abundant at 19.3% of the dissolved organic carbon, followed by phenols (17.8%), nitriles (4.3%), aliphatic alcohols (3.5%), aliphatic ketones (2.4%), and lactones (1.3%). Steam-volatile organic solutes were enriched in the gas-condensate retort water, whereas nonvolatile acids and polyfunctional neutral compounds were predominate organic constituents of the process retort water. 28 references.

  4. Handling of solids-laden hydrocarbonaceous bottoms in a retort using solid heat-carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, H.B.

    1981-01-20

    Crushed mined coal, oil shale or tar sands, feedstocks are retorted in a retort using heat-carrying solids to supply at least fifty percent of the heat required to produce an average retort temperature of between 700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/C) and 1200/sup 0/F (649/sup 0/C) to produce hydrocarbonaceous gases and oil. The hydrocarbon oils are treated in a manner such that there is produced a bottoms fraction containing organic carbon compounds having a boiling point above 950* F. And particulate inorganic matter derived from the retorted material. The bottoms fraction is fed directly or indirectly into the retort in a manner such that the bottoms fraction does not contact the reheated heat carriers before the heat carrying solids are contacted with the crushed mined feedstock. The bottoms fraction may be fed directly into the retort downstream of the point where the feedstock and heat carriers are first mixed, or the bottoms fraction may be fed into the feedstock before the feedstock enters the retort. This method of handling the bottoms fraction prevents breakage or agglomeration of the heat carrying solids.

  5. Comparison of naturally occurring shale bitumen asphaltene and retorted shale oil asphaltene

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, F.F.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    Asphaltene is ubiquitously present in both the natural occurring bitumen and the retorted shale oil. Very few cases for the comparison of asphaltene properties are available in the literature. In this research, a comparison of the shale bitumen asphaltene and the retorted shale oil asphaltene was undertaken to investigate structural changes during thermal cracking. This was accomplished by means of elemental chemical analysis, infrared spectra, proton nmr spectra, and carbon-13 spectra of the bitumen asphaltenes and asphaltenes derived from shale oil retorted at 425 and 500/sup 0/C. Elemental analysis indicated that asphaltenes derived from retorted shale oils have smaller H/C ratio and smaller oxygen and sulfur contents, but greater nitrogen content than that derived from shale bitumen. Infrared spectra revealed that the retorted shale oil asphaltenes have greater pyrrolic N-H and hydrogen bonded O-H or N-H absorption than the shale bitumen asphaltene. Retorted shale oil asphaltenes have relatively higher aromaticity, lower degree of substitution of the aromatic sheet, and shorter alkyl substituents, which indicated that the main reactions in the retorting process are carbon-carbon bond fission and intramolecular aromatization.

  6. Determination of polar organic solutes in oil-shale retort water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Stuber, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of analytical methods were used to quantitatively determine polar organic solutes in process retort water and a gas-condensate retort water produced in a modified in situ oil-shale retort. Specific compounds accounting for 50% of the dissolved organic carbon were identified in both retort waters. In the process water, 42% of the dissolved organic carbon consisted of a homologous series of fatty acids from C2 to C10. Dissolved organic carbon percentages for other identified compound classes were as follows: aliphatic dicarboxylic acids, 1.4%; phenols, 2.2%; hydroxypyridines, 1.1%; aliphatic amides, 1.2%. In the gas-condensate retort water, aromatic amines were most abundant at 19.3% of the dissolved organic carbon, followed by phenols (17.8%), nitriles (4.3%), aliphatic alcohols (3.5%), aliphatic ketones (2.4%), and lactones (1.3%). Steam-volatile organic solutes were enriched in the gas-condensate retort water, whereas nonvolatile acids and polyfunctional neutral compounds were predominant organic constituents of the process retort water.

  7. Inorganic solute profiles of waters related to Rio Blanco oil shale project retort 1

    SciTech Connect

    Poulson, R.E.; Borg, H.M.

    1986-03-01

    Water samples were taken from the Rio Blanco oil shale project retort 1 site approximately three- and one-half years after the shutdown of the oil recovery phase. Intermittent flooding and pumpdown of the retort occurred in the interval between shutdown and sampling for this study. Waters from within the retort and from downgradient and offsite locations were compared using a battery of analyses for inorganic and general water quality parameters. Inorganic solute species were selected as potential key indicator species if the particular species concentration inside the retort was greater than that outside the retort. Six inorganic parameters were found to qualify as potential key indicators for retort water migration from the site: potassium, lithium, ammonia, fluoride, thiosulfate, and boron. Except for ammonia, these indicators differ from those selected by other researchers at other modified in situ retorting sites. Ion chromatographic techniques were shown to be applicable for five of the six potential key indicators - all except boron which was detected spectroscopically. Low part-per-billion ion chromatographic analyses were demonstrated for lithium and ammonia. Fractional part-per-million ion chromatographic analyses were demonstrated for potassium and fluoride. Thiosulfate detection limits were in the low part-per-million range and only allowed detection of this indicator inside the retort. Five of the indicators (all except thiosulfate) were detected at slightly elevated levels in the Mahogany Zone ''B'' groove completion of the downgradient well. However, insufficient historical baseline data are available at the low detection levels required to allow positive identification of communication between this well and the retort. The potential for enhancement of sensitivity of the ion chromatographic methods beyond that already achieved for the selected indicators is discusses. 11 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  8. Manufacturability of Heat and Serve Ration in Institutional Pouch System Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    If a four-seal tester (designed to pressurize filled pouches by use of a hypodermic needle through the pouch wall) is used, all four seals can be...COMBAT RATION NETWORK FOR TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION Manufacturability of Heat and Serve Ration in Institutional Pouch “System Analysis ...5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH August 2006 Final May 2005 - September 2006 Manufacturability of Heat and Serve Ration in Institutional Pouch System Analysis

  9. In-situ oil shale retort with differing upper and lower void fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1984-03-06

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation by excavating voids adjacent the top and bottom boundaries of the retort, leaving an intermediate zone of unfragmented formation between the voids. The lower level void is substantially larger than the upper level void. A lower portion of the intermediate zone is explosively expanded downwardly towards the lower level void for forming a first moiety of a fragmented mass of formation particles in the retort and leaving a void space over the top of the first moiety having about the same volume as the upper level void. Thereafter an upper portion of the intermediate zone is explosively expanded upwardly towards the upper level void and downwardly towards the void space for forming a second moiety of the fragmented mass in the retort. The fragmented mass has an average void fraction up to about 25% and no substantial part has a void fraction less than about 20%.

  10. In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

  11. Mercury retorts for the processing of precious metals and hazardous wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Charles; Hill, Eldan

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the authors describe some of the considerations for the design and operation of mercury retort facilities. These retort facilities are used for precious metals processing and for the treatment of mercury-bearing hazardous wastes. The relevant properties and characteristics of mercury and mercury vapor are presented, as well as facility engineering with respect to industrial hygiene, area ventilation, and material handling.

  12. Application of biomass pyrolytic polygeneration technology using retort reactors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiping; Liu, Biao; Chen, Yingquan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    To introduce application status and illustrate the good utilisation potential of biomass pyrolytic polygeneration using retort reactors, the properties of major products and the economic viability of commercial factories were investigated. The capacity of one factory was about 3000t of biomass per year, which was converted into 1000t of charcoal, 950,000Nm(3) of biogas, 270t of woody tar, and 950t of woody vinegar. Charcoal and fuel gas had LHV of 31MJ/kg and 12MJ/m(3), respectively, indicating their potential for use as commercial fuels. The woody tar was rich in phenols, while woody vinegar contained large quantities of water and acetic acid. The economic analysis showed that the factory using this technology could be profitable, and the initial investment could be recouped over the factory lifetime. This technology offered a promising means of converting abundant agricultural biomass into high-value products.

  13. Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J H; Monaco, S B; Sanborn, R H; Hirschfeld, T B; Taylor, J R

    1982-08-01

    A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

  14. Using Giant African Pouched Rats ("Cricetomys Gambianus") to Detect Landmines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, giant pouched rats have been used successfully to detect landmines. This manuscript summarizes how these rats are trained and used operationally. The information provided is intended to be of practical value toward strengthening best practices in using "Cricetomys" for humanitarian purposes while simultaneously…

  15. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  16. Pouch brooding marsupial frogs transfer nutrients to developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Warne, Robin W; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Marsupial frogs have a unique reproductive mode in which females carry eggs enclosed in a sealed dorsal brood pouch. While most anurans are considered to be oviparous with lecithotrophic eggs, the extensively vascularized membrane of the brood pouch in marsupial frogs suggests potential opportunities for nutrient transfer. We tested for matrotrophy in the live-bearing Gastrotheca excubitor (Hemiphractidae), through feeding insects labelled with a (13)C-fatty acid and a (15)N-amino acid to brooding marsupial frogs. We observed significant increases of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in both maternal pouch tissues and embryos, suggesting nutrient transfer. Embryo dry mass also increased with developmental stage, providing further direct evidence for matrotrophy. These results suggest that in addition to gas exchange, the vascularized brood pouch membrane of G. excubitor also enables maternal nutrient transfer. This finding revealed a suspected but untested trait in the evolution of parental care in marsupial frogs, in contrast to previous work on Gastrotheca species that release tadpoles, and suggests greater complexity in reproductive and provisioning modes than previously thought.

  17. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... attached to the patient's skin by an adhesive material and that is intended for use as a receptacle for... generic type of device and its accessories includes the ostomy pouch, ostomy adhesive, the disposable... bag, ostomy drainage bag with adhesive, stomal bag, ostomy protector, and the ostomy size...

  19. Nitrogen and carbon oxides chemistry in the HRS retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1993-11-12

    The HRS Oil Shale Retort process consists of a pyrolysis section which converts kerogen of the shale to liquid and gaseous products, and a combustion section which burns residual carbon on the shale to heat the process. Average gas concentrations of selected gas phase species were determined from data measured at several placed on the combustion system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycled-Solids Retort Pilot Plant for representative rich and lean shale runs. The data was measured on-line and in real time by on-line meters (CO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 2}), mass spectrometry (CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and HCN). For both the rich and leans shale runs, the Lift-Pipe Combustor (LFT) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the exit of the LFT) indicative of incomplete combustion and oxidation; the Delayed-Fall Combustor (DFC) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the annulus and the exit of the DFC) indicative of much more complete combustion and oxidation. The Fluidized-Bed Combustor exhibited gas concentrations which were controlled to a large extent by the injection atmosphere of the FBC. High levels of nitrogen oxides and low levels of CO were detected when full air injection was used, while high levels of CO and low levels of nitrogen-oxides were detected with partial N{sub 2} injection. Sequential sampling limitations and nitrogen balances are also discussed.

  20. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Retort No. 18 produced 3479 barrels of oil during the quarter for a total of 4528 barrels to date. Chromatographic analyses of Retort No. 18 shale oil by the GKI analytical laboratory indicated variation in the oil from the wells near the air-in end and from the air-out end of the retort. Shale oil has been blended with Altamont crude (the Roosevelt refinery's normal feedstock); the distillation, API gravity, pour point, flash point, Naptha and Cat Gas were not affected by the shale oil. The diesel off the crude unit changed from water white to yellow, however, and a fine grayish-brown precipitate formed. Re-entry drilling was performed on Retorts No. 21, No. 22, and No. 23 during the quarter; tracer tests were run by Sandia Laboratories on Retorts No. 19, No. 21, No. 22, and No. 23. Blasthole drilling began on Retort No. 25.

  1. Common Inflammatory Disorders and Neoplasia of the Ileal Pouch: A Review of Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Collinsworth, Amy L.; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the standard restorative procedure after proctocolectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who require colectomy. The ileal pouch is susceptible to a variety of insults including mechanical injury, ischemia, fecal stasis, and infectious agents. In addition, the development of recurrent and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and neoplasia may occur in the ileal pouch. Although clinical, endoscopic, and radiographic examination can diagnose many ileal pouch diseases, histologic examination plays an essential role in diagnosis and management, particularly in cases with antibiotic refractory chronic pouchitis and pouch neoplasia. PMID:27785322

  2. Trace element partitioning during the retorting of Condor and Rundle oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.H.; Dale, L.S.; Chapman, J.F. )

    1988-05-01

    Composite oil shale samples from the Condor and Rundle deposits in Queensland were retorted under Fischer assay conditions at temperatures ranging from 300 to 545{degree}C. Trace elements mobilized to the shale oil and retort water were determined at each temperature. The results were comparable for both oil shales. Several elements including arsenic, selenium, chlorine, bromine, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc were progressively mobilized as the retort temperature was increased. Most elements partition mainly to the oil and to a lesser extent to the retort water in a similar manner to other oil shales. For Rundle oil shales, trace element abundances in oils, and the proportions of elements mobilized, generally increased with oil shale grade. This was attributed to the reduced effect of adsorption and/or coking of heavier oil fractions during retorting of higher grade samples. Nickel porphyrins, unidentified organometallic compounds, pyrite, and halite are considered to be the sources of mobile trace elements. The results are relatively favorable for oil shale processing and show that arsenic is the most significant element in relation to both shale oil refining and disposal of retort waters.

  3. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an oil shale retort by effluent water composition

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1980-09-23

    A processing zone advances through a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale in an in-situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort has an effluent water passing therefrom. The effluent water carries a constituent which is formed, by advancement of the processing zone through the fragmented mass, from a precursor contained in the formation. In a first aspect of the invention, the locus of the processing zone is determined by assaying the formation at selected locations in the retort for content of the precursor before processing the selected locations, and effluent water from the retort is monitored for concentration of the selected constituent. For example, the nitrogen content of kerogen can be the precursor and effluent water from the retort can be monitored for the concentration of ammonia and/or ammonium sulfate produced by retorting of kerogen in the oil shale. In the second embodiment of the invention, recognition is made of the correlation between the fischer assay of the oil shale and the amount of water it contains. Core samples of the formation are analyzed prior to processing to determine the water content and the predicted water production rate due to the passage of a processing zone through that location in the formation. Actual water production rate can then be compared with the predicted rate and the locus of the processing zone determined.

  4. In situ oil shale retort having horizontal voids with side pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.; Burton, R.S.

    1984-06-12

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale by excavating one or more horizontally extending voids across a retort site, leaving a zone of unfragmented formation having a horizontal free face adjacent such a horizontal void. In one embodiment, such a horizontal void is excavated across less than the entire width of the retort site, leaving ''side pillars'' of unfragmented formation spaced inwardly from adjacent side boundaries of the retort site at opposite sides of such a horizontal void. This reduces the maximum span of the horizontal void, when compared with supporting overburden above the void with one or more interior isolated pillars spaced inwardly from the side boundaries of the retort. The side pillars are explosively expanded. Then such a zone of unfragmented formation is explosively expanded toward such a horizontal void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in the retort. The resulting fragmented mass can have a slightly narrowed region along the sides where the side pillars were present.

  5. Control of airblast during explosive expansion in an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, N.M.

    1980-05-06

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Underground workings excavated within the formation provide a means for access to a retort site in the formation. At least one void is excavated in the retort site via access provided by the underground workings, leaving a remaining portion of the unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent the void. Explosive placed in the remaining unfragmented formation adjacent such a void is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding the unfragmented formation toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. Prior to such explosive expansion, a barrier of unfragmented formation is left between such a void and underground workings providing means for access to such a void. At least one gas flow passage extends through the barrier of unfragmented formation between the means for access and the retort site. Such a gas flow passage has a substantially smaller cross-section for gas flow than the transverse crosssection of the means for access to the retort site. The smaller cross-section of such a gas flow passage temporarily confines the high gas pressure generated by the explosion and limits the flow of gas to the means for access for attenuating airblast in the means for access and other underground workings in gas communication with the means for access.

  6. Method of bulking an in situ oil shale retort substantially full of fragmented shale

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1982-11-23

    A method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is provided. The in situ oil shale retort has a top boundary, generally vertically extending side boundaries, and a bottom boundary of unfragmented formation. A first portion of formation is excavated for forming at least one void within the boundaries, leaving a remaining portion of formation within the boundaries adjacent the void or voids. A remaining portion of unfragmented formation within the retort boundaries is explosively expanded toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in the retort. A void space remains between the upper surface of the fragmented mass and overlying unfragmented formation. A lower portion of the overlying formation is explosively expanded downwardly toward the void space for substantially filling the retort with formation particles. A sill pillar of unfragmented formation is left extending between an air level base of operation and the top boundary of the retort being formed.

  7. Characterization of in-situ oil-shale retorts prior to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1982-06-04

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the report. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition. 9 figures.

  8. Method of forming an in-situ oil shale retort in formation with joints

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts

    1984-08-21

    A method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale and having at least one set of naturally occurring cleavage planes is provided. The in situ oil shale retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed within top, bottom, and side boundaries of unfragmented formation. A void is excavated in the subterranean formation within the boundaries of the retort site, while a zone of unfragmented formation is left within the retort boundaries adjacent the void. A plurality of rows of horizontally spaced apart explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation where each such row is in a line about perpendicular to the strike of the major cleavage plane set in the formation. The rows of explosive charges are detonated in a selected sequence with the charges in each such row detonated about simultaneously for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the retort.

  9. Rock bolting techniques for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, A.

    1981-08-04

    A subterranean formation containing oil shale is prepared for in situ retorting by forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort site. Formation is initially excavated from the retort site for forming one or more voids extending horizontally across the retort site, leaving a zone of unfragmented formation adjacent such a void. In one ambodiment, an array of rocks bolts are anchored in at least a portion of the roof adjacent such a void for providing reinforcement of unfragmented formation above the void. Vertical blasting holes are drilled in the zone of unfragmented formation adjacent the void. Explosive is placed in the blasting holes and detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void, including the rock bolted portion of the roof, for forming at least a portion of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. Surprisingly, the rock bolting does not interfere with, and in some instances can improve, fragmentation compared with comparable blasts without such rock bolts. The reinforcement provided by the rock bolts can reduce or eliminate the need for roof support pillars in horizontal voids at intermediate levels of the retort site.

  10. Method for inhibiting sloughing of unfragmented formation in an in-situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.C.

    1984-04-24

    A method for igniting an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale is provided. A void space is in the retort between the top surface of the fragmented mass and the top boundary of overlying unfragmented formation. A hot ignition gas comprising oxygen is introduced into the void space to form a combustion zone across the surface of the fragmented mass. An oxygen-supplying gas is then introduced into the void space for sustaining the combustion zone and for advancing the combustion zone downwardly through the retort. The combustion zone is then extinguished and a cool inert gas is introduced into the retort to cool carbonaceous materials comprising the surface of the fragmented mass to a temperature below the self-ignition temperature of such carbonaceous materials, while leaving carbonaceous materials below the fragmented mass surface at temperatures greater than the self-ignition temperature of such materials. Introduction of the inert gas is then discontinued. Thereafter, an oxygen-supplying gas is re-introduced into the retort to ignite the carbonaceous materials below the surface of the fragmented mass for re-establishing the combustion zone in the fragmented mass and for advancing the combustion zone downwardly through the retort.

  11. Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Studebaker, Irving G.; Hefelfinger, Richard

    1980-01-01

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

  12. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    The ignition of Geokinetics first full-sized prototype retort (Retort 24) was completed on December 1, 1980. Recovery of oil from Retort No. 24 began about midway through December, and 531 barrels of oil had been recovered by the end of the quarter. A cold oil effect resulted in the accumulation of oil within the retort. Five thousand one ninety one barrels of oil were shipped to WESRECO, Salt Lake City, Utah during the quarter, and the shale oil was blended into No. 5 fuel oil, which was sold to industrial users. The Retort No. 25 post-blast core drilling program was completed in October. A total of seven core holes were drilled. Evaluation of the core samples was underway. Preliminary analysis indicated good breakage in the lower portion of Retort No. 25. A new technique for sealing retort surface fractures was designed and implemented on Retort No. 25. A layer of bentonite with gas and steam retention properties was applied to the retort surface and covered with a layer of topsoil.

  13. Sandia/Geokinetics retort 23: Comparison of real-time analyses with post-burn coring results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, C.E.; Cook, D.W.; Costomiris, E.G.

    1983-04-01

    Retort 23, a 6000-tonne horizontal in situ oil shale retorting experiment conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and Geokinetics, Inc., was completed in June, 1981. Detailed analyses of retort performance based upon data available in real-time (flows, temperatures, product compositions) were made at that time. Seventeen months after completion of the experiment, the retort had cooled enough to allow recovery of spent shale samples from six vertical core wells at various locations in and just outside the retort. All cores were logged and photographed; in addition, two complete cores (plus one pre-burn core) were analyzed chemically. We present comparisons of visual observations and chemical analyses of the cores with real-time results (thermal data and material balance calculations) to verify such indicators of retort performance as the extent of retorting, carbonate decomposition, and char combustion. While these data were, of course, important in completing the analyses of retort 23, they have had even more significance in validating realtime analyses techniques for use on other retorts.

  14. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an oil shale retort by effluent off gas heating value

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1981-07-21

    A processing zone advances through a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort has an effluent gas passing therefrom. The effluent gas has a heating value which is dependent on the kerogen content of the oil shale then in contact with the processing zone. To determine the locus of the processing zone, the formation is assayed at selected locations in the retort for kerogen content before processing the selected locations, and effluent gas from the retort is monitored for its heating value.

  15. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, April, May, June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The Retort No. 18 burn was terminated on May 11, 1980. A total of 5547 barrels of shale oil or 46 percent of in-place resource was recovered from the retort. The EPA-DOE/LETC post-burn core sampling program is underway on Retort No. 16. Eleven core holes (of 18 planned) have been completed to date. Preliminary results indicate excellent core recovery has been achieved. Recovery of 702 ft of core was accomplished. The Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit application was submitted to the EPA regional office in Denver for review by EPA and Utah air quality officials. The application for an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit to authorize GKI to inject retort wastewater into the Mesa Verde Formation is being processed by the State of Utah. A hearing before the Board of Oil, Gas and Mining is scheduled in Salt Lake City, Utah, for July 22, 1980. Re-entry drilling on Retort No. 24 is progressing and placement of surface equipment is underway. Retort No. 25 blasthole drilling was completed and blast preparations are ongoing. Retort No. 25 will be blasted on July 18, 1980. The retort will be similar to Retort No. 24, with improvements in blasthole loading and detonation. US Patent No. 4,205,610 was assigned to GKI for a shale oil recovery process. Rocky Mountain Energy Company (RME) is evaluating oil shale holdings in Wyoming for application of the GKI process there.

  16. Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-03-01

    Retort No. 27 was ignited on August 11, 1983 and by December 31 had completed 139 days of operation and produced 11,420 barrels of oil. Retort No. 28 was ignited on October 18, 1983 and on December 31 had completed 74 days of operation and produced 5,285 barrels of oil. The off-gas processing plants for the two retorts was completed and put through a shakedown run. Concentration levels of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ in the retort off gas did not warrant plant operation in the fourth quarter. Environmental studies are reported.

  17. Trace element mineral transformations associated with hydration and recarbonation of retorted oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essington, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hydration and recarbonation on the solidphase distribution of trace elements in retorted oil shale. The oil shale samples were retorted by the Paraho direct heating process and equilibrated with deionized—distilled water under controlled carbon dioxide conditions. A sequential extraction technique was then used to fractionate trace elements into soluble, KNO3-extractable (easily exchangeable), H2O-extractable (easily adsorbed), NaOh-extractable (organic), EDTA-extractable (carbonate), HNO3-extractable (sulfide), and residual (nonextractable silicate) phases. The chemical fractions present in retorted oil shale and hydrated and recarbonated retorted oil shale were compared to identify trace element mineralogical changes that may occur in retorted oil shale disposal environments. Trace elements examined in this study were found to reside predominantly in the HNO3-extractable and residual fractions. Hydration of retorted oil shale resulted in a shift in the majority of trace elements from residual to extractable forms. Cobalt, nickel, and zinc extractabilities were not significantly influenced by hydration, whereas antimony increased in the residual fraction. Subjecting retorted oil shale to atmospheric (0.033%) and 10% CO2(g) levels over a nine-month equilibration period resulted in partial and full recarbonation, respectively. As the influence of recarbonation increased, trace elements reverted to residual forms. Vanadium, choromium, copper, zinc, antimony, and molybdenum in the 10% CO2(g) recarbonated material were more resistant to sequential extraction than in retorted oil shale, whereas strontium, barium, and manganese were less resistant to sequential extraction. The extractabilities of cobalt, nickel, and lead were not affected by recarbonation. Recarbonation did not result in a predicted increase in EDTA-extractable trace elements. In general, the amounts of trace elements extracted by EDTA (and

  18. Postburn lithology and mineralogy at Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's Tract C-a retort 1, Rio Blanco County, Colorado. [Core samples from near the in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, L.G.; Mason, G.M.; Fahy, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide basic data on some of the characteristics of a modified in situ (MIS) oil shale retort after processing. Samples of retort contents and overburden were obtained from three core holes drilled into Rio Blanco's Tract C-a retort 1 in the western part of the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. The retort operation had been completed nearly four years before the coring, and the cavity and mine workings had been flooded by groundwater for almost one year. Cores were characterized by lithologic description, x-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy. Drilling and logging records indicate as much as 35 to 40 feet of roof rock has collapsed into the retort since the burn was terminated. A water-filled attic cavity 46 to 62 feet high exists at the top of the retort. One core hole penetrated 377 feet of rubble in the retort and floor rock with numerous fractures below the retort. Most of the material recovered from the retort consisted of highly altered, fused and vesicular rock. Lesser amounts of carbonized, oxidized and moderately heated-altered oil shale were recovered from the upper and lower parts. Raw shale roof fall at the top and unretorted oil shale rubble at the bottom are also present. Thermal alteration has produced high-temperature silicate minerals from the original mixtures of carbonate and silicate minerals in the raw oil shale. Adequate material was recovered from the retort contents to provide valuable data on the lithologic, mineralogic, and physical characteristics of the MIS retort. 19 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. True in situ oil shale retort: the role of intrashale transport and char gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Louvar, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical understanding of the true in situ crack retort process for Eastern oil shale was expanded by: establishing the role of intrashale 2-dimensional transport on the performance of the retort; determining the significance of the intrashale char gasification reactions with water and carbon dioxide; and determining the conditions for improving the retort performance. Two computer simulation models were developed, one with 1-D mass transport and another with 2-D mass transport. The 1-D transport model includes: 2-D energy transport; variable physical properties; and instantaneous 1-D transfer of the pyrolysis products to the crack. The 2-D transport model includes; 2-D energy transport; variable physical properties; 2-D species transport within the oil shale; and pyrolysis, gasification, and oxidation reactions within the oil shale. The performance of the two models were studied. The results show that the 2-D transport feature has a significant impact on the performance of a true in situ Eastern oil shale retort. Intrashale pressure profiles were found to be very complex, distributing the pyrolysis and gasification products into the crack over a broad region. Results were used to develop regression equations to establish the functional relationships between the dependent and independent variables. Retort performance varied significantly with only minor changes in the operating variables: crack width, inlet gas moisture, ignition time, and gas inlet rate. The regression equations were also used to determine the optimum retort performance while constraining the gas temperature within a reasonable operating region. This theoretically predicted low optimum performance and variable sensitivity identify new problems which make the successful operation of a true in situ crack retort more difficult than previously anticipated.

  20. Evaluation of control technology for modified in-situ oil-shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate two technologies to control groundwater pollution due to leaching of abandoned modified in-situ (MIS) retorts, retort grouting and international leaching. Retort grouting to reduce permeability was evaluated by measuring the permeability of grouts containing only raw or refined waste materials (Lurgi spent shale, fly ash, gypsum tailings, and lignosulfonate fluidizers). Permeability of the cured grouts decreased with increasing confining pressure. Electrical conductivity measurements on the permeate produced during permeability measurements suggest that grouting abandoned MIS retorts would increase the TDS of leachate by a factor of approximately 3; benefit of the proposed grouting operation would depend upon the flow rate through retorts being reduced by a greater factor to reduce the total mass (concentration x flow) of solute released. Costs for international leaching depend primarily upon the volume of leachate to be treated. The required number of pore volumes of leaching to reduce leachate concentration to 10% of its initial value was found to be 2.1 at tract C-a and 3.4 at tract C-b; the difference is due primarily to the greater void volume used at tract C-a (40% compared to 23%). Both technologies would require a large amount of water. Retort grouting requires water to prewet the MIS spent shale and to prepare the grout. These requirements were estimated at 140 to 210 gal/bbl of oil, considering only oil recovered by in-situ retorting. International leaching requires water to saturate the MIS spent shale and to replace blowdown or rejected brine from the leachate treatment process. These requirements were estimated at approximately 120 gal/bbl of oil.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory oil shale project quarterly report, July-September 1984. [Moving-bed retort

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.E.

    1984-11-01

    Highlights of progress achieved during the quarter ending September, 1984, are summarized. Additional parameter studies using our moving-bed retort model were completed for an external-combustion, hot gas retort. Previously reported studies focused on effects of variations in the temperature and flow rate of the recycle gas and the dimensions of the retort. More recently, we investigated the effects of variations in shale grade, water content, flow rate, particle size, and bed porosity. We also considered effects of permeability contrast within a retort. The LLNL one-dimensional model for simulating oil shale retorting in an aboveground, moving-bed retort was applied to the indirect mode of operation in which externally heated recycle gas provides the heat required for the retorting process. Variations in recycle-gas temperature and flow rate, shale flow rate, shale grade, water content, particle size distribution, bed porosity, uniformity of porosity, and retort dimensions were studied. We have been evaluating the results for determining hydrogen sulfide and trace sulfur in gases taken from the pyrolysis portion of the retort after leaving the oil condensers, as determined by the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) for the retort runs R-2 through R-7. These runs were conducted in our hot solid retort system consisting of a fluidized bed pyrolyzer, a cascading bed combustor, and recirculating gas and solid streams. Differences had been noted between determinations of the H/sub 2/S by Draeger tubes and the portable on-line mini-quadrupole mass spectrometer (Analog Technology Corp. Automated Trace Gas Monitor Model 2001), and the grab samples run on the TQMS. The error was due to a complex mix of ion gauge response, gas viscosities and pumping speeds.

  2. Neutron Imaging of Lithium Concentration in Battery Pouch Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    battery pouch cell is constructed based on the material densities and dimensions. This model is aug- mented with simulation of the neutron...the electrolyte solution limit the performance and longevity of the battery [2], [3]. The electrode material can be modeled as a distribution of...based and scalable battery models of the spatiotemporal varia- tions in lithium concentration throughout the electrode and electrolyte . Although

  3. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  4. The Kock pouch reconsidered: an alternative surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Alison; Williams, Julia; Woodhouse, Fran

    The psychological impact stoma surgery can have on an individual is well documented within the literature (White and Hunt, 1997; Borwell, 2009; Williams, 2005; Brown, 2005). For many years, surgeons have explored and developed innovations in surgical techniques, in particular restorative procedures with a view of preventing permanent stoma formation; ileal anal pouch (IAP) now being the surgical procedure of choice for treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, high morbidity rates are associated with pouch longevity (Castillo et al 2005; Nessar and Wu, 2012) and once removed can lead to a high-output ileostomy with risks of electrolyte imbalance and malabsorption. This then creates the dilemma of whether the Kock pouch (KP) should be offered as a surgical option. This article offers a historical perspective of the KP and its place in the surgical management of UC and FAP. This article also presents results from a recent audit funded by the Ileostomy Association (IA), highlighting how patients manage their KP and the importance of maintaining bowel control and being free of an incontinent stoma as a means of coming to terms with their condition.

  5. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting – A Systems Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty

    2012-12-01

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The major water consumption was during the remediation of the insitu retorting zone.

  6. Method for control of geometry of fragmented mass in an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T. E.

    1985-12-24

    A method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is provided. The in situ retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles within top, bottom, and generally vertically extending side boundaries of unfragmented formation. A lower portion of the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles having a nonlevel top surface is initially formed in the retort. A void space is left within the retort boundaries extending between the nonlevel top surface of the fragmented mass lower portion and a generally horizontally extending free face of an overlying layer of unfragmented formation. Thereafter, the overlying layer of unfragmented formation is explosively expanded into the void space to thereby form the remaining portion of the fragmented mass in the retort. The overlying layer is expanded in a plurality of separate horizontally spaced regions with a time delay between explosive expansion of each successive region. The average vertical distance from the generally horizontal free face of each such region of the layer expanded earlier in the sequence to the nonlevel top surface of the lower portion of the fragmented mass is greater than the average vertical distance from the generally horizontal free face of each such region expanded later in the sequence to the nonlevel top surface of the lower portion of the fragmented mass.

  7. A plan for hydrologic investigations of in situ, oil-shale retorting near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, Kent C.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Larson, L.R.; Wallace, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The recovery of shale oil by the in-situ retort process may cause hydrologic impacts, the most significant being ground-water contamination and possible transport of contaminants into surrounding areas. Although these impacts are site-specific, many of the techniques used to investigate each retort operation commonly will be the same. The U.S. Geological Survey has begun a study of hydrologic impacts in the area of an in-situ retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, as a means of refining and demonstrating these techniques. Geological investigations include determining the areal extent and thickness of aquifers. Emphasis will be placed on determining lithologic variations from geophysical logging. Hydrologic investigations include mapping of potentiometric surfaces, determining rates of ground-water discharge, and estimating aquifer properties by analytical techniques. Water-quality investigations include monitoring solute migration from the retort site and evaluating sampling techniques by standard statistical procedures. A ground-water-flow and solute-transport model will be developed to predict future movement of the water plume away from the retort. (USGS)

  8. Mercury emissions from a modified in-situ oil shale retort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Pollard, Martin J.; Brown, Nancy J.

    Gaseous Hg emissions were measured during the processing of a large modified in-situ oil shale retort (4×10 4 m 3) in Colorado. A continuous, on-line, gas monitor based upon the principal of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy was the primary analytical method. The on-line monitor technique was shown to be well suited for this application and compared favorably with an independent reference method which collects gaseous Hg by Au-amalgamation. Forty-two hours of on-line data were obtained over a 35-day period during the latter half of the retort burn. Hg emission rates in g day -1 were calculated from Hg concentration and offgas flow rate data. The predicted total gaseous Hg mass emission for the retort was 4 kg. Extrapolation of the data to a hypothetical modified in-situ oil shale facility with a daily production of 8× 10 61 (5 × 10 4 bbl) of oil results in a projected emission rate of ≈ 8 kg day -1. This estimated value is higher than Hg emission rates recorded for coal fired power plants. Emission rates were found to be highly variable both within and between days. Factors which may limit Hg emissions from a modified in-situ retort are discussed. Adsorption losses to unretorted shale at the bottom of a retort are suggested as a major sink for Hg. Losses of Hg to the extensive offgas plumbing system may also be substantial.

  9. Method of attenuating airblast from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    French, G. B.

    1980-12-16

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale and including underground workings by excavating a means for access to a retort site in the formation, excavating a void in the retort site at least in part from the means for access, leaving a remaining portion of the unfragmented formation in the retort site adjacent the void, placing explosive in the remaining portion of formation, and detonating the explosive in such unfragmented formation in a single round to explosively expand formation toward the void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ retort. A permeable barrier is provided between the void and the underground workings which provide means for access to such a void. The permeable barrier has a cross-section for gas flow which is substantially smaller than the transverse cross-section of such means for access, and the cross-section of such permeable barrier temporarily confines gas from such explosive expansion and limits flow of such gas to such means for access to attentuate airblast in underground workings. A fragmented permeable mass of formation particles produced during excavation of the void can provide such a permeable barrier.

  10. Method of in situ oil shale retort ignition with oxygen control

    SciTech Connect

    Gragg, F.M.; Jacobson, L.; Shen, J.C.

    1984-05-15

    A method for recovering liquid and gaseous products from an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale is provided. A hot ignition gas comprising oxygen at a first selected concentration is introduced into the fragmented mass for heating the fragmented mass top surface. The percentage of the fragmented mass top surface that is at a temperature no less than the ignition temperature of oil shale is determined. Thereafter, the concentration of oxygen in the ignition gas is increased by an amount proportional to the determined percentage. Such heating of the fragmented mass top surface establishes a combustion zone in the retort. After the combustion zone has spread horizontally across the retort, introduction of the hot ignition gas is discontinued. Thereafter, an oxygen-supplying gas is introduced into the retort for advancing the combustion zone downwardly through the fragmented mass. Liquid and gaseous products are produced in a retorting zone on the advancing side of the combustion zone and are recovered.

  11. Evaluation of control technology for modified in situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate two technologies to control groundwater pollution due to leaching of abandoned modified in-situ (MIS) retorts, retort grouting and intentional leaching. Retort grouting to reduce permeability was evaluated by measuring the permeability of grouts containing only raw or refined waste materials (Lurgi spent shale, fly ash, gypsum tailings, and lignosulfonate fluidizers). The principal factor controlling grout formulation was the requirement for adequate fluidity without bleeding. This was achieved by inclusion of 0.25% lignosulfonate fluidizer in the grout. Permeability of the cured grouts decreased with increasing confining pressure; at 200 psi confining pressure, permeabilities as low as 5x10/sup -7/ cm/sec were measured. Electrical conductivity measurements on the permeate produced during permeability measurements suggest that grouting abandoned MIS retorts would increase the TDS of leachate by a factor of approximately 3; benefit of the proposed grouting operation would depend upon the flow rate through retorts being reduced by a greater factor to reduce the total mass (concentration x flow) of solute released. Comparison of the measured grout permeabilities to the permeability of surrounding rock suggest that this would be the case.

  12. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in-situ oil-shale-retorting process. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S.F.

    1982-08-01

    The ignition of Retort No. 25 took place on October 15, 1981. The operation was a success and the fire front remained uniform throughout the quarter. Production of crude shale oil from Retort No. 25 was 7153 barrels during the quarter. Stack gas analysis began on Retort No. 25 as part of normal air quality studies. The re-entry drilling program began on Retort No. 26 and all process wells were completed in December. Blasthole drilling began on the Retort No. 27 site in November. By the end of December, 16,416 feet had been drilled and an early February shot date is scheduled. Retort No. 27 will be twice the size of Retort No. 26. Lab personnel were involved in the testing of retort water for scrubbing purposes and the removal of H/sub 2/S gas. The new Kamp Kerogen water well was completed and put into service. Three mobile homes were relocated on the new mobile home park. Hook-ups were made and services provided.

  13. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  14. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, July, August, September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    Progress is reported by Geokinetics on the successful blasting of Retort No. 25. Preparations are described for the ignition of Retort No. 24 nearing completion. This will be the largest retort processing facility utilized to date. Meteorological data of the area was obtained for permit applications from the Utah Air Conservation Committee and the US EPA. These must be obtained before ignition of retort No. 24. Drilling for the post-burn core sampling program (Retorts No. 16 and No. 17) was completed during the quarter. Approval to inject effluent water into the Mesa Verde Formation through a deep well was obtained. Construction of a new 1 1/2 acre evaporating pond has begun. The DOE Oil Shale Task Force will aid in the environmental research program; its role is described. A new vibro-rotary hammer was tested. Drilling penetration rates increased by 35%. A patent on horizontal fracturing methods was obtained. (DMC)

  15. Plasmodium berghei-Hamster Cheek Pouch Model for the Study of Severe Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-21

    rCFILE COY ] Plasmodium berghei-llansler Cheek Pouch Model for the study of Severe Malaria Lfl C) David R. Franz, Wallace B. Baze, G. David Young...PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Plasmodium bergehei-Hamster Cheek Pouch Model...CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necesry and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Hamster cheek pouch, Plasmodium berghei

  16. Evaluation of physical-chemical and biological treatment of shale oil retort water

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, B.W.; Mason, M.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Wakamiya, W.

    1982-09-01

    Bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate conventional physical-chemical and biological treatment processes for removal of pollutants from retort water produced by in situ shale oil recovery methods. Prior to undertaking these studies, very little information had been reported on treatment of retort water. A treatment process train patterned after that generally used throughout the petroleum refining industry was envisioned for application to retort water. The treatment train would consist of processes for removing suspended matter, ammonia, biodegradable organics, and nonbiodegradable or refractory organics. The treatment processes evaluated include anaerobic digestion and activated sludge for removal of biodegradable organics and other oxidizable substances; activated carbon adsorption for removal of nonbiodegradable organics; steam stripping for ammonia removal; and chemical coagulation, sedimentation and filtration for removal of suspended matter. Preliminary cost estimates are provided.

  17. Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort with horizontal free faces

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.; Fernandes, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort is provided. A horizontally extending void is excavated in unfragmented formation containing oil shale and a zone of unfragmented formation is left adjacent the void. An array of explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation. The array of explosive charges comprises rows of central explosive charges surrounded by a band of outer explosive charges which are adjacent side boundaries of the retort being formed. The powder factor of each outer explosive charge is made about equal to the powder factor of each central explosive charge. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles having a reasonably uniformly distributed void fraction in the in situ oil shale retort.

  18. Retorting of oil shale followed by solvent extraction of spent shale: Experiment and kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khraisha, Y.H.

    2000-05-01

    Samples of El-Lajjun oil shale were thermally decomposed in a laboratory retort system under a slow heating rate (0.07 K/s) up to a maximum temperature of 698--773 K. After decomposition, 0.02 kg of spent shale was extracted by chloroform in a Soxhlet extraction unit for 2 h to investigate the ultimate amount of shale oil that could be produced. The retorting results indicate an increase in the oil yields from 3.24% to 9.77% of oil shale feed with retorting temperature, while the extraction results show a decrease in oil yields from 8.10% to 3.32% of spent shale. The analysis of the data according to the global first-order model for isothermal and nonisothermal conditions shows kinetic parameters close to those reported in literature.

  19. Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

  20. Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.

    1979-12-07

    A process is described for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

  1. Final report on the use of gaseous tracers in WRI's 10-ton nonuniform oil shale retorting tests

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1985-12-01

    For tests on nonuniform oil shale retorting, Western Research Institute's 10-ton retort was loaded with shale rubble in zones of different permeability. The permeability of any given zone was determined by the particle size range loaded into that zone. The retort was studied using gas tracer techniques and flow model simulations. Results of these tracer studies are discussed in this report. Nine retorting and tracer runs were made on the retort. For each run, tracer injections were made into the main air flow inlet and into taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps were located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level in tests S71 through S78 and six taps on each level in run S79. The oil shale rubble bed was configured with a cylindrical core in tests S71 through S78 and with two side-by-side regions with differing bed properties in test S79. Relationships are shown between the tracer response and sweep efficiency, oil yield, and local yield. Model simulations are compared with tracer responses and indicate fair agreement between model-estimated and measured response times but poor agreement on the shapes of the response curves. Although the data are scattered, there is suggestive evidence that the sweep efficiency of a retort can be determined using simple inlet-to-outlet tracer tests. Oil yield can also be predicted for the operating conditions used for the nonuniform retorting tests. More tests on retorts with intermediate degrees of nonuniformity must be made to confirm the correlations developed in this study. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in-situ oil-shale-retorting process. Quarterly report, January, February, March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S.F.

    1982-08-01

    At the end of March 1982, Retort No. 25 was in its 167th day of burning with a total oil production of 16,599 barrels, an average of 99 barrels per day for this five month burn period. Total oil production for the first quarter was 9187 barrels, an average of 3062 barrels per month or 102 barrels per day. Various environmental studies were carried out on Retort No. 25 during this burn period, as defined in the Environment Research Plan. Stack gas analyses show that the retort operated within the PSD established emission levels. Lab and field experiments continued on a wet scrubber to remove H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ from the process gas. Process and instrumentation wells were drilled on Retort No. 26. All process holes were completed in February and all instrumentation holes were finished in March. Installment of process manifolding, surface piping and thermocouples is continuing. The Retort No. 27 site was prepared for blasting during January and February with detonation of the retort accomplished on February 25. Retort No. 27, the first 2 acre retort, used 283,000 pounds of Ireco explosive loaded into 354 blast holes. Important data concerning the effect of retort size increase, early overburden motion and the effects of blast design modifications upon shale fracturing characteristics were obtained from this blast. Preliminary indications show that the blast was a success and post blast analysis is presently in progress to evaluate the characteristics of the blast. During the quarter, the second and third suite of samples for the Retort No. 25 fugitive emissions study were gathered. From this study, it was concluded that more sampling will be required before fugitive emission rates can be properly characterized.

  3. A review of complementary mechanisms which protect the developing marsupial pouch young.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M J; Hinds, L A; Deane, E M; Deakin, J E

    2012-06-01

    Marsupials are born without a functioning adaptive immune system, into a non-sterile environment where they continue to develop. This review examines the extent of exposure of pouch young to microorganisms and describes the protective mechanisms that are complementary to adaptive immunity in the developing young. Complementary protective mechanisms include the role of the innate immune system and maternal protection strategies, such as immune compounds in milk, prenatal transfer of immunoglobulins, antimicrobial compounds secreted in the pouch, and chemical or mechanical cleaning of the pouch and pouch young.

  4. Mercury isotope fractionation during ore retorting in the Almadén mining district, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John E.; Pribil, Michael J.; Higueras, Pablo L.

    2013-01-01

    Almadén, Spain, is the world's largest mercury (Hg) mining district, which has produced over 250,000 metric tons of Hg representing about 30% of the historical Hg produced worldwide. The objective of this study was to measure Hg isotopic compositions of cinnabar ore, mine waste calcine (retorted ore), elemental Hg (Hg0(L)), and elemental Hg gas (Hg0(g)), to evaluate potential Hg isotopic fractionation. Almadén cinnabar ore δ202Hg varied from − 0.92 to 0.15‰ (mean of − 0.56‰, σ = 0.35‰, n = 7), whereas calcine was isotopically heavier and δ202Hg ranged from − 0.03‰ to 1.01‰ (mean of 0.43‰, σ = 0.44‰, n = 8). The average δ202Hg enrichment of 0.99‰ between cinnabar ore and calcines generated during ore retorting indicated Hg isotopic mass dependent fractionation (MDF). Mass independent fractionation (MIF) was not observed in any of the samples in this study. Laboratory retorting experiments of cinnabar also were carried out to evaluate Hg isotopic fractionation of products generated during retorting such as calcine, Hg0(L), and Hg0(g). Calcine and Hg0(L) generated during these retorting experiments showed an enrichment in δ202Hg of as much as 1.90‰ and 0.67‰, respectively, compared to the original cinnabar ore. The δ202Hg for Hg0(g) generated during the retorting experiments was as much as 1.16‰ isotopically lighter compared to cinnabar, thus, when cinnabar ore was roasted, the resultant calcines formed were isotopically heavier, whereas the Hg0(g) generated was isotopically lighter in Hg isotopes.

  5. Design and test of two-step solar oil shale retort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, D. W.; Taylor, R. W.; Aiman, W. R.; Ruiz, R.

    1981-09-01

    A design of a two step solar retort, the logic for the design, and the results from a preliminary test of the design at the White Sands Solar Furnace, New Mexico are presented. Solar retorting of oil shale is a technically feasible process where focused solar energy can displace fossil energy in the production of liquid fuels. The predicted result is a 10 to 40% improvement in the exportable fuel (oil + gas) production per ton of raw shale. Greater improvements are achieved with the lower grade shales where with nonsolar processes a larger fraction of the fuel content has to be used in the processing.

  6. Geotechnical Properties of Oil Shale Retorted by the PARAHO and TOSCO Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    outlet size set by consideration of particle interlucking, flow rate, etc. 235 .," Material Oil shale B. With vibrating equipment ] Material not suited...AD-AB.a 317 ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG--ETC F/S 8/7 GEOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF OIL SHALE RETORTED BY THE PARAHO AND-ETC(U...lEEllllElhllIE MEJ I .LEVEL. TECHNICAL REPORT 66-79-22 GEOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF OILas SHALE RETORTED BY THE PARAHO AND C TOSCO PROCESSES by ( Frank C

  7. Safety and Long-Term Performance of Lithium-ion Pouch Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have the highest energy density of the batteries available in the commercial market today. Although most lithium-ion cell designs use a metal can design, this has changed significantly in recent years. Cell designs are offered in the pouch format as they offer better volumetric and gravimetric energy densities and in some cases, higher tolerance to abuse or off-nominal conditions. In the past decade, several state-of-the-art lithium-ion pouch cell designs have been tested. The pouch cell designs have become more robust in the past two years but there are still a few issues that need to be looked into for optimization. The pouch cells seem to have a tendency to swell when left in storage under ambient conditions. The cells also swell under overvoltage and undervoltage conditions. A significant issue that has been observed is the swelling of the cells under a vacuum condition which could lead to deformation of the cell pouch after this exposure. This last factor would be very critical in the use of these cell designs for space applications as vacuum exposure is used to check for cell and battery leaks before it is flown into space. In rare cases, corrosion of the aluminum layer of the pouches has been observed in stored cells. Pouch material analysis has been carried out in an effort to understand the strength of the pouches and determine if this is a factor in the corrosion as well as unsafe condition of the cells as deformation of the inner layers of the pouch could occur when the cells swell under the various conditions described above. Pouch materials are typically aluminized plastic, made up of a layer of Al sandwiched between one or more layers of polymeric material. Deformations or cell manufacturing processes could lead to a compromise of the inner polymeric layer/s of the pouch leading to the corrosion of the Al layer in the aluminized pouch material. The safety of the pouch cell designs has been determined for cells from various

  8. Parafilm-M®, An Available Cost-Effective Alternative for Immuno-blot Pouches.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Syed M S

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available standard immuno-blot pouches do play an efficient role in antibody incubation in performing an immuno-blot, but are not readily available in the laboratory and have to be specifically ordered. We have developed an equally efficient technique to make an immune-blot more cost-effective with more conservation of antibodies by using a common and readily available laboratory product Parafilm-M(®). Parafilm-M(®) which serves as a sealant for various items of laboratory equipment can be used for antibody incubation. Manually made Parafilm-M(®) pouch has a clear advantage over standard immuno-blot pouches in terms of availability, cost-effectiveness, and consumption of antibodies that ultimately reduces the cost of an immuno-blot. We have performed a series of experiments to check the efficacy of both the techniques. Samples with equal amount of protein were analyzed on separate SDS PAGE gels. The proteins were transferred electrophoretically to the nitrocellulose membrane using Trans-Blot(®) Turbo™ Mini Nitrocellulose Transfer Pack. Antibody incubation was done using standard immuno-blot pouch, standard container and Parafilm-M(®) sealed pouch. The expression of protein was determined and the results of immuno-blots were compared. We found that antibodies are binding the membrane in Parafilm-M(®) pouches as efficiently as in container method or in standard immuno-blot pouches. By restricting the membrane, the surface area of the manually made Parafilm-M(®) pouch can be reduced, less diluent is required to cover the membrane as a result less antibodies are consumed. We also calculated that each immuno-blot pouch cost around $0.1906, whereas the cost for Parafilm-M(®) pouch is 0.0695 which is almost one-third the price of an immuno-blot pouch. Thus, Parafilm-M(®) method distinctly provides a cost-effective solution for antibody incubation.

  9. The hamster cheek pouch model for field cancerization studies.

    PubMed

    Monti-Hughes, Andrea; Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, Maria E

    2015-02-01

    External carcinogens, such as tobacco and alcohol, induce molecular changes in large areas of oral mucosa, which increase the risk of malignant transformation. This condition, known as 'field cancerization', can be detected in biopsy specimens using histochemical techniques, even before histological alterations are identified. The efficacy of these histochemical techniques as biomarkers of early cancerization must be demonstrated in appropriate models. The hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, universally employed in biological studies and in studies for the prevention and treatment of oral cancer, is also an excellent model of field cancerization. The carcinogen is applied in solution to the surface of the mucosa and induces alterations that recapitulate the stages of cancerization in human oral mucosa. We have demonstrated that the following can be used for the early detection of cancerized tissue: silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions; the Feulgen reaction to stain DNA followed by ploidy analysis; immunohistochemical analysis of fibroblast growth factor-2, immunohistochemical labeling of proliferating cells to demonstrate an increase of epithelial cell proliferation in the absence of inflammation; and changes in markers of angiogenesis (i.e. those indicating vascular endothelial growth factor activity, endothelial cell proliferation and vascular density). The hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer was also proposed and validated by our group for boron neutron capture therapy studies for the treatment of oral cancer. Clinical trials of this novel treatment modality have been performed and are underway for certain tumor types and localizations. Having demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy to control tumors in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, we adapted the model for the long-term study of field cancerized tissue. We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of boron neutron capture therapy on tumor development in field

  10. Tunguska, 1908: the gas pouch and soil fluidization hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Siberian taiga explosion of 30 June 1908 remains one of the great mysteries of the 20th century: millions of trees put down over an area of 2200 km2 without trace of a crater or meteorite fragments. Hundred years of failed searches have followed, resulting in as many flawed hypothesis which could not offer satisfactory explanations: meteorite, comet, UFO, etc. In the author's opinion, the cause is that the energy the explorers looked for was simply not there! The author's hypothesis is that a meteoroid encountered a gas pouch in the atmosphere, producing a devastating explosion, its effects being amplified by soil fluidization.

  11. Evaluation by respirometry of the degradability of retort water using a shale ash and overburden packed column.

    PubMed

    Clarke, W P; Ho, N M; Taylor, M; Coombs, S; Bell, P R; Picaro, T

    2005-08-01

    Oil shale processing produces an aqueous wastewater stream known as retort water. The fate of the organic content of retort water from the Stuart oil shale project (Gladstone, Queensland) is examined in a proposed packed bed treatment system consisting of a 1:1 mixture of residual shale from the retorting process and mining overburden. The retort water had a neutral pH and an average unfiltered TOC of 2,900 mg 1(-1). The inorganic composition of the retort water was dominated by NH4+. Only 40% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the retort water was identifiable, and this was dominated by carboxylic acids. In addition to monitoring influent and effluent TOC concentrations, CO2 evolution was monitored on line by continuous measurements of headspace concentrations and air flow rates. The column was run for 64 days before it blocked and was dismantled for analysis. Over 98% of the TOC was removed from the retort water. Respirometry measurements were confounded by CO2 production from inorganic sources. Based on predictions with the chemical equilibrium package PHREEQE, approximately 15% of the total CO2 production arose from the reaction of NH4+ with carbonates. The balance of the CO2 production accounted for at least 80% of the carbon removed from the retort water. Direct measurements of solid organic carbon showed that approximately 20% of the influent carbon was held-up in the top 20cm of the column. Less than 20% of this held-up carbon was present as either biomass or as adsorbed species. Therefore, the column was ultimately blocked by either extracellular polymeric substances or by a sludge that had precipitated out of the retort water.

  12. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Mie Dilling; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Hvidsten, Svend; Kjeldsen, Jens; Gerke, Oke; Qvist, Niels

    2015-10-10

    Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105-365). Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF) was 49% (3-77) and 62% (17-98) after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100-360). A median daily stool frequency of nine (4-25) was reported and three (14%) patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90%) patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF) and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI) and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful.

  13. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Kjaer, Mie Dilling; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Hvidsten, Svend; Kjeldsen, Jens; Gerke, Oke; Qvist, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365). Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF) was 49% (3–77) and 62% (17–98) after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360). A median daily stool frequency of nine (4–25) was reported and three (14%) patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90%) patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF) and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI) and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful. PMID:26854162

  14. Pharyngeal neuromuscular dysfunction associated with bilateral guttural pouch tympany in a foal

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A 2-month-old warmblood filly was presented for a 1-week history of a large, nonpainful, fluctuant swelling of the parotid and laryngeal area. Bilateral guttural pouch tympany was diagnosed. Surgical correction resolved the guttural pouch tympany; however, postoperative pharyngeal neuromuscular dysfunction developed. PMID:17334035

  15. Optimization of operating parameters of endothermic generators with electric heating of retort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, A. M.; Fink, A. V.; Kagarmanov, G. R.

    2009-07-01

    Equations of heat and gas balance of endothermic generator at air conversion of methane are used for optimizing the parameters with respect to maximum yield of hydrogen and carbon oxide at minimum consumption of electric energy for heating the retort with catalyst.

  16. Monitoring in situ retorting processes of oil shale by reflected and transmitted electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. H.; DuBow, J. B.

    1980-07-01

    A theoretical model for an in situ oil shale retort with three distinct vertical zones, all surrounded by a wall of oil shale, overburden and underburden, is considered for the study of potential electromagnetic monitoring of the progression of retorting processes using wave propagation techniques. The overall power reflection and transmission coefficients for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves are used for finding the position of a combustion zone in the retort, based upon the assumption of straight-line propagation of monochromatic plane waves through layered lossy dielectric media characterized by the dielectric constants and loss tangents. The behavior of each power coefficient is discussed as a function of burn front positions and signal frequencies. As a result of the relatively moderate signal power for each coefficient required for detection, and the one-to-one correspondence between each power coefficient and burn front position at typical conditions, the feasibility of using low radio-frequency waves to monitor relatively large scale in situ retorting process is established.

  17. Investigation of tracer tests on the Western Research Institute 10-ton retort

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1984-05-01

    An oil shale rubble bed with contrasting permeability regions is investigated using a gas tracer in conjunction with a two-dimensional flow and tracer model and with a one-dimensional dispersion model. Six runs on the retort are discussed. Tracer injections are made into the main flow inlet and into five taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps are located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level. The one-dimensional dispersion model is fit to the tracer response curves producing estimates of dispersion and space time in the retort. The dispersion model produces reasonable estimates where the fluid flow deviates only slightly from vertical. The two-dimensional flow model developed by Travis at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is compared to tracer velocities. The correlation between the model and the data is good in the last of the six tests. The correlation is not as good in the earlier tests and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  18. Growth of bacteria in an oil shale retort water by indigenous microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gauger, W.K.; Williams, S.E.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relatively high aerobic and anaerobic (or facultatively anaerobic) heterotrophic bacterial population densities occur as indicated by an increase in the turbidity of freshly filtered (0.4 ..mu..m) Omega-9 retort water after a few days incubation at room temperature. Growth of these microorganisms alters the nature and concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic constituents. Bacteria are the only microorganisms known to have demonstrated a capacity to grow in undiluted Omega-9 retort water. Bacterial growth experiments are performed for a variety of reasons. In some situations microorganisms are cultivated to yield a specific product, as a protein source, or because their growth in a particular medium removes certain undesired constituents. Nutritional and physical parameters will often govern the rate at which growing microbial populations proliferate. It was considered important, therefore, to establish what rates of bacterial growth were occurring in the Omega-9 retort water by indigenous, mixed bacterial populations. The study reported here was devised to assess bacterial growth characteristics in an example retort water. Information of this type may have implications in 1) the development of biological treatment systems, 2) establishing hazard assessment and abatement criteria, and 3) in assessing the stability of research samples.

  19. Rock motion simulation and prediction of porosity distribution for a two-void-level retort

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The computer program DMC (Distinct Motion Code) was developed in 1988 and 1989 to predict the motion of rock following a conventional blast. The ability to predict the rock motion associated with oil shale retort blasting, along with the induced porosity distribution, has been a driving force behind the development of DMC. Earlier this year DMC was used to simulate the rock motion associated with the rubblization of Occidental Oil Shale's Retort Number 8 which was a three-void-level retort processed in 1982. This paper discusses the algorithm developed to compute the porosity distribution of the muck after rock motion. It also contains a simulation of a two-void-level retort rubblization plan proposed by Ricketts, 1989. DMC is used to model the rock motion associated with the blasting and to obtain a final porosity distribution. Some improvement in the porosity distribution is seen over that observed in the three-void-level simulation. Thus, it may be that the two-void-level approach is not only more efficient to mine, but may also produce a more uniform rubble bed. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Cytotoxicity of synthetic fuel products on Tetrahymena pyriformis. II. Shale oil retort water.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Dumont, J N; Kyte, L M

    1978-11-01

    Shale oil retort water is obtained by centrifuging the oil/water emulsion produced by oil shale retorting. The ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis was exposed to retort water; 2, 1, and 0.5% initially increased motility; longer exposures decreased motility. Three, 4, and 5% all decreased motility. Cell lysis was directly related to concentration; after 24 h, population densities were 0, 10, and 25% of controls for 2, 1, and 0.5% retort water, respectively. Oxygen consumption paralleled the motility pattern: at lower concentrations it increased initially but decreased with extended exposures while at higher concentrations it decreased rapidly. The most striking cytologic alteration of cells exposed to the toxicant occurred in the membranes; alterations of mucocysts and glycogen content were also observed, but mitochondrial changes were not. Population growth was affected at much lower concentrations than the other test indices. The growth of test populations reached a plateau at values inversely related to concentration: concentrations less than 0.4% had no effect on growth rate.

  1. Documentation of INL’s In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Larry Hull

    2012-12-01

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an in situ retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The document discusses each of the three phases used in the model.

  2. Mercury retorting of calcine waste, contaminated soils and railroad ballast at the Idaho National Egineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, G.B.; Rothermel, J.S.; Sherwood, J.; Heath, S.A.; Lo, T.Y.R.

    1996-02-28

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in nuclear reactor research and development for over 40 years. One of the earliest major projects involved the development of a nuclear powered aircraft engine, a long-term venture which used mercury as a shielding medium. Over the course of several years, a significant amount of mercury was spilled along the railroad tracks where the test engines were transported and stored. In addition, experiments with volume reduction of waste through a calcine process employing mercury as a catalyst resulted in mercury contaminated calcine waste. Both the calcine and Test Area North wastes have been identified in Department of Energy Action Memorandums to be retorted, thereby separating the mercury from the various contaminated media. Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company awarded the Mercury Retort contract to ETAS Corporation and assigned Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. to manage the treatment field activities. The mercury retort process entails a mobile unit which consists of four trailer-mounted subsystems requiring electricity, propane, and a water supply. This mobile system demonstrates an effective strategy for retorting waste and generating minimal secondary waste.

  3. Impact of overall and particle surface heat transfer coefficients on thermal process optimization in rotary retorts.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Abakarov, A; Almonacid, S; Teixeira, A

    2008-10-01

    This study attempts to examine the significance of recent research that has focused on efforts to estimate values for global and surface heat transfer coefficients under forced convection heating induced by end-over-end rotation in retorting of canned peas in brine. The study confirms the accuracy of regression analysis used to predict values for heat transfer coefficients as a function of rotating speed and headspace, and uses them to predict values over a range of process conditions, which make up the search domain for process optimization. These coefficients were used in a convective heat transfer model to establish a range of lethality-equivalent retort temperature-time processes for various conditions of retort temperature, rotating speed, and headspace. Then, they were coupled with quality factor kinetics to predict the final volume average and surface quality retention resulting from each process and to find the optimal thermal process conditions for canned fresh green peas. Results showed that maximum quality retention (surface and volume average retention) was achieved with the shortest possible process time (made possible with highest retort temperature), and reached the similar level in all cases with small difference between surface and volume average quality retention. The highest heat transfer coefficients (associated with maximum rotating speed and headspace) showed a 10% reduction in process time over that required with minimum rotating speed and headspace. The study concludes with a discussion of the significance of these findings and degree to which they were expected.

  4. Method for explosive expansion toward horizontal free faces for forming an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    Formation is excavated from within a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming a plurality of vertically spaced apart voids extending horizontally across different levels of the retort site, leaving a separate zone of unfragmented formation between each pair of adjacent voids. Explosive is placed in each zone, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for forming an in situ retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The same amount of formation is explosively expanded upwardly and downwardly toward each void. A horizontal void excavated at a production level has a smaller horizontal cross-sectional area than a void excavated at a lower level of the retort site immediately above the production level void. Explosive in a first group of vertical blast holes is detonated for explosively expanding formation downwardly toward the lower void, and explosive in a second group of vertical blast holes is detonated in the same round for explosively expanding formation upwardly toward the lower void and downwardly toward the production level void for forming a generally T-shaped bottom of the fragmented mass.

  5. FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4FOOT RETORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4-FOOT RETORT, USED TO FLASH MERCURY FROM GOLD. MERCURY VAPOR THEN CONDENSED ON INSIDE OF HOOD AND WAS COLLECTED FOR REUSE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  6. A geochemical method for determining heat history of retorted shale oil. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Flom, E.A.; Thompson, S.J.

    1980-06-01

    Geochemical data is encoded in biochemical molecules which survive in oil shale deposits. Porphyrins in retorted shale oil hold a key to the heat history of the oil. A method for analyzing shale oils to determine ratios of porphyrin types and mass spectral data of these porphyrins is reported. (Author)

  7. Groundwater studies at Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's retort 1 at Tract C-a

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, J.S.; Poulson, R.; Hill, S.; Suthersan, S.

    1987-11-01

    Western Research Institute has continued to assess groundwater at the site of the 1981 modified in situ oil shale retorting tests at Federal Prototype Lease Trace C-a near Rifle, Colorado. The organic constituents, the toxicology, and the microorganisms associated with the groundwater are discussed in this report. 22 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 4. Solid waste from mining and surface retorts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The overall objectives of this study were to: review and evaluate published information on the disposal, composition, and leachability of solid wastes produced by aboveground shale oil extraction processes; examine the relationship of development to surface and groundwater quality in the Piceance Creek basin of northwestern Colorado; and identify key areas of research necessary to quantitative assessment of impact. Information is presented under the following section headings: proposed surface retorting developments; surface retorting processes; environmental concerns; chemical/mineralogical composition of raw and retorted oil shale; disposal procedures; water quality; and research needs.

  9. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort by sound monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Elkington, W. Brice

    1978-01-01

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring for sound produced in the retort, preferably by monitoring for sound at at least two locations in a plane substantially normal to the direction of advancement of the processing zone. Monitoring can be effected by placing a sound transducer in a well extending through the formation adjacent the retort and/or in the fragmented mass such as in a well extending into the fragmented mass.

  10. A mouse air pouch model for evaluating the immune response to Taenia crassiceps infection.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B; Sakai, Yuriko I; Gaspari, Elizabeth De

    2014-02-01

    The experimental system of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci infection in BALB/c mice is considered to be the most representative model of cysticercosis. In our work, mice were sacrificed 7 and 30days after infection, and pouch fluid was collected to determine the number of accumulated cells and the concentrations of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and nitric oxide. The injection of 50 nonbudding cysticerci into normal mouse dorsal air pouches induced a high level of IFNγ and nitric oxide production relative to the parasite load. The air pouch provides a convenient cavity that allows studying the cellular immunological aspects of the T. crassiceps parasite. The nonbudding cysticerci recovered from the air pouches contained cells that can reconstitute complete cysts in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the air pouch model is an alternative tool for the evaluation of the immune characteristics of T. crassiceps infection.

  11. High Capacity Pouch-Type Li-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-05-05

    The pouch-type Li-air batteries operated in ambient condition are reported in this work. The battery used a heat sealable plastic membrane as package material, O2¬ diffusion membrane and moisture barrier. The large variation in internal resistance of the batteries is minimized by a modified separator which can bind the cell stack together. The cells using the modified separators show improved and repeatable discharge performances. It is also found that addition of about 20% of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) in PC:EC (1:1) based electrolyte solvent improves can improve the wetability of carbon electrode and the discharge capacities of Li-air batteries, but further increase in DME amount lead to a decreased capacity due to increase electrolyte loss during discharge process. The pouch-type Li-air batteries with the modified separator and optimized electrolyte has demonstrated a specific capacity of 2711 mAh g-1 based on carbon and a specific energy of 344 Wh kg-1 based on the complete batteries including package.

  12. Cheek pouch use in relation to interspecific competition and predator risk for three guenon monkeys (Cercopithecus spp.).

    PubMed

    Buzzard, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    Forest guenons (Cercopithecus spp.) are often found in polyspecific associations that may decrease predator risk while increasing interspecific competition for food. Cheek pouch use may mitigate interspecific competition and predator risk by reducing the time spent in areas of high competition/predator risk. I investigated these ideas in three forest guenons: Campbell's monkey (Cercopithecus campbelli), spot-nosed monkey (C. petaurista), and Diana monkey (C. diana). I present 13 months of scan sample data from Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, including 3,675, 3,330, and 5,689 records of cheek pouch distention, to quantify cheek pouch use, for Campbell's, spot-nosed, and Diana monkeys, respectively. Cheek pouches are often used to hold fruit, so I first predicted that the most frugivorous species, Diana monkeys, would have the most cheek pouch distension. Spot-nosed monkeys ate the least amount of fruit over the study period and had the least distended cheek pouches, suggesting the importance of frugivory in relation to cheek pouch distension for this species. This was not a sufficient explanation for Campbell's monkeys; Campbell's ate fruit less than Diana monkeys, but had more distended cheek pouches, suggesting that cheek pouch use was not simply a reflection of high frugivory. From the interspecific competition hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's monkeys would have more distended cheek pouches than Diana and spot-nosed monkeys, and more distended cheek pouches when associated with Diana because Campbell's monkeys have the highest potential for interspecific competition with dominant Diana monkeys. From the predator risk hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's would have more distended cheek pouches when not associated with highly vigilant Diana monkeys. Campbell's monkeys had the most distended cheek pouches overall, but had more distended cheek pouches when not in association with Diana, suggesting the greater importance of predator risk rather than

  13. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Transitional Zone after Ileal Pouch Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis: Systematic Review and Treatment Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pellino, Gianluca; Kontovounisios, Christos; Tait, Diana; Nicholls, John; Tekkis, Paris P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Few cases of pouch-related cancers have been reported in ulcerative colitis (UC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is very rare. Method A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify all unequivocal cases of pouch-related SCC in UC patients. Results Eight cases of SCC developing after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) have been observed since 1978. Two arose from the pouch mucosa and 6 from below. The pooled cumulative incidence of SCC is below 0.06% after IPAA. Many patients had neoplasia on the preoperative specimen, but squamous metaplasia of the pouch or anorectal mucosa may have an important role in SCC. These patients are rarely offered chemoradiation therapy and the outcome is poor. Selected patients with SCC located close to the pouch outlet can be treated with chemoradiation prior to consideration of surgery and salvage their pouch. A chemoradiation regimen is suggested to avoid pouch excision in these patients. Conclusions SCC is rare after pouch surgery but associated with extremely poor survival. Very low SCC can be managed with chemoradiation treatment, preserving the pouch and avoiding surgery, even in older patients. The role of pouch metaplasia, surveillance frequency, and treatment modalities after IPAA need further studying. PMID:28203173

  14. Development of Stainless Steel Laminate Li-Ion Pouch Cell for Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooto, Hiroki; Koide, Kazuya; Ohira, Kenji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Abe, Hidetoshi; Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Takahashi, Yu; Hirose, Kazuyuki

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the development of stainless steel laminate Li-ion pouch battery cells for space application. Currently, the cells have a high specific energy of 118 Wh/kg for 10-Ah cells at the moment. Unlike conventional Li-ion pouch cells for terrestrial use, where the casing is made of aluminum laminate, Li-ion pouch cells made with stainless steel laminate neither expand nor lose their capacity after charge/discharge cycles in vacuum. The results of a mechanical environment test show that the cell also meet the requirements for vibration and pyroshock tolerance during launch.

  15. A Novel Lithium-ion Laminated Pouch Cell Tested For Performance And Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Inoue, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    A new Li-ion 4.0 Ah pouch cell from GS Yuasa has been tested to determine its performance and safety. The cell is of a laminate pouch design with liquid electrolyte. The rate, thermal and vacuum performance capabilities have been tested to determine the optimum parameters. Under vacuum conditions, the cells were cycled under restrained and unrestrained configurations. The burst pressure of the laminate pouch was also determined. The overcharge, overdischarge into reversal and external short circuit safety tests were also performed to determine the cell s tolerance to abuse. Key Words: Li-ion, safety, vacuum test, abuse, COTS batteries, rate capability

  16. The effect of distending a pouch of the left atrium on the heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Ledsome, J. R.; Linden, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    1. A pouch has been prepared consisting of a part of the wall of the left atrium together with the left pulmonary vein—atrial junctions. 2. An increase of perfusion pressure in the pouch caused a reflex increase in heart rate. 3. The afferent path of the reflex was in the vagus nerves and the efferent path was in the sympathetic nerves. 4. The receptors most likely to be stimulated by an increase in pressure in the pouch are those receptors situated in the subendocardium of the pulmonary vein—left atrial junctions. PMID:16992279

  17. Assessment of TAMU Rack Material in Poly Tray Racks using Spray Retort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    strength after the retort exposure. 15 Comparison 3.67±1.07334.02±0.64RACK_B 2.5±0.35312.84±0.1030wt%_H-PP/ CaCO3 9.83±1.41352.15±0.24RACK_A 7.39±2.24...Retort Exposure Time (h) C en te r S pa n D ef le ct io n (m m ) Trial PP+35% R-Talc Reference New (Rutgers) This graph depicts the deflection of test...bowed up) due to the shape of the pallet frame and not supporting the rack in the load bearing points. The two graphs below summarize the pocket sag as

  18. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.S.

    1982-02-16

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  19. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    DOEpatents

    Burton, III, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  20. Method and apparatus for igniting an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Robert S.; Rundberg, Sten I.; Vaughn, James V.; Williams, Thomas P.; Benson, Gregory C.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is provided for igniting an in situ oil shale retort having an open void space over the top of a fragmented mass of particles in the retort. A conduit is extended into the void space through a hole in overlying unfragmented formation and has an open end above the top surface of the fragmented mass. A primary air pipe having an open end above the open end of the conduit and a liquid atomizing fuel nozzle in the primary air pipe above the open end of the primary air pipe are centered in the conduit. Fuel is introduced through the nozzle, primary air through the pipe, and secondary air is introduced through the conduit for vortical flow past the open end of the primary air pipe. The resultant fuel and air mixture is ignited for combustion within the conduit and the resultant heated ignition gas impinges on the fragmented mass for heating oil shale to an ignition temperature.

  1. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  2. Modeling study of carbonate decomposition in LLNL`s 4TU pilot oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1994-10-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) 4 tonne-per-day oil shale Pilot Retort (4TU-Pilot) has been modeled to study the degree of carbonate decomposition occurring in the process. The modeling uses a simplified version of the processes occurring in the retort to allow parametric studies to be performed. The primary focus of the work is on the sensitivity of computed carbonate decomposition to the assumed manner in which solid material leaves the retort. It was found that for a variety of assumptions about solid passage and evolution within the process the computed carbonate decomposition varied by only a few percent. It was also determined that using available kinetic expressions based on literature data led to a consistent underestimate of the carbonate decomposition, from 12--17% low on an absolute basis and on a relative basis as much as a factor of seven times too low. A simplified kinetic expression based on limited data from laboratory experiments on the same shale as used in the 4TU-Pilot run was also employed and found to match the pilot results fairly well.

  3. Microbiological degradation of organic components in oil shale retort water: organic acids.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J E; Riley, R G; Li, S W; Mann, D C; Wildung, R E

    1981-11-01

    The losses of benzoic acid and a homologous series of both mono- and dibasic aliphatic acids in oil shale retort water were monitored with time (21 days) in liquid culture (4% retort water, vol/vol) inoculated with soil. The organic acids constituted approximately 12% of the dissolved organic carbon in retort water, which served as the sole source of carbon and energy in these studies. The levels of the acids in solution were reduced by 80 to 90% within 9 days of incubation. From mass balance calculations, the decrease in dissolved organic carbon with time of incubation was equal to the formation of CO(2) and bacterial cell carbon. The decrease in the level of the acid components, either from degradation to CO(2) or incorporation into bacteria, would account for approximately 70% of the loss in dissolved organic carbon within the first 9 days of incubation and would account for approximately 50% of the loss over the entire 21-day incubation period.

  4. Method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit for in situ retorting

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for rubblizing an oil shale deposit that has been formed in alternate horizontal layers of rich and lean shale, including the steps of driving a horizontal tunnel along the lower edge of a rich shale layer of the deposit, sublevel caving by fan drilling and blasting of both rich and lean overlying shale layers at the distal end of the tunnel to rubblize the layers, removing a substantial amount of the accessible rubblized rich shale to permit the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form a column of lean shale, performing additional sublevel caving of rich and lean shale towards the proximate end of the tunnel, removal of a substantial amount of the additionally rubblized rich shale to allow the overlying rubblized lean shale to drop to tunnel floor level to form another column of rubblized lean shale, similarly performing additional steps of sublevel caving and removal of rich rubble to form additional columns of lean shale rubble in the rich shale rubble in the tunnel, and driving additional horizontal tunnels in the deposit and similarly rubblizing the overlying layers of rich and lean shale and forming columns of rubblized lean shale in the rich, thereby forming an in situ oil shale retort having zones of lean shale that remain permeable to hot retorting fluids in the presence of high rubble pile pressures and high retorting temperatures.

  5. Withdrawal of gases and liquids from an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Martin M.

    1982-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed within a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. A production level drift extends below the fragmented mass, leaving a lower sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the production level drift and the fragmented mass. During retorting operations, liquid and gaseous products are recovered from a lower portion of the fragmented mass. A liquid outlet line extends from a lower portion of the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar for conducting liquid products to a sump in the production level drift. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the fragmented mass through a plurality of gas outlet lines distributed across a horizontal cross-section of a lower portion of the fragmented mass. The gas outlet lines extend from the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar and into the production level drift. The gas outlet lines are connected to a gas withdrawal manifold in the production level drift, and gaseous products are withdrawn from the manifold separately from withdrawal of liquid products from the sump in the production level drift.

  6. Carcinoid tumor of the ileoanal pouch in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Murray; Pricolo, Victor; Chen, Sonja

    2013-01-04

    Carcinoid tumors have been reported to occur in various locations, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. The relationship between the development of carcinoids and ulcerative colitis has been an unclear and controversial one. The association of ulcerative colitis and the development of ileal-pouch carcinoids has not, however, been well documented. We report a case of carcinoid tumor arising in an ileoanal pouch and discuss its unique diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

  7. High-G Verification of Lithium-Polymer (Li-Po) Pouch Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-19

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 766 Technical Report ARMET-TR-15067 HIGH-G VERIFICATION OF LITHIUM- POLYMER (LI-PO) POUCH...TITLE AND SUBTITLE HIGH-G VERIFICATION OF LITHIUM- POLYMER (LI-PO) POUCH CELLS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army ARDEC, METC Fuze & Precision Armaments Technology Directorate (RDAR-MEF-I) Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806

  8. Seahorse Brood Pouch Transcriptome Reveals Common Genes Associated with Vertebrate Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Camilla M; Griffith, Oliver W; Qi, Weihong; Thompson, Michael B; Wilson, Anthony B

    2015-12-01

    Viviparity (live birth) has evolved more than 150 times in vertebrates, and represents an excellent model system for studying the evolution of complex traits. There are at least 23 independent origins of viviparity in fishes, with syngnathid fishes (seahorses and pipefish) unique in exhibiting male pregnancy. Male seahorses and pipefish have evolved specialized brooding pouches that provide protection, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and limited nutrient provisioning to developing embryos. Pouch structures differ widely across the Syngnathidae, offering an ideal opportunity to study the evolution of reproductive complexity. However, the physiological and genetic changes facilitating male pregnancy are largely unknown. We used transcriptome profiling to examine pouch gene expression at successive gestational stages in a syngnathid with the most complex brood pouch morphology, the seahorse Hippocampus abdominalis. Using a unique time-calibrated RNA-seq data set including brood pouch at key stages of embryonic development, we identified transcriptional changes associated with brood pouch remodeling, nutrient and waste transport, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and immunological protection of developing embryos at conception, development and parturition. Key seahorse transcripts share homology with genes of reproductive function in pregnant mammals, reptiles, and other live-bearing fish, suggesting a common toolkit of genes regulating pregnancy in divergent evolutionary lineages.

  9. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Luigi; Caprino, Paola; Sacchetti, Franco; Bossola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (RP-IPAA) is the gold standard surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis. However, despite the widespread use of RP-IPAA, many aspects of this treatment still remain controversial, such as the approach (open or laparoscopic), number of stages in the surgery, type of pouch, and construction type (hand-sewn or stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis). The present narrative review aims to discuss current evidence on the short-, mid-, and long-term results of each of these technical alternatives as well as their benefits and disadvantages. A review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases was performed to identify studies published through March 2016. Few large, randomized, controlled studies have been conducted, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn regarding controversial issues. The available data from retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic surgery has no clear advantages compared with open surgery and that one-stage RP-IPAA may be indicated in selected cases. Regarding 2- and 3-stage RP-IPAA, patients who underwent these surgeries differed significantly with respect to clinical and laboratory variables, making any comparisons extremely difficult. The long-term results regarding the pouch type show that the W- and J-reservoirs do not differ significantly, although the J pouch is generally preferred by surgeons. Hand-sewn and stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomoses have their own advantages, and there is no clear benefit of one technique over the other. PMID:27648159

  10. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Sofo, Luigi; Caprino, Paola; Sacchetti, Franco; Bossola, Maurizio

    2016-08-27

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (RP-IPAA) is the gold standard surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis. However, despite the widespread use of RP-IPAA, many aspects of this treatment still remain controversial, such as the approach (open or laparoscopic), number of stages in the surgery, type of pouch, and construction type (hand-sewn or stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis). The present narrative review aims to discuss current evidence on the short-, mid-, and long-term results of each of these technical alternatives as well as their benefits and disadvantages. A review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases was performed to identify studies published through March 2016. Few large, randomized, controlled studies have been conducted, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn regarding controversial issues. The available data from retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic surgery has no clear advantages compared with open surgery and that one-stage RP-IPAA may be indicated in selected cases. Regarding 2- and 3-stage RP-IPAA, patients who underwent these surgeries differed significantly with respect to clinical and laboratory variables, making any comparisons extremely difficult. The long-term results regarding the pouch type show that the W- and J-reservoirs do not differ significantly, although the J pouch is generally preferred by surgeons. Hand-sewn and stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomoses have their own advantages, and there is no clear benefit of one technique over the other.

  11. Experimental modal analysis of lithium-ion pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, James Michael; Marco, James

    2015-07-01

    If future electric and hybrid electric vehicle batteries are to be designed such that the impact of vibration induced resonance is minimized, engineers tasked with the design of the vehicle's energy storage system must have a rigorous understanding of key system attributes such as the natural frequencies of the cell, the level of damping present and the mode shapes induced within the battery under mechanical load. This paper describes the underpinning theory and experimental method employed when using the impulse excitation technique to quantify the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a commercially available 25 Ah Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) Laminate Pouch Cell. Experimental results are presented for fifteen cells at five different values of state of charge (SOC). The results indicate that irrespective of the energy content within the cell, the same four modes of vibration (torsion and bending) exist within a frequency range of 191 Hz-360 Hz. This is above the frequency range (0-150 Hz) typically associated with road-induced vibration. The results also indicate that the cell's natural frequencies of vibration and damping do not vary with changing values of SOC.

  12. Inheritance of guttural pouch tympany in the arabian horse.

    PubMed

    Blazyczek, I; Hamann, H; Ohnesorge, B; Deegen, E; Distl, O

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the mode of inheritance of guttural pouch tympany (GPT) using pedigrees of Arabian horses. Complex segregation analyses were employed to test for the significance of nongenetic transmission and for monogenic, polygenic, and mixed monogenic-polygenic modes of inheritance. Horses affected by GPT comprised 27 Arabian purebred foals. Of these 27 animals, 22 were patients at the Clinic for Horses, School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany, between 1994 and 2001 and 5 Arabian foals were from stud farms. Information on the pedigrees of these patients allowed us to classify the affected foals into four families with a total of 276 animals. The regressive logistic model analysis took into account the nonrandomness of the pedigrees through multiple single ascertainment correction. The complex segregation analysis showed that, among all other models employed, a polygenic and a mixed monogenic-polygenic model best explained the segregation of Arabian foals with GPT. Models including only nongenetic distributions and monogenic inheritance could be significantly rejected. This is the first report in which a genetic component could be shown to be responsible for GPT in horses.

  13. Method for flattening the combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort by the addition of fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.

    1980-09-30

    A secondary combustion zone is established and its location is controlled in a fragmented mass of particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort. A processing zone including a primary combustion zone is established in the retort by igniting a portion of the mass of particles. An oxygen-supplying gas is introduced into the retort to advance the processing zone through the fragmented mass. If the primary combustion zone is not substantially planar or has not progressed uniformly, a secondary combustion zone is established upstream of the primary combustion zone by introducing into the retort a retort inlet mixture comprising fuel and at least sufficient oxygen for combustion of the fuel at a temperature no greater than the primary combustion zone temperature. The secondary combustion zone is maintained at an upstream location and allowed to spread laterally through the fragmented mass, heating portions of such fragmented mass, to the self-ignition temperature of oil shale which spreads the primary combustion zone laterally across the fragmented mass at the upstream location. 48 claims.

  14. Horizontal free face blasting for minimizing channeling and mounding in situ retort with cusp at intermediate elevation

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1984-07-10

    A method is claimed for forming an in situ retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in a retort site within a subterranean formation. A void is excavated into the formation and a zone of unfragmented formation is left adjacent the void. A plurality of explosive charges are formed in the zone of unfragmented formation. At least one central explosive charge is in a central portion of the zone of unfragmented formation, and a plurality of outer explosive charges are in the zone of unfragmented formation nearer the side walls of the void than the central explosive charge. The distance from each such outer explosive charge to an adjacent side wall of the void is about equal to the crater radius of the outer explosive charge. The central and outer explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the in situ retort. The retort has a horizontal cross-sectional area at an intermediate elevation which is less than the horizontal cross-sectional area of the retort at elevations above and below the intermediate elevation.

  15. Comparison of the InPouch TV culture system and Diamond's modified medium for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, M H; Torres, J; Piña, C; Klein, R S

    1997-01-01

    This study compared the use of Diamond's modified medium to InPouch for the culture of Trichomonas vaginalis from pooled vaginal secretions. The sensitivity for InPouch was 82.4% (61/74) versus 87.8% (65/74) for Diamond's modified medium. There were no significant differences in the sensitivity and negative predictive value of InPouch compared to Diamond's modified medium. PMID:9399542

  16. Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory 6-kg retort

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Sanders, R.W.

    1985-12-01

    The objective of this program is to determine how retorting process parameters affect the partitioning of Hg, As, Se, and Cd from raw oil shale to spent shale, shale oil, retort water, and offgas. For each of the elements, the objective of this study is to (1) determine the distribution coefficients for each product stream; (2) identify the chemical forms in water, gas, and oil streams, with particular emphasis on inorganic or organometallic species known to be or suspected of being carcinogenic, toxic, or otherwise harmful; (3) investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for mobilization into each product stream for toxic or labile chemical forms identified in item 2 are mobilized into each product stream; and (4) the effect of retorting rate, maximum retorting temperature, and retorting atmosphere on items 1 and 3. A Green River shale from Colorado and a New Albany shale from Kentucky were heated at 1 to 2/sup 0/C/min and at 10/sup 0/C/min to maximum temperatures of 500 and 750/sup 0/C under a nitrogen sweep gas. The product streams were analyzed using a variety of methods including Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy, microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, instrumental neutron activation analysis, high-pressure liquid and silica gel column chromatography, and mercury cold vapor atomic absorption. The results obtained using these analytical methods indicate that the distribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product stream is a function of oil shale type, heating rates, and maximum retorting temperatures. 11 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Design of small-size pouch motors for rat gait rehabilitation device.

    PubMed

    Shih-Yin Chang; Takashima, Kenta; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Niiyama, Ryuma; Someya, Takao; Onodera, Hiroshi; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that active gait training can recover voluntary locomotive ability of paralyzed rats. Rehabilitation devices used for studying spinal cord injury to date are usually fixed on a treadmill, but they have been used only slightly for active training. To process active rehabilitation, a wearable, lightweight device with adequate output is needed. Pouch motors, soft pneumatic actuators, are extremely light and have other benefits such as low cost, easy fabrication, and highly customizable design. They can be used to develop active gait rehabilitation devices. However, performance details of different motor designs have not been examined. As described herein, to build a wearable gait assistive device for rat study, we specifically examine how to design small pouch motors with a good contraction ratio and force output. Results show that pouch performance decreases dramatically with size, but better output is obtainable by separation into small 0.8 length-to-width ratio rooms. We used this knowledge to produce an assistive robot suit for gait rehabilitation and to test it with paralyzed rats. Results show that these small pouches can produce sufficient power to control hip joint movements during gait training. They can reveal the potential for new pouch motor applications for spinal cord injury studies.

  18. Hog barn dust extract increases macromolecular efflux from the hamster cheek pouch.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Israel; Von Essen, Susanna G

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term exposure to an aqueous extract of hog barn dust increases macromolecular efflux from the intact hamster cheek pouch and, if so, to begin to determine the mechanism(s) underlying this response. By using intravital microscopy, we found that suffusion of hog barn dust extract onto the intact hamster cheek pouch for 60 min elicited a significant, concentration-dependent leaky site formation and increase in clearance of FITC-labeled dextran (molecular mass, 70 kDa). This response was significantly attenuated by suffusion of catalase (60 U/ml), but not by heat-inactivated catalase, and by pretreatment with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg iv) (P < 0.05). Catalase had no significant effects on adenosine-induced increase in macromolecular efflux from the cheek pouch. Suffusion of hog barn dust extract had no significant effects on arteriolar diameter in the cheek pouch. Taken together, these data indicate that hog barn dust extract increases macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch, in part, through local elaboration of reactive oxygen species that are inactivated by catalase. This response is specific and attenuated by corticosteroids. We suggest that plasma exudation plays an important role in the genesis of upper airway dysfunction evoked by short-term exposure to hog barn dust.

  19. True in situ oil shale retorting experiment at Rock Springs site 12

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A. Jr.; Merriam, N.W.; Virgona, J.E.; Parrish, R.L.

    1980-05-01

    A true in situ oil shale fracturing and retorting experiment was conducted near Rock Springs, Wyoming in 1977, 1978, and 1979. A 20-foot (6.1 m) thick zone of oil shale located 200 feet (61 m) below surface was hydraulically and explosively fractured. The fractured oil shale was extensively evaluated using flow tests, TV logging, caliper logging, downhole flow logging, core samples, and tracer tests. Attempts to conduct true in situ retorting tests in portions of the pattern with less than 5 percent void space as measured by caliper logs and less than 1 percent active void space measured by tracer test were curtailed when air could not be injected at desired rates. It is thought the fractures plugged as a result of thermal swelling of the oil shale. Air was injected at programmed rates in an area with 10 percent void measured by caliper log and 1.4 pecent active void measured by tracer test. A burn front was propagated in a narrow path moving away from the location of the production well. The vertical sweep of the burn front was measured at less than 4 feet (1.3 m). The burn front could not be sustained beyond 10 days without use of supplemental fuel. The authors recommend a minimum of 5 percent well-distributed void for attempts to retort 20 gpt (81 L/m ton) oil shale in confined beds. A void space of 5 percent may be roughly equivalent to 5 to 10 percent measured by caliper log and 1.4 percent or more by tracer test.

  20. Leachate migration from an in situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    Geohydrologic factors influencing leachate movement from an in situ oil shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, were investigated by developing models of groundwater flow and solute transport. Leachate, indicated by the conservative ion thiocyanate, has been observed 1/2 mi downgradient from the retort. The contaminated aquifer is part of the Green River Formation and consists of thin, permeable layers of tuff and sandstone interbedded with oil shale. Most solute migration has occurred in an 8-ft sandstone at the top of the aquifer. Groundwater flow in the study area is complexly 3-D and is characterized by large vertical variations in hydraulic head. The solute transport model was used to predict the concentration of thiocyanate at a point where groundwater discharges to the land surface. Leachates with peak concentrations of thiocyanate--45 mg/L or approximately one-half the initial concentration of retort water--were estimated to reach the discharge area during January 1985. Advantages as well as the problems of site specific studies are described. Data such as the distribution of thin permeable beds or fractures may introduce an unmanageable degree of complexity to basin-wide studies but can be incorporated readily in site specific models. Solute migration in the study area primarily occurs in thin permeable beds rather than in oil shale strata. Because of this behavior, leachate traveled far greater distances than might otherwise have been expected. The detail possible in site specific models permits more accurate prediction of solute transport than is possible with basin-wide models. A major problem in site specific studies is identifying model boundaries that permit the accurate estimation of aquifer properties. If the quantity of water flowing through a study area cannot be determined prior to modeling, the hydraulic conductivity and groundwater velocity will be estimated poorly. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Leachate migration from an in-situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, Kent C.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogeologic factors influencing leachate movement from an in-situ oil-shale retort near Rock Springs, Wyoming, were investigated through models of ground-water flow and solute transport. Leachate, indicated by the conservative ion thiocyanate, has been observed ? mile downgradient from the retort. The contaminated aquifer is part of the Green River Formation and consists of thin, permeable layers of tuff and sandstone interbedded with oil shale. Most solute migration has occurred in an 8-foot sandstone at the top of the aquifer. Ground-water flow in the study area is complexly three dimensional and is characterized by large vertical variations in hydraulic head. The solute-transport model was used to predict the concentration of thiocyanate at a point where ground water discharges to the land surface. Leachate with peak concentrations of thiocyanate--45 milligrams per liter or approximately one-half the initial concentration of retort water--was estimated to reach the discharge area during January 1985. This report describes many of th3 advantages, as well as the problems, of site-specific studies. Data such as the distribution of thin, permeable beds or fractures might introduce an unmanageable degree of complexity to basin-wide studies but can be incorporated readily into site-specific models. Solute migration in the study area occurs primarily in thin, permeable beds rather than in oil-shale strata. Because of this behavior, leachate traveled far greater distances than might otherwise have been expected. The detail possible in site-specific models permits more accurate prediction of solute transport than is possible with basin-wide models. A major problem in site-specific studies is identifying model boundaries that permit the accurate estimation of aquifer properties. If the quantity of water flowing through a study area cannot be determined prior to modeling, the hydraulic conductivity and ground-water velocity will be poorly estimated.

  2. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  3. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Walton, O.R.

    1983-09-21

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus are disclosed in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  4. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent.

  5. Development and evaluation of a reflective solar disinfection pouch for treatment of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Walker, D Carey; Len, Soo-Voon; Sheehan, Brita

    2004-04-01

    A second-generation solar disinfection (SODIS) system (pouch) was constructed from food-grade, commercially available packaging materials selected to fully transmit and amplify the antimicrobial properties of sunlight. Depending upon the season, water source, and challenge organism, culturable bacteria were reduced between 3.5 and 5.5 log cycles. The system was also capable of reducing the background presumptive coliform population in nonsterile river water below the level of detection. Similar experiments conducted with a model virus, the F-specific RNA bacteriophage MS2, indicated that the pouch was slightly less efficient, reducing viable plaques by 3.5 log units in comparison to a 5.0 log reduction of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O18:H11 within the same time period. These results suggest that water of poor microbiological quality can be improved by using a freely available resource (sunlight) and a specifically designed plastic pouch constructed of food-grade packaging materials.

  6. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy ileal pouch anal anastomosis: How I do it?

    PubMed Central

    Madnani, Manish A; Mistry, Jitendra H; Soni, Harshad N; Shah, Atul J; Patel, Kantilal S; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for ulcerative colitis is a major and complex colorectal surgery. Laparoscopy benefits these patients with better outcomes in context of cosmesis, pain and early recovery, especially in young patients. For surgeons, it is a better tool for improving vision and magnification in deep cavities. This is not the simple extension of the laparoscopy training. Starting from preoperative preparation to post operative care there are wide variations as compared to open surgery. There are also many variations in steps of laparoscopic surgery. It involves left colon, right colon and rectal mobilisation, low division of rectum, pouch creation and anastomosis of pouch to rectum. Over many years after standardisation of this technique, it takes same operative time as open surgery at our centre. So we present our standardized technique of laparoscopic assisted restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). PMID:26195886

  7. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy ileal pouch anal anastomosis: How I do it?

    PubMed

    Madnani, Manish A; Mistry, Jitendra H; Soni, Harshad N; Shah, Atul J; Patel, Kantilal S; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for ulcerative colitis is a major and complex colorectal surgery. Laparoscopy benefits these patients with better outcomes in context of cosmesis, pain and early recovery, especially in young patients. For surgeons, it is a better tool for improving vision and magnification in deep cavities. This is not the simple extension of the laparoscopy training. Starting from preoperative preparation to post operative care there are wide variations as compared to open surgery. There are also many variations in steps of laparoscopic surgery. It involves left colon, right colon and rectal mobilisation, low division of rectum, pouch creation and anastomosis of pouch to rectum. Over many years after standardisation of this technique, it takes same operative time as open surgery at our centre. So we present our standardized technique of laparoscopic assisted restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA).

  8. Computed tomography-guided endoscopic needle knife therapy for ileal pouch sinus.

    PubMed

    Nyabanga, Custon T; Veniero, Joseph; Shen, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis surgery can be complicated by anastomotic leaks, leading to the formation of abscess and chronic sinus that have been routinely managed by a surgical approach. We developed the endoscopic needle knife sinusotomy (NKSi) technique, which has become a valid alternative. The basic principle of endoscopic NKSi is dissection and drainage of the sinus through its orifice internally into the lumen of pouch body. The success of NKSi requires an access to the sinus from the pouch side. One of the most challenging situations for NKSi is a closed orifice of the sinus, which leaves an isolated chronic abscess cavity. Here we report a case of complicated presacral sinus with a closed orifice that was not amenable to NKSi, necessitating a CT-guided guide wire placement and subsequent NKSi.

  9. The Quechua Manta Pouch: A Caretaking Practice for Buffering the Peruvian Infant against the Multiple Stressors of High Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronick, E. Z.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the caretaking practices employed by the Peruvian Quechua mountain people, who swaddle infants in cloths and blankets (known as a manta pouch) to protect them from the harsh and frigid environment. The practices of 14 mother-infants pairs are examined in detail, and the benefits and drawbacks of the manta pouch are examined. (MDM)

  10. Giant African Pouched Rats as Detectors of Tuberculosis in Human Sputum: Comparison of Two Techniques for Sputum Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Alisha M.; Mahoney, Amanda; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kazwala, Rudovic; Mfinanga, Godfrey S.; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that pouched rats can detect the presence of "Mycobacterium tuberculosis," which causes tuberculosis, in human sputum samples obtained from clinical facilities. Although pouched rats evaluate sputum samples quickly, preparing the samples is relatively slow. The present study evaluated whether the rats can detect…

  11. Endoscopic closure instead of surgery to close an ileal pouch fistula with the over-the-scope clip system

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yao; Gong, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    An ileal pouch fistula is an uncommon complication after an ileal pouch anal anastomosis. Most patients who suffer from an ileal pouch fistula will need surgical intervention. However, the surgery can be invasive and has a high risk compared to endoscopic treatment. The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) system was initially developed for hemostasis and leakage closure in the gastrointestinal tract during flexible endoscopy. There have been many successes in using this approach to apply perforations to the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, this approach has not been used for ileal pouch fistulas until currently. In this report, we describe one patient who suffered a leak from the tip of the “J” pouch and was successfully treated with endoscopic closure via the OTSC system. A 26-year-old male patient had an intestinal fistula at the tip of the “J” pouch after an ileal pouch anal anastomosis procedure. He received endoscopic treatment via OTSC under intravenous anesthesia, and the leak was closed successfully. Endoscopic closure of a pouch fistula could be a simpler alternative to surgery and could help avoid surgery-related complications. PMID:28250903

  12. Puborectal sling interposition combined with seton drainage for pouch-vaginal fistula after rectal cancer surgery with colonic J pouch-anal reconstruction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Okigami, Masato; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    The management of postoperative rectovaginal fistula (RVF) after rectal cancer surgery is difficult and requires reconstruction of the anastomotic site and fistula. Though various surgical procedures have been reported for the repair of RVFs, the results of surgical repair are often unsatisfactory, and failure of the initial repair leads to difficulty in the later operations. Furthermore, it has been reported that cases associated with local infection result in low success rates. We report a case of an 80-year-old woman with a recurrent colonic J pouch-vaginal fistula after anoabdominal rectal resection with partial internal sphincteric resection, who achieved a good outcome following a repair using a puborectal sling interposition combined with seton drainage. It may be a useful option for RVF management in repair of such pouch-vaginal fistula after coloanal anastomosis with intersphincteric resection.

  13. Explosively produced fracture of oil shale. Progress report, July-September 1981. [Field experiments; computer models; retort stability

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is conducting rock fragmentation research in oil shale to develop the blasting technologies and designs required to create a rubble bed for a modified in situ retort. This report outlines our first field experiments at the Anvil Points Mine in Colorado. These experiments are part of a research program, sponsored by the Laboratory through the Department of Energy and by a Consortium of oil companies. Also included are some typical numerical calculations made in support of proposed field experiments. Two papers detail our progress in computer modeling and theory. The first presents a method for eliminating hourglassing in two-dimensional finite-difference calculations of rock fracture without altering the physical results. The second discusses the significant effect of buoyancy on tracer gas flow through the retort. A paper on retort stability details a computer application of the Schmidt graphical method for calculating fine-scale temperature gradients in a retort wall. The final paper, which describes our approach to field experiments, presents the instrumentation and diagnostic techniques used in rock fragmentation experiments at Anvil Points Mine.

  14. Using Trained Pouched Rats (Cricetomys Gambianus) to Detect Land Mines: Another Victory for Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Bach, Harvard; Sully, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We used giant African pouched rats ("Cricetomys gambianus") as land mine-detection animals in Mozambique because they have an excellent sense of smell, weigh too little to activate mines, and are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and therefore are resistant to local parasites and diseases. In 2009 the rats searched 93,400 m[superscript 2] of…

  15. Using Trained Pouched Rats to Detect Land Mines: Another Victory for Operant Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Bach, Harvard; Sully, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We used giant African pouched rats ("Cricetomys gambianus") as land mine-detection animals in Mozambique because they have an excellent sense of smell, weigh too little to activate mines, and are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and therefore are resistant to local parasites and diseases. In 2009 the rats searched 93,400 m[superscript 2] of…

  16. Mycotic encephalitis, sinus osteomyelitis, and guttural pouch mycosis in a 3-year-old Arabian colt.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara; Nation, Patrick N

    2011-12-01

    Mycotic encephalitis caused severe ataxia and other neurologic deficits in a horse. The finding of a single, large focus of cerebral malacia, with histopathologic evidence of fungal elements, suggested infection was a result of direct transfer from the frontal sinuses, rather than hematogenous spread from the guttural pouch.

  17. Pouch young removal and return to oestrus in wild southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Finlayson, G R; Taggart, D A; Shimmin, G A; White, C R; Dibben, R; Steele, V; Paris, M C J; Temple-Smith, P D

    2007-07-01

    The southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) is a seasonal breeding, burrowing marsupial adapted to a semi-arid environment and the closest relative of the endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii). Females typically give birth to one to two young every 3 years with young weaned at 360-400 days. This study examined the occurrence of polyoestry in a wild population of southern hairy-nosed wombats, and in particular the ability of this species to produce additional offspring in the same breeding season if a young was prematurely lost or removed. Pouch young were removed during the breeding seasons of 1996/1997 and 2003. No females from the 1996 (n=3)/1997 (n=3) group gave birth to a second pouch young in the same breeding season. However, two females in this group gave birth to young the following season. In contrast, all the 2003 group of females (n=6) produced a second offspring in the same breeding season after removal of pouch young (RPY). The reason for the different response to RPY between the two groups is unknown. These studies confirm that southern hairy-nosed wombats are polyoestrus in the wild and are capable of producing more than one offspring in a single breeding season. Females that failed to return to oestrus in the breeding season that pouch young were removed bred again in the following season. Rapid replacement of southern hairy-nosed wombat pouch young in the same breeding season as RPY suggests that this procedure, linked to either hand-rearing or interspecific cross-fostering, should be seriously considered as a priority conservation action to increase the population size of the critically endangered sister species, the northern hairy-nosed wombat.

  18. Measuring neoplastic transformation in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Brown, William; Wax, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is a promising technique which combines the depth resolution of low coherence interferometry with the sensitivity of light scattering spectroscopy for probing the health of epithelial tissue layers. Our new fLCI system configuration utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source and a 4-f interferometer which re-images light scattered from the sample onto the detection plane. The system employs an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire depth resolved profiles from 252 adjacent spatial points without the need for any scanning. The limited spatial coherence of the light source requires the resolution of adjacent spatial points for the generation of depth information. Depth-resolved spectral information is recovered by performing a short-time Fourier transform on the detected spectra, similar to spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain information about the neoplastic transformation of the probed cells. Previous studies have demonstrated fLCI as an excellent technique for probing the scatterer morphology of simple phantoms and of in vitro cancer cell monolayers. We now seek to assess the ability of the new fLCI system to measure the health of subsurface tissue layers using the hamster cheek pouch model. Seven hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. We expect our results to establish the feasibility of fLCI to distinguish between healthy and dysplastic epithelial tissues in the hamster cheek pouch.

  19. Rice protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome with transient specific IgE to boiled rice but not to retort-processed rice.

    PubMed

    Yasutomi, Motoko; Kosaka, Takuya; Kawakita, Akiko; Hayashi, Hisako; Okazaki, Shintaro; Murai, Hiroki; Miyagawa, Kazuhiko; Mayumi, Mitsufumi; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-02-01

    Described herein is the case of an 8-month-old girl with atypical food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome due to rice. She presented with vomiting and poor general activity 2 h after ingestion of boiled rice. Oral food challenge test using high-pressure retort-processed rice was negative, but re-exposure to boiled rice elicited gastrointestinal symptoms. On western blot analysis the patient's serum was found to contain IgE bound to crude protein extracts from rice seed or boiled rice, but not from retort-processed rice. The major protein bands were not detected in the electrophoresed gel of retort-processed rice extracts, suggesting decomposition by high-temperature and high-pressure processing. Oral food challenge for diagnosing rice allergy should be performed with boiled rice to avoid a false negative. Additionally, some patients with rice allergy might be able to ingest retort-processed rice as a substitute for boiled rice.

  20. Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

  1. Relationship between peel force, opening force, and burst force for a semi-rigid cup and lid, pre- and post-retort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalakha, Raj Prakash

    This research determines if there is any relationship between the peel force, the opening force and the burst force for a semi-rigid cup and lid system, for pre- and post-retort conditions. It also compares the relationship (regression lines) between these forces pre- and post-retort. These seal results were studied by varying the sealing parameters of dwell time and temperature while keeping the pressure constant. Polypropylene cups and a peelable barrier retort lidding were used in this study. As compared to past research, a different peel testing technique was used to measure the peel and the opening force. The entire lid was peeled to measure the "true" opening and peel forces experienced by the consumer. A dynamic burst test was performed using unrestrained plates. Creep tests were performed to ensure a good quality of seals. The relationship for these forces, which were measured on different cups due to their destructive nature, were found using instrument variables (dwell time and temperature). The study found that there was a relationship between these the three force for both pre- and post-retort conditions. Six regression equations for these relationships were found. The pre- and post-retort regression lines were compared. The nature of these forces were found to be different pre- and post-retort. Different concepts were discussed to better understand the nature of these forces pre- and post-retort, such as modes of failure, cold crystallization of materials in the retort, sealant flow at high temperatures and dwell times, and so on.

  2. KECL finds that 18-8 alloys are needed for oil shale retorting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Kentucky Energy Cabinet Laboratory (KECL) has, over a period of several years, investigated the corrosion and wear of materials of construction in oil shale retorting. The objective of the program was to develop an alloy performance database so that cost-effective materials of construction can be selected for plant designs. The KECL researchers conclude that 18-8 type alloys are needed for components exposed to gas and mist. For components exposed to interaction of erosion or abrasion with corrosion, wastage rates can be 10-20 times those under corrosion alone. These areas should probably be refractory or ceramic lined. Any metallic components (thermowells, etc.) will need to be protected by hard coatings or overlays. In condensate systems, the low alloys suffered extensive corrosive damage. Ferritic and stabilized austinitic stainless steels can be used to prevent stress corrosion cracking in these systems. 4 tables.

  3. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of the shale-oil produced in the Estonian Kiviter retort.

    PubMed

    Bogovski, P; Veidebaum, T; Tamme, J; Põldvere, E

    1990-01-01

    Skin painting experiments in CC57Bl mice showed that the total oil (TO) obtained by thermal processing of lump oil shale in the high capacity 'Kiviter' retort containing 56 ppm benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and diluted with benzene (66.6%) induced skin tumours in five out of 60 effective mice--in three mice squamous-cell papillomas and in two mice carcinomas. The light fraction (230-350 degrees C) of this oil and the laboratory residue (82 ppm BP) of the latter failed to induce skin tumours. An industrial residue of a blend of shale oils containing 590 ppm BP induced in 10 mice papillomas and in three mice carcinomas, gave a positive response in the Ames assay and also induced chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. The laboratory residue and light fraction were clearly mutagenic in the Ames assay and positive responses were also obtained with the basic and neutral fractions and a polynuclear aromatics fraction.

  4. Improving the dependability of critical thermocouple thermometry for fossil-fuel gasifiers and retorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.

    1982-07-01

    Critical thermocouple thermometry is such a measurement in which either excessive error or loss of signal can result in unacceptable consequences. To avoid these consequences it is necessary that the thermometry survive whatever adverse environment accompanies the measurement; however, it is just as essential to accomplish definite, adequate, demonstrated accuracy. This report describes some of the more significant problems involved in applying thermocouple thermometry in hostile environments. For example a hostile environment is encountered in some locations in gasifiers and retorts; there sensor damage is likely. A model of defective thermocouples is used to describe several damage mechanisms, their effects on dependability, and the symptoms that allow their detection. The model illustrates why many significant errors can occur unrecognized and demonstrates the practical need for real-time validation diagnostics. Special continual diagnostic techniques are described that can help to establish the dependability of critical measurement throughout the period of use.

  5. Changes in physicochemical properties of retort-sterilized dairy beverages during storage.

    PubMed

    Cano-Ruiz, M E; Richter, R L

    1998-08-01

    The effects of composition, storage time, and storage temperature on the physicochemical properties of a retort-sterilized dairy beverage were investigated. Drinks with eight formulations were stored at 4, 25, and 37 degrees C for 6 mo and were analyzed monthly for pH, net color difference, apparent viscosity, sedimentation index, homogenization index, particle size index, and soluble calcium. The changes in the physicochemical properties of the beverages increased as storage time and temperature increased. The degree of change was affected by the composition of the product. Sodium tripolyphosphate was implicated in promoting age gelation of samples with 11% nonfat milk solids, but sedimentation was observed in the absence of sodium tripolyphosphate and carrageenan. The apparent viscosity of samples affected the rate of age gelation and sedimentation, both of which increased as viscosity decreased. Interactions between milk fat, carrageenan, and nonfat milk solids were important in determining the apparent viscosity of the beverages and the rate of change observed during storage.

  6. Pollution control technical manual: Lurgi oil shale retorting with open pit mining. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The Lurgi oil shale PCTM addresses the Lurgi retorting technology, developed by Lurgi Kohle and Mineralotechnik GmbH, West Germany, in the manner in which this technology may be applied to the oil shales of the western United States. This manual proceeds through a description of the Lurgi oil shale plant proposed by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, characterizes the waste streams produced in each medium, and discusses the array of commercially available controls which can be applied to the Lurgi plant waste streams. From these generally characterized controls, several are examined in more detail for each medium in order to illustrate typical control technology operation. Control technology cost and performance estimates are presented, together with descriptions of the discharge streams, secondary waste streams and energy requirements. A summary of data limitations and needs for environmental and control technology considerations is presented.

  7. Apparatus and method for igniting an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, Carlon C.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for conducting such method are disclosed for igniting a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort. The method is conducted by forming a hole through unfragmented formation to the fragmented mass. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the hole. A fuel is introduced into a portion of the hole spaced apart from the fragmented mass. The fuel and oxygen-containing gas mix forming a combustible mixture which is ignited for establishing a combustion zone in a portion of the hole spaced apart from the fragmented mass. The hot gas generated in the combustion zone is conducted from the hole into the fragmented mass for heating a portion of the fragmented mass above an ignition temperature of oil shale.

  8. A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Coburn, T.T.

    1988-07-26

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

  9. High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOEpatents

    Coburn, Thomas T.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

  10. Alkaline scrubbing of in-situ oil shale retort offgas at Geokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Taback, H.; Goldstick, R.; Bates, E.

    1985-08-01

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's mobile wet scrubber on a 200-acfm slipstream of Geokinetics' retort offgas to investigate the H2S removal efficiency and selectivity (percent H2S removal/percent CO2 removal) as a function of liquid/gas contact time, alkaline solution OH(minus) concentration, and the specific scrubbing chemical. A venturi and spray tower were used to produce contact times of about 0.003 and 0.2 second, respectively. Three alkaline solutions (NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH) were employed on each contactor at various concentrations for a total of 22 runs. To analyze these results and provide design criteria for future alkaline scrubbers a sophisticated computer model employing the penetration theory for liquid-phase mass transfer was developed.

  11. Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Characteristic and antioxidant activity of retorted gelatin hydrolysates from cobia (Rachycentron canadum) skin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Ho, Hsin-Yi; Chu, Yuh-Jwo; Chow, Chau-Jen

    2008-09-01

    Alkali-pretreated cobia (Rachycentron canadum) skin was extracted in a retort (121°C) for 30min to obtain a retorted skin gelatin hydrolysate (RSGH). The molecular mass distributions and antioxidant activities of cobia RSGH and enzyme-treated RSGHs (ET-RSGHs) derived from bromelain, papain, pancreatin, and trypsin digestion were then characterized. The molecular mass distribution of the RSGH ranged mainly between 20,000 and 700Da and those of ET-RSGHs ranged between 6500 and 700Da. The DPPH (α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging effects (%) of 10mg/ml of RSGH and 10mg/ml of the four ET-RSGHs were 55% and 51-61%, respectively. The lipid peroxidation inhibition (%) of RSGH and ET-RSGHs (10mg/ml) were 58% and 60-71% on the fifth day in a linoleic acid model system, respectively. The 3Kd-ET-RSGHs, obtained by using a series of centrifugal ultrafiltration filters (molecular weight cut-offs of 10, 5, and 3kDa done sequentially with decreasing pore size), exhibited dramatically improved antioxidant activity, with most of the molecular mass ranging below 700Da. Compared to 10mg/ml of the RSGH, 10mg/ml of 3Kd-ET-RSGHs exhibited 45-65% more scavenging of DPPH radical and 24-38% more inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The peptides with molecular masses below 700Da in the ET-RSGHs or 3Kd-ET-RSGHs significantly affect the antioxidant properties. These peptides are composed of a small number of amino acids or free amino acids and have the potential to be added as antioxidants in foods.

  13. Optimization of processing conditions for the sterilization of retorted short-rib patties using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Su-Hee; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimum sterilization conditions for short-rib patties in retort trays by considering microbiological safety, nutritive value, sensory characteristics, and textural properties. In total, 27 sterilization conditions with various temperatures, times, and processing methods were tested using a 3(3) factorial design. The response surface methodology (RSM) and contour analysis were applied to find the optimum sterilization conditions for the patties. Quality attributes were significantly affected by the sterilization temperature, time, and processing method. From RSM and contour analysis, the final optimum sterilization condition of the patties that simultaneously satisfied all specifications was determined to be 119.4°C for 18.55min using a water-cascading rotary mode. The findings of the present study suggest that using optimized sterilization conditions will improve the microbial safety, sensory attributes, and nutritional retention for retorted short-rib patties.

  14. Method for establishing a combustion zone in an in situ oil shale retort having a pocket at the top

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1980-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort having a top boundary of unfragmented formation and containing a fragmented permeable mass has a pocket at the top, that is, an open space between a portion of the top of the fragmented mass and the top boundary of unfragmented formation. To establish a combustion zone across the fragmented mass, a combustion zone is established in a portion of the fragmented mass which is proximate to the top boundary. A retort inlet mixture comprising oxygen is introduced to the fragmented mass to propagate the combustion zone across an upper portion of the fragmented mass. Simultaneously, cool fluid is introduced to the pocket to prevent overheating and thermal sloughing of formation from the top boundary into the pocket.

  15. Crohn's-like complications in patients with ulcerative colitis after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, N S; Sanford, W W; Bodzin, J H

    1997-11-01

    Total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) has become an established surgical procedure for ulcerative colitis. Occasional patients who have undergone IPAA develop persistent or recurrent episodes of pouchitis (chronic pouchitis), from which a subset also develop gastrointestinal and systemic complications that are identical to those seen in Crohn's disease. These complications include enteric stenoses or fistulas in the pouch or pouch inlet segment, perianal fistulas or abscesses, pouch fistulas, arthritis, iridocyclitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum. The development of Crohn's-like gastrointestinal complications in a patient with chronic pouchitis frequently engenders concern that the pathologist misinterpreted the proctocolectomy specimen as ulcerative colitis instead of Crohn's disease. We describe eight patients who developed chronic pouchitis and Crohn's-like complications after IPAA and total proctocolectomy. In each case, concern was voiced about misinterpretation of the proctocolectomy specimen as ulcerative colitis instead of Crohn's disease after the development of the Crohn's-like complications. Preoperatively, all eight patients had characteristic clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of ulcerative colitis. Review of the pathology specimens indicated that all eight had ulcerative colitis. Crohn's-like complications are most likely related to chronic pouchitis, which probably is a form of recrudescent ulcerative colitis within the novel environment of the pouch. A diagnosis of Crohn's disease after IPAA surgery should only be made when reexamination of the original proctocolectomy specimen shows typical pathologic features of Crohn's disease, Crohn's disease arises in parts of the gastrointestinal tract distant from the pouch, pouch biopsies contain active enteritis with granulomas, or excised pouches show the characteristic features of Crohn's disease, including granulomas. There were no histologic differences in the total

  16. Cystic Endometrioma with Coexisting Fibroma Originating in a Supernumerary Ovary in the Rectovaginal Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Asumi; Kodama, Hiroko; Ogura, Kanako; Miwa, Ayako; Sugimori, Yayoi; Matuoka, Shozo; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2017-01-01

    A supernumerary ovary is an exceedingly rare disorder, in which the structure containing ovarian tissue is located at some distance from the normally placed ovary. 16 cases of endometriosis or tumors originating in a supernumerary ovary have been published in the English literature, but no case of coexisting endometriosis and a tumor has been published. We present the case of a 40-year-old female with cystic endometrioma with coexisting fibroma originating in a supernumerary ovary in the rectovaginal pouch. The present case is the first to be reported with coexisting endometriosis and a tumor originating in a supernumerary ovary. Our experience with this case and the results of our previous studies of rectovaginal endometriosis indicated that the possibility of originating in a supernumerary ovary shall be examined in cases of cystic endometrioma in the rectovaginal pouch. PMID:28210515

  17. The relationship between hatching rate and number of embryos of the brood pouch in Littorina saxatilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Padín, P.; Carballo, M.; Caballero, A.; Rolán-Alvarez, E.

    2008-10-01

    Littorina saxatilis is an ovoviviparous organism in which shelled embryos can be directly observed in nearly all mature females captured in the wild. This characteristic has been used a number of times as an indirect estimate for fecundity of natural populations. However, there is no experimental corroboration that the number of embryos within a female brood pouch is actually related to the rate of hatching per unit of time, a more realistic estimate of female fecundity. In order to make this corroboration we estimated the correlation between the number of embryos in the brood pouch and the hatching rate of isolated females grown in the laboratory. We also compared the hatching rates of females from two sympatric ecotypes (RB and SU) of this species, which differ significantly in the number of embryos. We found a high agreement between hatching rate and number of embryos, concluding that the latter is a good proxy for fecundity.

  18. Nd:YAG photovaporization of residual equine guttural-pouch mycotic lesions after internal carotid occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P.; Tudor, R. A.; Little, Edwina D. E.

    1998-07-01

    Hospital records reviewed over a 12-year period determined that 6 horses had been presented for guttural pouch mycosis. All had a history of epistaxis and several had accompanying neurologic signs, including dysphagia. Initially, conformation of the disease was obtained by radiographic and endoscopic examinations. Surgical treatment was directed at controlling and preventing additional hemorrhage by occluding the arterial source of the hemorrhage. Direct treatment of the mycotic plaque present within the guttural pouch was conducted using transendoscopic technique to direct irradiation from the Nd:YAG laser. The protocol described for the laser application was successful in resolving the lesions and was less complicated and stressful than previously reported topically applied chemical protocols.

  19. Guttural pouch mycosis in horses: a retrospective study of 28 cases.

    PubMed

    Dobesova, O; Schwarz, B; Velde, K; Jahn, P; Zert, Z; Bezdekova, B

    2012-12-01

    The medical records of 28 horses with guttural pouch mycosis were reviewed. The most commonly observed clinical signs were nasal discharge, epistaxis, dysphagia and/or cough. All 28 horses had the disease unilaterally, however, in five of them, it had spread into the contralateral pouch via the mesial septum. Three horses were treated medically, 11 horses underwent surgery and seven horses were treated both medically and surgically. Fifty percent of horses (14/28) were euthanased or died, fifty percent of horses (14/28) survived. There was no significant correlation between treatment method (medical, surgical, combination) and survival rate. The most common reason for euthanasia was dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction. There was a highly significant correlation between the presence of dysphagia and non-survival (p=0.008).

  20. Auto-inflammatory diseases in ileal pouch patients with NOD2/CARD15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Seril, Darren N.; Yao, Qingping; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Pouchitis is common in ulcerative colitis patients undergoing total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, and chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis occurs in a subgroup of the patients. Auto-inflammatory diseases are characterized by systemic inflammation, manifesting as periodic fever, rash, arthritis, and serositis. We describe two cases with ulcerative colitis and an ileal pouch, who presented with extra-intestinal manifestations and genetic features atypical for inflammatory bowel disease alone. Case 1 had a spectrum of clinical manifestations including refractory pouchitis, intermittent fevers, polyarthralgia, and pericarditis. Case 2 presented with oral ulcers, migratory oligoarthritis, and periodic papular rash. Genetic testing in both cases revealed mutations of the NOD2/CARD15 gene, including the IVS8+158 mutation commonly detected among patients with NOD2-associated auto-inflammatory disease. Both of the patients demonstrated clinical improvement of these diverse systemic complaints following treatment with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:25313006

  1. Auto-inflammatory diseases in ileal pouch patients with NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

    PubMed

    Seril, Darren N; Yao, Qingping; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Pouchitis is common in ulcerative colitis patients undergoing total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, and chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis occurs in a subgroup of the patients. Auto-inflammatory diseases are characterized by systemic inflammation, manifesting as periodic fever, rash, arthritis, and serositis. We describe two cases with ulcerative colitis and an ileal pouch, who presented with extra-intestinal manifestations and genetic features atypical for inflammatory bowel disease alone. Case 1 had a spectrum of clinical manifestations including refractory pouchitis, intermittent fevers, polyarthralgia, and pericarditis. Case 2 presented with oral ulcers, migratory oligoarthritis, and periodic papular rash. Genetic testing in both cases revealed mutations of the NOD2/CARD15 gene, including the IVS8(+158) mutation commonly detected among patients with NOD2-associated auto-inflammatory disease. Both of the patients demonstrated clinical improvement of these diverse systemic complaints following treatment with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies.

  2. Mucus accumulation and necrosis of the ventral air pouch in a marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) with productive rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Collarile, Tommaso; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Selleri, Paolo; Melidone, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    A captive-born marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) was presented for swelling of the ventral air pouch of 1 month's duration. The pouch appeared fluid filled, and its distal third wall was markedly inspissated. The thickened distal portion of the pouch wall was removed surgically. During anesthesia, mucous discharge from the nares was evident and the nasal mucosa was hyperemic. Aeromonas and Proteus species were isolated from a nasal culture. Postoperative therapy that consisted of nasal flushing, antimicrobial agents, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was effective in managing the disease. On histologic examination, diffuse hemorrhage, necrosis, and multifocal vasculitis with moderate-to-severe heterophilic inflammation were present within sections of the ventral pouch. To our knowledge this is the first report of a mucus-filled ventral air pouch with associated pathologic changes secondary to a productive infection of the upper respiratory tract in a marabou stork. The unique communication between nasal cavities and the ventral air pouch should be considered in future cases of respiratory infection in marabou storks.

  3. Natural honey: a new and potent anti-angiogenic agent in the air-pouch model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eteraf-Oskouei, T; Najafi, M; Gharehbagheri, A

    2014-10-01

    Despite reports indicating anti-inflammatory effects of honey, the anti-angiogenic effect of honey and its impact on inflammatory mediators in the air pouch model of inflammation have not yet been studied. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of honey on angiogenesis, inflammatory cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level as an important marker of angiogenesis and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the rat air pouch model of inflammation. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, and then 20 ml and 10 ml of sterile air were injected subcutaneously in the back on days 0 and 3, respectively. On day 6, inflammation was induced by injection of 1 ml of carrageenan 1% into pouches. After 72 h, the rats were sacrificed; pouch fluid was collected in order to determine PGE2 concentration and VEGF level. The Pouches were dissected out and weighed. Angiogenesis of granulomatous tissue was assayed using a hemoglobin kit. Honey was able to reduce granulation tissue weight and angiogenesis as well as showing potent inhibitory activities against PGE2 and VEGF in air pouch model of inflammation. The decrease in angiogenesis correlates with the inhibition of PGE2 and VEGF. Honey is potentially useful in the treatment of granulomatous inflammatory conditions. It seems that the anti-angiogenic activities of honey are mediated through modulation of PGE2 and VEGF production.

  4. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts. I. Activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Strniste, G F; Chen, D J

    1981-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to dilutions of shale oil retort process waters obtained from three different retorting processes located in the Green River oil shale formations in the western part of the United States. Although the intensity of the response was dictated by thd process water used, all induced a cytotoxic (reduction in colony-forming ability) and mutagenic (induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus) response in cells pretreated with dilutions of the waters and subsequent exposure to near ultraviolet light (NUV). Combinations of process water plus NUV yielded mutation frequencies as great as 50% that witnessed for the mutation frequency induced by the potent carcinogen far ultraviolet light. NUV alone was nontoxic and nonmutagenic at the doses of radiation used. Exposure of CHO cells in the dark to nontoxic dilutions of the process waters resulted in small but significant increases in 6-thioguanine resistant mutants. (1-2 time background rates). The biological consequences resulting from the disposal of retort process waters into the delicate environment present in this oil shale region could be further complicated by this photoactivating process.

  5. Marsupial tammar wallaby delivers milk bioactives to altricial pouch young to support lung development.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Hinds, Lyn A; Sharp, Julie A; Lefevre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2016-11-01

    Our research is exploiting the marsupial as a model to understand the signals required for lung development. Marsupials have a unique reproductive strategy, the mother gives birth to altricial neonate with an immature lung and the changes in milk composition during lactation in marsupials appears to provide bioactives that can regulate diverse aspects of lung development, including branching morphogenesis, cell proliferation and cell differentiation. These effects are seen with milk collected between 25 and 100days postpartum. To better understand the temporal effects of milk composition on postnatal lung development we used a cross-fostering technique to restrict the tammar pouch young to milk composition not extending beyond day 25 for 45days of its early postnatal life. These particular time points were selected as our previous study showed that milk protein collected prior to ~day 25 had no developmental effect on mouse embryonic lungs in culture. The comparative analysis of the foster group and control young at day 45 postpartum demonstrated that foster pouch young had significantly reduced lung size. The lungs in fostered young were comprised of large intermediate tissue, had a reduced size of airway lumen and a higher percentage of parenchymal tissue. In addition, expression of marker genes for lung development (BMP4, WNT11, AQP-4, HOPX and SPB) were significantly reduced in lungs from fostered young. Further, to identify the potential bioactive expressed by mammary gland that may have developmental effect on pouch young lungs, we performed proteomics analysis on tammar milk through mass-spectrometry and listed the potential bioactives (PDGF, IGFBP5, IGFBPL1 and EGFL6) secreted in milk that may be involved in regulating pouch young lung development. The data suggest that postnatal lung development in the tammar young is most likely regulated by maternal signalling factors supplied through milk.

  6. Assessment of Nutritional Status of Patients of Congenital Pouch Colon Following Definitive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Nand Kishor; Kumar, Praveen; Dabla, Pradeep Kumar; Jhanwar, Praveen; Chadha, Rajiv; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the nutritional status in 31 patients of congenital pouch colon (CPC) who had undergone definitive surgery and closure of a protective stoma, if any, at least 1 year earlier and were below 14 years age. Materials and Methods: The clinical history, demographic details, anthropometric measurements, and results of hematological and biochemical tests were recorded. In addition to collective data, analysis was also performed after grouping by age, subtype of CPC (Types I/II and Types III/IV CPC), and in Types I/II CPC patients, by whether the colonic pouch had been completely excised or else a segment preserved by tubular colorraphy (TC). Results: Severe fecal incontinence (FI) was common (64.52%). Anthropometry showed a significant malnutrition in 53.85–95.45% patients, especially stunting which was most prevalent in the 0–5 years age-group. Serum Vitamin B12, folate, and Vitamin D were lower than normal in 38.71%, 22.58%, and 74.19% patients, respectively, without statistically significant difference among the various groups studied. Patients with Types I/II CPC had a statistically significant higher incidence of anemia, low serum ferritin, and severe FI than patients with Types III/IV CPC. Patients with Types I/II CPC, managed by excision of the colonic pouch, had a higher incidence of severe FI, wasting, and thinness than those undergoing TC. Conclusions: On follow-up of the patients of CPC, anthropometry shows a high incidence of malnutrition, especially stunting in the 0–5 years age-group. There is an adequate adaptation of fluid-electrolyte homeostasis. Although Types I/II CPC patients have a significantly higher incidence of anemia and severe FI than Types III/IV CPC patients, long-term anthropometric parameters are similar. In Types I/II CPC, preservation of the colonic pouch by TC offers long-term benefit. PMID:28082770

  7. Expansion of Lithium Ion Pouch Cell Batteries: Observations from Neutron Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-21

    low C-rates the measured battery thickness was a function of State of Charge (SOC) and independent of a small external clamping force. A 0.3...Lee et al. in [4] measured the dimensional changes in lithium cobalt oxide pouch cells during cycling using a specialized dilatometer setup. They...and rates on electrode expansion was investigated. At low C-rates the measured battery thickness was a function of State of Charge (SOC) and independent

  8. Teaching Giant African Pouched Rats to Find Landmines: Operant Conditioning With Real Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Bach, Håvard; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Giant African pouched rats recently have been used as mine-detection animals in Mozambique. To provide an example of the wide range of problems to which operant conditioning procedures can be applied and to illustrate the common challenges often faced in applying those procedures, this manuscript briefly describes how the rats are trained and used operationally. To date, the rats have performed well and it appears they can play a valuable role in humanitarian demining. PMID:22532890

  9. Effects of chlorhexidine on the structure and permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, B.V.; Squier, C.A.; Hall, B.K.

    1984-10-01

    This study examined the effects of chlorhexidine (CHD) on the clinical appearance, morphology, and in vitro permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa. The cheek pouches were treated daily for 3 weeks with topical applications of saline, 0.2% CHD, or 2.0% CHD. Treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in the formation of discrete white lesions in every animal in the group, whereas no changes were identified in any animal treated with 0.2% CHD or saline. Upon microscopic examination it was determined that treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in a statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness, when compared to the other groups, and the lesions were found to consist of hyperplastic areas of epithelium with associated inflammatory cell accumulations. Daily treatments with 2.0% CHD, 0.2% CHD or saline had no effect on the very low permeability of cheek pouch mucosa to /sup 14/C-CHD. However, treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in decreased permeability to /sup 3/H/sub 2/O when compared to the other groups. Treatment with 2.0% CHD also resulted in a thickened permeability barrier, as determined using a tracer, horseradish peroxidase. It is concluded that topical applications of 0.2% T CHD have no detectable effect on cheek-pouch mucosa while applications of 2.0% CHD result in hyperplasia and a decrease in mucosal permeability. Results suggest that CHD should be used with caution clinically and at a concentration of 0.2% or less.

  10. Detecting neoplastic development in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Robles, Francisco; Chen, Xiaoxin; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is an optical technique that recovers depth-resolved spectroscopic information about scatterers. The current fLCI system utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source, a 4-f interferometer, and an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire spectra from 256 adjacent spatial points. This configuration permits the acquisition of ultrahigh depth resolution Fourier domain OCT images without the need for any beam scanning. fLCI has traditionally obtained depth-resolved spectral information by performing a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) on the detected spectra, similar to the processing techniques of spectroscopic OCT. We now employ a dual Gaussian window processing method which simultaneously obtains high spectral and temporal resolution, thus avoiding the resolution trade-off normally associated with the STFT. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain structural information about the probed scatterers. We now verify fLCI's ability to distinguish between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissue using the hamster cheek pouch model. Thirty hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. Our results will further establish fLCI as an effective method for distinguishing between normal and dysplastic epithelial tissues.

  11. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  12. Comparative rice seed toxicity tests using filter paper, growth pouch-tm, and seed tray methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1993-01-01

    Paper substrate, especially circular filter paper placed inside a Petri dish, has long been used for the plant seed toxicity test (PSTT). Although this method is simple and inexpensive, recent evidence indicates that it gives results that are significantly different from those obtained using a method that does not involve paper, especially when testing metal cations. The study compared PSTT using three methods: filter paper, Growth Pouch-TM, and seed tray. The Growth Pouch-TM is a commercially available device. The seed tray is a newly designed plastic receptacle placed inside a Petri dish. The results of the Growth Pouch-TM method showed no toxic effects on rice for Ag up to 40 mg L-1 and Cd up to 20 mg L-1. Using the seed tray method, IC50 (50% inhibitory effect concentration) values were 0.55 and 1.4 mg L-1 for Ag and Cd, respectively. Although results of filter paper and seed tray methods were nearly identical for NaF, Cr(VI), and phenol, the toxicities of cations Ag and Cd were reduced by using the filter paper method; IC50 values were 22 and 18 mg L-1, respectively. The results clearly indicate that paper substrate is not advisable for PSTT.

  13. Sunitinib Improves Some Clinical Aspects and Reverts DMBA-Induced Hyperplasic Lesions in Hamster Buccal Pouch

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Mariana; Nunes, Marianne Brochado; Serafim, Lucas Horstmann; Azambuja, Alan Arrieira; Braga, Luisa Maria G. de M.; Saur, Lisiani; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a public health problem. The hamster buccal pouch model is ideal for analyzing the development of OSCC. This research analysed the effects of sunitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) in precancerous lesions induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in this model. Thirty-four male hamsters, divided into six groups: control—C (n = 7), acetone—A (n = 12), carbamide peroxide—CP (n = 5 ), acetone and CP—A+CP (n = 8), 1% DMBA in acetone and CP—DA+CP (n = 6), and 1% DMBA in acetone and CP and 4-week treatment with sunitinib—DA+CP+S (n = 7). The aspects evaluated were anatomopathological features (peribuccal area, paws, nose, and fur), histological sections of the hamster buccal pouches (qualitatively analyzed), epithelium thickness, and the rete ridge density (estimated). Sunitinib was unable to attenuate the decrease in weight gain induced by DMBA; no increase in volume was detected in the pouch and/or ulceration, observed in 43% of the animals in the DA+CP group. DA+CP groups presented a significant increase in rete ridge density compared to the control groups (P < 0.01) which was reverted by sunitinib in the DA+CP+S group. Sunitinib seems to have important benefits in early stage carcinogenesis and may be useful in chemoprevention. PMID:24693453

  14. Endoscopic treatment of leak at the tip of the “J” ileal pouch

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, Gursimran Singh; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The tip of the “J” of the ileal pouch is the vulnerable location for leak after restorative proctocolectomy, which has normally been treated with surgery. We aimed to describe a novel endoscopic method to treat the same. Patients and methods A cohort of 12 consecutive patients with a leak at the tip of the “J” was identified in our prospectively maintained Pouch Registry. The endoscopic over-the-scope clipping (OTSC) system was used for the closure of the leak. Results Eight patients (66.6 %) achieved complete closure of the leak documented by endoscopy confirmed with guidewire and/or contrasted pouchogram, with 6 requiring a single endoscopic session and 2 undergoing a repeat session. Four patients (33.3 %) had a persistent leak and required surgical intervention, of whom 1 developed abscess in the pre-spine region 14 days after the endoscopic procedure and underwent pouch revision surgery. Conclusions OSTC appears to be safe and effective in treating the leak at the tip of the “J” in the majority of patients. PMID:28180150

  15. Developing the Geokinetics/Department of Energy horizontal in situ retorting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lekas, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed under a cooperative agreement between Geokinetics Inc., and the US Department of Energy, spanning on eight year period. A large body of experimental data was generated which has been previously reported in a series of published and unpublished reports, as indicated in Chapter VII. The report summarizes research work performed from April of 1975 to August 15, 1985, but emphasizes data generated during the final three years of the project, when five large retorts were tested. The report draws conclusions based upon the total program, including work performed by Geokinetics prior to entering into the Cooperative Agreement, and presents the initial parameters useful for scaleup and design of a commercial scale operation, including data useful for assessing the environmental impacts and criteria for mitigation of such impacts. Specific details concerning the various aspects of the program may be obtained from the many previous reports that have been generated from the date of project initiation. A list of these reports is presented in Chapter VII. 28 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Gamma 60Co-irradiation of organic matter in the Phosphoria Retort Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Ulmishek, G. F.; Harrison, W.; Schreiner, F.

    1991-04-01

    Irradiation experiments were conducted on a thermally immature rock sample of the Phosphoria Retort Shale and its isolated kerogen. A 60Co-source for gamma radiation was employed at dosages ranging from 81 to 885 Mrads, which are attainable by Paleozoic and Precambrian black shales with syngenetic uranium enrichments. Kerogen elemental, isotopic, and pyrolysate compositions are not affected at these dosages, but the bitumens extracted from the irradiated rock are affected. The major effects are reductions in the amounts of bitumen, acyclic isoprenoids, and high-molecular weight acyclic carboxylic acids. Natural differences in the amounts of bitumen and acyclic isoprenoid due to regional and stratigraphie variations in organic source input and depositional conditions make the radiation-induced reductions in these parameters difficult to use as indicators of natural radiation damage in black shales. However, the preferential reduction in the high-molecular weight acyclic carboxylic acids, which are ubiquitous in the living precursory organic matter, is diagnostic of experimental γ-irradiation but may not be diagnostic of natural irradiation. The overall process associated with radiation damage is polymerization by cross-linking through a free radical mechanism. As a result, irradiation of organic matter in black shales is more likely to retard rather than enhance petroleum generation.

  17. Shale oil from the LLNL pilot retort: Metal ions as markers for water and dust

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, T.T.; Duewer, T.I.; King, K.J.; Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A metal ion found primarily in one of the three phases (oil, water, or dust) can serve as a marker for that phase. Emulsified water contains most of the magnesium detected in a shale oil. Extraction with saturated salt solution removes most of that Mg. The Mg content of retort water and the percentage of water in the oil (by ASTM D-4006) provides a good estimate of an oil`s Mg content. Mineral matter elements with poorly water soluble carbonates (or oxides) at pH 8 (calcium, for example) serve as markers for dust. When the water is separated from the main and light oil fractions before adding the heavy fraction containing dust, a much drier oil can be obtained. However, when done in this way, a powder containing Ca and Si remains in the oil; it cannot be completely removed even by filtering through a 0.24-{mu} frit. Iron, and certain other transition metal ions, is quite oil soluble. Extraction with dilute nitric acid to remove basic amines reduces the Fe content of shale oil. Unlike carboxylate- complexed metal ions in crude oils, the iron in shale oil does not extract efficiently into an aqueous EDTA solution (pH 5.9). Distillation of shale oil leaves most of the iron and other metals behind in the vacuum residum. Shale oil corrodes the hottest condenser`s steel interior; this is the chief source of iron in the oil.

  18. Self-cementing properties of oil shale solid heat carrier retorting residue.

    PubMed

    Talviste, Peeter; Sedman, Annette; Mõtlep, Riho; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2013-06-01

    Oil shale-type organic-rich sedimentary rocks can be pyrolysed to produce shale oil. The pyrolysis of oil shale using solid heat carrier (SHC) technology is accompanied by large amount of environmentally hazardous solid residue-black ash-which needs to be properly landfilled. Usage of oil shale is growing worldwide, and the employment of large SHC retorts increases the amount of black ash type of waste, but little is known about its physical and chemical properties. The objectives of this research were to study the composition and self-cementing properties of black ash by simulating different disposal strategies in order to find the most appropriate landfilling method. Three disposal methods were simulated in laboratory experiment: hydraulic disposal with and without grain size separation, and dry dumping of moist residue. Black ash exhibited good self-cementing properties with maximum compressive strength values of >6 MPa after 90 days. About 80% of strength was gained in 30 days. However, the coarse fraction (>125 µm) did not exhibit any cementation, thus the hydraulic disposal with grain size separation should be avoided. The study showed that self-cementing properties of black ash are governed by the hydration of secondary calcium silicates (e.g. belite), calcite and hydrocalumite.

  19. Localised inhibition of FGF signalling in the third pharyngeal pouch is required for normal thymus and parathyroid organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer R; Jackson, Abigail L; Gordon, Julie; Lickert, Heiko; Manley, Nancy R; Basson, M Albert

    2012-09-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands are derived from the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm. The mechanisms that establish distinct molecular domains in the third pouch and control the subsequent separation of these organ primordia from the pharynx are poorly understood. Here, we report that mouse embryos that lack two FGF feedback antagonists, Spry1 and Spry2, display parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia and a failure of these organ primordia to completely separate from the pharynx. We show that FGF ligands and downstream reporter genes are expressed in highly regionalised patterns in the third pouch and that sprouty gene deletion results in upregulated FGF signalling throughout the pouch endoderm. As a consequence, the initiation of markers of parathyroid and thymus fate is altered. In addition, a normal apoptotic programme that is associated with the separation of the primordia from the pharynx is disrupted, resulting in the maintenance of a thymus-pharynx attachment and a subsequent inability of the thymus to migrate to its appropriate position above the heart. We demonstrate that the sprouty genes function in the pharyngeal endoderm itself to control these processes and that the defects in sprouty-deficient mutants are, at least in part, due to hyper-responsiveness to Fgf8. Finally, we provide evidence to suggest that parathyroid hypoplasia in these mutants is due to early gene expression defects in the third pouch, whereas thymus hypoplasia is caused by reduced proliferation of thymic epithelial cells in the thymus primordium.

  20. FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Richard H.; Brinckman, Frederick E.; Jewett, Kenneth L.

    1981-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds were speciated in seven oil shale retort and process waters, including samples from simulated, true and modified in situ processes, using a high performance liquid chromatograph automatically coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption detector. The molecular forms of arsenic at ppm levels (({micro}g/mL) in these waters are identified for the first time, and shown to include arsenate, methylarsonic acid and phenylarsonic acid. An arsenic-specific fingerprint chromatogram of each retort or process water studied has significant impliestions regarding those arsenical species found and those marginally detected, such as dimethylarsinic acid and the suspected carcinogen arsenite. The method demonstrated suggests future means for quantifying environmental impacts of bioactive organometal species involved in oil shale retorting technology.

  1. The Promoting Effect of Carbamide Peroxide Teeth Bleaching Gel in a Preclinical Model of Head and Neck Cancer in Hamster Buccal Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Vilela, Wadson; Vilela Gonçalves, Reggiani; Tavares Rheingantz, Maria Gabriela; Minello, Luiz Fernando; Braga da Silva, Jefferson Luis; Oliveira de Oliveira, Laura Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to verify the promoting effect of carbamide peroxide on dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenesis in the hamster buccal pouch, in order to reduce the period of latency for tumor formation. Methods Sixteen hamsters were randomized into two groups of eight animals each. The hamsters of the group I had their right buccal pouches treated with 0.5% DMBA and 10% carbamide peroxide teeth bleaching gel for 55 days. The animals of the group II had their right pouches treated only with DMBA. After, six animals of each group had their pouches prepared for light microscopy. Histomorphometry was performed to assess the presence of keratinization, nuclear polymorphism, pattern of invasion, number of blood vessels, and inflammatory infiltrate in the tumor front. Furthermore, the newly formed lesions were graded according the Bryne's grading system. The remaining animals had the vascular system of the pouches casted by Mercox and qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results Histopathological analysis of the buccal pouches treated with DMBA and carbamide peroxide exhibited formation of squamous cell carcinoma well-differentiated with a high degree of malignancy in all pouches. The development of this neoplasm was associated with a significant increase in the number of blood vessels, presence of keratin pearls, and inflammatory infiltrate. The pouches of the group II showed inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma in only three right pouches. The analysis of the electron micrographs of the pouches chemically inducted with DBMA and carbamide peroxide reveled formation of a new vascular network characteristic of squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The protocol presented here, using DMBA associated with carbamide peroxide, shortens the period of latency to produce squamous cell carcinoma in the hamster buccal pouch, decreasing the time and costs of the experiments. PMID:25177438

  2. Association between gastro-intestinal symptoms and menstruation in patients with ileal pouches

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Wu, Xian-rui; Barber, Matthew D.; Queener, Elaine; Graff, Lesley; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms are often experienced by healthy women during menstruation. An increased frequency of GI symptoms during menses has also been reported in women with irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, IBD patients with restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomoses (IPAA) have not been studied. We aimed to examine the association between GI symptoms before and during menses in patients with IPAA, and to assess factors for exacerbation of GI symptoms in those patients. Methods: Adult women recorded in the Pouchitis Registry were invited to participate in a mailed survey. Participants reported on GI symptoms 1–5 days prior to- (pre-menses) and during the days of their menses in recent months. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained through the survey and chart review. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight (21.3%) out of 600 women with IPAA responded to the survey questionnaire. Forty-three (33.5%) were excluded for reasons including post-menopausal (n = 25), hysterectomy (n = 14) and use of contraceptives (n = 4). Abdominal pain (P = 0.001), diarrhea (P = 0.021), and urgency (P = 0.031) were more commonly reported during menses than pre-menses by the participants. Only a history of painful menses was significantly associated with increased GI symptoms during menses for patients with ileal pouch (odds ratio = 5.67; 95% confidence interval: 1.41–22.88; P = 0.015). Conclusion: GI symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and urgency are commonly associated with menses in patients with ileo-anal pouch. Painful menses may be associated with worsening of GI symptoms. PMID:25016379

  3. Effect of Withania somnifera on glycosaminoglycan synthesis in carrageenin-induced air pouch granuloma

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, V.H.; Sadique, J.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of W. somnifera on glycosaminoglycan synthesis in the granulation tissue of carrageenin-induced air pouch granuloma was studied. W. somnifera was shown to exert significant inhibitory effect on incorporation of /sup 35/S into the granulation tissue. The uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation (ADP/O ratio reduction) was also observed in the mitochondria of granulation tissue. Further, Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent ATPase activity was found to be influenced by W. somnifera. W. somnifera also reduced the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in the mitochondria of granulation tissue.

  4. In vitro inhibitory effect of onion extract on hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niukian, K; Schwartz, J; Shklar, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed that used varying concentrations of onion extract added to cell cultures of an epidermoid carcinoma cell line derived from hamster buccal pouch carcinoma (HCPC-1). The studies demonstrated tumor growth inhibition beginning after 24 hours of incubation at an onion extract concentration of 25% and above in culture media. After 4 days and 10 days of incubation, there was a noted decrease in tumor proliferation. The plating efficiency for 24 hours was observed to produce a 54-89% inhibition in plating density. The results indicated here provide in vitro evidence of the inhibitory and cytotoxic activity on an oral carcinoma cell line.

  5. Congenital pouch colon in a girl associated with bilateral atresia of cervix uteri and uterus didelphys.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Rajiv; Puri, Manju; Saxena, Rahul; Agarwala, Surendrakumar; Puri, Archana; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a girl with congenital pouch colon (CPC), uterus didelphys with septate vagina, and a cloacal anomaly. The girl underwent cloacal reconstruction at the age of 15 months. Subsequently, at puberty, the child had primary amenorrhea with severe cyclic abdominal pain due to endometriosis of both the uteruses and adnexal cysts with hematometra and hematosalpinx. Laparotomy with removal of both uteri and the left fallopian tube was performed. Both uteri had atresia of the cervix uteri. This report emphasizes the need for comprehensive evaluation and a long-term management strategy for associated gynecologic anomalies in girls with CPC, especially with regard to patency of the outflow tract.

  6. Characterization of Rio Blanco retort 1 water following treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kocornik, D.J.

    1985-12-01

    Laboratory research was initiated to evaluate the chemical, physical, and toxicological characteristics of treated and untreated Rio Blanco oil shale retort water. Wet chemical analyses, metals analyses, MICROTOX assays and particle-size analysis were performed on the wastewater before and after treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The reverse osmosis system successfully removed dissolved solids and organics from the wastewater. Based on MICROTOX tests, the water was much less toxic after treatment by reverse osmosis. 8 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Effect of γ-irradiation on commercial polypropylene based mono and multi-layered retortable food packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Johnsy; Kumar, R.; Sajeevkumar, V. A.; Sabapathy, S. N.; Vaijapurkar, S. G.; Kumar, D.; Kchawahha, A.; Bawa, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    Irradiation processing of food in the prepackaged form may affect chemical and physical properties of the plastic packaging materials. The effect of γ-irradiation doses (2.5-10.0 kGy) on polypropylene (PP)-based retortable food packaging materials, were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the changes happening to these materials after irradiation. The mechanical properties decreased with irradiation while oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was not affected significantly. Colour measurement indicated that Nylon 6 containing multilayer films became yellowish after irradiation. Thermal characterization revealed the changes in percentage crystallinity.

  8. Induction of CCR2-Dependent Macrophage Accumulation by Oxidized Phospholipids in the Air-Pouch Model of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kadl, Alexandra; Galkina, Elena; Leitinger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Objective Macrophages are key players in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid synovitis as well as in atherosclerosis. To determine whether atherogenic oxidized phospholipids potentially contribute to synovial inflammation and subsequent monocyte/macrophage recruitment, we examined the effects of oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-3-glycero-phosphorylcholine (OxPAPC) on chemokine expression and leukocyte recruitment in a facsimile synovium in vivo using the murine air-pouch model. Methods Air pouches were raised by 2 injections of sterile air, and inflammation was induced by injecting either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or OxPAPC into the pouch lumen. Inflammation was assessed by analysis of inflammatory gene expression using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction or immunohistochemical analysis, and leukocytes were quantified in the lavage fluid and in the pouch wall after staining with Giemsa or after enzymatic digestion followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Results Application of OxPAPC resulted in selective recruitment of monocyte/macrophages into the air-pouch wall, but not in the lumen. In contrast, LPS induced both monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the pouch lumen as well as in the wall. LPS, but not OxPAPC, induced the expression of adhesion molecules E-selectin, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. OxPAPC increased the expression of the CCR2 ligands monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, and MCP-5, as well as RANTES and growth-related oncogene α (GROα), while it down-regulated the expression of CCR2 on macrophages. Moreover, oxidized phospholipid–induced macrophage accumulation was abrogated in CCR2−/− mice. Conclusion These data demonstrate that oxidized phospholipids trigger a type of inflammatory response that leads to selective macrophage accumulation in vivo, a process relevant for the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:19404946

  9. Effects of thermal maturation on steroid hydrocarbons as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Phosphoria Retort Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Bjorøy, M.; Dolcater, D. L.

    1986-09-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis experiments on the Phosphoria Retort Shale generate bitumen extracts and expelled oils that have steroid hydrocarbons with m/z 217-, 231-, and 253-mass Chromatographic distributions that are similar to those of bitumens and crude oils in the natural system. These experiments agree with the natural observations that diasteroid hydrocarbons increase relative to their regular counterparts with increasing thermal stress, while their C 27 through C 29 proportionality shows a slight enrichment in C 27. Relative concentrations of 20S to 20R configurations of 24-ethyl-14α,17α-cholestane show the expected increase with increasing thermal stress into the early part of the primary oil generation stage, but thereafter decrease with increasing thermal stress. If this reversal is found in high maturity sections of the natural system, the utility of this transformation as a maturity index will be limited. Triaromatic- to monoaromatic-steroid hydrocarbon concentrations increase with increasing thermal stress as observed in the natural system. Preferred migration of monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons from bitumen extracts to expelled oils places considerable doubt on currently employed kinetic models for this aromatization reaction. As in the natural system, the experiments show relative concentrations of low-molecular weight- to high-molecular weight-triaromatic steroid hydrocarbons to increase with increasing thermal stress. Assuming a first-order reaction rate, the apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor for this apparent side-chain cleavage reaction are 175.59 kJ mol -1 and 2.82 × 10 13hr-1, respectively. These kinetic parameters are geologically reasonable and are similar to those for the overall generation of expelled oil.

  10. Fluidized-bed retorting of Colorado oil shale: Topical report. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Albulescu, P.; Mazzella, G.

    1987-06-01

    In support of the research program in converting oil shale into useful forms of energy, the US Department of Energy is developing systems models of oil shale processing plants. These models will be used to project the most attractive combination of process alternatives and identify future direction for R and D efforts. With the objective of providing technical and economic input for such systems models, Foster Wheeler was contracted to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates for commercial scale processing plants to produce syncrude from oil shales via various routes. This topical report summarizes the conceptual design of an integrated oil shale processing plant based on fluidized bed retorting of Colorado oil shale. The plant has a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per operating day of syncrude product, derived from oil shale feed having a Fischer Assay of 30 gallons per ton. The scope of the plant encompasses a grassroots facility which receives run of the mine oil shale, delivers product oil to storage, and disposes of the processed spent shale. In addition to oil shale feed, the battery limits input includes raw water, electric power, and natural gas to support plant operations. Design of the individual processing units was based on non-confidential information derived from published literature sources and supplemented by input from selected process licensors. The integrated plant design is described in terms of the individual process units and plant support systems. The estimated total plant investment is similarly detailed by plant section and an estimate of the annual operating requirements and costs is provided. In addition, the process design assumptions and uncertainties are documented and recommendations for process alternatives, which could improve the overall plant economics, are discussed.

  11. Redo Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease with pelvic fistula: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-10-01

    Pouch failure has been reported to occur after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Crohn's disease. We report two cases of patients with Crohn's disease, who underwent redo ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (redo-IPAA) combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy, with good functional results. The first patient, a man with presumed ulcerative colitis, suffered pelvic fistula recurrence and anastomotic dehiscence. He underwent redo-IPAA, at which time longitudinal ulcers were found. Infliximab was started 4 days postoperatively and continued. The second patient, a woman treated for ulcerative colitis, underwent laparoscopic IPAA 8 years later. After the development of a pelvic fistula, twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch was found intraoperatively and Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Adalimumab therapy resulted in fistula closure. Redo-IPAA was performed to normalize the twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch. No complications have been observed in either patient, both of whom have experienced good functional results after closure of the covering stomas.

  12. Critical review, comparative evaluation, cost update, and baseline data development services in oil shale mining, in-situ liquefaction, and above ground retorting processes from the environmental, permitting, and licensing viewpoints. Volume I. Oil-shale retorting process engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-15

    The present volume is the first of a series of three constituting the title study. It provides a brief but thorough description of six Oil Shale Retorting Processes, namely: Paraho, Tosco II, Oxidental Modified In-Situ, Rio Blanco, Union Oil, and Superior Oil. The processes are treated at Unit Operations level, including operations such as Mining, Crushing, Screening, Conveying, Hydrogenation (or Upgrading), Hydrogen Manufacturing Plant, Amine Treating, Low-Btu Gas Treating, Tail Gas Treating, Sulfur Recovery, Wastewater Treatment, Sour Waste Stripping, Refining, Spent Shale Disposal, etc. The present first volume of the study provides most process engineering information required in order for Control Requirements, at specific points of a given unit operations flowsheet, to be fully assessed. Flow sheets for unit operations presented in the present Volume I are only conceptual and qualitative. Some quantitative data on volumeric flow rates of specific flow streams are occasionally given. However, no systematic effort has been presently made to develop a numerical data base on process flow streams. This has been done in a much more systematic and thorough manner in another FMR study performed on behalf of DOE under title Source Terms for the Health and Environmental Effects Document (HEED) for Oil Shale - 1982. Additional original quantitative analysis has been performed by FMR towards developing material balances for specific oil shale feeds into specific retorting processes.

  13. Thermal behavior and electrochemical heat generation in a commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Elke; Ziebert, Carlos; Melcher, Andreas; Rohde, Magnus; Seifert, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative data on the thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries under charging and discharging conditions are essential for designing thermal management systems and improving battery safety. In this work, commercial 40 Ah lithium ion pouch cells with Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 cathodes were tested under isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions in an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter at different charging/discharging currents from 5 A to 40 A. Adiabatic tests simulate the worst-case scenario of a battery pack without cooling. For charging and discharging an overall exothermic behavior was found and a total temperature increase for one half cycle between 3 and 11 K. Isoperibolic tests simulate a single cell under constant environmental temperature. Here an exothermic behavior for discharging and an endothermic behavior for charging were observed. To transfer the measured temperature changes into heat data, the effective specific heat capacity and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. For the first time the heat generation data for a large format pouch cell have been determined using both isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions. These data were compared with the total heat data calculated as the sum of reversible and irreversible heat that were measured by potentiometric and current interruption techniques respectively. A good agreement was found between all three heat generation determination methods.

  14. The pouch and tunnel technique for management of multiple gingival recession defects

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Sneha; Dhage, Aditi; Gundannavar, Gayatri

    2014-01-01

    The desire for improved esthetics has increased tremendously over the years. Periodontal plastic surgery deals with regenerative procedures designed to restore form, function and enhance esthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of subepithelial connective tissue graft using pouch and tunnel technique as root coverage procedure. Three patients corresponding to a total of 8 sites participated in the study. Maxillary teeth with miller's class I gingival recession were included in the study. All the sites were treated using subepithelial connective tissue graft using pouch and tunneling technique. Patients were followed up for a period of 6 months and 1 year. All the treated teeth showed 100% root coverage at the end of 6 months and 1 year. Gingival recession is a common occurrence and its prevalence increases with age. It can lead to clinical problems, diminished cosmetic appeal and hence esthetic concern. There are various techniques for root coverage. Subepithelial connective tissue graft has shown the best predictability (95%) of root coverage in Millers class I & II cases. This technique preserves the intermediate papilla, accelerates the initial wound healing & also applies less traction. Due to minimal trauma at the recipient site, this procedure may be advantageous in treatment of recession as compared to other treatment modalities. PMID:25624637

  15. Combat Ration Network for Technology Implementation. CORANET Demonstration Site: Results and Accomplishments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Pouch Heat Bar Sealer Wrapade X Check Weigher HiSpeed X Vertical Pouch Sealer Fresco X Retorting Stock 1100/1 Retort Stock...efforts was the qualification of Fresco for the military Institutional Pouch. The Demonstration facility was also used by combat ration producers to

  16. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid-bed retorting process. Final report, September 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Stehn, J.L.; Vego, A.; Robl, T.L.

    1995-02-01

    This summarizes the development of the KENTORT II retorting process, which includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of oil shale. Purpose was to design and test the process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The program included bench- scale studies of coking and cracking reactions of shale oil vapors over processed shale particles to address issues of scaleup associated with solid-recycle retorting. The bench-scale studies showed that higher amounts of carbon coverage reduce the rate of subsequent carbon deposition by shale oil vapors onto processed shale particles; however carbon-covered materials were also active in terms of cracking and coking. Main focus was the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II PDU. Cold-flow modeling and shakedown were done before the PDU was made ready for operation. Seven mass-balanced, steady-state runs were completed within the window of design operating conditions. Goals were achieved: shale feedrate, run duration (10 hr), shale recirculation rates (4:1 to pyrolyzer and 10:1 to combustor), bed temperatures (pyrolyzer 530{degree}C, gasifier 750{degree}C, combustor 830{degree}C), and general operating stability. Highest oil yields (up to 109% of Fischer assay) were achieved for runs lasting {ge} 10 hours. High C content of the solids used for heat transfer to the pyrolysis zone contributed to the enhanced oil yield achieved.

  17. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Taulbee, D.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Fei, Y.; Robl, T.; Derbyshire, F.

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993 under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27286 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The PDU was assembled, instrumented and tested during this fiscal year. Along with the major activity of commissioning the 50-lb/hr retort, work was also completed in other areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of model compounds in a fixed bed reactor were continued. Additionally, as part of the effort to investigate niche market applications for KENTORT II-derived products, a study of the synthesis of carbon fibers from the heavy fraction of KENTORT II shale oil was initiated.

  18. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of January 1, 1992 through March 31, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The design of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II retort was completed and fabrication is ready to begin. Data from the cold-flow model of the system and operating experience from the 5-lb/hr unit were used as the basis for the design. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors was continued. A mathematical model was implemented to characterize the important mass transfer effects of the system. This model will be eventually broadened to become a general fluidized bed coking model. In addition, experiments were performed to examine the effects of surface area, initial carbon content and steam treatment on coking activity. From the data that has been collected to-date, it appears that the coking activity of the tested substrates can be explained in terms of porosity (surface area and pore volume) and the initial carbon content of the solid.

  19. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. Technical report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of January 1, 1992 through March 31, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The design of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II retort was completed and fabrication is ready to begin. Data from the cold-flow model of the system and operating experience from the 5-lb/hr unit were used as the basis for the design. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors was continued. A mathematical model was implemented to characterize the important mass transfer effects of the system. This model will be eventually broadened to become a general fluidized bed coking model. In addition, experiments were performed to examine the effects of surface area, initial carbon content and steam treatment on coking activity. From the data that has been collected to-date, it appears that the coking activity of the tested substrates can be explained in terms of porosity (surface area and pore volume) and the initial carbon content of the solid.

  20. Perchloric acid-soluble proteins from goat liver inhibit chemical carcinogenesis of Syrian hamster cheek-pouch carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzo, F; Berta, G N; Bussolati, B; Bosio, A; Corvetti, G; Di Carlo, F; Bussolati, G; Guglielmone, R; Bartorelli, A

    1999-01-01

    Chemically induced Syrian hamster cheek-pouch squamous cell carcinoma is very similar to the corresponding human tumour. This paper describes a blind study in which inhibition of dimethylbenzanthracene-induced cheek-pouch tumours by a goat liver extract denominated UK101 was investigated. Less than 40% of animals treated with UK101 developed tumours compared with 100% of the controls. Intermediate results (80%) were noted in a positive control group treated with Calmette–Guérin bacillus. Immunocytochemical testing of cheek-pouch mucosa by Mib5 showed significantly less proliferating cells in UK101 animals than in the controls. The effect of UK101 was completely reversed when dexamethasone was added in a third control group. A significant difference in complement-mediated cytotoxicity was noted in the sera of UK101-tested and control animals. These findings suggest that an immune mechanism is responsible for the inhibition of hamster cheek-pouch carcinoma by UK101. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408693

  1. Severe Dumping Syndrome in a 6-year-old Girl with Congenital Microgastria Treated by Hunt-Lawrence Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Filisetti, Claudia; Maestri, Luciano; Meroni, Milena; Marinoni, Federica; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Microgastria is a rare congenital condition often associated with other anomalies. In the present report we describe the case of a 6-year-old girl with isolated CM who presented with dumping syndrome successfully treated by a Hunt-Lawrence pouch. PMID:28361011

  2. Pouchitis-associated iritis (uveitis) following total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-to-anal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis treated with a proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-to-anal anastomosis developed an erosive and ulcerative pouchitis. Although no ophthalmological manifestations were present before the staged surgical procedures, iritis developed after appearance of the pouchitis. Both conditions subsequently resolved with oral corticosteroids and metronidazole.

  3. Effect of pasteurization, high-pressure processing, and retorting on the barrier properties of nylon 6, nylon 6/ethylene vinyl alcohol, and nylon 6/nanocomposites films.

    PubMed

    Halim, L; Pascall, M A; Lee, J; Finnigan, B

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the impact of pasteurization, high-pressure processing (HPP), and retorting on the barrier properties of nylon 6 (N6), nylon 6/ethylene vinyl alcohol (N6/EVOH), and nylon 6/nanocomposite (N6/nano) materials. The pasteurized and high-pressure treated films were coextruded with low-density polyethylene (PE) as the heat-sealing layer. The retorted films were coextruded with polypropylene (PP). Oxygen transmission rate (OTR) and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of the samples were measured after pasteurization (75 degrees C for 30 min), HPP (800 MPa for 10 min at 70 degrees C), and retorting (121 degrees C for 30 min) treatments. These were compared with the thermal characteristics and morphologies of the samples using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that OTR of N6 and N6/Nano increased after HPP (16.9% and 39.7%), pasteurization (13.3% and 75.9%), and retorting (63.3% and 112.6%), respectively. For N6/EVOH, a decrease in OTR after HPP (53.9%) and pasteurization (44.5%) was observed. The HPP treatment increased the WVTR of N6 (21.0%), N6/EVOH (48.9%), and N6/Nano (21.2%). The WVTR of N6, N6/EVOH, and N6/Nano increased by 96.7%, 43.8%, and 40.7%, respectively, after pasteurization. The DSC analyses showed that the enthalpy and percent crystallinity increased (2.3% to 6.5%) in the N6/Nano when compared with the N6 material after each treatment. Retorting caused a decrease (3.5%) in the percent crystallinity of the polypropylene material. HPP did not cause major morphological changes to the samples. Results of the barrier studies were influenced by the crystallinity changes in the materials as seen in the XRD diffractograms.

  4. Label-free vascular imaging in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model for pre-cancer detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Liu, Heather; Murphy, Helen; Farsiu, Sina; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-03-01

    Inducing angiogenesis is one hallmark of cancer. Tumor induced neovasculature is often characterized as leaky, tortuous and chaotic, unlike a highly organized normal vasculature. Additionally, in the course of carcinogenesis, angiogenesis precedes a visible lesion. Tumor cannot grow beyond 1-2 mm in diameter without inducing angiogenesis. Therefore, capturing the event of angiogenesis may aid early detection of pre-cancer -important for better treatment prognoses in regions that lack the resources to manage invasive cancer. In this study, we imaged the neovascularization in vivo in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model using a, non-invasive, label-free, high resolution, reflected-light spectral darkfield microscope. Hamsters' cheek pouches were painted with 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce pre-cancerous to cancerous changes, or mineral oil as control. High resolution spectral darkfield images were obtained over the course of pre-cancer development and in control cheek pouches. The vasculature was segmented with a multi-scale Gabor filter with an 85% accuracy compared with manually traced masks. Highly tortuous vasculature was observed only in the DMBA treated cheek pouches as early as 6 weeks of treatment. In addition, the highly tortuous vessels could be identified before a visible lesion occurred later during the treatment. The vessel patterns as determined by the tortuosity index were significantly different from that of the control cheek pouch. This preliminary study suggests that high-resolution darkfield microscopy is promising tool for pre-cancer and early cancer detection in low resource settings.

  5. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  6. J-pouch versus Roux-en-Y reconstruction after gastrectomy: functional assessment and quality of life (randomized trial)

    PubMed Central

    Zonča, Pavel; Malý, Tomáš; Ihnát, Peter; Peteja, Matus; Kraft, Otakar; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life and functional emptying of J-pouch versus Roux-en-Y reconstruction after total gastrectomy for malignancy. Methods This study was designed as a prospective, nonblinded, randomized, parallel clinical trial (Trial Number: MN Ostrava, 200604). With informed consent, patients undergoing gastrectomy for malignancy were randomized to J-pouch or Roux-en-Y reconstruction. The time taken for a test semisolid meal labeled with 99mTc-sulfur colloid to exit the reconstructed parts was measured by dynamic scintigraphy 1 year after resection. Quality of life was measured using the Eypasch questionnaire at the same time as functional emptying assessment. This trial was investigator-initiated. Results In all, 72 patients were included into the study. The time taken for the test meal to exit the postgastrectomy reconstruction was 16.5±10.0 minutes (mean ± standard deviation) in the Roux-en-Y group and 89.4±37.8 minutes in the “J-pouch” group; the difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). Emptying of the J-pouch appeared to be a linear decreasing function compared to the exponential pattern seen in the Roux-en-Y group. The quality of life measurement showed scores of 106±18.8 points (mean ± standard deviation) in the Roux-en-Y group compared to 122±22.5 points in the J-pouch group; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.0016). There were no important adverse events. Conclusion After total gastrectomy, a J-pouch reconstruction empties more slowly and is associated with higher quality of life compared to Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Whether these two observations have a direct causative link remains unanswered. PMID:28031718

  7. Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch: initial development and preliminary performance assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Iseli, A.M.; Kwen, H.D.; Ul-Alam, M.; Balasubramanian, M.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2011-11-07

    The objective is to produce a proof of concept prototype Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch (ECHRP) with self-decontamination capability to provide increased protection to emergency response personnel. The key objective was to decrease the concentration of toxic chemicals through the use of an absorbent and reactive nanocellulose liner. Additionally, nanomaterials with biocidal properties were developed and tested as a 'stand-alone' treatment. The setting was a private company research laboratory. The main outcome measures were production of a functional prototype. A functional prototype capable of mitigating the threats due to sulfur mustard, Soman, and a large variety of liquid and vapor toxic industrial chemicals was produced. Stand-alone biocidal treatment efficacy was validated. The ECHRP provides superior protection from both chemical and biological hazards to various emergency response personnel and human remains handlers.

  8. Ultrasonography of wallaby prenatal development shows that the climb to the pouch begins in utero

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Barbara; Roellig, Kathleen; Menzies, Brandon R.; Shaw, Geoff; Buentjen, Ina; Herbert, Catherine A.; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2013-01-01

    Marsupials have a functional placenta for a shorter period of time compared to that of eutherian species, and their altricial young reach the teats without any help from the mother. We have monitored the short intrauterine development of one marsupial, the tammar wallaby, with high-resolution ultrasound from reactivation of the 100-cell diapausing blastocyst to birth. The expanding blastocyst could be visualized when it had reached a diameter of 1.5 mm. From at least halfway through pregnancy, there are strong undulating movements of the endometrium that massage the expanding vesicle against the highly secretory endometrial surface. These unique movements possibly enhance exchange of uterine secretions and gases between the mother and embryo. There was a constant rate of development measured ultrasonographically from mid-gestation, regardless of when the blastocyst reactivated. Interestingly climbing movements by the fetus began in utero about 3 days before birth, mimicking those required to climb to the pouch. PMID:23492830

  9. USING TRAINED POUCHED RATS TO DETECT LAND MINES: ANOTHER VICTORY FOR OPERANT CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W; Bach, Harvard; Sully, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We used giant African pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) as land mine-detection animals in Mozambique because they have an excellent sense of smell, weigh too little to activate mines, and are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and therefore are resistant to local parasites and diseases. In 2009 the rats searched 93,400 m2 of land, finding 41 mines and 54 other explosive devices. Humans with metal detectors found no additional mines. On average, the rats emitted 0.33 false alarm for every 100 m2 searched, which is below the threshold given by International Mine Action Standards for accrediting mine-detection animals. These findings indicate that Cricetomys are accurate mine-detection animals and merit continued use in this capacity. PMID:21709791

  10. Combination chemoprevention of hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis by bovine milk lactoferrin and black tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K V P Chandra; Letchoumy, P Vidjaya; Hara, Y; Nagini, S

    2008-03-01

    Combination chemoprevention is a promising approach for oral cancer prevention. The authors evaluated the combined chemopreventive effects of bovine milk lactoferrin (bLF) and black tea polyphenols (Polyphenon-B) in a clinically relevant in vivo model of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Although dietary administration of bLF and Polyphenon-B alone significantly reduced the tumor incidence, combined administration of bLF and polyphenon-B was more effective in inhibiting DMBA-induced genotoxicity and development of HBP carcinomas by modulation of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and cellular redox status. These results suggest that a "designer item" approach will be useful for human oral cancer prevention strategies.

  11. Ultrasonography of wallaby prenatal development shows that the climb to the pouch begins in utero.

    PubMed

    Drews, Barbara; Roellig, Kathleen; Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Buentjen, Ina; Herbert, Catherine A; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-01-01

    Marsupials have a functional placenta for a shorter period of time compared to that of eutherian species, and their altricial young reach the teats without any help from the mother. We have monitored the short intrauterine development of one marsupial, the tammar wallaby, with high-resolution ultrasound from reactivation of the 100-cell diapausing blastocyst to birth. The expanding blastocyst could be visualized when it had reached a diameter of 1.5 mm. From at least halfway through pregnancy, there are strong undulating movements of the endometrium that massage the expanding vesicle against the highly secretory endometrial surface. These unique movements possibly enhance exchange of uterine secretions and gases between the mother and embryo. There was a constant rate of development measured ultrasonographically from mid-gestation, regardless of when the blastocyst reactivated. Interestingly climbing movements by the fetus began in utero about 3 days before birth, mimicking those required to climb to the pouch.

  12. Using giant African pouched rats to detect human tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Mahoney, Amanda; Beyene, Negussie; Mgode, Georgies; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Durgin, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Despite its characteristically low sensitivity, sputum smear microscopy remains the standard for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in resource-poor countries. In an attempt to develop an alternative or adjunct to microscopy, researchers have recently examined the ability of pouched rats to detect TB-positive human sputum samples and the microbiological variables that affect their detection. Ten published studies, reviewed herein, suggest that the rats are able to detect the specific odor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB, and can substantially increase new-case detections when used for second-line TB screening following microscopy. Further research is needed to ascertain the rats' ability to detect TB in children and in HIV-positive patients, to detect TB when used for first-line screening, and to be useful in broad-scale applications where cost-effectiveness is a major consideration.

  13. [Food protective property of new liquid food container PID (Pouch in Dispenser) for microbes].

    PubMed

    Tominari, Keita; Tanaka, Asato; Shinoda, Yuma; Futase, Katsunori; Nei, Daisuke; Isshiki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We examined the content protection characteristics of the PID (Pouch in Dispenser) when it was used in the usual manner and when it was polluted artificially. When the PID was used in the usual manner, the nozzle was opened, and experiments were carried out with and without air-blowing. The invasion of bacteria into the PID was not detected. Also, no bacteria were detected in the material poured from the nozzle of the PID. When 3 strains of bacteria suspensions were intentionally smeared on the nozzle of the PID, invasion of bacteria was observed. When the PID was wiped with a dirty cloth, no invasion of bacteria into the PID was detected. It may be necessary to label the PID with the instruction that the nozzle should not be touched. The effected of changes in the water activity and pH, and the preservatives used, may also need to be considered, depending on the contents in the PID.

  14. Malignant familial adenomatous polyposis treated by laparoscopic colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zaharie, Florin; Ciorogar, George; Zaharie, Roxana; Tantau, Marcel; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2014-12-01

    The mean age of colorectal cancer in untreated familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is 39 years. We present the case of a 21-year-old patient with FAP and colorectal cancer. The patient was detected with significant family history: her mother died at age 45 with colon cancer; two uncles were diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 40 and 43 and one aunt at the age of 45 with colon cancer and gastric cancer. The treatment was laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with total excision of the mesorectum and ileal pouch anal anastomosis completed with endoanal excision of inferior rectal polyps. The histopathological report described a well differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma T1N1aMx developed on a tubulo-villous adenoma located on the rectosigmoid jonction, the rest of the polyps with benign histology.

  15. Chronic treatment of female tammar wallabies with deslorelin implants during pouch life: effects on reproductive maturation.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C A; Eckery, D C; Trigg, T E; Cooper, D W

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on attempts to delay puberty in a model marsupial species using the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist deslorelin. Female tammar wallaby pouch young received deslorelin (5 mg) or placebo implants (n=8/group) when they were 193±2 days old. Sexual maturity was significantly delayed in deslorelin-treated animals, with the first successful production of offspring in treated and control animals occurring at 813±62 and 430±42 days of age, respectively. This delay was associated with a period of retarded pouch and teat development. Progesterone concentrations remained at basal levels throughout the first breeding season, indicating the absence of luteal cycles in treated females. Recovery and maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis was a gradual process. Treated animals failed to respond to GnRH challenge at 12 months of age and had a reduced LH response at 18 months of age, before attaining full responsiveness by 24 months of age. Despite this apparent pituitary recovery by 24 months of age, as evidenced by complete teat eversion and LH responsiveness to GnRH, the time to first parturition was significantly delayed beyond this time in three females. This suggests that there may be longer-lasting effects at the level of the ovary and/or on FSH secretion. The significant delay in the onset of sexual maturation in response to chronic GnRH agonist treatment in this model marsupial species may be of practical significance to the management of fertility in captive and semi-free range marsupial populations.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  17. Cross-fostering of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) pouch young accelerates fore-stomach maturation.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Joly H L; Iongh, Robbert De; Digby, Matthew R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Nicholas, Kevin R; Familari, Mary

    2009-01-01

    There are two phases of fore-stomach development during the first 200 days of pouch life in tammar wallaby. For the first 170 days, the mucosa displays an immature gastric glandular phenotype that changes to a cardia glandular phenotype, which remains for the rest of the animal's life. During this 200-day period after birth, the pouch young (PY) is dependent on maternal milk, which progressively changes in composition. We showed previously that PY cross-fostered to host mothers at a later stage of lactation accelerated development. In this study, we investigated whether cross-fostering and exposure to late lactation stage milk affected the transition to cardia glandular phenotype. In fostered PY fore-stomach, there was increased apoptosis, but no change in cell proliferation. The parietal cell population was significantly reduced, and expression of gastric glandular phenotype marker genes (ATP4A, GKN2, GHRL and NDRG2) was down-regulated, suggesting down-regulation of gastric phenotype in fostered PY fore-stomach. The expression of cardia glandular phenotype genes (MUC4, KRT20, CSTB, ITLN2 and LPLUNC1) was not changed in fostered PY. These data suggest that fore-stomach maturation proceeds via two temporally distinct processes: down-regulation of gastric glandular phenotype and initiation of cardia glandular phenotype. In fostered PY, these two processes appear uncoupled, as gastric glandular phenotype was down-regulated but cardia glandular phenotype was not initiated. We propose that milk from later stages of lactation and/or herbage consumed by the PY may play independent roles in regulating these two processes.

  18. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Technical report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.; Fei, Y.; Carter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. Along with the major activity of assembling the components of the 50-lb/hr retort, work was also completed in other areas this quarter. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of model compounds in a fixed bed reactor were continued. Additionally, as part of the effort to investigate niche market applications for KENTORT II-derived products, a study of the synthesis of carbon fibers from the heavy fraction of KENTORT II shale oil was initiated.

  19. A First Look at the Structure of the Wave Pouch during the 2009 PREDICT-GRIP Dry Runs over the Atlantic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    importance of a Lagrangian recirculation region within a tropical-wave critical layer (the so-called pouch), where persistent deep convection and...emphasizes the importance of a Lagrangian recirculation region within a tropical-wave critical layer (the so-called pouch) where persistent deep convection...for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) data and the satellite brightness temperature between 1979 and 2001, Hopsch et al. (2010

  20. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) modulates oxidative burst and nitric oxide production in carrageenan-elicited granulocytes from rat air pouch.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Mićić, Stana; Vujić, Vesna; Kovacević-Jovanović, Vesna; Mitić, Katarina; von Hörsten, Stephan; Kosec, Dusko

    2006-12-01

    We studied the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY-related receptor specific peptides on functions of carrageenan-elicited granulocytes in vitro and ability of NPY to modulate carrageenan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats in vivo. Anti-inflammatory effect of NPY comprises reduced granulocyte accumulation into the air pouch, to some extent attenuation of phagocytosis, attained via Y1 receptor, and considerable decrease in peroxide production, albeit mediated via Y2 and Y5 receptors activation. Conversely, NPY increases nitric oxide production and this potentiation is mediated via Y1 receptor. It is concluded that NPY Y1 and Y2/Y5 receptors' interaction participates in NPY-induced modulation of granulocyte functions related to inflammation.

  1. Detection of vesicant-induced upper airway mucosa damage in the hamster cheek pouch model using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Wilson, Marie J.; Nguyen, Vi; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Ahn, Yehchen; Chen, Zhongping; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Hamster cheek pouches were exposed to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide [CEES, half-mustard gas (HMG)] at a concentration of 0.4, 2.0, or 5.0 mg/ml for 1 or 5 min. Twenty-four hours post-HMG exposure, tissue damage was assessed by both stereomicrography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Damage that was not visible on gross visual examination was apparent in the OCT images. Tissue changes were found to be dependent on both HMG concentration and exposure time. The submucosal and muscle layers of the cheek pouch tissue showed the greatest amount of structural alteration. Routine light microscope histology was performed to confirm the OCT observations.

  2. The surgical technique of the Fobi-Pouch operation for obesity (the transected silastic vertical gastric bypass).

    PubMed

    Fobi, M A; Lee, H

    1998-06-01

    The Fobi-Pouch operation (FPO) for obesity is the product of clinical trials, more than 15 years of personal clinical experience and information gathered from publications, scientific meetings, and personal communications with other bariatric surgeons. The essence of the operation is the small vertical pouch (< 25 ml), an externally supported stoma, the interposed Roux-en-Y limb, the gastrostomy and the bypassed stomach marker to facilitate percutaneous transabdominal access to the bypassed segment. Patients undergoing this operation are usually given bowel prep the day before the operation, admitted the morning of the operation and started on subcutaneous heparin, prophylactic antibiotic and hydration. Antithrombotic sequential compression devices are regularly used. The hospital stay is usually 4 days. Our results and those of other surgeons who have used this modification substantiate the rationale for the modifications entailed in the FPO. Our longer-term experience and results are being compiled for publication.

  3. Use of the air pouch model to investigate immune responses to a hookworm vaccine containing the Na-ASP-2 protein in rats.

    PubMed

    Mendez, S; D' Samuel, A; Antoine, A D; Ahn, S; Hotez, P

    2008-01-01

    Hookworms are gastrointestinal nematodes that affect approximately 600 million people in developing countries. Using the air pouch model, we have examined the effects of vaccination with the recombinant hookworm larval antigen Na-ASP-2 and the adjuvant Alhydrogel on the skin immune response to hookworms in Sprague Dawley rats. Following vaccination, rats were inoculated 100 Necator americanus L3 into the air pouch, and the exudates and cell infiltrates were collected from the pouch 24 h later. Larval inoculation induced leucocyte recruitment into the pouch. Exudates of rats vaccinated with Na-ASP-2 showed an increase of cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, IFN-gamma and especially, IL-5, as well as IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies. The increased amount of antigen-presenting cells and cytokines in the pouch of vaccinated animals suggests that vaccination could potentially restrain this parasite to the inoculation site, avoiding its migration and establishment in the host. Moreover, the air pouch model could constitute an alternative to screen immune responses to L3 antigens.

  4. Postpartum complications in a patient with a previous proctocolectomy and ileo-pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Spina, Vincenzo; Giovannini, Massimo; Fabiani, Cristina; Vetrano, Giuseppe; Bagolan, Pietro; Colizza, Sergio; Aleandri, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    This case report regards pregnancy and delivery of a patient who had undergone proctocolectomy and ileo-pouch-anal-anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis. The patient delivered through cesarean section and experienced serious complications postpartum. Such complications have been described in association with Chron's disease and have never been described after proctocolectomy and IPAA for ulcerative colitis. This case report suggests that the limit between these two diseases is not sharp.

  5. Further Assessment of Monkeypox Virus Infection in Gambian Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus) Using In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Salzer, Johanna S.; Hutson, Christina L.; Doty, Jeffrey; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Carroll, Darin S.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox is a zoonosis clinically similar to smallpox in humans. Recent evidence has shown a potential risk of increased incidence in central Africa. Despite attempts to isolate the virus from wild rodents and other small mammals, no reservoir host has been identified. In 2003, Monkeypox virus (MPXV) was accidentally introduced into the U.S. via the pet trade and was associated with the Gambian pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus). Therefore, we investigated the potential reservoir competence of the Gambian pouched rat for MPXV by utilizing a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods. We inoculated three animals by the intradermal route and three animals by the intranasal route, with one mock-infected control for each route. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to track replicating virus in infected animals and virological assays (e.g. real time PCR, cell culture) were used to determine viral load in blood, urine, ocular, nasal, oral, and rectal swabs. Intradermal inoculation resulted in clinical signs of monkeypox infection in two of three animals. One severely ill animal was euthanized and the other affected animal recovered. In contrast, intranasal inoculation resulted in subclinical infection in all three animals. All animals, regardless of apparent or inapparent infection, shed virus in oral and nasal secretions. Additionally, BLI identified viral replication in the skin without grossly visible lesions. These results suggest that Gambian pouched rats may play an important role in transmission of the virus to humans, as they are hunted for consumption and it is possible for MPXV-infected pouched rats to shed infectious virus without displaying overt clinical signs. PMID:26517839

  6. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Chen, Ying-Ru; Lee, Jeng-Woei

    2010-02-01

    One of the best strategies to prevent the occurrence of oral cancer is to eliminate oral precancers and block their further malignant transformation. Previous studies showed that photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy (photosan-PDT) is very effective for human head and neck cancers. To avoid the systemic photodynamic toxicity of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. Twelve 10-week-old male Syrian golden hamsters were used in this study. DMBA was applied to the left buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks and mineral oil was painted on the right buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks as the normal controls. Six hamsters were euthanized for tissue harvest. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were consistently induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions in the remaining 6 hamsters were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan-gel. We found that PpIX reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan-gel. The precancerous lesions in 4 hamsters were treated with topical photosan-PDT using the 635-nm LED light once or twice a week. Complete regression of the precancerous lesions was found after 2-4 PDT treatments by visual and histological examination. Our findings indicate that topical photosan-PDT is a very effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  7. Further assessment of Monkeypox Virus infection in Gambian pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) using in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falendysz, Elizabeth; Lopera, Juan G.; Faye Lorenzsonn,; Salzer, Johanna S.; Hutson, Christina L.; Doty, Jeffrey; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Carroll, Darin S.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox is a zoonosis clinically similar to smallpox in humans. Recent evidence has shown a potential risk of increased incidence in central Africa. Despite attempts to isolate the virus from wild rodents and other small mammals, no reservoir host has been identified. In 2003,Monkeypox virus (MPXV) was accidentally introduced into the U.S. via the pet trade and was associated with the Gambian pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus). Therefore, we investigated the potential reservoir competence of the Gambian pouched rat for MPXV by utilizing a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods. We inoculated three animals by the intradermal route and three animals by the intranasal route, with one mock-infected control for each route. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to track replicating virus in infected animals and virological assays (e.g. real time PCR, cell culture) were used to determine viral load in blood, urine, ocular, nasal, oral, and rectal swabs. Intradermal inoculation resulted in clinical signs of monkeypox infection in two of three animals. One severely ill animal was euthanized and the other affected animal recovered. In contrast, intranasal inoculation resulted in subclinical infection in all three animals. All animals, regardless of apparent or inapparent infection, shed virus in oral and nasal secretions. Additionally, BLI identified viral replication in the skin without grossly visible lesions. These results suggest that Gambian pouched rats may play an important role in transmission of the virus to humans, as they are hunted for consumption and it is possible for MPXV-infected pouched rats to shed infectious virus without displaying overt clinical signs.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Essential Oil Citral in Experimental Infection with Staphylococcus aureus in a Model Air Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Hellen Braga; Selis, Nathan das Neves; Souza, Clarissa Leal Silva e; Nascimento, Flávia S.; de Carvalho, Suzi Pacheco; Gusmão, Lorena D'Oliveira; Nascimento, Jannine dos Santos; Brito, Anne Karoline Pereira; de Souza, Samira Itana; de Oliveira, Marcio Vasconcelos; Timenetsky, Jorge; Yatsuda, Regiane

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes to implement an alternative and effective strategy for local treatment of disease provoked by S. aureus. For the analysis of possible anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil, after establishing an air pouch model, 48 male mice of Balb/c were treated, infected, and euthanized at 4 and 8 h. Thus, the total and differential white blood cells were counted in the animal's blood, and cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were titrated using ELISA in the air pouch lavage. Moreover, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression was analyzed through an RT-qPCR array, and S. aureus was quantified using qPCR. Our results, p < 0.05, showed that EOC reduced the quantity of microorganisms. The group of mice treated with essential oil citral showed a significant decrease in TNF-α levels in tests demonstrating anti-inflammatory activity. There is no data about the mutual influence of the air pouch model, essential oil citral, and S. aureus. Thus, considering the interaction of these variables and the anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil citral, we demonstrated, by alternative local treatment, a new antimicrobial agent that is not an antibiotic. PMID:28316634

  9. Development and on-orbit operation of lithium-ion pouch battery for small scientific satellite “REIMEI”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Keita; Takeda, Yasuo; Sone, Yoshitsugu; Tanaka, Koji; Mita, Makoto; Saito, Hirobumi

    2011-10-01

    A lithium-ion battery was developed using off-the-shelf pouch cells and launched with a small scientific satellite "REIMEI." The cells were potted with polyurethane or epoxy resin to protect the battery from vacuum in space. Preliminary experimental test results of pouch cells potted in a soft aluminum cap suggested that the cells tended to swell in vacuum, although they had been reinforced with the resins. Bread board models (BBMs), in which pouch cells were potted with resins in a hard aluminum case, were fabricated for cycle life performance tests in the laboratory. The test results indicated that the performance of epoxy-potted BBM was superior to that of the polyurethane-potted BBM. The measured cell resistance implied that the electrolyte solution leaked through the polyurethane resin, resulting in premature deterioration. The epoxy resin was used for the flight battery. The end-of-discharge-voltage (EoDV) trend of the flight battery on orbit was compared with the laboratory test results corrected based on a post-launch cycle test using a fresh cell. The corrected EoDV trend in the laboratory was in good agreement with the on-orbit trend for the early cycle period, indicating that the on-orbit battery was not inadvertently affected by conditions in space.

  10. Methanolic Extract of Ficus carica Linn. Leaves Exerts Antiangiogenesis Effects Based on the Rat Air Pouch Model of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Eteraf-Oskouei, Tahereh; Allahyari, Saeideh; Akbarzadeh-Atashkhosrow, Arezu; Delazar, Abbas; Pashaii, Mahdiyeh; Gan, Siew Hua; Najafi, Moslem

    2015-01-01

    The antiangiogenesis effect of Ficus carica leaves extract in an air pouch model of inflammation was investigated in rat. Inflammation was induced by injection of carrageenan into pouches. After antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content (TPC) investigations, the extract was administered at 5, 25, and 50 mg/pouch, and then the volume of exudates, the cell number, TNFα, PGE2, and VEGF levels were measured. Angiogenesis of granulation tissues was determined by measuring hemoglobin content. Based on the DPPH assay, the extract had significant antioxidant activity with TPC of 11.70 mg GAE/100 g dry sample. In addition, leukocyte accumulation and volume of exudate were significantly inhibited by the extract. Moreover, it significantly decreased the production of TNFα, PGE2, and VEGF, while angiogenesis was significantly inhibited by all administered doses. Interestingly, attenuation of angiogenesis and inflammatory parameters (except leukocyte accumulation) by the extract was similar to that shown by diclofenac. The extract has anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorated cell influx and exudation to the site of the inflammatory response which may be related to the local inhibition of TNFα, PGE2, and VEGF levels as similarly shown by diclofenac. The antiangiogenesis and anti-VEGF effects of Ficus carica may be correlated with its significant antioxidant potentials. PMID:25977699

  11. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch early cancer lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent cancer disease in recent years in Taiwan. The reason is the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people results in oral cancer becomes the fastest growth incident cancer amongst other major cancer diseases. In previous studies showed that photosan, haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), has demonstrated effective PDT results on human head and neck disease studies. To avoid the systemic phototoxic effect of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when photosan reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan gel. We found that photosan reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical photosan-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 600 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 200 J/cm2) using the portable Lumacare 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that topical photosan-mediated PDT was an applicable treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions.

  12. Combination therapies in adjuvant with topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has becomes the fastest growth male cancer disease due to the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people. In order to eliminate the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when ALA reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of ALA gel. We found that ALA reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 150 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that adjuvant topical ALA -mediated PDT group has shown better therapeutic results in compared to those of non-adjuvant topical ALA-mediated PDT group for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  13. Electrochemical properties of large-sized pouch-type lithium ion batteries with bio-inspired organic cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Jae-Seong; Yoo, Eun-Ji; Ha, Sang-Hyeon; Cheong, Dong-Ik; Cho, Sung-Baek

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of scaling up bio-inspired organic materials as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries, large-sized pouch cells are successfully prepared via tape casting using lumichrome with an alloxazine structure and aqueous styrene butadiene rubber-carboxymethyl cellulose (SBR-CMC) binders. A battery module with a two-in-series, six-in-parallel (2S6P) configuration is also successfully fabricated and is able to power blue LEDs (850 mW). Lumichrome shows no structural changes during the fabrication processes used to produce the positive electrode. The large-sized pouch cells show two sets of cathodic and anodic peaks with average potentials of 2.58 V and 2.26 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively. The initial discharge capacities are 142 mAh g-1 and 148 mAh g-1 for ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate (EC-DMC) and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) electrolytes, respectively, similar to that of a coin cell (149 mAh g-1). The EC-DMC-injected pouch cells exhibit higher rate performance and cyclability than the TEGDME-injected ones. The TEGDME electrolyte is not suitable for lithium metal anodes because of electrolyte decomposition and subsequent cell swelling.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Leukocytes Enhance Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Production in a Mouse Air-Pouch-Type Inflammation Model.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hatayama, Takahiro; Jiangxu, Dong; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Endo, Yasuo; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-08-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a key cytokine that exacerbates allergic and fibrotic reactions. Several microbes and virus components have been shown to induce TSLP production, mainly in epithelial cells. TLR4 activators, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induce TSLP production in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the contribution of LPS-activated leukocytes to the production of TSLP in a mouse air-pouch-type inflammation model. LPS induced the production of TSLP in this model but not in the mouse keratinocyte cell line PAM212. Transfer of the infiltrated leukocytes collected from an LPS-injected air pouch to the air pouch of another mouse enhanced TSLP production. Further, the LPS-activated leukocytes produced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β); a deficiency in these cytokines attenuated the LPS-induced production of TSLP. TSLP production was induced by TNF-α and enhanced by IL-1β and LPS in the PAM212 cells. These results demonstrated that TNF-α and IL-1β, which are partly produced by LPS-activated leukocytes, contribute to TSLP production via TLR4 activation in vivo.

  15. Rhythmic motor activity and interlimb co-ordination in the developing pouch young of a wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S M

    1997-01-01

    1. The forelimb motor behaviour of developing wallaby was studied. A clock-like alternating movement was reactivated whenever the animal was removed from the pouch. 2. Forelimb stepping frequency increased during the first 3 weeks of development, while the phase relationship remained constant. Forelimb activity could be affected by altering the afferent feedback from the contralateral limb, or an increase in ambient temperature. 3. In vitro experiments were performed using an isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation from animals up to 6 weeks postnatal. Fictive locomotor activity could be evoked by electrical stimulation or bath-applied NMDA (< 10 microM). 4. Bath-applied strychnine (10-25 microM) and bicuculline (10-50 microM) disrupted the phase relationship between motor pools, while rhythmic motor discharge remained in the absence of these inhibitory pathways. 5. The present findings indicate that the pattern generator that underlies the robust forelimb movement during the first journey to the pouch is retained for different motor functions during in-pouch development. The neural network that underlies such behaviour can be divided into two major components, a rhythm generator within each hemicord, and a pattern co-ordinating pathway which involve both glycinergic and GABAergic interneurones. PMID:9218221

  16. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis. PMID:27699096

  17. Whole-genome scan for guttural pouch tympany in Arabian and German warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, A; Spötter, A; Blazyczek, I; Diesterbeck, U; Ohnesorge, B; Deegen, E; Distl, O

    2009-12-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary disease in foals of several breeds, including thoroughbreds, Arabian, Quarter and warmblood horses. We performed a whole-genome scan for GPT in 143 horses from five Arabian and five German warmblood families and genotyped 257 microsatellites. Chromosome-wide significant linkage was detected on ECA2 and ECA15 using multipoint non-parametric linkage analyses. Analyses stratified by sex revealed chromosome-wide significant linkage on ECA2 for fillies and chromosome-wide significant linkage on ECA15 for colts. For Arabian colts, the quantitative trait locus (QTL) on ECA15 was genome-wide significant. Haplotypes including two to four microsatellites within the QTL on ECA2 and 15 in fillies and colts, respectively, were significantly associated with GPT for both breeds. Thus, our analysis indicated sex-specific QTL, a fact which is in agreement with a two- to fourfold higher incidence of GPT in females. This is the first report of QTL for equine GPT and a first step towards identifying genes responsible for GPT.

  18. Noncontact point spectroscopy guided by two-channel fluorescence imaging in a hamster cheek pouch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor X.; Yeow, Jenny; Lilge, Lothar D.; Kost, James; Mang, Thomas S.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1999-07-01

    A system for in vivo, fluorescence image-guided, non-contact point fluorescence spectroscopy is presented. A 442 nm HeCd laser is used as the fluorescence excitation source. An intensified CCD serves as the detector for both imaging and spectroscopy, on which two regions of 300 X 300 pixels were used for green (500 +/- 18 nm) and red (630 +/- 18 nm) imaging channels, and a strip of 600 X 120 pixels are used for emission spectroscopy (450 - 750 nm). At a working distance of 40 mm, the system has a spatial resolution of 0.16 mm and a spectral resolution of 5 nm. System performance is demonstrated in a carcinogenesis model in hamsters, where tumors were induced by painting DMBA in the cheek pouch. Autofluorescence and Photofrin-induced fluorescence measurements were performed every 2 weeks during the 18 weeks of tumor induction. Punch biopsies on selected animals were taken for histological staging. The results show that autofluorescence fluorescence can distinguish dysplasia from normal mucosal tissue model, utilizing the peak red intensity (or the red-to-green intensity ratio). Photofrin-induced fluorescence was superior to autofluorescence for differentiating high grade dysplasia from invasive cancer.

  19. Society for Reproductive Biology Founders' Lecture 2006 - life in the pouch: womb with a view.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B

    2006-01-01

    Marsupials give birth to an undeveloped altricial young after a relatively short gestation period, but have a long and sophisticated lactation with the young usually developing in a pouch. Their viviparous mode of reproduction trades placentation for lactation, exchanging the umbilical cord for the teat. The special adaptations that marsupials have developed provide us with unique insights into the evolution of all mammalian reproduction. Marsupials hold many mammalian reproductive 'records', for example they have the shortest known gestation but the longest embryonic diapause, the smallest neonate but the longest sperm. They have contributed to our knowledge of many mammalian reproductive events including embryonic diapause and development, birth behaviour, sex determination, sexual differentiation, lactation and seasonal breeding. Because marsupials have been genetically isolated from eutherian mammals for over 125 million years, sequencing of the genome of two marsupial species has made comparative genomic biology an exciting and important new area of investigation. This review will show how the study of marsupials has widened our understanding of mammalian reproduction and development, highlighting some mechanisms that are so fundamental that they are shared by all today's marsupial and eutherian mammals.

  20. The Antarctic holothurian genus Echinopsolus Gutt, 1990 (Dendrochirotida, Cucumariidae): brood pouches, spermatozoa, spermatozeugmata and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Jens Michael; Heß, Martin

    2014-07-29

    An examination of seven Antarctic brooding cucumariid and psolid holothurian species revealed a variety of characters all of them have in common: (1) All are gonochoric. (2) A genital papilla is present on the oral disc (permanent and digitiform in males). (3) Females brood their offspring in five anterior interradial brood pouches that are situated at the transition of body to introvert. (4) Multiple spermatozoa are always bundled to bunch-like spermato-zeugmata. (5) The spermatozoa have a fusiform head and a hollow cylinder-like mid-piece encircling the anterior end of the flagellum. This combination of characters so far is unique, and indicates a close relationship based on common origin. As a consequence, we unite all species sharing this set of synapomorphies in the genus Echinopsolus Gutt, 1990. The herewith included species are: E. acanthocola Gutt, 1990, E. acutus (Massin, 1992) comb. nov., E. charcoti (Vaney, 1906) comb. nov., E. koehleri (Vaney, 1914) comb. nov., E. mollis (Ludwig & Heding, 1935) comb. nov., E. parvipes Massin, 1992 and E. splendidus (Gutt, 1990) comb. nov.. Because the current assignment of Echinopsolus to the family Psolidae can not be retained, the genus is tranferred to the family Cucumariidae, as relationships to taxa within this family are obvious. The peculiar spermatozoa and spermato-zeugmata of all Echinopsolus species are described using light- and electron-microscopical techniques and the results are evaluated and discussed concerning their taxonomy and phylogeny. 

  1. Distribution and ecology of lesser pouched rat, Beamys hindei, in Tanzanian coastal forests.

    PubMed

    Sabuni, Christopher A; Sluydts, Vincent; Mulungu, Loth S; Maganga, Samwel L S; Makundi, Rhodes H; Leirs, Herwig

    2015-11-01

    The lesser pouched rat, Beamys hindei, is a small rodent that is patchily distributed in the Eastern Arc Mountains and coastal forests in East Africa. The ecology of this species and its current distribution in coastal forests is not well known. Therefore, we conducted a study in selected coastal forests to assess the current distribution of the species and to investigate the population ecology in terms of abundance fluctuations and demographic patterns. Assessments of the species distribution were conducted in 5 forests through trapping with Sherman live traps. Data on ecology were obtained from monthly capture-mark-recapture studies conducted for 5 consecutive nights per month in two 1 ha grids set in Zaraninge Forest over a 2-year period. The results indicate the presence of B. hindei in 3 forests where it was not previously recorded. The population abundance estimates ranged from 1 to 40 animals per month, with high numbers recorded during rainy seasons. Reproduction patterns and sex ratios did not differ between months. Survival estimates were not influenced by season, and recruitment was low, with growth rate estimates of 1 animal per month. These estimates suggest a stable population of B. hindei in Zaraninge Forest. Further studies are recommended to establish the home range, diet and burrowing behavior of the species in coastal forests in East Africa.

  2. Failure statistics for commercial lithium ion batteries: A study of 24 pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Stephen J.; Harris, David J.; Li, Chen

    2017-02-01

    There are relatively few publications that assess capacity decline in enough commercial cells to quantify cell-to-cell variation, but those that do show a surprisingly wide variability. Capacity curves cross each other often, a challenge for efforts to measure the state of health and predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of individual cells. We analyze capacity fade statistics for 24 commercial pouch cells, providing an estimate for the time to 5% failure. Our data indicate that RUL predictions based on remaining capacity or internal resistance are accurate only once the cells have already sorted themselves into ;better; and ;worse; ones. Analysis of our failure data, using maximum likelihood techniques, provide uniformly good fits for a variety of definitions of failure with normal and with 2- and 3-parameter Weibull probability density functions, but we argue against using a 3-parameter Weibull function for our data. pdf fitting parameters appear to converge after about 15 failures, although business objectives should ultimately determine whether data from a given number of batteries provides sufficient confidence to end lifecycle testing. Increased efforts to make batteries with more consistent lifetimes should lead to improvements in battery cost and safety.

  3. Multi-analyte approach for determining the extraction of tobacco constituents from pouched snus by consumers during use

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Snus is a smokeless oral tobacco product with a significant history of use in Sweden, where it is regulated under food legislation. Users place a small porous sachet or a pinch of loose snus between the upper jaw and cheek for approximately one hour, leading to partial intake of tobacco constituents. To understand user exposure to tobacco, a multi-analyte approach based on the extraction of pouches by methanol, ethanol and water was validated and applied to the measurement of various constituents, including nicotine, four tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), propylene glycol, water, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, chloride, linalool, citronellol, linalyl acetate and geraniol, extracted from snus pouches during use by human consumers. Results After validation against established single-analyte methods, the multi-analyte approach was used to determine constituent levels in snus pouches before and after one hour of use. Although the concentrations in the snus pouches varied from nanogram (e.g. TSNAs) to milligram (e.g. nicotine, sodium and propylene glycol) quantities (25.1 ng to 35.3 mg per 1 g pouch), the mean percentage extracted varied only from 19.2% for linalyl acetate to 37.8% for the TSNA 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) among all constituents analyzed. The TSNAs, some of which are known carcinogens, showed the highest percentage extraction (range 34.6%–37.8%). Measurement variability was low for all analytes, ranging from 2.4% (total TSNAs, NAT) to 9.5% (geraniol). By contrast, inter-subject variability ranged from 6.7% (NAB) to 52.2% (linalyl acetate), and was greater than 20% for eight of the constituents analyzed. Intra-subject variability ranged from 3.4% (citronellol) to 29.7% (geraniol). Conclusions Generally, less than a third of each constituent tested was extracted during one hour of snus use, independent of constituent concentration. The variable nature of in-use extraction was shown to be driven by inter

  4. Longchain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and microvascular reactivity: observation in the hamster cheek pouch.

    PubMed

    Conde, Cristiane M S; Cyrino, Fatima Z G A; Bottino, Daniel A; Gardette, Jean; Bouskela, Eliete

    2007-05-01

    Previous experiments in our laboratory, using the hamster cheek pouch microcirculation, have shown that precapillary vessels exhibit spontaneous rhythmic luminal variations, termed vasomotion, a myogenic activity sustained by a balance between membrane currents among which polarizing K(+) currents play an important role. In these microvessels, endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs) seem to regulate arteriolar diameter [via nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP] and vasomotion [probably via endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)]. Fish or fish oil diet can decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases, probably by modifying the conductance of selective ion channels, such as K(+) and/or Ca(++), and/or increasing the production of vasodilators, such as NO. To investigate its effect on microvascular reactivity, using the same preparation and an intravital microscope coupled to a closed circuit TV system, male hamsters were treated for 14 days, twice a day, with 0.4 mL/100 g body weight with fish or olive oil. An attempt was also undertaken to record in arterioles, in vivo, the membrane potential of smooth muscle cells during their vasomotor activity combining conventional microelectrode and intravital microscopy techniques. The effects of topical application of two vasodilators, acetylcholine [endothelium-dependent one, NO release and membrane hyperpolarization via Ca(++)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca))] and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent, NO donor and no change on membrane potential) and two vasoconstrictors which elicited membrane depolarization via Ca(++) channels, phenylephrine (alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist) and serotonin (5-hydroxi-tryptamine) on mean internal diameter of arterioles and venules, arteriolar blood flows, spontaneous arteriolar vasomotion frequency and amplitude and functional capillary density (FCD, number of capillaries with flowing red blood cells per unit area of tissue) were determined. Anesthesia was induced by

  5. Impact of electrolyte solvent and additive choices on high voltage Li-ion pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian; Nelson, K. J.; Lu, Zhonghua; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    The effects that various electrolyte solvents and electrolyte additives had on both LaPO4-coated LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O2 and uncoated LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O2/graphite pouch cells were studied using automated storage, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, gas production and long-term cycling experiments. Storage experiments showed that the voltage drop during storage at 4.3 or 4.4 V for both coated and uncoated cells was very similar for the same electrolyte choice. At 4.5 V or above, the LaPO4-coated cells had a significantly smaller voltage drop than the uncoated cells except when fluorinated electrolytes were used. Automated charge discharge cycling/impedance spectroscopy testing of cells held at 4.5 V for 24 h every cycle showed that all cells containing ethylene carbonate:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte or sulfolane:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte exhibited severe capacity fade. By contrast, cells containing fluorinated electrolytes had the best capacity retention and smallest impedance growth during these aggressive cycling/hold tests. Long-term cycling experiments to 4.5 V confirmed that cells containing fluorinated electrolyte had the best cycling performance in the uncoated LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O2/graphite cells while cells containing sulfolane:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte had the best cycling performance in coated LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O2/graphite cells.

  6. Gastric pouches and the mucociliary sole: setting the stage for nervous system evolution.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Benito-Gutierrez, Elia; Brunet, Thibaut; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-19

    Prerequisite for tracing nervous system evolution is understanding of the body plan, feeding behaviour and locomotion of the first animals in which neurons evolved. Here, a comprehensive scenario is presented for the diversification of cell types in early metazoans, which enhanced feeding efficiency and led to the emergence of larger animals that were able to move. Starting from cup-shaped, gastraea-like animals with outer and inner choanoflagellate-like cells, two major innovations are discussed that set the stage for nervous system evolution. First, the invention of a mucociliary sole entailed a switch from intra- to extracellular digestion and increased the concentration of nutrients flowing into the gastric cavity. In these animals, an initial nerve net may have evolved via division of labour from mechanosensory-contractile cells in the lateral body wall, enabling coordinated movement of the growing body that involved both mucociliary creeping and changes of body shape. Second, the inner surface of the animals folded into metameric series of gastric pouches, which optimized nutrient resorption and allowed larger body sizes. The concomitant acquisition of bilateral symmetry may have allowed more directed locomotion and, with more demanding coordinative tasks, triggered the evolution of specialized nervous subsystems. Animals of this organizational state would have resembled Ediacarian fossils such as Dickinsonia and may have been close to the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. In the bilaterian lineage, the mucociliary sole was used mostly for creeping, or frequently lost. One possible remnant is the enigmatic Reissner's fibre in the ventral neural tube of cephalochordates and vertebrates.

  7. fras1 shapes endodermal pouch 1 and stabilizes zebrafish pharyngeal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Jared Coffin; Walker, Macie B.; Carney, Thomas J.; Huycke, Tyler R.; Yan, Yi-Lin; BreMiller, Ruth A.; Gai, Linda; DeLaurier, April; Postlethwait, John H.; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Kimmel, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions in the epithelially expressed human gene FRAS1 cause Fraser syndrome, a complex disease with variable symptoms, including facial deformities and conductive hearing loss. The developmental basis of facial defects in Fraser syndrome has not been elucidated. Here we show that zebrafish fras1 mutants exhibit defects in facial epithelia and facial skeleton. Specifically, fras1 mutants fail to generate a late-forming portion of pharyngeal pouch 1 (termed late-p1) and skeletal elements adjacent to late-p1 are disrupted. Transplantation studies indicate that fras1 acts in endoderm to ensure normal morphology of both skeleton and endoderm, consistent with well-established epithelial expression of fras1. Late-p1 formation is concurrent with facial skeletal morphogenesis, and some skeletal defects in fras1 mutants arise during late-p1 morphogenesis, indicating a temporal connection between late-p1 and skeletal morphogenesis. Furthermore, fras1 mutants often show prominent second arch skeletal fusions through space occupied by late-p1 in wild type. Whereas every fras1 mutant shows defects in late-p1 formation, skeletal defects are less penetrant and often vary in severity, even between the left and right sides of the same individual. We interpret the fluctuating asymmetry in fras1 mutant skeleton and the changes in fras1 mutant skeletal defects through time as indicators that skeletal formation is destabilized. We propose a model wherein fras1 prompts late-p1 formation and thereby stabilizes skeletal formation during zebrafish facial development. Similar mechanisms of stochastic developmental instability might also account for the high phenotypic variation observed in human FRAS1 patients. PMID:22782724

  8. Gastric pouches and the mucociliary sole: setting the stage for nervous system evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Detlev; Benito-Gutierrez, Elia; Brunet, Thibaut; Marlow, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Prerequisite for tracing nervous system evolution is understanding of the body plan, feeding behaviour and locomotion of the first animals in which neurons evolved. Here, a comprehensive scenario is presented for the diversification of cell types in early metazoans, which enhanced feeding efficiency and led to the emergence of larger animals that were able to move. Starting from cup-shaped, gastraea-like animals with outer and inner choanoflagellate-like cells, two major innovations are discussed that set the stage for nervous system evolution. First, the invention of a mucociliary sole entailed a switch from intra- to extracellular digestion and increased the concentration of nutrients flowing into the gastric cavity. In these animals, an initial nerve net may have evolved via division of labour from mechanosensory-contractile cells in the lateral body wall, enabling coordinated movement of the growing body that involved both mucociliary creeping and changes of body shape. Second, the inner surface of the animals folded into metameric series of gastric pouches, which optimized nutrient resorption and allowed larger body sizes. The concomitant acquisition of bilateral symmetry may have allowed more directed locomotion and, with more demanding coordinative tasks, triggered the evolution of specialized nervous subsystems. Animals of this organizational state would have resembled Ediacarian fossils such as Dickinsonia and may have been close to the cnidarian–bilaterian ancestor. In the bilaterian lineage, the mucociliary sole was used mostly for creeping, or frequently lost. One possible remnant is the enigmatic Reissner's fibre in the ventral neural tube of cephalochordates and vertebrates. PMID:26554050

  9. Advanced retorting, microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS), and pressure assisted thermal sterilization (PATS) to process meat products.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V; Medina-Meza, Ilce; Candoğan, Kezban; Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Conventional thermal processes have been very reliable in offering safe sterilized meat products, but some of those products are of questionable overall quality. Flavor, aroma, and texture, among other attributes, are significantly affected during such processes. To improve those quality attributes, alternative approaches to sterilizing meat and meat products have been explored in the last few years. Most of the new strategies for sterilizing meat products rely on using thermal approaches, but in a more efficient way than in conventional methods. Some of these emerging technologies have proven to be reliable and have been formally approved by regulatory agencies such as the FDA. Additional work needs to be done in order for these technologies to be fully adopted by the food industry and to optimize their use. Some of these emerging technologies for sterilizing meat include pressure assisted thermal sterilization (PATS), microwaves, and advanced retorting. This review deals with fundamental and applied aspects of these new and very promising approaches to sterilization of meat products.

  10. Organic constituents in process water from the in-situ retorting of oil from oil-shale kerogen

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L A; Harrison, W

    1981-02-01

    Capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) was performed on the acid, base, and neutral fractions of liquid- and particulate-phase methylene chloride extracts of a composite sample of raw process water collected from separator Tank 6 by the Laramie Energy Technology Center. Of the 160 extractable and chromatographable organic compounds tentatively identified, the following compound classes were found (listed in decreasing order of abundance): quinolines and lower fatty acids, aminoindoles, neutral oxygenated heterocyclics, pyridines, pyrroles, pyrazoles, phenols, and alkanes. Noticeably absent or in low concentration were alkyl benzenes and alkenes. Assuming 100% extraction efficiency, these organics constitute approximately 0.035% of the retort water; approximately 50% of this amount is represented by the quinolines, fatty acids, aminoindoles, and oxygenated heterocyclics. The following differences were noted in the composition of the particulate and liquid extracts of the neutral and base fractions, respectively: (1) alkanes are a major portion of the particulates, whereas oxygenated hereocyclics are most prominent in the liquid; and (2) aminoindoles are only a minor portion of the particulates, but are prominent in the liquid phase. The concentration of a compound occurring in both the liquid and particulate extracts is approximately 40 to 100 times higher in the liquid than in the particulate extract.

  11. Use of a laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch to facilitate removal of intact or fragmented cystic calculi from standing sedated horses: 8 cases (2012-2015).

    PubMed

    Katzman, Scott A; Vaughan, Betsy; Nieto, Jorge E; Galuppo, Larry D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch for removal of intact or fragmented cystic calculi from standing horses. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 8 horses (5 geldings and 3 mares) with cystic calculi. PROCEDURES Physical examination and cystoscopic, ultrasonographic, and hematologic evaluations of urinary tract function were performed for each horse. A diagnosis of cystic calculus was made on the basis of results of cystoscopy and ultrasonography. Concurrent urolithiasis or other urinary tract abnormalities identified during preoperative evaluation were recorded. Horses were sedated and placed in standing stocks, and the perineum was aseptically prepared. Direct access to the urinary bladder was gained in geldings via perineal urethrotomy or in mares by a transurethral approach. Calculi were visualized endoscopically, manipulated into the retrieval pouch, and removed intact or fragmented (for larger calculi). RESULTS For 4 geldings and 1 mare, fragmentation was necessary to facilitate calculus removal. Mean duration of surgery was 125 minutes, and trauma to the urinary bladder and urethra was limited to areas of hyperemia and submucosal petechiation. No postoperative complications were encountered for any horse. When lithotripsy was required, the retrieval pouch provided an effective means of stabilizing calculi and containing the fragments for removal. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of the laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch was an effective, minimally traumatic method for retrieving cystic calculi from standing horses. The pouch protected the urinary bladder and urethra from trauma during calculus removal and allowed for stabilization, containment, and fragmentation of calculi when necessary.

  12. Comparative evaluation of antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and apoptosis inducing potential of black tea polyphenols in the hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Letchoumy, Paramasivame Vidjaya; Mohan, Kurapathy Venkata Poorna Chandra; Prathiba, Duvuru; Hara, Yukihiko; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2007-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relative chemopreventive efficacy of two black tea polyphenols, Polyphenon-B [P-B] and BTF-35 on 7,12-dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Methods Hamsters were divided into 6 groups. The right buccal pouches of animals in groups 1–3 were painted with 0.5% of DMBA three times a week for 14 weeks. While hamsters in group 1 received no further treatment, animals in groups 2 and 3 received diet containing 0.05% P-B and BTF-35 respectively, four weeks before DMBA painting that was continued until the end of the experiments. Animals in groups 4 and 5 were given P-B and BTF-35 alone respectively as in groups 2 and 3. Group 6 animals served as the untreated control. All the animals were sacrificed after 18 weeks. The expression of p21, cyclin D1, glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-P), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), cytokeratins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was analysed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Results DMBA treated animals developed buccal pouch carcinomas that displayed increased expression of p21, cyclin D1, GST-P, NF-κB, cytokeratins, VEGF and Bcl-2 with decreased expression of Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP. Dietary administration of both P-B and BTF-35 reduced the incidence of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by modulating markers of cell proliferation, cell survival, tumour infiltration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Conclusion The results of the present study provide a mechanistic basis for the chemopreventive potential of black tea polyphenols. The greater efficacy of BTF-35 in inhibiting HBP carcinogenesis and modulating multiple molecular targets may have a potential role in the prevention of oral cancer. PMID:18053169

  13. Blake's pouch cyst and Werdnig-Hoffmann disease: Report of a new association and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shohoud, Sherien A.; Azab, Waleed A.; Alsheikh, Tarek M.; Hegazy, Rania M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report a case of a neonate with proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1 (also known as Werdnig-Hoffmann disease or severe infantile acute SMA) associated with a Blake's pouch cyst; a malformation that is currently classified within the spectrum of Dandy-Walker complex. The association of the two conditions has not been previously reported in the English literature. A comprehensive review of the pertinent literature is presented. Case Description: A male neonate was noted to have paucity of movement of the four limbs with difficulty of breathing and poor feeding soon after birth. Respiratory distress with tachypnea, necessitated endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pregnancy was uneventful except for decreased fetal movements reported by the mother during the third trimester. Neurological examination revealed generalized hypotonia with decreased muscle power of all limbs, nonelicitable deep tendon jerks, and occasional tongue fasciculations. Molecular genetic evaluation revealed a homozygous deletion of both exons 7 and 8 of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and exon 5 of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene on the long arm of chromosome 5 consistent with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (SMA type 1). At the age of 5 months, a full anterior fontanelle and abnormal increase of the occipito-frontal circumference were noted. Computed tomographic (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tetraventricular hydrocephalus and features of Blake's pouch cyst of the fourth ventricle. Conclusions: This case represents a previously unreported association of Blake's pouch cyst and SMA type 1. PMID:25225621

  14. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: Combined administration of BSH and BPA

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; William Bauer; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70–85 ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: combined administration of BSH and BPA.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Molinari, Ana J; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (70-85ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Communication—indentation of Li-ion pouch cell: Effect of material homogenization on prediction of internal short circuit

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, A.; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Simunovic, Srdjan; ...

    2016-09-12

    We performed finite element simulations of spherical indentation of Li-ion pouch cells. Our model fully resolves different layers in the cell. The results of the layer resolved models were compared to the models available in the literature that treat the cell as an equivalent homogenized continuum material. Simulations were carried out for different sizes of the spherical indenter. Here, we show that calibration of a failure criterion for the cell in the homogenized model depends on the indenter size, whereas in the layer-resoled model, such dependency is greatly diminished.

  17. Blister pouches for effective reagent storage and release for low cost point-of-care diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne; Sewart, Rene; Land, Kevin; Roux, Pieter; Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger

    2016-03-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are often applied to point-of-care diagnostic solutions as they are low-cost, compact, disposable, and require only small sample volumes. For such devices, various reagents are required for sample preparation and analysis and, for an integrated solution to be realized, on-chip reagent storage and automated introduction are required. This work describes the implementation and characterization of effective liquid reagent storage and release mechanisms utilizing blister pouches applied to various point-of-care diagnostic device applications. The manufacturing aspects as well as performance parameters are evaluated.

  18. Comparsion of light dose on topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Tseng, Meng-Ke; Liu, Chung-Ji; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent male cancer disease due to the local betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle. In order to minimize the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks. Precancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA -mediated PDT. We found that ALA reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The precancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 75 and 100 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm Wonderlight device. It is suggesting that optimization of the given light dose is critical to the success of PDT results.

  19. Roles for FGF in lamprey pharyngeal pouch formation and skeletogenesis highlight ancestral functions in the vertebrate head.

    PubMed

    Jandzik, David; Hawkins, M Brent; Cattell, Maria V; Cerny, Robert; Square, Tyler A; Medeiros, Daniel M

    2014-02-01

    A defining feature of vertebrates (craniates) is a pronounced head supported and protected by a cellularized endoskeleton. In jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), the head skeleton is made of rigid three-dimensional elements connected by joints. By contrast, the head skeleton of modern jawless vertebrates (agnathans) consists of thin rods of flexible cellular cartilage, a condition thought to reflect the ancestral vertebrate state. To better understand the origin and evolution of the gnathostome head skeleton, we have been analyzing head skeleton development in the agnathan, lamprey. The fibroblast growth factors FGF3 and FGF8 have various roles during head development in jawed vertebrates, including pharyngeal pouch morphogenesis, patterning of the oral skeleton and chondrogenesis. We isolated lamprey homologs of FGF3, FGF8 and FGF receptors and asked whether these functions are ancestral features of vertebrate development or gnathostome novelties. Using gene expression and pharmacological agents, we found that proper formation of the lamprey head skeleton requires two phases of FGF signaling: an early phase during which FGFs drive pharyngeal pouch formation, and a later phase when they directly regulate skeletal differentiation and patterning. In the context of gene expression and functional studies in gnathostomes, our results suggest that these roles for FGFs arose in the first vertebrates and that the evolution of the jaw and gnathostome cellular cartilage was driven by changes developmentally downstream from pharyngeal FGF signaling.

  20. A flexible and low-cost polypropylene pouch for naked-eye detection of herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Sharifun; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Rochette, Annie; Toro, Carla; Zourob, Mohammed

    2015-02-07

    Effective viral detection is a key goal in the development of point of care (POC) diagnostic devices. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) could potentially be a valuable tool for rapid viral detection and diagnosis in commercial and hospital laboratories and resource limited settings. Here, we present a novel polypropylene pouch (PP) for detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2. With this plastic pouch we could detect up to 6.08 × 10(1) copies per μL of HSV-1 DNA and 0.598 copies per μL of HSV-2 DNA within 45 minutes. Since LAMP itself is less sensitive to inhibitory substances present in the real sample, we could also detect viral DNA without the need for viral DNA extraction and purification. The result from LAMP could be evaluated by naked eye due to the addition of hydroxy naphthol blue (HNB) dye in the reaction mixture. Since this proposed device is easy to handle, portable, user friendly and low cost, it offers a tremendous potential to be a perfect candidate for POC diagnostic device for use in resource limited settings.

  1. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Report on preliminary results of aerosol measurements at the Rio Blanco oil-shale retort, Burn No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Stuart, M.L.; Johnson, J.S.; Wikkerink, R.W.

    1982-02-01

    Solid particles and liquid droplets suspended in the treated and untreated off-gas from the Rio Blanco Retort were sampled during a seven-day period beginning August 3, 1981. The purpose of the work was to characterize the major constituents of the aerosol particles and droplets, to determine their distribution with respect to size, to determine their mutagenic activity, and finally to evaluate the performance of inertial collectors for sampling and sizing liquid droplets suspended in the untreated off-gas. The ultimate objective is to characterize potential air emissions, and to identify possible control needs. In this report, the measurements and samples made and collected in August are summarized, and the mass concentrations, particle-size distributions, and basic gas parameters measured in the field are reported. Results show that both the treated and untreated off-gas streams were totally saturated with water vapor at the two sampling locations. Approximately half of the stack emitted particulate material is in the form of hydroscopic salts, that are probably produced by the flue gas scrubber. Estimates of the total aerosol mass discharge to the atmosphere ranged from 5.4 to 16.2 lbs/h. Six of the 8 values reported were less than or equal to 9 lbs/h, expressed as dry particulate weight. Approximately 70% of the particulate mass emitted to the atmosphere resided in particles of submicrometer aerodynamic diameter. Preliminary mutagenic assays indicate that components of the untreated off-gas aerosol contained as much as 18 times more specific mutagenic activity (No. revertants/mg of material tested) than the product oil. The stack emitted aerosol contained very low levels (about 50 times less than the product oil sample) of direct acting mutagens.

  3. Studying the possibility of separate and joint combustion of Estonian shales and oil shale retort gas at thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Attikas, Raivo; Zaichenko, M. N.; Pleshanov, K. A.; Ionkin, I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Results from investigations of joint and separate combustion of shale with a low heating value and oil shale retort gas (OSRG) are presented. The question about the possibility of further using shale as basic fuel is presently placed on the agenda. This matter is connected with the fact that the environmental regulations are imposing increasingly more stringent limits on emissions of harmful substances and that a decrease in the shale heating value is predicted. An adequate mathematical model of one of the TP-101 boilers installed at the Estonian power plant was developed and verified for carrying out investigations. Criteria for determining the reliability, efficiency, and environmental safety of equipment operation were formulated based on the operating chart, regulatory documents, and environmental requirements. Assessment of the possibility of boiler operation and the boiler unit as a whole in firing shale with a low calorific value has shown that despite fulfilling the required superheated steam parameters, quite a number of limitations relating to reliable operation of the boiler are not complied with. In addition, normal operation of forced-draft equipment and mills is possible only at low loads. For operation with joint combustion of shale and OSRG, the fractions of degraded-quality shale and OSRG (by heat) at which reliable and efficient operation of the boiler and boiler unit is ensured in the entire working range of loads with fulfilling the environmental standards are determined. Proposals on modifying the equipment for joint combustion of shale and OSRG are formulated. Boiler operation with firing OSRG as main fuel was modeled for three versions of furnace waterwall thermal efficiency with a view to estimate possible changes of boiler operation in carrying out waterwall cleaning operations. Calculation results have shown that operation of the boiler and boiler unit meeting the elaborated criteria is possible in the entire working range of loads with

  4. Differential expression of p53, p63 and p73 protein and mRNA for DMBA-induced hamster buccal-pouch squamous-cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Huse, Shue-Sang; Lin, Li-Min

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in the p53 gene are regarded as the most consistent of the genetic abnormalities associated with oral squamous-cell carcinoma. Two related members of the p53 gene family, p73 and p63, have shown remarkable structural similarity to p53, suggesting possible functional and biological interactions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential expression of p73, p63 and p53 genes for DMBA-induced hamster buccal-pouch squamous-cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis for protein expression and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for mRNA expression were performed for 40 samples of hamster buccal pouches, the total being separated into one experimental group (15-week DMBA-treated; 20 animals) and two control groups (untreated and mineral oil-treated; 10 animals each). Using immunohistochemical techniques, nuclear staining of p53 and p73 proteins was detected in a subset of hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens treated with DMBA for a period of 15 weeks, whereas p63 proteins were noted for all of the 20 hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens treated with DMBA for 15 weeks as well as for all of the untreated and mineral oil-treated hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens. Differential expression of p63, p73 and p53 protein for the experimental group was as follows: p63+/p73+/p53+ (n = 14; 70%); p63+/p73+/p53− (n = 2; 10%); p63+/p73−/p53− (n = 4; 20%) and p63+/p73−/p53− (untreated [n = 10] and mineral oil-treated mucosa [n = 10]; 100% each). Upon RT-PCR, ΔNp63mRNA was detected within all of the 20 hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens treated with DMBA for 15 weeks, whereas expression of TAp63 was not detected. Furthermore, p73 mRNA was identified for 16 of the hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens treated with DMBA for 15 weeks, whereas p53 mRNA was noted for 14 15-week DMBA-treated pouches. The proportional (percentage) expression of ΔNp63, p73 and p53 mRNA for the hamster buccal-pouch tissue specimens

  5. Role of the Chinese Herbal Medicine Xianhuayin on the Reversal of Premalignant Mucosal Lesions in the Golden Hamster Buccal Pouch

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-zhi; Qiu, Yong-le; An, Zhi-guang; Yang, Feng-ying

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of the Chinese herbal medicine Xianhuayin on the reversal of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced premalignant mucosal lesions in the oral buccal pouch of golden hamsters. Methodology The animals were randomly divided into a non-diseased control group (n=5) and an experimental group including 50 animals in which the buccal mucosa had been painted with DMBA (0.5% in acetone) to generate an oral mucosa premalignant lesion. Animals in the experimental group were further divided into Xianhuayin-treated group (n=30), untreated premalignant lesion group (n=10) and normal saline (NS)-treated group (n=10). The cheek (buccal) pouch mucosa of the golden hamsters in each group was observed with light and electron microscopy eight weeks after intragastric administration with NS or Xianhuayin. Results In the non-diseased control group, the buccal mucosa was keratinized and stratified squamous epithelium under a light microscope. In the untreated premalignant lesion group, variable degrees of epithelial dysplasia was observed. The irregular epithelial mucosa gradually became distinct in the Xianhuayin-treated group. Scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis showed that surface of the cells exhibited honeycomb structures in the hamster of untreated-group. The cells were morphologically irregular, overlapped and loosened in the untreated premalignant lesion group. Most of the cell surface exhibited honeycomb structure in the Xianhuayin-treated group. Transmission electronic microscopic (TEM) analysis showed that buccal mucosal epithelial cells were morphologically regular in the non-diseased control group. Desmosomes and tonofibrils were reduced and the nucleus was morphologically irregular in the untreated premalignant lesion group. In the Xianhuayin-treated group, the widening intercellular gap was gradually reduced, desmosomes and the cells becoming morphologically regular. No significant difference was observed between the hamsters in

  6. Dysphagia caused by focal guttural pouch mycosis: mononeuropathy of the pharyngeal ramus of the vagal nerve in a 20-year-old pony mare

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old pony mare was presented to the equine hospital with a ten-day history of dysphagia, regurgitation and coughing. An obstruction of the oesophagus was excluded via endoscopy, but the proximal oesophagus appeared to be distended and circular contractions were missing. A guttural pouch endoscopy revealed a single, black-mottled plaque on the pharyngeal ramus of the vagus nerve in the left guttural pouch, causing a local swelling of this nerve. The pharyngeal ramus seemed to be atrophic distal to the lesion. A biopsy was taken from the lesion and histopathological findings proved the reasonable suspicion of a guttural pouch mycosis with a high degree of purulent-necrotic inflammation and invasion of fungal hyphae. There were no signs of neoplasia, such as melanoma. Daily guttural pouch irrigations with a clotrimazole emulsion (20 g Canesten® Gyn4 solved in 500 ml water), led to a good recovery of the mucosa above the nerve. Periodic endoscopic examination of the left guttural pouch showed that local thickening and distal atrophy of this pharyngeal ramus did not improve, neither did the clinical symptoms. Due to progressive weight loss, acute respiratory distress and aspiration pneumonia, the 20-year-old pony mare unfortunately had to be euthanized three weeks after discharge. This case report emphasizes the enormous importance of a single nerve for the realization of the swallowing process. The one-sided loss of function of the pharyngeal branch of the vagal nerve cannot be compensated neither by the remaining ipsilateral nerves nor by the contralateral normal functioning glossopharyngeal and vagal nerves and thus inevitably leads to severe dysphagia. PMID:23845027

  7. Cytotoxicity of liposomal α-tocopheryl succinate towards hamster cheek pouch carcinoma (HCPC-1) cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinbin; Schwartz, Joel L.; Pang, Xiaowu; Zhou, Yanfei; Sirois, David A.; Sridhar, Rajagopalan

    2007-01-01

    There is compelling evidence for the cancer chemopreventive effects of vitamin E and related compounds. Of all the vitamin E derivatives that have been investigated to date, vitamin E acid succinate is the most effective anti-cancer agent. This report describes the preparation and testing of liposomal formulation of mono α-tocopheryl ester of succinic acid (α-TOS) for cytotoxicity against hamster cheek pouch carcinoma cell line (HCPC-1). Small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) of phosphatidylcholine incorporating 70 μM α-TOS were superior to α-TOS alone or SUV without incorporated α-TOS, as inducers of apoptosis in HCPC-1 cells. Liposomal α-TOS perturbed the lipid structure in cells, promoted apoptosis, and decreased cell viability. The mechanism of action of α-TOS appears to involve membrane damage and induction of ceramide mediated apoptosis. PMID:16271438

  8. Prospective radionuclide renal function evaluation and its correlation with radiological findings in patients with Kock pouch urinary diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.K.; Chang, L.S.; Chen, M.T.; Yeh, S.H. )

    1991-05-01

    In an attempt to understand better the status of renal function after Kock pouch urinary diversion we conducted a prospective evaluation of renal function in 25 patients using the radionuclide 131iodine-hippurate. Studies were done before, and at 1 month and every 6 months for 30 months postoperatively. The radionuclide results were then compared to excretory urography and contrast study of the reservoir. Our renal function study included the determination of individual and total effective renal plasma flow (ml. per minute), the time to maximal radioactivity over the kidney (peak time in minutes) and a renogram. The mean total (both kidneys) effective renal plasma flow rates before (25 patients) and at month 1 (19), month 6 (14), month 12 (12), month 18 (6), month 24 (6) and month 30 (7) after operation were 385.5 +/- 112.2, 310.5 +/- 109.9, 362.7 +/- 69.2, 442.0 +/- 97.5, 468.2 +/- 82.5, 405.7 +/- 70.6 and 414.0 +/- 65.1, respectively. A comparison of individual and total effective renal plasma flow before and after operation revealed that only the change of the flow at each or both sides of the kidney before and at 1 month after the operation reached statistically significant differences, respectively (p less than 0.05, paired t test). Postoperatively 5 of 6 patients with hydronephrosis had abnormal peak time and a third segment on the renogram was performed on the corresponding side of the kidney. No reflux was noted on contrast study of the reservoir of any patient followed for up to 30 months. In conclusion, the radionuclide renal function evaluation showed a significant decrease of renal function 1 month after Kock pouch diversion, then it resumed and remained stable (neither improved nor deteriorated) for 30 months. Also the abnormal peak time and third segment on the renogram usually implicated a dilated upper urinary tract.

  9. Development and verification of a mouse model for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery with a small gastric pouch.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zheng; Zhao, Zhiyun; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Ye, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Existing mouse models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery are not comparable to human RYGB in gastric pouch volume for a large or absent gastric volume. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a mouse RYGB model that closely replicates gastric pouch size of human RYGB surgery of about 5% of total gastric volume. We established this model in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice of C57BL/6J. This surgery resulted in a sustained 30% weight loss, entirely accounted for by decreased fat mass but not lean mass, compared to sham-operated mice on the high fat diet. Compared to sham-operated mice, energy expenditure corrected for total body weight was significantly increased by about 25%, and substrate utilization was shifted toward higher carbohydrate utilization at 8 weeks after RYGB when body weight had stabilized at the lower level. The energy expenditure persisted and carbohydrate utilization was even more pronounced when the mice were fed chow diet. Although significantly increased during daytime, overall locomotor activity was not significantly different. In response to cold exposure, RYGB mice exhibited an improved capacity to maintain the body temperature. In insulin tolerance test, exogenous insulin-induced suppression of plasma glucose levels was significantly greater in RYGB mice at 4 weeks after surgery. Paradoxically, food intake measured at 5 weeks after surgery was significantly increased, possibly in compensation for increased fecal energy loss and energy expenditure. In conclusion, this new model is a viable alternative to existing murine RYGB models and the model matches human RYGB surgery in anatomy. This model will be useful for studying molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of RYGB on body weight and glucose homeostasis.

  10. Alkaline and Stretford scrubbing tests for H/sub 2/S removal from in-situ oil retort offgas. Final report, February 1983-February 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Taback, H.J.; Quartucy, G.C.; Goldstick, R.J.

    1985-06-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation of two mobile pilot-plant scrubbers (one alkaline, the other Stretford) for removing reduced sulfur compounds from the offgas of an in-situ retort at Geokinetics. The alkaline scrubber had a tray tower and a venturi contactor used alternately with NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH to investigate the effects of scrubbing chemical, chemical concentration, and residence time on removal efficiency and H/sub 2/S selectivity. The Stretford plant employed a venturi contactor (near the end of the test, a packed-tower contactor was added downstream of the venturi). A computer model of the alkaline scrubber, based on the penetration theory, was developed and agrees well with the observed performance. Based on this model, it appears possible to design an alkaline scrubber system that can achieve 95% H/sub 2/S removal at a selectivity of 37.

  11. Retort Upgrading for Surge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Endress & Hauser Analog Level Gauge PV with Sight Glass Minco Temperature Transmitters (2) Steam Pressure Alarm Switch ABB Kent Taylor...Transmitter SV (0-100 psig range) LogTec Pressure Transmitter PV (0-60 psig) Strobe Light Rotor Proximity Switches (3) Endress & Hauser ... Endress & Hauser Analog Level Gauge PV with Sight Glass Minco Temperature Transmitters (2) Steam Pressure Alarm Switch ABB Kent Taylor

  12. A "Retort Courteous."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Mary E.

    1979-01-01

    Responds to article by Pauline Wilson (School Library Journal, v25 n6 Feb 1979) in terms of defining the role of children's librarians, clarifying the goals of children's services, making a case for such services, improving the impression made by children's librarians, determining appropriate preparation, and understanding and achieving quality…

  13. MicroRNAs Expression in the Ileal Pouch of Patients with Ulcerative Colitis Is Robustly Up-Regulated and Correlates with Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sherman Horev, Hadas; Elad, Hofit; Baram, Liran; Issakov, Ofer; Tulchinsky, Hagit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Shomron, Noam; Dotan, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background Gene expression alterations are associated with disease behavior in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). microRNAs (miRNAs) are dominant in the regulation of gene expression, and may affect IBD phenotype. Our aim was to assess mucosal miRNA expression in IBD and the correlation with intestinal inflammation. Methods We performed a large-scale analysis of ileal mucosal miRNA. Biopsies were retrieved from patients with ileal Crohn’s disease (CD), unoperated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, UC patients after pouch surgery, and normal controls (NC). Pouch UC patients were classified as having a normal pouch (NP), chronic pouchitis (CP), and Crohn’s-like disease of the pouch (CLDP). miRNA expression was analyzed by parallel massive (next-generation) sequencing (NGS). Bioinformatics tools were applied for clustering and the detection of potential targets. Results Sixty-one subjects were recruited. The ileum of unoperated UC patients was comparable with NC. There were significant miRNA expression alterations (fold change ≥2, corrected P ≤.05) in NP (n = 6), CP (n = 40) and CLDP (n = 139), but only two expression alterations were noted in CD. More than 90% of the altered miRNAs were up-regulated, and many were predicted to be associated with significantly decreased transcripts. miRNAs alterations were generally clustered with disease phenotypes. Conclusions Ileal inflammation causes increased miRNA expression. miRNA alterations correlate with IBD phenotype, apparently by controlling the down-regulation of specific mRNAs. PMID:27536783

  14. Retinoic acid is required for specification of the ventral eye field and for Rathke's pouch in the avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Maden, Malcolm; Blentic, Aida; Reijntjes, Susan; Seguin, Sophie; Gale, Emily; Graham, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the role of retinoic acid (RA) in eye development using the vitamin A deficient quail model system, which overcomes problems of retinoic acid synthesising enzyme redundancy in the embryo. In the absence of retinoic acid, the ventral optic stalk and ventral retina are missing, whereas the dorsal optic stalk and dorsal retina develop appropriately. Other ocular abnormalities observed were a thinner retina and the lack of differentiation of the lens. In an attempt to explain this, we studied the expression of various dorsally and ventrally expressed genes such as Pax2, Pax6, Tbx6, Vax2, Raldh1 and Raldh3 and noted that they were unchanged in their expression patterns. In contrast, the RA catabolising enzymes Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1 which are known to be RA-responsive were not expressed at all in the developing eye. At much earlier stages, the expression domain of Shh in the prechordal plate was reduced, as was Nkx2.1 and we suggest a model whereby the eye field is specified according to the concentration of SHH protein that is present. We also describe another organ, Rathke's pouch which fails to develop in the absence of retinoic acid. We attribute this to the down-regulation of Bmp2, Shh and Fgf8 which are known to be involved in the induction of this structure.

  15. Stereological studies of differentiation in hamster cheek pouch epithelium: variations in the volume and frequency of mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    White, F H; Gohari, K

    1983-01-01

    The present report describes quantitative studies of mitochondria from stratified squamous epithelial cells from hamster cheek pouch mucosa in differentiating compartments. Mucosa was processed for electron microscopy and, using strict sampling procedures, electron micrographs of epithelium from defined basal, spinous and granular strata were acquired. Using stereological and other morphometric methods, the volume density, numerical density and volume-to-surface ratio of mitochondria were estimated in each cellular layer, and these data were transformed into absolute values characterising the average cell in these layers. The results suggest that both volumetric and numerical densities of mitochondria decreased progressively during epithelial differentiation; conversely, the total volume and number of mitochondria present in granular cells were consistently higher than in basal cells, as was the volume of individual mitochondria. These quantitative changes may reflect functional alterations in the metabolism of epithelial cells during differentiation and provide a base line for further work on experimental epithelial biology and pathology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6350250

  16. Fast and slow ion diffusion processes in lithium ion pouch cells during cycling observed with fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Lars Wilko; Kiesel, Peter; Ganguli, Anurag; Lochbaum, Alexander; Saha, Bhaskar; Schwartz, Julian; Bae, Chang-Jun; Alamgir, Mohamed; Raghavan, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Cell monitoring for safe capacity utilization while maximizing pack life and performance is a key requirement for effective battery management and encouraging their adoption for clean-energy technologies. A key cell failure mode is the build-up of residual electrode strain over time, which affects both cell performance and life. Our team has been exploring the use of fiber optic (FO) sensors as a new alternative for cell state monitoring. In this present study, various charge-cycling experiments were performed on Lithium-ion pouch cells with a particular class of FO sensors, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), that were externally attached to the cells. An overshooting of the volume change at high SOC that recovers during rest can be observed. This phenomenon originates from the interplay between a fast and a slow Li ion diffusion process, which leads to non-homogeneous intercalation of Li ions. This paper focuses on the strain relaxation processes that occur after switching from charge to no-load phases. The correlation of the excess volume and subsequent relaxation to SOC as well as temperature is discussed. The implications of being able to monitor this phenomenon to control battery utilization for long life are also discussed.

  17. Raman spectroscopic detection of early stages in DMBA-induced tumor evolution in hamster buccal pouch model: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanate, Avinash D.; Kumar, G.; Talathi, Sneha; Maru, G. B.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2010-12-01

    Oral cancers are the serious health problem in developing as well as developed world, and more so in India and other south Asian countries. Survival rate of these cancers, despite advances in treatment modalities are one of the poorest which is attributed to lack of reliable screening and early detection methods. The hamster buccal pouch (HBP)carcinogenesis model closely mimics human oral cancers. Optical spectroscopy methods are sensitive enough to detect subtle biochemical changes and thus hold great potential in early detection of cancers. However, efficacy of these techniques in classifying of sequential evolution of tumors has never been tested. Therefore, in this study, we have explored the feasibility of Raman spectroscopic classification of different stages of cancers in hamster model. Strong vibrational modes of lipids (1440, 1654, and 1746 cm-1) are seen in control tissue spectra, whereas strong protein bands are seen in spectra of DMBA treated tissues. These differences were exploited to classify control and treated tissues using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Principle Component Analysis (PCA)-Limit test, Factorial Discriminant Analysis (FDA), Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA), PLS-DA and non- linear decision tree methods. All these techniques have shown good classification between spectra of different stages of tumor evolution and results were further successfully verified by leave-one-out and single blinded methods. Thus findings of this study, first of its kind,demonstrate the feasibility of Raman spectroscopic detection of early changes in tumor evolution.

  18. Raman spectroscopic detection of early stages in DMBA-induced tumor evolution in hamster buccal pouch model: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanate, Avinash D.; Kumar, G.; Talathi, Sneha; Maru, G. B.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2011-08-01

    Oral cancers are the serious health problem in developing as well as developed world, and more so in India and other south Asian countries. Survival rate of these cancers, despite advances in treatment modalities are one of the poorest which is attributed to lack of reliable screening and early detection methods. The hamster buccal pouch (HBP)carcinogenesis model closely mimics human oral cancers. Optical spectroscopy methods are sensitive enough to detect subtle biochemical changes and thus hold great potential in early detection of cancers. However, efficacy of these techniques in classifying of sequential evolution of tumors has never been tested. Therefore, in this study, we have explored the feasibility of Raman spectroscopic classification of different stages of cancers in hamster model. Strong vibrational modes of lipids (1440, 1654, and 1746 cm-1) are seen in control tissue spectra, whereas strong protein bands are seen in spectra of DMBA treated tissues. These differences were exploited to classify control and treated tissues using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Principle Component Analysis (PCA)-Limit test, Factorial Discriminant Analysis (FDA), Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA), PLS-DA and non- linear decision tree methods. All these techniques have shown good classification between spectra of different stages of tumor evolution and results were further successfully verified by leave-one-out and single blinded methods. Thus findings of this study, first of its kind,demonstrate the feasibility of Raman spectroscopic detection of early changes in tumor evolution.

  19. Chronic treatment of male tammar wallabies with deslorelin implants during pouch life: effects on development, puberty, and reproduction in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C A; Eckery, D C; Trigg, T E; Cooper, D W

    2007-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of chronic GnRH agonist (deslorelin) treatment on sexual maturation in the male tammar wallaby. Slow-release deslorelin or placebo implants were administered to male pouch young (n = 10/group) when they were between 180 and 200 days old, to determine if disruption of the pituitary-testicular axis during development altered the timing of sexual maturation or had long-term effects on adult reproductive function. Deslorelin treatment caused retardation of testicular growth and reduced the serum FSH and testosterone concentrations between 12 and 24 mo of age. Maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was also delayed in treated animals at 13 and 19 mo of age. Despite these alterations in the pattern and timing of neuroendocrine development, sexual maturation was not permanently blocked in these animals and deslorelin-treated animals reached sexual maturity at the same age as treated animals, as evidenced by a fully functional pituitary-testicular axis and proven fertility at 25 mo of age. The ability of the treated animals to reach puberty at the same time as control animals, despite delayed maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, suggests that puberty in the male tammar wallaby is additionally regulated by other, gonadotropin-independent factors.

  20. Ontogenetic shifts in brain scaling reflect behavioral changes in the life cycle of the pouched lamprey Geotria australis

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos A.; Yopak, Kara E.; Warrington, Rachael E.; Hart, Nathan S.; Potter, Ian C.; Collin, Shaun P.

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have described brain scaling in vertebrates throughout ontogeny and none in lampreys, one of the two surviving groups of the early agnathan (jawless) stage in vertebrate evolution. The life cycle of anadromous parasitic lampreys comprises two divergent trophic phases, firstly filter-feeding as larvae in freshwater and secondly parasitism as adults in the sea, with the transition marked by a radical metamorphosis. We characterized the growth of the brain during the life cycle of the pouched lamprey Geotria australis, an anadromous parasitic lamprey, focusing on the scaling between brain and body during ontogeny and testing the hypothesis that the vast transitions in behavior and environment are reflected in differences in the scaling and relative size of the major brain subdivisions throughout life. The body and brain mass and the volume of six brain structures of G. australis, representing six points of the life cycle, were recorded, ranging from the early larval stage to the final stage of spawning and death. Brain mass does not increase linearly with body mass during the ontogeny of G. australis. During metamorphosis, brain mass increases markedly, even though the body mass does not increase, reflecting an overall growth of the brain, with particularly large increases in the volume of the optic tectum and other visual areas of the brain and, to a lesser extent, the olfactory bulbs. These results are consistent with the conclusions that ammocoetes rely predominantly on non-visual and chemosensory signals, while adults rely on both visual and olfactory cues. PMID:26283894

  1. A new species of pouched octopus, Cistopus Gray, 1849 (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) from the southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, Vijayamma; Norman, Mark D; Kumar, Appukuttannair Biju

    2015-12-16

    Octopuses of the genus Cistopus Gray, 1849 are commercially valuable catches in the cephalopod fisheries of India. The primary and unique diagnostic character of this genus is the possession of eight small mucous pouches embedded in the oral faces of the webs between the bases of each arm. Historically only a single species of Cistopus, C. indicus, had been reported from Indian waters. In reviewing the octopod fauna off the Kerala coast, we have detected three species of Cistopus, of which one is described here as a new species. Cistopus platinoidus sp. nov. is distinct from Cistopus species described to date (C. indicus, C. taiwanicus and C. chinensis) on the basis of sucker counts, the number and position of enlarged suckers in males, and presence/absence of a calamus. Our studies of catch composition of Kerala octopod fisheries indicate a higher diversity of target species than previously suspected, including a number of undescribed species. Taxonomic resolution and collation of biological and distributional data are required for effective monitoring and management of these valuable fisheries.

  2. Diabetes Is Reversed in a Murine Model by Marginal Mass Syngeneic Islet Transplantation Using a Subcutaneous Cell Pouch Device

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Andrew R.; Pawlick, Rena; Gala-Lopez, Boris; MacGillivary, Amanda; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; White, David J. G.; Toleikis, Philip M.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2015-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is a successful β-cell replacement therapy for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although high rates of early insulin independence are achieved routinely, long-term function wanes over time. Intraportal transplantation is associated with procedural risks, requires multiple donors, and does not afford routine biopsy. Stem cell technologies may require potential for retrievability, and graft removal by hepatectomy is impractical. There is a clear clinical need for an alternative, optimized transplantation site. The subcutaneous space is a potential substitute, but transplantation of islets into this site has routinely failed to reverse diabetes. However, an implanted device, which becomes prevascularized before transplantation, may alter this equation. Methods Syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted subcutaneously within Sernova Corp's Cell Pouch (CP). All recipients were preimplanted with CPs 4 weeks before diabetes induction and transplantation. After transplantation, recipients were monitored for glycemic control and glucose tolerance. Results Mouse islets transplanted into the CP routinely restored glycemic control with modest delay and responded well to glucose challenge, comparable to renal subcapsular islet grafts, despite a marginal islet dose, and normoglycemia was maintained until graft explantation. In contrast, islets transplanted subcutaneously alone failed to engraft. Islets within CPs stained positively for insulin, glucagon, and microvessels. Conclusions The CP is biocompatible, forms an environment suitable for islet engraftment, and offers a potential alternative to the intraportal site for islet and future stem cell therapies. PMID:26308506

  3. Laboratory Investigations of African Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus) as a Potential Reservoir Host Species for Monkeypox Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Christina L.; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J.; Self, Joshua; Olson, Victoria A.; Regnery, Russell L.; Braden, Zachary; Weiss, Sonja; Malekani, Jean; Jackson, Eddie; Tate, Mallory; Karem, Kevin L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Damon, Inger K.; Carroll, Darin S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease endemic to central and western Africa, where it is a major public health concern. Although Monkeypox virus (MPXV) and monkeypox disease in humans have been well characterized, little is known about its natural history, or its maintenance in animal populations of sylvatic reservoir(s). In 2003, several species of rodents imported from Ghana were involved in a monkeypox outbreak in the United States with individuals of three African rodent genera (Cricetomys, Graphiurus, Funisciurus) shown to be infected with MPXV. Here, we examine the course of MPXV infection in Cricetomys gambianus (pouched Gambian rats) and this rodent species’ competence as a host for the virus. We obtained ten Gambian rats from an introduced colony in Grassy Key, Florida and infected eight of these via scarification with a challenge dose of 4X104 plaque forming units (pfu) from either of the two primary clades of MPXV: Congo Basin (C-MPXV: n = 4) or West African (W-MPXV: n = 4); an additional 2 animals served as PBS controls. Viral shedding and the effect of infection on activity and physiological aspects of the animals were measured. MPXV challenged animals had significantly higher core body temperatures, reduced activity and increased weight loss than PBS controls. Viable virus was found in samples taken from animals in both experimental groups (C-MPXV and W-MPXV) between 3 and 27 days post infection (p.i.) (up to 1X108 pfu/ml), with viral DNA found until day 56 p.i. The results from this work show that Cricetomys gambianus (and by inference, probably the closely related species, Cricetomys emini) can be infected with MPXV and shed viable virus particles; thus suggesting that these animals may be involved in the maintenance of MPXV in wildlife mammalian populations. More research is needed to elucidate the epidemiology of MPXV and the role of Gambian rats and other species. PMID:26517724

  4. Laboratory Investigations of African Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus) as a Potential Reservoir Host Species for Monkeypox Virus.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Christina L; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J; Self, Joshua; Olson, Victoria A; Regnery, Russell L; Braden, Zachary; Weiss, Sonja; Malekani, Jean; Jackson, Eddie; Tate, Mallory; Karem, Kevin L; Rocke, Tonie E; Osorio, Jorge E; Damon, Inger K; Carroll, Darin S

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease endemic to central and western Africa, where it is a major public health concern. Although Monkeypox virus (MPXV) and monkeypox disease in humans have been well characterized, little is known about its natural history, or its maintenance in animal populations of sylvatic reservoir(s). In 2003, several species of rodents imported from Ghana were involved in a monkeypox outbreak in the United States with individuals of three African rodent genera (Cricetomys, Graphiurus, Funisciurus) shown to be infected with MPXV. Here, we examine the course of MPXV infection in Cricetomys gambianus (pouched Gambian rats) and this rodent species' competence as a host for the virus. We obtained ten Gambian rats from an introduced colony in Grassy Key, Florida and infected eight of these via scarification with a challenge dose of 4X104 plaque forming units (pfu) from either of the two primary clades of MPXV: Congo Basin (C-MPXV: n = 4) or West African (W-MPXV: n = 4); an additional 2 animals served as PBS controls. Viral shedding and the effect of infection on activity and physiological aspects of the animals were measured. MPXV challenged animals had significantly higher core body temperatures, reduced activity and increased weight loss than PBS controls. Viable virus was found in samples taken from animals in both experimental groups (C-MPXV and W-MPXV) between 3 and 27 days post infection (p.i.) (up to 1X108 pfu/ml), with viral DNA found until day 56 p.i. The results from this work show that Cricetomys gambianus (and by inference, probably the closely related species, Cricetomys emini) can be infected with MPXV and shed viable virus particles; thus suggesting that these animals may be involved in the maintenance of MPXV in wildlife mammalian populations. More research is needed to elucidate the epidemiology of MPXV and the role of Gambian rats and other species.

  5. Macroscopic anatomy of the lower respiratory system in a nocturnal burrowing rodent: African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse 1840).

    PubMed

    Ibe, C S; Salami, S O; Onyeanusi, B I

    2011-04-01

    Cricetomys gambianus is a rat that lives principally in burrows, coming out at night in search of food. The design and structure of the lower respiratory system reflects its oxygen and metabolic demand which can be attributed to its habitat. A morphological and morphometric investigation of its lower respiratory system was undertaken to document the normal anatomical features and assess its morpho-functional paradigm. Specifically, an anatomical detail of the lungs and conductive airway was described, the structures being elucidated by dissection and radiography. Evaluation of dissected specimens showed that tracheal cartilages ranged from 21 to 33 rings with an average of 25.5. They exhibited a random pattern of anastomoses between adjacent rings. Transverse diameters of the principal bronchus in the male and female rats were 3.767 and 3.759 mm respectively. The right lung consisted of four lobes while the left lung was not lobed. Bronchogram revealed that lung lobation corresponded with bronchial tree division. Inter-lobar fissures were absent on the right lung except for the ventral boarder separating the cranial lobe from the caudal lobe. The entire lungs provided stability to the heart in situ, through the cardiac notch. This study also included correlation analysis of the dimensions, weights and volumes of the lower respiratory organs with the nose-rump length and body weight of 18 African giant pouched rats of both sexes. The relationship of the anatomy of the lower respiratory system of the rodent to the oxygen tension in their burrow and to their energy utilization is discussed.

  6. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  7. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model.

  8. Topical chlorophyll-pheophytin derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Lee, Jeng-Woei; How, Mon-Hsin

    2010-02-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has become a prominent cancer because of its highest annual increase rate among all cancer diseases. Betel quid chewing habit is a major risk factor for oral precancerous and cancerous lesions and there are more than two million people who have this habit in Taiwan. Our previous studies showed that chlorophyll-pheophytin derivative (CPD)-mediated PDT is very effective for killing of SCC-4 cell lines in vitro. In order to decrease the systemic phototoxic effect of CPD, this study was designed to use a topical CPD-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical CPD-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when CPD reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of CPD gel. We found that CPD reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 1 hour (range, 0 to 30 hours) after topical application of CPD gel. The precancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical CPD-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 200 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 100 J/cm2) using the portable WonderLight LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device once or twice a week. Visual and histological examination demonstrated that topical CPD-mediated PDT was partially effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  9. Late-onset fistula presenting as buttock abscess in two patients with ileo-anal J-pouches for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Farquharson, M; Cecil, T D; Gold, D; Moran, B J

    2004-03-01

    Two cases are described of patients who presented with a buttock abscess 3 and 5 years after restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. In both the abscess was secondary to a fistula, which was shown on further investigation to be a track traversing the greater sciatic notch. Both patients had had an ileo-anal J-pouch after a proctectomy which had included a mesorectal excision. The possibility that these unusual fistulae might be more common following removal of the mesorectum rather than a close rectal dissection is explored.

  10. Laboratory investigations of African Pouched Rats (Cricetomys gambianus) as a potential reservoir host species for Monkeypox Virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Christina L.; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J.; Self, Joshua; Olson, Victoria A.; Regnery, Russell L.; Braden, Zachary; Weiss, Sonja; Malekani, Jean; Jackson, Eddie; Tate, Mallory; Karem, Kevin L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Damon, Inger K.; Carroll, Darin S.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease endemic to central and western Africa, where it is a major public health concern. Although Monkeypox virus (MPXV) and monkeypox disease in humans have been well characterized, little is known about its natural history, or its maintenance in animal populations of sylvatic reservoir(s). In 2003, several species of rodents imported from Ghana were involved in a monkeypox outbreak in the United States with individuals of three African rodent genera (Cricetomys, Graphiurus, Funisciurus) shown to be infected with MPXV. Here, we examine the course of MPXV infection in Cricetomys gambianus (pouched Gambian rats) and this rodent species’ competence as a host for the virus. We obtained ten Gambian rats from an introduced colony in Grassy Key, Florida and infected eight of these via scarification with a challenge dose of 4X104 plaque forming units (pfu) from either of the two primary clades of MPXV: Congo Basin (C-MPXV: n = 4) or West African (W-MPXV: n = 4); an additional 2 animals served as PBS controls. Viral shedding and the effect of infection on activity and physiological aspects of the animals were measured. MPXV challenged animals had significantly higher core body temperatures, reduced activity and increased weight loss than PBS controls. Viable virus was found in samples taken from animals in both experimental groups (C-MPXV and W-MPXV) between 3 and 27 days post infection (p.i.) (up to 1X108pfu/ml), with viral DNA found until day 56 p.i. The results from this work show that Cricetomys gambianus (and by inference, probably the closely related species, Cricetomys emini) can be infected with MPXV and shed viable virus particles; thus suggesting that these animals may be involved in the maintenance of MPXV in wildlife mammalian populations. More research is needed to elucidate the epidemiology of MPXV and the role of Gambian rats and other species.

  11. Effect of mangrove black tea extract from Ceriops decandra (Griff.) on hematology and biochemical changes in dimethyl benz[a]anthracene-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sithranga Boopathy, N; Kathiresan, K; Jeon, Y J

    2011-09-01

    Effect of the black tea extracted from a mangrove plant species, Ceriops decandra (Griff.) was studied on dimethyl benz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced changes in blood hematology and plasma non-enzymatic antioxidants in male hamsters. Hamsters were painted with 0.5% solution of DMBA in liquid paraffin on the right buccal pouch three times in a week up to 14 weeks. Each application treated with 0.4mg of DMBA. The mangrove black tea extract (MBTE) was administrated orally with 5mgkg(-1) twice a day and then with DMBA on alternate days. Results showed that the DMBA caused a significant (P<0.05) decline in the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin-C, -E, red blood cells, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume and hematocrit; and increase in the levels of WBC, platelets, lymphocytes and neutrophils. The MBTE prevented the DMBA-induced adverse changes significantly in blood and biochemical parameters of the male hamsters. This work concluded that the black tea extracted from the coastal mangrove species C. decandra prevented the DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters.

  12. Quality of life, social impact and functional outcome following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Raviram, S; Rajan, Ramesh; Sindhu, R S; Bonny, N; Kuruvilla, A P; Subhalal, N

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to assess quality of life (QoL), functional outcome, and social impact following ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) since Indian data is limited. Data was collected prospectively from patients who underwent IPAA for UC or FAP from 2004 to 2013. QoL and functional outcome at 1, 3, and 5 years after surgery, return to work, and change of job (social impact) were documented. QoL was assessed using the validated Cleveland Global Quality of Life (CGQL) score, the normal score being 1.0. Twenty-five patients were analyzed. Mean CGQL scores before surgery and at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.5, 0.63, 0.73, and 0.8, respectively. FAP patients had better scores at 3 and 5 years. Only 40 % returned to same job. Sixty-four percent returned to work within a year. The median number of bowel movements per 24 h was less for FAP patients at 3 and 5 years. UC patients on long-term steroids had poorer function at 3 years. Long-term QoL and functional outcomes following IPAA are acceptable. Initial deterioration in QoL, mainly in FAP and long-term adverse social impact in both groups should not be underestimated. UC patients on long-term steroids showed delayed improvement in pouch function.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of meso-(tetrahydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC) studied by fluorescence spectroscopy on early cancer of the cheek pouch mucosa of Golden Syrian hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanzmann, Thomas M.; Theumann, Jean-Francois; Braichotte, Daniel; Forrer, Martin; Wagnieres, Georges A.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Andrejevic-Blant, Snezana; Savary, Jean-Francois; Monnier, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    Golden Syrian hamsters are evaluated as an animal model for phototherapy of early squamous cell carcinomas of the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus and the tracheobronchial tree. Carcinomas of this type are induced on the hamster cheek pouch mucosa by the application of the carcinogen 7,12 DMBA. For phototherapeutic experiments on the animals we utilized meso- (tetrahydoxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC). The same drug is currently in phase I, II clinical trials for ENT patients with superficial squamous cell carcinomas. By means of light induced fluorescence (LIF) we measured in vivo the kinetics of the uptake and removal of mTHPC in the normal and tumoral cheek mucosa and in the skin. The photodynamic therapy (PDT) reaction of the tissue after excitation of the photosensitizer by laser light at 652 nm was studied. Both pharmacokinetics and PDT efficacy are compared between animal model and clinical results with special emphasis on selectivity between normal and tumoral mucosa. These first experiments show that this tumor model in the hamster cheek pouch seems to be suitable for tests of a number of PDT variables of new photosensitizers preceding their clinical application as well as for optimization of the multiple parameters of clinical phototherapy.

  14. Virilization of the male pouch young of the tammar wallaby does not appear to be mediated by plasma testosterone or dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J D; George, F W; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    1999-08-01

    Virilization of the male urogenital tract of all mammals, including marsupials, is mediated by androgenic hormones secreted by the testes. We have previously demonstrated profound sexual dimorphism in the concentrations of gonadal androgens in pouch young of the tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii during the interval when the urogenital sinus virilizes. To provide insight into the mechanisms by which androgens are transported from the testes to the target tissues, we measured testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in plasma pools from tammar pouch young from the day of birth to Day 150. Plasma testosterone levels were measurable (0.5-2 ng/ml) at all times studied, but there were no differences between males and females. These low concentrations of plasma testosterone appear to be derived from the adrenal glands and not the testes. Plasma dihydrotestosterone levels in plasma pools from these animals were also low and not sexually dimorphic. We conclude that virilization of the male urogenital tract cannot be explained by the usual transport of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in plasma but may be mediated by the direct delivery of androgens to the urogenital tract via the Wolffian ducts. Alternatively, circulating prohormones may be converted to androgens in target tissues.

  15. Gastric-type extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in the blind pouch of a bypassed stomach, presenting as colonic pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Sarah; Manivel, Carlos J; Ramaswamy, Archana; Mesa, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma after gastric bypass is rare. Extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (EWDA) of the stomach is a rare variant that has been mostly reported in Japan. We present a case of a 68-year-old man with EWDA arising in the bypassed stomach that presented as a colonic pseudo-obstruction (CPO). Several imaging, endoscopic and pathologic studies performed in the course of 2 months were non-diagnostic. An iatrogenic duodenal perforation during a diagnostic procedure led to an emergent exploratory laparotomy in which the dilated colonic segment was resected. Pathologic examination showed metastatic EWDA in the colonic wall. Post-operative complications led to the patient's demise. At autopsy the primary tumor was identified in the blind pouch of the bypassed stomach. A literature review on gastric EWDA and carcinomas arising in bypassed stomachs is discussed. EWDA of the stomach is rare, difficult to diagnose, and shows an aggressive clinical course discordant with its near-benign histology. Gastric cancer arising in a bypassed stomach is uncommon; when it occurs it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Surveillance of the blind pouch is not currently recommended. Malignant infiltration of the colonic wall should be included in the differential diagnosis of CPO of unclear etiology.

  16. An extended polarization model to study the influence of current collector geometry of large-format lithium-ion pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Stephan; Rheinfeld, Alexander; Erhard, Simon V.; Jossen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, depth-of-discharge and temperature distribution of a large-format lithium-ion pouch cell are examined by means of a two-dimensional electro-thermal polarization model. A method of improving the dynamic behavior of the model while maintaining its accuracy under constant current loads by applying intermittent charge and discharge data is given. The model is validated with the aid of experimental data gained from dynamic and constant current discharge profiles applied to a commercial 40 Ah Li-ion pouch cell. Two major design studies are carried out focusing on a variation of geometrical parameters, namely the size and the positioning of the cell tabs. For each design, the influence of current collector thickness on the uniformity of the temperature and depth-of-discharge distribution is investigated during a 4C constant current discharge operation. Simulation results show that reducing the current collector thickness results in a moderate increase of 3 °C in maximum temperature and 1.5% in depth-of-discharge imbalance if the tab size is increased. In consequence, lowering the share of inactive components within a lithium-ion cell by optimizing the thickness of the current collector foils should be further considered to enhance the performance of typical lithium-ion cell designs.

  17. Changing your ostomy pouch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mosby; 2014:chap 35. Read More Colon cancer Intestinal obstruction repair Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Diet - full liquid Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge Large bowel resection - discharge Review Date 12/ ...

  18. Characterization of Rio Blanco retort 1 water following treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis; Residual brine treated by wet-air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kocornik, D.; Renk, R.

    1986-09-01

    Laboratory research has been conducted to evaluate the chemical, physical, and toxicological characteristics of treated and untreated water pumped from the flooded modified in situ retort at lease tract C-a. This wastewater had a total dissolved solids (TDS) content of about 5450 mg/L and a total organic carbon content of about 16 mg/L. Wet chemical analyses, metals analyses, particle-size analyses, and MICROTOX assays were performed on the wastewater before and after treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The reverse osmosis membrane used in this research was a Filmtec model SW30-2521 spiral-wound polyamide unit. In a short duration test at a TDS of 21,800 mg/L, the reverse osmosis system successfully removed dissolved solids and organics from the wastewater. The water was also much less toxic to the MICROTOX organism after treatment by reverse osmosis. Membrane fouling was observed when water with a TDS of 54,500 mg/L was treated. Treatment of the reverse osmosis residual brine was attempted by subcritical wet-air oxidation. The brine remaining after the 170-hour test on the water with a TDS of 5450 mg/L was subjected to temperatures ranging from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F) and pressures from 500 to 1600 psig for approximately 30 minutes. The waste treated by the higher temperatures and pressures showed good removals of organics, nitrogen compounds, and some metals. The sample treated at 302/sup 0/C (575/sup 0/F) and 1300 psi was assayed for MICROTOX response and no toxicity was measured. The reverse osmosis brine was significantly toxic to the MICROTOX organism before treatment by subcritical wet-air oxidation. 14 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. Sesamin inhibits bacterial formylpeptide-induced inflammatory responses in a murine air-pouch model and in THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Youhong; Hou, Xinwei; Chen, Juan; Xie, Lianying; Yang, Lang; Le, Yingying

    2010-02-01

    The reaction of human leukocytes to chemoattractants is an important component of the host immune response and also plays a crucial role in the development of inflammation. Sesamin has been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation and regulate cytokine production. In this study, we examined the effect of sesamin on inflammatory responses elicited by the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) in vitro and in vivo and explored the mechanisms involved. fMLF is recognized by a human G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor (FPR) on phagocytic leukocytes. Sesamin at concentrations between 12.5 and 50 micromol/L inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis of human monocyte cell line THP-1 differentiated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (P < 0.01). Similarly, sesamin inhibited FPR-transfected rat basophilic leukemia cell [epitope-tagged human FPR (ETFR) cell] migration toward fMLF (P < 0.01). In fMLF-induced inflammation in a murine air-pouch model, intraperitoneal administration of sesamin (12 mgkg(-1)d(-1) for 2 d) suppressed leukocyte infiltration into the air pouch induced by fMLF [(62.89 +/- 7.93) x 10(4) vs. (19.67 +/- 4.43) x 10(4) cells/air pouch; n = 9; P < 0.001]. Ca(2+) mobilization and mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activation are involved in fMLF-induced leukocyte migration. Pretreatment of ETFR cells with sesamin inhibited fMLF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner but did not affect fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that pretreatment of THP-1 cells with sesamin dose dependently inhibited fMLF-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. These results suggest that sesamin inhibits leukocyte activation by fMLF through ERK1/2- and NF-kappaB-related signaling pathways and thus is a potential compound for the management of inflammatory diseases.

  20. [A case of low anterior resection combined with resection of the prostate seminal vesicle urethra for douglas' pouch metastasis of the colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryo; Yokouchi, Hideoki; Murata, Kohei

    2011-11-01

    A-71-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer underwent sigmoidectomy in 2004. Ascites cytology was positive. He had a postoperative chemotherapy, but cancer recurred on the Douglas' pouch in the first year after the surgery. After chemoradiation, he underwent a low anterior resection with combined resection of the prostate seminal vesicle urethra in 2005. Four years after the recurrence, metastasis of the right lung S9 occurred, and he underwent right lower lobectomy. One year later, metastasis of the left lung S6 occurred, he underwent a partial resection of S6. Later a local recurrence has not been observed. Among the colon cancer recurrence, we think the surgery was effective for local recurrence disease with adequate observation.

  1. The neem limonoids azadirachtin and nimbolide inhibit hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by modulating xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, DNA damage, antioxidants, invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi Vidya; Manikandan, Palrasu; Kumar, Gurram Harish; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2009-05-01

    The neem tree has attracted considerable research attention as a rich source of limonoids that have potent antioxidant and anti-cancer properties. The present study was designed to evaluate the chemopreventive potential of the neem limonoids azadirachtin and nimbolide based on in vitro antioxidant assays and in vivo inhibitory effects on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Both azadirachtin and nimbolide exhibited concentration-dependent anti-radical scavenging activity and reductive potential in the order: nimbolide > azadirachtin > ascorbate. Administration of both azadirachtin and nimbolide inhibited the development of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by influencing multiple mechanisms including prevention of procarcinogen activation and oxidative DNA damage, upregulation of antioxidant and carcinogen detoxification enzymes and inhibition of tumour invasion and angiogenesis. On a comparative basis, nimbolide was found to be a more potent antioxidant and chemopreventive agent and offers promise as a candidate agent in multitargeted prevention and treatment of cancer.

  2. Development of a gastric pouch-aorto-colic fistula as a complication of a revisionary open roux-en-y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Mario Raul; Villalba, Mario Ramon

    2009-02-01

    A 45-year-old female presented with an enterocutaneous fistula and intraabdominal abscesses weeks after undergoing an open roux-en-y gastric bypass 20 years after a previous bariatric procedure. Initial management consisted of exploration with resection of the fistula, open abscess drainage, percutaneous drains, and culture-directed intravenous antibiotics. Months later, the patient developed a gastrocolic fistula and massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a gastro-aortic fistula. The patient underwent resection of the gastrocolic fistula followed by a damage control operation including a left thoracotomy with aortic cross-clamping for the gastro-aortic fistula. Final reconstruction necessitated an extra-anatomic opening in the diaphragm for creation of an intrathoracic esophagojejunostomy and marsupialization of the distal esophagus and gastric pouch with concomitant mucusectomy. This rare but devastating complication requires prompt surgical management. In the appropriate setting, a high suspicion must be maintained in order to act swiftly for the patient's benefit.

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Heber, Elisa M; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Maitz, Charles A; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Nigg, David W; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-11

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing (10)B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70-88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70-88%.

  4. Hamsters chewing betel quid or areca nut directly show a decrease in body weight and survival rates with concomitant epithelial hyperplasia of cheek pouch.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chun-Pin; Chang, Mei-Chi; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Lee, Po-Hsuen; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2004-08-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is strongly associated with the occurrence of oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral cancer. There are about 200-600 million BQ chewers in the world. Previous animal studies support the potential carcinogenicity of BQ in different test systems. However, little animal experiment has let hamsters or rats to chew BQ directly, similar to that in humans. In the present study, we established a hamster model of chewing BQ or areca nut (AN). A total of 81 2-week-old hamsters were randomly divided into three groups: 25 for control group, 28 for BQ-chewing group, and 28 for AN-chewing group. These animals were fed with powdered diet with/without BQ or AN for 18 months. Although the consumption of BQ or AN showed some variations, hamsters fed with powdered diet could chew and grind AN or BQ into small pieces of coarse fibers during the entire experimental period. The survival rate of AN-chewing hamsters decreased significantly after 6 months of exposure. The mean survival time was 15.6 +/- 0.9 months for control animals, 13.6 +/- 0.98 months for AN-chewing animals, and 15.7 +/- 0.55 months for BQ-chewing animals. The body weight of BQ- or AN-chewing animals also decreased after 4-13 months. Hamsters fed with AN for 18 months showed hyperkeratosis in 80% and acanthosis in 50% of cheek pouches. Animals fed with BQ for 18 months also showed hyperkeratosis in 93% and acanthosis in 14% of cheek pouches. These results indicate that AN and BQ components may induce alterations in proliferation and differentiation of oral epithelial cells. Animal model of chewing BQ or AN can be useful for future tumor initiation, promotion and chemoprevention experiments simulating the condition of BQ chewing in humans.

  5. Effects of babassu nut oil on ischemia/reperfusion-induced leukocyte adhesion and macromolecular leakage in the microcirculation: Observation in the hamster cheek pouch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The babassu palm tree is native to Brazil and is most densely distributed in the Cocais region of the state of Maranhão, in northeastern Brazil. In addition to the industrial use of refined babassu oil, the milk, the unrefined oil and the nuts in natura are used by families from several communities of African descendants as one of the principal sources of food energy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of babassu oil on microvascular permeability and leukocyte-endothelial interactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion using the hamster cheek pouch microcirculation as experimental model. Methods Twice a day for 14 days, male hamsters received unrefined babassu oil (0.02 ml/dose [BO-2 group], 0.06 ml/dose [BO-6 group], 0.18 ml/dose [BO-18 group]) or mineral oil (0.18 ml/dose [MO group]). Observations were made in the cheek pouch and macromolecular permeability increase induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) or topical application of histamine, as well as leukocyte-endothelial interaction after I/R were evaluated. Results The mean value of I/R-induced microvascular leakage, determined during reperfusion, was significantly lower in the BO-6 and BO-18 groups than in the MO one (P < 0.001). In addition, histamine-induced increase of microvascular permeability was significantly less pronounced in BO groups compared to MO one. No significant differences among groups in terms of leukocyte adhesion, concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were found. Conclusions Our findings suggest that unrefined babassu oil reduced microvascular leakage and protected against histamine-induced effects in postcapillary venules and highlights that these almost unexploited nut and its oil might be secure sources of food energy. PMID:23158555

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Elisa M.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Pozzi, Emiliano C. C.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Maitz, Charles A.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Nigg, David W.; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70–88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70–88%. PMID:25349432

  7. Thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica in minced beef under laboratory conditions and in sous-vide prepared minced and solid beef cooked in a commercial retort.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D J; McMahon, C M; Doherty, A M; Sheridan, J J; McDowell, D A; Blair, I S; Harrington, D

    2000-04-01

    D-values were obtained for Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica at 50, 55 and 60 degrees C in vacuum-packed minced beef samples heated in a laboratory water-bath. The experiment was repeated using vacutainers, which allowed heating of the beef to the desired temperature before inoculation. D-values of between 0.15 and 36.1 min were obtained for L. monocytogenes. Pre-heating the beef samples significantly affected (P < 0.05) the D60 value only. D-values for Y. enterocolitica ranged from 0.55 to 21.2 min and all the D-values were significantly different (P < 0.05) after pre-heating. In general, the D-values obtained for core inoculated solid beef samples were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those generated in minced beef when heated in a Barriquand Steriflow commercial retort.

  8. A comparative study between detached leaf and plastic growth pouches techniques on the infection of pseudocercospora leaf spot disease of cowpea cultivars (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sinsiri, N; Laohasiriwong, S

    2009-03-01

    This glasshouse experiment was carried out in the 2004 at the Department of Agricultural Production, Faculty of Technology, Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 4400, Northeast Thailand to compare amounts of infection of Pseudocercospora leaf spot disease in leaves of cowpea cultivars being screened between detached leaf and plastic growth pouches techniques. The experiment was laid in a factorial arranged in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. KVC7, IT81D-1228-14-1 and KKU25 cowpea cultivars were used as factor A, detached leaf and plastic growth pouches techniques were used as factor B and four levels of the concentrations of the spores of the disease, i.e., 0, l x 10(4), 5 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(5) of disease forming units mL(-1) of distilled water were used as factor C. The results showed that KVC7 and IT81D-1228-14-1 cultivars possessed immune and high resistant properties against the disease, respectively, whereas KKU25 cultivar ranked as a susceptible cultivar. Detached leaf technique gave higher amount of infection of the disease than plastic growth pouches technique and the differences were highly significant. A plentiful amount of Infected disease was attained with an inoculation rate of l x 10(5) forming units mL(-1) of distilled water, which was considered too high and the most appropriate concentrations for use lie on both concentrations, i.e., 1 x 10(4) and 5 x 10(4) forming units mL(-1) of distilled water. An interaction among factors AxBxC was severely found with KKU25 cultivar, particularly on day 28 after inoculation, whilst other two cultivars gave a minute amount of disease incidences (%) where detached leaf technique gave much higher disease incidences than plastic growth pouches technique, thus detached leaf technique should be of higher advantages.

  9. Suppression of local and systemic responses in streptococcal cell wall-induced acute inflammation of the air pouch by cyclosporine A. Comparison with the effects of two anti-inflammatory bis-benzimidazoles.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter Geratz, J.; Pryzwansky, K. B.; Schwab, J. H.; Anderle, S. K.; Tidwell, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Injection of streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide into a subcutaneous air pouch causes local outpouring of neutrophils and macrophages and distant hemopoietic proliferation in spleen and bone marrow. Cyclosporine A (CyA) suppressed neutrophil accumulation and all cell lines of hemopoiesis. trans-1,2-Bis(5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethene (BBE) also interfered with neutrophil exudation, yet reduced only the erythroid component of the hemopoietic process. The ethane analogue of BBE, on the other hand, did not prevent neutrophil emigration, but held down splenic erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis. All three compounds stimulated streptococcus group A cell wall-derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide uptake by pouch macrophages. CyA being the least active, BBE and its ethane analogue also produced a shift of wear-and-tear pigment from large numbers of small splenic macro-phages into small numbers of large macrophages. The pouch model is very useful in the study of anti-inflammatory compounds and has furnished the first evidence of CyA interference with massive neutrophilic infiltration and with hemopoietic signals. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8475995

  10. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  11. Long-term follow-up after ileocaecal continent cutaneous urinary diversion (Mainz I pouch): A retrospective study of a monocentric experience

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Fahd; Fellahi, Saad; Ouslim, Hicham; Mhanna, Tarik; El Houmaidi, Amine; Aynaou, Mohammed; Boteng, Paapa Dua; Barki, Ali; Nouini, Yassine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the long-term follow-up after ileocaecal continent cutaneous reservoir (ICCR) and to review the late complications. Patients and methods In all, 756 patients underwent an ICCR in our department, with long-term follow-up data available in 50 patients. The inclusion criterion was ICCR regardless of the indication and the exclusion criteria were orthotopic neobladder or other continent urinary diversions not performed with the ileocaecum. Patients were followed to record primary outcomes and late complications. Complications were stratified according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. Results The mean patient age was 44 years and pelvic malignancies were the first indication for urinary diversion. The mean (range) follow-up was 19 (9–36) years. A stoma stenosis was the most frequent outlet-related complication requiring re-intervention, followed by ischaemic outlet degeneration, and stoma incontinence. Six renal units (RUs) developed obstruction at the anastomotic site and were managed by open surgery. Three RUs had to be removed due to deterioration. A dederivation was necessary in three patients (6%). Conclusion The ICCR is a safe and established technique when an orthotopic pouch is impossible. The long-term follow-up shows acceptable complication rates and satisfactory continence conditions. However, large population studies are necessary to confirm this observation. PMID:26609442

  12. Genome-wide linkage and association analysis identifies major gene loci for guttural pouch tympany in Arabian and German warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Julia; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary condition affecting foals in their first months of life. Complex segregation analyses in Arabian and German warmblood horses showed the involvement of a major gene as very likely. Genome-wide linkage and association analyses including a high density marker set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed to map the genomic region harbouring the potential major gene for GPT. A total of 85 Arabian and 373 German warmblood horses were genotyped on the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses showed genome-wide significance on horse chromosomes (ECA) 3 for German warmblood at 16-26 Mb and 34-55 Mb and for Arabian on ECA15 at 64-65 Mb. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed the linked regions for both breeds. In Arabian, genome-wide association was detected at 64 Mb within the region with the highest linkage peak on ECA15. For German warmblood, signals for genome-wide association were close to the peak region of linkage at 52 Mb on ECA3. The odds ratio for the SNP with the highest genome-wide association was 0.12 for the Arabian. In conclusion, the refinement of the regions with the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip is an important step to unravel the responsible mutations for GPT.

  13. "Sequential" boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): a novel approach to BNCT for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Quintana, Jorge; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2011-04-01

    In the present study the therapeutic effect and potential toxicity of the novel "Sequential" boron neutron capture therapy (Seq-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer was evaluated in the hamster cheek pouch model at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with "Sequential" BNCT, i.e., BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (Seq-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (Seq-48h-BNCT) later. In an additional group of animals, BPA and GB-10 were administered concomitantly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT]. The single-application BNCT was to the same total physical tumor dose as the "Sequential" BNCT treatments. At 28 days post-treatment, Seq-24h-BNCT and Seq-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor responses of 95 ± 2% and 91 ± 3%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Overall response for the single treatment with (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75 ± 5%, significantly lower than for Seq-BNCT. Both Seq-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in the dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47 ± 12% and 60 ± 22% of the animals, respectively. No normal tissue toxicity was associated with tumor response for any of the protocols. "Sequential" BNCT enhanced tumor response without an increase in mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  14. Ligation of the ipsilateral common carotid artery and topical treatment for the prevention of epistaxis from guttural pouch mycosis in horses.

    PubMed

    Cousty, M; Tricaud, C; De Beauregard, T; Picandet, V; Bizon-Mercier, C; Tessier, C

    2016-01-09

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of ligation of the ipsilateral common carotid artery (CCA) combined with various antimycotic treatments for the prevention of epistaxis in horses with guttural pouch mycosis. For each case, ipsilateral ligation of the CCA was performed, followed by application of various topical medications under endoscopic guidance. Frequency and number of treatments, outcome and recurrence of haemorrhage were retrospectively recorded. Twenty-four horses were included. Topical medication was administered by detachment of the diphtheric membrane and spraying (n=16) or by intralesional injection directly in the plaques using a transendoscopic needle (n=8). Epistaxis recurred in five horses (20.8 per cent), causing death of four horses (16.6 per cent). The mean number of treatments was 6.3±4.0 (range 2-14) for all topical treatments. Ligation of the ipsilateral CCA and topical medication carries a fair prognosis for avoidance of recurrent episodes of epistaxis, but fatal haemorrhage can occur. Removal of the fungal plaque and topical treatment of the underlying lesion appeared to speed up resolution of the mycotic mucosal lesions. The described technique is a salvage procedure when financial or technical constraints prevent the use of transarterial catheter occlusion techniques.

  15. Long-term function of islets encapsulated in a re-designed alginate microcapsule construct in omentum pouches of immune-competent diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, Rajesh; McQuilling, John P; Sittadjody, Sivanandane; Jenkins, Randy; Bowden, Stephen; Orlando, Giuseppe; Farney, Alan C; Brey, Eric M; Opara, Emmanuel C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our study aim was to determine encapsulated islet graft viability in an omentum pouch and the effect of FGF-1 released from our redesigned alginate microcapsules on the function of the graft. Methods Isolated rat islets were encapsulated in an inner core made with 1.5% low-viscosity high-mannuronic acid (LVM) alginate followed by an external layer made with 1.25% low-viscosity high-guluronic acid (LVG) alginate with or without FGF-1, in microcapsules measuring 300 – 400 μm in diameter. The two alginate layers were separated by a perm-selective membrane made with 0.1 % Poly-L-Ornithine (PLO), and the inner LVM core was partially chelated using 55 mM sodium citrate for 2 min. Results A marginal mass of encapsulated islet allografts (~2000 islets/kg) in Streptozotocin-diabetic Lewis rats caused significant reduction in blood glucose levels similar to the effect observed with encapsulated islet isografts. Transplantation of allo-islets co-encapsulated with FGF-1 did not result in better glycemic control, but induced greater body weight maintenance in transplant recipients compared to those that received only allo-islets. Histological examination of the retrieved tissue demonstrated morphologically and functionally intact islets in the microcapsules, with no signs of fibrosis. Conclusion We conclude that the omentum is a viable site for encapsulated islet transplantation. PMID:24681880

  16. Tumor suppressor p16INK4A/Cdkn2a alterations in 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junan; Warner, Blake; Casto, Bruce C.; Knobloch, Thomas J.; Weghorst, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of p16INK4A/CDKN2A genetic alterations in human oral cancers indicates that the p16 gene could be a potent and appropriate target for novel intervention. Chemically induced hamster cheek pouch (HCP) tumors are highly similar to human oral cancers in both histology and genetics and may be a good choice as a surrogate model for human oral cancers. Nevertheless, little is known about the genetic events in the p16 gene in the HCP tumor model. The purpose of this study was to evaluate chemically induced HCP tumor specimens for potential inactivating p16 alterations. HCP tumors were induced with 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), and DNA extracted from 34 such specimens were analyzed for homozygous/hemizygous deletions, aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands, and point mutations using real-time multiplex PCR, methylation-specific PCR, and direct sequencing/cold single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), respectively. Homozygous deletions, hemizygous deletions, aberrant methylation of 5’-CpG islands, and point mutation were identified in 11, 4, 9, and 1 of 34 specimens, respectively. While the overall incidence of p16 alterations was 70.6% (24 of 34 specimens), the majority of inactivating events (67.6%) stemmed from deletion or methylation, which is consistent with the observations that in human oral SCC, the significant p16-inactivating events have been reported to be deletion and methylation. Our results strongly support the use of DMBA-induced HCP tumor model in evaluating novel p16-targeted therapy and prevention of human oral SCC. PMID:18247379

  17. Comparison of brush and biopsy sampling methods of the ileal pouch for assessment of mucosa-associated microbiota of human subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucosal biopsy is the most common sampling technique used to assess microbial communities associated with the intestinal mucosa. Biopsies disrupt the epithelium and can be associated with complications such as bleeding. Biopsies sample a limited area of the mucosa, which can lead to potential sampling bias. In contrast to the mucosal biopsy, the mucosal brush technique is less invasive and provides greater mucosal coverage, and if it can provide equivalent microbial community data, it would be preferable to mucosal biopsies. Results We compared microbial samples collected from the intestinal mucosa using either a cytology brush or mucosal biopsy forceps. We collected paired samples from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who had previously undergone colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA), and profiled the microbial communities of the samples by sequencing V4-V6 or V4-V5 16S rRNA-encoding gene amplicons. Comparisons of 177 taxa in 16 brush-biopsy sample pairs had a mean R2 of 0.94. We found no taxa that varied significantly between the brush and biopsy samples after adjusting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate ≤0.05). We also tested the reproducibility of DNA amplification and sequencing in 25 replicate pairs and found negligible variation (mean R2 = 0.99). A qPCR analysis of the two methods showed that the relative yields of bacterial DNA to human DNA were several-fold higher in the brush samples than in the biopsies. Conclusions Mucosal brushing is preferred to mucosal biopsy for sampling the epithelial-associated microbiota. Although both techniques provide similar assessments of the microbial community composition, the brush sampling method has relatively more bacterial to host DNA, covers a larger surface area, and is less traumatic to the epithelium than the mucosal biopsy. PMID:24529162

  18. The effects of packaging method (vacuum pouch vs. plastic tray) on spoilage in a cook-chill pork-based dish kept under refrigeration.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Pedro; Garrido, María Dolores; Bañón, Sancho

    2010-03-01

    The effects of two packaging methods on the spoilage of a cook-chill pork-based dish kept under refrigeration were studied. Raw pork cuts and pre-cooked tomato sauce were packed under vacuum "sous vide" in polyamide-polypropylene pouches (SV) or into translucent polypropylene trays under modified atmosphere (80% N(2)+20% CO(2)) and sealed with a top film (PT). Samples were cooked inside the pack at an oven temperature/time of 70 degrees C/7h, chilled at 3 degrees C and stored at 2 degrees C for up to 90days. Microbial (psychrotrophs, lactic-acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts), physical-chemical (pH, water activity and total acidity) and sensory (colour, odour, flavour, texture and acceptance) parameters were determined. Heat penetration was faster in SV (2 degrees C/min) than in PT (1 degrees C/min) (core temperature). Both packaging methods were equally effective in protecting against microbial spoilage for 90 day at 2 degrees C. Minor counts were only detected for lactic-acid bacteria and anaerobic psychrotrophs in SV. No Enterobacteriaceae growth was found. Slight differences between SV and PT in pH and total acidity were observed. SV and PT had similar effects on the sensory preservation of the dishes. A gradual loss of acceptance of the cooked pork and tomato sauce was observed. Rancid flavour in PT and warmed-over-flavour in SV were noted in the final stages of storage. According to acceptance scores, the shelf-life of both SV and PT was 56 days at 2 degrees C. Both packaging methods can be used to manufacture sous vide meat-based dishes subsequently stored under refrigeration for catering use.

  19. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21{sup ras}, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-{kappa}B pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-{kappa}B, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-{kappa}B DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-{kappa}B, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  20. Effect of aspirin, paracetamol and their nitric oxide donating derivatives on exudate cytokine and PGE2 production in zymosan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Mamuk, Soner; Melli, Mehmet

    2007-04-30

    Effects of different doses of aspirin, compared to equimolar doses of nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin (NCX 4016), and of a single dose of paracetamol, compared to an equimolar dose of NO-donating paracetamol (NCX 701) were investigated in acute zymosan-induced air pouch inflammation in rats. Treatments were administered by orogastric route, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in the exudates were analysed 4 h after zymosan injection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Aspirin, at 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg doses, increased IL-1beta levels in exudates, however, only the highest dose lead to a significant increase when compared to control, whereas a significant increase in TNF-alpha level was observed at all doses tested. NCX 4016, at equimolar doses for aspirin, i.e., 18.6, 55.8 and 186 mg/kg, respectively, did not cause any changes in exudate IL-1beta or TNF-alpha levels. These effects were significantly different, when aspirin was compared with the corresponding NCX 4016 group. Nevertheless, the ability of aspirin and NCX 4016 to inhibit PGE(2) synthesis in the exudate where comparable. Although paracetamol significantly increased exudate TNF-alpha level compared to the control group and NCX 701 group, neither paracetamol, nor NCX701 treatments changed the levels of exudate IL-1beta significantly. As expected, paracetamol and NCX 701 showed poor PGE(2) inhibition. At high doses, aspirin and NCX 4016 decreased the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the exudate. However, this inhibition was not significantly different from the control group. Paracetamol and NO-paracetamol did not cause any change in the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in exudate. These results indicated that aspirin and NCX 4016 possessed different effects on cytokine production or release, despite the fact that both drugs inhibited the synthesis of PGE(2) in a similar way. Unlike paracetamol, which increased exudate