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Sample records for retrieval knowledge center

  1. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  2. Object-Centered Knowledge Representation and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panyr, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    Discusses object-centered knowledge representation and information retrieval. Highlights include semantic networks; frames; predicative (declarative) and associative knowledge; cluster analysis; creation of subconcepts and superconcepts; automatic classification; hierarchies and pseudohierarchies; graph theory; term classification; clustering of…

  3. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River

  4. THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-12-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same

  5. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  6. Representation of Legal Knowledge for Conceptual Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George R.; deBessonet, Cary G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes traditional legal information retrieval systems--Juris, Lexis, Westlaw--and several new rule-based, knowledge-based, legal knowledge reasoning, and analytical legal information systems--Waterman and Peterson's Legal Decisionmaking System, Hafner's Legal Information Retrieval System, McCarty's TAXMAN, and the deBessonet representation of…

  7. Knowledge Retrieval through Virtual Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammelgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) manages knowledge retrieval by employees when they need to access documents written by colleagues in geographically distant units. CSC's establishment of virtual communities of practice facilitates the coordination of knowledge, and minimises contextual gaps between senders and…

  8. Introduction and Overview: Visualization, Retrieval, and Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark; Lunin, Lois F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes this perspectives issue that was designed to provide an historical background to visualization in information retrieval. Topics include knowledge, digital technology, the first visual interface to a collection at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), theoretical foundations, and applications. (LRW)

  9. Dynamic neural architecture for social knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Collins, Jessica A; Koski, Jessica; Nugiel, Tehila; Metoki, Athanasia; Olson, Ingrid R

    2017-03-13

    Social behavior is often shaped by the rich storehouse of biographical information that we hold for other people. In our daily life, we rapidly and flexibly retrieve a host of biographical details about individuals in our social network, which often guide our decisions as we navigate complex social interactions. Even abstract traits associated with an individual, such as their political affiliation, can cue a rich cascade of person-specific knowledge. Here, we asked whether the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) serves as a hub for a distributed neural circuit that represents person knowledge. Fifty participants across two studies learned biographical information about fictitious people in a 2-d training paradigm. On day 3, they retrieved this biographical information while undergoing an fMRI scan. A series of multivariate and connectivity analyses suggest that the ATL stores abstract person identity representations. Moreover, this region coordinates interactions with a distributed network to support the flexible retrieval of person attributes. Together, our results suggest that the ATL is a central hub for representing and retrieving person knowledge.

  10. Knowledge-mediated retrieval of laboratory observations.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C.; Goldberg, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    Intelligent medical applications including agents, clinical decision support systems, and expert systems can benefit from components that expose the meanings of medical concepts. We have endeavored to create an ontology for laboratory observations and to make the ontology accessible in a distributed environment through a knowledge mediator offering several services. To date we have created two such services, one service to mediate the retrieval of laboratory observations and an auxiliary service to facilitate the mapping of units of measure to LOINC property-types. We report progress and insights on the development of our ontology and related knowledge mediator. Images Figure 3 PMID:10566472

  11. The Creation of New Knowledge by Information Retrieval and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previous work on producing knowledge by the use of information retrieval or classification schemes, and describes techniques by which hidden knowledge may be retrieved, i.e., serendipity in browsing and use of appropriate search strategies. Possible future methods based on relational indexing or artificial intelligence are also explored.…

  12. Mining knowledge from corpora: an application to retrieval and indexing.

    PubMed

    Soualmia, Lina F; Dahamna, Badisse; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2008-01-01

    The present work aims at discovering new associations between medical concepts to be exploited as input in retrieval and indexing. Association rules method is applied to documents. The process is carried out on three major document categories referring to e-health information consumers: health professionals, students and lay people. Association rules evaluation is founded on statistical measures combined with domain knowledge. Association rules represent existing relations between medical concepts (60.62%) and new knowledge (54.21%). Based on observations, 463 expert rules are defined by medical librarians for retrieval and indexing. Association rules bear out existing relations, produce new knowledge and support users and indexers in document retrieval and indexing.

  13. An Ebola virus-centered knowledge base

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Maulik R.; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), of the family Filoviridae viruses, is a NIAID category A, lethal human pathogen. It is responsible for causing Ebola virus disease (EVD) that is a severe hemorrhagic fever and has a cumulative death rate of 41% in the ongoing epidemic in West Africa. There is an ever-increasing need to consolidate and make available all the knowledge that we possess on EBOV, even if it is conflicting or incomplete. This would enable biomedical researchers to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and help develop tools for efficient diagnosis and effective treatment. In this article, we present our approach for the development of an Ebola virus-centered Knowledge Base (Ebola-KB) using Linked Data and Semantic Web Technologies. We retrieve and aggregate knowledge from several open data sources, web services and biomedical ontologies. This knowledge is transformed to RDF, linked to the Bio2RDF datasets and made available through a SPARQL 1.1 Endpoint. Ebola-KB can also be explored using an interactive Dashboard visualizing the different perspectives of this integrated knowledge. We showcase how different competency questions, asked by domain users researching the druggability of EBOV, can be formulated as SPARQL Queries or answered using the Ebola-KB Dashboard. Database URL: http://ebola.semanticscience.org. PMID:26055098

  14. An Ebola virus-centered knowledge base.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Maulik R; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), of the family Filoviridae viruses, is a NIAID category A, lethal human pathogen. It is responsible for causing Ebola virus disease (EVD) that is a severe hemorrhagic fever and has a cumulative death rate of 41% in the ongoing epidemic in West Africa. There is an ever-increasing need to consolidate and make available all the knowledge that we possess on EBOV, even if it is conflicting or incomplete. This would enable biomedical researchers to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and help develop tools for efficient diagnosis and effective treatment. In this article, we present our approach for the development of an Ebola virus-centered Knowledge Base (Ebola-KB) using Linked Data and Semantic Web Technologies. We retrieve and aggregate knowledge from several open data sources, web services and biomedical ontologies. This knowledge is transformed to RDF, linked to the Bio2RDF datasets and made available through a SPARQL 1.1 Endpoint. Ebola-KB can also be explored using an interactive Dashboard visualizing the different perspectives of this integrated knowledge. We showcase how different competency questions, asked by domain users researching the druggability of EBOV, can be formulated as SPARQL Queries or answered using the Ebola-KB Dashboard.

  15. Conventional and Knowledge-Based Information Retrieval with Prolog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, William; Paz, Noemi

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of PROLOG to program knowledge-based information retrieval systems, in which the knowledge contained in a document is translated into machine processable logic. Several examples of the resulting search process, and the program rules supporting the process, are given. (10 references) (CLB)

  16. Knowledge Representation and Retrieval for Natural Language Processing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    AD-A132 524 KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION AND RETRIEVAL FOR NATURAL 1/1 LANGUAGE PROCESSING(U) ROCHESTER UNIV NY DEPT OF COMPUTER SCIEMCE A U FRISCH ET AL...retriever must have certain properties. We now examine these more closely from the new viewpoint. The first requirement is derived from the...incomplete. The important question remains open: Is this rewriting technique complete for our class of theories? The new set of sentences does not need to be

  17. Retrieval of Knowledge through Algorithmic Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    regulatory requirements. It has been given no primary distribution other than to DTIC and will be available only through DTIC or the National Technical...Effective querying of the system in the latter case requires a careful structuring of the user’s information requirements, the absence of which can lead...intuitively divine an estimate that seems reasonable in light of whatever knowledge comes to mind. This wholistic approach to estimation relies

  18. Automatic retrieval of bone fracture knowledge using natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew S; Maley, Joan; Biswal, Sandip

    2013-08-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) techniques to extract data from unstructured text into formal computer representations are valuable for creating robust, scalable methods to mine data in medical documents and radiology reports. As voice recognition (VR) becomes more prevalent in radiology practice, there is opportunity for implementing NLP in real time for decision-support applications such as context-aware information retrieval. For example, as the radiologist dictates a report, an NLP algorithm can extract concepts from the text and retrieve relevant classification or diagnosis criteria or calculate disease probability. NLP can work in parallel with VR to potentially facilitate evidence-based reporting (for example, automatically retrieving the Bosniak classification when the radiologist describes a kidney cyst). For these reasons, we developed and validated an NLP system which extracts fracture and anatomy concepts from unstructured text and retrieves relevant bone fracture knowledge. We implement our NLP in an HTML5 web application to demonstrate a proof-of-concept feedback NLP system which retrieves bone fracture knowledge in real time.

  19. Document Retrieval Using A Fuzzy Knowledge-Based System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Viswanath; Biswas, Gautam; Bezdek, James C.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a prototype document retrieval system using a knowledge-based systems approach. Both the domain-specific knowledge base and the inferencing schemes are based on a fuzzy set theoretic framework. A query in natural language represents a request to retrieve a relevant subset of documents from a document base. Such a query, which can include both fuzzy terms and fuzzy relational operators, is converted into an unambiguous intermediate form by a natural language interface. Concepts that describe domain topics and the relationships between concepts, such as the synonym relation and the implication relation between a general concept and more specific concepts, have been captured in a knowledge base. The knowledge base enables the system to emulate the reasoning process followed by an expert, such as a librarian, in understanding and reformulating user queries. The retrieval mechanism processes the query in two steps. First it produces a pruned list of documents pertinent to the query. Second, it uses an evidence combination scheme to compute a degree of support between the query and individual documents produced in step one. The front-end component of the system then presents a set of document citations to the user in ranked order as an answer to the information request.

  20. Knowledge Acquisition of Generic Queries for Information Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Yoon-Ho; Johnson, Stephen B.; Cimino, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies have identified clinical questions posed by health care professionals to understand the nature of information needs during clinical practice. To support access to digital information sources, it is necessary to integrate the information needs with a computer system. We have developed a conceptual guidance approach in information retrieval, based on a knowledge base that contains the patterns of information needs. The knowledge base uses a formal representation of clinical questions based on the UMLS knowledge sources, called the Generic Query model. To improve the coverage of the knowledge base, we investigated a method for extracting plausible clinical questions from the medical literature. This poster presents the Generic Query model, shows how it is used to represent the patterns of clinical questions, and describes the framework used to extract knowledge from the medical literature.

  1. The impact of psychosocial stress on conceptual knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Merz, Christian J; Dietsch, Florian; Schneider, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The acquisition of conceptual knowledge in scientific domains is among the central aims of school instruction because this semantic declarative knowledge helps individuals make interferences and explain complex phenomena. Recent research shows that naïve concepts acquired during childhood persist in long-term memory long after learning the scientifically correct concepts in school. In this study, we investigated the effects of stress on the retrieval of these conceptual representations. To this end, 40 healthy men were randomly assigned to either psychosocial stress or a control condition and evaluated, as quickly and accurately as possible, statements that were compatible with scientific concepts or incompatible with those concepts. Some of these statements were true and some were false. Incompatible statements in this case are statements which are in line with adults' scientific concepts, but not with children's naïve theories. In contrast, compatible statements are in line with both. Stress induction was successful as evidenced by increases in blood pressure and cortisol concentrations in the stress group compared to the control group. Responses were delayed and less accurate for incompatible compared to compatible statements. Psychosocial stress had no main effect on retrieval, but abolished reaction time differences on false- vs. true-incompatible statements. This effect was mirrored in correlations between individuals' cortisol increases and reaction times. These results suggest that stress, as embodied by increases in cortisol concentrations, interferes with the retrieval of conceptual knowledge. They help to better understand conceptual knowledge retrieval in real-life situations such as examinations or problem solving in the workplace.

  2. Modes of knowledge acquisition and retrieval in artificial grammar learning.

    PubMed

    Poznanski, Yael; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to conceptualize artificial grammar learning (AGL) in terms of two orthogonal dimensions--the mode of knowledge acquisition and the mode of knowledge retrieval--as was done by Perlman and Tzelgov (2006) for sequence learning. Experiment 1 was carried out to validate our experimental task; Experiments 2-4 tested, respectively, performance in the intentional, incidental, and automatic retrieval modes, for each of the three modes of acquisition. Furthermore, signal detection theory (SDT) was used as an analytic tool, consistent with our assumption that the processing of legality-relevant information involves decisions along a continuous dimension of fluency. The results presented support the analysis of AGL in terms of the proposed dimensions. They also indicate that knowledge acquired during training may include many aspects of the presented stimuli (whole strings, relations among elements, etc.). The contribution of the various components to performance depends on both the specific instruction in the acquisition phase and the requirements of the retrieval task.

  3. Knowledge-Based Query Construction Using the CDSS Knowledge Base for Efficient Evidence Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Jamil; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Finding appropriate evidence to support clinical practices is always challenging, and the construction of a query to retrieve such evidence is a fundamental step. Typically, evidence is found using manual or semi-automatic methods, which are time-consuming and sometimes make it difficult to construct knowledge-based complex queries. To overcome the difficulty in constructing knowledge-based complex queries, we utilized the knowledge base (KB) of the clinical decision support system (CDSS), which has the potential to provide sufficient contextual information. To automatically construct knowledge-based complex queries, we designed methods to parse rule structure in KB of CDSS in order to determine an executable path and extract the terms by parsing the control structures and logic connectives used in the logic. The automatically constructed knowledge-based complex queries were executed on the PubMed search service to evaluate the results on the reduction of retrieved citations with high relevance. The average number of citations was reduced from 56,249 citations to 330 citations with the knowledge-based query construction approach, and relevance increased from 1 term to 6 terms on average. The ability to automatically retrieve relevant evidence maximizes efficiency for clinicians in terms of time, based on feedback collected from clinicians. This approach is generally useful in evidence-based medicine, especially in ambient assisted living environments where automation is highly important. PMID:26343669

  4. Dissipation of 'dark energy' by cortex in knowledge retrieval.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The center for expanded data annotation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Musen, Mark A; Bean, Carol A; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Dumontier, Michel; Durante, Kim A; Gevaert, Olivier; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Khatri, Purvesh; Kleinstein, Steven H; O'Connor, Martin J; Pouliot, Yannick; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Wiser, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    The Center for Expanded Data Annotation and Retrieval is studying the creation of comprehensive and expressive metadata for biomedical datasets to facilitate data discovery, data interpretation, and data reuse. We take advantage of emerging community-based standard templates for describing different kinds of biomedical datasets, and we investigate the use of computational techniques to help investigators to assemble templates and to fill in their values. We are creating a repository of metadata from which we plan to identify metadata patterns that will drive predictive data entry when filling in metadata templates. The metadata repository not only will capture annotations specified when experimental datasets are initially created, but also will incorporate links to the published literature, including secondary analyses and possible refinements or retractions of experimental interpretations. By working initially with the Human Immunology Project Consortium and the developers of the ImmPort data repository, we are developing and evaluating an end-to-end solution to the problems of metadata authoring and management that will generalize to other data-management environments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The center for expanded data annotation and retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Carol A; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Dumontier, Michel; Durante, Kim A; Gevaert, Olivier; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Khatri, Purvesh; Kleinstein, Steven H; O’Connor, Martin J; Pouliot, Yannick; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Wiser, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Expanded Data Annotation and Retrieval is studying the creation of comprehensive and expressive metadata for biomedical datasets to facilitate data discovery, data interpretation, and data reuse. We take advantage of emerging community-based standard templates for describing different kinds of biomedical datasets, and we investigate the use of computational techniques to help investigators to assemble templates and to fill in their values. We are creating a repository of metadata from which we plan to identify metadata patterns that will drive predictive data entry when filling in metadata templates. The metadata repository not only will capture annotations specified when experimental datasets are initially created, but also will incorporate links to the published literature, including secondary analyses and possible refinements or retractions of experimental interpretations. By working initially with the Human Immunology Project Consortium and the developers of the ImmPort data repository, we are developing and evaluating an end-to-end solution to the problems of metadata authoring and management that will generalize to other data-management environments. PMID:26112029

  7. A single center experience with retrievable IVC filters.

    PubMed

    Renno, Anas; Khateeb, Faisal; Kazan, Viviane; Qu, Weikai; Gollapudi, Anurekha; Aplin, Brett; Abbas, Jihad; Zelenock, Gerald; Nazzal, Munier

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate retrievable IVC filters in our institution and assess their retrieval following a well-structured follow up program. Retrospective cohort study. The medical records of patients implanted with retrievable IVC filters were reviewed. All retrievable filter insertions between July 2007 and August 2011 at our institution were reviewed. Data was analyzed for age, gender, indication, complications, retrieval rate, and brand of filter inserted. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software v19. Chi-square was used to compare discrete data and t-test for continuous data. P < 0.05 was significant. A total of 484 patients were reviewed of which 258 (53.1%) had a complete medical record. And 96 (37.2%) filters were placed as permanent at the time of insertion. An additional 40 (15.5%) filters were converted to permanent (total permanent filters 136; 52.7%). Death was reported in 26 (10%) patients and 96 (37.2%) out of the remaining 232 patients presented for potential retrieval. Also, 73 (28.2%) had an attempt to retrieve the filters, 69 (94.5%) were successful and 4 (5.4%) failed to retrieve. The remaining 23 (8.9%) patients declined retrieval. Filters studied include Celect (38%), Bard (31.4%), Option (26.2%), Tulip (4.1%), and Recovery (0.2%). Bard was more commonly used as a retrievable filter (80.9%). Retrieval on the first attempt was 90.4% (n = 66) successful. Of the remaining seven filters, three were successfully retrieved on a second attempt, and four failed to retrieve due to filter tilt. The success rates of retrieval for Celect and Tulip were significantly lower than for Bard (p = 0.04 and 0.023, respectively). Our study showed that a variety of IVC filters can be retrieved successfully with minimal complication rates. In more than half of our patients, IVC filters were used as permanent. Failure of retrieval was most frequently due to filter tilting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Increasing levels of assistance in refinement of knowledge-based retrieval systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Kedar, Smadar; Pell, Barney

    1994-01-01

    The task of incrementally acquiring and refining the knowledge and algorithms of a knowledge-based system in order to improve its performance over time is discussed. In particular, the design of DE-KART, a tool whose goal is to provide increasing levels of assistance in acquiring and refining indexing and retrieval knowledge for a knowledge-based retrieval system, is presented. DE-KART starts with knowledge that was entered manually, and increases its level of assistance in acquiring and refining that knowledge, both in terms of the increased level of automation in interacting with users, and in terms of the increased generality of the knowledge. DE-KART is at the intersection of machine learning and knowledge acquisition: it is a first step towards a system which moves along a continuum from interactive knowledge acquisition to increasingly automated machine learning as it acquires more knowledge and experience.

  9. The influence of prior knowledge on the retrieval-directed function of note taking in prior knowledge activation.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, Sandra A J; Kester, Liesbeth; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; Broers, Nick J

    2011-06-01

    Prior knowledge activation facilitates learning. Note taking during prior knowledge activation (i.e., note taking directed at retrieving information from memory) might facilitate the activation process by enabling learners to build an external representation of their prior knowledge. However, taking notes might be less effective in supporting prior knowledge activation if available prior knowledge is limited. This study investigates the effects of the retrieval-directed function of note taking depending on learners' level of prior knowledge. It is hypothesized that the effectiveness of note taking is influenced by the amount of prior knowledge learners already possess. Sixty-one high school students participated in this study. A prior knowledge test was used to ascertain differences in level of prior knowledge and assign participants to a low or a high prior knowledge group. A 2×2 factorial design was used to investigate the effects of note taking during prior knowledge activation (yes, no) depending on learners' level of prior knowledge (low, high) on mental effort, performance, and mental efficiency. Note taking during prior knowledge activation lowered mental effort and increased mental efficiency for high prior knowledge learners. For low prior knowledge learners, note taking had the opposite effect on mental effort and mental efficiency. The effects of the retrieval-directed function of note taking are influenced by learners' level of prior knowledge. Learners with high prior knowledge benefit from taking notes while activating prior knowledge, whereas note taking has no beneficial effects for learners with limited prior knowledge. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  10. The Development and Implementation of a Management Information System for an Education Information Retrieval Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegi, John

    A management information system was developed for the Contra Costa County, California, Department of Education's Educational Information Retrieval Center. The system was designed to determine needed operational changes, to measure the effects of these changes, to monitor the center's operation, and to obtain information for dissemination. Data…

  11. Alternative ways for knowledge collection, indexing and robust language retrieval.

    PubMed

    Baud, R H; Lovis, C; Rassinoux, A M; Scherrer, J R

    1998-11-01

    Definitions are provided of the key entities in knowledge representation for Natural Language Processing (NLP). Starting from the words, which are the natural components of any sentence, both the role of expressions and the decomposition of words into their parts are emphasized. This leads to the notion of concepts, which are either primitive or composite depending on the model where they are created. The problem of finding the most adequate degree of granularity for a concept is studied. From this reflection on basic Natural Language Processing components, four categories of linguistic knowledge are recognized, that are considered to be the building blocks of a Medical Linguistic Knowledge Base (MLKB). Following on the tracks of a recent experience in building a natural language-based patient encoding browser, a robust method for conceptual indexing and query of medical texts is presented with particular attention to the scheme of knowledge representation.

  12. A Model of Knowledge Based Information Retrieval with Hierarchical Concept Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Jin H.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a model of knowledge-based information retrieval (KBIR) that is based on a hierarchical concept graph (HCG) which shows relationships between index terms and constitutes a hierarchical thesaurus as a knowledge base. Conceptual distance between a query and an object is discussed and the use of Boolean operators is described. (25…

  13. Retrieval Enhances Route Knowledge Acquisition, but Only When Movement Errors Are Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Carpenter, Shana K.; Sjolund, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the "testing effect" have shown that retrieval significantly improves learning. However, most of these studies have been restricted to simple types of declarative verbal knowledge. Five experiments were designed to explore whether testing improves acquisition of route knowledge, which has a procedural component consisting of…

  14. Retrieval Enhances Route Knowledge Acquisition, but Only When Movement Errors Are Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Carpenter, Shana K.; Sjolund, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the "testing effect" have shown that retrieval significantly improves learning. However, most of these studies have been restricted to simple types of declarative verbal knowledge. Five experiments were designed to explore whether testing improves acquisition of route knowledge, which has a procedural component consisting of…

  15. Towards knowledge-based retrieval of medical images. The role of semantic indexing, image content representation and knowledge-based retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A

    1998-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly image-intensive. The central importance of imaging technologies such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in clinical decision making, combined with the trend to store many "traditional" clinical images such as conventional radiographs, microscopic pathology and dermatology images in digital format present both challenges and an opportunities for the designers of clinical information systems. The emergence of Multimedia Electronic Medical Record Systems (MEMRS), architectures that integrate medical images with text-based clinical data, will further hasten this trend. The development of these systems, storing a large and diverse set of medical images, suggests that in the future MEMRS will become important digital libraries supporting patient care, research and education. The representation and retrieval of clinical images within these systems is problematic as conventional database architectures and information retrieval models have, until recently, focused largely on text-based data. Medical imaging data differs in many ways from text-based medical data but perhaps the most important difference is that the information contained within imaging data is fundamentally knowledge-based. New representational and retrieval models for clinical images will be required to address this issue. Within the Image Engine multimedia medical record system project at the University of Pittsburgh we are evolving an approach to representation and retrieval of medical images which combines semantic indexing using the UMLS Metathesuarus, image content-based representation and knowledge-based image analysis.

  16. Towards knowledge-based retrieval of medical images. The role of semantic indexing, image content representation and knowledge-based retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, H. J.; Antipov, I.; Hersh, W.; Smith, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly image-intensive. The central importance of imaging technologies such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in clinical decision making, combined with the trend to store many "traditional" clinical images such as conventional radiographs, microscopic pathology and dermatology images in digital format present both challenges and an opportunities for the designers of clinical information systems. The emergence of Multimedia Electronic Medical Record Systems (MEMRS), architectures that integrate medical images with text-based clinical data, will further hasten this trend. The development of these systems, storing a large and diverse set of medical images, suggests that in the future MEMRS will become important digital libraries supporting patient care, research and education. The representation and retrieval of clinical images within these systems is problematic as conventional database architectures and information retrieval models have, until recently, focused largely on text-based data. Medical imaging data differs in many ways from text-based medical data but perhaps the most important difference is that the information contained within imaging data is fundamentally knowledge-based. New representational and retrieval models for clinical images will be required to address this issue. Within the Image Engine multimedia medical record system project at the University of Pittsburgh we are evolving an approach to representation and retrieval of medical images which combines semantic indexing using the UMLS Metathesuarus, image content-based representation and knowledge-based image analysis. PMID:9929345

  17. Recent study, but not retrieval, of knowledge protects against learning errors.

    PubMed

    Mullet, Hillary G; Umanath, Sharda; Marsh, Elizabeth J

    2014-11-01

    Surprisingly, people incorporate errors into their knowledge bases even when they have the correct knowledge stored in memory (e.g., Fazio, Barber, Rajaram, Ornstein, & Marsh, 2013). We examined whether heightening the accessibility of correct knowledge would protect people from later reproducing misleading information that they encountered in fictional stories. In Experiment 1, participants studied a series of target general knowledge questions and their correct answers either a few minutes (high accessibility of knowledge) or 1 week (low accessibility of knowledge) before exposure to misleading story references. In Experiments 2a and 2b, participants instead retrieved the answers to the target general knowledge questions either a few minutes or 1 week before the rest of the experiment. Reading the relevant knowledge directly before the story-reading phase protected against reproduction of the misleading story answers on a later general knowledge test, but retrieving that same correct information did not. Retrieving stored knowledge from memory might actually enhance the encoding of relevant misinformation.

  18. Beyond the Keyword Barrier: Knowledge-Based Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes the inability of traditional subject index terms to represent relational information among concepts, and the development of frame based knowledge representation methods that provide relational semantic representations of documents and user queries. The discussion covers research in user interfaces and automatic document classifications,…

  19. Distributed Knowledge Base Systems for Diagnosis and Information Retrieval.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    progress came in the area of diagnostic reasoning and in the conceptual foundations of knowledge-based systems in general. We also developed an approach to a...have been experimenting with the application of this tool to the design and implementation of expert systems in the area of mechanical systems, since...itself or in the problem solving open area of research in the field, but the intuition is that processes that operate on it. Thus the range of

  20. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California

    SciTech Connect

    Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

  1. Knowledge of Senior Center Activities among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krout, John A.

    In the past few decades, senior centers have developed at an exponential rate. To investigate elderly citizens' knowledge of senior center activities and services, 250 white older adults (125 center users and 125 nonusers) from a small urban community were personally interviewed about the services and activities provided by their local senior…

  2. Intentional retrieval suppression can conceal guilty knowledge in ERP memory detection tests☆

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Zara M.; Anderson, Michael C.; Buda, Marie; Simons, Jon S.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Brain-activity markers of guilty knowledge have been promoted as accurate and reliable measures for establishing criminal culpability. Tests based on these markers interpret the presence or absence of memory-related neural activity as diagnostic of whether or not incriminating information is stored in a suspect's brain. This conclusion critically relies on the untested assumption that reminders of a crime uncontrollably elicit memory-related brain activity. However, recent research indicates that, in some circumstances, humans can control whether they remember a previous experience by intentionally suppressing retrieval. We examined whether people could use retrieval suppression to conceal neural evidence of incriminating memories as indexed by Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). When people were motivated to suppress crime retrieval, their memory-related ERP effects were significantly decreased, allowing guilty individuals to evade detection. Our findings indicate that brain measures of guilty knowledge may be under criminals’ intentional control and place limits on their use in legal settings. PMID:23664804

  3. Development of the Defense Documentation Center Remote On-Line Retrieval System - Past, Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennertz, Richard K.

    The document highlights in nontechnical language the development of the Defense Documentation Center (DDC) Remote On-Line Retrieval System from its inception in 1967 to what is planned. It describes in detail the current operating system, equipment configuration and associated costs, user training and system evaluation and may be of value to other…

  4. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations.

  5. User-Centered Perspective of Information Retrieval Research and Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William

    1995-01-01

    Reviews information retrieval (IR) studies since 1986 from the user's perspective. Identifies two main approaches that advocate user-centered design theory: (1) the cognitive approach; and (2) the holistic approach. Also explores other approaches--systems thinking/action research and usability techniques that may have potential for IR research and…

  6. Testing of a Natural Language Retrieval System for a Full Text Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Lionel M.; Williamson, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    The Hepatitis Knowledge Base (text of prototype information system) was used for modifying and testing "A Navigator of Natural Language Organized (Textual) Data" (ANNOD), a retrieval system which combines probabilistic, linguistic, and empirical means to rank individual paragraphs of full text for similarity to natural language queries…

  7. Testing of a Natural Language Retrieval System for a Full Text Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Lionel M.; Williamson, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    The Hepatitis Knowledge Base (text of prototype information system) was used for modifying and testing "A Navigator of Natural Language Organized (Textual) Data" (ANNOD), a retrieval system which combines probabilistic, linguistic, and empirical means to rank individual paragraphs of full text for similarity to natural language queries…

  8. Bioenergy Science Center KnowledgeBase

    DOE Data Explorer

    Syed, M. H.; Karpinets, T. V.; Parang, M.; Leuze, M. R.; Park, B. H.; Hyatt, D.; Brown, S. D.; Moulton, S. Galloway, M.D.; Uberbacher, E. C.

    The challenge of converting cellulosic biomass to sugars is the dominant obstacle to cost effective production of biofuels in s capable of significant enough quantities to displace U. S. consumption of fossil transportation fuels. The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) tackles this challenge of biomass recalcitrance by closely linking (1) plant research to make cell walls easier to deconstruct, and (2) microbial research to develop multi-talented biocatalysts tailor-made to produce biofuels in a single step. [from the 2011 BESC factsheet] The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. The BESC Knowledgebase and its associated tools is a discovery platform for bioenergy research. It consists of a collection of metadata, data, and computational tools for data analysis, integration, comparison and visualization for plants and microbes in the center.The BESC Knowledgebase (KB) and BESC Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) enable bioenergy researchers to perform systemic research. [http://bobcat.ornl.gov/besc/index.jsp

  9. Terminology challenges implementing the HL7 context-aware knowledge retrieval ('Infobutton') standard.

    PubMed

    Strasberg, Howard R; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Cimino, James J

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care information needs are common and frequently unmet. One solution to this problem is the use of Infobuttons, which are context-sensitive links from electronic health records (EHR) to knowledge resources, sometimes involving an intermediate broker known as an Infobutton Manager. Health Level Seven (HL7) has developed the Context-Aware Knowledge Retrieval (Infobutton) standard to standardize the integration between EHR systems and knowledge resources. While the standard specifies a set of context attributes and standard terminologies, it leaves to knowledge resources the flexibility to decide how to use these attributes and terminologies to retrieve the most relevant content. This paper describes some of the challenges faced by knowledge resources in trying to locate the most relevant content based on the attribute values for a given Infobutton request. Various approaches to content retrieval are discussed, including the role of indexing with standardized codes, the role of text-based search engines together with their ranking algorithms, and the role of hybrid approaches. Knowledge resource developers must carefully consider business rules, heuristics, and precision/recall tradeoffs when implementing the HL7 Infobutton standard.

  10. JANE, A new information retrieval system for the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    SciTech Connect

    Trubey, D.K.

    1991-05-01

    A new information storage and retrieval system has been developed for the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to replace mainframe systems that have become obsolete. The database contains citations and abstracts of literature which were selected by RSIC analysts and indexed with terms from a controlled vocabulary. The database, begun in 1963, has been maintained continuously since that time. The new system, called JANE, incorporates automatic indexing techniques and on-line retrieval using the RSIC Data General Eclipse MV/4000 minicomputer, Automatic indexing and retrieval techniques based on fuzzy-set theory allow the presentation of results in order of Retrieval Status Value. The fuzzy-set membership function depends on term frequency in the titles and abstracts and on Term Discrimination Values which indicate the resolving power of the individual terms. These values are determined by the Cover Coefficient method. The use of a commercial database base to store and retrieve the indexing information permits rapid retrieval of the stored documents. Comparisons of the new and presently-used systems for actual searches of the literature indicate that it is practical to replace the mainframe systems with a minicomputer system similar to the present version of JANE. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  11. An overview of the National Space Science data Center Standard Information Retrieval System (SIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, A.; Blecher, S.; Verson, E. E.; King, M. L. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    A general overview is given of the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Standard Information Retrieval System. A description, in general terms, the information system that contains the data files and the software system that processes and manipulates the files maintained at the Data Center. Emphasis is placed on providing users with an overview of the capabilities and uses of the NSSDC Standard Information Retrieval System (SIRS). Examples given are taken from the files at the Data Center. Detailed information about NSSDC data files is documented in a set of File Users Guides, with one user's guide prepared for each file processed by SIRS. Detailed information about SIRS is presented in the SIRS Users Guide.

  12. Does this ring a bell? Music-cued retrieval of semantic knowledge and metamemory judgments.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Maya; Levy, Daniel A; Tibon, Roni; Reggev, Niv; Maril, Anat

    2012-11-01

    Failed knowledge recall attempts are sometimes accompanied by a strong feeling of imminent success, giving rise to a "tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) experience. Similar to successful retrieval (i.e., the Know state, K), a TOT commences with strong cue familiarity but involves only partial retrieval of related information. We sought to characterize the cognitive processes and temporal dynamics of these retrieval states and to extend the applicability of previous findings about TOT to the auditory modality. Participants heard 3-sec initial segments of popular songs and were asked to recall their names. EEG was recorded while participants indicated their retrieval state via button press. Stimulus-locked analyses revealed a significant early left fronto-central difference between TOT and K, at 300-550 msec postcue onset. Post hoc analysis revealed that, in this time window, TOT also differed from DK (Don't Know) responses, which themselves were similar to the K responses. This finding indicates that neural processes, which may reflect strategy selection, ease of semantic processing, familiarity-related processes, or conflict monitoring, are indicative of the fate of our knowledge judgments long before we actually execute them.

  13. From capturing nursing knowledge to retrieval of data from a data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Thoroddsen, Asta; Guðjónsdóttir, Hanna K; Guðjónsdóttir, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to capture nursing data and knowledge, represent it for use and re-use by retrieval from a data warehouse, which contains both clinical and financial hospital data. Today nurses at LUH use standardized nursing terminologies to document information related to patients and the nursing care in the EHR at all times. Pre-defined order sets for nursing care have been developed using best practice where available and tacit nursing knowledge has been captured and coded with standardized nursing terminologies and made explicit for dissemination in the EHR. All patient-nursing data is permanently stored in a data repository. Core nursing data elements have been selected for transfer and storage in the data warehouse and patient-nursing data are now captured, stored, can be related to other data elements from the warehouse and be retrieved for use and re-use.

  14. Aerosol optical depth retrieval in the Arctic region using MODIS based on prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Xue, Y.; de Leeuw, G.; Hou, T.; Guang, J.; Yang, L.; Li, Y.; Xu, H.; He, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic is especially vulnerable to the long-term transport of aerosols and other pollutants because aerosols can affect the albedo of the surface by deposition on snow and ice. However, aerosol observations for this area are sparse and hence there is considerable uncertainty in the knowledge on the properties of the Arctic aerosol. Arctic aerosol observations are needed to fill this gap because these are among the basic and most important parameters for researching the Arctic environment. Atmospheric remote sensing using satellites offers us an opportunity to describe the aerosol distribution in terms of both local, regional and global coverage. However, AOD retrieval over a bright surface remains a difficult task because it is hard to separate and explicitly describe the contribution of the observed signal reflected by the variable surface and back scattering by the semi-transparent aerosols, especially with a large solar or sensor zenith angle. In this paper, an approach using a synergetic approach with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data based on prior knowledge is presented. The detailed analysis of the model demonstrates that it is suitable for Arctic region AOD retrieval. Six AERONET stations at high latitude (Andenes, Barrow, Ittoqqortoormiit, OPAL, Thule, and Tiksi) were used for validation, and the correlation coefficient between retrieved AODs and AERONET AODs was 0.75 and the retrieval absolute error is approximately 0.1, while the relative error is 20% (at some stations with clear skies as low as 10% was found). Furthermore, the Russian wildfires that occurred in late July of 2010 and their effect on the Arctic environment is presented; Satellite retrieved AODs in the Arctic increased to 1.0 during 1 August and 15 August 2010, even 2.0, during the burning phase, and subsequently returned to normal values (lower than 0.1), which was fully in line with the AERONET observations. This indicates that the fire plumes were

  15. Knowledge-driven multidimensional indexing structure for biomedical media database retrieval.

    PubMed

    Scott, Grant; Shyu, Chi-Ren

    2007-05-01

    Today, biomedical media data are being generated at rates unimaginable only years ago. Content-based retrieval of biomedical media from large databases is becoming increasingly important to clinical, research, and educational communities. In this paper, we present the recently developed entropy balanced statistical (EBS) k-d tree and its applications to biomedical media, including a high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) lung image database and the first real-time protein tertiary structure search engine. Our index utilizes statistical properties inherent in large-scale biomedical media databases for efficient and accurate searches. By applying concepts from pattern recognition and information theory, the EBS k-d tree is built through top-down decision tree induction. Experimentation shows similarity searches against a protein structure database of 53 363 structures consistently execute in less than 8.14 ms for the top 100 most similar structures. Additionally, we have shown improved retrieval precision over adaptive and statistical k-d trees. Retrieval precision of the EBS k-d tree is 81.6% for content-based retrieval of HRCT lung images and 94.9% at 10% recall for protein structure similarity search. The EBS k-d tree has enormous potential for use in biomedical applications embedded with ground-truth knowledge and multidimensional signatures.

  16. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  17. Information Retrieval Center of the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services. Final Report, FY 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services, Boulder. Information Retrieval Center.

    The Information Retrieval Center of the Northern Colorado Educational Board of Cooperative Services (NCEBOCS) offers computer-and manually-produced information products to educators within a regional network. The Center searches the automated Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) data base to provide three products: Catalog of…

  18. Really Useful Knowledge: A Cultural Studies Agenda for Writing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marilyn M.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that writing centers have the essential function of critiquing institutions and creating knowledge about writing. Explains how this function has clear implications for what tutors should know and how they should be trained. Enlists Antonio Gramsci's theory of culture to analyze traditional composition teaching and research. (HB)

  19. Really Useful Knowledge: A Cultural Studies Agenda for Writing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marilyn M.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that writing centers have the essential function of critiquing institutions and creating knowledge about writing. Explains how this function has clear implications for what tutors should know and how they should be trained. Enlists Antonio Gramsci's theory of culture to analyze traditional composition teaching and research. (HB)

  20. Impaired retrieval of object-colour knowledge with preserved colour naming.

    PubMed

    Luzzatti, C; Davidoff, J

    1994-08-01

    Two cases (G.G. and A.V.) are described of cognitive impairment resulting from herpes simplex infection. Both cases demonstrated anomic disorders and impairments in drawing but only in G.G.'s drawings was there a reliable selective impairment for items from natural categories. Both cases, however, showed an impairment for the retrieval of knowledge concerning the colours of objects. The impairment has, in the past, been ascribed to interference from colour anomia; this was not so for the present cases. For G.G. and A.V., impairments in object-colour retrieval were related to errors in picture naming. More errors were associated with items that induced circumlocutions than to those that were correctly named. The impairment was also present for some items that were named correctly. The patients' impairments are discussed within a model in which object-colour knowledge is functionally situated between an object's shape description and its output phonology but on a separate route from other associated object knowledge.

  1. SYSTEMS MANUAL FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL LITERATURE COLLECTION AND REFERENCE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM OF THE CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES. EXPERIMENTAL RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS STUDIES, REPORT NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, RONALD R.; TAYLOR, ROBERT S.

    THE MANUAL DESCRIBES AND DOCUMENTS THE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM IN TERMS OF ITS TAPE AND DISK FILE PROGRAMS AND ITS SEARCH PROGRAMS AS USED BY THE LEHIGH CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES FOR SELECTED CURRENT LITERATURE OF THE INFORMATION SCIENCES, ABOUT 2500 DOCUMENT REFERENCES. THE SYSTEM IS PRESENTLY ON-LINE VIA TELETYPE AND CONVERSION IS IN PROCESS…

  2. SYSTEMS MANUAL FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL LITERATURE COLLECTION AND REFERENCE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM OF THE CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES. EXPERIMENTAL RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS STUDIES, REPORT NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, RONALD R.; TAYLOR, ROBERT S.

    THE MANUAL DESCRIBES AND DOCUMENTS THE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM IN TERMS OF ITS TAPE AND DISK FILE PROGRAMS AND ITS SEARCH PROGRAMS AS USED BY THE LEHIGH CENTER FOR THE INFORMATION SCIENCES FOR SELECTED CURRENT LITERATURE OF THE INFORMATION SCIENCES, ABOUT 2500 DOCUMENT REFERENCES. THE SYSTEM IS PRESENTLY ON-LINE VIA TELETYPE AND CONVERSION IS IN PROCESS…

  3. Human-centered design of a distributed knowledge management system.

    PubMed

    Rinkus, Susan; Walji, Muhammad; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A; Malin, Jane T; Turley, James P; Smith, Jack W; Zhang, Jiajie

    2005-02-01

    Many healthcare technology projects fail due to the lack of consideration of human issues, such as workflow, organizational change, and usability, during the design and implementation stages of a project's development process. Even when human issues are considered, the consideration is typically on designing better user interfaces. We argue that human-centered computing goes beyond a better user interface: it should include considerations of users, functions and tasks that are fundamental to human-centered computing. From this perspective, we integrated a previously developed human-centered methodology with a Project Design Lifecycle, and we applied this integration in the design of a complex distributed knowledge management system for the Biomedical Engineer (BME) domain in the Mission Control Center at NASA Johnson Space Center. We analyzed this complex system, identified its problems, generated systems requirements, and provided specifications of a replacement prototype for effective organizational memory and knowledge management. We demonstrated the value provided by our human-centered approach and described the unique properties, structures, and processes discovered using this methodology and how they contributed in the design of the prototype.

  4. Quantitative analysis of 4468 uroliths retrieved from farm animals, exotic species, and wildlife submitted to the Minnesota Urolith Center: 1981 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Carl A; Albasan, Hasan; Lulich, Jody P; Nwaokorie, Eugene; Koehler, Lori A; Ulrich, Lisa K

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the mineral composition of uroliths in various species of animals can help veterinarians predict the mineral composition of stones in vivo. This information is important because dissolution of existing uroliths, or minimizing further growth of uroliths in situ, is dependent on knowledge of the mineral composition of uroliths. With this objective in mind, this report summarizes the results of quantitative mineral analysis of uroliths retrieved from 4468 animals sent to the Minnesota Urolith Center. It also encompasses the most extensive database about uroliths from animals other than domesticated dogs and cats found in the literature.

  5. Dissipation of ‘dark energy’ by cortex in knowledge retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli.

  6. Dissipation of ‘dark energy’ by cortex in knowledge retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrodearrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli. PMID:23333569

  7. Multi-Standard Metadata Retrieval Framework at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, N. T.; Huang, T.; Armstrong, E. M.; Gangl, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    With the vast amount of Earth Science data available, providing the user community with high quality metadata to facilitate information retrieval and exchange is integral to scientific research. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) archives and distributes data products along with metadata pertinent to the physical state of the ocean. As one of the Earth Science data center for NASA, PO.DAAC is expected to work with multiple metadata standards. Since there is no single metadata standard that meets everyone's needs, a web-based framework has been designed and integrated as part of PO.DAAC's scalable Core Data System to enable users to quickly retrieve metadata in the format that they need. Currently, the framework supports the Open Search specification for data discovery, ISO 19115-2, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata standards, with new metadata standards still being added. In this talk we will present the architecture behind the framework that makes it possible to support various metadata standards as well as the challenges we encountered.

  8. Technical and financial feasibility of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval program at a level one trauma center.

    PubMed

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Leake, Samuel S; Sola, Cristina N; Sandhu, Harleen K; Albarado, Rondel; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Considering new guidelines for retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), we examine our initial experience after establishing a comprehensive filter removal program in our level 1 trauma center. We evaluated the technical and financial feasibility of this program and barriers to IVCF retrieval, including insurance status and costs, in trauma patients. Trauma patients receiving IVCFs from May 2011 to 2013 were consented and prospectively enrolled in the study program. Retrieval rates were assessed for the years before study initiation. Primary outcome was IVCF retrieval. Hospital financial data for retrieval were examined and univariate analysis performed. Hospital cost-to-charge and payment-to-charge ratios were assessed. Before study initiation from April 2009 to 2011, 66 IVCFs were placed in trauma patients with only 2 retrievals in 2 years. During the study period, 247 trauma patients had IVCF placement of which 111 (45%) were enrolled. The main reason for nonenrollment was lack of referral by the implanting team. Retrieval was attempted in 100 outpatients with success in 85 (85%). Patients enrolled in the program were more likely to have their filters removed (73% vs. 18%; odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-24.3; P < 0.001). Mean time from placement to attempt was 6.2 ± 4.0 months (range, 0.5-31.8). Of the total attempts, 29% were nonresource patients, 11% had Medicaid, and 60% had commercial insurance including Medicare patients. Chances of successful retrieval were higher if performed later during the study (P = 0.03). Successful retrieval was not related to insurance status (P = not significant). The mean total hospital charges related to retrieval were $4,493 (range, $2,510-$9,106). Successful retrieval contributed to lower total charges (P < 0.01). Factors contributing to higher total charges were retrieval attempt later in study period (P = 0.01) and commercial insurance status (P = 0.04). The rate of IVCF placement in trauma patients

  9. SHRIF, a General-Purpose System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, Applied to Medical Knowledge Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Nicholas V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes SHRIF, a System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, and the medical knowledge base that was used in its development. Highlights include design decisions; the user-machine interface, including the language processor; and the organization of the knowledge base in an artificial intelligence (AI) project like this one. (57…

  10. SHRIF, a General-Purpose System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, Applied to Medical Knowledge Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Nicholas V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes SHRIF, a System for Heuristic Retrieval of Information and Facts, and the medical knowledge base that was used in its development. Highlights include design decisions; the user-machine interface, including the language processor; and the organization of the knowledge base in an artificial intelligence (AI) project like this one. (57…

  11. Information retrieval, critical appraisal and knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among Finnish dental students.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Virtanen, J I

    2016-04-04

    One of the core skills of competent dentist is the ability to search and analyse high-quality evidence. Problems in understanding the basic aspects of knowledge-based information may impede its implementation into clinical practice. We examined how Finnish dental students acquire scientific information and how familiar they are with methods for evaluating scientific evidence related to clinical questions. All fifth-year dental students (n = 120) at the three universities in Finland received a self-administered questionnaire. The three most commonly used sources of information were colleagues, the commercial Health Gate Portal for dental practitioners and personal lecture notes. Although students rarely read scientific journals, they did find that they possess at least passable or even good skills in literature retrieval. Three questions related to the appraisal of evidence in dentistry revealed that students' knowledge of evidence-based dentistry was inadequate to critically evaluate clinical research findings. Most students seem to lack knowledge of key methodological evidence-based terms. The present curricula in dental schools fail to encourage the students to search and acquire knowledge wider than their patients themselves do. Universities have the responsibility to teach dentists various methods of critical appraisal to cope with scientific information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. "I know you are but what am I?!": neural bases of self- and social knowledge retrieval in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Jennifer H; Lieberman, Matthew D; Dapretto, Mirella

    2007-08-01

    Previous neuroimaging research with adults suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the medial posterior parietal cortex (MPPC) are engaged during self-knowledge retrieval processes. However, this has yet to be assessed in a developmental sample. Twelve children and 12 adults (average age = 10.2 and 26.1 years, respectively) reported whether short phrases described themselves or a highly familiar other (Harry Potter) while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. In both children and adults, the MPFC was relatively more active during self- than social knowledge retrieval, and the MPPC was relatively more active during social than self-knowledge retrieval. Direct comparisons between children and adults indicated that children activated the MPFC during self-knowledge retrieval to a much greater extent than adults. The particular regions of the MPPC involved varied between the two groups, with the posterior precuneus engaged by adults, but the anterior precuneus and posterior cingulate engaged by children. Only children activated the MPFC significantly above baseline during self-knowledge retrieval. Implications for social cognitive development and the processing functions performed by the MPFC are discussed.

  13. Exploiting CReP for Knowledge Retrieval and Use in Complex Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manenti, Lorenza; Sartori, Fabio

    Case Based Reasoning (CBR) is a Knowledge Management approach that consists in the development of decision support systems where problem are solved by analogy with similar problem solved in the past. In this way, the system supports users in finding solutions without starting from scratch. CBR has become a very important research topic in Artificial Intelligence, with the definition of methodologies and architectural patterns for supporting developers in the design and implementation of case-based systems. The paper presents one of this frameworks, namely CReP, an on-going research project of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (L.Int.Ar.) of University of Milan-Bicocca, focusing on the integration between CBR paradigm and metadata approach to obtain domain-independent case structure and retrieval algorithm definition.

  14. Lexical retrieval and semantic knowledge in patients with left inferior temporal lobe lesions

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Sharon M.; Beeson, Pélagie M.; Labiner, David M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anomia following left inferior temporal lobe lesions may have two different underlying mechanisms with distinct neural substrates. Specifically, naming impairment following damage to more posterior regions (BA 37) has been considered to result from a disconnection between preserved semantic knowledge and phonological word forms (pure anomia), whereas anomia following damage to anterior temporal regions (BAs 38, 20/21) has been attributed to the degradation of semantic representations (semantic anomia). However, the integrity of semantic knowledge in patients with pure anomia has not been demonstrated convincingly, nor were lesions in these cases necessarily confined to BA 37. Furthermore, evidence of semantic anomia often comes from individuals with bilateral temporal lobe damage, so it is unclear whether unilateral temporal lobe lesions are sufficient to produce significant semantic impairment. Aims The main goals of this study were to determine whether anomia following unilateral left inferior temporal lobe damage reflected a loss of semantic knowledge or a post-semantic deficit in lexical retrieval and to identify the neuroanatomical correlates of the naming impairment. Methods & Procedures Eight individuals who underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy (L ATL) and eight individuals who sustained left posterior cerebral artery strokes (L PCA) completed a battery of language measures that assessed lexical retrieval and semantic processing, and 16 age- and education-matched controls also completed this battery. High-resolution structural brain scans were collected to conduct lesion analyses. Outcomes & Results Performance of L ATL and L PCA patients was strikingly similar, with both groups demonstrating naming performance ranging from moderately impaired to unimpaired. Anomia in both groups occurred in the context of mild deficits to semantic knowledge, which manifested primarily as greater difficulty in naming living things

  15. Generic Information Can Retrieve Known Biological Associations: Implications for Biomedical Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    van Haagen, Herman H. H. B. M.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Mons, Barend; Schultes, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Weighted semantic networks built from text-mined literature can be used to retrieve known protein-protein or gene-disease associations, and have been shown to anticipate associations years before they are explicitly stated in the literature. Our text-mining system recognizes over 640,000 biomedical concepts: some are specific (i.e., names of genes or proteins) others generic (e.g., ‘Homo sapiens’). Generic concepts may play important roles in automated information retrieval, extraction, and inference but may also result in concept overload and confound retrieval and reasoning with low-relevance or even spurious links. Here, we attempted to optimize the retrieval performance for protein-protein interactions (PPI) by filtering generic concepts (node filtering) or links to generic concepts (edge filtering) from a weighted semantic network. First, we defined metrics based on network properties that quantify the specificity of concepts. Then using these metrics, we systematically filtered generic information from the network while monitoring retrieval performance of known protein-protein interactions. We also systematically filtered specific information from the network (inverse filtering), and assessed the retrieval performance of networks composed of generic information alone. Results Filtering generic or specific information induced a two-phase response in retrieval performance: initially the effects of filtering were minimal but beyond a critical threshold network performance suddenly drops. Contrary to expectations, networks composed exclusively of generic information demonstrated retrieval performance comparable to unfiltered networks that also contain specific concepts. Furthermore, an analysis using individual generic concepts demonstrated that they can effectively support the retrieval of known protein-protein interactions. For instance the concept “binding” is indicative for PPI retrieval and the concept “mutation abnormality” is

  16. ArhiNet - A Knowledge-Based System for Creating, Processing and Retrieving Archival eContent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomie, Ioan; Dinsoreanu, Mihaela; Pop, Cristina; Suciu, Sorin

    This paper addresses the problem of creating, processing and querying semantically enhanced eContent from archives and digital libraries. We present an analysis of the archival domain, resulting in the creation of an archival domain model and of a domain ontology core. Our system adds semantic mark-up to the historical documents content, thus enabling document and knowledge retrieval as response to natural language ontology-guided queries. The system functionality follows two main workflows: (i) semantically enhanced eContent generation and knowledge acquisition and (ii) knowledge processing and retrieval. Within the first workflow, the relevant domain information is extracted from documents written in natural languages, followed by semantic annotation and domain ontology population. In the second workflow, ontologically guided natural language queries trigger reasoning processes that provide relevant search results. The paper also discusses the transformation of the OWL domain ontology into a hierarchical data model, thus providing support for the efficient ontology processing.

  17. Does phonological encoding in speech production always follow the retrieval of semantic knowledge? Electrophysiological evidence for parallel processing.

    PubMed

    Abdel Rahman, Rasha; Sommer, Werner

    2003-05-01

    In this article a new approach to the distinction between serial/contingent and parallel/independent processing in the human cognitive system is applied to semantic knowledge retrieval and phonological encoding of the word form in picture naming. In two-choice go/nogo tasks pictures of objects were manually classified on the basis of semantic and phonological information. An additional manipulation of the duration of the faster and presumably mediating process (semantic retrieval) allowed to derive differential predictions from the two alternative models. These predictions were tested with two event-related brain potentials (ERPs), the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) and the N200. The findings indicate that phonological encoding can proceed in parallel to the retrieval of semantic features. A suggestion is made how to accommodate these findings with models of speech production.

  18. Deficits in allergy knowledge among physicians at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Stukus, David R; Green, Todd; Montandon, Shari V; Wada, Kara J

    2015-07-01

    Allergic conditions have high prevalence in the general population. Misconceptions regarding the diagnosis and management of allergic disease among physicians can lead to suboptimal clinical care. To determine the extent of allergy-related knowledge deficits among physicians. Pediatric and internal medicine resident and attending physicians from 2 separate academic medical centers were asked to answer an anonymous electronic survey. Survey questions addressed 7 different allergy content areas. Four hundred eight physicians completed surveys (23.9% response rate). Respondents had few correct answers (mean ± SD 1.91 ± 1.43). Pediatric respondents had a larger number of correct answers compared with medicine-trained physicians (P < .001). No individual answered every survey question correctly, and 50 respondents (12.3%) had no correct answer. Three hundred seventy-eight respondents (92.6%) were unable to provide correct answers for at least 50% of survey questions. Level of residency training and prior rotation through an allergy and immunology elective correlated with a larger number of correct responses (P < .01). Only 1 survey question had an overall correct response rate higher than 50% (n = 261, 64%). Correct response rate was lower than 30% for 7 of the 9 possible questions. There are significant knowledge deficits in many areas of allergy-related content among pediatric and internal medicine physicians and across all levels of training and specialty. Given the prevalence of allergic conditions, the potential implications of a negative impact on clinical care are staggering. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. IVC filter retrieval in adolescents: experience in a tertiary pediatric center.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Anthony K; Zahra, Mahmoud; Trerotola, Scott O; Raffini, Leslie J; Itkin, Maxim; Keller, Marc S; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2016-04-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are commonly implanted with the intent to prevent life-threatening pulmonary embolism in at-risk patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. Various studies have reported increases in the rate of venous thromboembolism within the pediatric population. The utility and safety of IVC filters in children has not yet been fully defined. To describe the technique and adjunctive maneuvers of IVC filter removal in children, demonstrate its technical success and identify complications. A retrospective 10-year review was performed of 20 children (13 male, 7 female), mean age: 15.1 years (range: 12-19 years), who underwent IVC filter retrieval. Eleven of 20 (55%) were placed in our institution. Electronic medical records were reviewed for filter characteristics, retrieval technique, technical success and complications. The technical success rate was 100%. Placement indications included: deep venous thrombosis with a contraindication to anticoagulation (10/20, 50%), free-floating thrombus (4/20, 20%), post-trauma pulmonary embolism prophylaxis (3/20, 15%) and pre-thrombolysis pulmonary patient (1/20, 5%). The mean implantation period was 63 days (range: 20-270 days). Standard retrieval was performed in 17/20 patients (85%). Adjunctive techniques were performed in 3/20 patients (15%) and included the double-snare technique, balloon assistance and endobronchial forceps retrieval. Median procedure time was 60 min (range: 45-240 min). Pre-retrieval cavogram demonstrated filter tilt in 5/20 patients (25%) with a mean angle of 17° (range: 8-40). Pre-retrieval CT demonstrated strut wall penetration and tip embedment in one patient each. There were two procedure-related complications: IVC mural dissection noted on venography in one patient and snare catheter fracture requiring retrieval in one patient. There were no early or late complications. In children, IVC filter retrieval can be performed safely but may be challenging, especially in

  20. Ten-year experience of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Tse, George; Cleveland, Trevor; Goode, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE A significant proportion of patients undergoing surgery have an increased incidence of acute pulmonary embolus (PE). We analyzed all patients who had a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed preoperatively for PE prophylaxis and investigated the long-term outcomes of the patients who did not have their filter removed. METHODS Patients who underwent retrievable IVC filter insertion and attempted removal were identified from the radiology information systems database in a large tertiary referral university teaching hospital. Results of all clinical investigations (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and plain radiography) while the IVC filters were in situ were reviewed. RESULTS In total, 393 retrievable IVC filters were inserted, 254 with the indication of preoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. Recurrent PE was reported in five patients (1.9%) despite the IVC filter. Of the 254 retrievable filters inserted prior to surgery, an attempt at retrieval was made in 168 filters (66.1%). Successful retrieval at the first attempt occurred in 143 cases (85.1%), while 25 cases failed or were aborted (14.9%). No attempt at retrieval was made in 86 (33.9%) patients and a significant proportion of these patients had undergone cancer surgery (P < 0.0107). In those patients where there was no attempt at retrieval, there was an association between cancer surgery and a shorter absolute survival time (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION The majority of attempted filter retrievals were successful, and a proportion of nonretrieved IVC filters are accounted for in patients who underwent cancer surgery and ultimately died with the filter in situ. A departmental protocol is recommended to ensure the filter is removed where appropriate and possible. PMID:28093377

  1. Ten-year experience of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in a tertiary referral center.

    PubMed

    Tse, George; Cleveland, Trevor; Goode, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients undergoing surgery have an increased incidence of acute pulmonary embolus (PE). We analyzed all patients who had a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed preoperatively for PE prophylaxis and investigated the long-term outcomes of the patients who did not have their filter removed. Patients who underwent retrievable IVC filter insertion and attempted removal were identified from the radiology information systems database in a large tertiary referral university teaching hospital. Results of all clinical investigations (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and plain radiography) while the IVC filters were in situ were reviewed. In total, 393 retrievable IVC filters were inserted, 254 with the indication of preoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. Recurrent PE was reported in five patients (1.9%) despite the IVC filter. Of the 254 retrievable filters inserted prior to surgery, an attempt at retrieval was made in 168 filters (66.1%). Successful retrieval at the first attempt occurred in 143 cases (85.1%), while 25 cases failed or were aborted (14.9%). No attempt at retrieval was made in 86 (33.9%) patients and a significant proportion of these patients had undergone cancer surgery (P < 0.0107). In those patients where there was no attempt at retrieval, there was an association between cancer surgery and a shorter absolute survival time (P < 0.0001). The majority of attempted filter retrievals were successful, and a proportion of nonretrieved IVC filters are accounted for in patients who underwent cancer surgery and ultimately died with the filter in situ. A departmental protocol is recommended to ensure the filter is removed where appropriate and possible.

  2. Information Extraction from Unstructured Text for the Biodefense Knowledge Center

    SciTech Connect

    Samatova, N F; Park, B; Krishnamurthy, R; Munavalli, R; Symons, C; Buttler, D J; Cottom, T; Critchlow, T J; Slezak, T

    2005-04-29

    The Bio-Encyclopedia at the Biodefense Knowledge Center (BKC) is being constructed to allow an early detection of emerging biological threats to homeland security. It requires highly structured information extracted from variety of data sources. However, the quantity of new and vital information available from every day sources cannot be assimilated by hand, and therefore reliable high-throughput information extraction techniques are much anticipated. In support of the BKC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, together with the University of Utah, are developing an information extraction system built around the bioterrorism domain. This paper reports two important pieces of our effort integrated in the system: key phrase extraction and semantic tagging. Whereas two key phrase extraction technologies developed during the course of project help identify relevant texts, our state-of-the-art semantic tagging system can pinpoint phrases related to emerging biological threats. Also we are enhancing and tailoring the Bio-Encyclopedia by augmenting semantic dictionaries and extracting details of important events, such as suspected disease outbreaks. Some of these technologies have already been applied to large corpora of free text sources vital to the BKC mission, including ProMED-mail, PubMed abstracts, and the DHS's Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection (IAIP) news clippings. In order to address the challenges involved in incorporating such large amounts of unstructured text, the overall system is focused on precise extraction of the most relevant information for inclusion in the BKC.

  3. User centered and ontology based information retrieval system for life sciences.

    PubMed

    Sy, Mohameth-François; Ranwez, Sylvie; Montmain, Jacky; Regnault, Armelle; Crampes, Michel; Ranwez, Vincent

    2012-01-25

    Because of the increasing number of electronic resources, designing efficient tools to retrieve and exploit them is a major challenge. Some improvements have been offered by semantic Web technologies and applications based on domain ontologies. In life science, for instance, the Gene Ontology is widely exploited in genomic applications and the Medical Subject Headings is the basis of biomedical publications indexation and information retrieval process proposed by PubMed. However current search engines suffer from two main drawbacks: there is limited user interaction with the list of retrieved resources and no explanation for their adequacy to the query is provided. Users may thus be confused by the selection and have no idea on how to adapt their queries so that the results match their expectations. This paper describes an information retrieval system that relies on domain ontology to widen the set of relevant documents that is retrieved and that uses a graphical rendering of query results to favor user interactions. Semantic proximities between ontology concepts and aggregating models are used to assess documents adequacy with respect to a query. The selection of documents is displayed in a semantic map to provide graphical indications that make explicit to what extent they match the user's query; this man/machine interface favors a more interactive and iterative exploration of data corpus, by facilitating query concepts weighting and visual explanation. We illustrate the benefit of using this information retrieval system on two case studies one of which aiming at collecting human genes related to transcription factors involved in hemopoiesis pathway. The ontology based information retrieval system described in this paper (OBIRS) is freely available at: http://www.ontotoolkit.mines-ales.fr/ObirsClient/. This environment is a first step towards a user centred application in which the system enlightens relevant information to provide decision help.

  4. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  5. A hierarchical knowledge-based approach for retrieving similar medical images described with semantic annotations

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Camille; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted image retrieval applications could assist radiologist interpretations by identifying similar images in large archives as a means to providing decision support. However, the semantic gap between low-level image features and their high level semantics may impair the system performances. Indeed, it can be challenging to comprehensively characterize the images using low-level imaging features to fully capture the visual appearance of diseases on images, and recently the use of semantic terms has been advocated to provide semantic descriptions of the visual contents of images. However, most of the existing image retrieval strategies do not consider the intrinsic properties of these terms during the comparison of the images beyond treating them as simple binary (presence/absence) features. We propose a new framework that includes semantic features in images and that enables retrieval of similar images in large databases based on their semantic relations. It is based on two main steps: (1) annotation of the images with semantic terms extracted from an ontology, and (2) evaluation of the similarity of image pairs by computing the similarity between the terms using the Hierarchical Semantic-Based Distance (HSBD) coupled to an ontological measure. The combination of these two steps provides a means of capturing the semantic correlations among the terms used to characterize the images that can be considered as a potential solution to deal with the semantic gap problem. We validate this approach in the context of the retrieval and the classification of 2D regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from computed tomographic (CT) images of the liver. Under this framework, retrieval accuracy of more than 0.96 was obtained on a 30-images dataset using the Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) index that is a standard technique used to measure the effectiveness of information retrieval algorithms when a separate reference standard is available. Classification

  6. A hierarchical knowledge-based approach for retrieving similar medical images described with semantic annotations.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Camille; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L

    2014-06-01

    Computer-assisted image retrieval applications could assist radiologist interpretations by identifying similar images in large archives as a means to providing decision support. However, the semantic gap between low-level image features and their high level semantics may impair the system performances. Indeed, it can be challenging to comprehensively characterize the images using low-level imaging features to fully capture the visual appearance of diseases on images, and recently the use of semantic terms has been advocated to provide semantic descriptions of the visual contents of images. However, most of the existing image retrieval strategies do not consider the intrinsic properties of these terms during the comparison of the images beyond treating them as simple binary (presence/absence) features. We propose a new framework that includes semantic features in images and that enables retrieval of similar images in large databases based on their semantic relations. It is based on two main steps: (1) annotation of the images with semantic terms extracted from an ontology, and (2) evaluation of the similarity of image pairs by computing the similarity between the terms using the Hierarchical Semantic-Based Distance (HSBD) coupled to an ontological measure. The combination of these two steps provides a means of capturing the semantic correlations among the terms used to characterize the images that can be considered as a potential solution to deal with the semantic gap problem. We validate this approach in the context of the retrieval and the classification of 2D regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from computed tomographic (CT) images of the liver. Under this framework, retrieval accuracy of more than 0.96 was obtained on a 30-images dataset using the Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) index that is a standard technique used to measure the effectiveness of information retrieval algorithms when a separate reference standard is available. Classification

  7. KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language. Presentation visuals. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1985-01-01

    A collection of presentation visuals associated with the companion report entitled KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language, is presented. Information is given on data retrieval, natural language database front ends, generic design objectives, processing capababilities and the query processing cycle.

  8. National Space Science Data Center data archive and distribution service (NDADS) automated retrieval mail system user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charleen M.; Vansteenberg, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has developed an automated data retrieval request service utilizing our Data Archive and Distribution Service (NDADS) computer system. NDADS currently has selected project data written to optical disk platters with the disks residing in a robotic 'jukebox' near-line environment. This allows for rapid and automated access to the data with no staff intervention required. There are also automated help information and user services available that can be accessed. The request system permits an average-size data request to be completed within minutes of the request being sent to NSSDC. A mail message, in the format described in this document, retrieves the data and can send it to a remote site. Also listed in this document are the data currently available.

  9. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  10. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  11. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Retrieving Teaching Materials for Context-Aware Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless communication and sensor technologies, ubiquitous learning has become a promising solution to educational problems. In context-aware ubiquitous learning environments, it is required that learning content is retrieved according to environmental contexts, such as learners' location. Also, a learning content…

  12. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Retrieving Teaching Materials for Context-Aware Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Wen-Chung; Tseng, Shian-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless communication and sensor technologies, ubiquitous learning has become a promising solution to educational problems. In context-aware ubiquitous learning environments, it is required that learning content is retrieved according to environmental contexts, such as learners' location. Also, a learning content…

  13. [Knowledge of hypothermia in nursing professionals of surgical center].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Isabel Yovana Quispe; Peniche, Aparecida de Cássia Giani; Püschel, Vilanice Alves de Araujo

    2012-10-01

    The objective was to identify the difference in knowledge about hypothermia in nursing assistant after an educational intervention. The conceptual basis of education is based on the prospect of meaningful learning allied to the construction of the conceptual map and the case study. Data were collected through the questionnaire validated by experts. The average knowledge after the educational intervention was (-3.49), however, there was no significant difference in knowledge as related to sociodemographic variables studied. We conclude that the educational intervention was satisfactory in that new information was anchored modified and expanded the cognitive structure of study subjects.

  14. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R. E.; Irons, J. R.; Allen, R.; Spruce, J.; Underwood, L. W.; Pagnutti, M.

    2006-12-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400 800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30 240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400 m, 600 m, and 800 m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  15. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  16. Estimating Temperature Retrieval Accuracy Associated With Thermal Band Spatial Resolution Requirements for Center Pivot Irrigation Monitoring and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Irons, James; Spruce, Joseph P.; Underwood, Lauren W.; Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the use of synthetic thermal center pivot irrigation scenes to estimate temperature retrieval accuracy for thermal remote sensed data, such as data acquired from current and proposed Landsat-like thermal systems. Center pivot irrigation is a common practice in the western United States and in other parts of the world where water resources are scarce. Wide-area ET (evapotranspiration) estimates and reliable water management decisions depend on accurate temperature information retrieval from remotely sensed data. Spatial resolution, sensor noise, and the temperature step between a field and its surrounding area impose limits on the ability to retrieve temperature information. Spatial resolution is an interrelationship between GSD (ground sample distance) and a measure of image sharpness, such as edge response or edge slope. Edge response and edge slope are intuitive, and direct measures of spatial resolution are easier to visualize and estimate than the more common Modulation Transfer Function or Point Spread Function. For these reasons, recent data specifications, such as those for the LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission), have used GSD and edge response to specify spatial resolution. For this study, we have defined a 400-800 m diameter center pivot irrigation area with a large 25 K temperature step associated with a 300 K well-watered field surrounded by an infinite 325 K dry area. In this context, we defined the benchmark problem as an easily modeled, highly common stressing case. By parametrically varying GSD (30-240 m) and edge slope, we determined the number of pixels and field area fraction that meet a given temperature accuracy estimate for 400-m, 600-m, and 800-m diameter field sizes. Results of this project will help assess the utility of proposed specifications for the LDCM and other future thermal remote sensing missions and for water resource management.

  17. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge is strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-04-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  18. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  19. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  20. Knowledge retrieval from PubMed abstracts and electronic medical records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Saiz, Albert; Pastor, Xavier; Lozano-Rubi, Raimundo; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Martinez-Lapsicina, Elena H; Zubizarreta, Irati; Mueller, Bernd; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Toldo, Luca; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Villoslada, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR) we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug) into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology. Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73). The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod). The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports. The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information.

  1. Knowledge Retrieval from PubMed Abstracts and Electronic Medical Records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Saiz, Albert; Pastor, Xavier; Lozano-Rubi, Raimundo; Martinez-Lapsicina, Elena H.; Zubizarreta, Irati; Mueller, Bernd; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Toldo, Luca; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Villoslada, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR) we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Methods The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug) into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology. Results Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73). The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod). The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports. Conclusion The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information. PMID:25665127

  2. Supporting academic health centers with knowledge management: learning from the Web.

    PubMed

    Littleton, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    In a 2003 publication, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) made explicit the many ways in which a library might contribute to an academic health center's success through knowledge management (KM). Building on Success: Charting the Future of Knowledge Management within the Academic Health Center elucidated the ways in which a library can serve as the center of an organization's KM initiatives. The study and application of knowledge management tools is formidable; unlike information management (IM), the field of knowledge management has roots in a seemingly infinite and wide-ranging number of professional and academic disciplines. The planning of institutional KM initiatives is not commonly discussed, and history shows knowledge management projects often fail to thrive. This column introduces the topic of knowledge management and includes suggested Web-based resources for further understanding and project planning.

  3. Intelligent Text Retrieval and Knowledge Acquisition from Texts for NASA Applications: Preprocessing Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A system that retrieves problem reports from a NASA database is described. The database is queried with natural language questions. Part-of-speech tags are first assigned to each word in the question using a rule based tagger. A partial parse of the question is then produced with independent sets of deterministic finite state a utomata. Using partial parse information, a look up strategy searches the database for problem reports relevant to the question. A bigram stemmer and irregular verb conjugates have been incorporated into the system to improve accuracy. The system is evaluated by a set of fifty five questions posed by NASA engineers. A discussion of future research is also presented.

  4. Media-independent knowledge representation via UMART: unified mental annotation and retrieval tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Roger W.; Kieronska, Dorota H.; Venkatesh, Svetha

    1996-03-01

    Multimedia information is now routinely available in the forms of text, pictures, animation and sound. Although text objects are relatively easy to deal with (in terms of information search and retrieval), other information bearing objects (such as sound, images, animation) are more difficult to index. Our research is aimed at developing better ways of representing multimedia objects by using a conceptual representation based on Schank's conceptual dependencies. Moreover, the representation allows for users' individual interpretations to be embedded in the system. This will alleviate the problems associated with traditional semantic networks by allowing for coexistence of multiple views of the same information. The viability of the approach is tested, and the preliminary results reported.

  5. Scientist-Centered Graph-Based Models of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Stephan, Eric G.; Gracio, Deborah K.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2005-07-01

    At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are researching and developing visual models and paradigms that will allow scientists to capture and represent conceptual models in a computational form that may linked to and integrated with scientific data sets and applications. Captured conceptual models may be logical in conveying how individual concepts tie together to form a higher theory, analytical in conveying intermediate or final analysis results, or temporal in describing the experimental process in which concepts are physically and computationally explored. In this paper, we describe and contrast three different research and development systems that allow scientists to capture and interact with computational graph-based models of scientific knowledge. Through these examples, we explore and examine ways in which researchers may graphically encode and apply scientific theory and practice on computer systems.

  6. Assessing the Potential of the AIRS Retrieved Surface Temperature for 6-Hour Average Temperature Forecast in River Forecast Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Theobald, M.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Hearty, T. J.; Esfandiari, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Producing timely and accurate water forecast and information is the mission of National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS RFCs) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The river forecast system in RFCs requires average surface temperature in the fixed 6-hour period 000-0600, 0600-1200, 1200-1800, and 1200-0000 UTC. The current logic of RFC temperature forecast relies on ingest of point values of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. Meanwhile, the mean temperature for the 6-hour period is estimated from a weighted average of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder on board the Aqua satellite which was launched in May 2002 and follows a Sun-synchronous polar orbit. It is aimed to produce high resolution atmospheric profile and surface atmospheric parameters. As Aqua crosses the equator at about 1330 and 0130 local time, the AIRS retrieved surface temperature may represent daytime maximum and nighttime minimum value. Comparing to point observation from surface weather stations which are often sparse over the less-populated area and are unevenly distributed, satellite may obtain better area averaged observation. This test study assesses the potential of using AIRS retrieved surface temperature to forecast 6-hour average temperature for NWS RFCs. The California Nevada RFC is selected due to the poor coverage of surface observation in the mountainous region and spring snow melting. The study focuses on the March to May spring season when water from snowpack melting often plays important role in flood. AIRS retrieved temperature and surface weather station data set will be used to derive statistical weighting coefficient for 6-hour average temperature forecast. The resulting forecast biases and errors will be the main indicators of the potential usage. All study results will be presented in the meeting.

  7. Targeting Lymph Node Retrieval and Assessment in Stage II Colon Cancer: A Quality Outcome Community-Based Cancer Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Thomas; Hughes, Amy H.; Rimmer, Cathy C.; Less, Dale A.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Adequate lymph node evaluation is required for the proper staging of colon cancer. The current recommended number of lymph nodes that should be retrieved and assessed is 12. Methods The multidisciplinary Gastrointestinal Tumor Board at the Derrick L. Davis Forsyth Regional Cancer Center reviewed and recommended that a minimum of 12 lymph nodes be examined in all cases of colon cancer to ensure proper staging. This recommendation occurred at the end of the first quarter of 2005. To ensure this new standard was being followed, an outcomes study looking at the number of lymph nodes evaluated in stage II colon cancer was initiated. All patients with stage II colon cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 were reviewed. Results There was a statistically significant improvement in the number of stage II colon cancer patients with 12 or more lymph nodes evaluated. Before the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 49% (40 out of 82 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes evaluated was 11. After the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 79% (70 out of 88 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes was 16. Conclusion Multidisciplinary tumor boards can impact the quality of care of patients as demonstrated in this study. Although we do not yet have survival data on these patients, based on the previous literature referenced in this article, we would expect to see an improvement in survival rates in patients with 12 or more nodes retrieved and assessed. PMID:20856779

  8. Globalization of Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidel, Mark; Guerrero, Osiris

    2008-01-01

    Developments in communication and information technologies in the last decade have had a significant impact on instructional and learning activities. For many students and educators, the Internet became the significant medium for sharing instruction, learning and communication. Access to knowledge beyond boundaries and cultures has an impact on…

  9. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant…

  10. Using Heterogeneous Linguistic Knowledge in Local Coherence Identification for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Samuel W. K.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses natural language processing and proposes a novel approach to automatic text segmentation using heterogeneous linguistic knowledge and cluster algorithms. Represents the diversity of textual relations in a discourse network in order to analyze the linguistic bonds and determine the degree of coherence that a text may exhibit. (Author/LRW)

  11. Globalization of Knowledge Discovery and Information Retrieval in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidel, Mark; Guerrero, Osiris

    2008-01-01

    Developments in communication and information technologies in the last decade have had a significant impact on instructional and learning activities. For many students and educators, the Internet became the significant medium for sharing instruction, learning and communication. Access to knowledge beyond boundaries and cultures has an impact on…

  12. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant…

  13. Design of a Mission Data Storage and Retrieval System for NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, Jessica; Downing, Bob; Sheldon, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) employs the WATR Integrated Next Generation System (WINGS) for the processing and display of aeronautical flight data. This report discusses the post-mission segment of the WINGS architecture. A team designed and implemented a system for the near- and long-term storage and distribution of mission data for flight projects at DFRC, providing the user with intelligent access to data. Discussed are the legacy system, an industry survey, system operational concept, high-level system features, and initial design efforts.

  14. Design of a Mission Data Storage and Retrieval System for NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, Jessica; Downing, Bob; Sheldon, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) employs the WATR Integrated Next Generation System (WINGS) for the processing and display of aeronautical flight data. This report discusses the post-mission segment of the WINGS architecture. A team designed and implemented a system for the near- and long-term storage and distribution of mission data for flight projects at DFRC, providing the user with intelligent access to data. Discussed are the legacy system, an industry survey, system operational concept, high-level system features, and initial design efforts.

  15. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates how physicians use scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and since the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant task structure of the organization, the form of knowledge that is therefore valued by physicians will vary with their hospital’s level of prestige. Social network and multivariate analyses are used to test this theory in six U.S. hospitals with varying levels of prestige. We find that in lower-prestige hospitals physicians can improve their reputation by reading a relatively broad range of scientific journals, whereas in higher-prestige hospitals esteem is allocated to those with a more elite medical school pedigree. Statistically significant differences also exist between hospitals in terms of whether work with patients is valued, with physicians who engage in more clinical activity in the highest-ranked hospitals receiving less esteem from their colleagues. We finish by discussing how the functioning of higher and lower prestige hospitals are interconnected in ways that sustain both the development of innovations and their widespread adoption. PMID:20617755

  16. The cultivation of esteem and retrieval of scientific knowledge in physician networks.

    PubMed

    Menchik, Daniel A; Meltzer, David O

    2010-06-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant task structure of the organization, the form of knowledge that is valued by a physician will vary with his or her hospital's level of prestige. We use social network and multivariate analyses to test this theory in six U.S. hospitals with varying levels of prestige. We find that in lower-prestige hospitals, physicians can improve their reputation by reading a relatively broad range of scientific journals, whereas in higher-prestige hospitals, esteem is allocated to those with a more elite medical school pedigree. Statistically significant differences also exist between hospitals in terms of whether work with patients is valued, with physicians who engage in more clinical activity in the highest-ranked hospitals receiving less esteem from their colleagues. We finish by discussing how the functioning of higher- and lower-prestige hospitals is interconnected in ways that sustain both the development of innovations and their widespread adoption.

  17. The center for causal discovery of biomedical knowledge from big data

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ivet; Becich, Michael J; Benos, Panayiotis V; Berg, Jeremy; Espino, Jeremy U; Glymour, Clark; Jacobson, Rebecca Crowley; Kienholz, Michelle; Lee, Adrian V; Lu, Xinghua; Scheines, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center for Causal Discovery is developing and disseminating an integrated set of open source tools that support causal modeling and discovery of biomedical knowledge from large and complex biomedical datasets. The Center integrates teams of biomedical and data scientists focused on the refinement of existing and the development of new constraint-based and Bayesian algorithms based on causal Bayesian networks, the optimization of software for efficient operation in a supercomputing environment, and the testing of algorithms and software developed using real data from 3 representative driving biomedical projects: cancer driver mutations, lung disease, and the functional connectome of the human brain. Associated training activities provide both biomedical and data scientists with the knowledge and skills needed to apply and extend these tools. Collaborative activities with the BD2K Consortium further advance causal discovery tools and integrate tools and resources developed by other centers. PMID:26138794

  18. The center for causal discovery of biomedical knowledge from big data.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gregory F; Bahar, Ivet; Becich, Michael J; Benos, Panayiotis V; Berg, Jeremy; Espino, Jeremy U; Glymour, Clark; Jacobson, Rebecca Crowley; Kienholz, Michelle; Lee, Adrian V; Lu, Xinghua; Scheines, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center for Causal Discovery is developing and disseminating an integrated set of open source tools that support causal modeling and discovery of biomedical knowledge from large and complex biomedical datasets. The Center integrates teams of biomedical and data scientists focused on the refinement of existing and the development of new constraint-based and Bayesian algorithms based on causal Bayesian networks, the optimization of software for efficient operation in a supercomputing environment, and the testing of algorithms and software developed using real data from 3 representative driving biomedical projects: cancer driver mutations, lung disease, and the functional connectome of the human brain. Associated training activities provide both biomedical and data scientists with the knowledge and skills needed to apply and extend these tools. Collaborative activities with the BD2K Consortium further advance causal discovery tools and integrate tools and resources developed by other centers.

  19. Developing a Strategic Plan for Transitioning to Healthcare Knowledge Services Centers (HKSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, H. Mark; Coletti, Margaret H.

    2012-01-01

    Facing a negative trend in the form of downsizing, layoffs, and closures, a small committee of hospital librarians in New England was formed in 2004 to provide library advocacy. Between 2008 and 2010, 23 hospital libraries closed in New England. In 2010, the committee shifted its focus from advocacy to a platform for change. This resulted in the creation of the Healthcare Knowledge Services Center (HKSC) Template. The Template is the basis for a 3-phased, 5-year strategic plan to establish several regional pilots, transitioning traditional hospital libraries to healthcare knowledge services centers. This article focuses on Phase One of the strategic plan, Development. PMID:23125551

  20. Managing knowledge and technology to foster innovation at the Ohio State University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Cain, Timothy J; Rodman, Ruey L; Sanfilippo, Fred; Kroll, Susan M

    2005-11-01

    Biomedical knowledge is expanding at an unprecedented rate-one that is unlikely to slow anytime in the future. While the volume and scope of this new knowledge poses significant organizational challenges, it creates tremendous opportunities to release and direct its power to the service of significant goals. The authors explain how the Center for Knowledge Management at The Ohio State University Medical Center, created during the academic year 2003-04, is doing just that by integrating numerous resource-intensive, technology-based initiatives-including personnel, services and infrastructure, digital repositories, data sets, mobile computing devices, high-tech patient simulators, computerized testing, and interactive multimedia-in a way that enables the center to provide information tailored to the needs of students, faculty and staff on the medical center campus and its surrounding health sciences colleges. The authors discuss how discovering, applying, and sharing new knowledge, information assets, and technologies in this way is a collaborative process. This process creates open-ended opportunities for innovation and a roadmap for working toward seamless integration, synergy, and substantial enhancement of the academic medical center's research, educational, and clinical mission areas.

  1. Toward an interim standard for patient-centered knowledge-access.

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, M. S.; Sherertz, D. D.; Fagan, L. M.; Carlson, R. W.; Cole, W. G.; Schipma, P. B.; Nelson, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Most care-giver "knowledge" needs arise at the point of care and are "patient-centered." Many of these knowledge needs can be met using existing on-line knowledge sources, but the process is too time-consuming, currently, for even the computer-proficient. We are developing a set of public domain standards aimed at bringing potentially relevant knowledge to the point of care in a straight-forward and timely fashion. The standards will a) make use of selected items from a Computer-based Patient Record (CPR), e.g., a diagnosis and measure of severity, b) anticipate certain care-giver knowledge needs, e.g., "therapy," "protocols," "complications," and c) try to satisfy those needs from available knowledge sources, e.g., knowledge-bases, citation databases, practice guidelines, and on-line textbooks. The standards will use templates, i.e., fill-in-the-blank structures, to anticipate knowledge needs and UMLS Metathesaurus enhancements to represent the content of knowledge sources. Together, the standards will form the specification for a "Knowledge-Server" (KS) designed to be accessed from any CPR system. Plans are in place to test an interim version of this specification in the context of medical oncology. We are accumulating anecdotal evidence that a KS operating in conjunction with a CPR is much more compelling to users than either a CPR or a KS operating alone. PMID:8130537

  2. KARL: A Knowledge-Assisted Retrieval Language. M.S. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1985-01-01

    Data classification and storage are tasks typically performed by application specialists. In contrast, information users are primarily non-computer specialists who use information in their decision-making and other activities. Interaction efficiency between such users and the computer is often reduced by machine requirements and resulting user reluctance to use the system. This thesis examines the problems associated with information retrieval for non-computer specialist users, and proposes a method for communicating in restricted English that uses knowledge of the entities involved, relationships between entities, and basic English language syntax and semantics to translate the user requests into formal queries. The proposed method includes an intelligent dictionary, syntax and semantic verifiers, and a formal query generator. In addition, the proposed system has a learning capability that can improve portability and performance. With the increasing demand for efficient human-machine communication, the significance of this thesis becomes apparent. As human resources become more valuable, software systems that will assist in improving the human-machine interface will be needed and research addressing new solutions will be of utmost importance. This thesis presents an initial design and implementation as a foundation for further research and development into the emerging field of natural language database query systems.

  3. Assessing Parental Knowledge About Thalassemia in a Thalassemia Center of Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Maheen, Humaira; Malik, Farrukh; Siddique, Barera; Qidwai, Asim

    2015-12-01

    Thalassemia is the leading haemoglobinopathy after sickle cell anemia that accounts for 1.5 % of the global population. In Pakistan, every 1-4 per 1000 infants suffers from Thalassemia. Regardless of being a population "at high risk" for Thalassemia major, evidence suggest that Pakistanis possess poor knowledge of the disease. The present study aimed to assess parents' accurate knowledge about Thalassemia disease at Afzaal Memorial Thalassemia Foundation in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 172 parents of existing patients who were receiving regular blood transfusion from the center were included in the study. Parents' knowledge was assessed via a pre-tested and validated Thalassemia knowledge questionnaire. Findings show that 40 % of the sample showed lower knowledge scores about Thalassemia. Among different ethnic origins, Urdu speaking respondents showed a higher average score of correct knowledge about Thalassemia major (21.6 ± 4.41) as compared to the Siraiki (17.9 ± 4.48) and the Pathans (17.2 ± 4.34). These latter two ethnic groups also showed poor knowledge about Thalassemia minor. Generally parents provided correct answers about treatment of Thalassemia major. The findings suggest targeted interventions are required for high risk ethnic groups. Thalassemia education programs should be offered to extended family members of existing patients by all Thalassemia centers. High risk ethnic groups (Siraiki and Pathan) need rigorous interventions, and Thalassemia worker program should be introduced nationwide.

  4. A Simple and Effective Program to Increase Faculty Knowledge of and Referrals to Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Susan A.; Pace, Kristi A.; Iannelli, Richard J.; Palma, Thomas V.; Pakalns, Gail P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a simple, cost-effective, and empirically supported program to increase faculty referrals of students to counseling centers (CCs). Incoming faculty members at 3 universities received a mailing and personal telephone call from a CC staff member. Faculty assigned to the outreach program had greater knowledge of and rates of…

  5. A Simple and Effective Program to Increase Faculty Knowledge of and Referrals to Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Susan A.; Pace, Kristi A.; Iannelli, Richard J.; Palma, Thomas V.; Pakalns, Gail P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a simple, cost-effective, and empirically supported program to increase faculty referrals of students to counseling centers (CCs). Incoming faculty members at 3 universities received a mailing and personal telephone call from a CC staff member. Faculty assigned to the outreach program had greater knowledge of and rates of…

  6. Learning and Relevance in Information Retrieval: A Study in the Application of Exploration and User Knowledge to Enhance Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of exploration and learning upon eDiscovery information retrieval; it is written in three parts. Part I contains foundational concepts and background on the topics of information retrieval and eDiscovery. This part informs the reader about the research frameworks, methodologies, data collection, and…

  7. Learning and Relevance in Information Retrieval: A Study in the Application of Exploration and User Knowledge to Enhance Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of exploration and learning upon eDiscovery information retrieval; it is written in three parts. Part I contains foundational concepts and background on the topics of information retrieval and eDiscovery. This part informs the reader about the research frameworks, methodologies, data collection, and…

  8. Development and validation of a patient-centered knowledge scale for left ventricular assist device placement

    PubMed Central

    Kostick, Kristin M.; Minard, Charles G.; Wilhelms, L.A.; Delgado, Estevan; Abraham, Mackenzie; Bruce, Courtenay R.; Estep, Jerry D.; Loebe, Matthias; Volk, Robert J.; Blumenthal-Barby, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND A central tenet of patient-centered health care advocated by the Institute of Medicine and the American Medical Association is to enhance informed decision-making in a way that incorporates patient values, knowledge and beliefs. Achievement of this goal is constrained by a lack of validated measures of patients’ knowledge needs. METHODS In this study we present a comprehensive and valid methodology for developing a clinically informed and patient centered measure of knowledge about left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy to facilitate discussion and measure candidate understanding of treatment options. Using structured interviews with patients, caregivers, candidates for LVAD treatment (New York Heart Association Class III and IV) and expert clinicians (n = 71), we identified top patient decisional needs and perspectives on essential knowledge needs for informed decision-making. From this list, we generated 20 knowledge scale question items to refine in cognitive interviews (n = 5) with patients and patient consultants. RESULTS Good internal consistency and reliability of the knowledge scale (Cronbach’s α = 0.81) was seen in 30 LVAD patients and candidates. Knowledge was higher among patients currently with LVADs than candidates, regardless of receiving standard education (with education: 69.9 vs 50.1, adjusted p = 0.02; without education: 69.9 vs 37.6, adjusted p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The LVAD knowledge scale may be useful in clinical settings to identify gaps in knowledge among patient candidates considering LVAD treatment, and to better tailor education and discussion with patients and their caregivers, and to enhance informed decision-making before treatment decisions are made. PMID:26922278

  9. Invasive brain-machine interfaces: a survey of paralyzed patients’ attitudes, knowledge and methods of information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahr, Jacob; Schwartz, Christina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Aertsen, Ad; Rickert, Jörn; Ball, Tonio

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are an emerging therapeutic option that can allow paralyzed patients to gain control over assistive technology devices (ATDs). BMI approaches can be broadly classified into invasive (based on intracranially implanted electrodes) and noninvasive (based on skin electrodes or extracorporeal sensors). Invasive BMIs have a favorable signal-to-noise ratio, and thus allow for the extraction of more information than noninvasive BMIs, but they are also associated with the risks related to neurosurgical device implantation. Current noninvasive BMI approaches are typically concerned, among other issues, with long setup times and/or intensive training. Recent studies have investigated the attitudes of paralyzed patients eligible for BMIs, particularly patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These studies indicate that paralyzed patients are indeed interested in BMIs. Little is known, however, about the degree of knowledge among paralyzed patients concerning BMI approaches or about how patients retrieve information on ATDs. Furthermore, it is not yet clear if paralyzed patients would accept intracranial implantation of BMI electrodes with the premise of decoding improvements, and what the attitudes of a broader range of patients with diseases such as stroke or spinal cord injury are towards this new kind of treatment. Approach. Using a questionnaire, we surveyed 131 paralyzed patients for their opinions on invasive BMIs and their attitude toward invasive BMI treatment options. Main results. The majority of the patients knew about and had a positive attitude toward invasive BMI approaches. The group of ALS patients was especially open to the concept of BMIs. The acceptance of invasive BMI technology depended on the improvements expected from the technology. Furthermore, the survey revealed that for paralyzed patients, the Internet is an important source of information on ATDs. Significance. Websites tailored to

  10. Invasive brain-machine interfaces: a survey of paralyzed patients' attitudes, knowledge and methods of information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Jacob; Schwartz, Christina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Aertsen, Ad; Rickert, Jörn; Ball, Tonio

    2015-08-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are an emerging therapeutic option that can allow paralyzed patients to gain control over assistive technology devices (ATDs). BMI approaches can be broadly classified into invasive (based on intracranially implanted electrodes) and noninvasive (based on skin electrodes or extracorporeal sensors). Invasive BMIs have a favorable signal-to-noise ratio, and thus allow for the extraction of more information than noninvasive BMIs, but they are also associated with the risks related to neurosurgical device implantation. Current noninvasive BMI approaches are typically concerned, among other issues, with long setup times and/or intensive training. Recent studies have investigated the attitudes of paralyzed patients eligible for BMIs, particularly patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These studies indicate that paralyzed patients are indeed interested in BMIs. Little is known, however, about the degree of knowledge among paralyzed patients concerning BMI approaches or about how patients retrieve information on ATDs. Furthermore, it is not yet clear if paralyzed patients would accept intracranial implantation of BMI electrodes with the premise of decoding improvements, and what the attitudes of a broader range of patients with diseases such as stroke or spinal cord injury are towards this new kind of treatment. Using a questionnaire, we surveyed 131 paralyzed patients for their opinions on invasive BMIs and their attitude toward invasive BMI treatment options. The majority of the patients knew about and had a positive attitude toward invasive BMI approaches. The group of ALS patients was especially open to the concept of BMIs. The acceptance of invasive BMI technology depended on the improvements expected from the technology. Furthermore, the survey revealed that for paralyzed patients, the Internet is an important source of information on ATDs. Websites tailored to prospective BMI users should be further developed to

  11. Genomics as knowledge enterprise: Implementing an electronic research habitat at the Biopolis Experimental Therapeutics Center.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Wayne; Breen, Colin; Entzeroth, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The Experimental Therapeutics Center (ETC) has been established at Biopolis to advance translational research by bridging the gap between discovery science and commercialization. We describe the Electronic Research Habitat at ETC, a comprehensive hardware and software infrastructure designed to effectively manage terabyte data flows and storage, increase back office efficiency, enhance the scientific work experience, and satisfy rigorous regulatory and legal requirements. Our habitat design is secure, scalable and robust, and it strives to embody the core values of the knowledge-based workplace, thus contributing to the strategic goal of building a "knowledge economy" in the context of Singapore's on-going biotechnology initiative.

  12. Improving midwives' knowledge and skills. JICA Reproductive Health Project. MCH / FP Center.

    PubMed

    Do Thi Mui

    1999-01-01

    The Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning (MCH/FP) Center in Nghe An Province, Vietnam, has contributed to the promotion of family planning throughout the province. The institute's effective work has led to an increase in the contraceptive prevalence rate from 57.8% in 1995 to 76.3% in 1999. In addition, the law has designated the MCH/FP Center to 1) manage the MCH/FP program in Nghe An Province; 2) provide quality contraceptives required in Nghe An Province; 3) provide MCH/FP services in Vinh City; 4) instruct and supervise MCH/FP services rendered by District Health Centers and Commune Health Centers; 5) conduct training for health personnel; 6) conduct research, evaluation and monitoring; and 7) implement national programs. In June 1997, the MCH/FP Center executed a technical cooperation project on reproductive health funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency. One of its major objectives has been the capacity building of the MCH/FP Center for training and service as a focal point of reproductive health promotion in Nghe An Province. Overall, the training programs provided by the project have been producing good results. Primary and secondary midwives and assistant doctors who participated in the JICA-training course are very pleased to be given the chance to review their knowledge and skills and to learn new techniques, and manage high-risk cases.

  13. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding.

    PubMed

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees.

  14. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides employees' perceptions about these subjects. Kruskal-Wallis with multiple comparison and chi-square tests were used to compare variables by professional category. RESULTS: 304 employees participated in the study. The highest percentages of correct answers were noted for questions about exclusive breastfeeding: definition - 97% (n=296) and duration - 65% (n=199). Regarding complementary feeding, 61% (n=187) correctly answered about the appropriate age to introduce it, with a lower percentage for meat (56%; n=170) and sugar (16%; n=50). Concerning employees' perceptions, 9% (n=29) believed that there is weak breast milk, 79% (n=241) and 51% (n=157) reported the negative influence of bottle feeding and pacifier use on breastfeeding. Among the interviewed subjects, 77% (n=234) answered that they had a positive influence on the quality of the food given to the children. There were no differences in the answers according to professional category, except for the negative influence of pacifiers on breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Employees of public day care centers knew more about breastfeeding than about complementary feeding. Educational activities about breastfeeding and complementary feeding are necessary for day care centers employees. PMID:24473953

  15. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children's center.

    PubMed

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children's center. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to "wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity" before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of "gum disease". Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers' response in relation to their specific job. The special health care workers in the disabled children's center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices.

  16. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J.; Koziol, Deloris E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. Methods: The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. Results: From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (P<0.001) but not for the Infobuttons application (P = 0.31). For the health resources application, the preferences of the 4 clinical groups varied according to the specific resources examined (all P≤0.02). Conclusion: The information-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources. PMID:23405044

  17. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J; Koziol, Deloris E

    2013-01-01

    The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (P<0.001) but not for the Infobuttons application (P = 0.31). For the health resources application, the preferences of the 4 clinical groups varied according to the specific resources examined (all P≤0.02). The information-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources.

  18. [Knowledge of nursing professionals of a surgical center regarding malignant hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristina Silva; Cunha, Ana Lucia Mirancos

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of the nursing professionals in a surgical center about malignant hyperther- mia.This is a descriptive exploratory study on malignant hyperthermia conducted with mid- and high-level nursing professionals in the surgical center of an institution located in the city of São Paulo, where the research was conducted between August and September 2013. Analysis of the data was descriptive and the average of the correct answers was compared using Student's t-test Among the 96 participants, the two items in which at least 70% of the team showed knowledge were: the definition of malignant hyperthermia and the professionals involved in the health care provided. With respect to all test items, 70% of nurses answered 50% correctly. The same percentage of mid-level professionals answered only 20% correctly.There was no statistically significant difference between the professional categories. This study revealed insufficient knowledge on the part of the nursing team about malignant hyperthermia.

  19. Color, Context, and Cognitive Style: Variations in Color Knowledge Retrieval as a Function of Task and Subject Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Nina S.; Kraemer, David J. M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Schlichting, Margaret L.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging tests of sensorimotor theories of semantic memory hinge on the extent to which similar activation patterns are observed during perception and retrieval of objects or object properties. The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that some of the seeming discrepancies across studies reflect flexibility in the systems responsible…

  20. Color, Context, and Cognitive Style: Variations in Color Knowledge Retrieval as a Function of Task and Subject Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Nina S.; Kraemer, David J. M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Schlichting, Margaret L.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging tests of sensorimotor theories of semantic memory hinge on the extent to which similar activation patterns are observed during perception and retrieval of objects or object properties. The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that some of the seeming discrepancies across studies reflect flexibility in the systems responsible…

  1. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  2. Center of excellence for mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Abowd, Gregory D; Abraham, William T; al’Absi, Mustafa; Gayle Beck, J; Chau, Duen Horng; Condie, Tyson; Conroy, David E; Ertin, Emre; Estrin, Deborah; Ganesan, Deepak; Lam, Cho; Marlin, Benjamin; Marsh, Clay B; Murphy, Susan A; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Patrick, Kevin; Rehg, James M; Sharmin, Moushumi; Shetty, Vivek; Sim, Ida; Spring, Bonnie; Srivastava, Mani; Wetter, David W

    2015-01-01

    Mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K) was chosen as one of 11 Big Data Centers of Excellence by the National Institutes of Health, as part of its Big Data-to-Knowledge initiative. MD2K is developing innovative tools to streamline the collection, integration, management, visualization, analysis, and interpretation of health data generated by mobile and wearable sensors. The goal of the big data solutions being developed by MD2K is to reliably quantify physical, biological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that contribute to health and disease risk. The research conducted by MD2K is targeted at improving health through early detection of adverse health events and by facilitating prevention. MD2K will make its tools, software, and training materials widely available and will also organize workshops and seminars to encourage their use by researchers and clinicians. PMID:26555017

  3. Center of excellence for mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Abowd, Gregory D; Abraham, William T; al'Absi, Mustafa; Beck, J Gayle; Chau, Duen Horng; Condie, Tyson; Conroy, David E; Ertin, Emre; Estrin, Deborah; Ganesan, Deepak; Lam, Cho; Marlin, Benjamin; Marsh, Clay B; Murphy, Susan A; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Patrick, Kevin; Rehg, James M; Sharmin, Moushumi; Shetty, Vivek; Sim, Ida; Spring, Bonnie; Srivastava, Mani; Wetter, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mobile sensor data-to-knowledge (MD2K) was chosen as one of 11 Big Data Centers of Excellence by the National Institutes of Health, as part of its Big Data-to-Knowledge initiative. MD2K is developing innovative tools to streamline the collection, integration, management, visualization, analysis, and interpretation of health data generated by mobile and wearable sensors. The goal of the big data solutions being developed by MD2K is to reliably quantify physical, biological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that contribute to health and disease risk. The research conducted by MD2K is targeted at improving health through early detection of adverse health events and by facilitating prevention. MD2K will make its tools, software, and training materials widely available and will also organize workshops and seminars to encourage their use by researchers and clinicians.

  4. National Center for Biomedical Ontology: advancing biomedicine through structured organization of scientific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel L; Lewis, Suzanna E; Mungall, Chris J; Misra, Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute, Christopher G; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F; Musen, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap, to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  5. [Knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of community health center staff on birth asphyxia in Kolokani (Mali)].

    PubMed

    Sidibé, T; Sangho, H; Doumbia, S; Sylla, M; Keita, M; Tékété, I; Cousens, S; Keita, D; Keita, H D; Keita, A S; Belemou, B; Diakité, B

    2007-01-01

    Most newborn deaths are associated with birth asphyxia (40%), low birth weigt and prematurity (25%) and infections (20%). In Mali, in the Community Health Centers (CSCOM) exercises a staff composed of the nurse chief of health centers (ICPM) assuring the supervision of the matrons that is charged in pregnancy and the newborn. An investigation KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practises) initiated in order to assess the knowledge and the practices of the community health centers agents on birth asphyxia. The survey was cross-sectional and that took place in September 2004. Have been included in the study the matrons, the nurse chief available at the time of the survey. The multiplicity of the names mentioned among which Ninakili dégou (27,3%) and Niominè (15,2%) are the most frequent and show the necessity of a qualitative investigation to find a name. Prolonged labor more than 12 hours (73,3%) and the stained amniotic liquid (63,3%) are the most recognized signs during labor making fear the birth asphyxia. In our survey the prolonged labor (63,7%), the infection/malaria of mother (60,7%) and the Dystocic delivery (45,5%) were the mostly reported causes of birth asphyxia. The pale or bluish coloration (69,7%), the irregular or lack of breath (69,7%), the lack of cry (63,6%) were known as the main signs of birth asphyxia. We noted some good practices as aspirating with a bulb (69,7%) and clearing upper ways with a finger covered with gauze (30,3% ); doing the mouth to mouth (51,5%); stimulating the newborn (66,7%). The improvement of the neontatal mortality requires the training of the staff and the equipment of the centers in small simple materials of resuscitation.

  6. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center

    PubMed Central

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to “wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity” before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of “gum disease”. Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers’ response in relation to their specific job. Conclusion: The special health care workers in the disabled children’s center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices. PMID:25878636

  7. Awareness of a rape crisis center and knowledge about sexual violence among high school adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sara H; Stark, Amrita K; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Lazebnik, Rina

    2015-02-01

    This study examined awareness among adolescents of a local rape crisis center as well as their knowledge about sexual violence. The Cleveland Rape Crisis Center (CRCC) conducts sexual violence prevention programs for high school students. A written, anonymous survey was distributed to students prior to the start of the program. Students were asked if they had heard of the CRCC; knowledge about sexual violence was assessed with a series of 7 statements (rape myths) that participants identified as true or false. Surveys were reviewed retrospectively. Analyses were carried out for individual questions and frequencies compared using chi-square analysis. A total of 1633 surveys were collected; 1118 (68.5%) participants were female and 514 (31.5%) were male; ages ranged from 12 to 19 years. Respondents described themselves as being of European descent (45.9%), African descent (26.2%), or mixed race (17.7%). Just over half (863, 52.9%) of survey respondents had heard of the CRCC. Over half (950, 58.2%) of participants answered 5 or more questions correctly (range of correct answers 0 to 7). In general, more participants who were aware of the CRCC were able to identify statements about rape correctly (P < .01 for statements 1, 4, 5, 6, and 7, P < .001 for ≥ 5 correct). Age, gender, and race were all significantly associated with knowledge about rape. Females were consistently more likely to get an answer correct, as were participants of European descent. Awareness of the CRCC was associated with increased knowledge about sexual violence. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maximizing competence through professional development: increasing disability knowledge among One-Stop Career Center staff.

    PubMed

    Hall, Allison Cohen; Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Boeltzig, Heike; Hamner, Doris; Fesko, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (USA) mandates that partners in the One-Stop Career Center system be prepared to serve a diverse customer base. Effective service delivery depends in part on a focus on human resources and professional development. This article presents innovative strategies for One-Stop Career Center staff training related to serving customers with disabilities. Findings from case study research conducted in several One-Stops across the country revealed that staff struggled with both knowledge and attitudes around disability issues. To address these concerns, local leaders developed practices that provided opportunities to gain practical skills and put acquired knowledge to use. These included a formalized curriculum focused on disability issues; informal support and consultation from a disability specialist; and exposure and learning through internships for students with disabilities. Implications are offered to stimulate thinking and creativity in local One-Stops regarding the most effective ways to facilitate staff learning and, in turn, improve services for customers with disabilities.

  9. Knowledge management: Role of the the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Timothy

    2017-09-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is an information analysis center that collects, archives, evaluates, synthesizes and distributes information, data and codes that are used in various nuclear technology applications. RSICC retains more than 2,000 software packages that have been provided by code developers from various federal and international agencies. RSICC's customers (scientists, engineers, and students from around the world) obtain access to such computing codes (source and/or executable versions) and processed nuclear data files to promote on-going research, to ensure nuclear and radiological safety, and to advance nuclear technology. The role of such information analysis centers is critical for supporting and sustaining nuclear education and training programs both domestically and internationally, as the majority of RSICC's customers are students attending U.S. universities. Additionally, RSICC operates a secure CLOUD computing system to provide access to sensitive export-controlled modeling and simulation (M&S) tools that support both domestic and international activities. This presentation will provide a general review of RSICC's activities, services, and systems that support knowledge management and education and training in the nuclear field.

  10. A multidimensional education program at substance dependence treatment centers improves patient knowledge and hepatitis C care.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Rui Tato; Costa, António; Pires, Teodomiro; Raposo, Helena; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Polónia, Cristina; Borges, Joaquim; Soares, Mariana; Vilar, Graça; Nogueira, Ana Maria

    2016-10-12

    HCV treatment among people who inject drugs (PWID) is low. Education programs may be suitable strategies to improve patients' knowledge about their condition and to overcome barriers to access treatment. The Health Educational Program (HEP) consisted of patient workshops and educational videos and leaflets, and healthcare professionals' workshops. HEP was implemented at seven substance dependence treatment centers (STDC) in Portugal. The study comprised two cross-sectional evaluations conducted before and after HEP. At both evaluations, adult patients with confirmed HCV diagnosis and registered in the STDC were consecutively included. For patients that completed both evaluations, the overall knowledge score were calculated and compared with McNemar test. Linear regression modelling was used to evaluate factors associated with baseline knowledge. Rates of referral and attendance to referral specialist, treatment proposal, initiation and retention at both evaluations were also compared with McNemar test. Overall, 504 patients with chronic hepatitis C were included: 78 % male, mean age 42.3 ± 6.6 years, 14 % school education ≤ 4 years, disease duration 11.0 ± 6.0 years and 26 % HIV co-infected. A higher baseline knowledge was independently associated with educational level ≥ 10 years (regression coefficient [B] =15.13, p < 0.001), current use of intravenous drugs (B = 7.99, p = 0.038), previous referral for treatment (B = 4.26, p = 0.008) and previous HCV treatment (B = 5.40, p = 0.003). Following HEP, mean knowledge score increased from 69 % to 79 % (p < 0.001). The rate of patient referral to a liver specialist increased from 56.2 % to 67.5 % (p < 0.001). An HEP conducted at STDCs improved significantly patient knowledge about hepatitis C, even among patients with a high baseline knowledge. The HEP has also increased the rate of referral to the liver specialist and showed a great potential to

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  12. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center Summary of Activities Conducted in FY16

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David

    2016-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation and knowledge management. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the NEKVaC as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, providing guidance in planning and executing experiments, facilitating access to and maximizing the usefulness of existing data, and preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the NEKVaC covers many interrelated activities that will need to be cultivated carefully in the near term and managed properly once the NEKVaC is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: (1) identify and prioritize projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, (2) develop and disseminate best practices and guidelines for high-fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and (3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are interdependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near term and long term, must possess elements supporting all three areas. This cross cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become “stove piped” (i.e., focused a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than achieving the larger vision). This report begins with a description of the mission areas; specifically, the role played by each major committee and the types

  13. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center – Summary of Activities Conducted in FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David; Hong, Bonnie Colleen

    2016-05-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE Complex toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the Center as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, for guidance in planning and executing experiments, for facilitating access to, and maximizing the usefulness of, existing data, and for preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the center covers many inter-related activities which will need to be cultivated carefully in the near-term and managed properly once the Center is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: 1) identification and prioritization of projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, 2) adapt or develop best practices and guidelines for high fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and 3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are inter-dependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near-term and long-term), must possess elements supporting all three. This cross-cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become ‘stove-piped’, i.e. focused so much on a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than the achieving the larger vision. Achieving the broader vision will require a healthy and accountable level of activity in each of the areas. This will take time and

  14. Development of user-centered interfaces to search the knowledge resources of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library.

    PubMed

    Jones, Josette; Harris, Marcelline; Bagley-Thompson, Cheryl; Root, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This poster describes the development of user-centered interfaces in order to extend the functionality of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library (VHINL) from library to web based portal to nursing knowledge resources. The existing knowledge structure and computational models are revised and made complementary. Nurses' search behavior is captured and analyzed, and the resulting search models are mapped to the revised knowledge structure and computational model.

  15. Development of User-Centered Interfaces to Search the Knowledge Resources of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Josette; Harris, Marcelline; Thompson, Cheryl Bagley; Root, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This poster describes the development of user-centered interfaces in order to extend the functionality of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library (VHINL) from library to web based portal to nursing knowledge resources. The existing knowledge structure and computational models are revised and made complementary. Nurses’ search behavior is captured and analyzed, and the resulting search models are mapped to the revised knowledge structure and computational model. PMID:14728389

  16. Designing a knowledge management system for distributed activities: a human centered approach.

    PubMed

    Rinkus, Susan; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A; Zhang, Jiajie

    2003-01-01

    In this study we use the principles of distributed cognition and the methodology of human-centered distributed information design to analyze a complex distributed human-computer system, identify its problems, and generate design requirements and implementation specifications of a replacement prototype for effective organizational memory and knowledge management. We argue that a distributed human-computer information system has unique properties, structures and processes that are best described in the language of distributed cognition. Distributed cognition provides researchers a richer theoretical understanding of human-computer interactions and enables re-searchers to capture the phenomenon that emerges in social interactions as well as the interactions between people and structures in their environment.

  17. Designing a Knowledge Management System for Distributed Activities: A Human Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rinkus, Susan; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Zhang, Jiajie

    2003-01-01

    In this study we use the principles of distributed cognition and the methodology of human-centered distributed information design to analyze a complex distributed human-computer system, identify its problems, and generate design requirements and implementation specifications of a replacement prototype for effective organizational memory and knowledge management. We argue that a distributed human-computer information system has unique properties, structures and processes that are best described in the language of distributed cognition. Distributed cognition provides researchers a richer theoretical understanding of human-computer interactions and enables researchers to capture the phenomenon that emerges in social interactions as well as the interactions between people and structures in their environment. PMID:14728235

  18. POLI.teca: a Design Knowledge Center at Politecnico di Milano. A Physical Interface to Networked Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    knowledge e information management per il design. Milano: Edizioni POLI.Design. Cosmai, L. (2004). Report sul servizio POLI.teca - 1 ° semestre ...categorize it as a Design Knowledge Centre. Keywords. Knowledge management, Design, Metadata description, Distributed environment. 1 . Introduction...Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time

  19. Knowledge and likelihood to recommend intrauterine devices for adolescents among school-based health center providers.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Julia E; Hacker, Jordan G; Rousselle, Marissa A; Gold, Marji

    2012-10-01

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend intrauterine devices (IUDs) as safe and highly effective contraceptives for adolescents. Nevertheless, many U.S. providers do not recommend or provide IUDs to adolescents-a population at high risk for unintended pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to IUD provision for adolescents. A 36-item self-administered survey of knowledge and attitudes regarding IUDs was completed by 162 staff of New York City school-based health centers, including 69 clinicians (e.g., pediatricians and nurse practitioners) and 93 nonclinicians (e.g., social workers and health educators). Half (55%) of all respondents would be likely to recommend an IUD to a patient under age 20 years. Respondents were less likely to recommend an IUD for patients with history of recent STD (31%), remote pelvic inflammatory disease (37%), and patients not in a monogamous relationship (38%). Whereas 77% of respondents indicated that IUDs are safe for adolescents, 18% of those respondents would be unlikely to recommend an IUD to a patient under age 20 years. While 86% of respondents knew that IUDs can be used in nulliparous women, 25% of those respondents would be unlikely to recommend an IUD to a patient who has never been pregnant. Additionally, 61% believed that counseling patients about IUDs would take more time than other methods. Misinformation about risks associated with IUDs and beliefs about patient eligibility may present barriers to provision. Apparent contradictions between knowledge and likelihood to recommend IUDs warrant further study. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating knowledge exchange and the assessment of dryland management alternatives - A learning-centered participatory approach.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Susana; Llovet, Joan; Ocampo-Melgar, Anahí; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Mayor, Ángeles G; Murias, Cristina; Vallejo, V Ramón; Orr, Barron J

    2016-12-08

    The adoption of sustainable land management strategies and practices that respond to current climate and human pressures requires both assessment tools that can lead to better informed decision-making and effective knowledge-exchange mechanisms that facilitate new learning and behavior change. We propose a learning-centered participatory approach that links land management assessment and knowledge exchange and integrates science-based data and stakeholder perspectives on both biophysical and socio-economic attributes. We outline a structured procedure for a transparent assessment of land management alternatives, tailored to dryland management, that is based on (1) principles of constructivism and social learning, (2) the participation of stakeholders throughout the whole assessment process, from design to implementation, and (3) the combination of site-specific indicators, identified by local stakeholders as relevant to their particular objectives and context conditions, and science-based indicators that represent ecosystem services of drylands worldwide. The proposed procedure follows a pattern of eliciting, challenging, and self-reviewing stakeholder perspectives that aims to facilitate learning. The difference between the initial baseline perspectives and the final self-reviewed stakeholder perspectives is used as a proxy of learning. We illustrate the potential of this methodology by its application to the assessment of land uses in a Mediterranean fire-prone area in East Spain. The approach may be applied to a variety of socio-ecological systems and decision-making and governance scales.

  1. Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) Needs Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress developing simulation tools to predict the behavior of nuclear systems with greater accuracy and of increasing our capability to predict the behavior of these systems outside of the standard range of applications. These analytical tools require a more complex array of validation tests to accurately simulate the physics and multiple length and time scales. Results from modern simulations will allow experiment designers to narrow the range of conditions needed to bound system behavior and to optimize the deployment of instrumentation to limit the breadth and cost of the campaign. Modern validation, verification and uncertainty quantification (VVUQ) techniques enable analysts to extract information from experiments in a systematic manner and provide the users with a quantified uncertainty estimate. Unfortunately, the capability to perform experiments that would enable taking full advantage of the formalisms of these modern codes has progressed relatively little (with some notable exceptions in fuels and thermal-hydraulics); the majority of the experimental data available today is the "historic" data accumulated over the last decades of nuclear systems R&D. A validated code-model is a tool for users. An unvalidated code-model is useful for code developers to gain understanding, publish research results, attract funding, etc. As nuclear analysis codes have become more sophisticated, so have the measurement and validation methods and the challenges that confront them. A successful yet cost-effective validation effort requires expertise possessed only by a few, resources possessed only by the well-capitalized (or a willing collective), and a clear, well-defined objective (validating a code that is developed to satisfy the need(s) of an actual user). To that end, the Idaho National Laboratory established the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center to address the challenges of modern code validation and to

  2. Healthcare professionals' sources of knowledge of complementary medicine in an academic center.

    PubMed

    Aveni, Eleonore; Bauer, Brent; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Decosterd, Isabelle; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Bonvin, Eric; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Complementary medicine (CM) is utilized in a growing number of academic centers despite the debate concerning its value, risks and benefits. Healthcare professionals often feel uncomfortable discussing CM with patients, and little is known about their sources of knowledge in the field of CM. To assess healthcare professionals' sources of knowledge and attitude toward CM in an academic hospital. The cross-sectional web-based survey took place from October to December 2013. A total of 4,925 healthcare professionals working at Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, were invited to answer the questionnaire. Factors influencing healthcare professionals' opinion toward CM, knowledge and communication about CM. The questionnaire was answered by 1,247 healthcare professionals. The three key factors influencing professionals' opinion toward CM were personal experience, clinical experience and evidence demonstrating the physiological mechanism of CM. Personal experience was more associated with nurses' and midwives' opinion compared to physicians' (80.8% vs 57.1%, OR = 3.08, [95% CI: 2.35-4.05], P<0.001 and 85.3% vs 57.1%, OR = 3.83, [95% CI: 1.95-7.53], P<0.001, respectively) as well as with professionals trained in CM compared to non-trained professionals (86.0% vs 73.2%, OR = 2.60, [95% CI: 1.92-3.53], P<0.001). Physicians relied more on randomized controlled clinical trials compared to nurses (81.3% vs 62.9%, OR = 0.43, [95% CI: 0.33-0.57], P<0.001). A majority of the respondents (82.5%) agreed that they lacked knowledge about CM and 65.0% noted that it was the patient who initially started the discussion about CM. Different professionals used different strategies to forge opinions regarding CM: physicians relied more on scientific evidence, while nurses and midwives were more influenced by personal experience. Regardless of preferred information source, most respondents did not feel prepared to address patient questions regarding CM. Enhancing interprofessional

  3. HyperText MARCup: A Conceptualization for Encoding, De-Constructing, Searching, Retrieving, and Using Traditional Knowledge Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. Edward; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the integration of Standard General Markup Language, Hypertext Markup Language, and MARC format to parse classified analytical bibliographies. Use of the resulting electronic knowledge constructs in local library systems as maps of a specified subset of resources is discussed, and an example is included. (LRW)

  4. HyperText MARCup: A Conceptualization for Encoding, De-Constructing, Searching, Retrieving, and Using Traditional Knowledge Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. Edward; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the integration of Standard General Markup Language, Hypertext Markup Language, and MARC format to parse classified analytical bibliographies. Use of the resulting electronic knowledge constructs in local library systems as maps of a specified subset of resources is discussed, and an example is included. (LRW)

  5. Cervical cancer, human papillomavirus and vaccines: assessment of the information retrieved from general knowledge websites in Chile.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C S; Krauskopf, E; Villota, C E; Burzio, L O; Villegas, J E

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy worldwide and is the sixth cause of cancer death in Chile. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for most cervical cancers. Individuals seeking basic information about HPV frequently turn to health information websites. We hypothesized that some of their data may be inaccurate. Comparative analysis of information. We analyze the content of highly accessed websites such as the Spanish version of Wikipedia and Yahoo Answers through the application of a questionnaire, as well as a website managed by the Chilean Ministry of Health (Minsal). The accuracy of each answer was confirmed by comparison with information retrieved from articles published by indexed journals. The information provided by the Spanish version of Wikipedia was accurate; nevertheless a few omissions were detected. The quality of the information provided by the Spanish version of Yahoo Answers was inaccurate and confusing. The Minsal website lacked important information on several topics about HPV even though it is managed and endorsed by the government. We suggest periodical content reviews to increase the completeness, transparency and correctness of the website. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Removing the center from computing: biology's new mode of digital knowledge production.

    PubMed

    November, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    This article shows how the USA's National Institutes of Health (NIH) helped to bring about a major shift in the way computers are used to produce knowledge and in the design of computers themselves as a consequence of its early 1960s efforts to introduce information technology to biologists. Starting in 1960 the NIH sought to reform the life sciences by encouraging researchers to make use of digital electronic computers, but despite generous federal support biologists generally did not embrace the new technology. Initially the blame fell on biologists' lack of appropriate (i.e. digital) data for computers to process. However, when the NIH consulted MIT computer architect Wesley Clark about this problem, he argued that the computer's quality as a device that was centralized posed an even greater challenge to potential biologist users than did the computer's need for digital data. Clark convinced the NIH that if the agency hoped to effectively computerize biology, it would need to satisfy biologists' experimental and institutional needs by providing them the means to use a computer without going to a computing center. With NIH support, Clark developed the 1963 Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC), a small, real-time interactive computer intended to be used inside the laboratory and controlled entirely by its biologist users. Once built, the LINC provided a viable alternative to the 1960s norm of large computers housed in computing centers. As such, the LINC not only became popular among biologists, but also served in later decades as an important precursor of today's computing norm in the sciences and far beyond, the personal computer.

  7. Academic Health Center Management of Chronic Diseases through Knowledge Networks: Project ECHO

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjeev; Geppert, Cynthia M. A.; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Pullara, Frank; Bjeletich, Barbara; Simpson, Gary; Alverson, Dale C.; Moore, Lori B.; Kuhl, Dave; Scaletti, Joseph V.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe an innovative academic health center (AHC)-led program of health care delivery and clinical education for the management of complex, common, and chronic diseases in underserved areas, using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a model. The program, based at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, represents a paradigm shift in thinking and funding for the threefold mission of AHCs, moving from traditional fee-for-service models to public health funding of knowledge networks. This program, Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO), involves a partnership of academic medicine, public health offices, corrections departments, and rural community clinics dedicated to providing best practices and protocol-driven health care in rural areas. Telemedicine and Internet connections enable specialists in the program to comanage patients with complex diseases, using case-based knowledge networks and learning loops. Project ECHO partners (nurse practitioners, primary care physicians, physician assistants, and pharmacists) present HCV-positive patients during weekly two-hour telemedicine clinics using a standardized, case-based format that includes discussion of history, physical examination, test results, treatment complications, and psychiatric, medical, and substance abuse issues. In these case-based learning clinics, partners rapidly gain deep domain expertise in HCV as they collaborate with university specialists in hepatology, infectious disease, psychiatry, and substance abuse in comanaging their patients. Systematic monitoring of treatment outcomes is an integral aspect of the project. The authors believe this methodology will be generalizable to other complex and chronic conditions in a wide variety of underserved areas to improve disease outcomes, and it offers an opportunity for AHCs to enhance and expand their traditional mission of teaching, patient care, and research. PMID:17264693

  8. Academic health center management of chronic diseases through knowledge networks: Project ECHO.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Geppert, Cynthia M A; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Pullara, Frank; Bjeletich, Barbara; Simpson, Gary; Alverson, Dale C; Moore, Lori B; Kuhl, Dave; Scaletti, Joseph V

    2007-02-01

    The authors describe an innovative academic health center (AHC)-led program of health care delivery and clinical education for the management of complex, common, and chronic diseases in underserved areas, using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a model. The program, based at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, represents a paradigm shift in thinking and funding for the threefold mission of AHCs, moving from traditional fee-for-service models to public health funding of knowledge networks. This program, Project Extension for Community Health care Outcomes (ECHO), involves a partnership of academic medicine, public health offices, corrections departments, and rural community clinics dedicated to providing best practices and protocol-driven health care in rural areas. Telemedicine and Internet connections enable specialists in the program to comanage patients with complex diseases, using case-based knowledge networks and learning loops. Project ECHO partners (nurse practitioners, primary care physicians, physician assistants, and pharmacists) present HCV-positive patients during weekly two-hour telemedicine clinics using a standardized, case-based format that includes discussion of history, physical examination, test results, treatment complications, and psychiatric, medical, and substance abuse issues. In these case-based learning clinics, partners rapidly gain deep domain expertise in HCV as they collaborate with university specialists in hepatology, infectious disease, psychiatry, and substance abuse in comanaging their patients. Systematic monitoring of treatment outcomes is an integral aspect of the project. The authors believe this methodology will be generalizable to other complex and chronic conditions in a wide variety of underserved areas to improve disease outcomes, and it offers an opportunity for AHCs to enhance and expand their traditional mission of teaching, patient care, and research.

  9. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility.

    PubMed

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher; Delp, Scott L

    2015-11-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research.

  10. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research. PMID:26272077

  11. Safety and Effectiveness of Drip, Ship, and Retrieve Paradigm for Acute Ischemic Stroke: a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    HIYAMA, Nagayasu; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; SHIRAKAWA, Manabu; UCHIDA, Kazutaka; OKI, Yoshiharu; SHINDO, Seigo; TOKUDA, Kou

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the efficacy and safety of the “drip, ship, and retrieve (DSR)” approach used to improve patient access to thrombectomy for acute stroke. Methods: The study participants were 45 patients who underwent thrombectomy following intravenous tissue plasminogen activator between September 2013 and August 2015. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they were transferred from another hospital (DSR group; n = 33) or were brought in directly (Direct group; n = 12). The two groups were compared based on their baseline characteristics, time from stroke onset to reperfusion, outcome, and adverse events. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. Time from onset until admission to our facility was significantly shorter in the Direct group (56.9 min) than in the DSR group (163.5 min) (P <0.0001). Conversely, time from arrival at the hospital to arterial puncture was significantly shorter in the DSR group (25.0 min) than in the Direct group (109.5 min) (P <0.0001). Time from onset to reperfusion did not differ significantly between the groups. There was no significant difference in patient outcomes, with a modified Rankin scale score of 0–2 (44.8% in DSR group versus 48.7% in Direct group). Moreover, there was no difference in the incidence of adverse events. Discussion: Despite the time required to transfer patients in the DSR group between hospitals, reducing the time from arrival until commencement of endovascular therapy meant that the time from onset to reperfusion was approximately equivalent to that of the Direct group. Conclusion: Time-saving measures need to be taken by both the transferring and receiving hospitals in DSR paradigm. PMID:27432512

  12. Emergency contraception: providers' knowledge and attitudes and their relationship with users' knowledge and attitudes at public health centers/posts of tabriz.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Farshbaf-Khalili, Azizeh; Moeinpoor, Roya

    2012-05-01

    Emergency contraceptives are accessible and acceptable methods for most women, which their proper use could prevent about three quarters of unwanted pregnancies. In this study, we aimed to determine the providers' knowledge, attitudes and their relation with the pills and condoms users' knowledge of and attitudes towards emergency contraception at public health centers/posts in Tabriz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, subjects were 140 health providers working in randomly selected 19 health centers and 33 health posts and 280 married women aged 15 to 49 years who were using contraceptive pills or condoms (two clients of each selected provider). A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the providers, while the questionnaire for the clients was filled up by face-to-face interview. The relationships were determined by Pearson's correlation test. Mean score of the providers' knowledge and attitude was 69.4 ± 11.8 and 70.1 ± 12.8, respectively (possible score range was 0-100). The providers' knowledge score was good only in 35% (score > 75.0). High majority (95.7%) had positive attitudes (score > 50.0). Overall, there were no sig-nificant relationships, neither between the provider's and users' knowledge nor between their attitudes (p > 0.05). The providers' knowledge was insufficient, and there was no significant association between the providers' and users' knowledge and attitudes. Thus, in addition to the need for promoting providers' knowledge, the other barriers should also be recognized and removed in order to promote using this method.

  13. Gresham's Law: Knowledge or Information? The Center for the Book Viewpoint Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorstin, Daniel J.

    There is a distinction to be made between knowledge and information. Knowledge is orderly and cumulative; information is random and miscellaneous and may be collected simply because it is there. The information industry is flourishing, but knowledge institutions--colleges, universities, and libraries--go begging. The knowledge industry is actually…

  14. Measuring Efficiency of Knowledge Production in Health Research Centers Using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA): A Case Study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad Meskarpour; Nasiri, Taha; Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Anabad, Hosein Amini; Ardakan, Payman Mahboobi

    2016-11-01

    Efficiency analysis is necessary in order to avoid waste of materials, energy, effort, money, and time during scientific research. Therefore, analyzing efficiency of knowledge production in health areas is necessary, especially for developing and in-transition countries. As the first step in this field, the aim of this study was the analysis of selected health research center efficiency using data envelopment analysis (DEA). This retrospective and applied study was conducted in 2015 using input and output data of 16 health research centers affiliated with a health sciences university in Iran during 2010-2014. The technical efficiency of health research centers was evaluated based on three basic data envelopment analysis (DEA) models: input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented. The input and output data of each health research center for years 2010-2014 were collected from the Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHE) profile and analyzed by R software. The mean efficiency score in input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented models was 0.781, 0.671, and 0.798, respectively. Based on results of the study, half of the health research centers are operating below full efficiency, and about one-third of them are operating under the average efficiency level. There is also a large gap between health research center efficiency relative to each other. It is necessary for health research centers to improve their efficiency in knowledge production through better management of available resources. The higher level of efficiency in a significant number of health research centers is achievable through more efficient management of human resources and capital. Further research is needed to measure and follow the efficiency of knowledge production by health research centers around the world and over a period of time.

  15. Measuring Efficiency of Knowledge Production in Health Research Centers Using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA): A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad Meskarpour; Nasiri, Taha; Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Anabad, Hosein Amini; Ardakan, Payman Mahboobi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Efficiency analysis is necessary in order to avoid waste of materials, energy, effort, money, and time during scientific research. Therefore, analyzing efficiency of knowledge production in health areas is necessary, especially for developing and in-transition countries. As the first step in this field, the aim of this study was the analysis of selected health research center efficiency using data envelopment analysis (DEA). Methods This retrospective and applied study was conducted in 2015 using input and output data of 16 health research centers affiliated with a health sciences university in Iran during 2010–2014. The technical efficiency of health research centers was evaluated based on three basic data envelopment analysis (DEA) models: input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented. The input and output data of each health research center for years 2010–2014 were collected from the Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHE) profile and analyzed by R software. Results The mean efficiency score in input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented models was 0.781, 0.671, and 0.798, respectively. Based on results of the study, half of the health research centers are operating below full efficiency, and about one-third of them are operating under the average efficiency level. There is also a large gap between health research center efficiency relative to each other. Conclusion It is necessary for health research centers to improve their efficiency in knowledge production through better management of available resources. The higher level of efficiency in a significant number of health research centers is achievable through more efficient management of human resources and capital. Further research is needed to measure and follow the efficiency of knowledge production by health research centers around the world and over a period of time. PMID:28344756

  16. Website quality, expectation, confirmation, and end user satisfaction: the knowledge-intensive website of the Korean National Cancer Information Center.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chulmo; Wati, Yulia; Park, Keeho; Lim, Min Kyung

    2011-11-02

    The fact that patient satisfaction with primary care clinical practices and physician-patient communications has decreased gradually has brought a new opportunity to the online channel as a supplementary service to provide additional information. In this study, our objectives were to examine the process of cognitive knowledge expectation-confirmation from eHealth users and to recommend the attributes of a "knowledge-intensive website.". Knowledge expectation can be defined as users' existing attitudes or beliefs regarding expected levels of knowledge they may gain by accessing the website. Knowledge confirmation is the extent to which user's knowledge expectation of information systems use is realized during actual use. In our hypothesized research model, perceived information quality, presentation and attractiveness as well as knowledge expectation influence knowledge confirmation, which in turn influences perceived usefulness and end user satisfaction, which feeds back to knowledge expectation. An empirical study was conducted at the National Cancer Center (NCC), Republic of Korea (South Korea), by evaluating its official website. A user survey was administered containing items to measure subjectively perceived website quality and expectation-confirmation attributes. A study sample of 198 usable responses was used for further analysis. We used the structural equation model to test the proposed research model. Knowledge expectation exhibited a positive effect on knowledge confirmation (beta = .27, P < .001). The paths from information quality, information presentation, and website attractiveness to knowledge confirmation were also positive and significant (beta = .24, P < .001; beta = .29, P < .001; beta = .18, P < .001, respectively). Moreover, the effect of knowledge confirmation on perceived usefulness was also positively significant (beta = .64, P < .001). Knowledge expectation together with knowledge confirmation and perceived usefulness also significantly

  17. Website Quality, Expectation, Confirmation, and End User Satisfaction: The Knowledge-Intensive Website of the Korean National Cancer Information Center

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chulmo; Wati, Yulia; Park, Keeho

    2011-01-01

    Background The fact that patient satisfaction with primary care clinical practices and physician-patient communications has decreased gradually has brought a new opportunity to the online channel as a supplementary service to provide additional information. Objective In this study, our objectives were to examine the process of cognitive knowledge expectation-confirmation from eHealth users and to recommend the attributes of a “knowledge-intensive website.”. Knowledge expectation can be defined as users’ existing attitudes or beliefs regarding expected levels of knowledge they may gain by accessing the website. Knowledge confirmation is the extent to which user’s knowledge expectation of information systems use is realized during actual use. In our hypothesized research model, perceived information quality, presentation and attractiveness as well as knowledge expectation influence knowledge confirmation, which in turn influences perceived usefulness and end user satisfaction, which feeds back to knowledge expectation. Methods An empirical study was conducted at the National Cancer Center (NCC), Republic of Korea (South Korea), by evaluating its official website. A user survey was administered containing items to measure subjectively perceived website quality and expectation-confirmation attributes. A study sample of 198 usable responses was used for further analysis. We used the structural equation model to test the proposed research model. Results Knowledge expectation exhibited a positive effect on knowledge confirmation (beta = .27, P < .001). The paths from information quality, information presentation, and website attractiveness to knowledge confirmation were also positive and significant (beta = .24, P < .001; beta = .29, P < .001; beta = .18, P < .001, respectively). Moreover, the effect of knowledge confirmation on perceived usefulness was also positively significant (beta = .64, P < .001). Knowledge expectation together with knowledge confirmation

  18. A Learner-Centered Spiral Knowledge Approach to Teaching Isotope Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Aided by the insights I gained by participation in the Arizona Board of Regents Tri-University Collaboration on Learner-Centered Practice, I made major changes to a graduate course in isotope geology (GLG617), including: 1) implementation of a spiral knowledge approach (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004); 2) incorporation of more learner-centered in-class activities; and 3) more explicit emphasis on skills that I regarded as important for success in geochemistry. In the geosciences, the field of isotope geology is now an essential area of inquiry with implications for geologic timescales, climate information, tracing geochemical processes, and biological evolution, to name a few. The traditional approach to teaching isotope geology suffers from the fact that learning tends to be compartmentalized by technique/approach and one subfield (e.g., stable or radiogenic isotopes) is usually favored by appearing earlier in semester. To make learning more integrated, I employed a simplified spiral learning approach so that common principles could be revisited several times over the course of the semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental principles could be scaffolded into greater understanding. Other learner-centered changes to the course included more explicit emphasis on helping students become comfortable with interpreting data displayed graphically and explicit emphasis on helping students give and evaluate oral presentations that rely on isotope data. I also developed a detailed grading rubric for the final paper and allowed students to have a draft of their final papers evaluated and graded (guided by Huba and Freed, 2000) A number of cooperative learning activities developed specifically for this course (19 in all) enabled me to gain a better appreciation for students' learning. Activities included pair share, round-robin, small group explorations of techniques and case studies (sometimes as introduction to, sometimes as review of material

  19. An approach to knowledge engineering to support knowledge-based simulation of payload ground processing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Shawn; Mcdaniel, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Planning for processing payloads was always difficult and time-consuming. With the advent of Space Station Freedom and its capability to support a myriad of complex payloads, the planning to support this ground processing maze involves thousands of man-hours of often tedious data manipulation. To provide the capability to analyze various processing schedules, an object oriented knowledge-based simulation environment called the Advanced Generic Accomodations Planning Environment (AGAPE) is being developed. Having nearly completed the baseline system, the emphasis in this paper is directed toward rule definition and its relation to model development and simulation. The focus is specifically on the methodologies implemented during knowledge acquisition, analysis, and representation within the AGAPE rule structure. A model is provided to illustrate the concepts presented. The approach demonstrates a framework for AGAPE rule development to assist expert system development.

  20. Patient-centered outcomes research in appendicitis in children: Bridging the knowledge gap.

    PubMed

    Chau, Danielle B; Ciullo, Sean S; Watson-Smith, Debra; Chun, Thomas H; Kurkchubasche, Arlet G; Luks, Francois I

    2016-01-01

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) aims to give patients a better understanding of the treatment options to enable optimal decision-making. As nonoperative alternatives are now being evaluated in children for acute appendicitis, we surveyed patients and their families regarding their knowledge of appendicitis and evaluated whether providing basic medical information would affect their perception of the disease and allow them to more rationally consider the treatment alternatives. Families of children aged 5-18 presenting to the Emergency Department with suspected appendicitis were recruited for a tablet-based interactive educational survey. One hundred subjects (caregivers and patients ≥ 15 years) were questioned before and after an education session about their understanding of appendicitis, including questions on three hypothetical treatment options: urgent appendectomy, antibiotics alone, or initial antibiotics followed by elective appendectomy. Subjects were clearly informed that urgent appendectomy is currently the standard of care. Only 14% of respondents correctly identified the mortality rate of appendicitis (17 deaths/year according to the 2010 US census) when compared with other extremely rare causes of death. Fifty-four and 31% thought it was more common than death from lightning (40/year) and hunting-associated deaths (44/year), respectively. Eighty-two percent of respondents believed it "likely" or "very likely" that the appendix would rupture if operation was at all delayed, and 81% believed that rupture of the appendix would rapidly lead to severe complications and death. In univariate analysis, this perception was significantly more prevalent for mothers (odds ratio, (OR) 5.19, confidence interval (CI) 1.33-21.15), and subjects who knew at least one friend or relative who had a negative experience with appendicitis (OR 5.53, CI 1.40-25.47). Following education, these perceptions changed significantly (53% still believed that immediate

  1. [Women's behavior and knowledge concerning family planning in the region of the Park Health Center].

    PubMed

    Ozyurda, F; Durmusoglu, M

    1989-01-01

    1390 women aged 15-44 were surveyed between February-June 1988 in the vicinity of the Park Health Education Center by the Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Public Health. Within this sample, the survey focused on the knowledge, attitude and behavior of the 1082 married women, regarding birth control. Birth control pills, IUDs, and condoms were classified as effective modern birth control methods. Other less effective traditional methods were classified as ineffective. Analysis of the data indicated 74.2% of the subjects resort to some form of birth control while 66.2% use an effective modern method. Age, education, work status, number of children and type and location of housing influence family planning decisions. In general, the women using birth control are primary school graduates aged between 25-39, living in urban areas for at least 5 years. Most have 2 to 3 children and have had an abortion. The most frequently used method of birth control is the IUD. It is notable that 29.5% use the ineffective withdrawal method. 58.62% of the women who do not use birth control, avoid family planning because of their husbands. These women have 2 or more children and are illiterate or primary school graduates between the ages of 25-35 when they are most likely to become pregnant. Family planning services should be geared towards educating these families, especially the husbands. Education services should also target families using the withdrawal method and the 35-44 age group of women who show a low percentage of contraceptive use.

  2. Effect of Baseline Characteristics on the Outcome of Stent Retriever-Based Thrombectomy in Acute Basilar Artery Occlusions: A Single-Center Experience and Pooled Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wan-Ling; Li, Zi-Fu; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yang, Peng-Fei; Simfukwe, Keith; Fang, Yi-Bin; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Deng, Ben-Qiang; Hong, Bo; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qing-Hai

    2017-08-01

    To explore the association of baseline characteristics and the outcome of patients with acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) after stent retriever-based thrombectomy (SRT). Clinical and imaging information of consecutive SRT-treated patients with BAO from a comprehensive stroke center and up-to-date literature were reviewed respectively. The impact of baseline variables toward favorable outcome was evaluated using subgroup analysis and odds ratio (OR) extracted from published data together with single-center records using pooled analysis. Nineteen cases from our center and 15 published studies involving 487 cases were included. Estimated pooled favorable outcome rate was 0.3746 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3165-0.4327), mortality was 0.2950 (95% CI, 0.2390-0.3510). Pooled estimates showed that successful reperfusion (modified thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia scale 2b or 3) gained by SRT alone was 0.7317 (95% CI, 0.6532-0.8102) and final successful reperfusion rate with or without additional reperfusion procedures was 0.8834 (95% CI, 0.8279-0.9390). Univariate analysis indicated that patients with successful reperfusion (OR, 2.05; P = 0.05), distal segment occlusion (OR, 2.03; P = 0.03), and cardioembolus origin (OR, 2.13; P = 0.01) were more likely to have favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 at 3 months). Study series that applied intra-arterial thrombolysis, angioplasty, or stenting as rescuing therapy had higher successful reperfusion rate but they did not show a higher rate of favorable outcome. SRT with or without additional treatment appeared to be effective for the treatment of BAO. Successful reperfusion, distal segment occlusion, and cardiac embolism were associated with favorable outcome. The overall benefit of lesions requiring additional reperfusion therapy was unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patients' medical knowledge and health counseling: what kind of information helps to make communication patient-centered?

    PubMed

    Jucks, Regina; Paus, Elisabeth; Bromme, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    To examine how physicians use information about a patient's background knowledge when both anticipating what a patient knows and producing actual answers in an email counseling setting. A fictitious patient used a (high vs. low) level of technical jargon in an email inquiry about diabetes and provided explicit information on prior knowledge (high vs. low) through self-report. Final-year medical students (semi-experts) were asked to gauge the patient's knowledge level (Experiment 1) and to produce an answer to the inquiry (Experiment 2). A total of N=150 participated in one of the two experiments. Information from word usage and self-reports was used differently in the two experiments. A patient self-reporting low knowledge was assumed to have less background knowledge than one reporting some knowledge about the domain. The technicality of the patient's word use influenced the answers: these were more technical when the inquiry used technical jargon instead of everyday language. Knowledge anticipation and communication behavior in email health care seem to be guided by different hints regarding the patient, suggesting the existence of two separate mechanisms. Beyond merely teaching physicians or health care providers to be aware of the patient's knowledge level when formulating a patient-centered response, on-task methods should support health care providers during the actual communication phase by providing, for instance, metacognitive prompts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children's body mass index.

    PubMed

    Alkon, Abbey; Crowley, Angela A; Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Hill, Sherika; Pan, Yi; Nguyen, Viet; Rose, Roberta; Savage, Eric; Forestieri, Nina; Shipman, Linda; Kotch, Jonathan B

    2014-03-01

    To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children's body mass index (BMI). A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center's written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children's nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers' and parents' knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children's zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by trained child health professionals such as child care

  5. Idea Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to retrieve ideas in addition to content retrieval by such means as classification, subject headings, and keywords. Three models for idea retrieval are described, and a new model is proposed which combines selection, a controlled vocabulary, and logical structure. (seven references) (CLB)

  6. Attitude and knowledge changes in collegiate dancers following a short-term, team-centered prevention program on eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M; Green, James M; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Leeper, James D; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T

    2011-06-01

    Eating knowledge, nutritional knowledge, and psychological changes among female collegiate dancers were examined before and after a 4-wk. team-centered program on sport nutrition, exercise, and disordered eating consequences. Collegiate female dancers from two NCAA Division I institutions participated in a control (n = 19; M age = 19.1 yr., SD = 1.0) or intervention (n = 21; M age = 19.2 yr., SD = 1.2) group. Measures were administered to both groups before and after intervention to assess eating disorders, depression, and nutritional and disordered eating knowledge. There was a statistically significant increase in scores on nutritional and overall eating disorder knowledge in the intervention group compared to the control group. Mean scores on depression, drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, and maturity fears decreased in the intervention group.

  7. FY2017 Pilot Project Plan for the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2016-10-30

    To prepare for technical development of computational code validation under the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVAC) initiative, several meetings were held by a group of experts of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop requirements of, and formulate a structure for, a transient fuel database through leveraging existing resources. It was concluded in discussions of these meetings that a pilot project is needed to address the most fundamental issues that can generate immediate stimulus to near-future validation developments as well as long-lasting benefits to NEKVAC operation. The present project is proposed based on the consensus of these discussions. Analysis of common scenarios in code validation indicates that the incapability of acquiring satisfactory validation data is often a showstopper that must first be tackled before any confident validation developments can be carried out. Validation data are usually found scattered in different places most likely with interrelationships among the data not well documented, incomplete with information for some parameters missing, nonexistent, or unrealistic to experimentally generate. Furthermore, with very different technical backgrounds, the modeler, the experimentalist, and the knowledgebase developer that must be involved in validation data development often cannot communicate effectively without a data package template that is representative of the data structure for the information domain of interest to the desired code validation. This pilot project is proposed to use the legendary TREAT Experiments Database to provide core elements for creating an ideal validation data package. Data gaps and missing data interrelationships will be identified from these core elements. All the identified missing elements will then be filled in with experimental data if available from other existing sources or with dummy data if nonexistent. The resulting hybrid

  8. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of pregnant women towards antenatal care in primary healthcare centers in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hala K; El Borgy, Mohamed D; Mohammed, Huda O

    2014-12-01

    Many underlying factors influence the capacity of women to survive from complications emerging during pregnancy and childbirth, including women's health and nutritional status starting from childhood and during pregnancy. Also, women's access to and the use of appropriate health services according to their knowledge, attitude, and behavior during pregnancy. This study was designed to assess the knowledge, the attitude, and practices of pregnant women toward antenatal care in primary healthcare centers in Benghazi, Libya. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 300 pregnant women, who were chosen from three primary healthcare centers with the highest attendance rate of pregnant women in Benghazi, Libya, using a structured interview questionnaire. The highest percentage (85.3%) of pregnant women had a high knowledge score regarding antenatal care, and most of them (96.0%) showed a positive attitude; the highest percentage (76.4%) of pregnant women also had good practice scores.The level of overall knowledge had a significant direct correlation with the practices towards antenatal care (r=0.228, P≤0.001), whereas it had an insignificant correlation with the attitude (r=0.029, P=0.619). The majority of the participants of the study tended to have a high level of knowledge and practices. Also, most of them had a positive attitude towards antenatal care. These findings can be used to plan a customized health intervention program aiming to improve maternal health practices regarding antenatal care and eventually improve the health status of Libyan women.

  9. Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on knowledge includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with knowledge and differences between how animals and humans learn. Sidebars discuss animal intelligence, learning proper behavior, and getting news from the Internet. (LRW)

  10. Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on knowledge includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with knowledge and differences between how animals and humans learn. Sidebars discuss animal intelligence, learning proper behavior, and getting news from the Internet. (LRW)

  11. The effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses' knowledge at dialysis centers in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Kalthoum Ibrahim; Abu-Aisha, Hasan; Abboud, Omar Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    End-stage renal disease is a worldwide problem that requires highly skilled nursing care. Hemodialysis (HD) is a corner-stone procedure in the management of most patients who require renal replacement therapy. Adequate vascular access is essential for the successful use of HD. Appropriate knowledge in taking care of vascular access is essential for minimizing complications and accurately recognizing vascular access-related problems. This study was to evaluate the effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses' knowledge at nine dialysis centers in Khartoum State. This was a Quasi experimental study (pre-and post-test for the same group). Sixty-one nurses working in these HD centers were chosen by simple random sampling method. A structured face-to-face interview questionnaire based on the Kidney Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) clinical practice guidelines for vascular access care was used. Instrument validity was determined through content validity by a panel of experts. Reliability of the instrument was tested by a pilot study to test the knowledge scores for 15 nurses. The Pearson correlation coefficient obtained was (r = 0.82). Data collection was taken before and after the educational intervention. A follow-up test was performed three month later, using the same data collection tools. Twenty-two individual variables assessing the knowledge levels in aspects related to the six K/DOQI guidelines showed improvement in all scores of the nurses' knowledge after the educational intervention; and the differences from the preeducational scores were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The study showed that a structured educational program based on the K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines had a significant impact on the dialysis nurses knowledge in caring for vascular access in HD patients. The knowledge level attained was maintained for at least three months after the educational intervention.

  12. Performance Support Engineering: Building Performance-Centered Web-based Systems, Information Systems, and Knowledge Management Systems in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybould, Barry

    2000-01-01

    Examines the growth in developing performance-centered systems in business. Discusses Web-based systems, including the Internet and intranets; knowledge management systems; knowledge acquisition; performance-centered design; performance support; group processes; systems approach; focus on goals; electronic performance support systems;…

  13. Information and psychomotor skills knowledge acquisition: A student-customer-centered and computer-supported approach.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Anita; Tobin, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This presentation will discuss coupling commercial and customized computer-supported teaching aids to provide BSN nursing students with a friendly customer-centered self-study approach to psychomotor skill acquisition.

  14. La tecnología y las monjitas: constellations of authoritative knowledge at a religious birthing center in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Fleuriet, K Jill

    2009-09-01

    In this article, I contrast conceptualizations of authoritative knowledge in pregnancy and birth between U.S. midwives and their Mexican immigrant clients at a religious birthing center in south Texas. Although the two groups share certain orientations to pregnancy management, essential differences in prenatal care and birth epistemologies underscore distinct social and economic positions. I use narrative data to document and explain these differences, which throw into relief the hierarchies of identity and need that structure immigrant women's reproductive experiences. Unveiling the different epistemologies can also help to explain sometimes radically divergent ideas that have impacted the very survivability of the birthing center. By focusing on Mexican immigrant women's reproductive decision making in an alternative birthing center, this analysis responds to feminists' call to look to the margins to understand the diversity of women's responses to what Rapp and Ginsburg have called "stratified reproduction".

  15. Knowledge Retrieval as Specialized Inference.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Rochester, supervised by James F. Allen. % 0 At the University of Rochester this reseach was supported in part by the Office of Naval .’ a...shared their best ideas with me. I thank my thesis committee, James Allen, Chris Brown, Henry Kyburg, and Haim Men- delson for their time, their comments...for his detailed comments on my manuscript and for helping to make the terminology of this thesis as standard and as consistent as possible. d James

  16. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology(http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leadinginformaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIHRoadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allowscientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information andknowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1)to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology developmentby promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create,manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so thatscientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data,(3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation,integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated toolsand theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and(4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify,evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to thebiomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives byproviding tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data,and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologiesas well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotatedusing those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops inontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research inontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientificdiscovery. Through the research activities within the Center,collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedicalcommunity, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in thee-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution,data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing,and understand human disease.

  17. Delivering spacecraft control centers with embedded knowledge-based systems: The methodology issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, S.; Haziza, M.; Cayrac, D.

    1994-11-01

    Matra Marconi Space (MMS) occupies a leading place in Europe in the domain of satellite and space data processing systems. The maturity of the knowledge-based systems (KBS) technology, the theoretical and practical experience acquired in the development of prototype, pre-operational and operational applications, make it possible today to consider the wide operational deployment of KBS's in space applications. In this perspective, MMS has to prepare the introduction of the new methods and support tools that will form the basis of the development of such systems. This paper introduces elements of the MMS methodology initiatives in the domain and the main rationale that motivated the approach. These initiatives develop along two main axes: knowledge engineering methods and tools, and a hybrid method approach for coexisting knowledge-based and conventional developments.

  18. Delivering spacecraft control centers with embedded knowledge-based systems: The methodology issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayache, S.; Haziza, M.; Cayrac, D.

    1994-01-01

    Matra Marconi Space (MMS) occupies a leading place in Europe in the domain of satellite and space data processing systems. The maturity of the knowledge-based systems (KBS) technology, the theoretical and practical experience acquired in the development of prototype, pre-operational and operational applications, make it possible today to consider the wide operational deployment of KBS's in space applications. In this perspective, MMS has to prepare the introduction of the new methods and support tools that will form the basis of the development of such systems. This paper introduces elements of the MMS methodology initiatives in the domain and the main rationale that motivated the approach. These initiatives develop along two main axes: knowledge engineering methods and tools, and a hybrid method approach for coexisting knowledge-based and conventional developments.

  19. Knowledge, awareness, attitudes and practice about hypertension in hypertensive patients referring to public health care centers in Khoor & Biabanak

    PubMed Central

    Sabouhi, Fakhri; Babaee, Sima; Naji, Homayoon; Zadeh, Akbar Hassan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is one of the most crucial health problems and the most common chronic disease in developed and underdeveloped countries. It is called the silent killer which is usually diagnosed incidentally. Although hypertension is a preventable and treatable condition but without treatment it leads to serious and life threatening complications such as heart, kidney and brain disorders which in most cases result in patient's disability. Prevention, plays significant role in controlling this disease which is achieved by increasing the knowledge and awareness of the public and changing their attitude and practice. METHODS: A cross-sectional, correlation-descriptive study was conducted in one stage, by one group. Two hundred and thirty four patients were recruited by random sampling among hypertensive patients referring to public health care centers in Khoor & Biabanak in Isfahan province, IRAN. Data gathering was carried out with a questionnaire. RESULTS: Our findings indicate that there is significant relationship between awareness and knowledge; awareness and attitude; awareness and practice. There is no significant relationship between knowledge and attitude or knowledge and practice. In addition, there is a significant relationship between attitude and practice of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although patients relatively had high awareness, knowledge, attitude and practice about their disease but their hypertension was not still under control. Several barriers are associated with uncontrolled hypertension particularly treatment-related barriers. Findings suggest further studies to determine new effective strategies to solve this problem. PMID:22039377

  20. Student-Centered Pedagogy: Co-Construction of Knowledge through Student-Generated Midterm Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Ruth; Class, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Using the example of student-generated midterm exams produced during a university classroom exercise, this narrative account examines student-centered pedagogy from both the university faculty and student perspectives. The central question revolved around how to actively engage a community of diverse university students from different academic,…

  1. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  2. Connecting Learning: Brain-Based Strategies for Linking Prior Knowledge in the Library Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderbilt, Kathi L.

    2005-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ and learning is a complex process. While there is not complete agreement among researchers about brain-based learning and its direct connection to neuroscience, knowledge about the brain as well as the examination of cognitive psychology, anthropology, professional experience, and educational research can provide…

  3. Silencing the Center: Local Knowledge and Imported Model in Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazna, Maysaa

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the interaction between local and imported knowledges in a specific case of transnational importation; the whole-sale importation of the American medical learning disabilities (LDs) model in Kuwait. A discourse analysis of the narratives of local educators at the only school for LDs in the country reveals a…

  4. Connecting Learning: Brain-Based Strategies for Linking Prior Knowledge in the Library Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderbilt, Kathi L.

    2005-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ and learning is a complex process. While there is not complete agreement among researchers about brain-based learning and its direct connection to neuroscience, knowledge about the brain as well as the examination of cognitive psychology, anthropology, professional experience, and educational research can provide…

  5. Retrieval Attempts Enhance Learning, but Retrieval Success (versus Failure) Does Not Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornell, Nate; Klein, Patricia Jacobs; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Retrieving information from memory enhances learning. We propose a 2-stage framework to explain the benefits of retrieval. Stage 1 takes place as one attempts to retrieve an answer, which activates knowledge related to the retrieval cue. Stage 2 begins when the answer becomes available, at which point appropriate connections are strengthened and…

  6. The effects of educational program on health volunteers’ knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health centers in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    JOUHARI, ZAHRA; PIRASTEH, AFSHAR; GHASSEMI, GHOLAM REZA; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The people's mental, intellectual and physical non-readiness to confront earthquake may result in disastrous outcomes. This research aimed to study of effects of a training intervention on health connector’s knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health-training centers in East of Tehran. Methods This research which is a semi-experimental study was designed and executed in 2011, using a questionnaire with items based on the information of Crisis Management Org. After a pilot study and making the questionnaire valid and reliable, we determined the sample size. Then, the questionnaires were completed before and after the training program by 82 health connectors at health-treatment centers in the East of Tehran. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using paired sample t–test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Health connectors were women with the mean age of 43.43±8.51 years. In this research, the mean score of connectors’ knowledge before and after the training was 35.15±4.3 and 43.73±2.91 out of 48, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). The classes were the most important source of information for the health connectors. Conclusion The people's knowledge to confront earthquake can be increased by holding training courses and workshops. Such training courses and workshops have an important role in data transfer and readiness of health connectors. PMID:25927068

  7. The effects of educational program on health volunteers' knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health centers in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Jouhari, Zahra; Pirasteh, Afshar; Ghassemi, Gholam Reza; Bazrafkan, Leila

    2015-04-01

    The people's mental, intellectual and physical non-readiness to confront earthquake may result in disastrous outcomes. This research aimed to study of effects of a training intervention on health connector's knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health-training centers in East of Tehran. This research which is a semi-experimental study was designed and executed in 2011, using a questionnaire with items based on the information of Crisis Management Org. After a pilot study and making the questionnaire valid and reliable, we determined the sample size. Then, the questionnaires were completed before and after the training program by 82 health connectors at health-treatment centers in the East of Tehran. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using paired sample t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Health connectors were women with the mean age of 43.43±8.51 years. In this research, the mean score of connectors' knowledge before and after the training was 35.15±4.3 and 43.73±2.91 out of 48, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). The classes were the most important source of information for the health connectors. The people's knowledge to confront earthquake can be increased by holding training courses and workshops. Such training courses and workshops have an important role in data transfer and readiness of health connectors.

  8. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  9. Team 2: AIRS Only Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Manning, Evan; Blaisdell, John; Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Goldberg, Mitch; Cho, Chuck; Staelin, Dave; Blackwelll, Bill

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation makes the case for the retrieval of data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). AIRS only retrieval is not only a risk reduction for failure of AMSU, but also important because NWP centers are reluctant to assimilate AMSU twice.

  10. New knowledge, innovations, and improvement in a Magnet® Children's Hospital Cardiac Center.

    PubMed

    Barton, Sharon J; Forster, Erin K; Stuart, Mary E; Patton, Ashley M; Rim, Jeong-Sook; Torowicz, Deborah L

    2012-06-01

    Bedside nurses involved in research and evidence-based practice (EBP) have the ability to change policies, patient care, and outcomes. This article describes the journey of a research committee using the Magnet® component of new knowledge, innovation, and improvements. Using several tools, the unit-based committee developed skills in meeting management, nursing research methods, and EBP. Focusing to improve family and nurse communication about the plan of care, the committee recommended changes in the existing Plan of Care tool, including family input and recommendations for families to view and add to the sheet and participate in daily rounds, which was not the standard practice. Since this intervention was implemented, patient satisfaction has increased, as well as nurse engagement and intent to stay. This project exemplifies how nurse-driven innovations and family partnership led to new knowledge, innovations in learning about research, applying it to practice, and improving practice.

  11. Assessing knowledge and attitudes of diabetes in Zuni Indians using a culture-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Newman, Sara; Cheng, Terri; Ghahate, Donica M; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Faber, Thomas; Shah, Vallabh O

    2014-01-01

    The Zuni Pueblo, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, have formed the Zuni Health Initiative (ZHI) engaged in community-based participatory research to plan and implement educational interventions to reduce health disparities. We conducted the first phase of ZHI study and identified barriers to healthcare. We concluded that the burden presented by these barriers ultimately translates into a lack of patient activation and engagement in their health care including for diabetes, effectively hindering adoption of healthy behaviors. Community health representatives (CHRs) led 10 one-hour focus group sessions to elicit information on diabetes knowledge and self-management strategies at which a total of 84 people participated. Audiotapes were translated and transcribed by bilingual ZHI staff. We reduced the text to thematic categories, constructed a coding dictionary and inserted the text into NVivo 9 program. The focus groups revealed that despite extensive personal or family experiences with diabetes or complications, participants identified knowledge gaps in the disease progression and disease management. However, we gained insight into how many Zunis conceptualize the etiology of diabetes, risk factors associated with diabetes, sources of knowledge and self-management practices. We concluded that many of the Zuni diabetics experience significant impacts on their life when they were diagnosed with diabetes and suffered the plight of stigmatization. We further concluded that developing Zuni culture specific diabetes care should focus on family involvement with continued education.

  12. Patient-Centered Medical Home Knowledge and Attitudes of Residents and Faculty: Certification Is Just the First Step.

    PubMed

    El Rayess, Fadya; Goldman, Roberta; Furey, Christopher; Chandran, Rabin; Goldberg, Arnold R; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2015-12-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an accepted framework for delivering high-quality primary care, prompting many residencies to transform their practices into PCMHs. Few studies have assessed the impact of these changes on residents' and faculty members' PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and skills. The family medicine program at Brown University achieved Level 3 PCMH accreditation in 2010, with training relying primarily on situated learning through immersion in PCMH practice, supplemented by didactics and a few focused clinical activities. To assess PCMH knowledge and attitudes after Level 3 PCMH accreditation and to identify additional educational needs. We used a qualitative approach, with semistructured, individual interviews with 12 of the program's 13 postgraduate year 3 residents and 17 of 19 core faculty. Questions assessed PCMH knowledge, attitudes, and preparedness for practicing, teaching, and leading within a PCMH. Interviews were analyzed using the immersion/crystallization method. Residents and faculty generally had positive attitudes toward PCMH. However, many expressed concerns that they lacked specific PCMH knowledge, and felt inadequately prepared to implement PCMH principles into their future practice or teaching. Some exceptions were faculty and resident leaders who were actively involved in the PCMH transformation. Barriers included lack of time and central roles in PCMH activities. Practicing in a certified PCMH training program, with passive PCMH roles and supplemental didactics, appears inadequate in preparing residents and faculty for practice or teaching in a PCMH. Purposeful curricular design and evaluation, with faculty development, may be needed to prepare the future leaders of primary care.

  13. Test plan for the retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    This test plan describes a simulated buried waste retrieval demonstration that will be performed at the Caterpillar, Inc., Edwards Training Center located near Peoria, Illinois. The purpose of the demonstration is to determine the effectiveness of using readily available excavation equipment to retrieve, size, and handle various simulated waste forms that are similar in size, structure, and composition to those expected to be found in US Department of Energy contaminated waste pits and trenches. The objectives of this demonstration are to: meet and maintain daily production goals of 80 yd{sup 3}/day; minimize spillage and dust generation through careful and deliberate operations; document and evaluate methods for manipulating, sizing, and/or working around large objects; and document and evaluate requirements for operator augmentation and remote operation for hot test pit excavation operations. Four conditions comprising the range of environments to be evaluated include excavation of random material from below grade; stacked boxes and barrels from below grade; random materials from at grade; and stacked boxes and barrels from at grade. Results of the retrieval demonstration will reduce unknowns in the body of knowledge about retrieval equipment and procedural options for removal of buried transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It is anticipated that DOE will factor this information into a remedial investigation/feasibility plan leading to a final record of decision for disposition of buried TRU waste.

  14. Assessing students' genre knowledge in an engineering writing center: An analysis of sophomore lab reports in electrical and computer engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristin Wilds Davidson

    As discipline-specific writing centers continue to increase in number, writing center consultants must determine ways to help their clients acquire discipline-specific and course-specific literacy. One way to achieve this goal is through genre analysis. This study focuses on the genre of EECE 201 (Tools and Techniques for Electrical and Computer Engineers) lab reports and strategies writing center consultants can implement to teach students communication skills necessary for discipline-specific literacy. Beginning with a discussion of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Writing Center's history, the methodological foundations of this study, and an historical overview of genre theory from classical times to the present, this study surveys the history and debates surrounding teaching genres to students. The role of assessment in analyzing and teaching genre is discussed as well, with application specifically to the sophomore-level EECE 201 course within ECE at the University of South Carolina. The study itself consists of analyzing four students' lab reports written for the EECE 201 course. Using a list of eleven characteristics developed with experienced communicators within this discipline, I analyzed each report (there is a total of 14), determining to what extent the characteristics appeared in the reports. At the end of each student's analysis, a table summarizes the information gathered from the reports, and overall conclusions are drawn for each student. The end of the study chapter presents generic writing trends exhibited by the students during the semester, such as inability to show evidence of inductive/deductive reasoning and difficulties with conceptualizing audience and applying formatting skills. The study concludes by recommending strategies that ECE Writing Center consultants can implement to help the sophomore students acquire discipline-specific knowledge. Going beyond the ECE Writing Center's context, however, the study also suggests

  15. The Networking of Interactive Bibliographic Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.; Reintjes, J. Francis

    Research in networking of heterogeneous interactive bibliographic retrieval systems is being conducted which centers on the concept of a virtual retrieval system. Such a virtual system would be created through a translating computer interface that would provide access to the different retrieval systems and data bases in a uniform and convenient…

  16. [Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction].

    PubMed

    Delfini, Patrícia Santos de Souza; Sato, Miki Takao; Antoneli, Patrícia de Paulo; Guimarães, Paulo Octávio da Silva

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The strategies used in this partnership were meetings with both teams with training, case discussion about the families assisted, support to workers' difficulties and elaboration of therapeutical projects, and joint domiciliary visits. Some difficulties had been found during the research: great demand for health services and lack of institutional guidelines to guarantee the effectiveness of the partnership. The look directed to the family and the social context presents positive results compared to the look directed only to the illness. The partnership enriches the practice and a larger network of care in the territory becomes possible. It is necessary to bring up new proposals and innovative enterprises.

  17. Patient-Centered Medical Home Knowledge and Attitudes of Residents and Faculty: Certification Is Just the First Step

    PubMed Central

    El Rayess, Fadya; Goldman, Roberta; Furey, Christopher; Chandran, Rabin; Goldberg, Arnold R.; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2015-01-01

    Background The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an accepted framework for delivering high-quality primary care, prompting many residencies to transform their practices into PCMHs. Few studies have assessed the impact of these changes on residents' and faculty members' PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and skills. The family medicine program at Brown University achieved Level 3 PCMH accreditation in 2010, with training relying primarily on situated learning through immersion in PCMH practice, supplemented by didactics and a few focused clinical activities. Objective To assess PCMH knowledge and attitudes after Level 3 PCMH accreditation and to identify additional educational needs. Methods We used a qualitative approach, with semistructured, individual interviews with 12 of the program's 13 postgraduate year 3 residents and 17 of 19 core faculty. Questions assessed PCMH knowledge, attitudes, and preparedness for practicing, teaching, and leading within a PCMH. Interviews were analyzed using the immersion/crystallization method. Results Residents and faculty generally had positive attitudes toward PCMH. However, many expressed concerns that they lacked specific PCMH knowledge, and felt inadequately prepared to implement PCMH principles into their future practice or teaching. Some exceptions were faculty and resident leaders who were actively involved in the PCMH transformation. Barriers included lack of time and central roles in PCMH activities. Conclusions Practicing in a certified PCMH training program, with passive PCMH roles and supplemental didactics, appears inadequate in preparing residents and faculty for practice or teaching in a PCMH. Purposeful curricular design and evaluation, with faculty development, may be needed to prepare the future leaders of primary care. PMID:26692970

  18. Fruit and vegetable intake and knowledge increased following a community-based intervention in older adults in Georgia senior centers.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Sara J; Fischer, Joan G; Reddy, R D Sudha; Lommel, Tiffany Sellers; Speer, Elizabeth M; Stephens, Heather; Park, Sohyun; Johnson, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate a community-based fruit and vegetable intervention conducted in rural and urban areas of Georgia. Participants were a convenience sample from Georgia senior centers that completed a pre-test, the intervention, and a post-test (N = 558, mean age = 75, 83% female, 47% white, 53% black). The 4-month intervention had eight sessions focused on practical ways to increase intake of fruits and vegetables at meals and snacks and included physical activity. Pre- and post-tests examined self-reported intakes of fruits and vegetables at breakfast, lunch, the evening meal, and snacks, knowledge of recommended intakes, and barriers to intake. Following the intervention, the number of participants reporting consumption of at least 7 servings of fruits and vegetables daily increased by 21-percentage points (P < or = 0.001), knowledge that 7 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables are recommended daily (for 1,600 to 2,200 calories) increased from 7% to 57% (P < or = 0.001), and three barriers to fruit and vegetable intake decreased (P < or = 0.05): "difficulties with digestion," "too many are recommended," and "too much trouble." Regression analyses indicated that increased intake following the intervention was independently associated with living in more urban rather than rural areas, improved knowledge of intake recommendations, decrease in perception of cost as a barrier, and increase in digestive problems as a barrier (P < or = 0.05). These results provide an evidence base for the effectiveness of this community intervention for improving knowledge and intake and decreasing barriers to fruit and vegetable intake in older adults.

  19. Bridging science to service: using Rehabilitation Research and Training Center program to ensure that research-based knowledge makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William A

    2007-01-01

    The challenge of bridging science to service is increasingly visible in the healthcare field, with emphasis on the influence of evidence-based knowledge on both policy and practice. Since its inception more than 40 years ago, the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) program has provided grants for both research and training activities designed to ensure that research knowledge is translated into practice. The RRTC program is unique in that its mission and funding have always required that both time and money be invested in the translation and dissemination of research-generated knowledge to users in the field, i.e., decision makers and practitioners. Boston University's Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation has been an RRTC for more than 25 years and provides an example of the effect of the RRTC program in bridging science to service. The Center's mission as an RRTC has been to develop and transfer research knowledge to decision makers and practitioners who can then inform change and promote progress in mental health disability policy and practice. This article reviews five basic dissemination and utilization principles for overcoming the most common barriers to effective dissemination of evidence-based knowledge and provides examples of the Center's activities related to each principle. In addition, a knowledge-transfer framework developed by the Center to organize dissemination and utilization efforts is described.

  20. [Study of knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation in sports instructors of public sport centers in Asturias (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Castro Cuervo, Coral; Cuartas Álvarez, Tatiana; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Arcos González, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the level of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation (AED) in sport instructors working in public sport centers in Asturias. A cross-sectional study was conducted on sports instructors in May 2014, by completing a self-administered questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AED, with 25 items and four possible answers, only one valid, divided into five categories (emergency medical system in Asturias, initial assessment, circulation,airway and use of AED). Age, gender, work experience as sports instructor, previous training courses, education and training and employment contract were studied as epidemiological variables. A total 26 questionnaires (52%) were collected in public sports centers, and 84% of total responses were correct. It should be emphasized that among the wrong answers, 42.30% did not know what was the first action in a cardiac arrest, and 36.62% did not know how to perform a complete cardiopulmonary resuscitation if the person affected had a perioral injury, with 46.15% not knowing how to respond to a cardiac arrest due to drowning. It is recommended to include the management of cardiac arrest in their workplace in the training plans and the continuing education of sports instructors, at least every two years, according to national laws and laws from Asturias, including also training on the use and management of AED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Information-centered representation of retrievals with limited degrees of freedom for signal: Application to methane from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Vivienne H.; Clough, Shepard A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Nassar, Ray; Logan, Jennifer A.

    2009-05-01

    Remote measurements of trace gas profiles from nadir-viewing instruments are often retrieved and/or reported on a fine grid containing more levels than the number of independent pieces of information in the measurement. Such profiles contain a priori information, which complicates interpretation. For scientific analyses of these data it is desirable to move to a representation in which measurement information is dominant and the influence of a priori information is minimal. Presented here is a postprocessing approach using a simple algorithm to transform each retrieved profile to an appropriate, geographically varying coarse grid. The representation is chosen such that the averaging kernel is close to unity for regions of the atmosphere where the retrieval has most information. The approach takes advantage of the sensitivity characterization allowed by retrieval on a fine grid, while reducing the influence of the a priori, accounting for spatial and temporal variations in the sensitivity of the measurement to the true atmosphere, and preserving obvious physical meaning in the end product. The example used to demonstrate the approach is the methane product from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), which contains 0.5-2.0 degrees of freedom for signal, depending on season and location. The TES methane has been postprocessed, and the end product has been compared with results from GEOS-Chem, a global chemical model. Results show realistic latitudinal gradients from the TES data. Model/measurement differences also show large-scale features over Indonesia that we attribute to tropical biomass burning in the summer/fall.

  2. Main Trunk and Division Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusions: Differences in Recanalization Times, Number of Stent Retriever Passes and Clinical Outcomes: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ihtesham A.; Maud, Alberto; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose In this article, we present our experience with the recanalization of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), we hypothesize that there are higher rates of recanalization with fewer stent retriever passes and better clinical outcomes in patients with division MCA occlusions. A more complex anatomy at the bifurcation may prevent a faster recanalization in main trunk MCA occlusions. Methods We retrospectively identified consecutive patients admitted with MCA occlusions who underwent mechanical thrombectomy using stent retrievers. We categorized patients into division MCA and main trunk MCA occlusions based on angiography. Variables were compared between the groups. We further analyzed patients with trunk MCA occlusions to identify reasons for delays in recanalization. Results There were 32 MCA occlusions that underwent mechanical thrombectomy and eligible for the analysis during the study period. Of those, 11 were main trunk MCA occlusions. Univariate analysis disclosed a trend toward a lower GP-to-recanalization time (p = 0.05) and a lower number of passes required for recanalization in division MCA occlusions. However, there was a significantly better outcome in patients with division MCA occlusion after multivariate analysis. Analyzing main trunk MCA occlusion data, we found that the need for more than one pass to achieve recanalization led to a trend toward a longer GP-to-recanalization time and a worse outcome. When the stent was placed in the dominant division, the chances of recanalization were significantly higher. Conclusions Division MCA occlusions have higher recanalization rates with fewer stent retriever passes and better clinical outcomes than main trunk MCA occlusions, likely due to a more favorable anatomy. Measures like placing the stent retriever in the dominant division may decrease recanalization times and improve clinical outcomes in main trunk MCA occlusions. PMID:27051403

  3. Golden Retrievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Provides a basic definition of metadata, including the usefulness of metatags for online information retrieval and documentation. Defines the elements of the Dublin Core, the next level of metadata. Discusses how librarians can take advantage of metadata. Describes the Gateway to Educational Materials (GEM) Project whose goal is to use metadata to…

  4. Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of the National Archives.

    It is the purpose of this handbook to provide managers and their assistants with guidelines for determining where new information processing systems (dissemination, storage and retrieval) might profitably be employed in Government offices and with criteria for selecting the right methods and equipment. While the main objective is to encourage…

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Animal Bite Victims Attending an Anti-rabies Health Center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kabeta, Tadele; Deresa, Benti; Tigre, Worku; Ward, Michael P.; Mor, Siobhan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is an important but preventable cause of death in Ethiopia. We assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of animal bite victims attending an anti-rabies health center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Findings Between July 2012 and March 2013 a cross-sectional questionnaire was administered to 384 bite victims or their guardians in the case of minors (aged <15 years). Factors associated with knowledge, attitudes and practices were evaluated using generalized linear models. Almost all participants (99%) were aware that rabies was transmitted by the bite or lick of a rabid dog, however only 20.1% identified “germs” as the cause of disease. A majority of participants stated rabies could be prevented by avoiding dog bites (64.6%) and confining dogs (53.9%); fewer (41.7%) recognized vaccination of dogs/cats as an important preventive strategy. Regarding attitudes, most (91.1%) agreed that medical evaluation should be sought as soon as possible. However, most (75.0%) also believed that traditional healers could cure rabies. Rural residence (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, p = 0.015) and Protestant religion (OR = 2.4, p = 0.041) were independently associated with this belief. Among 186 participants who owned dogs, only 9 (4.8%) had ever vaccinated their dog and more than 90% of respondents indicated that their dog was free-roaming or cohabitated with the family. Only 7.0% of participants applied correct first aid following exposure, and the majority (47.7%) reported that the animal was killed by the community following the incident. Female sex and Muslim religion were independently associated with higher and lower practices scores, respectively, due largely to differences in animal management practices following the incident. Conclusions/Significance Although respondents demonstrated reasonably sound knowledge of rabies and its transmission, attitudes and practices were inconsistent with rabies prevention. Culturally- and gender

  6. Knowledge translation: a Nurse Practitioner Clinical Ladder Advancement Program in a university-affiliated, integrated medical center.

    PubMed

    Paplanus, Lisa M; Bartley-Daniele, Patricia; Mitra, Kathryn S

    2014-08-01

    A Nurse Practitioner Clinical Ladder (NPCL) Advancement Program was designed to recognize and reward advanced nursing practice and promote nurse practitioner (NP) retention at New York University Hospitals Center (NYUHC). Search of published and gray literature was conducted. Electronic databases included CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, and the Joanna Briggs Institute. The NYUHC NPCL Advancement Program incorporated its current Staff Nurse Clinical Ladder, previous NP promotional program literature, and NP role competencies to support the Advanced Practice Nursing Clinical Ladder Program. The NPCL is supportive of professional development, performance evaluation, clinical practice excellence, job satisfaction, and NP retention. Program outgrowths include a progressive model of NP clinical practice, a formal NP mentoring program, NP leadership, and research opportunities. Organizational commitment to a structured NPCL Advancement Program is critical for NP professional development, evolving role responsibilities, and job satisfaction. The NPCL Advancement Program provides requisite structures and processes supportive of clinical excellence. The development of the NPCL has highlighted the need for structured NP orientation and mentorship, knowledge translation, and leadership programs to meet the professional needs of NPs in diverse clinical settings. ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Self-reported practice, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care of nurses in a Japanese Regional Cancer Center: longitudinal study after 1-year activity of palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Koji; Imura, Chizuru; Nanba, Miki; Fukumoto, Naoko; Itoh, Tomoko

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge and skill deficits about palliative care in medical professionals are among the most common barriers to quality palliative care. This study in a Japanese regional cancer center was conducted to clarify nurses' self-reported practices, confidence, and knowledge, and the changes in these parameters after the 1-year educational and clinical activity of a palliative care team. Questionnaires were distributed to 134 nurses before and after a palliative care team conducted 6-topic educational programs and clinical consultation activity throughout the year. The nurses were asked to report their practices, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care in 5 fields (pain, dyspnea, delirium, communication, and dying-phase). In some areas of palliative care, hospital nurses did not adhere to recommended practices, had knowledge deficits, and were not generally confident with palliative care practices. However, daily palliative care team activities, including educational programs and clinical consultation service, could improve their practice and knowledge levels.

  8. Sexual Knowledge and Attitude among Girls Who are Getting Married Based on the Information from Yas Pre-marriage Counseling Center.

    PubMed

    Baghersad, Zahra; Fahami, Fariba; Beigi, Marjan; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2017-01-01

    High prevalence of sexual dysfunction results from inadequate knowledge or inappropriate attitude toward the natural phenomenon of sexual desire. This study aimed to define sexual knowledge and attitude among girls who were getting married and referred to Yas pre-marriage counseling center. This research was a descriptive analytical study. The information of 165 girls, who were about to get married, were collected through convenient sampling using a researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Inferential statistical method and Pearson correlation were used for data analysis. Results showed that the mean scores of sexual knowledge and attitude among the participants were 57.42 and 69.02, respectively. There was a significant association between the mean scores of sexual knowledge and sexual attitude (P < 0.001, r = 0.63). Results showed that the participants had relatively appropriate knowledge and attitude toward sexual relationship.

  9. Using Induction to Refine Information Retrieval Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Pell, Barney; Kedar, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual information retrieval systems use structured document indices, domain knowledge and a set of heuristic retrieval strategies to match user queries with a set of indices describing the document's content. Such retrieval strategies increase the set of relevant documents retrieved (increase recall), but at the expense of returning additional irrelevant documents (decrease precision). Usually in conceptual information retrieval systems this tradeoff is managed by hand and with difficulty. This paper discusses ways of managing this tradeoff by the application of standard induction algorithms to refine the retrieval strategies in an engineering design domain. We gathered examples of query/retrieval pairs during the system's operation using feedback from a user on the retrieved information. We then fed these examples to the induction algorithm and generated decision trees that refine the existing set of retrieval strategies. We found that (1) induction improved the precision on a set of queries generated by another user, without a significant loss in recall, and (2) in an interactive mode, the decision trees pointed out flaws in the retrieval and indexing knowledge and suggested ways to refine the retrieval strategies.

  10. Using Induction to Refine Information Retrieval Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Pell, Barney; Kedar, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual information retrieval systems use structured document indices, domain knowledge and a set of heuristic retrieval strategies to match user queries with a set of indices describing the document's content. Such retrieval strategies increase the set of relevant documents retrieved (increase recall), but at the expense of returning additional irrelevant documents (decrease precision). Usually in conceptual information retrieval systems this tradeoff is managed by hand and with difficulty. This paper discusses ways of managing this tradeoff by the application of standard induction algorithms to refine the retrieval strategies in an engineering design domain. We gathered examples of query/retrieval pairs during the system's operation using feedback from a user on the retrieved information. We then fed these examples to the induction algorithm and generated decision trees that refine the existing set of retrieval strategies. We found that (1) induction improved the precision on a set of queries generated by another user, without a significant loss in recall, and (2) in an interactive mode, the decision trees pointed out flaws in the retrieval and indexing knowledge and suggested ways to refine the retrieval strategies.

  11. The Effect of a Workshop on School Counselor Trainee's Child-Centered Play Therapy Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes, and Self-Estimate of Counseling Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    The results of this experimental study have demonstrated that following participation in a 12-hour training in Child-Centered Play Therapy (CCPT), school counselor trainees significantly increased their CCPT knowledge and skills in employing CCPT, as compared to a control group. Participants reported that they had learned enough of the philosophy…

  12. Adolescent substance use: Assessing the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of a school-based health center workforce.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Mary M; Sebastian, Rachel A; Murphy, Mary; Oreskovich, Kristin; Condon, Timothy P

    2017-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the potential for school-based health centers (SBHCs) to provide access points for adolescent substance use care. In 2015, the University of New Mexico began screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training for providers at New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH)-funded SBHCs across the state. This study assesses baseline knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the New Mexico SBHC provider workforce regarding adolescent substance use and provision of services. In early 2015, the NMDOH administered an SBHC provider workforce survey (N = 118) and achieved a 44.9% response rate. This descriptive analysis includes all survey respondents who self-identified as a primary care or behavioral health provider in an SBHC serving middle or high school students (n = 52). Among respondents, the majority (57.7%) were primary care providers, including nurse practitioners, physicians, and physician assistants. The remaining 42.3% of respondents were master's-level behavioral health providers. Only 44.2% of providers reported practicing the full SBIRT model at their SBHC, and 21.2% reported having received continuing education on SBIRT within the previous 3 years. Most respondents, 84.6%, agreed that it is the responsibility of SBHC providers to screen students for substance use using a standardized tool, and 96.2% agreed that it is the responsibility of the SBHC provider to assess for students' readiness to change. A majority reported self-efficacy in helping students achieve change in their alcohol use, illicit drug use, and prescription drug misuse: 73.1%, 65.4%, and 63.5%, respectively. These results suggest that SBIRT training for New Mexico SBHC providers is timely. The authors identified gaps between recommended SBIRT practices and SBIRT delivery as well as discrepancies between reported provider self-efficacy and actual implementation of the SBIRT model. Further study will determine the effectiveness of efforts to

  13. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  15. Evaluation of the knowledge level of health violations in food production, distribution, sales centers and public places and their authorities investigating among the women of Bushehr city

    PubMed Central

    Rassafiani, Hamidreza; Ghazanfari, Mahtab; Ravanipour, Masoumeh; Motamed, Niloofar; Ravanipour, Maryam; Vakilabadi, Dariush Ranjbar; Zare, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women and mothers are the most important educational audience to convey health teachings. This study was aimed to evaluate the knowledge level of different types of health violations of food production, distribution, sale centers and public places; and authorities investigating the violations among women referring to health care centers in Bushehr. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, which was done cross-sectionally, 600 women who were referred to health care centers affiliated to the Bushehr University of Medical Sciences was selected by convenience sampling. Two-part questionnaire was used to collect data: demographic information and a researcher-designed knowledge survey questionnaire consisted of 25 questions with Cronbach's alpha = 0.7. Data were analyzed with the software SPSS version 13; using Chi-square test and Phi and Cramer test. P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The findings showed that 56.9% and 26.5% of women had good and moderate knowledge levels regarding health violations, while the general knowledge level of authorities investigating health violations were at the moderate level among 57.3% and at the good level among 15.3% of women. Overall, there was a significant relationship between education level and the women's knowledge level of health violations (P < 0.0001). The relationship between the women's education level and authorities investigating health violations was not significant (P = 0.073). Conclusion: Applying interventional methods of education in health violations to the women by health centers can elevate the level of health knowledge among them. PMID:27500164

  16. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    the text. Problems with the many, often incompatible mobile platforms were discovered and are listed in the text. Mobile information access is a quickly growing domain and the constraints of mobile access also need to be taken into account for image retrieval. The demonstrated access to the medical literature is most relevant as the medical literature and their images are clearly the largest knowledge source in the medical field.

  17. Enhanced Text Retrieval Using Natural Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddy, Elizabeth D.

    1998-01-01

    Defines natural language processing (NLP); describes the use of NLP in information retrieval (IR); provides seven levels of linguistic analysis: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, semantic, discourse, and pragmatic. Discusses the commercial use of NLP in IR with the example of DR-LINK (Document Retrieval using LINguistic Knowledge)…

  18. Enhanced Text Retrieval Using Natural Language Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddy, Elizabeth D.

    1998-01-01

    Defines natural language processing (NLP); describes the use of NLP in information retrieval (IR); provides seven levels of linguistic analysis: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, semantic, discourse, and pragmatic. Discusses the commercial use of NLP in IR with the example of DR-LINK (Document Retrieval using LINguistic Knowledge)…

  19. Efficient Methods to Assimilate Satellite Retrievals Based on Information Content. Part 2; Suboptimal Retrieval Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Dee, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in data assimilation has been and continues to be how best to utilize satellite data while balancing the tradeoff between accuracy and computational cost. A number of weather prediction centers have recently achieved remarkable success in improving their forecast skill by changing the method by which satellite data are assimilated into the forecast model from the traditional approach of assimilating retrievals to the direct assimilation of radiances in a variational framework. The operational implementation of such a substantial change in methodology involves a great number of technical details, e.g., pertaining to quality control procedures, systematic error correction techniques, and tuning of the statistical parameters in the analysis algorithm. Although there are clear theoretical advantages to the direct radiance assimilation approach, it is not obvious at all to what extent the improvements that have been obtained so far can be attributed to the change in methodology, or to various technical aspects of the implementation. The issue is of interest because retrieval assimilation retains many practical and logistical advantages which may become even more significant in the near future when increasingly high-volume data sources become available. The central question we address here is: how much improvement can we expect from assimilating radiances rather than retrievals, all other things being equal? We compare the two approaches in a simplified one-dimensional theoretical framework, in which problems related to quality control and systematic error correction are conveniently absent. By assuming a perfect radiative transfer model and perfect knowledge of radiance and background error covariances, we are able to formulate a nonlinear local error analysis for each assimilation method. Direct radiance assimilation is optimal in this idealized context, while the traditional method of assimilating retrievals is suboptimal because it

  20. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  1. Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in child care centers improves knowledge, policies, and children’s body mass index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To address the public health crisis of overweight and obese preschool-age children, the Nutrition And Physical Activity Self Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) intervention was delivered by nurse child care health consultants with the objective of improving child care provider and parent nutrition and physical activity knowledge, center-level nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, and children’s body mass index (BMI). Methods A seven-month randomized control trial was conducted in 17 licensed child care centers serving predominantly low income families in California, Connecticut, and North Carolina, including 137 child care providers and 552 families with racially and ethnically diverse children three to five years old. The NAP SACC intervention included educational workshops for child care providers and parents on nutrition and physical activity and consultation visits provided by trained nurse child care health consultants. Demographic characteristics and pre - and post-workshop knowledge surveys were completed by providers and parents. Blinded research assistants reviewed each center’s written health and safety policies, observed nutrition and physical activity practices, and measured randomly selected children’s nutritional intake, physical activity, and height and weight pre- and post-intervention. Results Hierarchical linear models and multiple regression models assessed individual- and center-level changes in knowledge, policies, practices and age- and sex-specific standardized body mass index (zBMI), controlling for state, parent education, and poverty level. Results showed significant increases in providers’ and parents’ knowledge of nutrition and physical activity, center-level improvements in policies, and child-level changes in children’s zBMI based on 209 children in the intervention and control centers at both pre- and post-intervention time points. Conclusions The NAP SACC intervention, as delivered by

  2. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Good, David; Lo, Joseph; Lee, W. Robert; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) is given a tour of a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship by United Space Alliance (USA) employee Joe Chaput (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (center) is given a tour of a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship by United Space Alliance (USA) employee Joe Chaput (right). NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  4. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  5. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  6. The Degree of Disease Knowledge in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Multi-center Prospective Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Beom Jin; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Sung, Hye Young; Oh, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Patient education has been shown to be beneficial in several diseases. To properly educate patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), it is necessary to understand how much they already know about their disease. However, no study has examined the degree of disease knowledge in Korean patients with GERD. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess the degree of knowledge in such patients. Methods This multicenter prospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2015. A total of 746 patients (mean age, 52 years; 57.6% female) were enrolled from 7 hospitals in Korea. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of GERD and ability to properly complete a survey. Degree of disease knowledge was assessed using the translated, validated Korean Urnes questionnaire, which consists of 22 items related to GERD. Results Mean percentage of correct answers was 46.3% and mean GERD knowledge score was 9.6. Degree of knowledge (mean percentage of correct answers) regarding etiology, prognosis, and treatment of GERD were 49.5%, 36.7%, and 37.5%, respectively. Degree of disease knowledge differed significantly according to age (P < 0.001), education (P < 0.001), income (P = 0.028), and occupation (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, using multiple logistic regression, the higher knowledge score group tended to have higher education and professional occupation. Conclusions The surveyed Korean patients had relatively low disease knowledge, suggesting that a GERD educational program may be beneficial in Korea. Formulation of a program is underway. PMID:28478662

  7. Integrated Knowledge Management Tool Suites: A User-Centered Approach to Collaborative Web Content Development and Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of knowledge management systems highlights an integrated tool architecture that focuses on content rather than technical issues and supports authoring Web pages and Web-based training, collaborating with subject matter experts, item tracking, and gathering feedback from end-users. Describes the updating of an existing knowledge base…

  8. Skill in Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval Skill quantifies the ability of one retrieval from a sounder to be more accurate than the best forecast relative to another with the same of another sounder. This is summarized using a Retrieval Anomaly Skill Score (RASS) which is the cor (retrieved-background, truth-background) * sqrt(f), Where f is defined as the ratio of accepted to the possible retrievals. Charts show various features and comparisons of RASS to other methods of retrieval.

  9. Knowledge of the Relationships between Oral Health, Diabetes, Body Mass Index and Lifestyle among Students at the Kuwait University Health Sciences Center, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Ali, Dena A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the level of knowledge regarding the relationships between oral health, diabetes, body mass index (BMI; obesity) and lifestyle among students of the Health Sciences Center (HSC), Kuwait, and to explore any possible correlation between students' oral health knowledge, BMI and lifestyle choices. A stratified random sample was proportionally selected according to the size of each faculty from the 1,799 students. The questionnaire was divided into 3 sections (i.e. demographics, evaluation of oral health knowledge in relation to diabetes, and evaluation of diabetes knowledge in relation to lifestyle) and distributed to 532 students. Oral health knowledge was categorized as limited, reasonable or knowledgeable. Lifestyle was classified as healthy or nonhealthy. The BMI was calculated as weight (kg) divided by the square of the height (m). ANOVA and χ2 tests were used to test for differences between independent variables. A Pearson correlation coefficient test was used to assess correlations. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 532 questionnaires, 498 (93.6%) were completed. The mean knowledge score was 47.7 ± 25.2; of the 498 students, 235 (47.3%) had a BMI within the normal range, 184 (37.0%) were pre-obese and 67 (13.5%) were obese. Of the 498 students, 244 (49%) had a healthy lifestyle. There was no correlation between oral health knowledge and the other variables; however, there was a correlation between lifestyle and obesity. In this study, the majority of the students had limited knowledge of oral health in association with diabetes and lifestyle. More than half of the students fell in the pre-obese/obese range. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Publication search and retrieval system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winget, Elizabeth A.

    1981-01-01

    The publication search and retrieval system of the Branch of Atlantic-Gulf of Mexico Geology, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Mass., is a procedure for listing and describing branch-sponsored publications. It is designed for maintenance and retrieval by those having limited knowledge of computer languages and programs. Because this branch currently utilizes the Hewlett-Packard HP-1000 computer with RTE-IVB operating system, database entry and maintenance is performed in accordance with the TE-IVB Terminal User’s Reference Manual (Hewlett-Packard Company, 1980) and within the constraints of GRASP (Bowen and Botbol, 1975) and WOLF (Evenden, 1978).

  11. Information retrieval for patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Doctors need clinical information during most consultations with patients, and much of this need could be satisfied by material from online sources. Advances in data communication technologies mean that multimedia information can be transported rapidly to various clinical care locations. However, selecting the few items of information likely to be useful in a particular clinical situation from the mass of information available is a major problem. Current information retrieval systems are designed primarily for use in research rather than clinical care. The design, implementation, and critical evaluation of new information retrieval systems for clinical care should be guided by knowledgeable clinical users. PMID:9099122

  12. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents.

  13. Retrieving fear memories, as time goes by…

    PubMed Central

    Do Monte, Fabricio H.; Quirk, Gregory J.; Li, Bo; Penzo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning researches have led to a comprehensive picture of the neuronal circuit underlying the formation of fear memories. In contrast, knowledge about the retrieval of fear memories is much more limited. This disparity may stem from the fact that fear memories are not rigid, but reorganize over time. To bring clarity and raise awareness on the time-dependent dynamics of retrieval circuits, we review current evidence on the neuronal circuitry participating in fear memory retrieval at both early and late time points after conditioning. We focus on the temporal recruitment of the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and its BDNFergic efferents to the central nucleus of the amygdala, for the retrieval and maintenance of fear memories. Finally, we speculate as to why retrieval circuits change across time, and the functional benefits of recruiting structures such as the paraventricular nucleus into the retrieval circuit. PMID:27217148

  14. Knowledge of HPV and Surgery among Women Who Underwent Cervical Conization: A Korean Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Jun, So Yeun; Kim, Se Ik; Lee, Jung-Yun; Lee, San Hui; Song, Yong Jung; Chun, Kyoung-Chul; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a well-known cause of cervical cancer, which, along with its precursors, can be diagnosed and treated with cervical conization (CC). This study aimed to assess HPV- and procedure-related knowledge among women who had undergone CC. Materials and Methods Between February and May 2014, consecutive women who had undergone CC at five different educational hospitals were recruited. All patients had undergone a loop electrosurgical excision procedure as the method of CC. A survey was conducted with a self-developed, 29-item questionnaire, measuring knowledge related to HPV and CC. We analyzed the responses of 160 patients who completed the questionnaire. Results Mean total knowledge scores (±standard deviation) for HPV and CC were 5.2±3.0 of a possible 13.0 and 8.3±4.2 of a possible 16.0, respectively. While 73% of the patients knew that HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer, only 44% knew that HPV is sexually transmitted. The purpose of CC was correctly identified by 71% of the patients. However, 35% failed to indicate the anatomical area resected at the time of CC in the schematic diagram. Women who were younger (p<0.001), had higher education level (p<0.001), and higher family income (p=0.008) had higher knowledge scores. In contrast, neither interval from CC to survey nor disease severity were associated with total knowledge score. Conclusion The level of knowledge related to HPV and CC was unexpectedly low in women who had undergone CC. Intuitive educational resources may improve this knowledge, and further cohort studies are warranted. PMID:27401655

  15. Implementing family nursing: how do we translate knowledge into clinical practice? Part II: The evolution of 20 years of teaching, research, and practice to a Center of Excellence in Family Nursing.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Fabie

    2010-02-01

    The author's reflections on knowledge transfer/translation highlight the importance of the circular process between science and practice knowledge, leading to the notion of "knowledge exchange." She addresses the dilemmas of translating knowledge into clinical practice by describing her academic contributions to knowledge exchange within Family Systems Nursing (FSN). Teaching and research strategies are offered that address the circularity between science and practice knowledge. The evolution of 20 years of teaching, research, and clinical experience has resulted in the recent creation of a Center of Excellence in Family Nursing at the University of Montreal. The three main objectives of the Center uniquely focus on knowledge exchange by providing (a) a training context for skill development for nurses specializing in FSN, (b) a research milieu for knowledge "creation" and knowledge "in action" studies to further advance the practice of FSN, and (c) a family healing setting to support families who experience difficulty coping with health issues.

  16. Cancer Knowledge and Opportunities for Education Among HIV-Infected Patients in an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lydia H; Stafford, Kristen A; Fantry, Lori E; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2015-06-01

    HIV-infected patients frequently present with advanced stage cancer. It is possible that late stage presentation may be related to lack of cancer knowledge and/or barriers to care. Questionnaires were administered to 285 adult HIV-infected patients to evaluate knowledge of cancer risk factors and symptoms and barriers to care between 2011 and 2012. Differences in mean and percent scores by group were assessed using a t test for independent samples and chi-square analysis, respectively. Respondents were predominantly male (64%), African-American (86%), and low income (60% < $10,000/year). Thirty-four (12%) had been diagnosed with cancer, and 169 (59%) had a family history of cancer. The mean knowledge score was 17.5 out of 24 questions (73%). Mean scores were not significantly different by sex, age, race, or income. Respondents with a college education scored significantly higher than those with less than a high school education (p < 0.01). In unadjusted analysis, a higher proportion of patients with a personal/family history of cancer (74%) scored in the highest quartile (>70% correct) compared to those without any personal history of cancer (62%) (p = 0.03). There was a higher level of cancer knowledge in this population compared to studies that have evaluated the HIV-uninfected population. Nevertheless, there were knowledge deficits, suggesting the need for further education about cancer to improve earlier detection rates and, ultimately, outcomes.

  17. Interaction Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominich, Sandor

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval focuses on an Interaction Information Retrieval model in which documents are interconnected; queries and documents are treated in the same way; and retrieval is the result of the interconnection between query and documents. A theoretical mathematical formulation of this type of retrieval is given. (Contains 31…

  18. "Making History Go" at a Local Community Center: Popular Media and the Construction of Historical Knowledge among African American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Looks at how young people use historical knowledge, gained from media sources, to deal with current situations. A group of young African Americans draw on behavioral examples from the film, "Panther," instead of school-based learning, to give them ways to deal with the Ku Klux Klan in their neighborhood. (DAJ)

  19. Assessing Organization Culture Readiness for Knowledge Management Implementation: The Case of Aeronautical Systems Center Directorate of Contracting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    13 Manage Knowledge As An Asset ............................................................. 13 KM And Change Management ............................................................................. 14...to the status quo and, as such, are often subject to implementation barriers that require prudent change management . One of these barriers can be...efforts and published articles relative to ICM, KM, and change management . This chapter focuses on reviewing existing literature on these topics

  20. Fostering a Collaborative and Creative Climate in a College Class through Idea-Centered Knowledge-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chang, Yu-Hui; Chai, Chin Sing

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of student engagement in a knowledge-building (KB) environment on their collaborative learning process and the perceived creative climate of that environment. The participants were 30 college students who undertook a living technology course in which KB were employed. The main data sources include students'…

  1. Fostering a Collaborative and Creative Climate in a College Class through Idea-Centered Knowledge-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chang, Yu-Hui; Chai, Chin Sing

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of student engagement in a knowledge-building (KB) environment on their collaborative learning process and the perceived creative climate of that environment. The participants were 30 college students who undertook a living technology course in which KB were employed. The main data sources include students'…

  2. The Level of Knowledge of Parkinson's Disease among Nonprofessional Caregivers in a Movement Disorders Center in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sarılar, Ayse Caglar; Ekinci, Ayten; Erturk, Gozde; Mirza, Meral

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Only a few studies have been conducted to determine the level of knowledge among caregivers about Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to determine the knowledge of PD among caregivers at a movement disorder clinic in Turkey. Methods. We conducted a questionnaire based interview with the subjects in a tertiary care neurology facility in Turkey. The questions were divided into two parts covering the symptomatology and treatment of PD. A questionnaire consisting of 10 questions was applied to the subjects who had to mark the correct option in a stipulated time. Results. Eighty caregivers were included in the study. The caregivers' mean age was 47.94 years (SD = 12.40). There were 47 female caregivers (58.8%). The most well-known question was that the number of drugs given to the patient may vary with time (76.3%), whereas “the benefit noted in the patient's treatment decreases over time” was the least known question (11.3%). Discussion. This study is the first in our country and shows the necessity to increase the knowledge of PD among caregivers and the public. Education programs may have a positive role in imparting knowledge to the caregivers of PD patients. PMID:28348917

  3. An information retrieval system for computerized patient records in the context of a daily hospital practice: the example of the Léon Bérard Cancer Center (France).

    PubMed

    Biron, P; Metzger, M H; Pezet, C; Sebban, C; Barthuet, E; Durand, T

    2014-01-01

    A full-text search tool was introduced into the daily practice of Léon Bérard Center (France), a health care facility devoted to treatment of cancer. This tool was integrated into the hospital information system by the IT department having been granted full autonomy to improve the system. To describe the development and various uses of a tool for full-text search of computerized patient records. The technology is based on Solr, an open-source search engine. It is a web-based application that processes HTTP requests and returns HTTP responses. A data processing pipeline that retrieves data from different repositories, normalizes, cleans and publishes it to Solr, was integrated in the information system of the Leon Bérard center. The IT department developed also user interfaces to allow users to access the search engine within the computerized medical record of the patient. From January to May 2013, 500 queries were launched per month by an average of 140 different users. Several usages of the tool were described, as follows: medical management of patients, medical research, and improving the traceability of medical care in medical records. The sensitivity of the tool for detecting the medical records of patients diagnosed with both breast cancer and diabetes was 83.0%, and its positive predictive value was 48.7% (gold standard: manual screening by a clinical research assistant). The project demonstrates that the introduction of full-text-search tools allowed practitioners to use unstructured medical information for various purposes.

  4. Integrating pretreatment and retrieval: Results from the July 1997 Tanks Focus Area workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    If scientists and researchers working to solve the tank waste challenges, technical program office managers at the tank sites, and others understand the connection between retrieval and pretreatment activities, more efficient processes and reduced costs can be achieved. To make this possible, researchers involved in retrieval and pretreatment activities met at the Conference Center in Richland, Washington, on July 16 and 17, 1997, to discuss the connections between these activities. The purpose of the workshop was to help participants (1) gain a better understanding of retrieval and pretreatment process needs and experiences; (2) gain practical knowledge of the applications, capabilities, and requirements of retrieval and pretreatment technologies being developed and deployed; and (3) focus on identifying and troubleshooting interface issues and problems. The end product of this meeting was to create a checklist of retrieval and pretreatment parameters to consider when developing new technologies or managing work at the sites in these areas. For convenience, the information is also organized by pretreatment parameter and retrieval-pretreatment parameter in Section 5.0.

  5. Knowledge About the Waterpipe (Hookah), a Qualitative Assessment Among Community Workers in a Major Urban Center in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hammal, Fadi; Wild, T Cameron; Finegan, Barry A

    2016-08-01

    Waterpipe (WP) use has surged in popularity since the introduction of flavoured shisha. It is now an increasingly popular form of smoking among youth in North America. Health professionals/educators knowledge about the WP may well be inadequate. This study, using qualitative methods, sought to explore the knowledge and attitude of leaders in the community toward the WP. Family physicians, pharmacists, tobacco counsellors, social workers and educators were invited to participate in a one-one interview using open-ended questions. A total of 27 interviews were conducted. Individuals from Eastern Mediterranean backgrounds raised doubt about the overemphasised cultural significance of the WP and perceived this as a marketing strategy by industry. Most felt that WP smokers believed the WP to be less harmful than cigarettes and that the use of flavoured tobacco was motivating people to smoke. Participants believed that education should be directed at the general public and healthcare professionals, suggesting school programs and the use of social media to inform young smokers. Most thought that the current practices regarding packaging and second hand smoke exposure are confusing. They identified the lack of knowledge, poor enforcement procedures, "so called cultural aspects" and the economic impact of banning the WP on small businesses as barriers to change. Despite the awareness of an increase in WP use, our participants recognized that little has been done to curb this problem. Our findings emphasize the need for further education and better legislation to regulate WP use and availability.

  6. Knowledge about Danger Signs of Obstetric Complications and Associated Factors among Postnatal Mothers of Mechekel District Health Centers, East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Amenu, Gedefa; Mulaw, Zerfu; Seyoum, Tewodros; Bayu, Hinsermu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Developing countries like Ethiopia contributed highest level of maternal mortality due to obstetric complications. Women awareness of obstetric danger sign to recognize complications to seek medical care early is the first intervention in an effort to decrease maternal death. Objective. To assess knowledge about danger signs of obstetric complications and associated factors among postnatal mothers at Mechekel district health centers, East Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October, 2014, in Mechekel district health centers. Systematic random sampling was used to select four hundred eleven study participants. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and exported to SPSS 20.0 for further analysis. Descriptive and summary statistics were done. Logistic regression analyses were used to see the association of different variables. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the presence and strength of association. Results. According to this study, 55.1% participants were knowledgeable about danger signs of obstetric complications. Maternal and husband educational level ((AOR = 1.977, 95% CI: 1.052, 3.716) and (AOR = 3.163, 95% CI: 1.860, 5.3770), resp.), family monthly income ≥ 1500 (AOR = 2.954, 95% CI: 1.289, 6.770), being multipara (AOR = 7.463, 95% CI: 1.301, 12.800), ANC follow-up during last pregnancy (AOR = 2.184, 95% CI: 1.137, 4.196), and place of last delivery (AOR = 1.955, 95% CI: 1.214, 3.150) were variables found to be significantly associated with women's knowledge on danger signs of obstetric complications. Conclusion. Significant proportion of respondents were not knowledgeable about obstetric danger signs and factors like educational status, place of last delivery, and antenatal follow-up were found to be associated. PMID:27375920

  7. Retrieval-Based Learning: A Perspective for Enhancing Meaningful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Grimaldi, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning is often identified with the acquisition, encoding, or construction of new knowledge, while retrieval is often considered only a means of assessing knowledge, not a process that contributes to learning. Here, we make the case that retrieval is the key process for understanding and for promoting learning. We provide an overview of recent…

  8. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  9. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  10. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  11. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  12. Preparing for Patient-Centered Care: Assessing Nursing Student Knowledge, Comfort, and Cultural Competence Toward the Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Rachel M.; Sherrill, Windsor W.; Truong, Khoa D.; Nichols, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    As the Latino population continues to grow throughout the United States, cultural competence training of nursing students at the baccalaureate level has become a priority. This study aimed to explore undergraduate nursing students’ attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients and their perceived readiness to provide care to Latino patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at four major nursing schools in the southeastern United States, which is the region that has seen the highest percentage of growth in the Latino population. Results from multivariable regression suggest that social interaction with Latino individuals and cultural immersion in a Spanish-speaking country predict student knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latino patients. Direct influence by nursing programs, such as clinical experience, coursework, and language proficiency, are positively associated with the designed outcomes, but these relationships are not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that dosage of training matters. Implications for student recruitment, selection, and training are discussed. PMID:24766083

  13. Preparing for patient-centered care: assessing nursing student knowledge, comfort, and cultural competence toward the Latino population.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Rachel M; Sherrill, Windsor W; Truong, Khoa D; Nichols, Christina M

    2014-06-01

    As the Latino population continues to grow throughout the United States, cultural competence training of nursing students at the baccalaureate level has become a priority. This study aimed to explore undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients and their perceived readiness to provide care to Latino patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at four major nursing schools in the southeastern United States, which is the region that has seen the highest percentage of growth in the Latino population. Results from multivariable regression suggest that social interaction with Latino individuals and cultural immersion in a Spanish-speaking country predict student knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latino patients. Direct influence by nursing programs, such as clinical experience, coursework, and language proficiency, are positively associated with the designed outcomes, but these relationships are not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that dosage of training matters. Implications for student recruitment, selection, and training are discussed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  15. Microfilm and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teplitz, Arthur

    This paper was prepared to provide a frame of reference to the role of microfilm within the information retrieval world and to provide an opportunity for evaluation of the use of microforms for active retrieval applications. The paper discusses the principles of information retrieval, considers subject and classification indexing, and describes…

  16. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  17. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  18. Retrieval of Emotional Memories

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Tony W.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term memories are influenced by the emotion experienced during learning as well as by the emotion experienced during memory retrieval. The present article reviews the literature addressing the effects of emotion on retrieval, focusing on the cognitive and neurological mechanisms that have been revealed. The reviewed research suggests that the amygdala, in combination with the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, plays an important role in the retrieval of memories for emotional events. The neural regions necessary for online emotional processing also influence emotional memory retrieval, perhaps through the reexperience of emotion during the retrieval process. PMID:17723029

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Ordering Patterns for Routine HIV Screening among Resident Physicians at an Urban Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Bares, Sara; Steinbeck, Jennifer; Bence, Lauren; Kordik, Abbe; Acree, Mary Ellen; Jih, Jane; Farnan, Jeanne; Watson, Sydeaka; Rasinski, Kenneth; Schneider, John; Pitrak, David

    2016-07-01

    We sought to measure resident physician knowledge of HIV epidemiology and screening guidelines, attitudes toward testing, testing practices, and barriers and facilitators to routine testing. Resident physicians in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, and emergency medicine were surveyed. Overall response rate was 63% (162 of 259). Half knew details of the HIV screening guidelines, but few follow these recommendations. Less than one-third reported always or usually performing routine testing. A significant proportion reported only sometimes or never screening patients with risk factors. This was despite a strong belief that HIV screening improves patient care and public health. The most common barriers to testing were competing priorities and forgetting to order the test. Elimination of written consent and electronic reminders was identified as facilitators to routine testing. Although an institutional policy assigns responsibility for test notification and linkage of HIV-positive patients to care to the HIV care program, only 29% were aware of this. Few resident physicians routinely screen for HIV infection and some don't test patients with risk factors. While competing priorities remain a significant barrier, elimination of written consent form and electronic reminders has facilitated testing. Increasing the awareness of policies regarding test notification and linkage to care may improve screening. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Maternity care provider knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding provision of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices at a tertiary center in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Rupley, Devon M; Morhe, Emmanuel S K; Moyer, Cheryl A; Dalton, Vanessa K

    2015-02-01

    To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices of maternity care providers regarding the provision of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted between June 28 and July 15, 2011. Specialists, residents, house officers, and nurse midwives who had been working in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology for at least 3months were included. Self-administered questionnaires assessed formal training, current proficiency in IUD insertion, and attitudes toward postpartum IUD provision. Of 91 providers surveyed, 70 (77%) reported previous training in contraceptive counseling. Fewer than one in three respondents had ever inserted an IUD: 17 (44%) of 39 physicians and 9 (17%) of 52 midwives reported ever having inserted an IUD. A total of 33 (36%) respondents reported that they would recommend an IUD in the immediate postpartum period. Although most maternity care providers at KATH had received training in contraceptive counseling, few felt confident in their ability to insert an IUD. Further training in postpartum contraceptive management is needed. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of coil price knowledge by the operator on the cost of aneurysm coiling. A single center study.

    PubMed

    Finitsis, Stephanos; Fahed, Robert; Gaulin, Ian; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain

    2017-09-15

    Endovascular treatment of aneurysms with coils is among the most frequent treatments in interventional neuroradiology, and represents an important expense. Each manufacturer has created several types of coils, with prices varying among brands and coil types. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of cost awareness of the exact price of each coil by the operating physician on the total cost of aneurysm coiling. This was a comparative study conducted over 1 year in a single tertiary care center. The reference cohort and the experimental cohort consisted of all aneurysm embolization procedures performed during the first 6 months and the last 6 months, respectively. During the second period, physicians were given an information sheet with the prices of all available coils and were requested to look at the sheet during each procedure with the instruction to try to reduce the total cost of the coils used. Expenses related to the coiling procedures during each period were compared. 77 aneurysms (39 ruptured) in the reference cohort and 73 aneurysms (36 ruptured) in the experimental cohort were treated, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference regarding aneurysm location and mean size. The overall cost of the coiling procedures, the mean number of coils used per procedure, and the median cost of each procedure did not differ significantly between the two cohorts. Awareness of the precise price of coils by operators without any additional measure did not have a scientifically proven impact on the cost of aneurysm embolization. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. A pilot study of BRCA mutation carriers' knowledge about the clinical impact of prophylactic-oophorectomy and views on fertility consultation: a single-center pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Skrzynia, C; Mersereau, J E

    2015-02-01

    BRCA mutation carriers will experience early surgically induced menopause following prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (PBSO). This pilot study aimed to investigate their (1) knowledge about the clinical impact of PBSO; (2) views on fertility consultation (FC)/fertility preservation (FP) treatment; and (3) difficulties in conceiving compared to non-carriers. A cross-sectional, single institution web-survey was performed at a university-based IVF center. Women aged 18-50 years who were screened for BRCA gene mutations from 2005 to 2013 were recruited via mail. Forty-one BRCA-positive and 110 BRCA-negative women completed the survey (response rate: 50 %). The knowledge about the reproductive impact of PBSO was limited, with the majority of women in this highly educated sample only identifying the correct response 64 % of the time. Among BRCA mutation carriers, 24 (59 %) had positive views about FC/FP treatments. A larger proportion of women with no children at the time of BRCA testing, and those who were non-white tended to have positive views toward FP. Women with, versus without, BRCA mutations were more likely to have difficulty in conceiving (p = 0.08). This well-educated group had limited knowledge about the reproductive clinical impact of PBSO, or the benefit of a FP before PBSO. Most women with BRCA mutations were interested in FC/FP treatment if they had not completed childbearing at the time of screening. Targeted referrals for FC at the time of BRCA screening may help women improve knowledge and allow improved decision-making about reproductive options.

  3. Research by retrieving experiments.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2007-06-01

    Newton did not discover that apples fall: the information was available prior to his gravitational hypothesis. Hypotheses can be tested not only by performing experiments but also by retrieving experiments from the literature (via PubMed, for example). Here I show how disconnected facts from known data, if properly connected, can generate novel predictions testable in turn by other published data. With examples from cell cycle, aging, cancer and other fields of biology and medicine, I discuss how new knowledge was and will be derived from old information. Millions of experiments have been already performed to test unrelated hypotheses and the results of those experiments are available to 'test' your hypotheses too. But most data (99% by some estimates) remain unpublished, because they were negative, seemed of low priority, or did not fit the story. Yet for other investigators those data may be valuable. The well-known story of Franklin and Watson is a case in point. By making preliminary data widely available, 'data-owners' will benefit most, receiving the credit for otherwise unused results. If posted (pre-published) on searchable databases, these data may fuel thousands of projects without the need for repetitive experiments. Enormous 'pre-published' databases coupled with Google-like search engines can change the structure of scientific research, and shrinking funding will make this inevitable.

  4. Patients’ Knowledge, Beliefs, and Distress associated with Detection and Evaluation of Incidental Pulmonary Nodules for Cancer: Results from a Multi-Center Survey

    PubMed Central

    Freiman, Marc R.; Clark, Jack A.; Slatore, Christopher G.; Gould, Michael K.; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M.; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary nodules are detected in over a million Americans each year. Prior qualitative work suggests the detection of incidental pulmonary nodules can be burdensome for patients, but it is unknown whether these findings generalize to a broader sample of patients. We categorized patients’ knowledge, beliefs, and distress associated with detection and evaluation of a pulmonary nodule, and their impressions of clinician communication. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to adults with an incidental pulmonary nodule recruited from a rural medical center, an urban safety net hospital, and a Veterans Affairs hospital. Results Of 490 surveys mailed, 244 (50%) responded. Median nodule size was 7 mm; mean patient age was 67 years; 29% were female, and 86% were white. A quarter (26%) of respondents reported clinically significant distress related to their nodule as measured by the Impact of Event scale, our primary outcome. Patients reported multiple concerns including uncertainty about the nodule’s etiology (78%), the possibility of cancer (73%), and the possible need for surgery (64%). Only 25% of patients accurately estimated their lung cancer risk (within 15% of their actual risk); overall there was no correlation between perceived and actual risk (r=−0.007, p=0.93). Among the 23% of patients who did receive cancer risk information from their provider, they were more likely to find this information reassuring (16%) than scary (7%). Conclusion A quarter of patients with incidental pulmonary nodules experienced clinically significant distress. Knowledge about cancer risk and evaluation was poor. Clinician communication may help bridge knowledge gaps and alleviate distress in some patients. PMID:26961390

  5. Comparison of childbirth training workshop effects on knowledge, attitude, and delivery method between mothers and couples groups referring to Isfahan health centers in Iran.

    PubMed

    Valiani, Mahboubeh; Haghighatdana, Zohreh; Ehsanpour, Soheila

    2014-11-01

    The World Health Organization announced the acceptable level of cesarean section (CS) as 10-15%. In recent years, the rate of CS has been increasing irregularly. Lack of appropriate knowledge and attitude among couples plays a major role in this regard. This study tried to compare the effects of a childbirth training workshop on knowledge, attitude, and delivery method. The present study is a randomized clinical trial conducted in four stages on 180 subjects referring to Isfahan health care centers in three groups of mothers (alone), couples (mothers and their respective partners), and control. After sampling, a pre-test and intervention in the form of an educational workshop were conducted. Then, post-test was conducted immediately after, 1 month later, and in puerperium in all three groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15. The analysis showed that the knowledge mean was statically significant in mothers (P < 0.0001), couples (P < 0.0001), and control group (P < 0.0001) before and after intervention. Also, the attitude mean was statically significant in mothers (P < 0.0001), couples (P < 0.0001), and control groups (P < 0.0001) before and after intervention. Analysis of delivery method showed that in mothers, couples, and control groups, normal vaginal delivery was the most preferred method in that order, w hich was significant (P = 0.017). Workshop education of pregnant women and their spouses was effective on encouraging them to natural delivery. Therefore, designing educational and counseling programs through collaborative methods for mothers and their spouses is suggested to reduce the rate of cesarean deliveries.

  6. Neural systems behind word and concept retrieval.

    PubMed

    Damasio, H; Tranel, D; Grabowski, T; Adolphs, R; Damasio, A

    2004-01-01

    Using both the lesion method and functional imaging (positron emission tomography) in large cohorts of subjects investigated with the same experimental tasks, we tested the following hypotheses: (A) that the retrieval of words which denote concrete entities belonging to distinct conceptual categories depends upon partially segregated regions in higher-order cortices of the left temporal lobe; and (B) that the retrieval of conceptual knowledge pertaining to the same concrete entities also depends on partially segregated regions; however, those regions will be different from those postulated in hypothesis A, and located predominantly in the right hemisphere (the second hypothesis tested only with the lesion method). The analyses provide support for hypothesis A in that several regions outside the classical Broca and Wernicke language areas are involved in name retrieval of concrete entities, and that there is a partial segregation in the temporal lobe with respect to the conceptual category to which the entities belong, and partial support for hypothesis B in that retrieval of conceptual knowledge is partially segregated from name retrieval in the lesion study. Those regions identified here are seen as parts of flexible, multi-component systems serving concept and word retrieval for concrete entities belonging to different conceptual categories. By comparing different approaches the article also addresses a number of method issues that have surfaced in recent studies in this field.

  7. Image selection system. [computerized data storage and retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, M. A.; Hurd, D.; Hubble, L.; Kroeck, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    An image selection (ISS) was developed for the NASA-Ames Research Center Earth Resources Aircraft Project. The ISS is an interactive, graphics oriented, computer retrieval system for aerial imagery. An analysis of user coverage requests and retrieval strategies is presented, followed by a complete system description. Data base structure, retrieval processors, command language, interactive display options, file structures, and the system's capability to manage sets of selected imagery are described. A detailed example of an area coverage request is graphically presented.

  8. Computer map retrievals from large files

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    Many exploration staffs consider computer-generated maps part of their routine work. More than 100,000 maps/year are delivered to operational personnel in some mapping centers. Many computer-generated maps exceed the clarity, accuracy, and content of hand-drafted maps, and retrieval and posting costs of a computer map can be less than the cost of a print made from a film by conventional reproduction techniques. Computer mapping for geologists began 20 years ago when values were posted for exploration projects with limited geologic objectives and were restricted to small geographic areas. Since then, the variety, number, and timeliness of computer maps have increased in proportional to: (1) the user community's knowledge; (2) the quantity of digital data; (3) the program dependability; and (4) the availability of better hardware. When users integrate computer maps into their work, their expectations increase and they become more critical of delays and file errors. This user dissatisfaction provides the motivation and economic justification for introducing better computer services. An average geologist can use about three maps each day derived from today's files. Map costs continue to decrease and the amount of digital data increases. Presently, explorationists have difficulty manipulating their own data, and each company must decide whether to use personal computers, distributed workstations, or partitioned central files.

  9. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  10. Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahle, Jack D., Jr.

    The Fort Detrick Information Retrieval System is a system of computer programs written in COBOL for a CDC 3150 to store and retrieve information about the scientific and technical reports and documents of the Fort Detrick Technical Library. The documents and reports have been abstracted and indexed. This abstract, the subject matter descriptors,…

  11. Natural Language Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strzalkowski, Tomek

    1995-01-01

    Describes an information retrieval system in which advanced natural language processing is used to enhance the effectiveness of term-based document retrieval by preprocessing the documents; discovering interterm dependencies and build a conceptual hierarchy specific to database domain; and processing the user's natural language requests into…

  12. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  13. Optical Storage and Retrieval of Library Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folen, Doris R.; Stackpole, Laurie E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the newly installed optical disk storage system at the Naval Research Laboratory's Research Library and Technical Information Center. Planning and design of the system, the conversion of 140,000 reports to optical disk, the information retrieval process, and future plans are covered. (Contains nine references.) (KRN)

  14. Subject Retrieval in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Contains nine papers read at the National Cataloguing Conference for 1981 of the section entitled, "Subject Retrieval in the 1980s." Topics include cost of subject access, research problems, options for automated subject access, and authority control. (Library Association of Australia, The Science Center, 35 Clarence St., Sydney, NSW…

  15. Use of Metadata Vocabularies in Data Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Edwin M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a prototype system for devising and using a metadata vocabulary for data retrieval, based on a project at the United States Department of Agriculture. A unified information-access system called REEIS (Research, Education, Economics, Extension Information System) is being designed to provide a knowledge base of programs, projects, and…

  16. Understanding Student Article Retrieval Behaviors: Instructional Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Schoen, David

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of full-text databases amongst 425 undergraduate and graduate students in western New York. A review of literature implicated convenience, time issues, article retrieval option knowledge, and the appreciation and understanding of research article quality as potential predictors of full-text reliance. These variables…

  17. Understanding Student Article Retrieval Behaviors: Instructional Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Schoen, David

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of full-text databases amongst 425 undergraduate and graduate students in western New York. A review of literature implicated convenience, time issues, article retrieval option knowledge, and the appreciation and understanding of research article quality as potential predictors of full-text reliance. These variables…

  18. The Setting Up of a Resources Centre. 3: Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Adam H., Ed.

    Assembled to aid educators and administrators in Scotland in selecting and applying appropriate information retrieval systems in learning resources centers, this collection contains an introductory essay and four articles on the characteristics and features of some basic information retrieval systems. The articles include (1) a discussion of the…

  19. The Setting Up of a Resources Centre. 3: Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Adam H., Ed.

    Assembled to aid educators and administrators in Scotland in selecting and applying appropriate information retrieval systems in learning resources centers, this collection contains an introductory essay and four articles on the characteristics and features of some basic information retrieval systems. The articles include (1) a discussion of the…

  20. A Comparative Study of Document Retrieval Systems of Nursing Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Virginia Kathleen Joseph

    Intended to provide the nursing community with a comparative analysis of four major computerized document retrieval systems and one manual system providing coverage of the nursing literature, this study compares the indexing vocabulary, database coverage, and retrieval performance of the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC),…

  1. WWW Entrez: A Hypertext Retrieval Tool for Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jonathan A.; Kans, Jonathan A.; Schuler, Gregory D.

    This article describes the World Wide Web (WWW) Entrez server which is based upon the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Entrez retrieval database and software. Entrez is a molecular sequence retrieval system that contains an integrated view of portions of Medline and all publicly available nucleotide and protein databases,…

  2. Prospects for Intelligent, Language-Based Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, Alan F.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike conventional information retrieval systems, natural language processing (NLP) systems translate queries automatically into the language of the system. This paper discusses the potential impact of NLP on both the indexing and retrieval of text and examines some current NLP projects and systems that have established knowledge bases in narrow…

  3. Information Retrieval and Creativity: Towards Support for the Original Thinker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the requirements of information retrieval systems to support creative thinking as well as more convergent thinking. Highlights include the nature of creative thinking; similarity relationships; serendipity; machine processing of similarities; high order knowledge representation; and fuzzy and parallel information retrieval. (Contains 34…

  4. Prospects for Intelligent, Language-Based Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, Alan F.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike conventional information retrieval systems, natural language processing (NLP) systems translate queries automatically into the language of the system. This paper discusses the potential impact of NLP on both the indexing and retrieval of text and examines some current NLP projects and systems that have established knowledge bases in narrow…

  5. Computer and Human Understanding in Intelligent Retrieval Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses general issues of computer and human understanding; contrasts three paradigms of information retrieval methodology, including statistical, deep semantic or natural language, and smart Boolean; describes CONIT, a knowledge-based intermediary retrieval assistance system; and examines system evaluation procedures, including a…

  6. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  7. Retrieval options study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

  8. Uterus retrieval process from brain dead donors.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Tristan; Piver, Pascal; Pichon, Nicolas; Bibes, Romain; Guillaudeau, Angelique; Piccardo, Alessandro; Pesteil, Francis; Tricard, Jeremy; Gardet, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc; Lalloué, Fabrice; Marquet, Pierre; Aubard, Yves

    2014-08-01

    To describe the feasibility of human uterus retrieval after donation after brain death. Single-center, prospective study. University hospital. Female brain dead donors. The families of female brain dead donors were informed about consent to uterus donation. A specific organ retrieval procedure was performed. At the end of the procedure the uterus was removed together with the hypogastric vessels, parametria, and vaginal fornix. The tolerance of the uterus to cold ischemia was evaluated with histology and TUNEL reaction up to 24 hours. Rate of uterus donation refusal. Between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013, seven uteri were retrieved from 14 female multiorgan donors. No refusal to uterus donation occurred. Our surgical protocol did not interfere with vital organ retrieval and was readily accepted by the other transplantation teams. The hypogastric vessels could be preserved in all cases but for one vein loss in the first retrieval. Histology studies did not find major morphologic changes after 24 hours of cold ischemia. Apoptosis was rare. Uterus retrieval could be part of a reproducible multiorgan procurement procedure. Uterus donation seems readily accepted. This preliminary study is a necessary step before any transplantation project. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Error reduction in retrievals of atmospheric species from symmetrically measured lidar sounding absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey R; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T

    2014-10-20

    We report new methods for retrieving atmospheric constituents from symmetrically-measured lidar-sounding absorption spectra. The forward model accounts for laser line-center frequency noise and broadened line-shape, and is essentially linearized by linking estimated optical-depths to the mixing ratios. Errors from the spectral distortion and laser frequency drift are substantially reduced by averaging optical-depths at each pair of symmetric wavelength channels. Retrieval errors from measurement noise and model bias are analyzed parametrically and numerically for multiple atmospheric layers, to provide deeper insight. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations are reduced to tolerable levels by "averaging before log" with pulse-by-pulse ranging knowledge incorporated.

  10. Wire Retrieves Broken Pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burow, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Safety wire retains pieces of broken tool. Retrieval wire running through shaft of tool used to pull pieces of tool out of hole, should tool break during use. Safety wire concept suitable for pins subject to deflection or breakage.

  11. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-08-25

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler.

  12. Data-Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    NASA Graphics and Display System (NGDS) helps solve problem of data retrieval for management. Since NGDS is interactive online system, user controls display content and format, and has capability of always working with latest version of his data.

  13. Information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  14. Retrieving Patent Information Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaback, Stuart M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses patent information retrieval from online files in terms of types of questions, file contents, coverage, timeliness, and other file variations. CLAIMS, Derwent, WPI, APIPAT and Chemical Abstracts Service are described. (KP)

  15. Retrieving Patent Information Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaback, Stuart M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses patent information retrieval from online files in terms of types of questions, file contents, coverage, timeliness, and other file variations. CLAIMS, Derwent, WPI, APIPAT and Chemical Abstracts Service are described. (KP)

  16. The Educational Resources Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesley, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    The Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) system, which provides access to a wide variety of information concerned with education, is discussed. The process of acquiring, selecting, retrieving, and disseminating documents is described. (Author/PHR)

  17. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  18. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  19. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  20. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  1. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to 42 CFR...

  2. The Development of Online Information Retrieval Services in the People's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiaocun, Lu

    1986-01-01

    Assesses the promotion and development of online information retrieval in China. Highlights include opening of the first online retrieval center at China Overseas Building Development Company Limited; establishment and activities of a cooperative network; online retrieval seminars; telecommunication lines and terminal installations; and problems…

  3. Retrieval with gene queries.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Aditya K; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2006-04-21

    Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline). For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene) summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  4. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    , practical, and cost effective. To properly formulate any future plans, background information and research are required. Before bringing in a consultant to tackle the three year process anticipated to prepare a Center Master Plan, my job was to gather information on different organizations contributions to the NASA mission, their facility needs, consistent trends they observe, etc. I conducted numerous interviews with personnel such as Directorate Representatives, Division Chiefs, Branch Chiefs, System Managers and Building Managers. I documented the information I received from them for future use. I used the information to create various color-coded maps layering the different data. This was done with the ending objective being to collect the information and place it in a database that will be linked with Aperture (a computer program that generates color-coded map layers from database information) and made electronically retrievable to the Planning Consultant, NASA personnel, program stakeholders, and other governmental agencies. My goal this summer was to gather information and ideas appropriate for use in NASA Glenn Research Center s Master Plan and organize them for future application by the Planning Consultant. By the end of the summer, after completion of my goal, I will utilize my knowledge and create an array of preliminary future plans for the facility that can be passed along as a guidance tool.

  5. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    , practical, and cost effective. To properly formulate any future plans, background information and research are required. Before bringing in a consultant to tackle the three year process anticipated to prepare a Center Master Plan, my job was to gather information on different organizations contributions to the NASA mission, their facility needs, consistent trends they observe, etc. I conducted numerous interviews with personnel such as Directorate Representatives, Division Chiefs, Branch Chiefs, System Managers and Building Managers. I documented the information I received from them for future use. I used the information to create various color-coded maps layering the different data. This was done with the ending objective being to collect the information and place it in a database that will be linked with Aperture (a computer program that generates color-coded map layers from database information) and made electronically retrievable to the Planning Consultant, NASA personnel, program stakeholders, and other governmental agencies. My goal this summer was to gather information and ideas appropriate for use in NASA Glenn Research Center s Master Plan and organize them for future application by the Planning Consultant. By the end of the summer, after completion of my goal, I will utilize my knowledge and create an array of preliminary future plans for the facility that can be passed along as a guidance tool.

  6. MODIS Sea-Surface Temperature retrieval by Optimal Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczodrak, G.; Minnett, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    We employ Optimal Estimation approach to retrieve Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Optimal Estimation (OE) approach uses a prior knowledge or estimation of the state of a system as an input of a forward model to simulate `observations' (known as prior observations) and seeks to minimize the difference between these simulated observation and actual measurements in the space of the state variables. In our case of SST estimation from MODIS observations the system is the ocean surface and the atmosphere between the ocean surface and the satellite. Following previous research (Merchant et al., 2008 and 2009) we introduced a reduced state consisting of variables to which the channel brightness temperatures are expected to be most sensitive, SST and the total column water vapor (TCWV). The actual observations are brightness temperature measurements in MODIS channels with center wavelengths of 11 and 12 microns. The prior knowledge of the state of the atmosphere comes from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast interim reanalysis fields (ECMWF, Dee et al., 2011) for the atmospheric variables and from Reynolds high resolution sea surface temperature analysis fields (Reynolds et al., 2007) for the SST. The forward model in our case is the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) of Clough et al., 2005. Our a priori data set consists of 38400 data points for each month of 2009 representing the state of atmosphere and ocean with 0.5 × 0.5 resolution on the 1st and 16th day of the month at two times a day 00Z and 12Z. We performed LBLRTM simulation for all a priori state data resulting in top of atmosphere infrared spectra. The simulated spectra were integrated with the MODIS 4, 11 and 12 micron channels relative spectral response functions and thus a set of MODIS channels brightness temperatures corresponding to the a priori states was obtained. These simulated brightness

  7. Biomartr: genomic data retrieval with R.

    PubMed

    Drost, Hajk-Georg; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2017-04-15

    Retrieval and reproducible functional annotation of genomic data are crucial in biology. However, the current poor usability and transparency of retrieval methods hinders reproducibility. Here we present an open source R package, biomartr , which provides a comprehensive easy-to-use framework for automating data retrieval and functional annotation for meta-genomic approaches. The functions of biomartr achieve a high degree of clarity, transparency and reproducibility of analyses. The biomartr package implements straightforward functions for bulk retrieval of all genomic data or data for selected genomes, proteomes, coding sequences and annotation files present in databases hosted by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). In addition, biomartr communicates with the BioMart database for functional annotation of retrieved sequences. Comprehensive documentation of biomartr functions and five tutorial vignettes provide step-by-step instructions on how to use the package in a reproducible manner. The open source biomartr package is available at https://github.com/HajkD/biomartr and https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/biomartr/index.html . hgd23@cam.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. AIRS Retrieval Validation During the EAQUATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Barnet, Christopher D.; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Newman, Stuart M.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric and surface thermodynamic parameters retrieved with advanced hyperspectral remote sensors of Earth observing satellites are critical for weather prediction and scientific research. The retrieval algorithms and retrieved parameters from satellite sounders must be validated to demonstrate the capability and accuracy of both observation and data processing systems. The European AQUA Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was conducted mainly for validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the AQUA satellite, but also for assessment of validation systems of both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments which will be used for other satellite systems such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European MetOp satellite, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the NPOESS Preparatory Project and the following NPOESS series of satellites. Detailed inter-comparisons were conducted and presented using different retrieval methodologies: measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers, aircraft in-situ instruments, dedicated dropsondes and radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar, as well as from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) modeled thermal structures. The results of this study not only illustrate the quality of the measurements and retrieval products but also demonstrate the capability of these validation systems which are put in place to validate current and future hyperspectral sounding instruments and their scientific products.

  9. Retrieval of abstract semantics.

    PubMed

    Noppeney, Uta; Price, Cathy J

    2004-05-01

    Behavioural and neuropsychological evidence suggests that abstract and concrete concepts might be represented, retrieved and processed differently in the human brain. Using fMRI, we demonstrate that retrieval of abstract relative to sensory-based semantics during synonym judgements increased activation in a left frontotemporal system that has been associated with semantic processing particularly at the sentence level. Since activation increases were observed irrespective of the degree of difficulty, we suggest that these differential activations might reflect a particular retrieval mechanism or strategy for abstract concepts. In contrast to sensory-based semantics, the meaning of abstract concepts is largely specified by their usage in language rather than by their relations to the physical world. Subjects might therefore generate an appropriate semantic sentential context to fully explore and specify the meaning of abstract concepts. Our results also explain why abstract semantics is vulnerable to left frontotemporal lesions.

  10. Retrieval Studies with LIDORT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Spurr, Robert J. D.; Chance, K. V.

    2003-01-01

    This short program of LIDORT-based research in atmospheric trace gas retrieval was conducted over the 1 year period 01 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. After consultation with the NASA reporting officer, the first of the two original proposal activities (development of a direct-fitting total O3 column retrieval algorithm with operational capability for GOME data) was replaced by other tasks. The three activities addressed were: (1) Sensitivity studies for column and profile retrieval of NO2 distributions from a new generation of multi-axis ground-based spectrometers; (2) use of the LIDORT-RRS model to determine the effect of inelastic rotational Raman scattering at SBUV wavelengths; (3) an examination of ozone profile weighting functions in the presence of optically thick tropospheric clouds.

  11. Retrieval of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-19

    Soil removal and drum retrieval equipment are being developed and demonstrated in support of the Transuranic Waste Facility (TWF) program. Accomplishments to date include: Soil removal equipment, a telescoping excavator and high velocity vacuum truck were selected for soil removal; Preliminary demonstrations, the capabilities of both the telescoping excavator and vacuum truck were demonstrated by the vendors; Shielding Lifting Canister, Functional parameters were defined and design is 95% complete; and Full-scale demonstration, SRL test mounds were selected for a full-scale drum retrieval demonstration. Further development will include an integrated full-scale demonstration. Several drums buried in non-radioactive TRU test mounds will be retrieved. Planning for the demonstration is underway. A telescoping excavator is being acquired, the shielded lifting canister will be fabricated and pre-tested, and a vacuum truck will be leased. 5 figs.

  12. Retrieving similar color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Isabella; Schettini, Raimondo

    1998-09-01

    There is a great demand for efficient tools that can, on the basis of the pictorial content, organize large quantities of images and rapidly retrieve those of interest. With that goal in mind we present a method for indexing complex color images. The basic idea is to exploit image data decomposition and compression based on the standard Haar multiresolution wavelet transform to describe image content. In this way we are able to effectively eliminate data redundancy and concisely represent the salient features of the image in image signatures of predefined lengths. In the retrieval phase image signatures are compared using a similarity measure that the system has 'learned' from user's. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of our approach, which outperforms more standard procedures, in retrieval accuracy and at lower computational costs.

  13. Iterative phase retrieval without support.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Weierstall, U; Spence, J C H; Koch, C T

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  14. Iterative phase retrieval without support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. S.; Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Koch, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  15. Docking and retrieval mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewell, J. R.; Spencer, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering prototype docking and retrieval mechanism (DRM) which enables two spacecraft to dock and be structurally joined on-orbit is described. The joining of two spacecraft or payloads on-orbit supports future planned space activities such as payload servicing, deployment and retrieval, and assembly or large space systems. Advantages of the DRM include: it is a nonimpact docking mechanism; does not require impact absorbing mechanisms or attitude stabilization on the target spacecraft; is capable of docking to a spinning spacecraft; and can spin up and deploy a spinning spacecraft or payload.

  16. Docking and retrieval mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewell, J. R.; Spencer, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering prototype docking and retrieval mechanism (DRM) is described which enables two spacecraft to dock and be structurally joined on-orbit. The joining of two spacecraft or payloads on-orbit supports future planned space activities such as payload servicing, deployment and retrieval, and assembly of large space systems. The DRM, as developed, provides advantages over prior approaches because it is a nonimpact docking mechanism, does not require impact absorbing mechanisms or attitude stabilization on the target spacecraft, is capable of docking to a spinning spacecraft, and can spin up and deploy a spinning spacecraft or payload.

  17. Semantic-Aware Co-Indexing for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiliang; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Yuanqing; Tian, Qi

    2015-12-01

    In content-based image retrieval, inverted indexes allow fast access to database images and summarize all knowledge about the database. Indexing multiple clues of image contents allows retrieval algorithms search for relevant images from different perspectives, which is appealing to deliver satisfactory user experiences. However, when incorporating diverse image features during online retrieval, it is challenging to ensure retrieval efficiency and scalability. In this paper, for large-scale image retrieval, we propose a semantic-aware co-indexing algorithm to jointly embed two strong cues into the inverted indexes: 1) local invariant features that are robust to delineate low-level image contents, and 2) semantic attributes from large-scale object recognition that may reveal image semantic meanings. Specifically, for an initial set of inverted indexes of local features, we utilize semantic attributes to filter out isolated images and insert semantically similar images to this initial set. Encoding these two distinct and complementary cues together effectively enhances the discriminative capability of inverted indexes. Such co-indexing operations are totally off-line and introduce small computation overhead to online retrieval, because only local features but no semantic attributes are employed for the query. Hence, this co-indexing is different from existing image retrieval methods fusing multiple features or retrieval results. Extensive experiments and comparisons with recent retrieval methods manifest the competitive performance of our method.

  18. Information Retrieval Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Paul B.

    1994-01-01

    Identifies current trends in the automation of indexing, of information retrieval, and of interaction between the system and the users. Topics discussed include location, navigation, and indexing; digital libraries; matching documents to queries; weight of concepts; query structure, including fuzzy sets; algorithms; stemming; clustering; users'…

  19. Information Retrieval in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschman, Arthur

    Discussed in this paper are the information problems in physics and the current program of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) being conducted in an attempt to develop an information retrieval system. The seriousness of the need is described by means of graphs indicating the exponential rise in the number of physics publications in the last…

  20. Information Retrieval by Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billowes, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    Bell Canada, the Public School and Collegiate Institute Boards of Ottawa, and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are collaborating on an educational television project which will provide a retrieval system that can supply any given program at any time under the control of the classroom teacher. Four schools in Ottawa will participate…

  1. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  2. Music Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Identifies MIR (Music Information Retrieval) computer system problems, historic influences, current state-of-the-art, and future MIR solutions through an examination of the multidisciplinary approach to MIR. Highlights include pitch; temporal factors; harmonics; tone; editorial, textual, and bibliographic facets; multicultural factors; locating…

  3. Information Retrieval by Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billowes, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    Bell Canada, the Public School and Collegiate Institute Boards of Ottawa, and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are collaborating on an educational television project which will provide a retrieval system that can supply any given program at any time under the control of the classroom teacher. Four schools in Ottawa will participate…

  4. Collaborative Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Harry; Fidel, Raya

    1999-01-01

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Microsoft Research, Boeing, and Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark have embarked on a project to explore the manifestations of Collaborative Information Retrieval (CIR) in work settings and to propose technological innovations and organizational changes that can support, facilitate, and improve CIR.…

  5. Multimedia Document Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkarahan, Esen

    1995-01-01

    This study develops an integrated conceptual representation scheme for multimedia documents that are viewed to comprise an object-oriented database; the necessary abstractions for the conceptual model and extensions to the relational model used as the search structure; a retrieval model that includes associative, semantic and media-specific…

  6. Retrieval Hierarchies in Hypertext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rada, Roy; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a collaborative, reuse hypertext system, called MUCH (Many Using and Creating Hypertext). The novel browsing and retrieval characteristics of the system are based on a semantic net connecting documents, thesauri, and discussions. Word patterns are documented for reuse, creating and reorganizing network traversal according to user…

  7. Statistical Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiFondi, Nicholas M.

    An information retrieval system was developed using technical word occurrences as a basis for classification. A set of words, designated a vocabulary, was selected from the middle range of frequency listing of words occurring in an experimental sample of 94 documents. The selection produced 115 non-function words with technical definition that did…

  8. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  9. Knowledge and Skill Differences between Expert and Novice Service Technicians on Technical Troubleshooting Tasks. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Twenty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott Duncan

    The major purpose of a study was to identify the knowledge, skill, and cognitive process differences between expert and novice technicians on technical troubleshooting tasks. Identification of these differences was conducted through two investigations. Investigation 1 sought to describe differences in the declarative and procedural knowledge bases…

  10. Indexing and retrieval strategies for natural language fact retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodner, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    Researchers in artificial intelligence have recently become interested in natural language fact retrieval; currently, their research is at a point where it can begin contributing to the field of information retrieval. In this paper, strategies for a natural language fact retrieval system are mapped out, and approaches to many of the organization and retrieval problems are presented. The CYRUS system, which keeps track of important people and is queried in English, is presented and used to illustrate those solutions. 30 references.

  11. Retrieval of Water Inherent Optical Properties by Optimal Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, Lena Katharina; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jurgen

    2015-12-01

    Due to the variety of parameters and states in ocean colour retrievals on one hand and the limited number of channels with limited precision on the other hand, it is necessary and useful to apply prior knowledge to the retrieval of ocean colour products. However the available prior knowledge can be very variable. Within the project SIOCS (Sensor Independent Ocean Colour Service) we developed a generic innovative algorithm for the retrieval of water inherent optical properties with a flexible way of including prior knowledge in order to constrain the result. The method is based on the inversion of simulated water-leaving reflectances from a look-up table. The inversion is solved including prior knowledge in the form of an apriori state and an apriori covariance matrix.

  12. Interactions between Encoding and Retrieval in the Domain of Sequence-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Amotz; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose to characterize sequence learning in terms of automatic versus nonautomatic processing and to apply this contrast independently to knowledge acquisition and retrieval. In several experiments of sequence learning, automaticity of both the acquisition and retrieval of the acquired knowledge was independently…

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) tours a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) tours a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and United Space Alliance (USA) Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Associate Program Manager of Florida Operations Bill Pickavance (left front) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right front) tour a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Associate Program Manager of Florida Operations Bill Pickavance (left front) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (right front) tour a solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ship at Cape Canaveral. NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday. The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

  15. Todai Scientific Information Retrieval (TSIR-1) System. II. Generation of a Scientific Literature Data Base in a Center-Oriented Format by a Tape-to-Tape Conversion of CAS SDF Data Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Yammoto, Takeo

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of the Chemical Abstract Service scientific literature data base from Standard Distribution Format to a center-oriented file format, STF, is described. A tape file format is described in which variable length logical records, possibly longer than the blocksize, may be stored safely. (7 references) (Author/NH)

  16. Todai Scientific Information Retrieval (TSIR-1) System. II. Generation of a Scientific Literature Data Base in a Center-Oriented Format by a Tape-to-Tape Conversion of CAS SDF Data Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Yammoto, Takeo

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of the Chemical Abstract Service scientific literature data base from Standard Distribution Format to a center-oriented file format, STF, is described. A tape file format is described in which variable length logical records, possibly longer than the blocksize, may be stored safely. (7 references) (Author/NH)

  17. Language Processing in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doszkocs, Tamase

    1986-01-01

    Examines role and contributions of natural-language processing in information retrieval and artificial intelligence research in context of large operational information retrieval systems and services. State-of-the-art information retrieval systems combining the functional capabilities of conventional inverted file term adjacency approach with…

  18. Memory Retrieval as Temporal Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gordon D. A.; Vousden, Janet I.; McCormack, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Temporal distinctiveness models of memory retrieval claim that memories are organised partly in terms of their positions along a temporal dimension, and suggest that memory retrieval involves temporal discrimination. According to such models the retrievability of memories should be related to the discriminability of their temporal distances at the…

  19. A Visual Information Retrieval Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of visualization for information retrieval, that transforms unseen internal semantic representation of a document collection into visible geometric displays, focuses on DARE (Distance Angle Retrieval Environment). Highlights include expression of information need; interpretation and manipulation of information retrieval models; ranking…

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF INFORMATION RETRIEVAL METHODS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SWETS, JOHN A.

    RESULTS OF FIFTY DIFFERENT RETRIEVAL METHODS AS APPLIED IN THREE EXPERIMENTAL RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS WERE SUBJECTED TO AN ANALYSIS SUGGESTED BY STATISTICAL DECISION THEORY. THE ANALYSIS USES A PREVIOUSLY-PROPOSED MEASURE OF EFFECTIVENESS AND DEMONSTRATES ITS SEVERAL PROPERTIES. SOME OF THESE PROPERTIES ARE--(1) IT ENABLES THE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM TO…

  1. Practical quantum retrieval games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Karasamanis, Markos; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Complex cryptographic protocols are often constructed from simpler building blocks. In order to advance quantum cryptography, it is important to study practical building blocks that can be used to develop new protocols. An example is quantum retrieval games (QRGs), which have broad applicability and have already been used to construct quantum money schemes. In this work, we introduce a general construction of quantum retrieval games based on the hidden matching problem and show how they can be implemented in practice using available technology. More precisely, we provide a general method to construct (1-out-of-k ) QRGs, proving that their cheating probabilities decrease exponentially in k . In particular, we define QRGs based on coherent states of light, which can be implemented even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results constitute a tool in the arsenal of the practical quantum cryptographer.

  2. Initial retrieval shields against retrieval-induced forgetting.

    PubMed

    Racsmány, Mihály; Keresztes, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Testing, as a form of retrieval, can enhance learning but it can also induce forgetting of related memories, a phenomenon known as retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). In four experiments we explored whether selective retrieval and selective restudy of target memories induce forgetting of related memories with or without initial retrieval of the entire learning set. In Experiment 1, subjects studied category-exemplar associations, some of which were then either restudied or retrieved. RIF occurred on a delayed final test only when memories were retrieved and not when they were restudied. In Experiment 2, following the study phase of category-exemplar associations, subjects attempted to recall all category-exemplar associations, then they selectively retrieved or restudied some of the exemplars. We found that, despite the huge impact on practiced items, selective retrieval/restudy caused no decrease in final recall of related items. In Experiment 3, we replicated the main result of Experiment 2 by manipulating initial retrieval as a within-subject variable. In Experiment 4 we replicated the main results of the previous experiments with non-practiced (Nrp) baseline items. These findings suggest that initial retrieval of the learning set shields against the forgetting effect of later selective retrieval. Together, our results support the context shift theory of RIF.

  3. REMOTE RETRIEVING TOOL

    DOEpatents

    Fromm, L.W. Jr.

    1958-08-19

    A retrieving tool is described to securely grasp an object for emplacement in, or withdrawal from, an elongated tube. The object is grasped by hooks actuated by a wedge and cann mechanism. The mechanism on the end of a long rodlike structure is controlled by levers or bars at the access end of the tube. This device is particularly useful for positioning fuel elements within a reactor core.

  4. Passage Retrieval and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    queries, is IDF(t) = log „ # docs. in corpus + 1 0.5 + # docs. t appears in « . (6) This rather ad hoc scoring formula is implemented in the Lemur ...problems with passage R-precision as an evaluation metric. Fernando was instrumental in extending the Lemur toolkit to make all of these experiments...and C. Zhai. The lemur toolkit for language modeling and information retrieval. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/∼ lemur /, 2003. [6] C. Buckley and E. M

  5. The Past and Present of Information Retrieval in Medical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Torao

    This is a lecture at the 15th anniversary of JICST Kyushu Branch. In Medical Science there are many fields of study classified by the difference of approach. Each field is related closely, and to make a study of a field the knowledges of other fields are also needed. Such characteristic of medical study has been the problem on research of medical literature. Online information retrieval such as JOIS has changed the retrieval much easier, however some difficulties by the characteristic still remain. Importance of training specialist in information retrieval, construction of specialized databases, making databases easier to use and so on are suggested.

  6. Impact of patient-held record on knowledge at 1-year follow-up for glaucoma patients: single-center randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Marina; Fairlamb, Helen; Jonker, Leon

    2017-08-30

    To assess whether provision of a personalized patient-held eye health summary (glaucoma personal record) improves patients' knowledge of glaucoma at 1-year follow-up. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence has recommended such an approach to ascertain if this may ultimately help slow disease progression. Recruited patients, newly diagnosed with glaucoma conditions, were randomly allocated to receive standard clinical care or an additional glaucoma personal record, detailing the current state of each individual's eye condition. Mann-Whitney U test was applied for comparison of knowledge scores between groups at 1-year follow-up, using a validated questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to detect any factors significantly associated with a difference in glaucoma knowledge. A total of 122 patients were recruited; 57 controls and 44 intervention patients were tested for their glaucoma knowledge, equating to 83% retention rate. Out of a maximum available 100% converted score, the median scores were 58% and 53% for the control and intervention arm, respectively (p = 0.85). Regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.015) had a negative association and level of education (p = 0.002) had a positive association with glaucoma knowledge. The glaucoma personal record does not impact on a patient's knowledge of glaucoma in either a positive or negative way. Other approaches to improve health literacy among glaucoma patients, particularly for patients who are elderly or have a limited educational background, must be considered to improve patients' awareness and knowledge of their own condition. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Registry: ISRCTN41306818.

  7. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Factors that Affect Retrieval Success

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbuesch, Philipp Benenati, James F.; Pena, Constantino S.; Couvillon, Joseph; Powell, Alex; Gandhi, Ripal; Samuels, Shaun; Uthoff, Heiko

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report and analyze the indications, procedural success, and complications of retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCF) placement and to identify parameters that influence retrieval attempt and failure. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, a total of 200 patients (80 men, median age 67 years, range 11-95 years) received a rIVCF with the clinical possibility that it could be removed. All patients with rIVCF were prospectively entered into a database and followed until retrieval or a decision not to retrieve the filter was made. A retrospective analysis of this database was performed. Results: Sixty-one percent of patients had an accepted indication for filter placement; 39% of patients had a relative indication. There was a tendency toward a higher retrieval rate in patients with relative indications (40% vs. 55%, P = 0.076). Filter placement was technically successful in all patients, with no procedure-related mortality. The retrieval rate was 53%. Patient age of >80 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.056, P > 0.0001) and presence of malignancy (OR 0.303, P = 0.003) was associated with a significantly reduced probability for attempted retrieval. Retrieval failure occurred in 7% (6 of 91) of all retrieval attempts. A time interval of > 90 days between implantation and attempted retrieval was associated with retrieval failure (OR 19.8, P = 0.009). Conclusions: Patient age >80 years and a history of malignancy are predictors of a reduced probability for retrieval attempt. The rate of retrieval failure is low and seems to be associated with a time interval of >90 days between filter placement and retrieval.

  8. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = −2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = −2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  9. Re-processing TOMS UV Measurements to Retrieve SO2 Emissions From Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B. L.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Li, C.; Haffner, D. P.; Leonard, P.; Carn, S. A.; Telling, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The SO2 Monitoring Group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is producing a new multi-satellite long term data set of volcanic SO2 column amounts and heights (MSVOLSO2L4) as part of the NASA MEaSUREs Program. Here we present re-analysis of the UV measurements (BUV) from the NASA Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (N7 TOMS: 1978-1993). Ozone is the dominant atmospheric absorber in the BUV spectrum, but volcanic eruptions can produce enough SO2 to be distinguished from ozone background. Quantitative retrieval of volcanic SO2 requires:1) Separation of the O3 and SO2 absorption in BUV radiances;2) Close to zero mean SO2 background;3) RT forward model that accounts for the presence of volcanic ash in the plume; 4) A priori knowledge of the ozone and SO2 vertical profiles.Our iterative retrieval algorithm returns O3 and SO2 column amounts, effective reflectivity and its spectral slope. The retrieval model also generates a 4 x 4 gain matrix for the SO2 free regions that is used to soft calibrate the measured 340 nm BUV radiance. The spectral slope implicitly accounts for the interference of volcanic ash, but more explicit ash treatment is required to better quantify SO2 errors in volcanic plumes heavily loaded with ash. This presentation will discuss the methods used to characterize the error sources and assess the quality of this unique long-term SO2 data set.

  10. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    respectively with that from the "concurrent" approach and the coincident MODIS operational surface albedo products. Using the tower measurements as reference, the derived Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave broadband albedo yields an absolute accuracy of 0.02 with a root mean square error less than 0.016 and a bias of no more than 0.007. A further cross-comparison over individual scenes shows that the retrieved white sky shortwave albedo from the "pre-MODIS era" LUT approach is highly consistent (R(exp 2) = 0.988, the scene-averaged low RMSE = 0.009 and bias = -0.005) with that generated by the earlier "concurrent" approach. The Landsat albedo also exhibits more detailed landscape texture and a wider dynamic range of albedo values than the coincident 500-m MODIS operational products (MCD43A3), especially in the heterogeneous regions. Collectively, the "pre-MODIS" LUT and "concurrent" approaches provide a practical way to retrieve long-term Landsat albedo from the historic Landsat archives as far back as the 1980s, as well as the current Landsat-8 mission, and thus support investigations into the evolution of the albedo of terrestrial biomes at fine resolution.

  11. Guenter Tulip Filter Retrieval Experience: Predictors of Successful Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Turba, Ulku Cenk Arslan, Bulent Meuse, Michael Sabri, Saher; Macik, Barbara Gail

    2010-08-15

    We report our experience with Guenter Tulip filter placement indications, retrievals, and procedural problems, with emphasis on alternative retrieval techniques. We have identified 92 consecutive patients in whom a Guenter Tulip filter was placed and filter removal attempted. We recorded patient demographic information, filter placement and retrieval indications, procedures, standard and nonstandard filter retrieval techniques, complications, and clinical outcomes. The mean time to retrieval for those who experienced filter strut penetration was statistically significant [F(1,90) = 8.55, p = 0.004]. Filter strut(s) IVC penetration and successful retrieval were found to be statistically significant (p = 0.043). The filter hook-IVC relationship correlated with successful retrieval. A modified guidewire loop technique was applied in 8 of 10 cases where the hook appeared to penetrate the IVC wall and could not be engaged with a loop snare catheter, providing additional technical success in 6 of 8 (75%). Therefore, the total filter retrieval success increased from 88 to 95%. In conclusion, the Guenter Tulip filter has high successful retrieval rates with low rates of complication. Additional maneuvers such as a guidewire loop method can be used to improve retrieval success rates when the filter hook is endothelialized.

  12. Center on Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah System Approach to Individualized Learning Project.

    Classroom areas organized into centers for specific study purposes are discussed. These centers are used for individual or small group work. The physical arrangement of the area used for a study center is described, including the organization of furniture, materials, and preferred locations. Suggestions are made for the management and stocking of…

  13. Self-Centered Management Skills and Knowledge Appropriation by Students in High Schools and Private Secondary Schools of the City of Maroua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyono, Tadjuidje Michel

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge in its process of appropriation necessitates on the part of the learner, the mobilization of an efficient management strategy of adapted competencies. The present article in its problematic presents the theoretical perspective of Desaunay (1985) which estimates that three fundamental competences (relational, technical and affective) have…

  14. The Retriever, Volume 1, Number 1, Fall 1966. ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools (CRESS) Newsletter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.

    The Educational Research Information Center (ERIC) is an educational information retrieval system. ERIC represents a decentralized, nationwide network of information Clearinghouses. Each Clearinghouse has its own area of subject specialization and retrieval responsibility, and is committed to acquiring, abstracting, indexing, storing, retrieving,…

  15. Music retrieval in ICOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  16. Retrieval induces reconsolidation of fear extinction memory

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R.; Izquierdo, Iván; Medina, Jorge H.; Cammarota, Martín

    2010-01-01

    The nonreinforced expression of long-tem memory may lead to two opposite protein synthesis-dependent processes: extinction and reconsolidation. Extinction weakens consolidated memories, whereas reconsolidation allows incorporation of additional information into them. Knowledge about these two processes has accumulated in recent years, but their possible interaction has not been evaluated yet. Here, we report that inhibition of protein synthesis in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus after retrieval of fear extinction impedes subsequent reactivation of the extinction memory trace without affecting its storage or that of the initial fear memory. Our results suggest that extinction memory is susceptible to a retrieval-induced process similar to reconsolidation in the hippocampus. PMID:21118982

  17. Retrieval induces reconsolidation of fear extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Izquierdo, Iván; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2010-12-14

    The nonreinforced expression of long-tem memory may lead to two opposite protein synthesis-dependent processes: extinction and reconsolidation. Extinction weakens consolidated memories, whereas reconsolidation allows incorporation of additional information into them. Knowledge about these two processes has accumulated in recent years, but their possible interaction has not been evaluated yet. Here, we report that inhibition of protein synthesis in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus after retrieval of fear extinction impedes subsequent reactivation of the extinction memory trace without affecting its storage or that of the initial fear memory. Our results suggest that extinction memory is susceptible to a retrieval-induced process similar to reconsolidation in the hippocampus.

  18. 2. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF XY RETRIEVER. THE XY RETRIEVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF X-Y RETRIEVER. THE X-Y RETRIEVER WAS HOUSED IN MODULE K AND WAS USED TO SORT AND RETRIEVE PLUTONIUM METAL FROM A STORAGE VAULT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO OTHER PROCESSES IN BUILDING 707. (11/29/88) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Electronic publishing and intelligent information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, A.

    1992-01-01

    Europeans are now taking steps to homogenize policies and standardize procedures in electronic publishing (EP) in astronomy and space sciences. This arose from an open meeting organized in Oct. 1991 at Strasbourg Observatory (France) and another business meeting held late Mar. 1992 with the major publishers and journal editors in astronomy and space sciences. The ultimate aim of EP might be considered as the so-called 'intelligent information retrieval' (IIR) or better named 'advanced information retrieval' (AIR), taking advantage of the fact that the material to be published appears at some stage in a machine-readable form. It is obvious that the combination of desktop and electronic publishing with networking and new structuring of knowledge bases will profoundly reshape not only our ways of publishing, but also our procedures of communicating and retrieving information. It should be noted that a world-wide survey among astronomers and space scientists carried out before the October 1991 colloquium on the various packages and machines used, indicated that TEX-related packages were already in majoritarian use in our community. It has also been stressed at each meeting that the European developments should be carried out in collaboration with what is done in the US (STELLAR project, for instance). American scientists and journal editors actually attended both meetings mentioned above. The paper will offer a review of the status of electronic publishing in astronomy and its possible contribution to advanced information retrieval in this field. It will also report on recent meetings such as the 'Astronomy from Large Databases-2 (ALD-2)' conference dealing with the latest developments in networking, in data, information, and knowledge bases, as well as in the related methodologies.

  20. [Need for dental prophylaxis in grown women: an investigation in maternal rest centers. 1. Information knowledge and or oral hygiene status].

    PubMed

    Mausberg, R; Hornecker, E; Grabbert, M; Krüger, W

    1991-04-01

    111 women out of 316 women relaxing in three rest homes volunteered to participate in this study and answered a questionnaire concerning following subjects: daily oral hygiene, knowledge in hygiene procedures, frequency of dental treatment and interest in dental prophylaxis. Oral hygiene behaviour and knowledge were not sufficient. Only half of them knew dental floss and fluorides. Interdental care was practised by 20 women and only 10 used fluorides, they had without exception a secondary education. Most of the participants were educated in dental health care mainly by their parents. 36 women went to see the dentist only in case of necessity. 15 women were very afraid of dental treatment. 60% out of 111 women participated in a lecture on preventive dentistry and prophylaxis.

  1. Social and Demographic Factors Influencing Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval at a Single Institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, S Christian; Shanks, Candace; Guy, Gregory; Yang, Xiangyu; Dowell, Joshua D

    2015-10-01

    Retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) are associated with long-term adverse events that have increased interest in improving filter retrieval rates. Determining the influential patient social and demographic factors affecting IVCF retrieval is important to personalize patient management strategies and attain optimal patient care. Seven-hundred and sixty-two patients were retrospectively studied who had a filter placed at our institution between January 2011 and November 2013. Age, gender, race, cancer history, distance to residence from retrieval institution, and insurance status were identified for each patient, and those receiving retrievable IVCFs were further evaluated for retrieval rate and time to retrieval. Of the 762 filters placed, 133 were permanent filters. Of the 629 retrievable filters placed, 406 met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for retrieval. Results revealed patients with Medicare were less likely to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.031). Older age was also associated with a lower likelihood of retrieval (p < 0.001) as was living further from the medical center (p = 0.027). Patients who were white and had Medicare were more likely than similarly insured black patients to have their filters retrieved (p = 0.024). The retrieval rate of IVCFs was most influenced by insurance status, distance from the medical center, and age. Race was statistically significant only when combined with insurance status. The results of this study suggest that these patient groups may need closer follow-up in order to obtain optimal IVCF retrieval rates.

  2. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  3. [From Problemata Aristotelis to the handbooks of Döderlein. The old book collection of the Rikshospitalet, a center of knowledge and a research tool].

    PubMed

    Børdahl, P E; Hem, E

    2001-12-10

    The collection of old medical and scientific books from the National Hospital in Oslo is a valuable library for education and research. Most of the books are from the collections of the obstetric, paediatric and dermatological departments. The oldest date from the mid-sixteenth century, but the collection also reflects systematic purchases of medical literature after 1800. This library offers an exceptional opportunity in Norway for studying the development of medical knowledge and practice over two centuries.

  4. Antigen Retrieval Causes Protein Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Carol B.; Evers, David L.; O’Leary, Timothy J.; Mason, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen retrieval (AR), in which formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections are briefly heated in buffers at high temperature, often greatly improves immunohistochemical staining. An important unresolved question regarding AR is how formalin treatment affects the conformation of protein epitopes and how heating unmasks these epitopes for subsequent antibody binding. The objective of the current study was to use model proteins to determine the effect of formalin treatment on protein conformation and thermal stability in relation to the mechanism of AR. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify the presence of protein formaldehyde cross-links, and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry was used to determine the effect of formalin treatment and high-temperature incubation on the secondary and tertiary structure of the model proteins. Results revealed that for some proteins, formalin treatment left the native protein conformation unaltered, whereas for others, formalin denatured tertiary structure, yielding a molten globule protein. In either case, heating to temperatures used in AR methods led to irreversible protein unfolding, which supports a linear epitope model of recovered protein immunoreactivity. Consequently, the core mechanism of AR likely centers on the restoration of normal protein chemical composition coupled with improved accessibility to linear epitopes through protein unfolding. PMID:21411808

  5. Effect of social media in improving knowledge among patients having fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Al-Silwadi, Fadi M; Gill, Daljit S; Petrie, Aviva; Cunningham, Susan J

    2015-08-01

    Research has shown that orthodontic patients are more likely to retain information presented in an audiovisual format. However, there has been little research on the effectiveness of audiovisual information provided through different routes such as the Internet. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial assessed whether provision of audiovisual information on the YouTube (Google, San Bruno, Calif) Web site to orthodontic patients undergoing fixed appliance treatment results in improved patient knowledge when compared with conventional methods of information provision. The effects of sex and ethnicity were also investigated. Participants were recruited from the Department of Orthodontics of the Eastman Dental Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. The patients were 13 years of age and over, with no history of orthodontic treatment, and patient and parental (where appropriate) consent were obtained. The participants were randomized into control (n = 34) and intervention (n = 33) groups using a random number table; there was stratification based on age group, with permuted blocks of 10 patients. Both groups were given routine verbal and written patient information related to fixed appliances, and the participants in the intervention group were sent 3 e-mails over 6 weeks requesting that they view a 6-minute YouTube video containing similar information but in audiovisual format. Patient knowledge was measured using identical questionnaires answered on the day of recruitment (baseline) and again 6 to 8 weeks later. The researchers were unaware of group allocations when enrolling patients and scoring questionnaires. Sixty participants (89.55%) completed the study. Those who completed the trial in the intervention group (n = 30) demonstrated significantly greater improvements in knowledge than did those in the control group (n = 30), scoring, on average, almost 1 point more (95% CI for the difference, 0.305-1.602; P = 0

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

  7. The Text Retrieval Conferences (TRECs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    Retrieval and Routing Using the INQUERY System" by John Broglio, James P. Callan, W. Bruce Croft and Daniel W. Nachbar) used a version of...University of Massachusetts at Amherst ("Document Retrieval and Routing Using the INQUERY System" by John Broglio, James P. Callan, W. Bruce Croft...342 terms were used. SIN002, SINOOI -- University of Massachusetts at Amherst ("Document Retrieval and Routing Using the INQUERY System" by John

  8. Semantic processing in information retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Rindflesch, T. C.; Aronson, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    Intuition suggests that one way to enhance the information retrieval process would be the use of phrases to characterize the contents of text. A number of researchers, however, have noted that phrases alone do not improve retrieval effectiveness. In this paper we briefly review the use of phrases in information retrieval and then suggest extensions to this paradigm using semantic information. We claim that semantic processing, which can be viewed as expressing relations between the concepts represented by phrases, will in fact enhance retrieval effectiveness. The availability of the UMLS domain model, which we exploit extensively, significantly contributes to the feasibility of this processing. PMID:8130547

  9. Patient-centered applications: use of information technology to promote disease management and wellness. A white paper by the AMIA knowledge in motion working group.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Afrin, Lawrence B; Speedie, Stuart; Courtney, Karen L; Sondhi, Manu; Vimarlund, Vivian; Lovis, Christian; Goossen, William; Lynch, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) enable a fundamental redesign of health care processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to patient-centric applications. This white paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of patient-centered technologies for disease management and prevention. It reviews current and emerging trends; highlights challenges related to design, evaluation, reimbursement and usability; and reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  10. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of disease among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome: A study from a tertiary care center in North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Chauahn, Pushpinder S.; Mehta, Karainder S.; Rawat, Ritu; Shiny, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although modification of behavioral practices among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-affected patients is important in decreasing HIV disease transmission, the knowledge, attitude, and perception studies about HIV infection rarely include persons living with HIV/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Aims: To assess knowledge, attitude, and perceptions of persons living with HIV/AIDS for the disease and other epidemiological aspects. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and fifty consecutive persons living with HIV/AIDS were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: These 150 patients comprised 93 men and 57 women, aged between 14 and 78 (mean 37.13) years. The majority, 112 (74.67%) patients were between 20 and 50 years of age and 116 (77.3%) patients were either illiterate or high-school dropouts. Drivers, laborers, and self-employed comprised 69 (74.2%) patients among affected males. Only 129 (86%) respondents had heard about HIV/AIDS and knew about its heterosexual transmission. Ninety-eight (65.3%) respondents were aware of disease transmission from infected blood or needle pricks. Interestingly, 106 (70.7%) respondents were aware of the importance of using condom in preventing disease transmission. Television/radio was the most common sources of information for 135 (90%) patients. Nearly, 69% respondents disfavored disclosing their disease to friends/colleagues fearing stigmatization. Conclusions: Information, education, and communication activities are imperative to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS about life-long nature of the disease, modes of its transmission, and significance of preventive measures to bridge the gaps in their knowledge. While improvement in individual economic status, education, and health services remains highly desirable, mass media can play a pivotal role in creating awareness among masses. PMID:27890953

  11. Effects of consumer-centered u-health service for the knowledge, skill, and attitude of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongeun; Kim, Sukwha; Kim, Hee-Chan; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Yang, Seok-Chul; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kong, Hyoun-Joong; Lee, Kyungsoon

    2012-12-01

    Through the use of ubiquitous health, or u-Health, services, medical information can be adapted and made accessible via computer and Internet to provide quality healthcare to anybody, any place, and any time. We developed and implemented u-Health services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and studied their experiences with respect to their knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and skill and attitude toward the u-Health devices. The u-Health services were composed of telemonitoring and teleconsultation supplemented with home visits. To determine its effectiveness, the u-Health service system was implemented for 2 years with 144 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in a clinical experiment. The subjects were divided into three experimental groups, each provided with different services, compared before and after intervention, and among groups. The analysis of data gathered through the system suggested that u-Health services can support patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, improve patients' knowledge about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-management, build u-Health device usage skills, and foster a positive attitude toward u-Health devices. The u-Health services for the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients were both feasible and effective from the patients' perspective.

  12. A study on knowledge, attitude, and practice towards premarital carrier screening among adults attending primary healthcare centers in a region in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, Omar A; Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Gupta, Ishita; Ouhtit, Allal; Al-Farsi, Khalil S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2014-04-17

    Despite that hereditary diseases are widespread among the Arab population due to high rates of consanguineous marriages, research regarding community awareness towards premarital carrier screening in some countries such as Oman, is extremely scarce. This study aimed to investigate knowledge and attitude towards premarital carrier screening (PMCS) in Oman. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed to 400 Omani adults aged 20-35 who attended primary healthcare institutions at the South Batinah Governorate in Oman. The majority of the participants (84.5%) believed that PMCS was necessary, and about half of them (49.5%) supported the view of making PMCS compulsory. On the contrary, approximately one third (30.5%) of the participants reported that they were not in favor of taking the blood screening test. Overall, unwillingness to perform pre-marital testing was associated with female gender, younger age, being single, less education, and increased income. Despite the relatively high level of knowledge, about one third of the participants were still reluctant to carry out premarital testing. Such attitude calls for immediate need for community-based campaigns to encourage the public to do premarital testing.

  13. A study on knowledge, attitude, and practice towards premarital carrier screening among adults attending primary healthcare centers in a region in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite that hereditary diseases are widespread among the Arab population due to high rates of consanguineous marriages, research regarding community awareness towards premarital carrier screening in some countries such as Oman, is extremely scarce. This study aimed to investigate knowledge and attitude towards premarital carrier screening (PMCS) in Oman. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed to 400 Omani adults aged 20–35 who attended primary healthcare institutions at the South Batinah Governorate in Oman. Results The majority of the participants (84.5%) believed that PMCS was necessary, and about half of them (49.5%) supported the view of making PMCS compulsory. On the contrary, approximately one third (30.5%) of the participants reported that they were not in favor of taking the blood screening test. Overall, unwillingness to perform pre-marital testing was associated with female gender, younger age, being single, less education, and increased income. Conclusion Despite the relatively high level of knowledge, about one third of the participants were still reluctant to carry out premarital testing. Such attitude calls for immediate need for community-based campaigns to encourage the public to do premarital testing. PMID:24742222

  14. In the era of corona virus: health care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice of hand hygiene in Saudi primary care centers: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alfahan, Ali; Alhabib, Samia; Abdulmajeed, Imad; Rahman, Saeed; Bamuhair, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is one of the essential means to prevent the spread of infections. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP) of hand hygiene in primary care settings. Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-reported questionnaire was conducted in primary care settings located in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, under the service of King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC). The Institutional Review Board of KAMC Research Centre approved the study. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS software. Results A total of 237 participants were included in the analysis. Participants who received hand hygiene training within the last 3 years (2012–2014) scored higher on a knowledge scale. Generally, there was an overall positive attitude from participants toward hand hygiene practice. In total, 87.54% acknowledged that they routinely used alcohol-based hand rub, 87.4% had sufficiently decontaminated hands even under high work pressure, and 78.6% addressed that this practice was not affected by less compliant colleagues. Conclusion Practicing hand hygiene was suggested to be influenced by variables related to the environmental context, social pressure, and individual attitudes toward hand hygiene. We believe that addressing beliefs, attitudes, capacity, and supportive infrastructures to sustain hand-hygiene routine behaviors are important components of an implementation strategy in enhancing health care workers’ KAP of hand hygiene. PMID:27609728

  15. Information retrieval: an overview of system characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wiesman, F; Hasman, A; van den Herik, H J

    1997-11-01

    The paper gives an overview of characteristics of information retrieval (IR) systems. The characteristics are identified from the descriptions of 23 IR systems. Four IR models are discussed: the Boolean model, the vector model, the probabilistic model and the connectionistic model. Twelve other characteristics of IR models are identified: search intermediary, domain knowledge, relevance feedback, natural language interface, graphical query language, conceptual queries, full-text IR, field searching, fuzzy queries, hypertext integration, machine learning, and ranked output. Finally, the relevance of IR systems for the World Wide Web is established.

  16. Learned interval time facilitates associate memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Vincent; Kochs, Sarah; Smulders, Fren; De Weerd, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The extent to which time is represented in memory remains underinvestigated. We designed a time paired associate task (TPAT) in which participants implicitly learned cue–time–target associations between cue–target pairs and specific cue–target intervals. During subsequent memory testing, participants showed increased accuracy of identifying matching cue–target pairs if the time interval during testing matched the implicitly learned interval. A control experiment showed that participants had no explicit knowledge about the cue–time associations. We suggest that “elapsed time” can act as a temporal mnemonic associate that can facilitate retrieval of events associated in memory. PMID:28298554

  17. SNUMedinfo at TREC CDS Track 2014: Medical Case-based Retrieval Task

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    at the TREC Clinical Decision Support track 2014. This task is about medical case- based retrieval. Case description is used as query text . Per each...knowledge-based query expan- sion method for the relevance ranking. Secondly, machine learning classifier based text categorization method is used for the...performance improvements. Keywords: Case-based retrieval, Query expansion, Text categorization, Infor- mation retrieval 1. Introduction In this

  18. Memory, Knowledge, and the Answering of Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Donald A.

    An examination of the nature of memory reveals that the representation of knowledge cannot be separated from the uses of knowledge. The answering of questions is not a simple retrieval and response of stored information; rather the process is embedded in a general structural framework containing knowledge of the questioner, the question, and the…

  19. Evaluation of database technologies for the CTBT Knowledge Base prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, R.; Shepard-Dombroski, E.; Baur, D.; Hipp, J.; Moore, S.; Young, C.; Chael, E.

    1996-11-01

    This document examines a number of different software technologies in the rapidly changing field of database management systems, evaluates these systems in light of the expected needs of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) Knowledge Base, and makes some recommendations for the initial prototypes of the Knowledge Base. The Knowledge Base requirements are examined and then used as criteria for evaluation of the database management options. A mock-up of the data expected in the Knowledge Base is used as a basis for examining how four different database technologies deal with the problems of storing and retrieving the data. Based on these requirement and the results of the evaluation, the recommendation is that the Illustra database be considered for the initial prototype of the Knowledge Base. Illustra offers a unique blend of performance, flexibility, and features that will aid in the implementation of the prototype. At the same time, Illustra provides a high level of compatibility with the hardware and software environments present at the US NDC (National Data Center) and the PIDC (Prototype International Data Center).

  20. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms. I: optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T

    2015-05-20

    Two modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative phase retrieval algorithms are proposed. The first we refer to as the spatial phase perturbation GS algorithm (SPP GSA). The second is a combined GS hybrid input-output algorithm (GS/HIOA). In this paper (Part I), it is demonstrated that the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are both much better at avoiding stagnation during phase retrieval, allowing them to successfully locate superior solutions compared with either the GS or the HIO algorithms. The performances of the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are also compared. Then, the error reduction (ER) algorithm is combined with the HIO algorithm (ER/HIOA) to retrieve the input object image and the phase, given only some knowledge of its extent and the amplitude in the Fourier domain. In Part II, the algorithms developed here are applied to carry out known plaintext and ciphertext attacks on amplitude encoding and phase encoding double random phase encryption systems. Significantly, ER/HIOA is then used to carry out a ciphertext-only attack on AE DRPE systems.

  1. Web information retrieval for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ting, S L; See-To, Eric W K; Tse, Y K

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Web Information Retrieval System (WebIRS), which is designed to assist the healthcare professionals to obtain up-to-date medical knowledge and information via the World Wide Web (WWW). The system leverages the document classification and text summarization techniques to deliver the highly correlated medical information to the physicians. The system architecture of the proposed WebIRS is first discussed, and then a case study on an application of the proposed system in a Hong Kong medical organization is presented to illustrate the adoption process and a questionnaire is administrated to collect feedback on the operation and performance of WebIRS in comparison with conventional information retrieval in the WWW. A prototype system has been constructed and implemented on a trial basis in a medical organization. It has proven to be of benefit to healthcare professionals through its automatic functions in classification and summarizing the medical information that the physicians needed and interested. The results of the case study show that with the use of the proposed WebIRS, significant reduction of searching time and effort, with retrieval of highly relevant materials can be attained.

  2. Impact of Pretransplantation Indices in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Knowledge of Center-Specific Outcome Data Is Pivotal before Making Index-Based Decisions.

    PubMed

    Törlén, Johan; Remberger, Mats; Le Blanc, Katarina; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is influenced by patient comorbidity, disease type, and status before treatment. We performed a retrospective study involving 521 consecutive adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients who underwent transplantation for hematological malignancy at our center from 2000 to 2012 to compare the predictive value of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and the disease risk index (DRI) for overall survival and transplantation-related mortality. Patients in the highest HCT-CI risk group (HCT-CI score ≥3) had a lower 5-year overall survival rate (50%) than the low-risk group (63%; P < .01). Subset analysis of donor origin showed greater 5-year overall survival in siblings than in matched unrelated donors, regardless of HCT-CI score (eg, 67% 5-year overall survival in siblings despite an HCT-CI score of >6 [n = 9]). Five-year overall survival in the highest DRI risk group was significantly poorer (44%) than in the low-risk group (63%; P < .01). Both indices failed to predict differences in transplantation-related mortality (HCT-CI, P = .54; DRI, P = .17). We conclude that HCT-CI and DRI were predictive of overall survival in our patient population. Even so, our data show that different patient groups may have different outcomes despite sharing the same index risk group and that indices should, therefore, be evaluated according to local data before clinical implementation at the single-center level.

  3. Disconnected in a connected world: knowledge and understanding of Web 2.0 tools at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, Joanna Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines five Web 2.0 resources and looks at the use of these tools among medical and nursing professionals and students at the Hospital, Medical School, and Nursing School of the University of Pennsylvania. Questionnaires showed that a majority of the individuals surveyed were unfamiliar with Web 2.0 resources. Additional respondents recognized the tools but did not use them in a medical or nursing context, with a minimal number using any tools to expand their medical or nursing knowledge. A lack of time to set up and use the resources, difficulty of set-up and use, skepticism about the quality of user-generated medical content, and a lack of perceived need for Web 2.0 resources contributed substantially to non-use. The University of Pennsylvania Biomedical Library is responding by increasing the availability of basic, quick, and easy-to-use instructional materials for selected Web 2.0 resources.

  4. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.

  5. NASA develops teleoperator retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The teleoperator retrieval system vehicle was designed to reboost and/or deorbit the Skylab; however, usefulness in survey, stabilization, retrieval and delivery was examined. Thrusters, designed for cold gas propulsion, were adapted to hydrazine propulsion. Design specifications and cost analysis are given.

  6. Retrieval Effectiveness on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, Jacques; Picard, Justin

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of search engines in Web usability and analyzes and evaluates the retrieval effectiveness of various indexing and searching strategies on a new Web text collection. Highlights include preprocessing techniques that might improve retrieval effectiveness; and hyperlinks as useful sources of evidence in improving retrieval…

  7. Organizing, Indexing, and Retrieving Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidel, Raya

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the literature that examines new capabilities and new problems associated with online catalogs, online searching of bibliographic databases, indexing, full text retrieval, and expert systems. The need for research that focuses on individual needs and that adopts an integrated approach which views indexing and retrieval as interrelated…

  8. Indexing Depth and Retrieval Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seely, Barbara J.

    1972-01-01

    There are six major studies of the effect of indexing depth on retrieval performance. They differ in purpose, methodology, measures, indexing language, field of study, and data base--nevertheless, all have found depth of indexing to have the same effect upon information retrieval. (13 references) (Author/NH)

  9. Student Attitude Toward Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Charles H.; Allen, Rodney F.

    This is an individually administered rating scale designed to evaluate teacher trainee attitudes toward an information retrieval system. A major goal of the scale is to seek responses that measure students' reactions to the cognitive interest and motivational nature of the information retrieval system through the use of Likert-type items. The…

  10. Vocabulary Control for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. W.

    This book deals with properties of vocabularies for indexing and searching document collections; the construction, organization, display, and maintenance of these vocabularies; and the vocabulary as a factor affecting the performance of retrieval systems. Most of the text is concerned with vocabularies for post-coordinate retrieval systems, with…

  11. Topology of Document Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Daniel M.; Cater, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    Explains the use of a topological structure to examine the closeness between documents in retrieval systems and analyzes the topological structure of a vector-space model, a fuzzy-set model, an extended Boolean model, a probabilistic model, and a TIRS (Topological Information Retrieval System) model. Proofs for the results are appended. (17…

  12. Passage Retrieval: A Probabilistic Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melucci, Massimo

    1998-01-01

    Presents a probabilistic technique to retrieve passages from texts having a large size or heterogeneous semantic content. Results of experiments comparing the probabilistic technique to one based on a text segmentation algorithm revealed that the passage size affects passage retrieval performance; text organization and query generality may have an…

  13. Detecting Mood-Dependent Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, John D.; Bower, Gordon H.

    The mood-dependent retrieval hypothesis states that mood will enhance recall by acting as a recall cue if the stimuli have been learned initially in the same mood. Material learned in a happy mood will be best recalled when the person returns to a happy mood; the same holds for a sad mood. Mood-dependent retrieval effect has been regulary…

  14. Intelligent Information Retrieval: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauch, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the application of artificial intelligence to online information retrieval systems and describes several systems: (1) CANSEARCH, from MEDLINE; (2) Intelligent Interface for Information Retrieval (I3R); (3) Gausch's Query Reformulation; (4) Environmental Pollution Expert (EP-X); (5) PLEXUS (gardening); and (6) SCISOR (corporate…

  15. Improving medical record retrieval for validation studies in Medicare data.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicole C; Delzell, Elizabeth S; Smith, Wilson K; Xue, Fei; Auroa, Tarun; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe medical record retrieval for a study validating claims-based algorithms used to identify seven adverse events of special interest (AESI) in a Medicare population. We analyzed 2010-2011 Medicare claims of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and men ≥65 years of age in the Medicare 5% national sample. The final cohorts included beneficiaries covered continuously for 12+ months by Medicare parts A, B, and D and not enrolled in Medicare Advantage before starting follow-up. We identified beneficiaries using each AESI algorithm and randomly selected 400 women and 100 men with each AESI for medical record retrieval. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provided beneficiary contact information, and we requested medical records directly from providers, without patient contact. We selected 3331 beneficiaries (women: 2272; men: 559) for whom we requested 3625 medical records. Overall, we received 1738 [47.9% (95%CI 46.3%, 49.6%)] of the requested medical records. We observed small differences in the characteristics of the total population with AESIs compared with those randomly selected for retrieval; however, no differences were seen between those selected and those retrieved. We retrieved 54.7% of records requested from hospitals compared with 26.3% of records requested from physician offices (p < 0.001). Retrieval did not differ by sex or vital status of the beneficiaries. Our national medical record validation study of claims-based algorithms produced a modest retrieval rate. The medical record procedures outlined in this paper could have led to the improved retrieval from our previous medical record retrieval study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Comparison of Three Online Information Retrieval Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zais, Harriet W.

    Three firms which offer online information retrieval are compared. The firms are Lockheed Information Service, System Development Corporation and the Western Research Application Center. Comparison tables provide information such as hours accessible, coverage, file update, search elements and cost figures for 15 data bases. In addition, general…

  17. Beyond Information Retrieval: Ways To Provide Content in Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Deborah Lynne

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of information retrieval from mainframe systems to Web search engines; discusses collaborative filtering, data extraction, data visualization, agent technology, pattern recognition, classification and clustering, and virtual communities. Argues that rather than huge data-storage centers and proprietary software, we need…

  18. An information retrieval system for research file data

    Treesearch

    Joan E. Lengel; John W. Koning

    1978-01-01

    Research file data have been successfully retrieved at the Forest Products Laboratory through a high-speed cross-referencing system involving the computer program FAMULUS as modified by the Madison Academic Computing Center at the University of Wisconsin. The method of data input, transfer to computer storage, system utilization, and effectiveness are discussed....

  19. Effects of Prior Knowledge on Memory: Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shing, Yee Lee; Brod, Garvin

    2016-01-01

    The encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of events and facts form the basis for acquiring new skills and knowledge. Prior knowledge can enhance those memory processes considerably and thus foster knowledge acquisition. But prior knowledge can also hinder knowledge acquisition, in particular when the to-be-learned information is inconsistent with…

  20. Effects of Prior Knowledge on Memory: Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shing, Yee Lee; Brod, Garvin

    2016-01-01

    The encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of events and facts form the basis for acquiring new skills and knowledge. Prior knowledge can enhance those memory processes considerably and thus foster knowledge acquisition. But prior knowledge can also hinder knowledge acquisition, in particular when the to-be-learned information is inconsistent with…

  1. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  2. n-Gram-Based Indexing for Korean Text Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joon Ho; Cho, Hyun Yang; Park, Hyouk Ro

    1999-01-01

    Discusses indexing methods in Korean text retrieval and proposes a new indexing method based on n-grams which can handle compound nouns effectively without dictionaries and complex linguistic knowledge. Experimental results show that n-gram-based indexing is considerably faster than morpheme-based indexing, and also provides better retrieval…

  3. Query Enhancement with Topic Detection and Disambiguation for Robust Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the amount of available information, people nowadays rely heavily on information retrieval (IR) systems such as web search engine to fulfill their information needs. However, due to the lack of domain knowledge and the limitation of natural language such as synonyms and polysemes, many system users cannot formulate their…

  4. Improve Precategorized Collection Retrieval by Using Supervised Term Weighting Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-10

    based on local latent semantic indexing [5, 12], and techniques based on supervised concept indexing [6]. All these previous approaches only used a...on Knowledge and Data Eng., 9(5):718–730, September/October 1997. [5] D. Hull. Improving text retrieval for the routing problem using latent semantic indexing

  5. Information Retrieval Today. Revised, Retitled, and Expanded Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. Wilfrid; Warner, Amy J.

    The emphasis of this text is that the problems of information retrieval are the intellectual ones of subject analysis and description. These problems are not easily solved by technology alone, although certain inroads are being made by knowledge-based expert systems and other computer aids to indexing. Linguistic approaches are also showing…

  6. Precise and Efficient Retrieval of Captioned Images: The MARIE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The MARIE project explores knowledge-based information retrieval of captioned images of the kind found in picture libraries and on the Internet. MARIE's five-part approach exploits the idea that images are easier to understand with context, especially descriptive text near them, but it also does image analysis. Experiments show MARIE prototypes…

  7. Selective Impairment of Verb Retrieval in Subcortical Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Gopee; Tiwari, Shivani

    2010-01-01

    Selective impairments of word-class retrieval skills have been extensively reported in the literature. Such findings posit that the conceptual knowledge is represented in specific categories, with possibly different neural representations. Although there are myriads of such findings in the literature, similar reports are scanty from the Indian…

  8. Integration of Complex Objects and Transitive Relationships for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvelin, Kalervo; Niemi, Timo

    1999-01-01

    Shows that in advanced information-retrieval applications capabilities for data aggregation, transitive computation and non-first normal-form relational computation are often necessary at the same time. Topics include complex objects; advanced data models; query languages; query formulation; knowledge representation; and query-language syntax.…

  9. Research and Development of Information Retrieval Models and Their Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    This introduction to a special issue devoted to modeling data, information, and knowledge briefly describes the origins of the papers presented and the topics covered, which include: Boolean logic; probability theory; artificial intelligence; organizing and encoding information and data; and characteristics of users of retrieval systems. (12…

  10. Query Enhancement with Topic Detection and Disambiguation for Robust Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the amount of available information, people nowadays rely heavily on information retrieval (IR) systems such as web search engine to fulfill their information needs. However, due to the lack of domain knowledge and the limitation of natural language such as synonyms and polysemes, many system users cannot formulate their…

  11. Precise and Efficient Retrieval of Captioned Images: The MARIE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The MARIE project explores knowledge-based information retrieval of captioned images of the kind found in picture libraries and on the Internet. MARIE's five-part approach exploits the idea that images are easier to understand with context, especially descriptive text near them, but it also does image analysis. Experiments show MARIE prototypes…

  12. 75 FR 72829 - Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and... Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA)Project. Time and Date: 5 p.m.-7...

  13. Memory Loss and Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Underlying the generally oblivious attitude of teachers and learners towards the past is insufficient respect for the role of memory in giving meaning to experience and access to knowledge. We shape our identity by making sense of our past and its relationship to present and future selves, a process that should be intensively cultivated when we…

  14. Memory Loss and Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Underlying the generally oblivious attitude of teachers and learners towards the past is insufficient respect for the role of memory in giving meaning to experience and access to knowledge. We shape our identity by making sense of our past and its relationship to present and future selves, a process that should be intensively cultivated when we…

  15. Experiments in Discourse Analysis Impact on Information Classification and Retrieval Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morato, Jorge; Llorens, J.; Genova, G.; Moreiro, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of contextual information in indexing and retrieval systems to improve results and the ability to carry out text analysis by means of linguistic knowledge. Presents research that investigated whether discourse variables have an impact on information and retrieval and classification algorithms. (Author/LRW)

  16. Experiments in Discourse Analysis Impact on Information Classification and Retrieval Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morato, Jorge; Llorens, J.; Genova, G.; Moreiro, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of contextual information in indexing and retrieval systems to improve results and the ability to carry out text analysis by means of linguistic knowledge. Presents research that investigated whether discourse variables have an impact on information and retrieval and classification algorithms. (Author/LRW)

  17. Elaboration over a Discourse Facilitates Retrieval in Sentence Processing

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Melissa; Hofmeister, Philip; Kutas, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Language comprehension requires access to stored knowledge and the ability to combine knowledge in new, meaningful ways. Previous work has shown that processing linguistically more complex expressions (‘Texas cattle rancher’ vs. ‘rancher’) leads to slow-downs in reading during initial processing, possibly reflecting effort in combining information. Conversely, when this information must subsequently be retrieved (as in filler-gap constructions), processing is facilitated for more complex expressions, possibly because more semantic cues are available during retrieval. To follow up on this hypothesis, we tested whether information distributed across a short discourse can similarly provide effective cues for retrieval. Participants read texts introducing two referents (e.g., two senators), one of whom was described in greater detail than the other (e.g., ‘The Democrat had voted for one of the senators, and the Republican had voted for the other, a man from Ohio who was running for president’). The final sentence (e.g., ‘The senator who the {Republican/Democrat}had voted for…’) contained a relative clause picking out either the Many-Cue referent (with ‘Republican’) or the One-Cue referent (with ‘Democrat’). We predicted facilitated retrieval (faster reading times) for the Many-Cue condition at the verb region (‘had voted for’), where readers could understand that ‘The senator’ is the object of the verb. As predicted, this pattern was observed at the retrieval region and continued throughout the rest of the sentence. Participants also completed the Author/Magazine Recognition Tests (ART/MRT; Stanovich and West, 1989), providing a proxy for world knowledge. Since higher ART/MRT scores may index (a) greater experience accessing relevant knowledge and/or (b) richer/more highly structured representations in semantic memory, we predicted it would be positively associated with effects of elaboration on retrieval. We did not observe the

  18. Elaboration over a Discourse Facilitates Retrieval in Sentence Processing.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Melissa; Hofmeister, Philip; Kutas, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Language comprehension requires access to stored knowledge and the ability to combine knowledge in new, meaningful ways. Previous work has shown that processing linguistically more complex expressions ('Texas cattle rancher' vs. 'rancher') leads to slow-downs in reading during initial processing, possibly reflecting effort in combining information. Conversely, when this information must subsequently be retrieved (as in filler-gap constructions), processing is facilitated for more complex expressions, possibly because more semantic cues are available during retrieval. To follow up on this hypothesis, we tested whether information distributed across a short discourse can similarly provide effective cues for retrieval. Participants read texts introducing two referents (e.g., two senators), one of whom was described in greater detail than the other (e.g., 'The Democrat had voted for one of the senators, and the Republican had voted for the other, a man from Ohio who was running for president'). The final sentence (e.g., 'The senator who the {Republican/Democrat}had voted for…') contained a relative clause picking out either the Many-Cue referent (with 'Republican') or the One-Cue referent (with 'Democrat'). We predicted facilitated retrieval (faster reading times) for the Many-Cue condition at the verb region ('had voted for'), where readers could understand that 'The senator' is the object of the verb. As predicted, this pattern was observed at the retrieval region and continued throughout the rest of the sentence. Participants also completed the Author/Magazine Recognition Tests (ART/MRT; Stanovich and West, 1989), providing a proxy for world knowledge. Since higher ART/MRT scores may index (a) greater experience accessing relevant knowledge and/or (b) richer/more highly structured representations in semantic memory, we predicted it would be positively associated with effects of elaboration on retrieval. We did not observe the predicted interaction between ART

  19. Web Mining for Web Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Wenyin, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Li, Mingjing; Zhang, Hongjiang

    2001-01-01

    Presents a prototype system for image retrieval from the Internet using Web mining. Discusses the architecture of the Web image retrieval prototype; document space modeling; user log mining; and image retrieval experiments to evaluate the proposed system. (AEF)

  20. Web Mining for Web Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Wenyin, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Li, Mingjing; Zhang, Hongjiang

    2001-01-01

    Presents a prototype system for image retrieval from the Internet using Web mining. Discusses the architecture of the Web image retrieval prototype; document space modeling; user log mining; and image retrieval experiments to evaluate the proposed system. (AEF)

  1. Solid rocket booster retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Solid Rocket Booster Retrieval operations are discussed in detail. The recovery of expended boosters and associated hardware without damage attributable to retrieval procedures is the main goal. The retrieval force consists tof ship's personnel and retrieval team members, each of whom has been trained and is highly skilled in multi-faceted operations. The retrieval force is equipped with two specially-built, highly maneuverable ships outfitted with parachute reels, retrieval cranes, towing winches, large volume-low pressure air compressors, SCUBA diving gear, inflatable boats with outboard motors and diver-operated SRB dewatering devices. The two ships are deployed in sufficient time to conduct an electronic and visual search of the impact area prior to launch. Upon search completeion, each ship takes station a safe distance from the predetermined impact point initiating both visual and electronic search in the direction of flight path, ensuring SRB acquisition at splashdown. When safe, the ships enter the impact area and commence recovery of all floating flight hardware which is subsequently returned to the Disassembly Facility for refurbishment and reuse. Retrieval techniques have evolved in parallel with equipment and flight hardware configuration changes. Additional changes have been initiated to improve personnel safety.

  2. A broad scope knowledge based model for optimization of VMAT in esophageal cancer: validation and assessment of plan quality among different treatment centers.

    PubMed

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Laksar, Sarbani; Tozzi, Angelo; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-10-31

    To evaluate the performance of a broad scope model-based optimisation process for volumetric modulated arc therapy applied to esophageal cancer. A set of 70 previously treated patients in two different institutions, were selected to train a model for the prediction of dose-volume constraints. The model was built with a broad-scope purpose, aiming to be effective for different dose prescriptions and tumour localisations. It was validated on three groups of patients from the same institution and from another clinic not providing patients for the training phase. Comparison of the automated plans was done against reference cases given by the clinically accepted plans. Quantitative improvements (statistically significant for the majority of the analysed dose-volume parameters) were observed between the benchmark and the test plans. Of 624 dose-volume objectives assessed for plan evaluation, in 21 cases (3.3 %) the reference plans failed to respect the constraints while the model-based plans succeeded. Only in 3 cases (<0.5 %) the reference plans passed the criteria while the model-based failed. In 5.3 % of the cases both groups of plans failed and in the remaining cases both passed the tests. Plans were optimised using a broad scope knowledge-based model to determine the dose-volume constraints. The results showed dosimetric improvements when compared to the benchmark data. Particularly the plans optimised for patients from the third centre, not participating to the training, resulted in superior quality. The data suggests that the new engine is reliable and could encourage its application to clinical practice.

  3. AROTEL Temperature Retrievals Within PSC's Using Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walt; Heaps, William; Twigg, Larry; Sumnicht, Grant; Hostetler, Chris; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) made temperature retrievals within Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) on several flights during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) campaign. The location of the PSCs was confirmed using simultaneously acquired data from the NASA Langley Aerosol lidar. Retrievals were made on flight dates 991207, 991210 and 000127 from just above the aircraft to 25 kilometers geometric altitude. Raman temperature retrievals are, to first order, insensitive to Mie interference because the Raman signals are red shifted by 2331 cm(exp -1) from the initial laser wavelength. Backscattering from clouds and aerosols is consequently not observed by the detector; however, extinction does impact the measurement and limits retrievals to optically thin clouds. Comparisons between retrievals employing Rayleigh and Raman scattering show the Raman temperatures to be significantly warmer than those employing Rayleigh scattering. Uncertainties are a function of altitude: at 25 km they were approximately 3 K. Temperature profiles could not be retrieved for optically thick clouds.

  4. Assimilation of Retrieved Surface Pressure from OCO-2 in GEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, M.; McCarty, W.; Sienkiewicz, M.; Pawson, S.

    2016-12-01

    The assessment of Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) surface pressure retrieval assimilation is currently underway in the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The surface pressure retrievals are considered in three classes: nadir-viewing over land, glint-viewing over land, and glint-viewing over ocean. This work will present the retrieval parameters, quality assessment procedures, and bias corrections used to preprocess these observations. The surface pressure retrievals are assimilated in the GEOS-5 system for the two months and the results from the assimilation and model output were analyzed. Varying observation statistics and forecast skill metrics will be presented. Most statistics have neutral to negative impact at this point, though there have been signs of potential improvement when the data were assimilated in the southern hemisphere. This implies that the space-borne OCO-2 retrievals may have the ability to fill in data void regions away from the existing observing system. Further investigation is ongoing to assess the impact of the OCO-2 retrieval on the atmospheric data assimilation system - specifically how they interact with the existing conventional surface pressure observations in the assimilation procedure.

  5. Mobile medical visual information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Duc, Samuel; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose mobile access to peer-reviewed medical information based on textual search and content-based visual image retrieval. Web-based interfaces designed for limited screen space were developed to query via web services a medical information retrieval engine optimizing the amount of data to be transferred in wireless form. Visual and textual retrieval engines with state-of-the-art performance were integrated. Results obtained show a good usability of the software. Future use in clinical environments has the potential of increasing quality of patient care through bedside access to the medical literature in context.

  6. System For Retrieving Reusable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Warren, Lloyd; Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    Encyclopedia of Software Components (ESC) is information-retrieval system of computer hardware and software providing access to generic reusable software tools and parts. Core of ESC is central tool base, which is repository of reusable software. It receives queries and submissions from user through local browser subsystem and receives authorized updates from maintenance subsystem. Sends retrievals to local browser subsystem and user's submissions to maintenance subsystem. Future versions will provide for advanced media, including voice and video, and will link system to database-management system. Programmers will not only retrieve software, but also modify, execute, and cross-link with other software.

  7. Electrophysiological correlates of competitor activation predict retrieval-induced forgetting.

    PubMed

    Hellerstedt, Robin; Johansson, Mikael

    2014-06-01

    The very act of retrieval modifies the accessibility of memory for knowledge and past events and can also cause forgetting. A prominent theory of such retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) holds that retrieval recruits inhibition to overcome interference from competing memories, rendering these memories inaccessible. The present study tested a fundamental tenet of the inhibitory-control account: The competition-dependence assumption. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants engaged in a competitive retrieval task. Competition levels were manipulated within the retrieval task by varying the cue-item associative strength of competing items. In order to temporally separate ERP correlates of competitor activation and target retrieval, memory was probed with the sequential presentation of 2 cues: A category cue, to reactivate competitors, and a target cue. As predicted by the inhibitory-control account, competitors with strong compared with weak cue-competitor association were more susceptible to forgetting. Furthermore, competition-sensitive ERP modulations, elicited by the category cue, were observed over anterior regions and reflected individual differences in ensuing forgetting. The present study demonstrates ERP correlates of the reactivation of tightly bound associated memories (the competitors) and provides support for the inhibitory-control account of RIF.

  8. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  9. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  10. Automatic Classification in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijsbergen, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Addresses the application of automatic classification methods to the problems associated with computerized document retrieval. Different kinds of classifications are described, and both document and term clustering methods are discussed. References and notes are provided. (Author/JD)

  11. Knowledge Activation and Schema Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Marino C.

    This study examined how instruction that encourages critical thinking about what has been read can lead to incorporated knowledge that can be retrieved and applied to other related settings. Case-based learning (an instructional method long used with graduate business, law, and medical students) is one method that can be used to foster critical…

  12. Informative Top-k Retrieval for Advanced Skill Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simona; di Noia, Tommaso; Ragone, Azzurra; Ruta, Michele; Straccia, Umberto; Tinelli, Eufemia

    The paper presents a knowledge-based framework for skills and talent management based on an advanced matchmaking between profiles of candidates and available job positions. Interestingly, informative content of top-k retrieval is enriched through semantic capabilities. The proposed approach allows to: (1) express a requested profile in terms of both hard constraints and soft ones; (2) provide a ranking function based also on qualitative attributes of a profile; (3) explain the resulting outcomes (given a job request, a motivation for the obtained score of each selected profile is provided). Top-k retrieval allows to select most promising candidates according to an ontology formalizing the domain knowledge. Such a knowledge is further exploited to provide a semantic-based explanation of missing or conflicting features in retrieved profiles. They also indicate additional profile characteristics emerging by the retrieval procedure for a further request refinement. A concrete case study followed by an exhaustive experimental campaign is reported to prove the approach effectiveness.

  13. Distributed Knowledge Base Systems for Diagnosis and Information Retrieval.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-08

    Information Processing Model of Japanese Foreign and Energy Policy Decision Making: JESSE Donald A. Sylvan Department of Political Science The Ohio State...processing theory would expect. Our political science judgment is that Japanese supply security is such a domain. We, therefore, propose, explicate, and test...annd natural resource obstacles that Japan faces. In the political science community, students of both foreign policy decision making and of

  14. Training for Retrieval of Knowledge under Stress through Algorithmic Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    impaired ability to read . Two percent of all first graders have dyslexia . A screening test for dyslexia has recently been devised that can be used with...aided subjects had to read a detailed tutorial, describing the algorithmic decomposition approach and why it should be used, The tutorial, shown in...information, it did so as a mechanical procedure, rather than contributed qualitatively to subjects’ comprehension . Fischhof4 & Bar-Hillel also tested

  15. Distributed Knowledge Base Systems for Diagnosis and Information Retrieval.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    done by a method called envisionment , which We will talk a great deal about quantities, so a is a combination of constraint propagation and constraint...the QS. So at a envisionment , one concerning the prediction of a temporal specific point of time in a specific situation, a quantity sequence of...what its next value will be. Envisionment , however, does not simply satisfy the confluences. Instead, an input disturbance is selected, and Each of

  16. Shape Retrieval Using Hierarchical Total Bregman Soft Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meizhu; Vemuri, Baba C.; Amari, Shun-ichi; Nielsen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the family of total Bregman divergences (tBDs) as an efficient and robust “distance” measure to quantify the dissimilarity between shapes. We use the tBD based ℓ1-norm center as the representative of a set of shapes, and call it the t-center. First, we briefly present and analyze the properties of the tBDs and t-centers following our previous work in [1]. Then, we prove that for any tBD, there exists a distribution which belongs to the lifted exponential family of statistical distributions. Further, we show that finding the maximum a posteriori estimate of the parameters of the lifted exponential family distribution is equivalent to minimizing the tBD to find the t-centers. This leads to a new clustering technique namely, the total Bregman soft clustering algorithm. We evaluate the tBD, t-center and the soft clustering algorithm on shape retrieval applications. Our shape retrieval framework is composed of three steps: (1) extraction of the shape boundary points (2) affine alignment of the shapes and use of a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) [2], [3], [4] to represent the aligned boundaries, and (3) comparison of the GMMs using tBD to find the best matches given a query shape. To further speed up the shape retrieval algorithm, we perform hierarchical clustering of the shapes using our total Bregman soft clustering algorithm. This enables us to compare the query with a small subset of shapes which are chosen to be the cluster t-centers. We evaluate our method on various public domain 2D and 3D databases, and demonstrate comparable or better results than state-of-the-art retrieval techniques. PMID:22331859

  17. A study of retrieval accuracy of pulmonary nodules based on external attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Mehre, Shrikant A.; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Prabhakar, Nidhi; Garg, Mandeep; Kalra, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, retrieval accuracy of different types of pulmonary nodules is studied. The trainee radiologists could enrich their knowledge using the visual information of the retrieved nodules. In the proposed retrieval system, the pulmonary nodules are segmented using a semi-automated technique. Several 3D features are explored to improve the performance of the proposed retrieval system. A set of relevant shape and texture features is determined for efficient representation of the nodules in the feature space. The proposed CBIR system is validated on a data set of 542 nodules of Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative (LIDC/IDRI). The nodules with composite rank of malignancy "1", "2" are considered as benign and "4", "5" are considered as malignant. Considering top five retrieved images, the precision of the proposed retrieval system are 84.76%, 80.75%, and 80.34% for well-circumscribed, juxta-pleural, and juxtavascular nodules, respectively.

  18. Multimedia Indexing and Retrieval Research at the Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Exam- ples include the W. B. DuBois collection at the Uni- versity of Massachusetts, Margaret Sanger’s collected works at Smith College and the early...them. For example, a substantial collection of Mar- garet Sanger’s work has been recently put on microfilm (see http://MEP.cla.sc.edu/ Sanger /SangBase.HTM...examples of the word “Lloyd” and the XOR image Higgins [28] models the transformation between words using an affine transform. 3.1 Prior Work The

  19. Retrieval of CHOCHO from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, Francois; Lerot, Christophe; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; De Smedt, Isabelle; Fayt, Caroline; Gielen, Clio; Hermans, Christian; Müller, Jean-Francois; Pinardi, Gaia; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is one of the most important carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. It is produced mainly by the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) which participate to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. CHOCHO is also directly released by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. Measuring this species is therefore of major importance for air quality monitoring, especially given the scarcity of available CHOCHO observational data sets. In this presentation, CHOCHO vertical profiles and corresponding column densities are retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing city center and at the suburban site of Xianghe located at 60km East of Beijing. The periods covered by the observations are June 2008-April 2009 in Beijing and March 2010-December 2014 in Xianghe. We first investigate the capability of the MAX-DOAS technique to measure this species in such highly-polluted environment. Then the diurnal and seasonal cycles of CHOCHO near-surface concentrations and vertical column densities as well as the corresponding CHOCHO/HCHO ratios are examined on a long-term basis at both locations. The CHOCHO/HCHO ratios are derived from MAX-DOAS HCHO vertical profiles retrieved in parallel to the CHOCHO profiles. These diurnal and seasonal cycles are further assessed using simulations from the 3D-CTM IMAGES and observations from the OMI and GOME-2 satellite nadir instruments. The impact of these results on our knowledge about the CHOCHO budget is discussed.

  20. Elaborative Retrieval: Do Semantic Mediators Improve Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Melissa; Karpicke, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The elaborative retrieval account of retrieval-based learning proposes that retrieval enhances retention because the retrieval process produces the generation of semantic mediators that link cues to target information. We tested 2 assumptions that form the basis of this account: that semantic mediators are more likely to be generated during…

  1. Elaborative Retrieval: Do Semantic Mediators Improve Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Melissa; Karpicke, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The elaborative retrieval account of retrieval-based learning proposes that retrieval enhances retention because the retrieval process produces the generation of semantic mediators that link cues to target information. We tested 2 assumptions that form the basis of this account: that semantic mediators are more likely to be generated during…

  2. The role of retrieval mode and retrieval orientation in retrieval practice: insights from comparing recognition memory testing formats and restudying.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuanji; Rosburg, Timm; Hou, Mingzhu; Li, Bingbing; Xiao, Xin; Guo, Chunyan

    2016-12-01

    The effectiveness of retrieval practice for aiding long-term memory, referred to as the testing effect, has been widely demonstrated. However, the specific neurocognitive mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. In the present study, we sought to explore the role of pre-retrieval processes at initial testing on later recognition performance by using event-related potentials (ERPs). Subjects studied two lists of words (Chinese characters) and then performed a recognition task or a source memory task, or restudied the word lists. At the end of the experiment, subjects received a final recognition test based on the remember-know paradigm. Behaviorally, initial testing (active retrieval) enhanced memory retention relative to restudying (passive retrieval). The retrieval mode at initial testing was indexed by more positive-going ERPs for unstudied items in the active-retrieval tasks than in passive retrieval from 300 to 900 ms. Follow-up analyses showed that the magnitude of the early ERP retrieval mode effect (300-500 ms) was predictive of the behavioral testing effect later on. In addition, the ERPs for correctly rejected new items during initial testing differed between the two active-retrieval tasks from 500 to 900 ms, and this ERP retrieval orientation effect predicted differential behavioral testing gains between the two active-retrieval conditions. Our findings confirm that initial testing promotes later retrieval relative to restudying, and they further suggest that adopting pre-retrieval processing in the forms of retrieval mode and retrieval orientation might contribute to these memory enhancements.

  3. Content-Based Retrieval of Medical Images with Elongated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Alexei Manso Correa; Teixeira, Christiano Augusto Caldas

    In this paper we propose a set of methods to describe, register and retrieve images of elongated structures from a database based on their shape content. Registration is performed based on an elastic matching algorithm that jointly takes into account the gross shape of the structure and the shape of its boundary, resulting in anatomically consistent deformations. The method determines a medial axis that represents the full extent of the structure with no branches. Discriminative anatomic features are computed from the results of registration and used as variables in a content-based image retrieval system. A case study on the morphology of the corpus callosum in the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome illustrates the effectiveness of the method and corroborates the hypothesis that retrieval systems may also act as knowledge discovery tools.

  4. Bayesian-network-based soccer video event detection and retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xinghua; Jin, Guoying; Huang, Mei; Xu, Guangyou

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents an event based soccer video retrieval method, where the scoring even is detected based on Bayesian network from six kinds of cue information including gate, face, audio, texture, caption and text. The topology within the Bayesian network is predefined by hand according to the domain knowledge and the probability distributions are learned in the case of the known structure and full observability. The resulting event probability from the Bayesian network is used as the feature vector to perform the video retrieval. Experiments show that the true and false detection rations for the scoring event are about 90% and 16.67% respectively, and that the video retrieval result based on event is superior to that based on low-level features in the human visual perception.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building and NASA-KSC News Center. The flag is near the News Center. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building and NASA-KSC News Center. The flag is near the News Center. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

  6. Ranked retrieval of Computational Biology models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of biological systems demands computational support. If targeting a biological problem, the reuse of existing computational models can save time and effort. Deciding for potentially suitable models, however, becomes more challenging with the increasing number of computational models available, and even more when considering the models' growing complexity. Firstly, among a set of potential model candidates it is difficult to decide for the model that best suits ones needs. Secondly, it is hard to grasp the nature of an unknown model listed in a search result set, and to judge how well it fits for the particular problem one has in mind. Results Here we present an improved search approach for computational models of biological processes. It is based on existing retrieval and ranking methods from Information Retrieval. The approach incorporates annotations suggested by MIRIAM, and additional meta-information. It is now part of the search engine of BioModels Database, a standard repository for computational models. Conclusions The introduced concept and implementation are, to our knowledge, the first application of Information Retrieval techniques on model search in Computational Systems Biology. Using the example of BioModels Database, it was shown that the approach is feasible and extends the current possibilities to search for relevant models. The advantages of our system over existing solutions are that we incorporate a rich set of meta-information, and that we provide the user with a relevance ranking of the models found for a query. Better search capabilities in model databases are expected to have a positive effect on the reuse of existing models. PMID:20701772

  7. Defining Prolonged Dwell Time: When Are Advanced Inferior Vena Cava Filter Retrieval Techniques Necessary? An Analysis in 762 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kush R; Laws, James L; Salem, Riad; Mouli, Samdeep K; Errea, Martin F; Karp, Jennifer K; Yang, Yihe; Ryu, Robert K; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Despite growth in placement of retrievable inferior vena cava filters, retrieval rates remain low. Filters with extended implantation times present a challenge to retrieval, where standard techniques often fail. The development of advanced retrieval techniques has positively impacted retrieval of retrievable inferior vena cava filters with prolonged dwell times; however, there is no precise definition of the time point when advanced techniques become necessary. We aim to define prolonged retrievable inferior vena cava filters dwell time by determining the inflection point when the risk of standard retrieval technique failure increases significantly, necessitating advanced retrieval techniques to maintain overall technical success of retrieval. From January 2009 to April 2015, 762 retrieval procedures were identified from a prospectively acquired database. We assessed patient age/sex, filter dwell time, procedural technical success, the use of advanced techniques, and procedure-related adverse events. Overall retrieval success rate was 98% (n=745). When standard retrieval techniques failed, advanced techniques were used; this was necessary 18% of the time (n=138). Logistic regression identified that dwell time was the only risk factor for failure of standard retrieval technique (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.10; P<0.001). Spline function regression analysis demonstrated that if dwell time exceeded 7 months, the risk of standard technique failure was 40.9%. Adverse events occurred at a rate of 2% (n=18; 15 minor and 3 major). The necessity of advanced techniques to maintain technical success of retrieval increases with dwell time. Patients with retrievable inferior vena cava filters in place beyond 7 months may benefit from referral to centers with expertise in advanced filter retrieval. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Retrieving the Irretrievable; or the Editor, the Author, and the Machine *

    PubMed Central

    Cranefield, Paul F.

    1967-01-01

    Present day programs of computerized information retrieval overvalue the importance of retrieving “facts” without either attaching a scale of importance to the material with which they deal or ordering information in any way which corresponds to the order of human thought. The limitations of classification by subject heading become especially apparent when a body of information becomes, through new insight, pertinent to a new area of thought. That body of information thereby acquires new subject headings: thus one sees that the system of retrieval by subject heading can never serve to aid fundamental discovery. The dangers of the present approach lie in their devaluation of traditional methods. Critical reviews are devalued, personal knowledge of the literature is devalued, and a false impression is created that knowledge is the same thing as retrievable information. This diminishes respect for that sort of personal organization of knowledge which alone can serve creative insight. PMID:6041824

  9. Proper name retrieval in temporal lobe epilepsy: naming of famous faces and landmarks.

    PubMed

    Benke, Thomas; Kuen, Eva; Schwarz, Michael; Walser, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore proper name (PN) retrieval and conceptual knowledge in patients with left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (69 patients with LTLE and 62 patients with RTLE) using a refined assessment procedure. Based on the performance of a large group of age- and education-matched normals, a new test of famous faces and famous landmarks was designed. Recognition, naming, and semantic knowledge were assessed consecutively, allowing for a better characterization of deficient levels in the naming system. Impairment in PN retrieval was common in the cohort with TLE. Furthermore, side of seizure onset impaired stages of name retrieval differently: LTLE impaired the lexico-phonological processing, whereas RTLE mainly impaired the perceptual-semantic stage of object recognition. In addition to deficient PN retrieval, patients with TLE had reduced conceptual knowledge regarding famous persons and landmarks.

  10. Temporal structure in associative retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Barnes, Gareth; Sejdinovic, Dino; Dolan, Ray; Dayan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological data disclose rich dynamics in patterns of neural activity evoked by sensory objects. Retrieving objects from memory reinstates components of this activity. In humans, the temporal structure of this retrieved activity remains largely unexplored, and here we address this gap using the spatiotemporal precision of magnetoencephalography (MEG). In a sensory preconditioning paradigm, 'indirect' objects were paired with 'direct' objects to form associative links, and the latter were then paired with rewards. Using multivariate analysis methods we examined the short-time evolution of neural representations of indirect objects retrieved during reward-learning about direct objects. We found two components of the evoked representation of the indirect stimulus, 200 ms apart. The strength of retrieval of one, but not the other, representational component correlated with generalization of reward learning from direct to indirect stimuli. We suggest the temporal structure within retrieved neural representations may be key to their function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04919.001 PMID:25615722

  11. Phenotype Information Retrieval for Existing GWAS Studies.

    PubMed

    Alipanah, Neda; Lin, Ko-Wei; Venkatesh, Vinay; Farzaneh, Seena; Kim, Hyeon-Eui

    2013-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) is archiving the results of different Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). dbGaP has a multitude of phenotype variables, but they are not harmonized across studies. We proposed a method to standardize phenotype variables by classifying similar variables based on semantic distances. We first extracted variables description, enriched them using domain knowledge, and computed the distances among them. We used clustering techniques to classify the most similar variables. We used domain experts to audit clusters, annotated the clusters with appropriate labels, and used re-clustering to build a semantically-driven Genotypes and Phenotypes (sdGaP) ontology using the UMLS semantic network and metathesaurus. The sdGaP ontology allowed us to expand user queries and retrieve information using a semantic metric called density measure (DM). We illustrated the potential improvement of information retrieval using the sdGaP ontology in one search scenario using the variables from the Cleveland Family Study.

  12. Knowledge management practices in healthcare settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karamitri, Ioanna; Talias, Michael A; Bellali, Thalia

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge is an intangible asset in Organizations, and provides a comparative advantage to those who possess it. Hospitals are complex organizations with unique characteristics because of the heterogeneity of health professionals' orientation, the composite networking and the decision-making processes. A deeper understanding of knowledge management (KM) could streamline productivity and coordinate the use of resources more efficient. We conducted a systematic literature search of peer-reviewed papers that described key elements of KM using three databases (Medline, Cinahl and Health Source: nursing/academic edition) for a 10-year period (1/1/2004-25/11/2014). The included articles were subjected to qualitative content analysis. We retrieved 604 articles of which 20 articles were eligible for analysis. Most of the studies (n=13) used a qualitative methodology. The total sample size was 2155 participants. The key elements that arose were as follows: perceptions of KM, synthesis, dissemination, collaboration, means of KM and leadership. Moreover, this study identified barriers for KM implementation, like time restrictions and limited skills. Healthcare managers ought to cultivate a knowledge environment, operate as role models, provide the tools for KM and reward people who act as knowledge brokers. Opportunities for collaboration and knowledge sharing should be encouraged. Successful KM should be patient-centered to gain its maximum value. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The NOAA/NESDIS Operational Microwave Integrated Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) is a state-of-the-art retrieval system developed to support POES, MetOp, DMSP, NPP/NPOESS programs at NOAA/NESDIS in generating operational temperature, water vapor, surface and hydrological parameters from microwave sensors. It is based on an assimilation-type scheme and capable of optimally retrieving atmospheric and surface state parameters in all weather and over all-surface conditions. The MIRS is being implemented at NESDIS to build a one-stop shop for operational microwave products from various satellites with different instrumental configurations. With its capability of providing optimal and physically-based retrievals of atmospheric and surface state parameters, the operational MIRS provides advanced near-real-time surface and precipitation products in all-weather and over all-surface conditions. These products are retrieved with brightness temperature measurements from microwave instruments, including AMSU-A and AMSU-B/MHS instruments onboard NOAA and EUMETSAT polar orbiting satellites, SSMIS on DMSP polar satellites and are operationally available to both real-time users and climate users through the NESDIS Environment Satellite Processing Center (ESPC) Data Distribution Sever (DDS) and Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In this presentation, we will discuss the operational MIRS system, its products and their application in supporting NESDIS precipitation operation.

  14. Platform for distributed image processing and image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueld, Mark O.; Thies, Christian J.; Fischer, Benedikt; Keysers, Daniel; Wein, Berthold B.; Lehmann, Thomas M.

    2003-06-01

    We describe a platform for the implementation of a system for content-based image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA). To cope with the constantly evolving medical knowledge, the platform offers a flexible feature model to store and uniformly access all feature types required within a multi-step retrieval approach. A structured generation history for each feature allows the automatic identification and re-use of already computed features. The platform uses directed acyclic graphs composed of processing steps and control elements to model arbitrary retrieval algorithms. This visually intuitive, data-flow oriented representation vastly improves the interdisciplinary communication between computer scientists and physicians during the development of new retrieval algorithms. The execution of the graphs is fully automated within the platform. Each processing step is modeled as a feature transformation. Due to a high degree of system transparency, both the implementation and the evaluation of retrieval algorithms are accelerated significantly. The platform uses a client-server architecture consisting of a central database, a central job scheduler, instances of a daemon service, and clients which embed user-implemented feature ansformations. Automatically distributed batch processing and distributed feature storage enable the cost-efficient use of an existing workstation cluster.

  15. [The ground reflectance spectrum retrieval from ETM images].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Wu, Yu-Hang; Liu, Zhi-Ming; He, Hai-Jian

    2007-04-01

    Retrieval of ground reflectance spectrum from satellite sensor digital count requires knowledge of the atmospheric conditions. Images of spectral radiance from ground-atmosphere system recorded by the multi-spectral imager ETM which boarded Landsat-7 sensor can retrieve the ground reflectivity spectrum. The uncertainty of reflectance spectrum retrieval is no more than 17% at the band 1 of ETM, and less than 10% at the band 2 and 3 of ETM. It is superior to those arithmetics widely used at present. Retrieval of ground radiance spectrum from ground-atmosphere system can be used to synthesize the sRGB true color image, but the definition is not excellent. And it was proved that the color of the images can not reflect the actual nature of earth objects before being adjusted. And the accuracy of interpretation based on true color synthesized images is superior to those based on the source images. So the precision of such reflectance spectrum retrieval is not as good as expected if applied to the true color photography on the ground.

  16. Intelligent web image retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungyong; Lee, Chungwoo; Nah, Yunmook

    2001-07-01

    Recently, the web sites such as e-business sites and shopping mall sites deal with lots of image information. To find a specific image from these image sources, we usually use web search engines or image database engines which rely on keyword only retrievals or color based retrievals with limited search capabilities. This paper presents an intelligent web image retrieval system. We propose the system architecture, the texture and color based image classification and indexing techniques, and representation schemes of user usage patterns. The query can be given by providing keywords, by selecting one or more sample texture patterns, by assigning color values within positional color blocks, or by combining some or all of these factors. The system keeps track of user's preferences by generating user query logs and automatically add more search information to subsequent user queries. To show the usefulness of the proposed system, some experimental results showing recall and precision are also explained.

  17. Retrieval interference in sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Julie A.; McElree, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The role of interference effects in sentence processing has recently begun to receive attention, however whether these effects arise during encoding or retrieval remains unclear. This paper draws on basic memory research to help distinguish these explanations and reports data from an experiment that manipulates the possibility for retrieval interference while holding encoding conditions constant. We found clear support for the principle of cue-overload, wherein cues available at retrieval cannot uniquely distinguish among competitors, thus giving rise to interference effects. We discuss the data in relation to a cue-based parsing framework (Van Dyke & Lewis, 2003) and other interference effects observed in sentence processing (e.g., Gordon, Hendrick, & Johnson, 2001, 2004). We conclude from the available data that the memory system that subserves language comprehension operates according to similar principles as memory in other domains. PMID:18209744

  18. Smart hands for the EVA retriever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Clifford W.; Li, Larry C.

    1990-01-01

    Dexterous, robotic hands are required for the extravehicular activity retriever (EVAR) system being developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). These hands, as part of the EVAR system, must be able to grasp objects autonomously and securely which inadvertently separate from the Space Station. Development of the required hands was initiated in 1987. Outlined here are the hand development activities, including design considerations, progress to date, and future plans. Several types of dexterous hands that were evaluated, along with a proximity-sensing capability that was developed to initiate a reflexive, adaptive grasp, are described. The evaluations resulted in the design and fabrication of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) hand that has two fingers and a thumb arranged in an anthropomorphic configuration. Finger joint force and position sensors are included in the design, as well as infrared proximity sensors which allow initiation of the grasp sequence when an object is detected within the grasp envelope.

  19. Local mesh quantized extrema patterns for image retrieval.

    PubMed

    Koteswara Rao, L; Venkata Rao, D; Reddy, L Pratap

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new feature descriptor, named local mesh quantized extrema patterns (LMeQEP) for image indexing and retrieval. The standard local quantized patterns collect the spatial relationship in the form of larger or deeper texture pattern based on the relative variations in the gray values of center pixel and its neighbors. Directional local extrema patterns explore the directional information in 0°, 90°, 45° and 135° for a pixel positioned at the center. A mesh structure is created from a quantized extrema to derive significant textural information. Initially, the directional quantized data from the mesh structure is extracted to form LMeQEP of given image. Then, RGB color histogram is built and integrated with the LMeQEP to enhance the performance of the system. In order to test the impact of proposed method, experimentation is done with bench mark image repositories such as MIT VisTex and Corel-1k. Avg. retrieval rate and avg. retrieval precision are considered as the evaluation metrics to record the performance level. The results from experiments show a considerable improvement when compared to other recent techniques in the image retrieval.

  20. Integrated Hydrologic Validation to Improve Physical Precipitation Retrievals for GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.; Tian, Y.; Kumar, S.

    2011-12-01

    One of the five scientific objectives for GPM is to "Improve hydrological modeling and prediction", including advancing prediction skill for high-impact hazards such as floods, droughts, landslides and landfalling hurricanes. Given the focus on land hydrology, and the range of hydrologic regimes targeted by GPM, it follows that a hydrologically-oriented ground validation program that covers these regimes from both the physical retrieval and the hydrological prediction perspectives is required for the successful application of GPM to land hydrology. In order to investigate the robustness of both hydrologic model predictions and physical precipitation retrievals, this talk will present recent evaluations of skill in land surface hydrologic models forced with TRMM-era multisensor products, with and without land data assimilation. In addition to LSM skill, we will also demonstrate how physical precipitation retrievals can be supported by land surface emissivity and temperature estimates obtained by coupling microwave emission models (e.g., the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Community Radiative Transfer Model CRTM and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting's Community Microwave Emission Model CMEM) to the land surface models in the Land Information System (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov). Evaluation at multiple frequencies, with and without land data assimilation, demonstrates the critical impact of certain real-time ancillary data (e.g., snow cover) on the microwave background states required for physical retrievals.

  1. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated for the Earth Resources Observation Systems Program of the Department of the Interior by the Topographic Division of the Geological Survey to provide access to Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, USGS aerial photography, and NASA aircraft data for the general public, domestic government agencies at all levels, and foreign government agencies at all levels, and foreign governments. Facilities are available for data storage, retrieval, reproduction, and dissemination, and for user assistance and training.

  2. Interactive information retrieval systems with minimalist representation

    SciTech Connect

    Domeshek, E.; Kedar, S.; Gordon, A.

    1996-12-31

    Almost any information you might want is becoming available on-line. The problem is how to find what you need. One strategy to improve access to existing information sources, is intelligent information agents - an approach based on extensive representation and inference. Another alternative is to simply concentrate on better information organization and indexing. Our systems use a form of conceptual indexing sensitive to users` task-specific information needs. We aim for minimalist representation, coding only select aspects of stored items. Rather than supporting reliable automated inference, the primary purpose of our representations is to provide sufficient discrimination and guidance to a user for a given domain and task. This paper argues, using case studies, that minimal representations can make strong contributions to the usefulness and usability of interactive information systems, while minimizing knowledge engineering effort. We demonstrate this approach in several broad spectrum applications including video retrieval and advisory systems.

  3. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  4. New frontiers for intelligent content-based retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, Ana B.; Smith, John R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we examine emerging frontiers in the evolution of content-based retrieval systems that rely on an intelligent infrastructure. Here, we refer to intelligence as the capabilities of the systems to build and maintain situational or world models, utilize dynamic knowledge representation, exploit context, and leverage advanced reasoning and learning capabilities. We argue that these elements are essential to producing effective systems for retrieving audio-visual content at semantic levels matching those of human perception and cognition. In this paper, we review relevant research on the understanding of human intelligence and construction of intelligent system in the fields of cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, semiotics, and computer vision. We also discus how some of the principal ideas form these fields lead to new opportunities and capabilities for content-based retrieval systems. Finally, we describe some of our efforts in these directions. In particular, we present MediaNet, a multimedia knowledge presentation framework, and some MPEG-7 description tools that facilitate and enable intelligent content-based retrieval.

  5. New frontiers for intelligent content-based retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, Ana B.; Smith, John R.

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we examine emerging frontiers in the evolution of content-based retrieval systems that rely on an intelligent infrastructure. Here, we refer to intelligence as the capabilities of the systems to build and maintain situational or world models, utilize dynamic knowledge representation, exploit context, and leverage advanced reasoning and learning capabilities. We argue that these elements are essential to producing effective systems for retrieving audio-visual content at semantic levels matching those of human perception and cognition. In this paper, we review relevant research on the understanding of human intelligence and construction of intelligent system in the fields of cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, semiotics, and computer vision. We also discus how some of the principal ideas form these fields lead to new opportunities and capabilities for content-based retrieval systems. Finally, we describe some of our efforts in these directions. In particular, we present MediaNet, a multimedia knowledge presentation framework, and some MPEG-7 description tools that facilitate and enable intelligent content-based retrieval.

  6. ERISTAR: Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) have sponsored faculty fellowship programs in systems engineering design for the past several years. During the summer of 1972 four such programs were conducted by NASA, with Auburn University cooperating with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The subject for the Auburn-MSFC design group was ERISTAR, an acronym for Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis and Retrieval, which represents an earth resources information management network of state information centers administered by the respective states and linked to federally administered regional centers and a national center. The considerations for serving the users and the considerations that must be given to processing data from a variety of sources are described. The combination of these elements into a national network is discussed and an implementation plan is proposed for a prototype state information center. The compatibility of the proposed plan with the Department of Interior plan, RALI, is indicated.

  7. Multimedia Information Retrieval Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2010-10-12

    This survey paper highlights some of the recent, influential work in multimedia information retrieval (MIR). MIR is a branch area of multimedia (MM). The young and fast-growing area has received strong industrial and academic support in the United States and around the world (see Section 7 for a list of major conferences and journals of the community). The term "information retrieval" may be misleading to those with different computer science or information technology backgrounds. As shown in our discussion later, it indeed includes topics from user interaction, data analytics, machine learning, feature extraction, information visualization, and more.

  8. A Web Information Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Dong-Chul; Huh, Woong; Kim, Hyen-Ug; Yoon, Chung-Hwa; Park, Chong-Dae; Woo, Dong-Min; Jeong, Taikyeong; Cho, Il-Hwan; Lee, Yunsik

    An approach for the retrieval of price information from internet sites is applied to real-world application problems in this paper. The Web Information Retrieval System (WIRS) utilizes Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for its powerful capability to process temporal information. HMM is an extremely flexible tool and has been successfully applied to a wide variety of stochastic modeling tasks. In order to compare the prices and features of products from various web sites, the WIRS extracts prices and descriptions of various products within web pages. The WIRS is evaluated with real-world problems and compared with a conventional method and the result is reported in this paper.

  9. Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Under Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Lang, R.; Kurum, M.; Joseph, A.; Jackson, T.; Cosh, M.

    2008-01-01

    Soil moisture is recognized as an important component of the water, energy, and carbon cycles at the interface between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Current baseline soil moisture retrieval algorithms for microwave space missions have been developed and validated only over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. Tree areas have commonly been excluded from operational soil moisture retrieval plans due to the large expected impact of trees on masking the microwave response to the underlying soil moisture. Our understanding of the microwave properties of trees of various sizes and their effect on soil moisture retrieval algorithms at L band is presently limited, although research efforts are ongoing in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere to remedy this situation. As part of this research, a coordinated sequence of field measurements involving the ComRAD (for Combined Radar/Radiometer) active/passive microwave truck instrument system has been undertaken. Jointly developed and operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and George Washington University, ComRAD consists of dual-polarized 1.4 GHz total-power radiometers (LH, LV) and a quad-polarized 1.25 GHz L band radar sharing a single parabolic dish antenna with a novel broadband stacked patch dual-polarized feed, a quad-polarized 4.75 GHz C band radar, and a single channel 10 GHz XHH radar. The instruments are deployed on a mobile truck with an 19-m hydraulic boom and share common control software; real-time calibrated signals, and the capability for automated data collection for unattended operation. Most microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms developed for use at L band frequencies are based on the tau-omega model, a simplified zero-order radiative transfer approach where scattering is largely ignored and vegetation canopies are generally treated as a bulk attenuating layer. In this approach, vegetation effects are parameterized by tau and omega, the microwave

  10. Text Passage Retrieval Based on Colon Classification: Retrieval Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the results of experiments using colon classification for the analysis, representation, and retrieval of primary information from the full text of documents. Recall, precision, and search length measures indicate colon classification did not perform significantly better than Boolean or simple word occurrence systems. Thirteen references…

  11. Flexible montage retrieval for image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hideharu; Uemori, Akira

    1994-04-01

    Academic and photo libraries require the reuse of images. If the database is large, similarity retrieval and retrieval by sketch are effective. However, similarity retrieval can retrieve images that are similar to only one key image. Retrieval by sketch can retrieve images that are similar to the sketch, but it is not always easy to make a sketch sufficiently similar to the desired image. To overcome these limitations, we propose a new flexible montage retrieval method (FMR) that allows the user to retrieve images by appropriately combining characteristics of the key images in the same way that a montage picture of a criminal is constructed. In FMR, the user selects one or more key images and specifies areas (called `key regions') manually or by using image manipulating tools. He then indicates the retrieval conditions, for example, the requirement that the image to be retrieved includes specified areas. This paper describes an FMR algorithm that uses a color histogram and texture to quantify the similarity between a key region and an image in the database. The effectiveness of FMR is then statistically demonstrated by comparing its correct retrieval rate with that of retrieval by sketch. The retrieval rate is calculated from the result of retrieving the images that include a specified sky image from among more than 150 images containing various sky images.

  12. An Integrated Korean Biodiversity and Genetic Information Retrieval System

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeongheui; Bhak, Jong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Chang-Bae; Park, Yong-Ha; Paek, Woon Kee

    2008-01-01

    Background On-line biodiversity information databases are growing quickly and being integrated into general bioinformatics systems due to the advances of fast gene sequencing technologies and the Internet. These can reduce the cost and effort of performing biodiversity surveys and genetic searches, which allows scientists to spend more time researching and less time collecting and maintaining data. This will cause an increased rate of knowledge build-up and improve conservations. The biodiversity databases in Korea have been scattered among several institutes and local natural history museums with incompatible data types. Therefore, a comprehensive database and a nation wide web portal for biodiversity information is necessary in order to integrate diverse information resources, including molecular and genomic databases. Results The Korean Natural History Research Information System (NARIS) was built and serviced as the central biodiversity information system to collect and integrate the biodiversity data of various institutes and natural history museums in Korea. This database aims to be an integrated resource that contains additional biological information, such as genome sequences and molecular level diversity. Currently, twelve institutes and museums in Korea are integrated by the DiGIR (Distributed Generic Information Retrieval) protocol, with Darwin Core2.0 format as its metadata standard for data exchange. Data quality control and statistical analysis functions have been implemented. In particular, integrating molecular and genetic information from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases with NARIS was recently accomplished. NARIS can also be extended to accommodate other institutes abroad, and the whole system can be exported to establish local biodiversity management servers. Conclusion A Korean data portal, NARIS, has been developed to efficiently manage and utilize biodiversity data, which includes genetic resources. NARIS aims

  13. An integrated Korean biodiversity and genetic information retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeongheui; Bhak, Jong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Chang-Bae; Park, Yong-Ha; Paek, Woon Kee

    2008-12-12

    On-line biodiversity information databases are growing quickly and being integrated into general bioinformatics systems due to the advances of fast gene sequencing technologies and the Internet. These can reduce the cost and effort of performing biodiversity surveys and genetic searches, which allows scientists to spend more time researching and less time collecting and maintaining data. This will cause an increased rate of knowledge build-up and improve conservations. The biodiversity databases in Korea have been scattered among several institutes and local natural history museums with incompatible data types. Therefore, a comprehensive database and a nation wide web portal for biodiversity information is necessary in order to integrate diverse information resources, including molecular and genomic databases. The Korean Natural History Research Information System (NARIS) was built and serviced as the central biodiversity information system to collect and integrate the biodiversity data of various institutes and natural history museums in Korea. This database aims to be an integrated resource that contains additional biological information, such as genome sequences and molecular level diversity. Currently, twelve institutes and museums in Korea are integrated by the DiGIR (Distributed Generic Information Retrieval) protocol, with Darwin Core2.0 format as its metadata standard for data exchange. Data quality control and statistical analysis functions have been implemented. In particular, integrating molecular and genetic information from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases with NARIS was recently accomplished. NARIS can also be extended to accommodate other institutes abroad, and the whole system can be exported to establish local biodiversity management servers. A Korean data portal, NARIS, has been developed to efficiently manage and utilize biodiversity data, which includes genetic resources. NARIS aims to be integral in maximizing

  14. Intrasubtest scatter on the WAIS-III information subtest and psychometrically defined retrieval deficits.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; Paul, C A; Arb, J D

    1999-12-01

    Milberg, et al. (1996) postulated that significant intrasubtest scatter on the Wechsler Information subtest reflects impaired retrieval. From a pool of 205 male referrals at a VA medical center with complete WAIS-III and WMS-III protocols, 28 participants with impaired retrieval (Group I) defined by a high Retrieval Composite score were identified. A sample (Group II) without similar evidence of impaired retrieval was matched to Group I on age, education, Full Scale IQ, race, and diagnosis. Intrasubtest scatter on the Information subtest was the same across groups (Group I M = 6.3, SD = 2.7; Group II M = 6.9, SD = 3.4). A second study identified impaired retrieval using the WMS-III Word Lists subtest. 21 participants (Group III) had impaired retrieval indicated by a Recognition scaled score being > or = 4 points higher than the Delayed Recall scaled score. A matched sample (Group IV) of VA patients without similar evidence of impaired retrieval was constituted. Intrasubtest scatter on the Information subtest did not differ across groups (Group III M = 6.6, SD = 2.4; Group IV M = 6.0, SD = 2.5). Evaluations of the retrieval deficit hypothesis should be based on responses of participants whose Information performance is characterized by abnormal amounts of intrasubtest scatter. It is possible that a specific amount of response variability must be present within the subtest before retrieval problems can be detected.

  15. JOIS-III JICST's new online information retrieval system (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanaka, Hisashi; Hosoyama, Miki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Okura, Katsumi; Motoyama, Noriyuki

    We give an outline of JOIS (JICST On-line Information System) - III, which has been developed as a succession to JOIS-II now being on service by the Japan Information Center of Science and Technology to start servicing in January 1990. In this report we explain mainly about new retrieval functions such as multiple file searches and proximity searching. (1st part Vol. 32. No. 3, 3rd part Vol. 32. No. 5)

  16. Information Retrieval for Ecological Syntheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayliss, Helen R.; Beyer, Fiona R.

    2015-01-01

    Research syntheses are increasingly being conducted within the fields of ecology and environmental management. Information retrieval is crucial in any synthesis in identifying data for inclusion whilst potentially reducing biases in the dataset gathered, yet the nature of ecological information provides several challenges when compared with…

  17. Photopolarimetric Retrievals of Snow Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, M.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Cairns, B.

    2015-01-01

    Polarimetric observations of snow surfaces, obtained in the 410-2264 nm range with the Research Scanning Polarimeter onboard the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft, are analyzed and presented. These novel measurements are of interest to the remote sensing community because the overwhelming brightness of snow plagues aerosol and cloud retrievals based on airborne and spaceborne total reflection measurements. The spectral signatures of the polarized reflectance of snow are therefore worthwhile investigating in order to provide guidance for the adaptation of algorithms currently employed for the retrieval of aerosol properties over soil and vegetated surfaces. At the same time, the increased information content of polarimetric measurements allows for a meaningful characterization of the snow medium. In our case, the grains are modeled as hexagonal prisms of variable aspect ratios and microscale roughness, yielding retrievals of the grains' scattering asymmetry parameter, shape and size. The results agree with our previous findings based on a more limited data set, with the majority of retrievals leading to moderately rough crystals of extreme aspect ratios, for each scene corresponding to a single value of the asymmetry parameter.

  18. Neural networks for atmospheric retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motteler, Howard E.; Gualtieri, J. A.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mcmillin, Larry

    1993-01-01

    We use neural networks to perform retrievals of temperature and water fractions from simulated clear air radiances for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Neural networks allow us to make effective use of the large AIRS channel set, and give good performance with noisy input. We retrieve surface temperature, air temperature at 64 distinct pressure levels, and water fractions at 50 distinct pressure levels. Using 728 temperature and surface sensitive channels, the RMS error for temperature retrievals with 0.2K input noise is 1.2K. Using 586 water and temperature sensitive channels, the mean error with 0.2K input noise is 16 percent. Our implementation of backpropagation training for neural networks on the 16,000-processor MasPar MP-1 runs at a rate of 90 million weight updates per second, and allows us to train large networks in a reasonable amount of time. Once trained, the network can be used to perform retrievals quickly on a workstation of moderate power.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope prescription retrieval.

    PubMed

    Redding, D; Dumont, P; Yu, J

    1993-04-01

    Prescription retrieval is a technique for directly estimating optical prescription parameters from images. We apply it to estimate the value of the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror conic constant. Our results agree with other studies that examined primary-mirror test fixtures and results. In addition they show that small aberrations exist on the planetary-camera repeater optics.

  20. INFORMATION RETRIEVAL EXPERIMENT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SELYE, HANS

    THIS REPORT IS A BRIEF REVIEW OF RESULTS OF AN EXPERIMENT TO DETERMINE THE INFORMATION RETRIEVAL EFFICIENCY OF A MANUAL SPECIALIZED INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED ON 700,000 DOCUMENTS IN THE FIELDS OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, STRESS, MAST CELLS, AND ANAPHYLACTOID REACTIONS. THE SYSTEM RECEIVES 30,000 PUBLICATIONS ANNUALLY. DETAILED INFORMATION IS REPRESENTED BY…