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Sample records for retrieved cross-correlation function

  1. Unified Green's Function Retrieval by Cross Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wapenaar, Kees; Slob, Evert; Snieder, Roel

    2006-12-08

    It has been shown by many authors that the cross correlation of two recordings of a diffuse wave field at different receivers yields the Green's function between these receivers. Recently the theory has been extended for situations where time-reversal invariance does not hold (e.g., in attenuating media) and where source-receiver reciprocity breaks down (in moving fluids). Here we present a unified theory for Green's function retrieval that captures all these situations and, because of the unified form, readily extends to more complex situations, such as electrokinetic Green's function retrieval in poroelastic or piezoelectric media. The unified theory has a wide range of applications in ''remote sensing without a source.''.

  2. Unified Green's function retrieval by cross-correlation; connection with energy principles.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees; Wegler, Ulrich

    2007-03-01

    It has been shown theoretically and observationally that the Green's function for acoustic and elastic waves can be retrieved by cross-correlating fluctuations recorded at two locations. We extend the concept of the extraction of the Green's function to a wide class of scalar linear systems. For systems that are not invariant under time reversal, the fluctuations must be excited by volume sources in order to satisfy the energy balance (equipartitioning) that is needed to extract the Green's function. The general theory for retrieving the Green's function is illustrated with examples that include the diffusion equation, Schrödinger's equation, a vibrating string, the acoustic wave equation, a vibrating beam, and the advection equation. Examples are also shown of situations where the Green's function cannot be extracted from ambient fluctuations. The general theory opens up new applications for the extraction of the Green's function from field correlations that include flow in porous media, quantum mechanics, and the extraction of the response of mechanical structures such as bridges.

  3. Experimental Study of the Convergence of Two-Point Cross-Correlation Toward the Green's Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouedard, P.; Roux, P.; Campillo, M.; Verdel, A.; Campman, X.

    2007-12-01

    It has been shown theoretically by several authors that cross-correlation of the seismic motion recorded at two points could yield the Green's Function (GF) between these points. Convergence of cross-correlations toward the GF depends on sources positions and/or the nature of the wavefield. Direct waves from an even distribution of sources can be used to retrieve the GF. On the other hand, in an inhomogeneous medium, recording the diffuse field (coda) is theoretically sufficient to retrieve the GF whatever the sources distribution is. Since none of these two conditions (even distribution of sources or a perfectly diffuse field) is satisfied in practice, the question of convergence toward the GF has to be investigated with real data. A 3D exploration survey with sources and receivers on a dense grid offers such an opportunity. We used a high- resolution survey recorded by Petroleum Development Oman in North Oman. The data have been obtained in a 1x1~km area covered with 1600 geophones located on a 25x25~m-cell grid. Records are 4-seconds long. A unique feature of this survey is that vibrators (working in the [8-120~Hz] frequency band), were located on a similar grid shifted with respect to the receiver grid by half a cell (12.5~m) in both directions. This allows us to compare estimated GF's with measured direct waves (GF's) between the geophones. The shallow subsurface is highly heterogeneous and records include seismic coda. From this dataset, we selected two receiver locations (Ra and Rb) distant from d=158~m. We used both different sets of source locations and time windows to compute the cross-correlation between these two receivers. Then we compared the derivatives of correlation functions with the actual GF measured in Rb (resp.~Ra) for a source close to Ra (resp.~Rb). By doing so, we show the actual influence of source locations and scattering (governed by the records' selected time window) on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed GF. When using

  4. Cross-correlation function of acoustic fields generated by random high-frequency sources.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2010-08-01

    Long-range correlations of noise fields in arbitrary inhomogeneous, moving or motionless fluids are studied in the ray approximation. Using the stationary phase method, two-point cross-correlation function of noise is shown to approximate the sum of the deterministic Green's functions describing sound propagation in opposite directions between the two points. Explicit relations between amplitudes of respective ray arrivals in the noise cross-correlation function and the Green's functions are obtained and verified against specific problems allowing an exact solution. Earlier results are extended by simultaneously accounting for sound absorption, arbitrary distribution of noise sources in a volume and on surfaces, and fluid inhomogeneity and motion. The information content of the noise cross-correlation function is discussed from the viewpoint of passive acoustic characterization of inhomogeneous flows.

  5. Analysis of Green functions obtained by cross-correlations for MASE stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, G. V. Vera

    2012-04-01

    We used continuous records of broadband seismic stations of the MASE experiment to obtain observed Green's functions using the method of ambient noise cross-correlations. The experiment consisted of 100 stations distributed along a perpendicular line to the Mesoamerican trench across the Valley of Mexico. The stations recorded continuously at 100 sps for more than two years. The geometry of the array provide a good opportunity to study the attenuation effects along the coast-perpendicular structure. The method we used to compute Green functions involves a strong data pre-processing (temporal normalization and spectral whitening). However, our results show that the amplitude of the cross-correlations still contains information about the surface waves attenuation and probably local amplification effects. Records from two regional earthquakes located close to Acapulco were used for comparison.

  6. Measurement of the dipole in the cross-correlation function of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaztanaga, Enrique; Bonvin, Camille; Hui, Lam

    2017-01-01

    It is usually assumed that in the linear regime the two-point correlation function of galaxies contains only a monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole. Looking at cross-correlations between different populations of galaxies, this turns out not to be the case. In particular, the cross-correlations between a bright and a faint population of galaxies contain also a dipole. In this paper we present the first attempt to measure this dipole. We discuss the four types of effects that contribute to the dipole: relativistic distortions, evolution effect, wide-angle effect and large-angle effect. We show that the first three contributions are intrinsic anti-symmetric contributions that do not depend on the choice of angle used to measure the dipole. On the other hand the large-angle effect appears only if the angle chosen to extract the dipole breaks the symmetry of the problem. We show that the relativistic distortions, the evolution effect and the wide-angle effect are too small to be detected in the LOWz and CMASS sample of the BOSS survey. On the other hand with a specific combination of angles we are able to measure the large-angle effect with high significance. We emphasise that this large-angle dipole does not contain new physical information, since it is just a geometrical combination of the monopole and the quadrupole. However this measurement, which is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions, validates our method for extracting the dipole from the two-point correlation function and it opens the way to the detection of relativistic effects in future surveys like e.g. DESI.

  7. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. III - Fourier transforms, autocorrelation functions, and cross-correlation functions of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper develops techniques to evaluate the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), the autocorrelation function (ACF), and the cross-correlation function (CCF) of time series which are not evenly sampled. The series may consist of quantized point data (e.g., yes/no processes such as photon arrival). The DFT, which can be inverted to recover the original data and the sampling, is used to compute correlation functions by means of a procedure which is effectively, but not explicitly, an interpolation. The CCF can be computed for two time series not even sampled at the same set of times. Techniques for removing the distortion of the correlation functions caused by the sampling, determining the value of a constant component to the data, and treating unequally weighted data are also discussed. FORTRAN code for the Fourier transform algorithm and numerical examples of the techniques are given.

  8. Cross-correlation beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruigrok, Elmer; Gibbons, Steven; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-10-01

    An areal distribution of sensors can be used for estimating the direction of incoming waves through beamforming. Beamforming may be implemented as a phase-shifting and stacking of data recorded on the different sensors (i.e., conventional beamforming). Alternatively, beamforming can be applied to cross-correlations between the waveforms on the different sensors. We derive a kernel for beamforming cross-correlated data and call it cross-correlation beamforming (CCBF). We point out that CCBF has slightly better resolution and aliasing characteristics than conventional beamforming. When auto-correlations are added to CCBF, the array response functions are the same as for conventional beamforming. We show numerically that CCBF is more resilient to non-coherent noise. Furthermore, we illustrate that with CCBF individual receiver-pairs can be removed to improve mapping to the slowness domain. An additional flexibility of CCBF is that cross-correlations can be time-windowed prior to beamforming, e.g., to remove the directionality of a scattered wavefield. The observations on synthetic data are confirmed with field data from the SPITS array (Svalbard). Both when beamforming an earthquake arrival and when beamforming ambient noise, CCBF focuses more of the energy to a central beam. Overall, the main advantage of CCBF is noise suppression and its flexibility to remove station pairs that deteriorate the signal-related beampower.

  9. When can Empirical Green Functions be computed from Noise Cross-Correlations? Hints from different Geographical and Tectonic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Catarina; Silveira, Graça; Custódio, Susana; Domingues, Ana; Dias, Nuno; Fonseca, João F. B.; Matias, Luís; Krueger, Frank; Carrilho, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Noise cross-correlations are now widely used to extract Green functions between station pairs. But, do all the cross-correlations routinely computed produce successful Green Functions? What is the relationship between noise recorded in a couple of stations and the cross-correlation between them? During the last decade, we have been involved in the deployment of several temporary dense broadband (BB) networks within the scope of both national projects and international collaborations. From 2000 to 2002, a pool of 8 BB stations continuously operated in the Azores in the scope of the Memorandum of Understanding COSEA (COordinated Seismic Experiment in the Azores). Thanks to the Project WILAS (West Iberia Lithosphere and Astenosphere Structure, PTDC/CTE-GIX/097946/2008) we temporarily increased the number of BB deployed in mainland Portugal to more than 50 (permanent + temporary) during the period 2010 - 2012. In 2011/12 a temporary pool of 12 seismometers continuously recorded BB data in the Madeira archipelago, as part of the DOCTAR (Deep Ocean Test Array Experiment) project. Project CV-PLUME (Investigation on the geometry and deep signature of the Cape Verde mantle plume, PTDC/CTE-GIN/64330/2006) covered the archipelago of Cape Verde, North Atlantic, with 40 temporary BB stations in 2007/08. Project MOZART (Mozambique African Rift Tomography, PTDC/CTE-GIX/103249/2008), covered Mozambique, East Africa, with 30 temporary BB stations in the period 2011 - 2013. These networks, located in very distinct geographical and tectonic environments, offer an interesting opportunity to study seasonal and spatial variations of noise sources and their impact on Empirical Green functions computed from noise cross-correlation. Seismic noise recorded at different seismic stations is evaluated by computation of the probability density functions of power spectral density (PSD) of continuous data. To assess seasonal variations of ambient noise sources in frequency content, time-series of

  10. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  11. Shot noise cross-correlation functions and cross spectra - Implications for models of QPO X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Elsner, R. F.; Bussard, R. W.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The cross-correlation functions (CCFs) and cross spectra expected for quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) shot noise models are calculated under various assumptions, and the results are compared to observations. Effects due to possible coherence of the QPO oscillations are included. General formulas for the cross spectrum, the cross-phase spectrum, and the time-delay spectrum for QPO shot models are calculated and discussed. It is shown that the CCFs, cross spectra, and power spectra observed for Cyg X-e2 imply that the spectrum of the shots evolves with time, with important implications for the interpretation of these functions as well as of observed average energy spectra. The possible origins for the observed hard lags are discussed, and some physical difficulties for the Comptonization model are described. Classes of physical models for QPO sources are briefly addressed, and it is concluded that models involving shot formation at the surface of neutron stars are favored by observation.

  12. Understanding volatility correlation behavior with a magnitude cross-correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Woo Cheol; Oh, Gabjin; Kim, Seunghwan

    2006-06-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing the basic relation between correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations by decomposing the original signal into its positive and negative fluctuation components. We use this relation to understand the following phenomenon found in many naturally occurring time series: the magnitude of the signal exhibits long-range correlation, whereas the original signal is short-range correlated. The applications of our approach to heart rate variability signals and high-frequency foreign exchange rates reveal that the difference between the correlation properties of the original signal and its magnitude fluctuations is induced by the time organization structure of the correlation function between the magnitude fluctuations of positive and negative components. We show that this correlation function can be described well by a stretched-exponential function and is related to the nonlinearity and the multifractal structure of the signals.

  13. Offshore Southern California lithospheric velocity structure from noise cross-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, D. C.; Kohler, M. D.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    A new shear wave velocity model offshore Southern California is presented that images plate boundary deformation including both thickening and thinning of the crustal and mantle lithosphere at the westernmost edge of the North American continent. The Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE) ocean bottom seismometer array, together with 65 stations of the onshore Southern California Seismic Network, is used to measure ambient noise correlation functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves which are inverted for 3-D shear wave velocities. The resulting velocity model defines the transition from continental lithosphere to oceanic, illuminating the complex history and deformation in the region. A transition to the present-day strike-slip regime between the Pacific and North American Plates resulted in broad deformation and capture of the now >200 km wide continental shelf. Our velocity model suggests the persistence of the uppermost mantle volcanic processes associated with East Pacific Rise spreading adjacent to the Patton Escarpment, which marks the former subduction of Farallon Plate underneath North America. The most prominent of these seismic structures is a low-velocity anomaly underlying the San Juan Seamount, suggesting ponding of magma at the base of the crust, resulting in thickening and ongoing adjustment of the lithosphere due to the localized loading. The velocity model also provides a robust framework for future earthquake location determinations and ground-shaking simulations for risk estimates.

  14. Dangers and uses of cross-correlation in analyzing time series in perception, performance, movement, and neuroscience: The importance of constructing transfer function autoregressive models.

    PubMed

    Dean, Roger T; Dunsmuir, William T M

    2016-06-01

    Many articles on perception, performance, psychophysiology, and neuroscience seek to relate pairs of time series through assessments of their cross-correlations. Most such series are individually autocorrelated: they do not comprise independent values. Given this situation, an unfounded reliance is often placed on cross-correlation as an indicator of relationships (e.g., referent vs. response, leading vs. following). Such cross-correlations can indicate spurious relationships, because of autocorrelation. Given these dangers, we here simulated how and why such spurious conclusions can arise, to provide an approach to resolving them. We show that when multiple pairs of series are aggregated in several different ways for a cross-correlation analysis, problems remain. Finally, even a genuine cross-correlation function does not answer key motivating questions, such as whether there are likely causal relationships between the series. Thus, we illustrate how to obtain a transfer function describing such relationships, informed by any genuine cross-correlations. We illustrate the confounds and the meaningful transfer functions by two concrete examples, one each in perception and performance, together with key elements of the R software code needed. The approach involves autocorrelation functions, the establishment of stationarity, prewhitening, the determination of cross-correlation functions, the assessment of Granger causality, and autoregressive model development. Autocorrelation also limits the interpretability of other measures of possible relationships between pairs of time series, such as mutual information. We emphasize that further complexity may be required as the appropriate analysis is pursued fully, and that causal intervention experiments will likely also be needed.

  15. Velocity variations associated with the large 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Java, retrieved from seismic multiplets and ambient noise cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi-Santoso, Agus; Lesage, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    We present a study of the seismic velocity variations that occurred in the structure before the large 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano. For the first time to our knowledge, the technique of coda wave interferometry is applied to both families of similar events (multiplets) and to correlation functions of seismic noise. About half of the seismic events recorded at the summit stations belong to one of the ten multiplets identified, including 120 similar events that occurred in the last 20 hr preceding the eruption onset. Daily noise cross-correlation functions (NCF) were calculated for the six pairs of short-period stations available. Using the stretching method, we estimate time-series of apparent velocity variation (AVV) for each multiplet and each pair of stations. No significant velocity change is detected until September 2010. From 10 October to the beginning of the eruption on 26 October, a complex pattern of AVV is observed with amplitude of up to ±1.5 per cent. Velocity decrease is first observed from families of deep events and then from shallow earthquakes. In the same period, AVV with different signs and chronologies are estimated from NCF calculated for various station pairs. The location in the horizontal plane of the velocity perturbations related with the AVV obtained from NCF is estimated by using an approach based on the radiative transfer approximation. Although their spatial resolution is limited, the resulting maps display velocity decrease in the upper part of the edifice in the period 12-25 October. After the eruption onset, the pattern of velocity perturbations is significantly modified with respect to the previous one. We interpret these velocity variations in the framework of a scenario of magmatic intrusion that integrates most observations. The perturbation of the stress field associated with the magma migration can induce both decrease and increase of the seismic velocity of rocks. Thus the detected AVVs can be considered as precursors of

  16. Intrinsic Noise Level of Noise Cross-Correlation Functions and its Implication to Source Population of Ambient noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Nien; Gung, Yuancheng; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Rhie, Junkee

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWe present a quantitative procedure to evaluate the intrinsic noise level (INL) of the noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (NCF). The method is applied to realistic NCFs derived from the continuous data recorded by the seismic arrays in Taiwan and Korea. The obtained temporal evolution of NCF noise level follows fairly the prediction of the theoretical formulation, confirming the feasibility of the method. We then apply the obtained INL to the assessment of data quality and the source characteristics of ambient noise. We show that the INL-based signal-to-noise ratio provides an exact measure for the true noise level within the NCF and better resolving power for the NCF quality, and such measurement can be implemented to any time windows of the NCFs to evaluate the quality of overtones or coda waves. Moreover, since NCF amplitudes are influenced by both the population and excitation strengths of noises, while INL is primarily sensitive to the overall source population, with information from both measurements, we may better constrain the source characteristics of seismic ambient noises.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OLEB...46..487M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OLEB...46..487M"><span>Reflected Light from Giant Planets in Habitable Zones: Tapping into the Power of the <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Melo, C.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>The direct detection of reflected light from exoplanets is an excellent probe for the characterization of their atmospheres. The greatest challenge for this task is the low planet-to-star flux ratio, which even in the most favourable case is of the order of 10-4 in the optical. This ratio decreases even more for planets in their host's habitable zone, typically lower than 10-7. To reach the signal-to-noise level required for such detections, we propose to unleash the power of the <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> in combination with the collecting power of next generation observing facilities. The technique we propose has already yielded positive results by detecting the reflected spectral signature of 51 Pegasi b (see Martins et al. 2015). In this work, we attempted to infer the number of hours required for the detection of several planets in their host's habitable zone using the aforementioned technique from theoretical EELT observations. Our results show that for 5 of the selected planets it should be possible to directly recover their reflected spectral signature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27029795','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27029795"><span>Reflected Light from Giant Planets in Habitable Zones: Tapping into the Power of the <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martins, J H C; Santos, N C; Figueira, P; Melo, C</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>The direct detection of reflected light from exoplanets is an excellent probe for the characterization of their atmospheres. The greatest challenge for this task is the low planet-to-star flux ratio, which even in the most favourable case is of the order of 10(-4) in the optical. This ratio decreases even more for planets in their host's habitable zone, typically lower than 10(-7). To reach the signal-to-noise level required for such detections, we propose to unleash the power of the <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> in combination with the collecting power of next generation observing facilities. The technique we propose has already yielded positive results by detecting the reflected spectral signature of 51 Pegasi b (see Martins et al. 2015). In this work, we attempted to infer the number of hours required for the detection of several planets in their host's habitable zone using the aforementioned technique from theoretical EELT observations. Our results show that for 5 of the selected planets it should be possible to directly recover their reflected spectral signature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.tmp.1605V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.tmp.1605V"><span>A Measurement of the Galaxy Group-Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vikram, Vinu; Lidz, Adam; Jain, Bhuvnesh</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Stacking cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps around known galaxy clusters and groups provides a powerful probe of the distribution of hot gas in these systems via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. A stacking analysis allows one to detect the average SZ signal around low mass halos, to extend measurements out to large scales and measure the redshift-dependence of the SZ background. Motivated by these exciting prospects, we measure the two-point <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between ˜380, 000 galaxy groups (at z = 0.01 - 0.2) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Compton-y parameter maps constructed by the Planck collaboration. We find statistically significant correlations in each of six separate mass bins, with halo masses ranging from 1011.5 - 15.5M⊙/h. We compare with halo models of the SZ signal, which describe the stacked measurement in terms of one-halo and two-halo contributions. The one-halo term quantifies the average pressure profile around the groups in a mass bin, while the two-halo term describes the contribution of correlated neighbouring halos. For the massive groups we find clear evidence for the one- and two-halo regimes, while groups with mass below 1013M⊙/h are dominated by the two-halo term given the resolution of Planck data. We use the signal in the two-halo regime to determine the bias-weighted electron pressure of the universe: <bPe> = 1.50 ± 0.226 × 10-7 keV cm-3 (1-σ) at z ≈ 0.15.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2720Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2720Z"><span>Properties of Noise <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> Obtained from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array at Garner Valley, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zeng, X.; Lancelle, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.; Clarke, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The field test of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) conducted at Garner Valley, California on September 11-12, 2013 provided a continuous overnight record of ambient noise. The DAS array recorded ground motions every one meter of optical cable that was arranged approximately in the shape of a rectangle with dimensions of 160 m by 80 m. The long dimension of the array was adjacent to a state highway. Three hours of record were used to compute noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (NCFs) in one-minute windows. The trace from each sensor channel was pre-processed by downsampling to 200 Hz, followed by normalization in the time-domain and bandpass filtering between 2 and 20 Hz (Bensen et al., 2007). The one-minute NCFs were then stacked using the time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking method (Schimmel & Gallart, 2007). The NCFs between channels were asymmetrical reflecting the direction of traffic noise. The group velocities were found using the frequency-time analysis method. The energy was concentrated between 5 and 15 Hz, which falls into the typical traffic noise frequency band. The resulting velocities were between 100 and 300 m/s for frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz, which are in the same range as described in the results for surface-wave dispersion obtained using an active source for the same site (Lancelle et al., 2015). The group velocity starts to decrease for frequencies greater than ~10 Hz, which was expected on the basis of a previous shear-wave velocity model (Steidl et al., 1996). Then, the phase velocity was calculated using the multichannel analysis of surface wave technique (MASW - Park et al., 1999) with 114 NCFs spaced one meter apart. The resulting dispersion curve between 5 and 15 Hz gave phase velocities that ranged from approximately 170 m/s at 15 Hz to 250 m/s at 5 Hz. These results are consistent with other results of active-source DAS and seismometer records obtained at the Garner Valley site (e.g., Stokoe et al. 2004). This analysis is</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19457766','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19457766"><span>Stress during simulated emergency transportation in a rescue helicopter: <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between stress hormones, vital <span class="hlt">functions</span> and subjective well-being.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Witzel, K; Elzer, M; Koch, Horst J</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Vital <span class="hlt">functions</span> and stress hormone levels during simulated emergency helicopter transport in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three volunteers were subjected to a simulated 15 minute rescue helicopter transport. We determined vital <span class="hlt">functions</span>, ACTH, cortisol and prolactin during the flight and filled in a standardized questionnaire before and after the flight. Data were analysed descriptively, by means of cross tabulation, Spearman rank correlation and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique. During take-off we recorded a significant increase of vital parameters such as heart rate. Prolactin concentration rose slightly after the start. Maximum cortisol and ACTH levels were found before take-off and then they decreased gradually. As expected, ACTH and cortisol <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> significantly without any relevant time lag. Test items showed a feeling of fear and concern before take off. After the flight the volunteers reported having less stress than expected. Particularly, diastolic blood pressure and prolactin levels were markedly associated with questionnaire items such as behaviour of the staff or nausea. Heart rate significantly correlated with anxiety scores. Helicopter transportation induced a marked stress reaction in healthy volunteers, which speaks in favour of smooth transports in modern helicopters and adequate behaviour towards the patient of the staff.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24089252','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24089252"><span>Optimization and extraction of <span class="hlt">functional</span> information from in vitro flow models using dual-beam spectral-domain optical coherence tomography <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Daly, Susan M; Silien, Christophe; Leahy, Martin J</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>As in vivo flow behavior can be pulsatile, intermittent, and/or otherwise changeable with time, the ability to provide clinicians with a means of real-time visualization and <span class="hlt">functional</span> assessment of structures is of particular importance. The discernment of pulsatile flow behavior using a dual-beam spectral domain optical coherence tomography system (db-SdOCT) by quasi-simultaneous measurement by two planes of illumination is demonstrated. By <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, it is possible to compute velocity metrics pertaining to flowing particle motion, without a priori angular knowledge. This is the first application of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>-based dynamic assessment for the extraction of pulsatile behavior in an in vitro environment using an optimized db-SdOCT system. The experimental results outlined have shown the db-SdOCT system and its associated algorithms to be successful in the discernment of intermittent pulsatile flow behavior in in vitro models, concurrent to yielding velocity values in good agreement with that of the applied flow rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712176F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712176F"><span>Identifying apparent velocity changes in <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlated</span> microseism noise data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Friderike Volk, Meike; Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; Pérez, Nemesio; Ibáñez, Jesús</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Currently there is a strong interest of using <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of ambient noise to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span>. These are usually used to calculate the seismic wave velocity of the subsurface and therefore can be used for subsurface imaging or monitoring of various geological settings where we expect rapid velocity changes (e.g. reservoirs or volcanoes). The assumption of this method is that the wavefields which are correlated must be diffuse. This criterion is fulfilled if the ambient noise sources are uniformly distributed or the scattering in the medium is high enough to mitigate any source directivity. The location of the sources is usually unknown and it can change in time. These temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources may lead to changes in the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span>, and so, to the apparent changes in seismic wave velocities. To further investigate the apparent changes in Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> we undertook an active seismic experiment in Tenerife lasting three months. A small airgun was used as an active source and was shooting repeatedly every 15 minutes. The shots and the microseism noise were recorded at several seismic stations at the same time. That data set gives us the opportunity to compare the changes in seismic wave velocity recovered through <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of ambient noise and changes we measure through active shots from the airgun. The aim is to distinguish between apparent seismic velocity changes and seismic velocity changes caused by changes in the medium. We also use the data set to track the direction of the microseism noise sources to see if changes which are only recovered through <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> can be related to temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2723H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2723H"><span>Verification of Green's <span class="hlt">Function</span> Approximation from Ambient Noise <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> using Three-year Continuous Seismic Data in South Niigata Prefecture, Japan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hayashida, T.; Yoshimi, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>A continuous broadband-to-strong motion observation network that consists of 15 stations has been in operation since September 2011 in south Niigata Prefecture (Yoshimi et al., 2012). We applied seismic interferometry to the ambient noise data for the purpose of validating three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure (deep sedimentary structure) models beneath the observation area (Hayashida and Yoshimi, 2012, 2015). We used 37-month ambient noise data (October 2011 - October 2014) to obtain nine component (RR, TT, ZZ, RT, TR, ZR, ZT, RZ, and TZ) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> between two stations (105 station pairs) for distances from 4.3 to 40.7 km, according to the signal processing technique by Bensen et al. (2007). Our results show that signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> increase logarithmically as the stacking number increase and the wave trains are clear especially for TT and ZZ correlations. Some station pairs show large SNRs even for RT and TR correlations, indicating complicated velocity structure beneath the area. To extract Rayleigh-wave Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> efficiently, we applied body and surface wave separation technique by Takagi et al. (2014). We obtained clear dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves in the frequency range between 0.1 and 1.0 Hz that correspond well to theoretical curves from existing velocity structure model of Sekiguchi et al. (2009). We found that maximum detectable wavelength of surface wave is nearly equivalent to station-to-station distance for near station pairs (< 20 km), whereas the maximum wavelength is about a half of station-to-station distance for further station pairs. We also investigated the effectiveness of uniform noise source distribution assumptions by comparing hourly stacked complex coherence <span class="hlt">functions</span> of ambient noise between neighboring two stations and theoretical Bessel <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the of first kind of zero order with the existing crustal (Takeda et al., 2012) and deep sedimentary</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PEPI..234...46C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PEPI..234...46C"><span>Lithospheric VS models in the Campanian Plain (Italy) by integrating Rayleigh wave dispersion data from noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and earthquake recordings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Costanzo, M. R.; Nunziata, C.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of long noise recordings with two broadband stations and earthquake recordings in the Campanian Plain have been processed with frequency time analysis to extract the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves. Group velocities have been combined with regional group and phase velocity data in the non-linear inversion, with Hedgehog method, in order to get average shear wave velocity models for lithospheric structures extending to 73 km of depth. The structural model below the central part of the Campanian Plain is characterized by a covering of pyroclastics and alluvial sediments, about 2 km thick, on the carbonate platform with VS ranging from 2.30-2.40 to 2.85-3.15 km/s. However, the presence of lava bodies within the carbonates cannot be excluded in the light of the same density and seismic velocities. At greater depths, a main feature is represented by a sharp increment of velocity around 8-9 km of depth (VS of 3.85 km/s), which can be attributed to the presence of metamorphic rocks, overlying a low VS layer (5% velocity reduction), at about 14-15 km of depth. Such structural model resembles those found below the quiescent Roccamonfina and Colli Albani volcanoes, and can be interpreted as the signature of a cooling magma chamber. Moreover, a low VS layer is detected at 8-9 km of depth towards the Apennines and at 6 km of depth in the southernmost part of the Campanian Plain, nearby Mt. Vesuvius. Such low velocity layer seems to be a regional feature since it has been found below Roccamonfina in the North, Campi Flegrei, bay of Napoli and Mt. Vesuvius in the South, and can be explained by the widespread presence of partially melted material below the whole Campanian area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567661','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567661"><span>THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AGNs. II. HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> <span class="hlt">FUNCTION</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector; Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L.</p> <p>2011-01-10</p> <p>This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS broad-line AGNs with SDSS luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36 that was calculated in Paper I. In our HOD modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a 'typical' AGN host halo mass, M{sub h}, and model the full distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M{sub h} more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper limit to the slope ({alpha}) of the AGN HOD that is far below unity. The other two models have a central component, which has a step <span class="hlt">function</span> form, where the HOD is constant above a minimum mass, without (Model B) or with (Model C) an upper mass cutoff, in addition to the truncated power-law satellite component, similar to the HOD that is found for galaxies. In these two models we find that the upper limits on {alpha} are still below unity, with {alpha} {approx}< 0.95 and {alpha} {approx}< 0.84 for Models B and C, respectively. Our analysis suggests that the satellite AGN occupation increases slower than, or may even decrease with, M{sub h}, in contrast to the satellite HODs of luminosity-threshold samples of galaxies, which, in contrast, grow approximately as (N{sub s}) {proportional_to} M{sup {alpha}}{sub h} with {alpha} {approx} 1. These results are consistent with observations that the AGN fraction in groups and clusters</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160011519','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160011519"><span><span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AMT.....8..751L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AMT.....8..751L"><span>Characterization and verification of ACAM slit <span class="hlt">functions</span> for trace-gas <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ flight campaign</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, C.; Liu, X.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.; González Abad, G.; Pickering, K. E.; Chance, K.; Lamsal, L. N.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM), an ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectrometer, has been flown on board the NASA UC-12 aircraft during the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaigns to provide remote sensing observations of tropospheric and boundary-layer pollutants from its radiance measurements. To assure the trace-gas <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> from ACAM measurements we perform detailed characterization and verification of ACAM slit <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The wavelengths and slit <span class="hlt">functions</span> of ACAM measurements are characterized for the air-quality channel (~304-500 nm) through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with a high-resolution solar irradiance reference spectrum after necessarily accounting for atmospheric gas absorption and the ring effect in the calibration process. The derived slit <span class="hlt">functions</span>, assuming a hybrid combination of asymmetric Gaussian and top-hat slit <span class="hlt">functions</span>, agree very well with the laboratory-measured slit <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Comparisons of trace-gas <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> between using derived and measured slit <span class="hlt">functions</span> demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique can be reliably used to characterize slit <span class="hlt">functions</span> for trace-gas <span class="hlt">retrievals</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5328397','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5328397"><span>Recirculating <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.</p> <p>1985-01-18</p> <p>A digital <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27723507','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27723507"><span>Improving information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in <span class="hlt">functional</span> analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, Juan C; González, Germán A; Fresno, Cristóbal; Llera, Andrea S; Fernández, Elmer A</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Transcriptome analysis is essential to understand the mechanisms regulating key biological processes and <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The first step usually consists of identifying candidate genes; to find out which pathways are affected by those genes, however, <span class="hlt">functional</span> analysis (FA) is mandatory. The most frequently used strategies for this purpose are Gene Set and Singular Enrichment Analysis (GSEA and SEA) over Gene Ontology. Several statistical methods have been developed and compared in terms of computational efficiency and/or statistical appropriateness. However, whether their results are similar or complementary, the sensitivity to parameter settings, or possible bias in the analyzed terms has not been addressed so far. Here, two GSEA and four SEA methods and their parameter combinations were evaluated in six datasets by comparing two breast cancer subtypes with well-known differences in genetic background and patient outcomes. We show that GSEA and SEA lead to different results depending on the chosen statistic, model and/or parameters. Both approaches provide complementary results from a biological perspective. Hence, an Integrative <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Analysis (IFA) tool is proposed to improve information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in FA. It provides a common gene expression analytic framework that grants a comprehensive and coherent analysis. Only a minimal user parameter setting is required, since the best SEA/GSEA alternatives are integrated. IFA utility was demonstrated by evaluating four prostate cancer and the TCGA breast cancer microarray datasets, which showed its biological generalization capabilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2715865','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2715865"><span>Evaluation of the Performance of Information Theory-Based Methods and <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> to Estimate the <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Connectivity in Cortical Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Garofalo, Matteo; Nieus, Thierry; Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Functional</span> connectivity of in vitro neuronal networks was estimated by applying different statistical algorithms on data collected by Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs). First we tested these “connectivity methods” on neuronal network models at an increasing level of complexity and evaluated the performance in terms of ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and PPC (Positive Precision Curve), a new defined complementary method specifically developed for <span class="hlt">functional</span> links identification. Then, the algorithms better estimated the actual connectivity of the network models, were used to extract <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity from cultured cortical networks coupled to MEAs. Among the proposed approaches, Transfer Entropy and Joint-Entropy showed the best results suggesting those methods as good candidates to extract <span class="hlt">functional</span> links in actual neuronal networks from multi-site recordings. PMID:19652720</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126846','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22126846"><span><span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATIONS</span> AS A COSMOLOGICAL CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pullen, Anthony R.; Dore, Olivier; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Lidz, Adam</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We present a new procedure to measure the large-scale carbon monoxide (CO) emissions across cosmic history. As a tracer of large-scale structure (LSS), the CO gas content as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of redshift can be quantified by its three-dimensional fluctuation power spectra. Furthermore, <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> CO emission with other LSS tracers offers a way to measure the emission as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of scale and redshift. Here we introduce the model relevant for such a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurement between CO and other LSS tracers, and between different CO rotational lines. We propose a novel use of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and attempt to extract redshifted CO emissions embedded in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data set. We <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> the all-sky WMAP7 data with LSS data sets, namely, the photometric quasar sample and the luminous red galaxy sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Releases 6 and 7, respectively. We are unable to detect a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal with either CO(1-0) or CO(2-1) lines, mainly due to the instrumental noise in the WMAP data. However, we are able to rule out models more than three times greater than our more optimistic model. We discuss the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal from the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and dust as potential contaminants, and quantify their impact for our CO measurements. We discuss forecasts for current CMB experiments and a hypothetical future CO-focused experiment, and propose to <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> CO temperature data with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Ly{alpha}-emitter sample, for which a signal-to-noise ratio of 58 is possible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22858972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22858972"><span>Optical anemometry based on the temporal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of angle-of-arrival fluctuations obtained from spatially separated light sources.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tichkule, Shiril; Muschinski, Andreas</p> <p>2012-07-20</p> <p>The temporal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the angle-of-arrival (AOA) fluctuations of two optical waves propagating through atmospheric turbulence carries information regarding the average wind velocity transverse to the propagation path. We present and discuss two estimators for the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of the path-averaged beam-transverse horizontal wind velocity, v(t). Both methods <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> v(t) from the temporal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of AOA fluctuations obtained from two closely spaced light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The first method relies on the time delay of the peak (TDP) of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, and the second method exploits its slope at zero lag (SZL). Over a 9 h period during which v(t) varied between -1.3 ms(-1) and 2.0 ms(-1), the maximum rms difference between optically <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> and in situ measured 10 s estimates of v(t) was found to be 0.18 ms(-1) for the TDP estimator and 0.23 ms(-1) for the SZL estimator. Applicability and limitations of these two optical wind <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> techniques are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28057726','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28057726"><span>Reduced Hippocampal <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Connectivity During Episodic Memory <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> in Autism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cooper, Rose A; Richter, Franziska R; Bays, Paul M; Plaisted-Grant, Kate C; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Simons, Jon S</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Increasing recent research has sought to understand the recollection impairments experienced by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we tested whether these memory deficits reflect a reduction in the probability of <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> success or in the precision of memory representations. We also used <span class="hlt">functional</span> magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural mechanisms underlying memory encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in ASD, focusing particularly on the <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity of core episodic memory networks. Adults with ASD and typical control participants completed a memory task that involved studying visual displays and subsequently using a continuous dial to recreate their appearance. The ASD group exhibited reduced <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> success, but there was no evidence of a difference in <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> precision. fMRI data revealed similar patterns of brain activity and <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity during memory encoding in the 2 groups, though encoding-related lateral frontal activity predicted subsequent <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> success only in the control group. During memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, the ASD group exhibited attenuated lateral frontal activity and substantially reduced hippocampal connectivity, particularly between hippocampus and regions of the fronto-parietal control network. These findings demonstrate notable differences in brain <span class="hlt">function</span> during episodic memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in ASD and highlight the importance of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity to understanding recollection-related <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> deficits in this population.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRS15002B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRS15002B"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-Correlating</span> DES and SPT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baxter, Eric</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) provide a uniquely powerful combination of overlapping optical imaging and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between DES and SPT are expected to arise from several physical effects, including gravitational lensing, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, and the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. The resultant correlations contain information not accessible to either experiment on its own. Measurement of these correlations offers several exciting possibilities, such as improved cosmological parameter constraints, improved understanding of systematics affecting the two experiments, and calibration of the masses of galaxy clusters at high redshift. In this talk I will summarize recent results obtained by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> early DES data with data from the SPT-SZ survey and will discuss prospects for future <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements with these two surveys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1166014','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1166014"><span>Background-free balanced optical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Nejadmalayeri, Amir Hossein; Kaertner, Franz X</p> <p>2014-12-23</p> <p>A balanced optical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span> includes an optical waveguide, a first photodiode including a first n-type semiconductor and a first p-type semiconductor positioned about the optical waveguide on a first side of the optical waveguide's point of symmetry, and a second photodiode including a second n-type semiconductor and a second p-type semiconductor positioned about the optical waveguide on a second side of the optical waveguide's point of symmetry. A balanced receiver including first and second inputs is configured to produce an output current or voltage that reflects a difference in currents or voltages, originating from the first and the second photodiodes of the balanced <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span> and fed to the first input and to the second input of the balanced receiver.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvE..73c6129R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvE..73c6129R"><span>Modeling <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> within a many-assets market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roman, H. E.; Albergante, M.; Colombo, M.; Croccolo, F.; Marini, F.; Riccardi, C.</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>A simple model for simulating <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> of a many-assets market is discussed. Correlations between assets are initially considered within the context of the well-known one-factor model, in which a driving term common to all stocks is present. The results are compared to those of real market data corresponding to a set of 445 stocks taken from the Standard and Poors 500 index. The model is further extended by introducing a stochastic volatility within each time series using an autoregressive scheme. This artifical market reproduces the empirically observed fat tails in the distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> of logarithmic price variations and, more important, leads to additional <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between the time series, in better agreement with the real market behavior.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25868704','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25868704"><span>Bootstrap testing for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> under low firing activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>González-Montoro, Aldana M; Cao, Ricardo; Espinosa, Nelson; Cudeiro, Javier; Mariño, Jorge</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>A new <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> synchrony index for neural activity is proposed. The index is based on the integration of the kernel estimation of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. It is used to test for the dynamic synchronization levels of spontaneous neural activity under two induced brain states: sleep-like and awake-like. Two bootstrap resampling plans are proposed to approximate the distribution of the test statistics. The results of the first bootstrap method indicate that it is useful to discern significant differences in the synchronization dynamics of brain states characterized by a neural activity with low firing rate. The second bootstrap method is useful to unveil subtle differences in the synchronization levels of the awake-like state, depending on the activation pathway.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1239272','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1239272"><span>Precise Relative Earthquake Magnitudes from <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cleveland, K. Michael; Ammon, Charles J.</p> <p>2015-04-21</p> <p>We present a method to estimate precise relative magnitudes using <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of seismic waveforms. Our method incorporates the intercorrelation of all events in a group of earthquakes, as opposed to individual event pairings relative to a reference event. This method works well when a reliable reference event does not exist. We illustrate the method using vertical strike-slip earthquakes located in the northeast Pacific and Panama fracture zone regions. Our results are generally consistent with the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog, which we use to establish a baseline for the relative event sizes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1335007','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1335007"><span>Exploiting <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlations</span> and Joint Analyses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rhodes, J.; Allen, S.; Benson, B. A.; Chang, T.; de Putter, R.; Dodelson, S.; Doré, O.; Honscheid, K.; Linder, E.; Ménard, B.; Newman, J.; Nord, B.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Vallinotto, A.; Weinberg, D.</p> <p>2014-02-28</p> <p>In this report, we present a wide variety of ways in which information from multiple probes of dark energy may be combined to obtain additional information not accessible when they are considered separately. Fundamentally, because all major probes are affected by the underlying distribution of matter in the regions studied, there exist covariances between them that can provide information on cosmology. Combining multiple probes allows for more accurate (less contaminated by systematics) and more precise (since there is cosmological information encoded in <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistics) measurements of dark energy. The potential of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methods is only beginning to be realized. By bringing in information from other wavelengths, the capabilities of the existing probes of dark energy can be enhanced and systematic effects can be mitigated further. We present a mixture of work in progress and suggestions for future scientific efforts. Given the scope of future dark energy experiments, the greatest gains may only be realized with more coordination and cooperation between multiple project teams; we recommend that this interchange should begin sooner, rather than later, to maximize scientific gains.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ASPC..475..135F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ASPC..475..135F"><span>HEALPix Based <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> in Astronomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fernique, P.; Durand, D.; Boch, T.; Oberto, A.; Pineau, F.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>We are presenting our work on a <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> system based on HEALPix cells indexing. The system allows users to answer scientific questions like “please find all HST images on which there is an observation of a radio quiet quasar” in a single query. The baseline of this system is the creation of the HEALPix indexes grouped hierarchically and organized in a special format file called MOC (see <a href='http://ivoa.net/Documents/Notes/MOC'>http://ivoa.net/Documents/Notes/MOC</a>) developed by the CDS. Using the MOC files, the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between images and or catalogues is reduced to searches only in meaningful areas. Under the condition that the survey database also internally uses a HEALPix positional index, the search result comes back almost immediately (typically a few seconds). We have started building the index for some surveys, catalogues (VizieR catalogues, Simbad, etc.) and some pointed mode archives (like HST at CADC) and are developing an elementary library to support basic operations on any input MOC files. The usage of the MOC files is starting to be used throughout the VO community as a general indexing method and tools such as Aladin and TOPCAT are starting to make use of them.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017FNL....1650004X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017FNL....1650004X"><span>Analyzing the <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Between Onshore and Offshore RMB Exchange Rates Based on Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis (MF-DCCA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Chi; Zhou, Yingying; Wang, Gangjin; Yan, Xinguo</p> <p></p> <p>We use the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA) method to explore the multifractal behavior of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between exchange rates of onshore RMB (CNY) and offshore RMB (CNH) against US dollar (USD). The empirical data are daily prices of CNY/USD and CNH/USD from May 1, 2012 to February 29, 2016. The results demonstrate that: (i) the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is persistent and its fluctuation is smaller when the order of fluctuation <span class="hlt">function</span> is negative than that when the order is positive; (ii) the multifractal behavior of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is significant during the sample period; (iii) the dynamic Hurst exponents obtained by the rolling windows analysis show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is stable when the global economic situation is good and volatile in bad situation; and (iv) the non-normal distribution of original data has a greater effect on the multifractality of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between CNY/USD and CNH/USD than the temporary correlation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4438072','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4438072"><span>A New Methodology of Spatial <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Yanguang</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Spatial correlation modeling comprises both spatial autocorrelation and spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> processes. The spatial autocorrelation theory has been well-developed. It is necessary to advance the method of spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis to supplement the autocorrelation analysis. This paper presents a set of models and analytical procedures for spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis. By analogy with Moran’s index newly expressed in a spatial quadratic form, a theoretical framework is derived for geographical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> modeling. First, two sets of spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients are defined, including a global spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient and local spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients. Second, a pair of scatterplots of spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is proposed, and the plots can be used to visually reveal the causality behind spatial systems. Based on the global <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient, Pearson’s correlation coefficient can be decomposed into two parts: direct correlation (partial correlation) and indirect correlation (spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>). As an example, the methodology is applied to the relationships between China’s urbanization and economic development to illustrate how to model spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> phenomena. This study is an introduction to developing the theory of spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, and future geographical spatial analysis might benefit from these models and indexes. PMID:25993120</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PThPS.194..181M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PThPS.194..181M"><span>Temporal and <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlations</span> in Business News</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mizuno, T.; Takei, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Watanabe, T.</p> <p></p> <p>We empirically investigate temporal and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> inthe frequency of news reports on companies, using a dataset of more than 100 million news articles reported in English by around 500 press agencies worldwide for the period 2003--2009. Our first finding is that the frequency of news reports on a company does not follow a Poisson process, but instead exhibits long memory with a positive autocorrelation for longer than one year. The second finding is that there exist significant correlations in the frequency of news across companies. Specifically, on a daily time scale or longer the frequency of news is governed by external dynamics, while on a time scale of minutes it is governed by internal dynamics. These two findings indicate that the frequency of news reports on companies has statistical properties similar to trading volume or price volatility in stock markets, suggesting that the flow of information through company news plays an important role in price dynamics in stock markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..428...80W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..428...80W"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between interest rates and commodity prices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Qing; Hu, Yiming</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between interest rate and agricultural commodity markets. Based on a statistic of Podobnik et al. (2009), we find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are all significant. Using the MF-DFA and MF-DXA methods, we find strong multifractality in both auto-correlations and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are persistent. Finally, based on the technique of rolling window, the time-variation property of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> is also revealed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5985E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5985E"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in the MENA area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>El Alaoui, Marwane; Benbachir, Saâd</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigated multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> qualitatively and quantitatively using a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> test and the Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method (MF-DCCA) for markets in the MENA area. We used <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients to measure the level of this correlation. The analysis concerns four stock market indices of Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt and Jordan. The countries chosen are signatory of the Agadir agreement concerning the establishment of a free trade area comprising Arab Mediterranean countries. We computed the bivariate generalized Hurst exponent, Rényi exponent and spectrum of singularity for each pair of indices to measure quantitatively the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. By analyzing the results, we found the existence of multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between all of these markets. We compared the spectrum width of these indices; we also found which pair of indices has a strong multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7858E..09D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7858E..09D"><span>Phase <span class="hlt">function</span> effects for ocean color <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Du, KePing; Lee, Zhongping</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Inherent optical properties (IOPs), e.g., absorption, back scattering coefficients, and volume scattering <span class="hlt">function</span>, are important parameters for radiance transfer simulation. Commercially available instruments (e.g., Wetlabs ACS, BB9, etc, and HOBILabs a-sphere, HS6, etc) basically only measure absorption and back scattering coefficients. In this paper, we used the same IOPs of International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) report 5 and Hydrolight to simulate the radiance distribution, however, different phase <span class="hlt">functions</span>, say, a new phase <span class="hlt">function</span> derived from the measured data by multispectral volume scattering meter (MVSM) in coastal waters, the widely used Petzold average phase <span class="hlt">function</span>, and the Fournier-Forand (FF) phase <span class="hlt">function</span>, were employed in the simulations. The simulation results were used to develop the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm with angular effects correction based on the quasi-analytical algorithm(QAA) developed by Lee et al.. Results showed that not only the back scattering probability, but also the angular shape of phase <span class="hlt">function</span> are important for ocean color <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm. Considering the importance of phase <span class="hlt">function</span> in ocean color remote sensing, methods to validate the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> data should be developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007EPJB...58..499D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007EPJB...58..499D"><span>World currency exchange rate <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Droå¼dż, S.; Górski, A. Z.; Kwapień, J.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>World currency network constitutes one of the most complex structures that is associated with the contemporary civilization. On a way towards quantifying its characteristics we study the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in changes of the daily foreign exchange rates within the basket of 60 currencies in the period December 1998 May 2005. Such a dynamics turns out to predominantly involve one outstanding eigenvalue of the correlation matrix. The magnitude of this eigenvalue depends however crucially on which currency is used as a base currency for the remaining ones. Most prominent it looks from the perspective of a peripheral currency. This largest eigenvalue is seen to systematically decrease and thus the structure of correlations becomes more heterogeneous, when more significant currencies are used as reference. An extreme case in this later respect is the USD in the period considered. Besides providing further insight into subtle nature of complexity, these observations point to a formal procedure that in general can be used for practical purposes of measuring the relative currencies significance on various time horizons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..395..293L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..395..293L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between crude oil and agricultural commodity markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Li</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between crude oil and agricultural commodity markets. Based on a popular statistical test proposed by Podobnik et al. (2009), we find that the linear return <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are significant at larger lag lengths and the volatility <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are highly significant at all of the lag lengths under consideration. Using a detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA), we find that the return <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are persistent for corn and soybean and anti-persistent for oat and soybean. The volatility <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are strongly persistent. Using a nonlinear <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measure, our results show that <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are relatively weak but they are significant for smaller time scales. For larger time scales, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are not significant. The reason may be that information transmission from crude oil market to agriculture markets can complete within a certain period of time. Finally, based on multifractal extension of DCCA, we find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are multifractal and high oil prices partly contribute to food crisis during the period of 2006-mid-2008.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Fract..2250007Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Fract..2250007Y"><span>Multiscale Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis of STOCK Markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yin, Yi; Shang, Pengjian</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we employ the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) to investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between different stock markets. We report the results of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> behaviors in US, Chinese and European stock markets in period 1997-2012 by using DCCA method. The DCCA shows the <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> behaviors of intra-regional and inter-regional stock markets in the short and long term which display the similarities and differences of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> behaviors simply and roughly and the persistence of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> behaviors of fluctuations. Then, because of the limitation and inapplicability of DCCA method, we propose multiscale detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MSDCCA) method to avoid "a priori" selecting the ranges of scales over which two coefficients of the classical DCCA method are identified, and employ MSDCCA to reanalyze these <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> to exhibit some important details such as the existence and position of minimum, maximum and bimodal distribution which are lost if the scale structure is described by two coefficients only and essential differences and similarities in the scale structures of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of intra-regional and inter-regional markets. More statistical characteristics of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> obtained by MSDCCA method help us to understand how two different stock markets influence each other and to analyze the influence from thus two inter-regional markets on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in detail, thus we get a richer and more detailed knowledge of the complex evolutions of dynamics of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between stock markets. The application of MSDCCA is important to promote our understanding of the internal mechanisms and structures of financial markets and helps to forecast the stock indices based on our current results demonstrated the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between stock indices. We also discuss the MSDCCA methods of secant rolling window with different sizes and, lastly, provide some relevant implications and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...627089B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...627089B"><span>Robust Statistical Detection of Power-Law <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blythe, Duncan A. J.; Nikulin, Vadim V.; Müller, Klaus-Robert</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We show that widely used approaches in statistical physics incorrectly indicate the existence of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between financial stock market fluctuations measured over several years and the neuronal activity of the human brain lasting for only a few minutes. While such <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are nonsensical, no current methodology allows them to be reliably discarded, leaving researchers at greater risk when the spurious nature of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> is not clear from the unrelated origin of the time series and rather requires careful statistical estimation. Here we propose a theory and method (PLCC-test) which allows us to rigorously and robustly test for power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, correctly detecting genuine and discarding spurious <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, thus establishing meaningful relationships between processes in complex physical systems. Our method reveals for the first time the presence of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between amplitudes of the alpha and beta frequency ranges of the human electroencephalogram.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21361436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21361436"><span>Acoustic ship signature measurements by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16740314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16740314"><span>Estimation of short-time <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between frequency bands of event related EEG.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zygierewicz, J; Mazurkiewicz, J; Durka, P J; Franaszczuk, P J; Crone, N E</p> <p>2006-10-30</p> <p>Simultaneous variations of the event-related power changes (ERD/ERS) are often observed in a number of frequency bands. ERD/ERS measures are usually based on the relative changes of power in a given single frequency band. Within such an approach one cannot answer questions concerning the mutual relations between the band-power variations observed in different frequency bands. This paper addresses the problem of estimating and assessing the significance of the average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between ERD/ERS phenomena occurring in two frequency bands. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in a natural way also provides estimation of the delay between ERD/ERS in those bands. The proposed method is based on estimating the short-time <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between relative changes of power in two selected frequency bands. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is estimated in each trial separately and then averaged across trials. The significance of those mean <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is evaluated by means of a nonparametric test. The basic properties of the method are presented on simulated signals, and an example application to real EEG and ECoG signals is given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4415R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4415R"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> of ambient noise recorded by accelerometers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rábade García, S. E.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We investigate the ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> obtained by using properly corrected accelerometric recordings, and determine velocity structure in central Mexico based on a dispersion analysis. The data used comprise ten months of continuous recordings - from April 2013 to January 2014 - of ambient seismic noise at stations operated by the National Seismological Service of Mexico and the Engineering Strong Ground Motion Network of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The vertical component of ambient noise was base-line corrected, filtered, and properly integrated before extracting Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> (GF), which were compared successfully against GF obtained using recordings from broadband velocity sensors. In order to obtain dispersion curves, we estimated group and phase velocities applying the FTAN analysis technique and obtained s-wave velocity profiles at selected regions. We conclude and highlight that the use of widely deployed accelerographs to conduct regional studies using ambient noise tomography is feasible</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995AJ....109.1371S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995AJ....109.1371S"><span>Bringing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method up to date</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Statler, Thomas</p> <p>1995-03-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (XC) method of Tonry & Davis (1979, AJ, 84, 1511) is generalized to arbitrary parametrized line profiles. In the new algorithm the correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> itself, rather than the observed galaxy spectrum, is fitted by the model line profile: this removes much of the complication in the error analysis caused by template mismatch. Like the Fourier correlation quotient (FCQ) method of Bender (1990, A&A, 229, 441), the inferred line profiles are, up to a normalization constant, independent of template mismatch as long as there are no blended lines. The standard reduced chi2 is a good measure of the fit of the inferred velocity distribution, largely decoupled from the fit of the spectral template. The updated XC method performs as well as other recently developed methods, with the added virtue of conceptual simplicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950061839&hterms=up+date&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dup%2Bdate','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950061839&hterms=up+date&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dup%2Bdate"><span>Bringing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method up to date</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Statler, Thomas</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (XC) method of Tonry & Davis (1979, AJ, 84, 1511) is generalized to arbitrary parametrized line profiles. In the new algorithm the correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> itself, rather than the observed galaxy spectrum, is fitted by the model line profile: this removes much of the complication in the error analysis caused by template mismatch. Like the Fourier correlation quotient (FCQ) method of Bender (1990, A&A, 229, 441), the inferred line profiles are, up to a normalization constant, independent of template mismatch as long as there are no blended lines. The standard reduced chi(exp 2) is a good measure of the fit of the inferred velocity distribution, largely decoupled from the fit of the spectral template. The updated XC method performs as well as other recently developed methods, with the added virtue of conceptual simplicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060037936&hterms=beer&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dbeer','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060037936&hterms=beer&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dbeer"><span>(abstract) Cross with Your Spectra? <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlate</span> Instead!</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Beer, Reinhard</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for certain types of spectral analysis is discussed. Under certain circumstances, the use of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between a real spectrum and either a model or another spectrum can provide a very powerful tool for spectral analysis. The method (and its limitations) will be described with concrete examples using ATMOS data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E1414N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E1414N"><span>Non-Stationary Effects and <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlations</span> in Solar Activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>In this paper within the framework of the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) we consider the dynamic properties of the solar activity by analyzing the Zurich sunspot numbers. As is well-known astrophysics objects are the non-stationary open systems, whose evolution are the quite individual and have the alternation effects. The main difference of FNS compared to other related methods is the separation of the original signal reflecting the dynamics of solar activity into three frequency bands: system-specific "resonances" and their interferential contributions at lower frequencies, chaotic "random walk" ("irregularity-jump") components at larger frequencies, and chaotic "irregularity-spike" (inertial) components in the highest frequency range. Specific parameters corresponding to each of the bands are introduced and calculated. These irregularities as well as specific resonance frequencies are considered as the information carriers on every hierarchical level of the evolution of a complex natural system with intermittent behavior, consecutive alternation of rapid chaotic changes in the values of dynamic variables on small time intervals with small variations of the values on longer time intervals ("laminar" phases). The jump and spike irregularities are described by power spectra and difference moments (transient structural <span class="hlt">functions</span>) of the second order. FNS allows revealing the most crucial points of the solar activity dynamics by means of "spikiness" factor. It is shown that this variable behaves as the predictor of crucial changes of the sunspot number dynamics, particularly when the number comes up to maximum value. The change of averaging interval allows revealing the non-stationary effects depending by 11-year cycle and by inside processes in a cycle. To consider the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between the different variables of solar activity we use the Zurich sunspot numbers and the sequence of corona's radiation energy. The FNS-approach allows extracting the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24929372','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24929372"><span>Temporal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> asymmetry and departure from equilibrium in a bistable chemical system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bianca, C; Lemarchand, A</p> <p>2014-06-14</p> <p>This paper aims at determining sustained reaction fluxes in a nonlinear chemical system driven in a nonequilibrium steady state. The method relies on the computation of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the internal fluctuations of chemical species concentrations. By employing Langevin-type equations, we derive approximate analytical formulas for the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> associated with nonlinear dynamics. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the chemical master equation are performed in order to check the validity of the Langevin equations for a bistable chemical system. The two approaches are found in excellent agreement, except for critical parameter values where the bifurcation between monostability and bistability occurs. From the theoretical point of view, the results imply that the behavior of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> cannot be exploited to measure sustained reaction fluxes in a specific nonlinear system without the prior knowledge of the associated chemical mechanism and the rate constants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019246','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019246"><span><span class="hlt">Functional</span> heterogeneity in posterior parietal cortex across attention and episodic memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hutchinson, J Benjamin; Uncapher, Melina R; Weiner, Kevin S; Bressler, David W; Silver, Michael A; Preston, Alison R; Wagner, Anthony D</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>While attention is critical for event memory, debate has arisen regarding the extent to which posterior parietal cortex (PPC) activation during episodic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> reflects engagement of PPC-mediated mechanisms of attention. Here, we directly examined the relationship between attention and memory, within and across subjects, using <span class="hlt">functional</span> magnetic resonance imaging attention-mapping and episodic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> paradigms. During <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, 4 <span class="hlt">functionally</span> dissociable PPC regions were identified. Specifically, 2 PPC regions positively tracked <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> outcomes: lateral intraparietal sulcus (latIPS) indexed graded item memory strength, whereas angular gyrus (AnG) tracked recollection. By contrast, 2 other PPC regions demonstrated nonmonotonic relationships with <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>: superior parietal lobule (SPL) tracked <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> reaction time, consistent with a graded engagement of top-down attention, whereas temporoparietal junction displayed a complex pattern of below-baseline <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> activity, perhaps reflecting disengagement of bottom-up attention. Analyses of <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> effects in PPC topographic spatial attention maps (IPS0-IPS5; SPL1) revealed that IPS5 and SPL1 exhibited a nonmonotonic relationship with <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> outcomes resembling that in the SPL region, further suggesting that SPL activation during <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> reflects top-down attention. While demands on PPC attention mechanisms vary during <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> attempts, the present <span class="hlt">functional</span> parcellation of PPC indicates that 2 additional mechanisms (mediated by latIPS and AnG) positively track <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> outcomes.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..89b3305O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..89b3305O"><span>Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis consistently extended to multifractality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oświȩcimka, Paweł; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław; Forczek, Marcin; Jadach, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>We propose an algorithm, multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MFCCA), which constitutes a consistent extension of the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis and is able to properly identify and quantify subtle characteristics of multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between two time series. Our motivation for introducing this algorithm is that the already existing methods, like multifractal extension, have at best serious limitations for most of the signals describing complex natural processes and often indicate multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> when there are none. The principal component of the present extension is proper incorporation of the sign of fluctuations to their generalized moments. Furthermore, we present a broad analysis of the model fractal stochastic processes as well as of the real-world signals and show that MFCCA is a robust and selective tool at the same time and therefore allows for a reliable quantification of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlative</span> structure of analyzed processes. In particular, it allows one to identify the boundaries of the multifractal scaling and to analyze a relation between the generalized Hurst exponent and the multifractal scaling parameter λq. This relation provides information about the character of potential multifractality in <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> and thus enables a deeper insight into dynamics of the analyzed processes than allowed by any other related method available so far. By using examples of time series from the stock market, we show that financial fluctuations typically <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> multifractally only for relatively large fluctuations, whereas small fluctuations remain mutually independent even at maximum of such <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. Finally, we indicate possible utility of MFCCA to study effects of the time-lagged <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18643354','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18643354"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis for two nonstationary signals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Wei-Xing</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>We propose a method called multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis to investigate the multifractal behaviors in the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between two time series or higher-dimensional quantities recorded simultaneously, which can be applied to diverse complex systems such as turbulence, finance, ecology, physiology, geophysics, and so on. The method is validated with <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> one- and two-dimensional binomial measures and multifractal random walks. As an example, we illustrate the method by analyzing two financial time series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..442...82X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..442...82X"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis of stock markets using EMD and EEMD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, Mengjia; Shang, Pengjian; Lin, Aijing</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is a data-driven signal analysis method for nonlinear and nonstationary data. Since it is intuitive, direct, posterior and adaptive, EMD is widely applied to various fields of study. In this paper, EMD and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), a modified method of EMD, are applied to financial time series. Through analyzing the intrinsic mode <span class="hlt">functions</span> (IMFs) of EMD and EEMD, we find EEMD method performs better on the orthogonality of IMFs than EMD. With clustering the ordered frequencies of IMFs, the IMFs obtained from EEMD method are grouped into high-, medium-, and low-frequency components, representing the short-, medium-, and long-term volatilities of the index sequences, respectively. With the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of DCCA <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient, our findings allow us to gain further and detailed insight into the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of stock markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21249986','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21249986"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> search for periodic gravitational waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Krishnan, Badri; Whelan, John T.</p> <p>2008-04-15</p> <p>In this paper we study the use of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between multiple gravitational wave (GW) data streams for detecting long-lived periodic signals. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> searches between data from multiple detectors have traditionally been used to search for stochastic GW signals, but recently they have also been used in directed searches for periodic GWs. Here we further adapt the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic for periodic GW searches by taking into account both the nonstationarity and the long-term-phase coherence of the signal. We study the statistical properties and sensitivity of this search and its relation to existing periodic wave searches, and describe the precise way in which the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic interpolates between semicoherent and fully coherent methods. Depending on the maximum duration over which we wish to preserve phase coherence, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic can be tuned to go from a standard <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic using data from distinct detectors, to the semicoherent time-frequency methods with increasing coherent time baselines, and all the way to a full coherent search. This leads to a unified framework for studying periodic wave searches and can be used to make informed trade-offs between computational cost, sensitivity, and robustness against signal uncertainties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890042','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890042"><span>Robust Statistical Detection of Power-Law <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blythe, Duncan A. J.; Nikulin, Vadim V.; Müller, Klaus-Robert</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We show that widely used approaches in statistical physics incorrectly indicate the existence of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between financial stock market fluctuations measured over several years and the neuronal activity of the human brain lasting for only a few minutes. While such <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are nonsensical, no current methodology allows them to be reliably discarded, leaving researchers at greater risk when the spurious nature of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> is not clear from the unrelated origin of the time series and rather requires careful statistical estimation. Here we propose a theory and method (PLCC-test) which allows us to rigorously and robustly test for power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, correctly detecting genuine and discarding spurious <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, thus establishing meaningful relationships between processes in complex physical systems. Our method reveals for the first time the presence of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between amplitudes of the alpha and beta frequency ranges of the human electroencephalogram. PMID:27250630</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..421..218K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..421..218K"><span>On the interplay between short and long term memory in the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> setting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kristoufek, Ladislav</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We focus on emergence of the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> from processes with both short and long term memory properties. In the case of correlated error-terms, the power-law decay of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> comes automatically with the characteristics of separate processes. Bivariate Hurst exponent is then equal to an average of separate Hurst exponents of the analyzed processes. Strength of short term memory has no effect on these asymptotic properties. Implications of these findings for the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> concept are further discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3305840','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3305840"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span>: An fMRI Signal-Processing Strategy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hyde, James S.; Jesmanowicz, Andrzej</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The discovery of <span class="hlt">functional</span> MRI (fMRI), with the first papers appearing in 1992, gave rise to new categories of data that drove the development of new signal-processing strategies. Workers in the field were confronted with image time courses, which could be reshuffled to form pixel time courses. The waveform in an active pixel time-course was determined not only by the task sequence but also by the hemodynamic response <span class="hlt">function</span>. Reference waveforms could be <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> with pixel time courses to form an array of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients. From this array of numbers, colorized images could be created and overlaid on anatomical images. An early paper from the authors’ laboratory is extensively reviewed here (Bandettini et al. 1993. Magn. Reson. Med. 30:161–173). That work was carried out using the vocabulary of vector algebra. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> methodology was central to the discovery of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity MRI (fcMRI) by Biswal et al. (1995. Magn. Reson. Med. 34:537–541). In this method, a whole volume time course of images is collected while the brain is nominally at rest and connectivity is studied by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of pixel time courses. PMID:22051223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015RvGeo..53..411B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015RvGeo..53..411B"><span>Stationary-phase integrals in the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of ambient noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of ambient signal allows seismologists to collect data even in the absence of seismic events. "Seismic interferometry" shows that the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of simultaneous recordings of a random wavefield made at two locations is formally related to the impulse response between those locations. This idea has found many applications in seismology, as a growing number of dense seismic networks become available: <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> long seismic records, the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> between instrument pairs is "reconstructed" and used, just like the seismic recording of an explosion, in tomography, monitoring, etc. These applications have been accompanied by theoretical investigations of the relationship between noise <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> and the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span>; numerous formulations of "ambient noise" theory have emerged, each based on different hypotheses and/or analytical approaches. The purpose of this study is to present most of those approaches together, providing a comprehensive overview of the theory. Understanding the specific hypotheses behind each Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> recipe is critical to its correct application. Hoping to guide nonspecialists who approach ambient noise theory for the first time, we treat the simplest formulation (the stationary-phase approximation applied to smooth unbounded media) in detail. We then move on to more general treatments, illustrating that the "stationary-phase" and "reciprocity theorem" approaches lead to the same formulae when applied to the same scenario. We show that a formal <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>/Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> relationship can be found in complex, bounded media and for nonuniform source distributions. We finally provide the bases for understanding how the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> is reconstructed in the presence of scattering obstacles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JGRC..107.3160Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JGRC..107.3160Z"><span>Continuity preserving modified maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zavialov, Peter O.; Grigorieva, Julia V.; MöLler, Osmar O.; Kostianoy, Andrey G.; Gregoire, Marilaure</p> <p>2002-10-01</p> <p>The maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (MCC) method reconstructs the surface advective velocity fields from the displacements of spatial patterns in pairs of sequential satellite (normally infrared) images. However, the performance of the conventional MCC method is not always satisfactory. One of the main reasons for this is the fact that the method can correctly estimate only the velocity component parallel to the gradient of the property depicted in the images, while any small displacement perpendicular to the gradient (i.e., directed along the isolines) essentially maps the spatial pattern onto itself and therefore can not be detected using the conventional MCC technique. In the present work we propose a modification of the MCC method that allows circumventing this basic deficiency and improving the performance of the MCC technique. In this approach, the "cross-isoline" components of the velocity field are obtained as in the conventional MCC scheme; however, the "along-isoline" components derived from the MCC are disregarded as unreliable. Instead, the "true" along-isoline components are then reconstructed from the given cross-isoline velocity field based on the continuity requirement and on the condition of no normal flow at solid boundaries. This inverse problem is solved by constructing the two-dimensional stream <span class="hlt">function</span> in the curvilinear coordinate frame associated with the image isolines. The method is illustrated using AVHRR images from the southwestern Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea. The results are compared with some direct drifter and current meter measurements and geostrophic estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0716954','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0716954"><span><span class="hlt">Functions</span> of a Man-Machine Interactive Information <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>An effective man-machine interactive <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> system is not achieved by simply placing a terminal on each end of an existing machine <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>...many of these needs was developed and tested. The objective of the development of this system, BROWSER, was to investigate the effectiveness of a free...form query with a combinatorial search algorithm and the effectiveness of various techniques and components to facilitate online browsing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930013022','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930013022"><span>A proposal of fuzzy connective with learning <span class="hlt">function</span> and its application to fuzzy <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hayashi, Isao; Naito, Eiichi; Ozawa, Jun; Wakami, Noboru</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A new fuzzy connective and a structure of network constructed by fuzzy connectives are proposed to overcome a drawback of conventional fuzzy <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> systems. This network represents a <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> query and the fuzzy connectives in networks have a learning <span class="hlt">function</span> to adjust its parameters by data from a database and outputs of a user. The fuzzy <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> systems employing this network are also constructed. Users can <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> results even with a query whose attributes do not exist in a database schema and can get satisfactory results for variety of thinkings by learning <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2233815','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2233815"><span>Autobiographical Memory <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> and Hippocampal Activation as a <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Repetition and the Passage of Time</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nadel, Lynn; Campbell, Jenna; Ryan, Lee</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Multiple trace theory (MTT) predicts that hippocampal memory traces expand and strengthen as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of repeated memory <span class="hlt">retrievals</span>. We tested this hypothesis utilizing fMRI, comparing the effect of memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> versus the mere passage of time on hippocampal activation. While undergoing fMRI scanning, participants <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> remote autobiographical memories that had been previously <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> either one month earlier, two days earlier, or multiple times during the preceding month. Behavioral analyses revealed that the number and consistency of memory details <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> increased with multiple <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> but not with the passage of time. While all three <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> conditions activated a similar set of brain regions normally associated with autobiographical memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> including medial temporal lobe structures, hippocampal activation did not change as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of either multiple <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> or the passage of time. However, activation in other brain regions, including the precuneus, lateral prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, lateral temporal lobe, and perirhinal cortex increased after multiple <span class="hlt">retrievals</span>, but was not influenced by the passage of time. These results have important implications for existing theories of long-term memory consolidation. PMID:18274617</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S43A4511C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S43A4511C"><span>Estimation of the Mean Free Path using <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> in the Seismic Coda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Clerc, V.; Roux, P.; Campillo, M.; Maynard, R.; Chaput, J. A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We present recent results concerning the extraction of Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> from coda waves. Campillo and Paul 2003 used earthquakes codas and found that the causal and anticausal parts of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are asymmetrical for some stations, depending on the earthquake source region. The lapse time in the coda window is a key parameter to understand causal to anticausal amplitude ratio. We show that this ratio result from the competition between the source signature (non-symmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> when the distribution of sources is non-isotropic around the receivers) and the scattering processes which tend to restore the time symmetry of the correlations. The theoretical analysis is derived from wave propagation theory for single scattering and multiple scattering as initiated by Roux 2005. We propose to use the temporal evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> amplitude in coda waves to estimate the value of the mean free path in the propagation medium. The equipartition of the energy is clearly observed in the numerical simulations conducted in a two-dimensional acoustic medium. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the distinct time windows in synthetic coda records at two points are measured for a set of events for which we obtain a good estimate of the medium mean free path. We perform the same analysis on a set of icequakes recorded at Mount Erebus. The correlations averaged over sources and time exhibit a temporal evolution that obeys to convergence patterns similar to those observed in numerical studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007APS..MARP38001T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007APS..MARP38001T"><span>An Ultra-Wideband <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Radiometer for Mesoscopic Experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Toonen, Ryan; Haselby, Cyrus; Qin, Hua; Eriksson, Mark; Blick, Robert</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>We have designed, built and tested a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> radiometer for detecting statistical order in the quantum fluctuations of mesoscopic experiments at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Our system utilizes a fully analog front-end--operating over the X- and Ku-bands (8 to 18 GHz)--for computing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. Digital signal processing techniques are used to provide robustness against instrumentation drifts and offsets. The economized version of our instrument can measure, with sufficient correlation efficiency, noise signals having power levels as low as 10 fW. We show that, if desired, we can improve this performance by including cryogenic preamplifiers which boost the signal-to-noise ratio near the signal source. By adding a few extra components, we can measure both the real and imaginary parts of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>--improving the overall signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of sqrt[2]. We demonstrate the utility of our <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> with noise power measurements from a quantum point contact.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EPJB...79...55O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EPJB...79...55O"><span>Statistical properties of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in the Korean stock market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oh, G.; Eom, C.; Wang, F.; Jung, W.-S.; Stanley, H. E.; Kim, S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the statistical properties of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix between individual stocks traded in the Korean stock market using the random matrix theory (RMT) and observe how these affect the portfolio weights in the Markowitz portfolio theory. We find that the distribution of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix is positively skewed and changes over time. We find that the eigenvalue distribution of original <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix deviates from the eigenvalues predicted by the RMT, and the largest eigenvalue is 52 times larger than the maximum value among the eigenvalues predicted by the RMT. The β_{473} coefficient, which reflect the largest eigenvalue property, is 0.8, while one of the eigenvalues in the RMT is approximately zero. Notably, we show that the entropy <span class="hlt">function</span> E(σ) with the portfolio risk σ for the original and filtered <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrices are consistent with a power-law <span class="hlt">function</span>, E( σ) σ^{-γ}, with the exponent γ 2.92 and those for Asian currency crisis decreases significantly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/993506','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/993506"><span>Magnified Weak Lensing <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ulmer, Melville P., Clowe, Douglas I.</p> <p>2010-11-30</p> <p> nights on 4-m class telescopes, which gives concrete evidence of strong community support for this project. The WLT technique is based on the dependence of the gravitational shear signal on the angular diameter distances between the observer, the lens, and the lensed galaxy to measure cosmological parameters. By taking the ratio of measured shears of galaxies with different redshifts around the same lens, one obtains a measurement of the ratios of the angular diameter distances involved. Making these observations over a large range of lenses and background galaxy redshifts will measure the history of the expansion rate of the universe. Because this is a purely geometric measurement, it is insensitive to any form of evolution of objects or the necessity to understand the physics in the early universe. Thus, WLT was identified by the Dark Energy Task Force as perhaps the best method to measure the evolution of DE. To date, however, the conjecture of the DETF has not been experimentally verified, but will be by the proposed project. The primary reason for the lack of tomography measurements is that one must have an exceptional data-set to attempt the measurement. One needs both extremely good seeing (or space observations) in order to minimize the point spread <span class="hlt">function</span> smearing corrections on weak lensing shear measurements and deep, multi-color data, from B to z, to measure reliable photometric redshifts of the background galaxies being lensed (which are typically too faint to obtain spectroscopic redshifts). Because the entire process from multi-drizzling the HST images, and then creating shear maps, to gathering the necessary ground based observations, to generating photo-zs and then carrying out the tomography is a complicated task, until the creation of our team, nobody has taken the time to connect all the levels of expertise necessary to carry out this project based on HST archival data. Our data are being used in 2 Ph.D. theses. Kellen Murphy, at Ohio University, is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.452.2149E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.452.2149E"><span>Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys using angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> - I. Algorithm and modelling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eriksen, Martin; Gaztañaga, Enrique</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Weak lensing (WL) clustering is studied using 2D (angular) coordinates, while redshift space distortions (RSD) and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) use 3D coordinates, which requires a model-dependent conversion of angles and redshifts into comoving distances. This is the first paper of a series, which explore modelling multi-tracer galaxy clustering (of WL, BAO and RSD), using only angular (2D) <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in thin redshift bins. This involves evaluating many thousands <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, each a multidimensional integral, which is computationally demanding. We present a new algorithm that performs these calculations as matrix operations. Nearby narrow redshift bins are intrinsically correlated, which can be used to recover the full (radial) 3D information. We show that the Limber approximation does not work well for this task. In the exact calculation, both the clustering amplitude and the RSD effect increase when decreasing the redshift bin width. For narrow bins, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> has a larger BAO peak than the auto-correlation because smaller scales are filtered out by the radial redshift separation. Moreover, the BAO peak shows a second (ghost) peak, shifted to smaller angles. We explore how WL, RSD and BAO contribute to the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the redshift bin width and present a first exploration of non-linear effects and signal-to-noise ratio on these quantities. This illustrates that the new approach to clustering analysis provides new insights and is potentially viable in practice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21251499','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21251499"><span>Polarization-assisted WMAP-NVSS <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Liu, G.-C.</p> <p>2008-10-10</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and large scale structure survey is one of the powerful tools for constraining the nature of dark energy through the so-called Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. However, CMB from higher redshift is the dominated noise of this effect. Here, we present the CMB polarization-assisted method to suppress this noise. We apply this method to <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the microwave sky observed by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the radio source catalog compiled by NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) to study the efficiency of the noise suppression. We find that the spurious correlation is reduced about 2-7%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375764','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375764"><span>Weak lensing corrections to tSZ-lensing <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tröster, Tilman; Waerbeke, Ludovic Van E-mail: waerbeke@phas.ubc.ca</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing in wide field has recently been measured. It can be used to probe the distribution of the diffuse gas in large scale structure, as well as inform us about the missing baryons. As for any lensing-based quantity, higher order lensing effects can potentially affect the signal. Here, we extend previous higher order lensing calculations to the case of tSZ-lensing <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span>. We derive terms analogous to corrections due to the Born approximation, lens-lens coupling, and reduced shear up to order ℓ ∼> 3000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/886073','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/886073"><span>Optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> based on supercontinuum generation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Filip, Catalin V.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.</p> <p>2006-03-20</p> <p>A novel <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> that can be used for temporal characterization of femtosecond laser pulses has been developed. The correlation trace is obtained by ''sampling'' the structure of the laser pulse with a single, high-contrast pulse produced through femtosecond white-light generation in a line focus. This correlator has, therefore, fewer ''ghosts'' than a conventional third-order <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> and it can be used with laser pulses that span across a wide wavelength range. Both scanning and single-shot experimental arrangements are described.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvE..73c1915C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvE..73c1915C"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of instantaneous phase increments in pressure-flow fluctuations: Applications to cerebral autoregulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>We investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during the quasisteady state after perturbation for four different physiologic conditions: supine rest, head-up tilt, hyperventilation, and CO2 rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes in the steady state are coupled with instantaneous changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well-pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced, and more variable. We propose an approach based on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the instantaneous phase increments to quantify the coupling between BP and BFV signals. We find that the maximum correlation strength is different for the two groups and for the different conditions. For healthy subjects the amplitude of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV is small and attenuates within 3-5 heartbeats. In contrast, for post-stroke subjects, this amplitude is significantly larger and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> persist up to 20 heartbeats. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> even within a single heartbeat cycle. We compare the results of our approach with three complementary methods: direct BP-BFV <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> analysis, and phase synchronization analysis. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of cerebral vascular control in healthy subjects, suggesting that this control mechanism may involve rapid adjustments (within a heartbeat) of the cerebral vessels, so that BFV remains steady in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CNSNS..40..163K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CNSNS..40..163K"><span>Power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> estimation under heavy tails</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kristoufek, Ladislav</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We examine the performance of six estimators of the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>-the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, the detrending moving-average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, the height <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, the averaged periodogram estimator, the cross-periodogram estimator and the local cross-Whittle estimator-under heavy-tailed distributions. The selection of estimators allows to separate these into the time and frequency domain estimators. By varying the characteristic exponent of the α-stable distributions which controls the tails behavior, we report several interesting findings. First, the frequency domain estimators are practically unaffected by heavy tails bias-wise. Second, the time domain estimators are upward biased for heavy tails but they have lower estimator variance than the other group for short series. Third, specific estimators are more appropriate depending on distributional properties and length of the analyzed series. In addition, we provide a discussion of implications of these results for empirical applications as well as theoretical explanations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..89d3516P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..89d3516P"><span>Cosmology from <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of CMB lensing and galaxy surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pearson, R.; Zahn, O.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>In recent years, <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with other large-scale structure (LSS) tracers has been used as a method to detect CMB lensing. Current experiments are also becoming sensitive enough to measure CMB lensing without the help of auxiliary tracers. As data quality improves rapidly, it has been suggested that the CMB lensing-LSS <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> may provide new insights into parameters describing cosmological structure growth. In this work, we perform forecasts that combine the lensing potential auto power spectrum from various future CMB experiments with the galaxy power spectrum from galaxy surveys, as well as the cross power spectrum between the two, marginalizing over a number of galactic and nongalactic cosmological parameters. We find that the CMB lensing-LSS <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> contains significant information on parameters such as the redshift distribution and bias of LSS tracers. We also find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> information will lead to independent probes of cosmological parameters such as neutrino mass and the reionization optical depth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000223','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000223"><span>Atmospheric pollution measurement by optical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> methods - A concept</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fisher, M. J.; Krause, F. R.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Method combines standard spectroscopy with statistical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis of two narrow light beams for remote sensing to detect foreign matter of given particulate size and consistency. Method is applicable in studies of generation and motion of clouds, nuclear debris, ozone, and radiation belts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352483','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352483"><span>Spatial coherence and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of three-dimensional ambient noise fields in the ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walker, Shane C; Buckingham, Michael J</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Ambient acoustic noise fields in the ocean are generally three dimensional in that they exhibit vertical and horizontal directivity. A model of spatially homogeneous noise is introduced in which the directionality is treated as separable, that is, the overall directionality of the field is the product of the individual directivities in the horizontal and vertical. A uni-modal von Mises circular distribution from directional statistics is taken to represent the noise in the horizontal, whilst the vertical component is consistent with a surface distribution of vertical dipoles. An analysis of the coherence and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of the noise at two horizontally aligned sensors is developed. The coherence <span class="hlt">function</span> involves a single integral over finite limits, whilst the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, derived on the assumption that the noise has been pre-whitened, is given by an integral with limits that depend on the correlation delay time. Although the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> does not exhibit delta <span class="hlt">functions</span> that could be identified with the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> for propagation between the two sensors in the field, it does drop abruptly to zero at numerical time delays equal to the travel time between the sensors. Hence the noise could be used to recover the sound speed in the medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28377210','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28377210"><span>Similar patterns of neural activity predict memory <span class="hlt">function</span> during encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kragel, James E; Ezzyat, Youssef; Sperling, Michael R; Gorniak, Richard; Worrell, Gregory A; Berry, Brent M; Inman, Cory; Lin, Jui-Jui; Davis, Kathryn A; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stein, Joel M; Jobst, Barbara C; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Sheth, Sameer A; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Neural networks that span the medial temporal lobe (MTL), prefrontal cortex, and posterior cortical regions are essential to episodic memory <span class="hlt">function</span> in humans. Encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> are supported by the engagement of both distinct neural pathways across the cortex and common structures within the medial temporal lobes. However, the degree to which memory performance can be determined by neural processing that is common to encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> remains to be determined. To identify neural signatures of successful memory <span class="hlt">function</span>, we administered a delayed free-recall task to 187 neurosurgical patients implanted with subdural or intraparenchymal depth electrodes. We developed multivariate classifiers to identify patterns of spectral power across the brain that independently predicted successful episodic encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. During encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, patterns of increased high frequency activity in prefrontal, MTL, and inferior parietal cortices, accompanied by widespread decreases in low frequency power across the brain predicted successful memory <span class="hlt">function</span>. Using a cross-decoding approach, we demonstrate the ability to predict memory <span class="hlt">function</span> across distinct phases of the free-recall task. Furthermore, we demonstrate that classifiers that combine information from both encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> states can outperform task-independent models. These findings suggest that the engagement of a core memory network during either encoding or <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> shapes the ability to remember the past, despite distinct neural interactions that facilitate encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10117314','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10117314"><span><span class="hlt">Functions</span> and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and packaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Feigenbutz, L.V.</p> <p>1994-12-16</p> <p>Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall <span class="hlt">functions</span> and requirements for sludge <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27368774','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27368774"><span>A novel coefficient for detecting and quantifying asymmetry of California electricity market based on asymmetric detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Fang</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>In order to detect and quantify asymmetry of two time series, a novel <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient is proposed based on recent asymmetric detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (A-DXA), which we called A-DXA coefficient. The A-DXA coefficient, as an important extension of DXA coefficient ρDXA, contains two directional asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> indexes, describing upwards and downwards asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, respectively. By using the information of directional covariance <span class="hlt">function</span> of two time series and directional variance <span class="hlt">function</span> of each series itself instead of power-law between the covariance <span class="hlt">function</span> and time scale, the proposed A-DXA coefficient can well detect asymmetry between the two series no matter whether the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is significant or not. By means of the proposed A-DXA coefficient conducted over the asymmetry for California electricity market, we found that the asymmetry between the prices and loads is not significant for daily average data in 1999 yr market (before electricity crisis) but extremely significant for those in 2000 yr market (during the crisis). To further uncover the difference of asymmetry between the years 1999 and 2000, a modified H statistic (MH) and ΔMH statistic are proposed. One of the present contributions is that the high MH values calculated for hourly data exist in majority months in 2000 market. Another important conclusion is that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with downwards dominates over the whole 1999 yr in contrast to the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with upwards dominates over the 2000 yr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Chaos..26f3109W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Chaos..26f3109W"><span>A novel coefficient for detecting and quantifying asymmetry of California electricity market based on asymmetric detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Fang</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>In order to detect and quantify asymmetry of two time series, a novel <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient is proposed based on recent asymmetric detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (A-DXA), which we called A-DXA coefficient. The A-DXA coefficient, as an important extension of DXA coefficient ρ D X A , contains two directional asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> indexes, describing upwards and downwards asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, respectively. By using the information of directional covariance <span class="hlt">function</span> of two time series and directional variance <span class="hlt">function</span> of each series itself instead of power-law between the covariance <span class="hlt">function</span> and time scale, the proposed A-DXA coefficient can well detect asymmetry between the two series no matter whether the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is significant or not. By means of the proposed A-DXA coefficient conducted over the asymmetry for California electricity market, we found that the asymmetry between the prices and loads is not significant for daily average data in 1999 yr market (before electricity crisis) but extremely significant for those in 2000 yr market (during the crisis). To further uncover the difference of asymmetry between the years 1999 and 2000, a modified H statistic (MH) and ΔMH statistic are proposed. One of the present contributions is that the high MH values calculated for hourly data exist in majority months in 2000 market. Another important conclusion is that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with downwards dominates over the whole 1999 yr in contrast to the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with upwards dominates over the 2000 yr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41A2372M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41A2372M"><span>On the linearity of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> delay times</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mercerat, E. D.; Nolet, G.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We investigate the question whether a P-wave delay time Δ T estimated by locating the maximum of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between data d(t) and a predicted test <span class="hlt">function</span> s(t): γ (t) = ∫ t1t_2 s(τ ) d(τ -t) \\ {d}τ, provides an estimate of the Delta T that is (quasi-)linear with the relative velocity perturbation deltaln V_P}. Such linearity is intuitive if the data d(t) is an undeformed but delayed replica of the test signal, i.e. if d(t)=s(t-Delta T). Then the maximum of gamma (t) is shifted exactly by the delay Delta T, and linearity holds even for Delta T very large. In this case, we say that the body waves are in the ray theoretical regime and their delays, because of Fermat's Principle, depend quasi-linearly on the relative velocity (or slowness) perturbations deltaln V_P in the model. However, even if we correct for dispersion induced by the instrument response and by attenuation, body waves may show frequency dependent delay times that are caused by diffraction effects around lateral heterogeneities. It is not a-priori clear that linearity holds for Delta T, as is assumed in finite-frequency theory, if the waveforms of d(t) and s(t) differ substantially because of such dispersion. To test the linearity, we generate synthetic seismograms between two boreholes, and between the boreholes and the surface, in a 3D box of 200 × 120 × 120 m. The heterogeneity is a checkerboard with cubic anomalies of size 12 × 12 × 12 m. We test two different anomaly amplitudes: ± 2% and ± 5%, and measure Delta T using a test seismogram s(t) computed for an homogeneous medium. We also predict the delays for the 5% model from those in the 2% model by multiplying with 5/2. These predictions are in error by 10-20% of the delay, which is usually acceptable for tomography when compared with actual data errors. A slight bias in the prediction indicates that the Wielandt effect - the fact that negative delays suffer less wavefront healing than positive delays - is a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4146561','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4146561"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Asymmetries and Causal Relationships between Stock and Market Risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Borysov, Stanislav S.; Balatsky, Alexander V.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We study historical correlations and lead-lag relationships between individual stock risk (volatility of daily stock returns) and market risk (volatility of daily returns of a market-representative portfolio) in the US stock market. We consider the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> averaged over all stocks, using 71 stock prices from the Standard & Poor's 500 index for 1994–2013. We focus on the behavior of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> at the times of financial crises with significant jumps of market volatility. The observed historical dynamics showed that the dependence between the risks was almost linear during the US stock market downturn of 2002 and after the US housing bubble in 2007, remaining at that level until 2013. Moreover, the averaged <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> often had an asymmetric shape with respect to zero lag in the periods of high correlation. We develop the analysis by the application of the linear response formalism to study underlying causal relations. The calculated response <span class="hlt">functions</span> suggest the presence of characteristic regimes near financial crashes, when the volatility of an individual stock follows the market volatility and vice versa. PMID:25162697</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162697','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162697"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> asymmetries and causal relationships between stock and market risk.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Borysov, Stanislav S; Balatsky, Alexander V</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We study historical correlations and lead-lag relationships between individual stock risk (volatility of daily stock returns) and market risk (volatility of daily returns of a market-representative portfolio) in the US stock market. We consider the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> averaged over all stocks, using 71 stock prices from the Standard & Poor's 500 index for 1994-2013. We focus on the behavior of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> at the times of financial crises with significant jumps of market volatility. The observed historical dynamics showed that the dependence between the risks was almost linear during the US stock market downturn of 2002 and after the US housing bubble in 2007, remaining at that level until 2013. Moreover, the averaged <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> often had an asymmetric shape with respect to zero lag in the periods of high correlation. We develop the analysis by the application of the linear response formalism to study underlying causal relations. The calculated response <span class="hlt">functions</span> suggest the presence of characteristic regimes near financial crashes, when the volatility of an individual stock follows the market volatility and vice versa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22742608A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22742608A"><span>Intensity Mapping During Reionization: 21 cm and <span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aguirre, James E.; HERA Collaboration</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The first generation of 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments are now reaching the sensitivities necessary for a detection of the power spectrum of plausible reionization models, and with the advent of next-generation capabilities (e.g. the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometer Array Phase I Low) will move beyond the power spectrum to imaging of the EoR intergalactic medium. Such datasets provide context to galaxy evolution studies for the earliest galaxies on scales of tens of Mpc, but at present wide, deep galaxy surveys are lacking, and attaining the depth to survey the bulk of galaxies responsible for reionization will be challenging even for JWST. Thus we seek useful <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with other more direct tracers of the galaxy population. I review near-term prospects for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> studies with 21 cm and CO and CII emission, as well as future far-infrared misions suchas CALISTO.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22373474','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22373474"><span>The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> with Planck maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Joanna; Næss, Sigurd; Addison, Graeme E.; Hincks, Adam D.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hlozek, Renée; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dünner, Rolando; Infante, Leopoldo; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; and others</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We present the temperature power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background obtained by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> maps from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and 218 GHz with maps from the Planck satellite at 143 and 217 GHz, in two overlapping regions covering 592 square degrees. We find excellent agreement between the two datasets at both frequencies, quantified using the variance of the residuals between the ACT power spectra and the ACT × Planck cross-spectra. We use these <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> to measure the calibration of the ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz relative to Planck, to 0.7% and 2% precision respectively. We find no evidence for anisotropy in the calibration parameter. We compare the Planck 353 GHz power spectrum with the measured amplitudes of dust and cosmic infrared background (CIB) of ACT data at 148 and 218 GHz. We also compare planet and point source measurements from the two experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APR.Y5003O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APR.Y5003O"><span>CMB lensing from SPT+Planck and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Omori, Yuuki; SPT Collaboration; DES Collaboration</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The South Pole Telescope (SPT) SZ survey has observed 2500 square degrees of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to high accuracy down to 1 arcminute resolution at 150GHz. The Planck satellite has also observed the same patch of the CMB sky at 143GHz, but the two experiments were designed to measure temperature anisotropies optimally at different angular scales. By combining data from these two experiments, we are able to produce a temperature map that has an improved signal-to-noise ratio at all scales. This combined temperature map is used to produce a CMB weak lensing map, which we use for cosmological parameter and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analyses. In particular, the SPT footprint has significant overlap with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) observing region, which allows us to <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> the CMB lensing map with galaxy density and galaxy shear measurements obtained by DES. In this talk, I will present the SPT+Planck combining procedure, the CMB lensing reconstruction pipeline, tests performed to verify the lensing map, and finally the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JMagR.155...29M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JMagR.155...29M"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Effects Involving Curie Spin Relaxation in Methyl Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Madhu, P. K.; Mandal, Pravat K.; Müller, Norbert</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> effects arising in methyl protons due to the simultaneous presence of dipole-dipole, chemical shift anisotropy, and Curie spin relaxation mechanisms in paramagnetic systems are analyzed. We assess the potential of obtaining structural constraints from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of Curie spin relaxation with dipolar relaxation mechanisms among methyl proton spins. By theoretical analysis and numerical simulations we characterize the transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> describing the interconversion processes of different ranks of multispin order. The time dependence of these processes contains a new type of structural information, the orientation of the methyl C3-axis with respect to the electron center. Experimental confirmation is found for selected methyl groups in low spin Fe3+ sperm whale myoglobin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5139993','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5139993"><span>Structure beyond pair correlations: X-ray <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> from colloidal crystals1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lehmkühler, Felix; Fischer, Birgit; Müller, Leonard; Ruta, Beatrice; Grübel, Gerhard</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The results of an X-ray <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (XCCA) study on hard-sphere colloidal crystals and glasses are presented. The article shows that <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be used to extract structural information beyond the static structure factor in such systems. In particular, the powder average can be overcome by accessing the crystals’ unit-cell structure. In this case, the results suggest that the crystal is of face-centered cubic type. It is demonstrated that XCCA is a valuable tool for X-ray crystallography, in particular for studies on colloidal systems. These are typically characterized by a rather poor crystalline quality due to size polydispersity and limitations in experimental resolution because of the small q values probed. Furthermore, nontrivial correlations are observed that allow a more detailed insight into crystal structures beyond conventional crystallography, especially to extend knowledge in structure formation processes and phase transitions. PMID:27980511</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249296','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249296"><span>Three dimensional winds: A maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> application to elastic lidar data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Buttler, William Tillman</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>Maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996PhDT........51B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996PhDT........51B"><span>Three-Dimensional Winds: a Maximum <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Application to Elastic LIDAR Data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Buttler, William Tillman</p> <p></p> <p>Maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of range and altitude from incoherent elastic back-scatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain -following winds in the Rio Grande valley.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10008E..02L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10008E..02L"><span>Improved MODIS aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in urban areas using a land classification approach and empirical orthogonal <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levitan, Nathaniel; Gross, Barry</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>New, high-resolution aerosol products are required in urban areas to improve the spatial coverage of the products, in terms of both resolution and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> frequency. These new products will improve our understanding of the spatial variability of aerosols in urban areas and will be useful in the detection of localized aerosol emissions. Urban aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> is challenging for existing algorithms because of the high spatial variability of the surface reflectance, indicating the need for improved urban surface reflectance models. This problem can be stated in the language of novelty detection as the problem of selecting aerosol parameters whose effective surface reflectance spectrum is not an outlier in some space. In this paper, empirical orthogonal <span class="hlt">functions</span>, a reconstruction-based novelty detection technique, is used to perform single-pixel aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> using the single angular and temporal sample provided by the MODIS sensor. The empirical orthogonal basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> are trained for different land classes using the MODIS BRDF MCD43 product. Existing land classification products are used in training and aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. The <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> is compared against the existing operational MODIS 3 KM Dark Target (DT) aerosol product and co-located AERONET data. Based on the comparison, our method allows for a significant increase in <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> frequency and a moderate decrease in the known biases of MODIS urban aerosol <span class="hlt">retrievals</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/65029','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/65029"><span><span class="hlt">Functional</span> design criteria, Project W-211, Initial Tank <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Systems. Revision 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rieck, C.A.</p> <p>1995-02-07</p> <p>This document provides the technical baseline for <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of waste from ten double-shell tanks in the SY, AN, AP, AW, AY, and AZ tank farms. In order to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> waste from these tanks, systems are needed to mix the sludge with the supernate and pump the waste mixture from the tank. For 101-SY, the existing mitigation pump will be used to mix the waste and Project W-211 will provide for waste removal. The <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> scope for the other nine tanks includes both the waste mixing and removal <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..84a6106J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..84a6106J"><span>Multifractal detrending moving-average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>There are a number of situations in which several signals are simultaneously recorded in complex systems, which exhibit long-term power-law <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span>. The multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MFDCCA) approaches can be used to quantify such <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span>, such as the MFDCCA based on the detrended fluctuation analysis (MFXDFA) method. We develop in this work a class of MFDCCA algorithms based on the detrending moving-average analysis, called MFXDMA. The performances of the proposed MFXDMA algorithms are compared with the MFXDFA method by extensive numerical experiments on pairs of time series generated from bivariate fractional Brownian motions, two-component autoregressive fractionally integrated moving-average processes, and binomial measures, which have theoretical expressions of the multifractal nature. In all cases, the scaling exponents hxy extracted from the MFXDMA and MFXDFA algorithms are very close to the theoretical values. For bivariate fractional Brownian motions, the scaling exponent of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> is independent of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient between two time series, and the MFXDFA and centered MFXDMA algorithms have comparative performances, which outperform the forward and backward MFXDMA algorithms. For two-component autoregressive fractionally integrated moving-average processes, we also find that the MFXDFA and centered MFXDMA algorithms have comparative performances, while the forward and backward MFXDMA algorithms perform slightly worse. For binomial measures, the forward MFXDMA algorithm exhibits the best performance, the centered MFXDMA algorithms performs worst, and the backward MFXDMA algorithm outperforms the MFXDFA algorithm when the moment order q<0 and underperforms when q>0. We apply these algorithms to the return time series of two stock market indexes and to their volatilities. For the returns, the centered MFXDMA algorithm gives the best estimates of hxy(q) since its hxy(2) is closest to 0</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445..437M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445..437M"><span>A method for the estimation of the significance of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in unevenly sampled red-noise time series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Max-Moerbeck, W.; Richards, J. L.; Hovatta, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>We present a practical implementation of a Monte Carlo method to estimate the significance of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in unevenly sampled time series of data, whose statistical properties are modelled with a simple power-law power spectral density. This implementation builds on published methods; we introduce a number of improvements in the normalization of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> estimate and a bootstrap method for estimating the significance of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. A closely related matter is the estimation of a model for the light curves, which is critical for the significance estimates. We present a graphical and quantitative demonstration that uses simulations to show how common it is to get high <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> for unrelated light curves with steep power spectral densities. This demonstration highlights the dangers of interpreting them as signs of a physical connection. We show that by using interpolation and the Hanning sampling window <span class="hlt">function</span> we are able to reduce the effects of red-noise leakage and to recover steep simple power-law power spectral densities. We also introduce the use of a Neyman construction for the estimation of the errors in the power-law index of the power spectral density. This method provides a consistent way to estimate the significance of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in unevenly sampled time series of data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4326781','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4326781"><span>Near-Field Fluorescence <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Spectroscopy on Planar Membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The organization and dynamics of plasma membrane components at the nanometer scale are essential for biological <span class="hlt">functions</span> such as transmembrane signaling and endocytosis. Planarized nanoscale apertures in a metallic film are demonstrated as a means of confining the excitation light for multicolor fluorescence spectroscopy to a 55 ± 10 nm beam waist. This technique provides simultaneous two-color, subdiffraction-limited fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy on planar membranes. The fabrication and implementation of this technique are demonstrated for both model membranes and live cells. Membrane-bound proteins were observed to cluster upon the addition of a multivalent cross-linker: On supported lipid bilayers, clusters of cholera toxin subunit B were formed upon cross-linking by an antibody specific for this protein; on living cells, immunoglobulin E bound to its receptor (FcεRI) on the plasma membranes of RBL mast cells was observed to form clusters upon exposure to a trivalent antigen. The formation of membrane clusters was quantified via fluorescence intensity vs time and changes in the temporal auto- and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> above a single nanoscale aperture. The illumination profile from a single aperture is analyzed experimentally and computationally with a rim-dominated illumination profile, yielding no change in the autocorrelation dwell time with changes in aperture diameter from 60 to 250 nm. This near-field fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methodology provides access to nanoscale details of dynamic membrane interactions and motivates further development of near-field optical methods. PMID:25004429</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.4353L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.4353L"><span>Modelling Lyman α forest <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with LyMAS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lochhaas, Cassandra; Weinberg, David H.; Peirani, Sébastien; Dubois, Yohan; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We use the Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS) to predict <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> at z = 2.5 between dark matter haloes and transmitted flux in the Lyα forest, and compare to <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> measured for quasars and damped Lyα systems (DLAs) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) by Font-Ribera et al. We calibrate LyMAS using Horizon-AGN hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of a (100 h- 1 Mpc)3 comoving volume. We apply this calibration to a (1 h- 1 Gpc)3 simulation realized with 20483 dark matter particles. In the 100 h- 1 Mpc box, LyMAS reproduces the halo-flux correlations computed from the full hydrodynamic gas distribution very well. In the 1 h- 1 Gpc box, the amplitude of the large-scale <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> tracks the halo bias bh as expected. We provide empirical fitting <span class="hlt">functions</span> that describe our numerical results. In the transverse separation bins used for the BOSS analyses, LyMAS <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> predictions follow linear theory accurately down to small scales. Fitting the BOSS measurements requires inclusion of random velocity errors; we find best-fitting rms velocity errors of 399 and 252 {km} {s}^{-1} for quasars and DLAs, respectively. We infer bias-weighted mean halo masses of M_h/10^{12} h^{-1} M_{⊙}=2.19^{+0.16}_{-0.15} and 0.69^{+0.16}_{-0.14} for the host haloes of quasars and DLAs, with ˜0.2 dex systematic uncertainty associated with redshift evolution, intergalactic medium parameters, and selection of data fitting range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.464.2120S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.464.2120S"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlating</span> Planck CMB lensing with SDSS: lensing-lensing and galaxy-lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brownstein, Joel R.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We present results from <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing maps with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy lensing shape catalogue and BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) galaxy catalogues. For galaxy position versus CMB lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, we measure the convergence signal around the galaxies in configuration space, using the BOSS LOWZ (z ˜ 0.30) and CMASS (z ˜ 0.57) samples. With fixed Planck 2015 cosmology, doing a joint fit with the galaxy clustering measurement, for the LOWZ (CMASS) sample we find a galaxy bias bg = 1.75 ± 0.04 (1.95 ± 0.02) and galaxy-matter <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient rcc = 1.0 ± 0.2 (0.8 ± 0.1) using 20 < rp < 70 h-1 Mpc, consistent with results from galaxy-galaxy lensing. Using the same scales and including the galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements, we constrain Ωm = 0.284 ± 0.024 and relative calibration bias between the CMB lensing and galaxy lensing to be b_γ =0.82^{+0.15}_{-0.14}. The combination of galaxy lensing and CMB lensing also allows us to measure the cosmological distance ratios (with zl ˜ 0.3, zs ˜ 0.5) R=D_s D_{l,*}/D_{* D_{l,s}}=2.68± 0.29, consistent with predictions from the Planck 2015 cosmology (R=2.35). We detect the galaxy position-CMB convergence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> at small scales, rp < 1 h-1 Mpc, and find consistency with lensing by NFW haloes of mass Mh ˜ 1013 h-1 M⊙. Finally, we measure the CMB lensing-galaxy shear <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, finding an amplitude of A = 0.76 ± 0.23 (zeff = 0.35, θ < 2°) with respect to Planck 2015 Λ cold dark matter predictions (1σ level consistency). We do not find evidence for relative systematics between the CMB and SDSS galaxy lensing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65f6126P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65f6126P"><span>Random matrix approach to <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in financial data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plerou, Vasiliki; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Rosenow, Bernd; Amaral, Luís A.; Guhr, Thomas; Stanley, H. Eugene</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>We analyze <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between price fluctuations of different stocks using methods of random matrix theory (RMT). Using two large databases, we calculate <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrices <ss>C</ss> of returns constructed from (i) 30-min returns of 1000 US stocks for the 2-yr period 1994-1995, (ii) 30-min returns of 881 US stocks for the 2-yr period 1996-1997, and (iii) 1-day returns of 422 US stocks for the 35-yr period 1962-1996. We test the statistics of the eigenvalues λi of <ss>C</ss> against a ``null hypothesis'' - a random correlation matrix constructed from mutually uncorrelated time series. We find that a majority of the eigenvalues of <ss>C</ss> fall within the RMT bounds [λ-,λ+] for the eigenvalues of random correlation matrices. We test the eigenvalues of <ss>C</ss> within the RMT bound for universal properties of random matrices and find good agreement with the results for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices-implying a large degree of randomness in the measured <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients. Further, we find that the distribution of eigenvector components for the eigenvectors corresponding to the eigenvalues outside the RMT bound display systematic deviations from the RMT prediction. In addition, we find that these ``deviating eigenvectors'' are stable in time. We analyze the components of the deviating eigenvectors and find that the largest eigenvalue corresponds to an influence common to all stocks. Our analysis of the remaining deviating eigenvectors shows distinct groups, whose identities correspond to conventionally identified business sectors. Finally, we discuss applications to the construction of portfolios of stocks that have a stable ratio of risk to return.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468..839X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468..839X"><span>The application of the multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis methods in radar target detection within sea clutter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xi, Caiping; Zhang, Shuning; Xiong, Gang; Zhao, Huichang; Yang, Yonghong</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Many complex systems generate multifractal time series which are long-range <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span>. This paper introduces three multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis methods, such as multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis based on the partition <span class="hlt">function</span> approach (MFXPF), multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MFDCCA) methods based on detrended fluctuation analysis (MFXDFA) and detrended moving average analysis (MFXDMA), which only consider one moment order. We do comparative analysis of the artificial time series (binomial multiplicative cascades and Cantor sets with different probabilities) by these methods. Then we do a feasibility test of the fixed threshold target detection within sea clutter by applying the multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis methods to the IPIX radar sea clutter data. The results show that it is feasible to use the method of the fixed threshold based on the multifractal feature parameter Δf(α) by the MFXPF and MFXDFA-1 methods. At last, we give the main conclusions and provide a valuable reference on how to choose the multifractal algorithms, the detection parameters and the target detection methods within sea clutter in practice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EL....11248001R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EL....11248001R"><span>Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between returns, volatility, trading activity, and volume traded for the stock market companies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rak, Rafał; Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We consider a few quantities that characterize trading on a stock market in a fixed time interval: logarithmic returns, volatility, trading activity (i.e., the number of transactions), and volume traded. We search for the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> among these quantities aggregated over different time units from 1 min to 10 min. Our study is based on empirical data from the American stock market consisting of tick-by-tick recordings of 31 stocks listed in Dow Jones Industrial Average during the years 2008-2011. Since all the considered quantities except the returns show strong daily patterns related to the variable trading activity in different parts of a day, which are the most evident in the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">function</span>, we remove these patterns by detrending before we proceed further with our study. We apply the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis with sign preserving (MFCCA) and show that the strongest power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> exist between trading activity and volume traded, while the weakest ones exist (or even do not exist) between the returns and the remaining quantities. We also show that the strongest <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are carried by those parts of the signals that are characterized by large and medium variance. Our observation that the most convincing power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> occur between trading activity and volume traded reveals the existence of strong fractal-like coupling between these quantities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525047','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525047"><span>Axion inflation with <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> axion isocurvature perturbations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kadota, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Otsuka, Hajime E-mail: kobayashi@particle.sci.hokudai.ac.jp</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We study the inflation scenarios, in the framework of superstring theory, where the inflaton is an axion producing the adiabatic curvature perturbations while there exists another light axion producing the isocurvature perturbations. We discuss how the non-trivial couplings among string axions can generically arise, and calculate the consequent <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes through concrete examples. Based on the Planck analysis on the generally correlated isocurvature perturbations, we show that there is a preference for the existence of the correlated isocurvature modes for the axion monodromy inflation while the natural inflation disfavors such isocurvature modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6006812','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6006812"><span>Acoustic <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> flowmeter for solid-gas flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.</p> <p>1984-05-14</p> <p>Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> said first and second output signals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1045175','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1045175"><span>Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Miller, Timothy; Daranciang, Dan; Lindenberg, Aaron; Corbett, Jeff; Fisher, Alan; Goodfellow, John; Huang, Xiaobiao; Mok, Walter; Safranek, James; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC</p> <p>2012-07-06</p> <p>By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22458430','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22458430"><span>Axion inflation with <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> axion isocurvature perturbations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kadota, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Otsuka, Hajime</p> <p>2016-01-25</p> <p>We study the inflation scenarios, in the framework of superstring theory, where the inflaton is an axion producing the adiabatic curvature perturbations while there exists another light axion producing the isocurvature perturbations. We discuss how the non-trivial couplings among string axions can generically arise, and calculate the consequent <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes through concrete examples. Based on the Planck analysis on the generally correlated isocurvature perturbations, we show that there is a preference for the existence of the correlated isocurvature modes for the axion monodromy inflation while the natural inflation disfavors such isocurvature modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JSMTE..03..037A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JSMTE..03..037A"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of long-range correlated series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arianos, Sergio; Carbone, Anna</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>A method for estimating the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> Cxy(τ) of long-range correlated series x(t) and y(t), at varying lags τ and scales n, is proposed. For fractional Brownian motions with Hurst exponents H1 and H2, the asymptotic expression for Cxy(τ) depends only on the lag τ (wide-sense stationarity) and scales as a power of n with exponent H1+H2 for \\tau \\rightarrow 0 . The method is illustrated on: (i) financial series, to show the leverage effect; (ii) genomic sequences, to estimate the correlations between structural parameters along the chromosomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865911','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865911"><span>Acoustic <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> flowmeter for solid-gas flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> said first and second output signals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19257417','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19257417"><span>Deterministic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of complex Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> using hard X rays.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vine, D J; Paganin, D M; Pavlov, K M; Uesugi, K; Takeuchi, A; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, N; Kämpfe, T; Kley, E-B; Förster, E</p> <p>2009-01-30</p> <p>A massively parallel deterministic method is described for reconstructing shift-invariant complex Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span>. As a first experimental implementation, we use a single phase contrast x-ray image to reconstruct the complex Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> associated with Bragg reflection from a thick perfect crystal. The reconstruction is in excellent agreement with a classic prediction of dynamical diffraction theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JAtS...59..335I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JAtS...59..335I"><span>Aerosol <span class="hlt">Retrievals</span> from Individual AVHRR Channels. Part II: Quality Control, Probability Distribution <span class="hlt">Functions</span>, Information Content, and Consistency Checks of <span class="hlt">Retrievals</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ignatov, Alexander; Stowe, Larry</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>This second part of a two-part study evaluates <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> of aerosol optical depths, 1 and 2, in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 1 and 2 centered at 1 = 0.63 and 2 = 0.83 m, and an effective Ångström exponent, , derived therefrom as = ln(1/2)/ln(1/2). The <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> are made with the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model from four NOAA-14 AVHRR datasets, collected between February 1998 and May 1999 in the latitudinal belt of 5°-25°S. A series of quality control (QC) checks applied to the <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> to identify outliers are described. These remove a total of 1% of points, which presumably originate from channel misregistration, residual cloud in AVHRR cloud-screened pixels, and substantial deviations from the assumptions used in the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> model (e.g., bright coastal and high altitude inland waters). First, from examining histograms of the derived parameters it is found that and are accurately fit by lognormal and normal probability distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span> (PDFs), respectively. Second, the scattergrams 1 versus 2 are analyzed to see if they form a coherent pattern. They do indeed converge at the origin, as expected, but frequently are outside of the expected domain in <IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/tauI.gif">1-<IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/tauI.gif">2 space, defined by two straight lines corresponding to <IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/alphaI.gif"> = 0 and <IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/alphaI.gif"> = 2. This results in a low bias in <IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/alphaI.gif">, which tends to fill in an interval of <IMG border="0" src="/charent/GREEK/UNACCENTED/LOWERCASE/alphaI.gif"> <IMG border="0" src="/charent/ISO_CHARACTERS_MIXED/LOWERCASE/isin.gif"> [<IMG border="0" src="/charent/ISO_CHARACTERS_MIXED/LOWERCASE/minus.gif">1, 1] rather than <IMG</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15447548','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15447548"><span>Random matrix theory analysis of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in financial markets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Utsugi, Akihiko; Ino, Kazusumi; Oshikawa, Masaki</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>We confirm universal behaviors such as eigenvalue distribution and spacings predicted by random matrix theory (RMT) for the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> matrix of the daily stock prices of Tokyo Stock Exchange from 1993 to 2001, which have been reported for New York Stock Exchange in previous studies. It is shown that the random part of the eigenvalue distribution of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> matrix is stable even when deterministic correlations are present. Some deviations in the small eigenvalue statistics outside the bounds of the universality class of RMT are not completely explained with the deterministic correlations as proposed in previous studies. We study the effect of randomness on deterministic correlations and find that randomness causes a repulsion between deterministic eigenvalues and the random eigenvalues. This is interpreted as a reminiscent of "level repulsion" in RMT and explains some deviations from the previous studies observed in the market data. We also study correlated groups of issues in these markets and propose a refined method to identify correlated groups based on RMT. Some characteristic differences between properties of Tokyo Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange are found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1366709','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1366709"><span>Cross Talk Free Fluorescence <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Spectroscopy in Live Cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Thews, Elmar; Gerken, Margarita; Eckert, Reiner; Zäpfel, Johannes; Tietz, Carsten; Wrachtrup, Jörg</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is now a widely used technique to measure small ensembles of labeled biomolecules with single molecule detection sensitivity (e.g., low endogenous concentrations). Fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> spectroscopy (FCCS) is a derivative of this technique that detects the synchronous movement of two biomolecules with different fluorescence labels. Both methods can be applied to live cells and, therefore, can be used to address a variety of unsolved questions in cell biology. Applications of FCCS with autofluorescent proteins (AFPs) have been hampered so far by cross talk between the detector channels due to the large spectral overlap of the fluorophores. Here we present a new method that combines advantages of these techniques to analyze binding behavior of proteins in live cells. To achieve this, we have used dual color excitation of a common pair of AFPs, ECFP and EYFP, being discriminated in excitation rather than in emission. This is made possible by pulsed excitation and detection on a shorter timescale compared to the average residence time of particles in the FCS volume element. By this technique we were able to eliminate cross talk in the detector channels and obtain an undisturbed <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> signal. The setup was tested with ECFP/EYFP lysates as well as chimeras as negative and positive controls and demonstrated to work in live HeLa cells coexpressing the two fusion proteins ECFP-connexin and EYFP-connexin. PMID:15951373</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..453..278R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..453..278R"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between Baltic Dry Index and crude oil prices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruan, Qingsong; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xinsheng; Qin, Jing</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>This paper examines the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties of Baltic Dry Index (BDI) and crude oil prices using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistics test and multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA). The empirical results show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between BDI and crude oil prices are significantly multifractal. By introducing the concept of a "crossover", we find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are strongly persistent in the short term and weakly anti-persistent in the long term. Moreover, <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of all kinds of fluctuations are persistent in the short time while <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of small fluctuations are persistent and those of large fluctuations are anti-persistent in the long term. We have also verified that the multifractality of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of BDI and crude oil prices is both attributable to the persistence of fluctuations of time series and fat-tailed distributions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22280725','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22280725"><span>A passive inverse filter for Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gallot, Thomas; Catheline, Stefan; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Passive methods for the recovery of Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> from ambient noise require strong hypotheses, including isotropic distribution of the noise sources. Very often, this distribution is nonisotropic, which introduces bias in the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> reconstruction. To minimize this bias, a spatiotemporal inverse filter is proposed. The method is tested on a directive noise field computed from an experimental active seismic data set. The results indicate that the passive inverse filter allows the manipulation of the spatiotemporal degrees of freedom of a complex wave field, and it can efficiently compensate for the noise wavefield directivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28040020','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28040020"><span>Effect of dispersion on the convergence rate for Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoritomo, John Y; Weaver, Richard L</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Much information about wave propagation in a variety of structures has been obtained from Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> by noise correlation. Here it is examined how dispersion affects Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and, in particular, its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On recalling how the inherent spread of a signal due to band limitation is augmented by spread due to dispersion and propagation distance, and how both affect amplitude, it is argued that SNR in highly dispersive media can be substantially lowered by strong dispersion. It is argued that this is most relevant for gravity waves over large propagation distances in the ocean or atmosphere. In particular, it is discussed that dispersion could explain recent <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> failure from surface gravity wave noise in the ocean. Methods are considered to ameliorate the poor SNR due to dispersion. Numerical simulation is used to substantiate the analytic results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25680583','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25680583"><span><span class="hlt">Functional</span> interactions between dentate gyrus, striatum and anterior thalamic nuclei on spatial memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Méndez-Couz, M; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Arias, J L</p> <p>2015-04-24</p> <p>The standard model of memory system consolidation supports the temporal reorganization of brain circuits underlying long-term memory storage, including interactions between the dorsal hippocampus and extra-hippocampal structures. In addition, several brain regions have been suggested to be involved in the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of spatial memory. In particular, several authors reported a possible role of the ventral portion of the hippocampus together with the thalamus or the striatum in the persistence of this type of memory. Accordingly, the present study aimed to evaluate the contribution of different cortical and subcortical brain regions, and neural networks involved in spatial memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. For this purpose, we used cytochrome c oxidase quantitative histochemistry as a reliable method to measure brain oxidative metabolism. Animals were trained in a hidden platform task and tested for memory retention immediately after the last training session; one week after completing the task, they were also tested in a memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> probe. Results showed that <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of the previously learned task was associated with increased levels of oxidative metabolism in the prefrontal cortex, the dorsal and ventral striatum, the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus and the dentate gyrus of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. The analysis of <span class="hlt">functional</span> interactions between brain regions suggest that the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus could be involved in spatial memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. In addition, the results highlight the key role of the extended hippocampal system, thalamus and striatum in this process. Our study agrees with previous ones reporting interactions between the dorsal hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex during spatial memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. Furthermore, novel activation patterns of brain networks involving the aforementioned regions were found. These <span class="hlt">functional</span> brain networks could underlie spatial memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> evaluated in the Morris water maze task.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..188D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..188D"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Analysis of Foreign Exchange and SENSEX fluctuation in Indian perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Chatterjee, Sucharita</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The manuscript studies autocorrelation and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of SENSEX fluctuations and Forex Exchange Rate in respect to Indian scenario. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) and multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis (MFDXA) were employed to study the correlation between the two series. It was observed that the two series are strongly <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlated</span>. The change of degree of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> with time was studied and the results are interpreted qualitatively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24568865','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24568865"><span>Unraveling Brain <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Connectivity of encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in the context of education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Panda, Rajanikant; Bharath, Rose Dawn; George, Lija; Kanungo, Silpa; Reddy, Rajakumari P; Upadhyay, Neeraj; Thamodharan, Arumugam; Rajeshwaran, Jamuna; Rao, Shobini L; Gupta, Arun Kumar</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Human memory is an enigmatic component of cognition which many researchers have attempted to comprehend. Accumulating studies on <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity see brain as a complex dynamic unit with positively and negatively correlated networks in perfect coherence during a task. We aimed to examine coherence of network connectivity during visual memory encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in the context of education. School Educated (SE) and College Educated (CE) healthy volunteers (n=60) were recruited and assessed for visual encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> connectivity using seed to voxel based connectivity analysis of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) was evaluated. We noticed that there were reciprocal dynamic changes in both dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) region and PCC regions during working memory encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. In agreement with the previous studies, there were more positively correlated regions during <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> compared to encoding. The default mode network (DMN) networks showed greater negative correlations during more attentive task of visual encoding. In tune with the recent studies on cognitive reserve we also found that number of years of education was a significant factor influencing working memory connectivity. SE had higher positive correlation to DLPFC region and lower negative correlation to DMN in comparison with CE during encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1201...37F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1201...37F"><span>Investigation Of The Diffuse IGM By <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Farnsworth, Damon; Brown, Shea; Rudnick, Lawrence</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We present results from the first <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> search for the synchrotron component of the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) in filamentary large scale structure (LSS). We used the low resolution (36') Bonn survey at 21cm, with the infrared 2MASS catalog as a tracer of the LSS. Synchrotron emission likely results from LSS formation shocks and feedback from AGN and galactic winds [2]. We determined 3σ upper limits to the diffuse emission in units of flux per galaxy; these correspond to filament equipartition magnetic fields as low as 0.2 μG. The detection threshold for the average (peak) filament brightness is 1 (7) mK for 0.03<z<0.04, far below the 50 mK effective sensitivity of the Bonn survey, demonstrating the power of this technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012874','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012874"><span>Effect of <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> on Geomagnetic Forecast Accuracies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Surface geomagnetic observation can determine up to degree L = 14 time-varying spherical harmonic coefficients of the poloidal magnetic field. Assimilation of these coefficients to numerical dynamo simulation could help us understand better the dynamical processes in the Earth's outer core, and to provide more accurate forecast of geomagnetic secular variations (SV). In our previous assimilation studies, only the poloidal magnetic field in the core is corrected by the observations in the analysis. Unobservable core state variables (the toroidal magnetic field and the core velocity field) are corrected via the dynamical equations of the geodynamo. Our assimilation experiments show that the assimilated core state converges near the CMB, implying that the dynamo state is strongly constrained by surface geomagnetic observations, and is pulled closer to the truth by the data. We are now carrying out an ensemble of assimilation runs with 1000 years of geomagnetic and archeo/paleo magnetic record. In these runs the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is incorporated into the analysis. This correlation is derived from the physical boundary conditions of the toroidal field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The assimilation results are then compared with those of the ensemble runs without the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, aiming at understanding two fundamental issues: the effect of the crosscorrelation on (1) the convergence of the core state, and (2) the SV prediction accuracies. The constrained dynamo solutions will provide valuable insights on interpreting the observed SV, e.g. the near-equator magnetic flux patches, the core-mantle interactions, and possibly other geodynamic observables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..393..460C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..393..460C"><span>Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis approach for assessing asymmetric multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> and their application to the Chinese financial market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Guangxi; Cao, Jie; Xu, Longbing; He, LingYun</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We propose a new method called the multifractal asymmetric detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method (MF-ADCCA) to investigate the asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in nonstationary time series that combine the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA) and asymmetric detrended fluctuation analysis (A-DFA). The study aims to determine whether different scaling properties of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are obtained if a one-time series trending is either positive or negative. We apply MF-ADCCA to analyze empirically the scaling behavior of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> among the Chinese stock market, the RMB exchange market, and the US stock market. Empirical results indicate that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the Chinese stock market and the RMB/USD exchange market are more persistent when any one of the markets is falling. On the contrary, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the Chinese stock market and the RMB/EU, RMB/GBP, RMB/JPY exchange markets and the US stock market are more persistent when one of the markets is rising. Moreover, asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between any two of the selected financial markets are multifractal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3695882','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3695882"><span>Episodic memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> for story characters in high-<span class="hlt">functioning</span> autism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background The objective of this study was to examine differences in episodic memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> between individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) individuals. Previous studies have shown that personality similarities between readers and characters facilitated reading comprehension. Highly extraverted participants read stories featuring extraverted protagonists more easily and judged the outcomes of such stories more rapidly than did less extraverted participants. Similarly, highly neurotic participants judged the outcomes of stories with neurotic protagonists more rapidly than did participants with low levels of neuroticism. However, the impact of the similarity effect on memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> remains unclear. This study tested our ‘similarity hypothesis’, namely that memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> is enhanced when readers with ASD and TD readers read stories featuring protagonists with ASD and with characteristics associated with TD individuals, respectively. Methods Eighteen Japanese individuals (one female) with high-<span class="hlt">functioning</span> ASD (aged 17 to 40 years) and 17 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched Japanese (one female) TD participants (aged 22 to 40 years) read 24 stories; 12 stories featured protagonists with ASD characteristics, and the other 12 featured TD protagonists. Participants read a single sentence at a time and pressed a spacebar to advance to the next sentence. After reading all 24 stories, they were asked to complete a recognition task about the target sentence in each story. Results To investigate episodic memory in ASD, we analyzed encoding based on the reading times for and readability of the stories and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> processes based on the accuracy of and response times for sentence recognition. Although the results showed no differences between ASD and TD groups in encoding processes, they did reveal inter-group differences in memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. Although individuals with ASD demonstrated the same level of accuracy as did</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010MNRAS.402....2B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010MNRAS.402....2B"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of diffuse synchrotron and large-scale structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brown, Shea; Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>We explore for the first time the method of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of radio synchrotron emission and tracers of large-scale structure in order to detect the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We performed a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of a 34° × 34° area of Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) galaxies for two redshift slices (0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07) with the corresponding region of the 1.4 GHz Bonn survey. For this analysis, we assumed that the synchrotron surface brightness is linearly proportional to surface density of galaxies. We also sampled the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF) using 24 distant fields of the same size from the Bonn survey, to better assess the noise properties. Though we obtained a null result, we found that by adding a signal weighted by the 2MASS image with a filament (peak) surface brightness of 1 (7) and 7 (49) mK would produce a 3σ positive correlation for the 0.03 < z < 0.04 and 0.06 < z < 0.07 redshift slices, respectively. These detection thresholds correspond to minimum energy magnetic fields as low as 0.2 μG, close to some theoretical expectations for filament field values. This injected signal is also below the rms noise of the Bonn survey, and demonstrates the power of this technique and its utility for upcoming sensitive continuum surveys such as those planned with the Murchison Widefield Array.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.203.1149L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.203.1149L"><span>Extracting seismic attenuation coefficients from <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of ambient noise at linear triplets of stations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We develop and apply an algorithm for deriving interstation seismic attenuation from <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of ambient noise recorded by linear arrays. Theoretical results on amplitude decay due to attenuation are used to form a linear least-square inversion for interstation QR values of Rayleigh surface waves propagating along linear arrays having three or more stations. The noise wave field is assumed stationary within each day and the interstation distances should be greater than the employed wavelength. The inversion uses differences of logarithmic amplitude decay curves measured at different stations from <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> within a given frequency band. The background attenuation between noise sources and receivers is effectively cancelled with this method. The site amplification factors are assumed constant (or following similar patterns) in the frequency band of interest. The inversion scheme is validated with synthetic tests using ambient noise generated by ray-theory-based calculations with heterogeneous attenuation and homogenous velocity structure. The interstation attenuation and phase velocity dispersion curves are inverted from <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of the synthetic data. The method is then applied to triplets of stations from the regional southern California seismic network crossing the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault, and a dense linear array crossing the southern San Jacinto Fault zone. Bootstrap technique is used to derive empirical mean and confidence interval for the obtained inverse Q values. The results for the regional stations yield QR values around 25 for a frequency band 0.2-0.36 Hz. The results for the San Jacinto fault zone array give QR values of about 6-30 for frequencies in the range 15-25 Hz.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhRvD..79d3509D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhRvD..79d3509D"><span>Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z˜1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to ˜4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise (˜1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92l3540S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92l3540S"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of the extragalactic gamma-ray background with luminous red galaxies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shirasaki, Masato; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Yoshida, Naoki</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Measurements of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and large-scale structure provide a novel probe of dark matter on extragalactic scales. We focus on luminous red galaxies (LRGs) as optimal targets to search for the signal of dark matter annihilation. We measure the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the EGB taken from the Fermi Large Area Telescope with the LRGs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Statistical errors are calculated using a large set of realistic mock LRG catalogs. The amplitude of the measured <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is consistent with null detection. Based on an accurate theoretical model of the distribution of dark matter associated with LRGs, we exclude dark matter annihilation cross-sections over ⟨σ v ⟩=3 ×10-25- 1 0-26 cm3 s-1 for a 10 GeV dark matter. We further investigate systematic effects due to uncertainties in the Galactic gamma-ray foreground emission, which we find to be an order of magnitude smaller than the current statistical uncertainty. We also estimate the contamination from astrophysical sources in the LRGs by using known scaling relations between gamma-ray luminosity and star-formation rate, finding them to be negligibly small. Based on these results, we suggest that LRGs remain ideal targets for probing dark matter annihilation with future EGB measurement and galaxy surveys. Increasing the number of LRGs in upcoming galaxy surveys such as LSST would lead to big improvements of factors of several in sensitivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1806f0004Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1806f0004Y"><span>Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> filtering techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yee, Andrew; Stewart, Dylan; Bunget, Gheorghe; Kramer, Patrick; Farinholt, Kevin; Friedersdorf, Fritz; Pepi, Marc; Ghoshal, Anindya</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Cyclic loading of mechanical components promotes the formation of dislocation dipoles in metals, which can serve as precursors to crack nucleation and ultimately lead to failure. In the laboratory setting, an acoustic nonlinearity parameter has been assessed as an effective indicator for characterizing the progression of fatigue damage precursors. However, the need to use monochromatic waves of medium-to-high acoustic energy has presented a constraint, making it problematic for use in field applications. This paper presents a potential approach for field measurement of acoustic nonlinearity by using general purpose ultrasonic pulser-receivers. Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements during fatigue testing were analyzed by the using contact and immersion pulse-through method. A novel <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> filtering technique was developed to extract the fundamental and higher harmonic waves from the signals. As in the case of the classic harmonic generation, the nonlinearity parameters of the second and third harmonics indicate a strong correlation with fatigue cycles. Consideration was given to potential nonlinearities in the measurement system, and tests have confirmed that measured second harmonic signals exhibit a linear dependence on the input signal strength, further affirming the conclusion that this parameter relates to damage precursor formation from cyclic loading.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJHPC..27..178C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJHPC..27..178C"><span>Accelerating radio astronomy <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with graphics processing units</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Clark, M. A.; LaPlante, P. C.; Greenhill, L. J.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We present a highly parallel implementation of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of time-series data using graphics processing units (GPUs), which is scalable to hundreds of independent inputs and suitable for the processing of signals from 'large-Formula' arrays of many radio antennas. The computational part of the algorithm, the X-engine, is implemented efficiently on NVIDIA's Fermi architecture, sustaining up to 79% of the peak single-precision floating-point throughput. We compare performance obtained for hardware- and software-managed caches, observing significantly better performance for the latter. The high performance reported involves use of a multi-level data tiling strategy in memory and use of a pipelined algorithm with simultaneous computation and transfer of data from host to device memory. The speed of code development, flexibility, and low cost of the GPU implementations compared with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementations have the potential to greatly shorten the cycle of correlator development and deployment, for cases where some power-consumption penalty can be tolerated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12513559','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12513559"><span>Large scale <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in Internet traffic.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barthélemy, Marc; Gondran, Bernard; Guichard, Eric</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>The Internet is a complex network of interconnected routers, and the existence of a collective behavior such as congestion suggests that the correlations between the different connections play a crucial role. It is thus critical to measure and quantify these correlations. We use methods of random matrix theory (RMT) to analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix C of information flow changes of 650 connections between 26 routers of the French scientific network "Renater." We find that C has the universal properties of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices: The distribution of eigenvalues-up to a rescaling that exhibits a typical correlation time of the order of 10 min-and the spacing distribution follow the predictions of RMT. There are some deviations for large eigenvalues which contain network-specific information and which identify genuine correlations between the connections. The study of the most correlated connections reveals the existence of "active centers" that are exchanging information with a large number of routers thereby inducing correlations between the corresponding connections. These strong correlations could be a reason for the observed self-similarity in the world-wide web traffic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66e6110B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..66e6110B"><span>Large scale <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in Internet traffic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barthélemy, Marc; Gondran, Bernard; Guichard, Eric</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>The Internet is a complex network of interconnected routers, and the existence of a collective behavior such as congestion suggests that the correlations between the different connections play a crucial role. It is thus critical to measure and quantify these correlations. We use methods of random matrix theory (RMT) to analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix <ss>C</ss> of information flow changes of 650 connections between 26 routers of the French scientific network ``Renater.'' We find that <ss>C</ss> has the universal properties of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices: The distribution of eigenvalues-up to a rescaling that exhibits a typical correlation time of the order of 10 min-and the spacing distribution follow the predictions of RMT. There are some deviations for large eigenvalues which contain network-specific information and which identify genuine correlations between the connections. The study of the most correlated connections reveals the existence of ``active centers'' that are exchanging information with a large number of routers thereby inducing correlations between the corresponding connections. These strong correlations could be a reason for the observed self-similarity in the world-wide web traffic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22373569','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22373569"><span>Quasar-Lyman α forest <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> from BOSS DR11: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Font-Ribera, Andreu; Kirkby, David; Blomqvist, Michael; Busca, Nicolas; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian; Ross, Nicholas P.; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Carithers, Bill; Slosar, Anže; Rich, James; Delubac, Timothée; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; and others</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We measure the large-scale <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption, using over 164,000 quasars from Data Release 11 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We extend the previous study of roughly 60,000 quasars from Data Release 9 to larger separations, allowing a measurement of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale along the line of sight c/(H(z = 2.36)r{sub s}) = 9.0±0.3 and across the line of sight D{sub A}(z = 2.36)/r{sub s} = 10.8±0.4, consistent with CMB and other BAO data. Using the best fit value of the sound horizon from Planck data (r{sub s} = 147.49 Mpc), we can translate these results to a measurement of the Hubble parameter of H(z = 2.36) = 226±8 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1} and of the angular diameter distance of D{sub A}(z = 2.36) = 1590±60 Mpc. The measured <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and an update of the code to fit the BAO scale (baofit) are made publicly available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003APS..DFD.MM012H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003APS..DFD.MM012H"><span>Lip pressure/velocity <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in an axisymmetric, compressible jet.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hall, Andre'; Tinney, Charles; Glauser, Mark</p> <p>2003-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between fluctuating lip pressure and the instantaneous stream-wise velocity of a 2-inch diameter, cold (104oF), high Mach number, axisymmetric, jet with a maximum co-flow of 5velocity measurements are acquired using a Dantec Dynamic LDA/PDA system with a Stabilite 2017 argon ion laser head, capable of capturing all three components (u,v,w) of the velocity field. Pressure fluctuations at the lip of the nozzle are measured by an array of fifteen Kulite pressure transducers distributed azimuthally at the jet lip. The pressure-velocity <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> is then determined as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of radial, azimuthal, and stream-wise location. The results from this investigation provide a foundation for future studies where the instantaneous velocity field will be estimated, using a Linear Stochastic Estimation technique, from the fluctuating lip pressure alone. These results are also compared with measurements taken via stereo PIV in the same facility under identical conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...802L...1F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...802L...1F"><span>Evidence of <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between the CMB Lensing and the γ-Ray Sky</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fornengo, Nicolao; Perotto, Laurence; Regis, Marco; Camera, Stefano</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT γ-ray sky maps and the cosmic microwave background lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to γ-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of γ-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurement is in agreement with current models of the γ-ray luminosity <span class="hlt">function</span> for active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0σ. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extragalactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic γ-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22518818','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22518818"><span>EVIDENCE OF <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> BETWEEN THE CMB LENSING AND THE γ-RAY SKY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Perotto, Laurence</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT γ-ray sky maps and the cosmic microwave background lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to γ-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of γ-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurement is in agreement with current models of the γ-ray luminosity <span class="hlt">function</span> for active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0σ. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extragalactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic γ-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AtmEn.146..206D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AtmEn.146..206D"><span>Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian forests using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>DeWalle, David R.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Buda, Anthony R.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Forecasts of ecosystem changes due to variations in atmospheric emissions policies require a fundamental understanding of lag times between changes in chemical inputs and watershed response. Impacts of changes in atmospheric deposition in the United States have been documented using national and regional long-term environmental monitoring programs beginning several decades ago. Consequently, time series of weekly NADP atmospheric wet deposition and monthly EPA-Long Term Monitoring stream chemistry now exist for much of the Northeast which may provide insights into lag times. In this study of Appalachian forest basins, we estimated lag times for S, N and Cl by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> monthly data from four pairs of stream and deposition monitoring sites during the period from 1978 to 2012. A systems or impulse response <span class="hlt">function</span> approach to <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> was used to estimate lag times where the input deposition time series was pre-whitened using regression modeling and the stream response time series was filtered using the deposition regression model prior to <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> for S were greatest at annual intervals over a relatively well-defined range of lags with the maximum correlations occurring at mean lags of 48 months. Chloride results were similar but more erratic with a mean lag of 57 months. Few high-correlation lags for N were indicated. Given the growing availability of atmospheric deposition and surface water chemistry monitoring data and our results for four Appalachian basins, further testing of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> as a method of estimating lag times on other basins appears justified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10109441','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10109441"><span><span class="hlt">Functions</span> and requirements for subsurface barriers used in support of single-shell tank waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lowe, S.S.</p> <p>1993-11-16</p> <p>The mission of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Program includes project and program activities for receiving, storing, maintaining, treating, and disposing onsite, or packaging for offsite disposal, all Hanford tank waste. Hanford tank waste includes the contents of 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), plus any new waste added to these facilities, and all encapsulated cesium and strontium stored onsite and returned from offsite users. A key element of the TWRS Program is <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of the waste in the SSTs. The waste stored in these underground tanks must be removed in order to minimize environmental, safety, and health risks associated with continuing waste storage. Subsurface barriers are being considered as a means to mitigate the effects of tank leaks including those occurring during SST waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. The <span class="hlt">functions</span> to be performed by subsurface barriers based on their role in <span class="hlt">retrieving</span> waste from the SSTs are described, and the requirements which constrain their application are identified. These <span class="hlt">functions</span> and requirements together define the <span class="hlt">functional</span> baseline for subsurface barriers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28283664','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28283664"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between entangled biofilaments as they diffuse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsang, Boyce; Dell, Zachary E; Jiang, Lingxiang; Schweizer, Kenneth S; Granick, Steve</p> <p>2017-03-10</p> <p>Entanglement in polymer and biological physics involves a state in which linear interthreaded macromolecules in isotropic liquids diffuse in a spatially anisotropic manner beyond a characteristic mesoscopic time and length scale (tube diameter). The physical reason is that linear macromolecules become transiently localized in directions transverse to their backbone but diffuse with relative ease parallel to it. Within the resulting broad spectrum of relaxation times there is an extended period before the longest relaxation time when filaments occupy a time-averaged cylindrical space of near-constant density. Here we show its implication with experiments based on fluorescence tracking of dilutely labeled macromolecules. The entangled pairs of aqueous F-actin biofilaments diffuse with separation-dependent dynamic <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> that exceed those expected from continuum hydrodynamics up to strikingly large spatial distances of ≈15 µm, which is more than 10(4) times the size of the solvent water molecules in which they are dissolved, and is more than 50 times the dynamic tube diameter, but is almost equal to the filament length. Modeling this entangled system as a collection of rigid rods, we present a statistical mechanical theory that predicts these long-range dynamic correlations as an emergent consequence of an effective long-range interpolymer repulsion due to the de Gennes correlation hole, which is a combined consequence of chain connectivity and uncrossability. The key physical assumption needed to make theory and experiment agree is that solutions of entangled biofilaments localized in tubes that are effectively dynamically incompressible over the relevant intermediate time and length scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5380065','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5380065"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between entangled biofilaments as they diffuse</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tsang, Boyce; Dell, Zachary E.; Jiang, Lingxiang; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Granick, Steve</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Entanglement in polymer and biological physics involves a state in which linear interthreaded macromolecules in isotropic liquids diffuse in a spatially anisotropic manner beyond a characteristic mesoscopic time and length scale (tube diameter). The physical reason is that linear macromolecules become transiently localized in directions transverse to their backbone but diffuse with relative ease parallel to it. Within the resulting broad spectrum of relaxation times there is an extended period before the longest relaxation time when filaments occupy a time-averaged cylindrical space of near-constant density. Here we show its implication with experiments based on fluorescence tracking of dilutely labeled macromolecules. The entangled pairs of aqueous F-actin biofilaments diffuse with separation-dependent dynamic <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> that exceed those expected from continuum hydrodynamics up to strikingly large spatial distances of ≈15 µm, which is more than 104 times the size of the solvent water molecules in which they are dissolved, and is more than 50 times the dynamic tube diameter, but is almost equal to the filament length. Modeling this entangled system as a collection of rigid rods, we present a statistical mechanical theory that predicts these long-range dynamic correlations as an emergent consequence of an effective long-range interpolymer repulsion due to the de Gennes correlation hole, which is a combined consequence of chain connectivity and uncrossability. The key physical assumption needed to make theory and experiment agree is that solutions of entangled biofilaments localized in tubes that are effectively dynamically incompressible over the relevant intermediate time and length scales. PMID:28283664</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790057372&hterms=correlation+coefficient&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcorrelation%2Bcoefficient','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790057372&hterms=correlation+coefficient&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcorrelation%2Bcoefficient"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> studies of wave particle interactions in ULF phenomena</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mcpherron, R. L.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic field observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetic field reveal a wide variety of ULF waves. These waves interact with the ambient particle populations in complex ways, causing modulation of the observed particle fluxes. This modulation is found to be a <span class="hlt">function</span> of species, pitch angle, energy and time. The characteristics of this modulation provide information concerning the wave mode and interaction process. One important characteristic of wave-particle interactions is the phase of the particle flux modulation relative to the magnetic field variations. To display this phase as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of time a dynamic cross spectrum program has been developed. The program produces contour maps in the frequency time plane of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> coefficient between any particle flux time series and the magnetic field vector. This program has been utilized in several studies of ULF wave-particle interactions at synchronous orbit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.3930L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.3930L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between agricultural commodity futures markets in the US and China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Zhihui; Lu, Xinsheng</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>This paper examines the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties of agricultural futures markets between the US and China using a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic test and multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA). The results show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the two geographically distant markets for four pairs of important agricultural commodities futures are significantly multifractal. By introducing the concept of a “crossover”, we find that the multifractality of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the two markets is not long lasting. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the short term are more strongly multifractal, but they are weakly so in the long term. Moreover, <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of small fluctuations are persistent and those of large fluctuations are anti-persistent in the short term while <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of all kinds of fluctuations for soy bean and soy meal futures are persistent and for corn and wheat futures are anti-persistent in the long term. We also find that <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> exponents are less than the averaged generalized Hurst exponent when q<0 and more than the averaged generalized Hurst exponent when q>0 in the short term, while in the long term they are almost the same.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468...91R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468...91R"><span>Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis on RMB exchange rate and Hang Seng China Enterprises Index</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruan, Qingsong; Yang, Bingchan; Ma, Guofeng</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets on the basis of a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic test and multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA). MF-DCCA has, at best, serious limitations for most of the signals describing complex natural processes and often indicates multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> when there are none. In order to prevent these false multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, we apply MFCCA to verify the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. Qualitatively, we find that the return series of the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets were, overall, significantly <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> based on the statistical analysis. Quantitatively, we find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the stock index and RMB exchange markets were strongly multifractal, and the multifractal degree of the onshore RMB exchange markets was somewhat larger than the offshore RMB exchange markets. Moreover, we use the absolute return series to investigate and confirm the fact of multifractality. The results from the rolling windows show that the short-term <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between volatility series remain high.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840026698','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840026698"><span>Ultrasonic velocity measurement using phase-slope <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hull, D. R.; Kautz, H. E.; Vary, A.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Computer implemented phase-slope and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methods are introduced for measuring time delays between pairs of broadband ultrasonic pulse-echo signals for determining velocity in engineering materials. The phase-slope and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methods are compared with the overlap method which is currently in wide use. Comparison of digital versions of the three methods shows similar results for most materials having low ultrasonic attenuation. However, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method is preferred for highly attenuating materials. An analytical basis for the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method is presented. Examples are given for the three methods investigated to measure velocity in representative materials in the megahertz range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.1172W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.1172W"><span>Price-volume <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of CSI300 index futures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Dong-Hua; Suo, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Xiao-Wen; Lei, Man</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>We investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between price returns and trading volumes for the China Securities Index 300 (CSI300) index futures, which are the only stock index futures traded on the China Financial Futures Exchange (CFFEX). The basic statistics suggest that distributions of these two time series are not normal but exhibit fat tails. Based on the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA), we obtain that returns and trading volumes are long-range <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span>. The existence of multifractality in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between returns and trading volumes has been proven with the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MFDCCA) algorithm. The multifractal analysis also confirms that returns and trading volumes have different degrees of multifractality. We further perform a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic to verify whether the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> significantly exists between returns and trading volumes for CSI300 index futures. In addition, results of the test for lead-lag effect demonstrate that contemporaneous <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of return and trading volume series is stronger than <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of leaded or lagged series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201.1383J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201.1383J"><span>Surface wave phase-velocity tomography based on multichannel <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We have developed a new method to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> seismic surface wave phase velocity using dense seismic arrays. The method measures phase variations between nearby stations based on waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. The coherence in waveforms between adjacent stations results in highly precise relative phase estimates. Frequency-dependent phase variations are then inverted for spatial variations in apparent phase velocity via the Eikonal equation. Frequency-dependent surface wave amplitudes measured on individual stations are used to correct the apparent phase velocity to account for multipathing via the Helmholtz equation. By using coherence and other data selection criteria, we construct an automated system that <span class="hlt">retrieves</span> structural phase-velocity maps directly from raw seismic waveforms for individual earthquakes without human intervention. The system is applied to broad-band seismic data from over 800 events recorded on EarthScope's USArray from 2006 to 2014, systematically building up Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps between the periods of 20 and 100 s for the entire continental United States. At the highest frequencies, the resulting maps are highly correlated with phase-velocity maps derived from ambient noise tomography. At all frequencies, we observe a significant contrast in Rayleigh-wave phase velocity between the tectonically active western US and the stable eastern US, with the phase velocity variations in the western US being 1-2 times greater. The Love wave phase-velocity maps are also calculated. We find that overtone contamination may produce systemic bias for the Love-wave phase-velocity measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.3715W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.3715W"><span>Random matrix theory analysis of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the US stock market: Evidence from Pearson’s correlation coefficient and detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Gang-Jin; Xie, Chi; Chen, Shou; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Yang, Ming-Yan</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>In this study, we first build two empirical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrices in the US stock market by two different methods, namely the Pearson’s correlation coefficient and the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then, combining the two matrices with the method of random matrix theory (RMT), we mainly investigate the statistical properties of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the US stock market. We choose the daily closing prices of 462 constituent stocks of S&P 500 index as the research objects and select the sample data from January 3, 2005 to August 31, 2012. In the empirical analysis, we examine the statistical properties of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients, the distribution of eigenvalues, the distribution of eigenvector components, and the inverse participation ratio. From the two methods, we find some new results of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the US stock market in our study, which are different from the conclusions reached by previous studies. The empirical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrices constructed by the DCCA coefficient show several interesting properties at different time scales in the US stock market, which are useful to the risk management and optimal portfolio selection, especially to the diversity of the asset portfolio. It will be an interesting and meaningful work to find the theoretical eigenvalue distribution of a completely random matrix R for the DCCA coefficient because it does not obey the Marčenko-Pastur distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMIN21A3700G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMIN21A3700G"><span>Big Data Solution for CTBT Monitoring Using Global <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gaillard, P.; Bobrov, D.; Dupont, A.; Grenouille, A.; Kitov, I. O.; Rozhkov, M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Due to the mismatch between data volume and the performance of the Information Technology infrastructure used in seismic data centers, it becomes more and more difficult to process all the data with traditional applications in a reasonable elapsed time. To fulfill their missions, the International Data Centre of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO/IDC) and the Département Analyse Surveillance Environnement of Commissariat à l'Energie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA/DASE) collect, process and produce complex data sets whose volume is growing exponentially. In the medium term, computer architectures, data management systems and application algorithms will require fundamental changes to meet the needs. This problem is well known and identified as a "Big Data" challenge. To tackle this major task, the CEA/DASE takes part during two years to the "DataScale" project. Started in September 2013, DataScale gathers a large set of partners (research laboratories, SMEs and big companies). The common objective is to design efficient solutions using the synergy between Big Data solutions and the High Performance Computing (HPC). The project will evaluate the relevance of these technological solutions by implementing a demonstrator for seismic event detections thanks to massive waveform correlations. The IDC has developed an expertise on such techniques leading to an algorithm called "Master Event" and provides a high-quality dataset for an extensive <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> study. The objective of the project is to enhance the Master Event algorithm and to reanalyze 10 years of waveform data from the International Monitoring System (IMS) network thanks to a dedicated HPC infrastructure operated by the "Centre de Calcul Recherche et Technologie" at the CEA of Bruyères-le-Châtel. The dataset used for the demonstrator includes more than 300,000 seismic events, tens of millions of raw detections and more than 30 terabytes of continuous seismic data</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18188650','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18188650"><span>A new family of distance <span class="hlt">functions</span> for perceptual similarity <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of medical images.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Felipe, Joaquim Cezar; Traina, Caetano; Traina, Agma Juci Machado</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>A long-standing challenge of content-based image <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> (CBIR) systems is the definition of a suitable distance <span class="hlt">function</span> to measure the similarity between images in an application context which complies with the human perception of similarity. In this paper, we present a new family of distance <span class="hlt">functions</span>, called attribute concurrence influence distances (AID), which serve to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> images by similarity. These distances address an important aspect of the psychophysical notion of similarity in comparisons of images: the effect of concurrent variations in the values of different image attributes. The AID <span class="hlt">functions</span> allow for comparisons of feature vectors by choosing one of two parameterized expressions: one targeting weak attribute concurrence influence and the other for strong concurrence influence. This paper presents the mathematical definition and implementation of the AID family for a two-dimensional feature space and its extension to any dimension. The composition of the AID family with L (p) distance family is considered to propose a procedure to determine the best distance for a specific application. Experimental results involving several sets of medical images demonstrate that, taking as reference the perception of the specialist in the field (radiologist), the AID <span class="hlt">functions</span> perform better than the general distance <span class="hlt">functions</span> commonly used in CBIR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950032547&hterms=transmission+distribution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dtransmission%2Bdistribution','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950032547&hterms=transmission+distribution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dtransmission%2Bdistribution"><span>Size distribution and scattering phase <span class="hlt">function</span> of aerosol particles <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> from sky brightness measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> the size distribution and the scattering phase <span class="hlt">function</span> at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> phase <span class="hlt">function</span> for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase <span class="hlt">function</span> predicted from the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994JGR....9910341K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994JGR....9910341K"><span>Size distribution and scattering phase <span class="hlt">function</span> of aerosol particles <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> from sky brightness measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> the size distribution and the scattering phase <span class="hlt">function</span> at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> phase <span class="hlt">function</span> for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase <span class="hlt">function</span> predicted from the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRC..119.5360Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRC..119.5360Y"><span>Aquarius geophysical model <span class="hlt">function</span> and combined active passive algorithm for ocean surface salinity and wind <span class="hlt">retrieval</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yueh, Simon; Tang, Wenqing; Fore, Alexander; Hayashi, Akiko; Song, Yuhe T.; Lagerloef, Gary</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>This paper describes the updated Combined Active-Passive (CAP) <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm for simultaneous <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of surface salinity and wind from Aquarius' brightness temperature and radar backscatter. Unlike the algorithm developed by Remote Sensing Systems (RSS), implemented in the Aquarius Data Processing System (ADPS) to produce Aquarius standard products, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's CAP algorithm does not require monthly climatology SSS maps for the salinity <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. Furthermore, the ADPS-RSS algorithm fully uses the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) wind for data correction, while the CAP algorithm uses the NCEP wind only as a constraint. The major updates to the CAP algorithm include the galactic reflection correction, Faraday rotation, Antenna Pattern Correction, and geophysical model <span class="hlt">functions</span> of wind or wave impacts. Recognizing the limitation of geometric optics scattering, we improve the modeling of the reflection of galactic radiation; the results are better salinity accuracy and significantly reduced ascending-descending bias. We assess the accuracy of CAP's salinity by comparison with ARGO monthly gridded salinity products provided by the Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center (APDRC) and Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). The RMS differences between Aquarius CAP and APDRC's or JAMSTEC's ARGO salinities are less than 0.2 psu for most parts of the ocean, except for the regions in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, near the outflow of major rivers and at high latitudes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSH31C2429H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSH31C2429H"><span>Multi-scale Analysis of DSCOVR Data Using Wavelet <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hegedus, A. M.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Alterman, B. L.; Case, A. W.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), launched February 11th 2015, makes the fastest combined measurements of solar wind magnetic field vectors and ion velocity distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span> ever. These data allow us to search for correlation between ion and magnetic field fluctuations at kinetic ion scales for the first time. We present first results of a wavelet correlation analysis, which allows us to search for wave-particle interactions while accounting for different sampling cadences and data gaps. Using different wavelet algorithms we circumvent these issues and decompose the covariance and correlation between these two data streams on a scale by scale basis. We then generalize these quantities to wavelet <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and cross-covariance to identify interactions between charged particles and magnetic fields on kinetic scales. The techniques developed in this work will be directly applicable to plasma and magnetic field observations in the corona on the upcoming Solar Probe Plus mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23456001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23456001"><span>Robust spectral-domain optical coherence tomography speckle model and its <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Xuan; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Huang, Yong; Guo, Yuan; Kang, Jin U</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In this study, we propose a generic speckle simulation for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal, by convolving the point-spread <span class="hlt">function</span> (PSF) of the OCT system with the numerically synthesized random sample field. We validate our model and use the simulation method to study the statistical properties of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients between A-scans, which have been recently applied in transverse motion analysis by our group. The results of simulation show that oversampling is essential for accurate motion tracking; exponential decay of OCT signal leads to an underestimate of motion that can be corrected; lateral heterogeneity of sample leads to an overestimate of motion for a few pixels corresponding to the structural boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptLE..86...44C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptLE..86...44C"><span>Investigation of measurement sensitivities in <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> Doppler global velocimetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV) is a flow measurement technique based on the estimation of Doppler frequency shift of scattered light by means of <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> two filtered intensity signals. The signal characteristics of CC-DGV result in fundamental limits for estimation variance as well as the possibility for estimator bias. The current study assesses these aspects theoretically and via Monte Carlo signal simulations. A signal model is developed using canonical numerical <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the iodine absorption cell and incorporating Poisson and Gaussian signal noise models. Along with consideration of the analytical form of the Cramér-Rao lower bound, best practices for system settings are discussed. The CC-DGV signal processing routine is then assessed by a series of Monte Carlo simulations studying the effect of temperature mismatch between flow signal and reference detector cells, velocity magnitude, and discretization error in the frequency modulation. A measurement bias was observed; the magnitude of the bias is a weak <span class="hlt">function</span> of the cell temperature mismatch, but it is independent of the flow velocity magnitude. The measurement variance was found to approach the Cramér-Rao lower bound for optimized conditions. A cyclical bias error resulting from the discrete nature of the laser frequency sweep is also observed with maximum errors of ± 1.0 % of the laser frequency scan step size, corresponding to peak errors of ± 0.61 m s-1 for typical settings. Overall, the signal estimator is found to perform best for matched cell temperatures, small frequency step size, and high velocity regimes, where the relative bias errors are collectively minimized.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..451...10R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..451...10R"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between price and volume in Chinese gold markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruan, Qingsong; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Guofeng</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We apply the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA) method to investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> behaviors between price and volume in Chinese gold spot and futures markets. Qualitatively, we find that the price and volume series are significantly <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> using the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> test statistics Qcc(m) and the ρDCCA coefficients. Quantitatively, by employing the MF-DCCA analysis, we find that there is a power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and significant multifractal features between price and volume in gold spot and futures markets. Furthermore, by comparing the multifractality of the original series to the shuffled and surrogated series, we find that, for the gold spot market, the main contribution of multifractality is fat-tail distribution; for the gold futures market, both long-range correlations and fat-tail distributions play important roles in the contribution of multifractality. Finally, by employing the method of rolling windows, we undertake further investigation into the time-varying features of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between price and volume. We find that for both spot and futures markets, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are anti-persistent in general. In the short term, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> shows obvious fluctuations due to exogenous shocks while, in the long term, the relationship tends to be at a metastable level due to the dynamic mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..453..131L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..453..131L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between crude oil and exchange markets for selected oil rich economies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Jianfeng; Lu, Xinsheng; Zhou, Ying</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Using multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA), this paper studies the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> behavior between crude oil market and five selected exchange rate markets. The dataset covers the period of January 1,1996-December 31,2014, and contains 4,633 observations for each of the series, including daily closing prices of crude oil, Australian Dollars, Canadian Dollars, Mexican Pesos, Russian Rubles, and South African Rand. Our empirical results obtained from <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> statistic and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient have confirmed the existence of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, and the MF-DCCA results have demonstrated a strong multifractality between <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> crude oil market and exchange rate markets in both short term and long term. Using rolling window analysis, we have also found the persistent <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the exchange rates and crude oil returns, and the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> scaling exponents exhibit volatility during some time periods due to its sensitivity to sudden events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91j2005W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91j2005W"><span>Model-based <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Whelan, John T.; Sundaresan, Santosh; Zhang, Yuanhao; Peiris, Prabath</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>We consider the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> search for periodic gravitational waves and its potential application to the low-mass x-ray binary Sco X-1. This method coherently combines data not only from different detectors at the same time, but also data taken at different times from the same or different detectors. By adjusting the maximum allowed time offset between a pair of data segments to be coherently combined, one can tune the method to trade off sensitivity and computing costs. In particular, the detectable signal amplitude scales as the inverse fourth root of this coherence time. The improvement in amplitude sensitivity for a search with a maximum time offset of one hour, compared with a directed stochastic background search with 0.25-Hz-wide bins, is about a factor of 5.4. We show that a search of one year of data from the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors with a coherence time of one hour would be able to detect gravitational waves from Sco X-1 at the level predicted by torque balance over a range of signal frequencies from 30 to 300 Hz; if the coherence time could be increased to ten hours, the range would be 20 to 500 Hz. In addition, we consider several technical aspects of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method: We quantify the effects of spectral leakage and show that nearly rectangular windows still lead to the most sensitive search. We produce an explicit parameter-space metric for the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> search, in general, and as applied to a neutron star in a circular binary system. We consider the effects of using a signal template averaged over unknown amplitude parameters: The quantity to which the search is sensitive is a given <span class="hlt">function</span> of the intrinsic signal amplitude and the inclination of the neutron-star rotation axis to the line of sight, and the peak of the expected detection statistic is systematically offset from the true signal parameters. Finally, we describe the potential loss of signal-to-noise ratio due to unmodeled effects such as signal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.465.4118J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.465.4118J"><span>2dFLenS and KiDS: determining source redshift distributions with <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Johnson, Andrew; Blake, Chris; Amon, Alexandra; Erben, Thomas; Glazebrook, Karl; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joudaki, Shahab; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Lidman, Chris; Marin, Felipe A.; McFarland, John; Morrison, Christopher B.; Parkinson, David; Poole, Gregory B.; Radovich, Mario; Wolf, Christian</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We develop a statistical estimator to infer the redshift probability distribution of a photometric sample of galaxies from its angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in redshift bins with an overlapping spectroscopic sample. This estimator is a minimum-variance weighted quadratic <span class="hlt">function</span> of the data: a quadratic estimator. This extends and modifies the methodology presented by McQuinn & White. The derived source redshift distribution is degenerate with the source galaxy bias, which must be constrained via additional assumptions. We apply this estimator to constrain source galaxy redshift distributions in the Kilo-Degree imaging survey through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with the spectroscopic 2-degree Field Lensing Survey, presenting results first as a binned step-wise distribution in the range z < 0.8, and then building a continuous distribution using a Gaussian process model. We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology using mock catalogues constructed from N-body simulations, and comparisons with other techniques for inferring the redshift distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22306215','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22306215"><span>A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/<span class="hlt">cross-correlators</span> for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.</p> <p>2014-10-15</p> <p>Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/<span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930070913&hterms=blue+ocean&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dblue%2Bocean','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930070913&hterms=blue+ocean&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dblue%2Bocean"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of the columnar aerosol phase <span class="hlt">function</span> and single-scattering albedo from sky radiance over the ocean - Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Menghua; Gordon, Howard R.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Based on the fact that the part of downward radiance that depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere can be extracted from the measured sky radiance, a new scheme for <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of the aerosol phase <span class="hlt">function</span> and the single-scattering albedo over the ocean is developed. This <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm is tested with simulations for several cases. It is found that the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> aerosol phase <span class="hlt">function</span> and the single-scattering albedo are virtually error-free if the vertical structure of the atmosphere is known and if the sky radiance and the aerosol optical thickness can be measured accurately. The robustness of the algorithm in realistic situations, in which the measurements are contaminated by calibration errors or noise, is examined. It is found that the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> value of omega(0) is usually in error by less than about 10 percent, and the phase <span class="hlt">function</span> is accurately <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> for theta less than about 90 deg. However, as the aerosol optical thickness becomes small, e.g., less than about 0.1, errors in the sky radiance measurement can lead to serious problems with the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm, especially in the blue. The use of the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> scheme should be limited to the red and near IR when the aerosol optical thickness is small.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Chaos..23a3129W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Chaos..23a3129W"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> detection and analysis for California's electricity market based on analogous multifractal analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Fang; Liao, Gui-ping; Li, Jian-hui; Zou, Rui-biao; Shi, Wen</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>A novel method, which we called the analogous multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, is proposed in this paper to study the multifractal behavior in the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between price and load in California electricity market. In addition, a statistic ρAMF -XA, which we call the analogous multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient, is defined to test whether the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between two given signals is genuine or not. Our analysis finds that both the price and load time series in California electricity market express multifractal nature. While, as indicated by the ρAMF -XA statistical test, there is a huge difference in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> behavior between the years 1999 and 2000 in California electricity markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7283E..0VP','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7283E..0VP"><span>Interfaces roughness <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> properties and light scattering of optical thin films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pan, Yong-qiang; Wu, Zhen-sen; Hang, Ling-xia</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>In order to study optical thin films interfaces roughness <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> properties and light scattering, theoretical models of optical thin films interfaces roughness light scattering are concisely presented. Furthermore, influence of interfaces roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties to light scattering was analyzed by total backscattering. Moreover, TiO2 single optical films thickness, substrate roughness of K9 glass and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique effect on interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> properties were studied by experiments, respectively. The results showed that theoretical results obtained by integrating vector light scattering were agreed well with experimental results. The interfaces roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> decrease with the increase of films thickness or with the decrease of substrates roughness. When ion beam assisted deposition was used, a high degree of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> can be obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23556966','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23556966"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> detection and analysis for California's electricity market based on analogous multifractal analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Fang; Liao, Gui-ping; Li, Jian-hui; Zou, Rui-biao; Shi, Wen</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>A novel method, which we called the analogous multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, is proposed in this paper to study the multifractal behavior in the power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between price and load in California electricity market. In addition, a statistic ρAMF-XA, which we call the analogous multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient, is defined to test whether the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between two given signals is genuine or not. Our analysis finds that both the price and load time series in California electricity market express multifractal nature. While, as indicated by the ρAMF-XA statistical test, there is a huge difference in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> behavior between the years 1999 and 2000 in California electricity markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24946713','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24946713"><span>Electron multiplying charge-coupled device-based fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy for blood velocimetry on zebrafish embryos.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pozzi, Paolo; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Cotelli, Franco; Foglia, Efrem A</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Biomedical issues in vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis require methods to follow hemodynamics with high spatial (micrometers) and time (milliseconds) resolution. At the same time, we need to follow relevant morphogenetic processes on large fields of view. Fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy coupled to scanning or wide-field microscopy meets these needs but has limited flexibility in the excitation pattern. To overcome this limitation, we develop here a two-photon two-spots setup coupled to an all-reflective near-infrared (NIR) optimized scanning system and to an electron multiplying charge-coupled device. Two NIR laser spots are spaced at adjustable micron-size distances (1 to 50 μm) by means of a Twyman-Green interferometer and repeatedly scanned on the sample, allowing acquisition of information on flows at 4 ms-3 μm time-space resolution in parallel on an extended field of view. We analyze the effect of nonhomogeneous and variable flow on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by numerical simulations and show exemplary application of this setup in studies of blood flow in zebrafish embryos in vivo. By coupling the interferometer with the scanning mirrors and by computing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of fluorescent red blood cells, we are able to map speed patterns in embryos' vessels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JBO....19f7007P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JBO....19f7007P"><span>Electron multiplying charge-coupled device-based fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy for blood velocimetry on zebrafish embryos</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pozzi, Paolo; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Cotelli, Franco; Foglia, Efrem A.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Biomedical issues in vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis require methods to follow hemodynamics with high spatial (micrometers) and time (milliseconds) resolution. At the same time, we need to follow relevant morphogenetic processes on large fields of view. Fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy coupled to scanning or wide-field microscopy meets these needs but has limited flexibility in the excitation pattern. To overcome this limitation, we develop here a two-photon two-spots setup coupled to an all-reflective near-infrared (NIR) optimized scanning system and to an electron multiplying charge-coupled device. Two NIR laser spots are spaced at adjustable micron-size distances (1 to 50 μm) by means of a Twyman-Green interferometer and repeatedly scanned on the sample, allowing acquisition of information on flows at 4 ms-3 μm time-space resolution in parallel on an extended field of view. We analyze the effect of nonhomogeneous and variable flow on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by numerical simulations and show exemplary application of this setup in studies of blood flow in zebrafish embryos in vivo. By coupling the interferometer with the scanning mirrors and by computing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of fluorescent red blood cells, we are able to map speed patterns in embryos' vessels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740014537&hterms=jet+engine&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DTitle%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Djet%2Bengine','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740014537&hterms=jet+engine&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DTitle%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Djet%2Bengine"><span>Use of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements to investigate noise generating regions of a real jet engine and a model jet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meecham, W. C.; Hurdle, P. M.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> are reported of the jet static pressure fluctuations (as measured with a B and K microphone fitted with a nose cone), with the far-field radiated sound pressure. These measurements were made for various probe positions and a large number of far-field positions (at various angles). In addition, the tests were run for a number of different jet exit velocities. The measured, normalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> vary between 0.004 and 0.155. These values depend upon the angular position of the far-field microphone, the jet exit Mach number, and the position of the probe. In addition, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique was employed to study the symmetry of the far-field radiated sound about the jet axis. Third-octave analyses of both the probe signal and the far-field radiated sound were made. This is the first time correlation measurements have been made on a jet engine. In addition, a report is given on an extensive noise survey of a model jet. The correlations are related to sound source <span class="hlt">functions</span> and jet source regions are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Chaos..24c2101Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Chaos..24c2101Y"><span>Asymmetric multiscale detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of financial time series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yin, Yi; Shang, Pengjian</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>We propose the asymmetric multiscale detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MS-ADCCA) method and apply MS-ADCCA method to explore the existence of asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for daily price returns in US and Chinese stock markets and to assess the properties of these asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. The results all show the existences of asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, while small asymmetries at small scales and larger asymmetries at larger scales are also displayed. There is a strong similarity between S&P500 and DJI, and we reveal that the asymmetries depend more on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of S&P500 vs. DJI, S&P500 vs. NQCI, DJI vs. NQCI, and ShangZheng vs. ShenCheng when the market is falling than rising, respectively. By comparing the spectra of S&P500 vs. NQCI and DJI vs. NQCI with uptrends and downtrends, we detect some new characteristics which lead to some new conclusions. Likewise, some new conclusions also can be drawn by the new characteristics displayed through the comparison between the spectra of ShangZheng vs. HSI and ShenCheng vs. HSI. Obviously, we conclude that although the overall spectra are similar and one market has the same effect when it is rising and falling in the study of asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between it and different markets, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> and asymmetries on the trends of the different markets are all different. MS-ADCCA method can detect the differences on the asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> by different trends of markets. Moreover, the uniqueness of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between NQCI and HSI can be detected in the study of the asymmetric <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, which confirms that HSI is unique in the Chinese stock markets and NQCI is unique in the US stock markets further.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......331C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......331C"><span>Smart Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) Nanofibers with Thermal Energy Storage and <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> <span class="hlt">Functionality</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cherry, De'Andre James</p> <p></p> <p>Phase change materials (PCMs) are generally substances with a high heat of fusion in the process of solid to liquid phase change. The nature of PCMs make them efficient materials to store and <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> large amounts of thermal energy. Presently, high efficiency thermal energy storage/<span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in applications where flexibility and space saving are required, such as smart textiles, still remains as a challenge. In this study, lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA) were combined to prepare a specific binary fatty acid eutectic (LA-MA) with a melting point near the operating body temperature of a human being and then encapsulated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers through the electrospinning technique. <span class="hlt">Functionalized</span> PCM-enhanced PAN nanofibers containing LA-MA at 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% of the weight of the PAN were successfully synthesized. The morphological structures and thermal energy storage capacity of the PCM-enhanced PAN nanofibers were characterized by electron microscopy (EM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The novel PCM-enhanced PAN nanofibers maintained their cylindrical fiber morphology after multiple heating-cooling cycles and retained their latent heat storage <span class="hlt">functionality</span>. Thus, it is envisioned that the prepared PCM-enhanced PAN nanofibers will find use in applications such as smart textiles where temperature regulation <span class="hlt">functionality</span> is required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219681"><span>Monitoring helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding by fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xi, Xu Guang; Deprez, Eric</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>In order to elucidate molecular mechanism of helicases, we have developed two new rapid and sensitive fluorescence assays to measure helicase-mediated DNA unwinding. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay takes the advantage of the substantial change in fluorescence polarization upon helicase binding to DNA and DNA unwinding. The extent of depolarization depends on the rate of tumbling of the fluorescently labeled DNA molecule, which decreases with increasing size. This assay therefore can simultaneously monitor the DNA binding of helicase and the subsequent helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding in real-time. For size limitation reasons, the FA approach is more suitable for single-turnover kinetic studies. A fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy method (FCCS) is also described for measuring DNA unwinding. This assay is based on the degree of concomitant diffusion of the two complementary DNA strands in a small excitation volume, each labeled by a different color. The decrease in the amplitude of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal is then directly related to the unwinding activity. By contrast with FA, the FCCS-based assay can be used to measure the unwinding activity under both single- and multiple-turnover conditions, with no limitation related to the size of the DNA strands constituting the DNA substrate. These methods used together have proven to be useful for studying molecular mechanism underlying efficient motor <span class="hlt">function</span> of helicases. Here, we describe the theoretical basis and framework of FA and FCCS and some practical implications for measuring DNA binding and unwinding. We discuss sample preparation and potential troubleshooting. Special attention is paid to instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.1179T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.1179T"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in electroencephalogram signals as an approach to proactive diagnosis of schizophrenia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Timashev, Serge F.; Panischev, Oleg Yu.; Polyakov, Yuriy S.; Demin, Sergey A.; Kaplan, Alexander Ya.</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>We apply flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS), a time series analysis method operating on structure <span class="hlt">functions</span> and power spectrum estimates, to study the clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) signals recorded in children/adolescents (11 to 14 years of age) with diagnosed schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms at the National Center for Psychiatric Health (NCPH) of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The EEG signals for these subjects were compared with the signals for a control sample of chronically depressed children/adolescents. The purpose of the study is to look for diagnostic signs of subjects' susceptibility to schizophrenia in the FNS parameters for specific electrodes and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the signals simultaneously measured at different points on the scalp. Our analysis of EEG signals from scalp-mounted electrodes at locations F3 and F4, which are symmetrically positioned in the left and right frontal areas of cerebral cortex, respectively, demonstrates an essential role of frequency-phase synchronization, a phenomenon representing specific correlations between the characteristic frequencies and phases of excitations in the brain. We introduce quantitative measures of frequency-phase synchronization and systematize the values of FNS parameters for the EEG data. The comparison of our results with the medical diagnoses for 84 subjects performed at NCPH makes it possible to group the EEG signals into 4 categories corresponding to different risk levels of subjects' susceptibility to schizophrenia. We suggest that the introduced quantitative characteristics and classification of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> may be used for the diagnosis of schizophrenia at the early stages of its development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JSV...332...43B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JSV...332...43B"><span>Fiber Bragg grating sensor fatigue crack real-time monitoring based on spectrum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bao, Pengyu; Yuan, Mei; Dong, Shaopeng; Song, Hao; Xue, Jingfeng</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>As one of the most critical tasks in structural damage monitoring, real-time fatigue crack monitoring plays an important role in improving the durability of a structure. In this paper, an online fatigue crack detection method is investigated based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) crack monitoring test bed (FBG-CMTB). Aiming at detecting ultrasonic spread in the structure when the crack is growing, the spectrum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis algorithm and the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> sequence are two methods that we will investigate in detail. Considering the singularity characteristic of the crack detecting signals when crack initiates, the wavelet packet analysis method is applied for feature extraction and two damage factors, crack initiation factor (CIF) and crack propagation factor (CPF), are constructed for damage initiation and propagation degree identification. To analyze the efficiency of this method, this paper presents the comparison tests based on different sensors array, FBG and acoustic emission (AE). Experimental results shows a satisfactory performance of the proposed spectrum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (SCCA) and damage feature factors on the fatigue crack online monitoring.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26172763','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26172763"><span>Detrended partial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of two nonstationary time series influenced by common external forces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qian, Xi-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Min; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>When common factors strongly influence two power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> time series recorded in complex natural or social systems, using detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) without considering these common factors will bias the results. We use detrended partial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DPXA) to uncover the intrinsic power-law <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between two simultaneously recorded time series in the presence of nonstationarity after removing the effects of other time series acting as common forces. The DPXA method is a generalization of the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis that takes into account partial correlation analysis. We demonstrate the method by using bivariate fractional Brownian motions contaminated with a fractional Brownian motion. We find that the DPXA is able to recover the analytical cross Hurst indices, and thus the multiscale DPXA coefficients are a viable alternative to the conventional <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient. We demonstrate the advantage of the DPXA coefficients over the DCCA coefficients by analyzing contaminated bivariate fractional Brownian motions. We calculate the DPXA coefficients and use them to extract the intrinsic <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between crude oil and gold futures by taking into consideration the impact of the U.S. dollar index. We develop the multifractal DPXA (MF-DPXA) method in order to generalize the DPXA method and investigate multifractal time series. We analyze multifractal binomial measures masked with strong white noises and find that the MF-DPXA method quantifies the hidden multifractal nature while the multifractal DCCA method fails.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6047E..2LL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6047E..2LL"><span>Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are <span class="hlt">retrieved</span>; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..434...52G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..434...52G"><span>Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Analysis of Market Clearing Price of electricity and SENSEX in India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghosh, Dipak; Dutta, Srimonti; Chakraborty, Sayantan</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>This paper reports a study on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the electric bid price and SENSEX using Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Analysis (MF-DXA). MF-DXA is a very rigorous and robust technique for assessment of cross-correction between two non-linear time series. The study reveals power law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between Market Clearing Price (MCP) and SENSEX which suggests that a change in the value of one can create a subjective change in the value of the other.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17410229','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17410229"><span>Long-term femtosecond timing link stabilization using a single-crystal balanced <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, J; Chen, J; Zhang, Z; Wong, F N C; Kärtner, F X; Loehl, F; Schlarb, H</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>We demonstrate a self-aligned balanced <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span> based on a single type-II phase-matched periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. The birefringence of the crystal generates a walk-off between the two orthogonally polarized pulses. This enables the balancing of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span> with input pulses at the same center wavelength. As a first application of this single-crystal balanced <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlator</span>, we stabilized a 310 m long optical fiber link for timing distribution with long-term stable 10 fs precision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IAUS..306..397L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IAUS..306..397L"><span>X-ray <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Ya-Juan</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the soft and hard X-rays of the atoll source 4U 1636-53 with RXTE data. The results show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> evolve along the different branches of the color-color diagram. At the lower left banana states, we have both positive and ambiguous correlations, and positive correlations are dominant for the lower banana and the upper banana states. The anti-correlation is detected at the top of the upper banana states. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of two atoll sources 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52 have been studied in previous work, and the anti-correlations are detected at the lower left banana or the top of the upper banana states. Our results show that, in the 4U 1636-53, the distribution of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the color-color diagram is similar to those of 4U 1735-44 and 4U 1608-52, and confirm further that the distribution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in color-color diagram could be correlated with the luminosity of the source.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..419..513K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..419..513K"><span>Finite sample properties of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> estimators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kristoufek, Ladislav</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>We study finite sample properties of estimators of power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>-detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA), height <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (HXA) and detrending moving-average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DMCA)-with a special focus on short-term memory bias as well as power-law coherency. We present a broad Monte Carlo simulation study that focuses on different time series lengths, specific methods' parameter setting, and memory strength. We find that each method is best suited for different time series dynamics so that there is no clear winner between the three. The method selection should be then made based on observed dynamic properties of the analyzed series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1366777','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1366777"><span>Determining Protease Activity In Vivo by Fluorescence <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kohl, Tobias; Haustein, Elke; Schwille, Petra</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>To date, most biochemical approaches to unravel protein <span class="hlt">function</span> have focused on purified proteins in vitro. Whereas they analyze enzyme performance under assay conditions, they do not necessarily tell us what is relevant within a living cell. Ideally, cellular <span class="hlt">functions</span> should be examined in situ. In particular, association/dissociation reactions are ubiquitous, but so far there is no standard technique permitting online analysis of these processes in vivo. Featuring single-molecule sensitivity combined with intrinsic averaging, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a minimally invasive technique ideally suited to monitor proteins. Moreover, endogenous fluorescence-based assays can be established by genetically encoding fusions of autofluorescent proteins and cellular proteins, thus avoiding the disadvantages of in vitro protein labeling and subsequent delivery to cells. Here, we present an in vivo protease assay as a model system: Green and red autofluorescent proteins were connected by Caspase-3- sensitive and insensitive protein linkers to create double-labeled protease substrates. Then, dual-color fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy was employed to study the protease reaction in situ. Allowing assessment of multiple dynamic parameters simultaneously, this method provided internal calibration and improved experimental resolution for quantifying protein stability. This approach, which is easily extended to reversible protein-protein interactions, seems very promising for elucidating intracellular protein <span class="hlt">functions</span>. PMID:16055538</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Fract..2350044Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Fract..2350044Y"><span>Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis for Large-Scale Warehouse-Out Behaviors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yao, Can-Zhong; Lin, Ji-Nan; Zheng, Xu-Zhou</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithm, we analyze the correlation property of warehouse-out quantity of different warehouses, respectively, and different products of each warehouse. Our study identifies that significant <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> relationship for warehouse-out quantity exists among different warehouses and different products of a warehouse. Further, we take multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis for warehouse-out quantity among different warehouses and different products of a warehouse. The results show that for the warehouse-out behaviors of total amount, different warehouses and different products of a warehouse significantly follow multifractal property. Specifically for each warehouse, the coupling relationships of rebar and wire rod reveal long-term memory characteristics, no matter for large fluctuation or small one. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> effect on long-range memory property among warehouses probably has less to do with product types,and the long-term memory of YZ warehouse is greater than others especially in total amount and wire rod product. Finally, we shuffle and surrogate data to explore the source of multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> property in logistics system. Taking the total amount of warehouse-out quantity as example, we confirm that the fat-tail distribution of warehouse-out quantity sequences is the main factor for multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. Through comparing the performance of the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA), centered multifractal detrending moving average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-X-DMA) algorithms, the forward and backward MF-X-DMA algorithms, we find that the forward and backward MF-X-DMA algorithms exhibit a better performance than the other ones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10031E..59S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10031E..59S"><span>Performance analysis and acceleration of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> computation using FPGA implementation for digital signal processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Selma, R.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Paper describes comparison of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> computation speed of most commonly used computation platforms (CPU, GPU) with an FPGA-based design. It also describes the structure of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> unit implemented for testing purposes. Speedup of computations was achieved using FPGA-based design, varying between 16 and 5400 times compared to CPU computations and between 3 and 175 times compared to GPU computations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApSS..256.3503P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApSS..256.3503P"><span>Investigation of interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties of optical thin films from total scattering losses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pan, Yongqiang; Wu, Zhensen; Hang, Lingxia</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The interface roughness and interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties affect the scattering losses of high-quality optical thin films. In this paper, the theoretical models of light scattering induced by surface and interface roughness of optical thin films are concisely presented. Furthermore, influence of interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties to light scattering is analyzed by total scattering losses. Moreover, single-layer TiO 2 thin film thickness, substrate roughness of K9 glass and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique effect on interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties are studied by experiments, respectively. A 17-layer dielectric quarter-wave high reflection multilayer is analyzed by total scattering losses. The results show that the interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties depend on TiO 2 thin film thickness, substrate roughness and deposition technique. The interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties decrease with the increase of film thickness or the decrease of substrates roughness. Furthermore, ion beam assisted deposition technique can increase the interface roughness <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties of optical thin films. The measured total scattering losses of 17-layer dielectric quarter-wave high reflection multilayer deposited with IBAD indicate that completely correlated interface model can be observed, when substrate roughness is about 2.84 nm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S43A4528W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S43A4528W"><span>Pre-Processing and <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Techniques for Time-Distance Helioseismology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, N.; de Ridder, S.; Zhao, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>In chaotic wave fields excited by a random distribution of noise sources a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the recordings made at two stations yield the interstation wave-field response. After early successes in helioseismology, laboratory studies and earth-seismology, this technique found broad application in global and regional seismology. This development came with an increasing understanding of pre-processing and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> workflows to yield an optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Helioseismologist rely heavily on stacking to increase the SNR. Until now, they have not studied different spectral-whitening and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> workflows and relies heavily on stacking to increase the SNR. The recordings vary considerably between sunspots and regular portions of the sun. Within the sunspot the periodic effects of the observation satellite orbit are difficult to remove. We remove a running alpha-mean from the data and apply a soft clip to deal with data glitches. The recordings contain energy of both flow and waves. A frequency domain filter selects the wave energy. Then the data is input to several pre-processing and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques, common to earth seismology. We anticipate that spectral whitening will flatten the energy spectrum of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. We also expect that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> converge faster to their expected value when the data is processed over overlapping windows. The result of this study are expected to aid in decreasing the stacking while maintaining good SNR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..139R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..139R"><span>The exceedance and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the gold spot and futures markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruan, Qingsong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Wei</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the dynamic features of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> and exceedance correlations between COMEX gold spot and futures returns using the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) and a test for symmetrical exceedance correlation. First, we examine the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> both qualitatively and quantitatively by employing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> test and the DCCA method. We find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are significant for all lagged orders and are weakly persistent. Our results from a rolling sample test also show that some exogenous events can apparently affect the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between gold spot and futures returns. Second, after employing the test statistic, our empirical results show that the exceedance correlations between spot and futures returns are both positive and symmetric, indicating that the two returns co-move in the same direction and that the correlations between them are symmetrical for the upper and lower of the returns. However, the results from the rolling sample show that occasional events can induce significant asymmetries of exceedance correlations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7623E..14V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7623E..14V"><span>Learning discriminative distance <span class="hlt">functions</span> for valve <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and improved decision support in valvular heart disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Voigt, Ingmar; Vitanovski, Dime; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Tsymal, Alexey; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Huber, Martin; Navab, Nassir; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Disorders of the heart valves constitute a considerable health problem and often require surgical intervention. Recently various approaches were published seeking to overcome the shortcomings of current clinical practice,that still relies on manually performed measurements for performance assessment. Clinical decisions are still based on generic information from clinical guidelines and publications and personal experience of clinicians. We present a framework for <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and decision support using learning based discriminative distance <span class="hlt">functions</span> and visualization of patient similarity with relative neighborhood graphsbased on shape and derived features. We considered two learning based techniques, namely learning from equivalence constraints and the intrinsic Random Forest distance. The generic approach enables for learning arbitrary user-defined concepts of similarity depending on the application. This is demonstrated with the proposed applications, including automated diagnosis and interventional suitability classification, where classification rates of up to 88.9% and 85.9% could be observed on a set of valve models from 288 and 102 patients respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2876832','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2876832"><span><span class="hlt">Functional</span> interface micromechanics of 11 en-bloc <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> cemented femoral hip replacements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Miller, Mark A; Verdonschot, Nico; Izant, Timothy H; Race, Amos</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background and purpose Despite the longstanding use of micromotion as a measure of implant stability, direct measurement of the micromechanics of implant/bone interfaces from en bloc human <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> has not been performed. The purpose of this study was to determine the stem-cement and cement-bone micromechanics of <span class="hlt">functionally</span> loaded, en-bloc <span class="hlt">retrieved</span>, cemented femoral hip components. Methods 11 fresh frozen proximal femurs with cemented implants were <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> at autopsy. Specimens were sectioned transversely into 10-mm slabs and fixed to a loading device where <span class="hlt">functional</span> torsional loads were applied to the stem. A digital image correlation technique was used to document micromotions at stem-cement and cement-bone interfaces during loading. Results There was a wide range of responses with stem-cement micromotions ranging from 0.0006 mm to 0.83 mm (mean 0.17 mm, SD 0.29) and cement-bone micromotions ranging from 0.0022 mm to 0.73 mm (mean 0.092 mm, SD 0.22). There was a strong (linear-log) inverse correlation between apposition fraction and micromotion at the stem-cement interface (r2 = 0.71, p < 0.001). There was a strong inverse log-log correlation between apposition fraction at the cement-bone interface and micromotion (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Components that were radiographically well-fixed had a relatively narrow range of micromotions at the stem-cement (0.0006–0.057 mm) and cement-bone (0.0022–0.029 mm) interfaces. Interpretatation Minimizing gaps at the stem-cement interface and encouraging bony apposition at the cement-bone interface would be clinically desirable. The cement-bone interface does not act as a bonded interface in actual use, even in radiographically well-fixed components. Rather, the interface is quite compliant, with sliding and opening motions between the cement and bone surfaces. PMID:20367421</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EntIS...6..433Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EntIS...6..433Z"><span>Term frequency - <span class="hlt">function</span> of document frequency: a new term weighting scheme for enterprise information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Hui; Wang, Deqing; Wu, Wenjun; Hu, Hongping</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>In today's business environment, enterprises are increasingly under pressure to process the vast amount of data produced everyday within enterprises. One method is to focus on the business intelligence (BI) applications and increasing the commercial added-value through such business analytics activities. Term weighting scheme, which has been used to convert the documents as vectors in the term space, is a vital task in enterprise Information <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> (IR), text categorisation, text analytics, etc. When determining term weight in a document, the traditional TF-IDF scheme sets weight value for the term considering only its occurrence frequency within the document and in the entire set of documents, which leads to some meaningful terms that cannot get the appropriate weight. In this article, we propose a new term weighting scheme called Term Frequency - <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Document Frequency (TF-FDF) to address this issue. Instead of using monotonically decreasing <span class="hlt">function</span> such as Inverse Document Frequency, FDF presents a convex <span class="hlt">function</span> that dynamically adjusts weights according to the significance of the words in a document set. This <span class="hlt">function</span> can be manually tuned based on the distribution of the most meaningful words which semantically represent the document set. Our experiments show that the TF-FDF can achieve higher value of Normalised Discounted Cumulative Gain in IR than that of TF-IDF and its variants, and improving the accuracy of relevance ranking of the IR results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4823478','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4823478"><span>The Hip <span class="hlt">Functional</span> <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> after Elective Surgery May Be Enhanced by Supplemented Essential Amino Acids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baldissarro, Eleonora; Aquilani, Roberto; Boschi, Federica; Baiardi, Paola; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Pasini, Evasio; Verri, Manuela; Dossena, Maurizia; Gambino, Arianna; Cammisuli, Sharon; Viglio, Simona</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>It is not known whether postsurgery systemic inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities are still present during rehabilitation of individuals after elective hip arthroplasty (EHA). Sixty subjects (36 females; age 66.58 ± 8.37 years) were randomized to receive 14-day oral EAAs (8 g/day) or a placebo (maltodextrin). At admission to and discharge from the rehabilitation center, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and venous plasma amino acid concentrations were determined. Post-EHA hip <span class="hlt">function</span> was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS) test. Ten matched healthy subjects served as controls. At baseline, all patients had high CRP levels, considerable reduction in several amino acids, and severely reduced hip <span class="hlt">function</span> (HHS 40.78 ± 2.70 scores). After treatment, inflammation decreased both in the EAA group and in the placebo group. Only EAA patients significantly improved their levels of glycine, alanine, tyrosine, and total amino acids. In addition, they enhanced the rate of hip <span class="hlt">function</span> recovery (HHS) (from baseline 41.8 ± 1.15 to 76.37 ± 6.6 versus baseline 39.78 ± 4.89 to 70.0 ± 7.1 in placebo one; p = 0.006). The study documents the persistence of inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities in post-EHA rehabilitation phase. EAAs enhance hip <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and improve plasma amino acid abnormalities. PMID:27110573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95d3530H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95d3530H"><span>Measuring cosmic velocities with 21 cm intensity mapping and galaxy redshift survey <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> dipoles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hall, Alex; Bonvin, Camille</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21 cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance (≲2 σ ) by combining the upcoming radio survey Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment with the future redshift surveys of Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and Euclid. More significant measurements (≲10 σ ) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement (≲100 σ ) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, nonlinear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and intensity maps probe the same tracers. We also derive a new expression for the covariance matrix of multitracer redshift-space correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> estimators with arbitrary orientation weights, which may be useful for upcoming surveys aiming at measuring redshift-space clustering with multiple tracers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642739','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642739"><span>Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in <span class="hlt">Function</span> <span class="hlt">Retrieved</span> Dental Implant.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was <span class="hlt">retrieved</span>. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AAS...211.5503L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AAS...211.5503L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> between Ly-break Galaxies and Damped Lyα Systems in Cosmological SPH Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Tae Song; Nagamine, K.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We calculate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF) between damped Ly-α systems (DLAs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations at z=3. We compute the CCF in two different methods. First, we assume that there is one DLA in each dark matter halo. Second approach is the cross-section-weighted CCF using the direct simulation result of DLA cross section for each halo. We find that the cross-section-weighted CCF gives a steeper γ than the unweighted one, and agrees well with the result of Cooke et al. (2006). Finally, we compute angular CCF for direct comparison with observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.453..819K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MNRAS.453..819K"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of Garstang's emission <span class="hlt">function</span> from all-sky camera images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kundracik, František</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>The emission <span class="hlt">function</span> from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this <span class="hlt">function</span>. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405-3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span>. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207.1630L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207.1630L"><span>Frequency domain analysis of errors in <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of ambient seismic noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We analyse random errors (variances) in <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of ambient seismic noise in the frequency domain, which differ from previous time domain methods. Extending previous theoretical results on ensemble averaged cross-spectrum, we estimate confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum of finite amount of data at each frequency using non-overlapping windows with fixed length. The extended theory also connects amplitude and phase variances with the variance of each complex spectrum value. Analysis of synthetic stationary ambient noise is used to estimate the confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum obtained with different length of noise data corresponding to different number of evenly spaced windows of the same duration. This method allows estimating Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR) of noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in the frequency domain, without specifying filter bandwidth or signal/noise windows that are needed for time domain SNR estimations. Based on synthetic ambient noise data, we also compare the probability distributions, causal part amplitude and SNR of stacked cross-spectrum <span class="hlt">function</span> using one-bit normalization or pre-whitening with those obtained without these pre-processing steps. Natural continuous noise records contain both ambient noise and small earthquakes that are inseparable from the noise with the existing pre-processing steps. Using probability distributions of random cross-spectrum values based on the theoretical results provides an effective way to exclude such small earthquakes, and additional data segments (outliers) contaminated by signals of different statistics (e.g. rain, cultural noise), from continuous noise waveforms. This technique is applied to constrain values and uncertainties of amplitude and phase velocity of stacked noise cross-spectrum at different frequencies, using data from southern California at both regional scale (˜35 km) and dense linear array (˜20 m) across the plate-boundary faults. A block bootstrap resampling method</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21216747','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21216747"><span>Rice TOGO Browser: A platform to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> integrated information on rice <span class="hlt">functional</span> and applied genomics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Antonio, Baltazar A; Sato, Yutaka; Miyao, Akio; Namiki, Nobukazu; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Minami, Hiroshi; Kamatsuki, Kaori; Shimura, Kan; Shimizu, Yuji; Hirochika, Hirohiko</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>The Rice TOGO Browser is an online public resource designed to facilitate integration and visualization of mapping data of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)/P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) clones, genes, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and phenotype data represented as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) onto the genome sequence, and to provide a platform for more efficient utilization of genome information from the point of view of applied genomics as well as <span class="hlt">functional</span> genomics. Three search options, namely keyword search, region search and trait search, generate various types of data in a user-friendly interface with three distinct viewers, a chromosome viewer, an integrated map viewer and a sequence viewer, thereby providing the opportunity to view the position of genes and/or QTLs at the chromosomal level and to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> any sequence information in a user-defined genome region. Furthermore, the gene list, marker list and genome sequence in a specified region delineated by RFLP/SSR markers and any sequences designed as primers can be viewed and downloaded to support forward genetics approaches. An additional feature of this database is the graphical viewer for BLAST search to reveal information not only for regions with significant sequence similarity but also for regions adjacent to those with similarity but with no hits between sequences. An easy to use and intuitive user interface can help a wide range of users in <span class="hlt">retrieving</span> integrated mapping information including agronomically important traits on the rice genome sequence. The database can be accessed at http://agri-trait.dna.affrc.go.jp/.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ESASP.740E..89S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ESASP.740E..89S"><span>SynSen PFT: Synergistic <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of Phytoplankton <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Types from Space From Hyper-and Multispectral Measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Soppa, Mariana A.; Loza, Svetlana N.; Dinter, Tilman; Wolanin, Aleksandra; Bricaud, Annick; Brewein, Robert; Rozanov, Vladimir; Barcher, Astrid</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>To gain knowledge on the role of marine phytoplankton in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, information on the global distribution of major phytoplankton <span class="hlt">functional</span> types is essential. The Synergistic <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of Phytoplankton <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Types from Space from Hyper- and Multispectral Measurements project (SynSenPFT) aims to improve the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of phytoplankton types (PFTs) from space by exploring the synergistic use of low-spatial-hyper- spectral and high-spatial-multi-spectral satellite data. Three PFTs are investigated: diatoms, coccolithophores and cyanobacteria. The work involves the improvement/revision of existing PFT algorithms based on hyper- (PhytoDOAS, [1]) and multi-spectral (OC- PFT, [2]) datasets, development of synergistic PFT products combining the <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> of these two algorithms and intercomparison of the synergistic PFT products with those derived from other methods [3,4,5].</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..472...67C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..472...67C"><span>Volatility-constrained multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis: <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> among Mainland China, US, and Hong Kong stock markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Guangxi; Zhang, Minjia; Li, Qingchen</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>This study focuses on multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of the different volatility intervals of Mainland China, US, and Hong Kong stock markets. A volatility-constrained multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (VC-MF-DCCA) method is proposed to study the volatility conductivity of Mainland China, US, and Hong Kong stock markets. Empirical results indicate that fluctuation may be related to important activities in real markets. The Hang Seng Index (HSI) stock market is more influential than the Shanghai Composite Index (SCI) stock market. Furthermore, the SCI stock market is more influential than the Dow Jones Industrial Average stock market. The conductivity between the HSI and SCI stock markets is the strongest. HSI was the most influential market in the large fluctuation interval of 1991 to 2014. The autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average method is used to verify the validity of VC-MF-DCCA. Results show that VC-MF-DCCA is effective.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22346645','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22346645"><span>Measuring time-of-flight in an ultrasonic LPS system using generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Villladangos, José Manuel; Ureña, Jesús; García, Juan Jesús; Mazo, Manuel; Hernández, Alvaro; Jiménez, Ana; Ruíz, Daniel; De Marziani, Carlos</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In this article, a time-of-flight detection technique in the frequency domain is described for an ultrasonic local positioning system (LPS) based on encoded beacons. Beacon transmissions have been synchronized and become simultaneous by means of the DS-CDMA (direct-sequence code Division multiple access) technique. Every beacon has been associated to a 255-bit Kasami code. The detection of signal arrival instant at the receiver, from which the distance to each beacon can be obtained, is based on the application of the generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (GCC), by using the cross-spectral density between the received signal and the sequence to be detected. Prior filtering to enhance the frequency components around the carrier frequency (40 kHz) has improved estimations when obtaining the correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> maximum, which implies an improvement in distance measurement precision. Positioning has been achieved by using hyperbolic trilateration, based on the time differences of arrival (TDOA) between a reference beacon and the others.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2215067','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2215067"><span>Finding Leading Indicators for Disease Outbreaks: Filtering, <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span>, and Caveats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bloom, Ronald M.; Buckeridge, David L.; Cheng, Karen E.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases such as influenza have spurred research into rapid outbreak detection. One primary thrust of this research has been to identify data sources that provide early indication of a disease outbreak by being leading indicators relative to other established data sources. Researchers tend to rely on the sample <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF) to quantify the association between two data sources. There has been, however, little consideration by medical informatics researchers of the influence of methodological choices on the ability of the CCF to identify a lead–lag relationship between time series. We draw on experience from the econometric and environmental health communities, and we use simulation to demonstrate that the sample CCF is highly prone to bias. Specifically, long-scale phenomena tend to overwhelm the CCF, obscuring phenomena at shorter wave lengths. Researchers seeking lead–lag relationships in surveillance data must therefore stipulate the scale length of the features of interest (e.g., short-scale spikes versus long-scale seasonal fluctuations) and then filter the data appropriately—to diminish the influence of other features, which may mask the features of interest. Otherwise, conclusions drawn from the sample CCF of bi-variate time-series data will inevitably be ambiguous and often altogether misleading. PMID:17068353</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OptLE..51..929L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OptLE..51..929L"><span>Experimental <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> nitrogen Q-branch CARS thermometry in a spark ignition engine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lockett, R. D.; Ball, D.; Robertson, G. N.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>A purely experimental technique was employed to derive temperatures from nitrogen Q-branch Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) spectra, obtained in a high pressure, high temperature environment (spark ignition Otto engine). This was in order to obviate any errors arising from deficiencies in the spectral scaling laws which are commonly used to represent nitrogen Q-branch CARS spectra at high pressure. The spectra obtained in the engine were compared with spectra obtained in a calibrated high pressure, high temperature cell, using direct <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in place of the minimisation of sums of squares of residuals. The technique is demonstrated through the measurement of air temperature as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of crankshaft angle inside the cylinder of a motored single-cylinder Ricardo E6 research engine, followed by the measurement of fuel-air mixture temperatures obtained during the compression stroke in a knocking Ricardo E6 engine. A standard CARS programme (SANDIA's CARSFIT) was employed to calibrate the altered non-resonant background contribution to the CARS spectra that was caused by the alteration to the mole fraction of nitrogen in the unburned fuel-air mixture. The compression temperature profiles were extrapolated in order to predict the auto-ignition temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSV...386...82P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSV...386...82P"><span>Acoustic source localization using a polyhedral microphone array and an improved generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Padois, Thomas; Sgard, Franck; Doutres, Olivier; Berry, Alain</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Millions of workers are exposed to excessive noise levels each day. Acoustic solutions have to be developed to protect workers from hearing loss. The first step of an acoustic diagnosis is the source localization which can be performed with a microphone array. Spherical microphone arrays can be used to detect the acoustic source positions in a workplace. In this study, a spherical microphone array, with polyhedral discretization, is proposed and compared with a spherical array with a slightly different geometry. The generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique is used to detect the source positions. Moreover, two criteria are introduced to improve the noise source map. The first is based on the geometric properties of the microphone array and the scan zone whereas the second is based on the energy of the spatial likelihood <span class="hlt">function</span>. Numerical data are used to provide a systematic comparison of both geometries and criteria. Finally, experiments in a reverberant room reveal that the polyhedral microphone array associated with both criteria provides the best noise source map.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMIN21B3702J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMIN21B3702J"><span>Pipeline Implementation of Real Time Event <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> for Nuclear Treaty Monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Junek, W. N.; Wehlen, J. A., III</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The United States National Data Center (US NDC) is responsible for monitoring international compliance to nuclear test ban treaties. This mission is performed through real time acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data acquired by a global network of seismic, hydroacoustic, and infrasonic sensors. Automatic and human reviewed event solutions are stored in a data warehouse which contains over 15 years of alphanumeric information and waveform data. A significant effort is underway to employ the data warehouse in real time processing to improve the quality of automatic event solutions, reduce analyst burden, and supply decision makers with information regarding relevant historic events. To this end, the US NDC processing pipeline has been modified to automatically recognize events built in the past. Event similarity information and the most relevant historic solution are passed to the human analyst to assist their evaluation of automatically formed events. This is achieved through real time <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of selected seismograms from automatically formed events against those stored in the data warehouse. Historic events used in correlation analysis are selected based on a set of user defined parameters, which are tuned to maintain pipeline timeliness requirements. Software architecture and database infrastructure were modified using a multithreaded design for increased processing speed, database connection pools for parallel queries, and Oracle spatial indexing to enhance query efficiency. This <span class="hlt">functionality</span> allows the human analyst to spend more time studying anomalous events and less time rebuilding routine events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525359','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525359"><span>Probing the diffuse baryon distribution with the lensing-tSZ <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zuntz, Joe; Waerbeke, Ludovic Van; Hinshaw, Gary; Hojjati, Alireza; Scott, Douglas E-mail: waerbeke@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: ahojjati@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: joezuntz@googlemail.com</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Approximately half of the Universe's baryons are in a form that has been hard to detect directly. However, the missing component can be traced through the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect with weak gravitational lensing. We build a model for this correlation and use it to constrain the extended baryon component, employing data from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey and the Planck satellite. The measured correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> is consistent with an isothermal β-model for the halo gas pressure profile, and the 1- and 2-halo terms are both detected at the 4σ level. In addition, we measure the hydrostatic mass bias (1−b)=0.79{sup +0.07}{sub −0.10}, which is consistent with numerical simulation results and the constraints from X-ray observations. The effective temperature of the gas is found to be in the range (7×10{sup 5}–3 ×10{sup 8}) K, with approximately 50% of the baryons appearing to lie beyond the virial radius of the halos, consistent with current expectations for the warm-hot intergalactic medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917269','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917269"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Weak Lensing of SDSS Galaxy Clusters I: Measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sheldon, Erin S.; Johnston, David E.; Scranton, Ryan; Koester, Ben P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Oyaizu, Hiroaki; Cunha, Carlos; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Huan; Frieman, Joshua A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Annis, James; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bahcall, Neta A.; Fukugita, Masataka</p> <p>2007-09-28</p> <p>This is the first in a series of papers on the weak lensing effect caused by clusters of galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The photometrically selected cluster sample, known as MaxBCG, includes {approx}130,000 objects between redshift 0.1 and 0.3, ranging in size from small groups to massive clusters. We split the clusters into bins of richness and luminosity and stack the surface density contrast to produce mean radial profiles. The mean profiles are detected over a range of scales, from the inner halo (25 kpc/h) well into the surrounding large scale structure (30 Mpc/h), with a significance of 15 to 20 in each bin. The signal over this large range of scales is best interpreted in terms of the cluster-mass <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. We pay careful attention to sources of systematic error, correcting for them where possible and bounding them where not. We find that the profiles scale strongly with richness and luminosity. We find the signal within a given richness bin depends upon luminosity, suggesting that luminosity is more closely correlated with mass than galaxy counts. We split the samples by redshift but detect no significant evolution. The profiles are not well described by power laws. In a subsequent series of papers we invert the profiles to three-dimensional mass profiles, show that they are well fit by a halo model description, measure mass-to-light ratios and provide a cosmological interpretation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3274287','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3274287"><span>Measuring Time-of-Flight in an Ultrasonic LPS System Using Generalized <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Villladangos, José Manuel; Ureña, Jesús; García, Juan Jesús; Mazo, Manuel; Hernández, Álvaro; Jiménez, Ana; Ruíz, Daniel; De Marziani, Carlos</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In this article, a time-of-flight detection technique in the frequency domain is described for an ultrasonic Local Positioning System (LPS) based on encoded beacons. Beacon transmissions have been synchronized and become simultaneous by means of the DS-CDMA (Direct-Sequence Code Division Multiple Access) technique. Every beacon has been associated to a 255-bit Kasami code. The detection of signal arrival instant at the receiver, from which the distance to each beacon can be obtained, is based on the application of the Generalized <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> (GCC), by using the cross-spectral density between the received signal and the sequence to be detected. Prior filtering to enhance the frequency components around the carrier frequency (40 kHz) has improved estimations when obtaining the correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> maximum, which implies an improvement in distance measurement precision. Positioning has been achieved by using hyperbolic trilateration, based on the Time Differences of Arrival (TDOA) between a reference beacon and the others. PMID:22346645</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.466.3558M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.466.3558M"><span>A joint analysis for cosmology and photometric redshift calibration using <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McLeod, Michael; Balan, Sreekumar T.; Abdalla, Filipe B.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>We present a method of calibrating the properties of photometric redshift bins as part of a larger nested sampling analysis for the inference of cosmological parameters. The redshift bins are characterized by their mean and variance, which are varied as free parameters and marginalized over when obtaining the cosmological parameters. We demonstrate that the likelihood <span class="hlt">function</span> for <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in an angular power spectrum framework tightly constrains the properties of bins such that they may be well determined, reducing their influence on cosmological parameters and avoiding the bias from poorly estimated redshift distributions. We demonstrate that even with only three photometric and three spectroscopic bins, we can recover accurate estimates of the mean redshift of a bin to within Δμ ≈ 3-4 × 10-3 and the width of the bin to Δσ ≈ 1 × 10-3 for galaxies near z = 1. This indicates that we may be able to bring down the photometric redshift errors to a level which is in line with the requirements for the next generation of cosmological experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636729','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636729"><span>Method for stationarity-segmentation of spike train data with application to the Pearson <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Quiroga-Lombard, Claudio S; Hass, Joachim; Durstewitz, Daniel</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Correlations among neurons are supposed to play an important role in computation and information coding in the nervous system. Empirically, <span class="hlt">functional</span> interactions between neurons are most commonly assessed by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Recent studies have suggested that pairwise correlations may indeed be sufficient to capture most of the information present in neural interactions. Many applications of correlation <span class="hlt">functions</span>, however, implicitly tend to assume that the underlying processes are stationary. This assumption will usually fail for real neurons recorded in vivo since their activity during behavioral tasks is heavily influenced by stimulus-, movement-, or cognition-related processes as well as by more general processes like slow oscillations or changes in state of alertness. To address the problem of nonstationarity, we introduce a method for assessing stationarity empirically and then "slicing" spike trains into stationary segments according to the statistical definition of weak-sense stationarity. We examine pairwise Pearson <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> (PCCs) under both stationary and nonstationary conditions and identify another source of covariance that can be differentiated from the covariance of the spike times and emerges as a consequence of residual nonstationarities after the slicing process: the covariance of the firing rates defined on each segment. Based on this, a correction of the PCC is introduced that accounts for the effect of segmentation. We probe these methods both on simulated data sets and on in vivo recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving rats. Rather than for removing nonstationarities, the present method may also be used for detecting significant events in spike trains.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5134487','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5134487"><span>A <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlational</span> Analysis between Electroencephalographic and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Signals: Methodological Issues in the Presence of Missing Data and Real Data Results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Morelli, Maria Sole; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Landini, Luigi; Emdin, Michele; Vanello, Nicola</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Electroencephalographic (EEG) irreducible artifacts are common and the removal of corrupted segments from the analysis may be required. The present study aims at exploring the effects of different EEG Missing Data Segment (MDS) distributions on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, involving EEG and physiological signals. The reliability of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis both at single subject and at group level as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of missing data statistics was evaluated using dedicated simulations. Moreover, a Bayesian-based approach for combining the single subject results at group level by considering each subject’s reliability was introduced. Starting from the above considerations, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between EEG Global Field Power (GFP) in delta band and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) during rest and voluntary breath-hold was evaluated in six healthy subjects. The analysis of simulated data results at single subject level revealed a worsening of precision and accuracy in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in the presence of MDS. At the group level, a large improvement in the results’ reliability with respect to single subject analysis was observed. The proposed Bayesian approach showed a slight improvement with respect to simple average results. Real data results were discussed in light of the simulated data tests and of the current physiological findings. PMID:27809243</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27809243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27809243"><span>A <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlational</span> Analysis between Electroencephalographic and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Signals: Methodological Issues in the Presence of Missing Data and Real Data Results.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Morelli, Maria Sole; Giannoni, Alberto; Passino, Claudio; Landini, Luigi; Emdin, Michele; Vanello, Nicola</p> <p>2016-10-31</p> <p>Electroencephalographic (EEG) irreducible artifacts are common and the removal of corrupted segments from the analysis may be required. The present study aims at exploring the effects of different EEG Missing Data Segment (MDS) distributions on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, involving EEG and physiological signals. The reliability of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis both at single subject and at group level as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of missing data statistics was evaluated using dedicated simulations. Moreover, a Bayesian-based approach for combining the single subject results at group level by considering each subject's reliability was introduced. Starting from the above considerations, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between EEG Global Field Power (GFP) in delta band and end-tidal CO₂ (PETCO₂) during rest and voluntary breath-hold was evaluated in six healthy subjects. The analysis of simulated data results at single subject level revealed a worsening of precision and accuracy in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in the presence of MDS. At the group level, a large improvement in the results' reliability with respect to single subject analysis was observed. The proposed Bayesian approach showed a slight improvement with respect to simple average results. Real data results were discussed in light of the simulated data tests and of the current physiological findings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5356M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5356M"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between West Texas Intermediate crude oil and the stock markets of the BRIC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ma, Feng; Wei, Yu; Huang, Dengshi; Zhao, Lin</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties between West Texas Intermediate crude oil and the stock markets of the BRIC. We use not only the qualitative analysis of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> test, but also take the quantitative analysis of the MF-DXA, confirming the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> relationship between West Texas Intermediate crude oil and the stock markets of the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) respectively, which have strongly multifractal features, and the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are more strongly multifractal in the short term than in the long term. Furthermore, based on the multifractal spectrum, we also find the multifractality strength between the crude oil WTI and Chinese stock market is stronger than the multifractality strength of other pairs. Based on the Iraq war (Mar 20, 2003) and the Financial crisis in 2008, we divide sample period into four segments to research the degree of the multifractal (ΔH) and the market efficiency (and the risk). Finally, we employ the technique of the rolling window to calculate the time-varying EI (efficiency index) and dependent on the EI, we can easily observe the change of stock markets. Furthermore, we explore the relationship between bivariate <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> exponents (Hxy(q)) and the generalized Hurst exponents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23469555','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23469555"><span>[Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis: a new method for gait signal analysis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Pingping; Wang, Jun</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of gait signal can mirror the health situations of different people. It is important to analyze the long-range <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> of the two signals of nonstationarity for medical research. In this paper, we propose a detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) method for analyzing the different gait signal in physiological and pathological conditions. Our work dealt with three kinds of gait signals, including those of normal young people (23 to 29 years of age), those of healthy old people (71 to 77 years of age) and those of the old people (60 to 77 years of age) with Parkinson's disease from the MIT-BIH database. We carried out the DCCA for the three gait signals of nonstationarity. The results showed that the self-similarity of gait signal got more unstable with the age increasing and health status worsening. From the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, we found that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> degree of gait signal of young people increased gradually, the healthy old people changed slowly and the Parkinson's disease patients showed unstable changes. We can make medical diagnosis and treatment according to the differences among different gait signals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22518758','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22518758"><span>DECONSTRUCTING THERMAL SUNYAEV–ZEL’DOVICH—GRAVITATIONAL LENSING <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATIONS</span>: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Battaglia, N.; Hill, J. C.; Murray, N.</p> <p>2015-10-20</p> <p>Recent first detections of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the thermal Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (tSZ) signal in Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps with gravitational lensing maps inferred from the Planck CMB data and the CFHTLenS galaxy survey provide new probes of the relationship between baryons and dark matter. Using cosmological hydrodynamics simulations, we show that these <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signals are dominated by contributions from hot gas in the intracluster medium (ICM), rather than diffuse, unbound gas located beyond the virial radius (the “missing baryons”). Thus, these <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> offer a tool with which to study the ICM over a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. In particular, we show that the tSZ—CMB lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is more sensitive to gas in lower-mass, higher-redshift halos and gas at larger cluster-centric radii than the tSZ—galaxy lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. Combining these measurements with primary CMB data will constrain feedback models through their signatures in the ICM pressure profile. We forecast the ability of ongoing and future experiments to constrain the parameters of a phenomenological ICM model, including the mean amplitude of the pressure–mass relation, the redshift evolution of this amplitude, and the mean outer logarithmic slope of the pressure profile. The results are promising, with ≈5%–20% precision constraints achievable with upcoming experiments, even after marginalizing over cosmological parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPA.784..460B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPA.784..460B"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> measurements with the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bourne, Mark M.; Whaley, Jeff; Dolan, Jennifer L.; Polack, John K.; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>New organic-plastic scintillation compositions have demonstrated pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) of neutrons and gamma rays. We present <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements of 252Cf and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) with the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator. For comparison, equivalent measurements were performed with an EJ-309 liquid scintillator. Offline, digital PSD was applied to each detector. These measurements show that EJ-299-33 sacrifices a factor of 5 in neutron-neutron efficiency relative to EJ-309, but could still utilize the difference in neutron-neutron efficiency and neutron single-to-double ratio to distinguish 252Cf from MOX. These measurements were modeled with MCNPX-PoliMi, and MPPost was used to convert the detailed collision history into simulated <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distributions. MCNPX-PoliMi predicted the measured 252Cf <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distribution for EJ-309 to within 10%. Greater photon uncertainty in the MOX sample led to larger discrepancy in the simulated MOX <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distribution. The modeled EJ-299-33 plastic also gives reasonable agreement with measured <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distributions, although the MCNPX-PoliMi model appears to under-predict the neutron detection efficiency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4757146','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4757146"><span><span class="hlt">Functional</span> outcomes and recanalization rates of stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span> in acute ischaemic stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mizzi, Adrian; Pullicino, Richard; Thornton, John; Downer, Jonathan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background and purpose Intra-arterial therapy for acute ischaemic stroke has evolved rapidly in the last few years. Stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span> have now replaced ‘first-generation’ devices, which have been the principle devices tested in stroke trials. Our aims were to determine the rates of successful recanalization and <span class="hlt">functional</span> independence in acute stroke patients treated with stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span>. We also sought to assess the safety outcomes of stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span> by assessing the rates of mortality and intra-cranial haemorrhage. Materials and methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies which utilized stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span> as sole treatment or as part of a multi-modal approach in acute ischaemic stroke. Results We identified 20 eligible studies: 17 on Solitaire (ev3/Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) (n = 762) and three on Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) (n = 210). The mean age of participants was 66.8 (range 62.1–73.0) years and the M:F ratio was 1.1:1. The average stroke severity score (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)) at presentation was 17.2. The weighted mean symptom onset to arterial puncture and procedural duration were 265.4 minutes and 54.8 minutes, respectively. Successful recanalization was achieved in 84.5% of patients with a weighted mean of 2.0 stent <span class="hlt">retriever</span> passes. Independent <span class="hlt">functional</span> outcome was achieved in 51.2% and the mortality rate was 16.8%. Conclusion Stent <span class="hlt">retrievers</span> have the potential to achieve a high rate of recanalization and <span class="hlt">functional</span> independence whilst being relatively safe. They should be assessed in well-designed randomized controlled trials to determine their efficacy and assess whether they compare favourably with ‘standard treatment’ in stroke. PMID:26156097</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cattells+AND+culture+AND+fair+AND+test&id=EJ765011','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cattells+AND+culture+AND+fair+AND+test&id=EJ765011"><span>Aging and Strategic <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> in a Cued-Recall Test: The Role of Executive <span class="hlt">Functions</span> and Fluid Intelligence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Bouazzaoui, Badiaa; Isingrini, Michel</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Cued-recall in episodic memory was investigated in relation to low and high cognitive support at <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, executive <span class="hlt">function</span> level and fluid intelligence level in 81 healthy adults divided first into two age groups (young and elderly adults). The first analyses showed that age-related differences were greater when a low cognitive support was…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810006040','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810006040"><span>Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary <span class="hlt">functional</span> specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> System (LAIRS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and <span class="hlt">functional</span> specifications for the development of LAIRS.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.463.3737C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.463.3737C"><span>CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: testing photometric redshift distributions using angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with spectroscopic galaxy surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilizes measurements of the angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the measured angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey, which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4 per cent. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..400...12M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..400...12M"><span>Autocorrelation and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in time series of homicide and attempted homicide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Machado Filho, A.; da Silva, M. F.; Zebende, G. F.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>We propose in this paper to establish the relationship between homicides and attempted homicides by a non-stationary time-series analysis. This analysis will be carried out by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis (DCCA), and DCCA <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient, ρ(n). Through this analysis we can identify a positive <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between homicides and attempted homicides. At the same time, looked at from the point of view of autocorrelation (DFA), this analysis can be more informative depending on time scale. For short scale (days), we cannot identify auto-correlations, on the scale of weeks DFA presents anti-persistent behavior, and for long time scales (n>90 days) DFA presents a persistent behavior. Finally, the application of this new type of statistical analysis proved to be efficient and, in this sense, this paper can contribute to a more accurate descriptive statistics of crime.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.2915N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.2915N"><span>One-factor model for the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix in the Vietnamese stock market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Quang</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Random matrix theory (RMT) has been applied to the analysis of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix of a financial time series. The most important findings of previous studies using this method are that the eigenvalue spectrum largely follows that of random matrices but the largest eigenvalue is at least one order of magnitude higher than the maximum eigenvalue predicted by RMT. In this work, we investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix in the Vietnamese stock market using RMT and find similar results to those of studies realized in developed markets (US, Europe, Japan) [9-18] as well as in other emerging markets[20,21,19,22]. Importantly, we found that the largest eigenvalue could be approximated by the product of the average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient and the number of stocks studied. We demonstrate this dependence using a simple one-factor model. The model could be extended to describe other characteristics of the realistic data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27795974','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27795974"><span>Versatile soft X-ray-optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for ultrafast applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schick, Daniel; Eckert, Sebastian; Pontius, Niko; Mitzner, Rolf; Föhlisch, Alexander; Holldack, Karsten; Sorgenfrei, Florian</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We present an X-ray-optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for the soft ([Formula: see text]) up to the hard X-ray regime based on a molybdenum-silicon superlattice. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is done by probing intensity and position changes of superlattice Bragg peaks caused by photoexcitation of coherent phonons. This approach is applicable for a wide range of X-ray photon energies as well as for a broad range of excitation wavelengths and requires no external fields or changes of temperature. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> can be employed on a 10 ps or 100 fs time scale featuring up to 50% total X-ray reflectivity and transient signal changes of more than 20%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..456..288P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..456..288P"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of genome sequences using chaos-game representation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pal, Mayukha; Kiran, V. Satya; Rao, P. Madhusudana; Manimaran, P.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We characterized the multifractal nature and power law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between any pair of genome sequence through an integrative approach combining 2D multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis and chaos game representation. In this paper, we have analyzed genomes of some prokaryotes and calculated fractal spectra h(q) and f(α) . From our analysis, we observed existence of multifractal nature and power law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> behavior between any pair of genome sequences. Cluster analysis was performed on the calculated scaling exponents to identify the class affiliation and the same is represented as a dendrogram. We suggest this approach may find applications in next generation sequence analysis, big data analytics etc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..255Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..255Y"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between crude oil market and Chinese ten sector stock markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Liansheng; Zhu, Yingming; Wang, Yudong; Wang, Yiqi</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Based on the daily price data of spot prices of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil and ten CSI300 sector indices in China, we apply multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA) method to investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between crude oil and Chinese sector stock markets. We find that the strength of multifractality between WTI crude oil and energy sector stock market is the highest, followed by the strength of multifractality between WTI crude oil and financial sector market, which reflects a close connection between energy and financial market. Then we do vector autoregression (VAR) analysis to capture the interdependencies among the multiple time series. By comparing the strength of multifractality for original data and residual errors of VAR model, we get a conclusion that vector auto-regression (VAR) model could not be used to describe the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between WTI crude oil and the ten sector stock markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJBC...2630004N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJBC...2630004N"><span>Nonlinear Analysis on <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> of Financial Time Series by Continuum Percolation System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun</p> <p></p> <p>We establish a financial price process by continuum percolation system, in which we attribute price fluctuations to the investors’ attitudes towards the financial market, and consider the clusters in continuum percolation as the investors share the same investment opinion. We investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in two return time series, and analyze the multifractal behaviors in this relationship. Further, we study the corresponding behaviors for the real stock indexes of SSE and HSI as well as the liquid stocks pair of SPD and PAB by comparison. To quantify the multifractality in <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> relationship, we employ multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method to perform an empirical research for the simulation data and the real markets data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..467..326S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..467..326S"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> between the US monetary policy, US dollar index and crude oil market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Xinxin; Lu, Xinsheng; Yue, Gongzheng; Li, Jianfeng</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the US monetary policy, US dollar index and WTI crude oil market, using a dataset covering a period from February 4, 1994 to February 29, 2016. Our study contributes to the literature by examining the effect of the US monetary policy on US dollar index and WTI crude oil through the MF-DCCA approach. The empirical results show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the three sets of time series exhibit strong multifractal features with the strength of multifractality increasing over the sample period. Employing a rolling window analysis, our empirical results show that the US monetary policy operations have clear influences on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> behavior of the three time series covered by this study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...11..050B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...11..050B"><span>Needlet estimation of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between CMB lensing maps and LSS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bianchini, Federico; Renzi, Alessandro; Marinucci, Domenico</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In this paper we develop a novel needlet-based estimator to investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing maps and large-scale structure (LSS) data. We compare this estimator with its harmonic counterpart and, in particular, we analyze the bias effects of different forms of masking. In order to address this bias, we also implement a MASTER-like technique in the needlet case. The resulting estimator turns out to have an extremely good signal-to-noise performance. Our analysis aims at expanding and optimizing the operating domains in CMB-LSS <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> studies, similarly to CMB needlet data analysis. It is motivated especially by next generation experiments (such as Euclid) which will allow us to derive much tighter constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements between CMB and LSS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5065566','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5065566"><span>Versatile soft X-ray-optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for ultrafast applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Schick, Daniel; Eckert, Sebastian; Pontius, Niko; Mitzner, Rolf; Föhlisch, Alexander; Holldack, Karsten; Sorgenfrei, Florian</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We present an X-ray-optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for the soft (>150 eV) up to the hard X-ray regime based on a molybdenum-silicon superlattice. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is done by probing intensity and position changes of superlattice Bragg peaks caused by photoexcitation of coherent phonons. This approach is applicable for a wide range of X-ray photon energies as well as for a broad range of excitation wavelengths and requires no external fields or changes of temperature. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> can be employed on a 10 ps or 100 fs time scale featuring up to 50% total X-ray reflectivity and transient signal changes of more than 20%. PMID:27795974</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930057659&hterms=dmr&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddmr','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930057659&hterms=dmr&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddmr"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between the 170 GHz survey map and the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ganga, Ken; Cheng, ED; Meyer, Stephan; Page, Lyman</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This letter describes results of a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the 170 GHz partial-sky survey, made with a 3.8 deg beam balloon-borne instrument, and the COBE DMR 'Fit Technique' reduced galaxy all-sky map with a beam of 7 deg. The strong correlation between the data sets implies that the observed structure is consistent with thermal variations in a 2.7 K emitter. A chi-square analysis applied to the correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> rules out the assumption that there is no structure in either of the two maps. A second test shows that if the DMR map has structure but the 170 GHz map does not, the probability of obtaining the observed correlation is small. Further analyses support the assumption that both maps have structure and that the 170 GHz-DMR <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is consistent with the analogous DMR correlation <span class="hlt">function</span>. Maps containing various combinations of noise and Harrison-Zel'dovich power spectra are simulated and correlated to reinforce the result. The correlation provides compelling evidence that both instruments have observed fluctuations consistent with anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3913K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3913K"><span>Waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> at the International Data Centre: comparison with Reviewed Event Bulletin and regional catalogues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kitov, Ivan; Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail; Johansson, Peder</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> substantially improves detection, phase association, and event building procedures at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. There were 50% to 100% events extra to the official Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) were found in the aftershock sequences of small, middle size, and very big earthquakes. Several per cent of the events reported in the REB were not found with <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> even when all aftershocks were used as master events. These REB events are scrutinized in interactive analysis in order to reveal the reason of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> failure. As a corroborative method, we use detailed regional catalogues, which often include aftershocks with magnitudes between 2.0 and 3.0. Since the resolution of regional networks is by at least one unit of magnitude higher, the REB events missed from the relevant regional catalogues are considered as bogus. We compare events by origin time and location because the regional networks and the International Monitoring System are based on different sets of seismic stations and phase comparison is not possible. Three intracontinental sequences have been studied: after the March 20, 2008 earthquake in China (mb(IDC)=5.4), the May 20, 2012 event in Italy (mb(IDC)=5.3), and one earthquake (mb(IDC)=5.6) in Virginia, USA (August 23, 2011). Overall, most of the events not found by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> are missing from the relevant regional catalogues. At the same time, these catalogues confirm most of additional REB events found only by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>. This observation supports all previous findings of the improved quality of events built by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92e2815K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92e2815K"><span>Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> fluctuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient ρDCCA has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ρDCCA works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span>, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ρDCCA that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ρq not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ρq works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q -dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014443','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014443"><span>Method for utilizing properties of the sinc(x) <span class="hlt">function</span> for phase <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> on nyquist-under-sampled data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey Scott (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor)</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Disclosed herein are systems, methods, and non-transitory computer-readable storage media for simulating propagation of an electromagnetic field, performing phase <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, or sampling a band-limited <span class="hlt">function</span>. A system practicing the method generates transformed data using a discrete Fourier transform which samples a band-limited <span class="hlt">function</span> f(x) without interpolating or modifying received data associated with the <span class="hlt">function</span> f(x), wherein an interval between repeated copies in a periodic extension of the <span class="hlt">function</span> f(x) obtained from the discrete Fourier transform is associated with a sampling ratio Q, defined as a ratio of a sampling frequency to a band-limited frequency, and wherein Q is assigned a value between 1 and 2 such that substantially no aliasing occurs in the transformed data, and <span class="hlt">retrieves</span> a phase in the received data based on the transformed data, wherein the phase is used as feedback to an optical system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S43G2555G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S43G2555G"><span>Seismicity of the North Atlantic as measured by the International Data Centre using waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Given, J. W.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I. O.; Spiliopoulos, S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Technical Secretariat (TS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) will carry out the verification of the CTBT which obligates each State Party not to carry out any nuclear explosions, independently of their size and purpose. The International Data Centre (IDC) receives, collects, processes, analyses, reports on and archives data from the International Monitoring System(IMS). The IDC is responsible for automatic and interactive processing of the IMS data and for standard IDC products. The IDC is also required by the Treaty to progressively enhance its technical capabilities. In this study, we use waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> as a technique to improve the detection capability and reliability of the seismic part of the IMS. In order to quantitatively estimate the gain obtained by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> on the current sensitivity of automatic and interactive processing we compared seismic bulletins built for the North Atlantic (NA), which is an isolated region with earthquakes concentrating around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This avoids the influence of adjacent seismic regions on the final bulletins: the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) issued by the International Data Centre and the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> Standard Event List (XSEL). We have <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlated</span> waveforms from ~1500 events reported in the REB since 2009. The resulting <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> matrix revealed the best candidates for master events. High-quality signals (SNR>5.0) recorded at eighteen array stations from approximately 50 master events evenly distributed over the seismically active zone in the NA were selected as templates. These templates are used for a continuous calculation of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> coefficients since 2011. All detections obtained by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are then used to build events according to the current IDC definition, i.e. at least three primary stations with accurate arrival times, azimuth and slowness estimates. The qualified event hypotheses populated the XSEL. In</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3920K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3920K"><span>Seismicity of the North Atlantic as measured by the International Data Centre using waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kitov, Ivan; Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The Technical Secretariat (TS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) will carry out the verification of the CTBT which obligates each State Party not to carry out nuclear explosions. The International Data Centre (IDC) receives, collects, processes, analyses, reports on and archives data from the International Monitoring System. The IDC is responsible for automatic and interactive processing of the International Monitoring System (IMS) data and for standard IDC products. The IDC is also required by the Treaty to progressively enhance its technical capabilities. In this study, we use waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> as a technique to improve the detection capability and reliability of the seismic part of the IMS. In order to quantitatively estimate the gain obtained by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> on the current sensitivity of automatic and interactive processing we compared seismic bulletins built for the North Atlantic (NA), which is a seismically isolated region with earthquakes concentrating around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This allows avoiding the spill-over of mislocated events between adjacent seismic regions and biases in the final bulletins: the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) issued by the IDC and the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> Standard Event List (XSEL). To begin with, we <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlated</span> waveforms recorded at 18 IMS array stations from ~1500 events reported in the REB between 2009 and 2011. The resulting <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> matrix revealed the best candidates for master events. We have selected 60 master events evenly distributed over the seismically active zone in the NA. High-quality signals (SNR>5.0) recorded by 10 most sensitive array stations were used as waveform templates. These templates are used for a continuous calculation of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> coefficients in the first half of 2012. All detections obtained by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are then used to build events according to the current IDC definition: at least three primary stations with accurate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IAUS..290..249L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IAUS..290..249L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of X-rays for 4U 1608-52</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Y. J.; Zhang, H. T.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, Y. H.</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>We study the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between X-rays of different energies for the atoll-type source 4U 1608-52 with RXTE, and find the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> evolutes along the different branches. The anti-correlation is reported from the Galactic black hole candidates and Z-type luminous sources in their hard states. Our results are a little different from the Z-type sources. Here we provide the first evidence that a similar anti-correlated feature can also be found in atoll-type source, and it is not corresponding to the lowest accretion rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhyA..390..837L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhyA..390..837L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> in volume space: Differences between buy and sell volumes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Sun Young; Hwang, Dong Il; Kim, Min Jae; Koh, In Gyu; Kim, Soo Yong</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>We study the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of buy and sell volumes on the Korean stock market in high frequency. We observe that the pulling effects of volumes are as small as that of returns. The properties of the correlations of buy and sell volumes differ. They are explained by the degree of synchronization of stock volumes. Further, the pulling effects on the minimal spanning tree are studied. In minimal spanning trees with directed links, the large pulling effects are clustered at the center, not uniformly distributed. The Epps effect of buy and sell volumes are observed. The reversal of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of buy and sell volumes is also detected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730037253&hterms=BZ&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DBZ','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730037253&hterms=BZ&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DBZ"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis of the AE index and the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meng, C.-I.; Tsurutani, B.; Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S.-I.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> study between magnetospheric activity (the AE index) and the southward-directed component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is made for a total of 792 hours (33 days) with a time resolution of about 5.5 min. The peak correlation tends to occur when the interplanetary data are shifted approximately 40 min later with respect to the AE index data. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis is conducted on some idealized wave forms to illustrate that this delay between southward turning of the IMF and the AE index should not be interpreted as being the duration of the growth phase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18345725','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18345725"><span>Small-scale seismic inversion using surface waves extracted from noise <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gouédard, Pierre; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> between receivers from the correlation of ambient seismic noise or with an appropriate set of randomly distributed sources. This principle is demonstrated in small-scale geophysics using noise sources generated by human steps during a 10-min walk in the alignment of a 14-m-long accelerometer line array. The time-domain correlation of the records yields two surface wave modes extracted from the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> between each pair of accelerometers. A frequency-wave-number Fourier analysis yields each mode contribution and their dispersion curve. These dispersion curves are then inverted to provide the one-dimensional shear velocity of the near surface.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10611957N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10611957N"><span>Characterization and field use of a CCD camera system for <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of bidirectional reflectance distribution <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nandy, P.; Thome, K.; Biggar, S.</p> <p>2001-06-01</p> <p>Vicarious calibration and field validation is a critical aspect of NASA's Earth Observing System program. As part of calibration and validation research related to this project, the Remote Sensing Group (RSG) of the Optical Science Center at the University of Arizona has developed an imaging radiometer for ground-based measurements of directional reflectance. The system relies on a commercially available 1024×1024 pixel, silicon CCD array. Angular measurements are accomplished using a fish-eye lens that has a full 180° field of view with each pixel on the CCD array having a nominal 0.2° field of view. Spectral selection is through four interference filters centered at 470, 575, 660, and 835 nm. The system is designed such that the entire 180° field is collected at one time with a complete multispectral data set collected in under 2 min. The results of laboratory experiments have been used to determine the gain and offset of each detector element as well as the effects of the lens on the system response. Measurements of a stable source using multiple integration times and at multiple distances for a set integration time indicate the system is linear to better than 0.5% over the upper 88% of the dynamic range of the system. The point spread <span class="hlt">function</span> (PSF) of the lens system was measured for several field angles, and the signal level was found to fall to less than 1% of the peak signal within 1.5° for the on-axis case. The effect of this PSF on the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of modeled BRDFs is shown to be less than 0.2% out to view angles of 70°. The degree of polarization of the system is shown to be negligible for on-axis imaging but to have up to a 20% effect at a field angle of 70°. The effect of the system polarization on the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of modeled BRDFs is shown to be up to 3% for field angles of 70° off nadir and with a solar zenith angle of 70°. Field measurements are made by mounting the camera to a boom mounted to a large tripod that is aligned toward south. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17182162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17182162"><span>Aging and strategic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in a cued-recall test: the role of executive <span class="hlt">functions</span> and fluid intelligence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Bouazzaoui, Badiâa; Isingrini, Michel</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>Cued-recall in episodic memory was investigated in relation to low and high cognitive support at <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, executive <span class="hlt">function</span> level and fluid intelligence level in 81 healthy adults divided first into two age groups (young and elderly adults). The first analyses showed that age-related differences were greater when a low cognitive support was provided to recall the words. An individual index of loss of performance when the number of cues was decreased was then calculated. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that the executive <span class="hlt">functions</span> measure (perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was a better candidate than the fluid intelligence measure (Cattell's culture fair test) to account for the age-related variance of the size of performance loss. These findings suggest that age differences in implementing strategic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> may be mainly due to a decline in executive <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952461','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952461"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlative</span> 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and <span class="hlt">function</span>. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047125','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047125"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> based time delay estimation for turbulent flow velocity measurements: Statistical considerations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tal, Balazs; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sandor; Veres, Gabor; Por, Gabor</p> <p>2011-12-15</p> <p>Time delay estimation methods (TDE) are well-known techniques to investigate poloidal flows in hot magnetized plasmas through the propagation properties of turbulent structures in the medium. One of these methods is based on the estimation of the time lag at which the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF) estimation reaches its maximum value. The uncertainty of the peak location refers to the smallest determinable flow velocity modulation, and therefore the standard deviation of the time delay imposes important limitation to the measurements. In this article, the relative standard deviation of the CCF estimation and the standard deviation of its peak location are calculated analytically using a simple model of turbulent signals. This model assumes independent (non interacting) overlapping events (coherent structures) with randomly distributed spatio-temporal origins moving with background flow. The result of our calculations is the derivation of a general formula for the CCF variance, which is valid not exclusively in the high event density limit, but also for arbitrary event densities. Our formula reproduces the well known expression for high event densities previously published in the literature. In this paper we also present a derivation of the variance of time delay estimation that turns out to be inversely proportional to the applied time window. The derived formulas were tested in real plasma measurements. The calculations are an extension of the earlier work of Bencze and Zoletnik [Phys. Plasmas 12, 052323 (2005)] where the autocorrelation-width technique was developed. Additionally, we show that velocities calculated by a TDE method possess a broadband noise which originates from this variance, its power spectral density cannot be decreased by worsening the time resolution and can be coherent with noises of other velocity measurements where the same turbulent structures are used. This noise should not be confused with the impact of zero mean frequency zonal flow</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MsT.........13S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MsT.........13S"><span><span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> calculations and neutron scattering analysis for a portable solid state neutron detection system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saltos, Andrea</p> <p></p> <p>In efforts to perform accurate dosimetry, Oakes et al. [Nucl. Intrum. Mehods. (2013)] introduced a new portable solid state neutron rem meter based on an adaptation of the Bonner sphere and the position sensitive long counter. The system utilizes high thermal efficiency neutron detectors to generate a linear combination of measurement signals that are used to estimate the incident neutron spectra. The inversion problem associated to deduce dose from the counts in individual detector elements is addressed by applying a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method which allows estimation of dose with average errors less than 15%. In this work, an evaluation of the performance of this system was extended to take into account new correlation techniques and neutron scattering contribution. To test the effectiveness of correlations, the Distance correlation, Pearson Product-Moment correlation, and their weighted versions were performed between measured spatial detector responses obtained from nine different test spectra, and the spatial response of Library <span class="hlt">functions</span> generated by MCNPX. Results indicate that there is no advantage of using the Distance Correlation over the Pearson Correlation, and that weighted versions of these correlations do not increase their performance in evaluating dose. Both correlations were proven to work well even at low integrated doses measured for short periods of time. To evaluate the contribution produced by room-return neutrons on the dosimeter response, MCNPX was used to simulate dosimeter responses for five isotropic neutron sources placed inside different sizes of rectangular concrete rooms. Results show that the contribution of scattered neutrons to the response of the dosimeter can be significant, so that for most cases the dose is over predicted with errors as large as 500%. A possible method to correct for the contribution of room-return neutrons is also assessed and can be used as a good initial estimate on how to approach the problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..442C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..442C"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> patterns in social opinion formation with sequential data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chakrabarti, Anindya S.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Recent research on large-scale internet data suggests existence of patterns in the collective behavior of billions of people even though each of them may pursue own activities. In this paper, we interpret online rating activity as a process of forming social opinion about individual items, where people sequentially choose a rating based on the current information set comprising all previous ratings and own preferences. We construct an opinion index from the sequence of ratings and we show that (1) movie-specific opinion converges much slower than an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) sequence of ratings, (2) rating sequence for individual movies shows lesser variation compared to an i.i.d. sequence of ratings, (3) the probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> of the asymptotic opinions has more spread than that defined over opinion arising from i.i.d. sequence of ratings, (4) opinion sequences across movies are correlated with significantly higher and lower correlation compared to opinion constructed from i.i.d. sequence of ratings, creating a bimodal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> structure. By decomposing the temporal correlation structures from panel data of movie ratings, we show that the social effects are very prominent whereas group effects cannot be differentiated from those of surrogate data and individual effects are quite small. The former explains a large part of extreme positive or negative correlations between sequences of opinions. In general, this method can be applied to any rating data to extract social or group-specific effects in correlation structures. We conclude that in this particular case, social effects are important in opinion formation process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..338H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..338H"><span>Oil price and exchange rate co-movements in Asian countries: Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hussain, Muntazir; Zebende, Gilney Figueira; Bashir, Usman; Donghong, Ding</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Most empirical literature investigates the relation between oil prices and exchange rate through different models. These models measure this relationship on two time scales (long and short terms), and often fail to observe the co-movement of these variables at different time scales. We apply a detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> approach (DCCA) to investigate the co-movements of the oil price and exchange rate in 12 Asian countries. This model determines the co-movements of oil price and exchange rate at different time scale. The exchange rate and oil price time series indicate unit root problem. Their correlation and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are very difficult to measure. The result becomes spurious when periodic trend or unit root problem occurs in these time series. This approach measures the possible <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> at different time scale and controlling the unit root problem. Our empirical results support the co-movements of oil prices and exchange rate. Our results support a weak negative <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between oil price and exchange rate for most Asian countries included in our sample. The results have important monetary, fiscal, inflationary, and trade policy implications for these countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/950875','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/950875"><span>Lenses in the forest: <span class="hlt">cross--correlation</span> of the Lyman-alpha flux with CMB lensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vallinotto, Alberto; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.; Viel, Matteo; /Trieste Observ. /INFN, Trieste</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>We present a theoretical estimate for a new observable: the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the Lyman-{alpha}-flux fluctuations in quasar (QSO) spectra and the convergence of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured along the same line-of-sight. As a first step toward the assessment of its detectability, we estimate the signal-to-noise ratio using linear theory. Although the signal-to-noise is small for a single line-of-sight and peaks at somewhat smaller redshifts than those probed by the Lyman-{alpha} forest, we estimate a total signal-to-noise of 9 for <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> QSO spectra of SDSSIII with Planck and 20 for <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> with a future polarization based CMB experiment. The detection of this effect would be a direct measure of the neutral hydrogen-matter <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and could provide important information on the growth of structures at large scales in a redshift range which is still poorly probed by observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S23D0197B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S23D0197B"><span>Ambient Noise <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Surface Wave Tomography of the Continental United States and Alaska.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bensen, G. D.; McCoy, C.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Shapiro, N. M.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>The recent development of surface wave tomography based on ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> has provided good results on regional scales and relatively short periods less than 40 seconds. This technique however is viable at longer periods and on the continental scale. We present dispersion maps from ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross</span>- <span class="hlt">correlation</span> surface-wave tomography for the continental United States and Alaska between 10 and 60 seconds period. Using up to 2 years of data from over 250 permanent and temporary stations obtained from the IRIS DMC and the Canadian National Seismic Network we compute <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> for all station pairs. An automated dispersion analysis technique is applied to obtain Rayleigh wave group and phase speed curves and unacceptable measurements are removed. Dispersion curves from over 12,500 paths are retained in the continental US and about 1,000 <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and earthquake paths result in Alaska. We obtain isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps on a one half degree grid using a damped ray theoretical inversion. Compared to previous teleseismic earthquake techniques, the short period maps provide better resolution of smaller scale features, especially those in the crust. The improved path coverage also enhances resolution at longer periods compared to previous maps with better delineation of tectonic provinces. In Alaska, limited station coverage and earthquake distribution confine the results to the south-central part of the state. Preliminary azimuthally anisotropic Rayleigh wave tomography maps are also presented together with an assessment of their robustness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1045408','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1045408"><span>The importance of transport parameter <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in natural systems radioactive transport models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Reimus, Paul W</p> <p>2011-01-03</p> <p>Transport parameter <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> are rarely considered in models used to predict radionuclide transport in natural systems. In this paper, it is shown that parameter <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> could have a significant impact on radionuclide transport predictions in saturated media. In fractured rock, the positive correlation between fracture apertures and groundwater residence times is shown to result in significantly less retardation due to matrix diffusion than is predicted without the correlation. The suppression of matrix diffusion is further amplified by a tendency toward larger apertures, smaller matrix diffusion coefficients, and less sorption capacity in rocks of lower matrix porosity. In a hypothetical example, strong <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between these parameters result in a decrease in predicted radionuclide travel times of an order of magnitude or more relative to travel times calculated with uncorrelated parameters. In porous media, expected correlations between permeability, porosity, and sorption capacity also result in shorter predicted travel times than when the parameters are assumed to be uncorrelated. Individual parameter standard deviations can also have a significant influence on predicted radionuclide travel times, particularly when <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> are considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94d2307O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94d2307O"><span>Multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> effects in two-variable time series of complex network vertex observables</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>OświÈ©cimka, Paweł; Livi, Lorenzo; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We investigate the scaling of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> calculated for two-variable time series containing vertex properties in the context of complex networks. Time series of such observables are obtained by means of stationary, unbiased random walks. We consider three vertex properties that provide, respectively, short-, medium-, and long-range information regarding the topological role of vertices in a given network. In order to reveal the relation between these quantities, we applied the multifractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis technique, which provides information about the nonlinear effects in coupling of time series. We show that the considered network models are characterized by unique multifractal properties of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. In particular, it is possible to distinguish between Erdös-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, and Watts-Strogatz networks on the basis of fractal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. Moreover, the analysis of protein contact networks reveals characteristics shared with both scale-free and small-world models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..403...35S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..403...35S"><span>Multiscale multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of financial time series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Wenbin; Shang, Pengjian; Wang, Jing; Lin, Aijing</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we introduce a method called multiscale multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MM-DCCA). The method allows us to extend the description of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties between two time series. MM-DCCA may provide new ways of measuring the nonlinearity of two signals, and it helps to present much richer information than multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA) by sweeping all the range of scale at which the multifractal structures of complex system are discussed. Moreover, to illustrate the advantages of this approach we make use of the MM-DCCA to analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> properties between financial time series. We show that this new method can be adapted to investigate stock markets under investigation. It can provide a more faithful and more interpretable description of the dynamic mechanism between financial time series than traditional MF-DCCA. We also propose to reduce the scale ranges to analyze short time series, and some inherent properties which remain hidden when a wide range is used may exhibit perfectly in this way.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAG...135...55A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAG...135...55A"><span>Refinement of arrival-time picks using a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> based workflow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Akram, Jubran; Eaton, David W.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We propose a new iterative workflow based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for improved arrival-time picking on microseismic data. In this workflow, signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and polarity weighted stacking are used to minimize the effect of S/N and polarity fluctuations on the pilot waveform computation. We use an exhaustive search technique for polarity estimation through stack power maximization. We use pseudo-synthetic and real microseismic data from western Canada in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed workflow relative to Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a previously published <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> based method. The pseudo-synthetic microseismic waveforms are obtained by introducing Gaussian noise and polarity fluctuations into waveforms from a high S/N microseismic event. We find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> based approaches yield more accurate arrival-time picks as compared to AIC for low S/N waveforms. AIC is not affected by waveform polarities as it works on individual receiver levels whereas the accuracy of existing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method decreases in spite of using envelope correlation. We show that our proposed workflow yields better and consistent arrival-time picks regardless of waveform amplitude and polarity variations within the receiver array. After refinement, the initial arrival-time picks are located closer to the best estimated manual picks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPLB...2850090C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPLB...2850090C"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the Chinese domestic and international gold markets based on DCCA and DMCA methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Guangxi; Han, Yan; Chen, Yuemeng; Yang, Chunxia</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Based on the daily price data of Shanghai and London gold spot markets, we applied detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) and detrended moving average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DMCA) methods to quantify power-law <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between domestic and international gold markets. Results show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the Chinese domestic and international gold spot markets are multifractal. Furthermore, forward DMCA and backward DMCA seems to outperform DCCA and centered DMCA for short-range gold series, which confirms the comparison results of short-range artificial data in L. Y. He and S. P. Chen [Physica A 390 (2011) 3806-3814]. Finally, we analyzed the local multifractal characteristics of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between Chinese domestic and international gold markets. We show that multifractal characteristics of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the Chinese domestic and international gold markets are time-varying and that multifractal characteristics were strengthened by the financial crisis in 2007-2008.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812188E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812188E"><span>Using the CARDAMOM framework to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> global terrestrial ecosystem <span class="hlt">functioning</span> properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Exbrayat, Jean-François; Bloom, A. Anthony; Smallman, T. Luke; van der Velde, Ivar R.; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Terrestrial ecosystems act as a sink for anthropogenic emissions of fossil-fuel and thereby partially offset the ongoing global warming. However, recent model benchmarking and intercomparison studies have highlighted the non-trivial uncertainties that exist in our understanding of key ecosystem properties like plant carbon allocation and residence times. It leads to worrisome differences in terrestrial carbon stocks simulated by Earth system models, and their evolution in a warming future. In this presentation we attempt to provide global insights on these properties by merging an ecosystem model with remotely-sensed global observations of leaf area and biomass through a data-assimilation system: the CARbon Data MOdel fraMework (CARDAMOM). CARDAMOM relies on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> confidence intervals of model parameters that regulate ecosystem properties independently of any prior land-cover information. The MCMC method thereby enables an explicit representation of the uncertainty in land-atmosphere fluxes and the evolution of terrestrial carbon stocks through time. Global experiments are performed for the first decade of the 21st century using a 1°×1° spatial resolution. Relationships emerge globally between key ecosystem properties. For example, our analyses indicate that leaf lifespan and leaf mass per area are highly correlated. Furthermore, there exists a latitudinal gradient in allocation patterns: high latitude ecosystems allocate more carbon to photosynthetic carbon (leaves) while plants invest more carbon in their structural parts (wood and root) in the wet tropics. Overall, the spatial distribution of these ecosystem properties does not correspond to usual land-cover maps and are also partially correlated with disturbance regimes. For example, fire-prone ecosystems present statistically significant higher values of carbon use efficiency than less disturbed ecosystems experiencing similar climatic conditions. These results</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968479','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968479"><span>Muscle <span class="hlt">function</span> recovery in golden <span class="hlt">retriever</span> muscular dystrophy after AAV1-U7 exon skipping.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vulin, Adeline; Barthélémy, Inès; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Beley, Cyriaque; Griffith, Graziella; Benchaouir, Rachid; le Hir, Maëva; Unterfinger, Yves; Lorain, Stéphanie; Dreyfus, Patrick; Voit, Thomas; Carlier, Pierre; Blot, Stéphane; Garcia, Luis</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from lesions of the gene encoding dystrophin. These usually consist of large genomic deletions, the extents of which are not correlated with the severity of the phenotype. Out-of-frame deletions give rise to dystrophin deficiency and severe DMD phenotypes, while internal deletions that produce in-frame mRNAs encoding truncated proteins can lead to a milder myopathy known as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Widespread restoration of dystrophin expression via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated exon skipping has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse model and in cardiac muscle after percutaneous transendocardial delivery in the golden <span class="hlt">retriever</span> muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) model. Here, a set of optimized U7snRNAs carrying antisense sequences designed to rescue dystrophin were delivered into GRMD skeletal muscles by AAV1 gene transfer using intramuscular injection or forelimb perfusion. We show sustained correction of the dystrophic phenotype in extended muscle areas and partial recovery of muscle strength. Muscle architecture was improved and fibers displayed the hallmarks of mature and <span class="hlt">functional</span> units. A 5-year follow-up ruled out immune rejection drawbacks but showed a progressive decline in the number of corrected muscle fibers, likely due to the persistence of a mild dystrophic process such as occurs in BMD phenotypes. Although AAV-mediated exon skipping was shown safe and efficient to rescue a truncated dystrophin, it appears that recurrent treatments would be required to maintain therapeutic benefit ahead of the progression of the disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120009492','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120009492"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieving</span> Aerosol in a Cloudy Environment: Aerosol Availability as a <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Spatial and Temporal Resolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Remer, Lorraine A.; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.; Heidinger, Andrew; Pierce, R. Bradley; Chin, Mian</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The challenge of using satellite observations to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> availability at different instrument pixel resolutions, using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the technqiues used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol <span class="hlt">retrievals</span>. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5x0.5 km for MODIS and 1x1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1x1 km, 2x2 km, 4x4 km and 8x8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8x8 km. The results show that as pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8x8 km 70% to 85% of the <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> available at 0.5 km have been lost. The diurnal pattern of aerosol <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> availability examined for one day in the summer suggests that coarse resolution sensors (i.e., 4x4 km or 8x8 km) may be able to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> aerosol early in the morning that would otherwise be missed at the time of current polar orbiting satellites, but not the diurnal aerosol properties due to cloud cover developed during the day. In contrast finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1x1 km or 2x2 km) have much better opportunity to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> aerosols in the partly cloudy scenes and better chance of returning the diurnal aerosol properties. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and that a generic cloud mask</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.458.3399W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.458.3399W"><span>Intensity mapping <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>: connecting the largest scales to galaxy evolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wolz, L.; Tonini, C.; Blake, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen (H I) is a new observational tool to efficiently map the large-scale structure over wide redshift ranges. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of intensity maps with galaxy surveys is a robust measure of the cosmological power spectrum and the H I content of galaxies which diminishes systematics caused by instrumental effects and foreground removal. We examine the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signature at redshift 0.9 using a semi-analytical galaxy formation model in order to model the H I gas of galaxies as well as their optical magnitudes. We determine the scale-dependent clustering of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> power for different types of galaxies determined by their colours, which act as a proxy for their star formation activity. We find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient with H I density for red quiescent galaxies falls off more quickly on smaller scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1 than for blue star-forming galaxies. Additionally, we create a mock catalogue of highly star-forming galaxies to mimic the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, and use this to predict existing and future measurements using data from the Green Bank telescope and Parkes telescope. We find that the cross-power of highly star-forming galaxies shows a higher clustering on small scales than any other galaxy type and that this significantly alters the power spectrum shape on scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1. We show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient is not negligible when interpreting the cosmological cross-power spectrum and additionally contains information about the H I content of the optically selected galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6748P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6748P"><span><span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of chemical profiles in minerals: insights into the architecture of magmatic reservoirs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Probst, Line; Caricchi, Luca; Gander, Martin; Wallace, Glenn</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Analysis of chemical zoning in minerals offers the opportunity to reconstruct the pre-eruptive conditions and the temporal evolution of magmatic reservoirs. The chemical composition of minerals is a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir from which they grow and therefore minerals record the evolution and variation of residual melt chemistry and intensive parameters within the magmatic system. A quantitative approach is required to determine if similar crystals actually shared a portion of their crystallisation history. These analyses are in many cases extremely time consuming and rather expensive. Therefore, it is not always possible to analyse a statically significant number of crystals, especially within their textural context in thin sections and that is the main reason to build automated methods. We are presenting a numerical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method that compares the zonation pattern of minerals to identify if they share the totality or part of their growth history. We modified the method first developed by Wallace and Bergantz (2004) to compare profiles in minerals also from samples collected in different outcrops and that can be used for any dataset (i.e. geochemical proxies in stratigraphic sections). The main purpose of this method is to objectively compare chemical profiles in minerals (collected by electron microprobe, LA-ICP-MS or cathodoluminescence images) and quantify their degree of similarity. For this purpose, we use a well-known mathematical tool: the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> which is a way of quantifying the difference between two given signals at a given position. Once our program was built, we performed tests using a set of synthetic profiles, profiles acquired along different transects of the same mineral and also on different minerals. Finally we applied our program to about 100 zircons from Kilgore Tuff, Heise Volcanic Field (USA) collected at different stratigraphic levels in two different outcrops. The correlation shows that</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15839797','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15839797"><span>Inverted-U <span class="hlt">function</span> between salivary cortisol and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of verbal memory after hydrocortisone treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Domes, Gregor; Rothfischer, Julia; Reichwald, Ursula; Hautzinger, Martin</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>The present study investigated the effect of a single oral dose of hydrocortisone (cortisol) on <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of verbal and nonverbal declarative memory. Fifty-nine healthy participants were randomly assigned to either receive 25 mg cortisol or a placebo 45 min before <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in a standardized memory test procedure. There was no global effect of cortisol on either verbal or nonverbal memory. However, a specific negative effect on free recall of associative verbal material appeared. In addition, high responders (salivary cortisol concentration>68.25 nmol/L) exhibited impaired verbal memory compared with low responders (<68.25 nmol/L). The results suggest specific nonlinear effects of cortisol on declarative memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, which appear to be more pronounced for verbal material.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8314E..06Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8314E..06Y"><span>Fully automated prostate segmentation in 3D MR based on normalized gradient fields <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> initialization and LOGISMOS refinement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yin, Yin; Fotin, Sergei V.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Cornud, François; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Manual delineation of the prostate is a challenging task for a clinician due to its complex and irregular shape. Furthermore, the need for precisely targeting the prostate boundary continues to grow. Planning for radiation therapy, MR-ultrasound fusion for image-guided biopsy, multi-parametric MRI tissue characterization, and context-based organ <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> are examples where accurate prostate delineation can play a critical role in a successful patient outcome. Therefore, a robust automated full prostate segmentation system is desired. In this paper, we present an automated prostate segmentation system for 3D MR images. In this system, the prostate is segmented in two steps: the prostate displacement and size are first detected, and then the boundary is refined by a shape model. The detection approach is based on normalized gradient fields <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. This approach is fast, robust to intensity variation and provides good accuracy to initialize a prostate mean shape model. The refinement model is based on a graph-search based framework, which contains both shape and topology information during deformation. We generated the graph cost using trained classifiers and used coarse-to-fine search and region-specific classifier training. The proposed algorithm was developed using 261 training images and tested on another 290 cases. The segmentation performance using mean DSC ranging from 0.89 to 0.91 depending on the evaluation subset demonstrates state of the art performance. Running time for the system is about 20 to 40 seconds depending on image size and resolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PEPI..265...92C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PEPI..265...92C"><span>Inferences on the lithospheric structure of Campi Flegrei District (southern Italy) from seismic noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Costanzo, M. R.; Nunziata, C.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Lithospheric VS models are defined in the Campi Flegrei District (southern Italy) through the non-linear inversion of the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves extracted from ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between two receivers, and the regional group and phase velocities of the Italian cellular lithospheric model (1° × 1° cells). Four paths are investigated, of which one (ISCHIA-MIS) across two adjoining cells. The distribution of VS shows a pyroclastic covering with VS increasing from 0.3-0.7 km/s to 2.1 km/s. It rests on a lava or carbonate basement, about 5-6 km thick, with VS increasing from 2.1 km/s to 3.1 km/s at about 2 km of depth and rising to ∼0.6 km towards the island of Procida. A metamorphic layer is detected at an average depth of 7.7 km with VS of 3.8-3.9 km/s, about 5 km thick, overlying a low velocity layer (VS of 3.5 km/s) at about 11-12 km of depth. The VS model along the ISCHIA-MIS path, as average of the models obtained by combining local and regional dispersion data of the two adjoining cells, is well consistent with the other paths. The Moho discontinuity is <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> at about 23 km of depth with VS of 4.2 km/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17055702','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17055702"><span>Modeling of context-dependent <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in hippocampal region CA1: implications for cognitive <span class="hlt">function</span> in schizophrenia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Siekmeier, Peter J; Hasselmo, Michael E; Howard, Marc W; Coyle, Joseph</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The symptoms of schizophrenia may be associated with reductions in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) <span class="hlt">function</span>. This is suggested by the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA antagonists, the ameliorative effects of NMDAR indirect agonists, elevated levels of the NMDA antagonist N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) in schizophrenic brain, and findings from recent genetic studies. However, the link between reduced NMDAR <span class="hlt">function</span> and the behavioral features of schizophrenics has not been made explicit. Here we present a network simulation of hippocampal <span class="hlt">function</span>, focused on <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of verbal stimuli in human memory tasks. Specifically, we trained a computational model of the hippocampal complex to perform a context-dependent paired associate task, a free recall task with category clustering, and the transitive inference (TI) task. In this network, direct perforant pathway input from entorhinal cortex to region CA1 provides the basis for semantic context cueing during initial encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, allowing selective <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> on the basis of category cues. Alterations in the magnitude of this direct perforant pathway input to region CA1 causes impairments in use of organizational strategies for memory, accounting for specific features of memory dysfunction in schizophrenics and in normals treated with ketamine. This model provides a theoretical link between cellular physiological changes and specific cognitive symptoms. As such, it can shed light on the etiology of schizophrenia in a fundamental way, and also holds the promise of pointing the way to more effective treatments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA325404','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA325404"><span>Combined Radar-Radiometer Rainfall <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> for TRMM Using Structure <span class="hlt">Function</span>-Based Optimization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-28</p> <p>Cumulonimbus vertical velocity events in GATE. Part II: Synthesis and model core structure. J. Appi . Meteor., 37, 2458-2469. 187 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH...rainfall <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithms,. J. Appi . Meteor., 33, 313-333. Farrar, M.R., and E.A. Smith, 1992: Spatial resolution enhancement of terrestrial features</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=3&id=EJ776756','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=3&id=EJ776756"><span>Spatial and Temporal Episodic Memory <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Recruit Dissociable <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Networks in the Human Brain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ekstrom, Arne D.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Imaging, electrophysiological studies, and lesion work have shown that the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is important for episodic memory; however, it is unclear whether different MTL regions support the spatial, temporal, and item elements of episodic memory. In this study we used fMRI to examine <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> performance emphasizing different aspects…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9487073','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9487073"><span>[A <span class="hlt">cross-correlational</span> analysis of the bioelectrical activity of muscle antagonists in studying human voluntary motor activity in certain forms of motor disorders].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sheliakin, A M; Preobrazhenskaia, I G; Bogdanov, O V</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>In healthy [correction of beglth] subjects, patients with children's cerebral palsy and spinal cord disturbances, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the EMG at the initial phase of voluntary movement and at the phase of static voluntary tension revealed some mechanisms maintaining coordinated interrelations among antagonist muscles at different phases. A new approach is suggested for estimation of the electromyogram and for a finer diagnosis of the CNS lesions at different levels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T21A0354O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T21A0354O"><span>A new hypocenter determination method using the summation of waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span>- <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ohta, K.; Ide, S.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Deep low frequency tremor is a swarm activity of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) at least in the western Shikoku, Japan [Shelly et al., 2007]. LFEs are considered as shear slip on the plate interface because their focal mechanism has a low-angle thrust fault plane [Ide et al., 2007] and because precisely determined hypocenters are located on the plate interface [Shelly et al., 2006]. However, it is not obvious whether LFEs in other regions have the same characteristics. For example, in the Tokai region and the Kii Peninsula the hypocentral depths of LFEs determined by Japan Meteorological Agency are widely distributed from 20 to 50 km. Precise hypocenters of LFEs are essential for discussion on regional diversity of low frequency tremor. The low signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of LFE records can be a source of larger estimated error in the hypocenter determination. Although waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is a useful tool for precise hypocenter determination, it is not reliable in the case of the low S/N ratio because the value of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is generally small. However, Shelly et al. [2007] showed that the summation of waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for many stations can enhance event detectability. Similarly, using the summation of waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, we develop a new hypocenter determination method that is less sensitive to noises. We apply this method to LFEs in the Tokai region and the Kii Peninsula. The data are 3-component velocity records from the NIED Hi-net, bandpass filtered between 2-8Hz. We first determine the relative hypocenral location between a pair of LFEs in a event list. Assuming a layered structure, we calculate theoretical differential travel times of body waves relative to the arrival times from the one event, After shifting the records of the other event using these differential travel times, we calculate the summation of the waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient between two events for all stations. The relative location is determined to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917266','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/917266"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Weak Lensing of SDSS Galaxy Clusters III: Mass-to-light Ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sheldon, Erin S.; Johnston, David E.; Masjedi, Morad; McKay, Timothy A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Scranton, Ryan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Ben P.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Annis, James</p> <p>2007-09-28</p> <p>We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio measured around MaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the SDSS. This red sequence cluster sample includes objects from small groups with M{sub 200} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 12}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} to clusters with M{sub 200} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 15}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. Using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean {Delta}{yields}(r) = {rho}(r) -- {bar {rho}} for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess {sup 0.25}i-band luminosity density {Delta}{ell}(r) = {ell}(r) -- {bar {ell}}. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce 3D mass and light profiles over scales from 25h{sup -1} kpc to 22h{sup -1} Mpc. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass {Delta}M(r) and excess light {Delta}L(r) as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where {rho}(r) >> {bar {rho}}, the integrated mass-to-light profile ({Delta}M/{Delta}L)(r) may be interpreted as the cluster mass-to-light ratio. We find the ({Delta}M/{Delta}L){sub 200}, the mass-to-light ratio within r{sub 200}, scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33{+-}0.02. On large scales, where {rho}(r) {approx} {bar {rho}}, the {Delta}M/{Delta}L approaches an asymptotic value independent of scale or cluster richness. For small groups, the mean ({Delta}M/{Delta}L){sub 200} is much smaller than the asymptotic value, while for large clusters ({Delta}M/{Delta}L)200 is consistent with the asymptotic value. This asymptotic value should be proportional to the mean mass-to-light ratio of the universe {l_angle}M/L{r_angle}. We find {l_angle}M/L{r_angle} b{sup -2}{sub M/L} = 362 {+-} 54h measured in the {sup 0.25}i-bandpass. The parameter b{sup 2}{sub M/L} is primarily a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the bias of the L {approx}< L* galaxies used as light tracers, and should be of order unity. Multiplying by the luminosity density in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371819','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371819"><span><span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> WEAK LENSING OF SDSS GALAXY CLUSTERS. III. MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sheldon, Erin S.; Johnston, David E.; Masjedi, Morad; Blanton, Michael R.; McKay, Timothy A.; Scranton, Ryan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Annis, James</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio (M/L) measured around MaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This red-sequence cluster sample includes objects from small groups with M {sub 200} approx 5 x 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M {sub sun} to clusters with M {sub 200} approx 10{sup 15} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}. Using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean DELTArho(r)=rho(r)-rho-bar for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess luminosity density DELTAl(r)=l(r)-l-bar measured in the z = 0.25 i band. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce three-dimensional mass and light profiles over scales from 25 h {sup -1} kpc to 22 h {sup -1} Mpc. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass DELTAM(r) and excess light DELTAL(r) as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where rho(r)>>rho-bar, the integrated mass-to-light profile (DELTAM/DELTAL)(r) may be interpreted as the cluster M/L. We find the (DELTAM/DELTAL){sub 200}, the M/L within r {sub 200}, scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33 +- 0.02. On large scales, where rho(r)approxrho-bar, the DELTAM/DELTAL approaches an asymptotic value independent of cluster richness. For small groups, the mean (DELTAM/DELTAL){sub 200} is much smaller than the asymptotic value, while for large clusters (DELTAM/DELTAL){sub 200} is consistent with the asymptotic value. This asymptotic value should be proportional to the mean M/L of the universe (M/L). We find (M/L)b{sup -2} {sub M/L} = 362 +- 54h (statistical). There is additional uncertainty in the overall calibration at the approx10% level. The parameter b {sup 2} {sub M/L} is primarily a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the bias of the L approx< L {sub *} galaxies used as light tracers, and should be of order unity. Multiplying by the luminosity density in the same bandpass we find OMEGA {sub m}b{sup -2} {sub M</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26627750','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26627750"><span>Measurement of circumferential Lamb waves using a line-focus poly(vinylidene fluoride) transducer and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> waveform analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Chun-I; Lu, Yan; He, Cunfu; Song, Guorong; Lee, Yung-Chun</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This paper presents a method for measuring circumferential Lamb waves propagating on a cylindrically curved thin plate. The measurement is carried out using a wideband and line-focused poly(vinylidene fluoride) transducer along with a defocusing waveform measurement method. After synthesizing the acquired waveforms, interference patterns can be obtained and a <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> method is developed to accurately extract the wave velocity as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of wave frequency. Using three stainless steel thin plates of different thicknesses (100, 150, and 300 μm) and a radius of curvature of 10 mm, dispersion curves for several fundamental and higher order modes of circumferential Lamb waves are simultaneously determined. Theoretical dispersion curves are also calculated and compared with their experimental counterparts. Very good agreements are observed, which concludes the measurement accuracy of this measurement method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.305a2005T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.305a2005T"><span>A Method for Vibration-Based Structural Interrogation and Health Monitoring Based on Signal <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trendafilova, I.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Vibration-based structural interrogation and health monitoring is a field which is concerned with the estimation of the current state of a structure or a component from its vibration response with regards to its ability to perform its intended <span class="hlt">function</span> appropriately. One way to approach this problem is through damage features extracted from the measured structural vibration response. This paper suggests to use a new concept for the purposes of vibration-based health monitoring. The correlation between two signals, an input and an output, measured on the structure is used to develop a damage indicator. The paper investigates the applicability of the signal <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and a nonlinear alternative, the average mutual information between the two signals, for the purposes of structural health monitoring and damage assessment. The suggested methodology is applied and demonstrated for delamination detection in a composite beam.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...593A..15D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...593A..15D"><span>Optimal cosmic microwave background map-making in the presence of <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Vittorio, N.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Aims: We present an extension of the ROMA map-making algorithm for the generation of optimal cosmic microwave background polarization maps. The new code allows for a possible <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> noise component among the detectors of a CMB experiment. A promising application is the forthcoming LSPE balloon-borne experiment, which is devoted to the accurate observation of CMB polarization at large angular scales. Methods: We generalized the noise covariance matrix in time domain to account for all the off-diagonal terms due to the detector cross-talk. Hence, we performed preliminary forecasts of the LSPE-SWIPE instrument. Results: We found that considering the noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> among the detectors results in a more realistic estimate of the angular power spectra. In particular, the extended ROMA algorithm has provided a considerable reduction of the spectra error bars. We expect that this improvement could be crucial in constraining the B-mode polarization at the largest scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8924E..1JW','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8924E..1JW"><span>A <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> based fiber optic white-light interferometry with wavelet transform denoising</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Zhen; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Wenhui; Gao, Ran</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>A fiber optic white-light interferometry based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> calculation is presented. The detected white-light spectrum signal of fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) sensor is firstly decomposed by discrete wavelet transform for denoising before interrogating the cavity length of the EFPI sensor. In measurement experiment, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithm with multiple-level calculations is performed both for achieving the high measurement resolution and for improving the efficiency of the measurement. The experimental results show that the variation range of the measurement results was 1.265 nm, and the standard deviation of the measurement results can reach 0.375 nm when an EFPI sensor with cavity length of 1500 μm was interrogated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10155E..1HH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10155E..1HH"><span>Vibration measurement based on the optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique with femtosecond pulsed laser</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..444..163M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..444..163M"><span>Efficiency and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in equity market during global financial crisis: Evidence from China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ma, Pengcheng; Li, Daye; Li, Shuo</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Using one minute high-frequency data of the Shanghai Composite Index (SHCI) and the Shenzhen Composite Index (SZCI) (2007-2008), we employ the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and the detrended <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) with rolling window approach to observe the evolution of market efficiency and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in pre-crisis and crisis period. Considering the fat-tail distribution of return time series, statistical test based on shuffling method is conducted to verify the null hypothesis of no long-term dependence. Our empirical research displays three main findings. First Shanghai equity market efficiency deteriorated while Shenzhen equity market efficiency improved with the advent of financial crisis. Second the highly positive dependence between SHCI and SZCI varies with time scale. Third financial crisis saw a significant increase of dependence between SHCI and SZCI at shorter time scales but a lack of significant change at longer time scales, providing evidence of contagion and absence of interdependence during crisis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53C2520S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53C2520S"><span>Detecting small scale heterogeneities in the crust from ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, W.; Fu, L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is extensively applied to obtain the surface wave dispersion, and further to study the structures of the crust and the upper mantle. In recent years, many applications of the ambient noise tomography are reported in many locations, e.g., California, Europe, New Zealand, Tibet, and even in the Antarctica. The scale is regional or even continental. However, the applications of the method in detecting small scale heterogeneities are paid little attention. Small scale heterogeneities may be important to monitor/predict activities of volcano. This is concluded from the fact activities of volcano will result in stress variations. Correspondingly, the velocity distribution, i.e., heterogeneities, will change. Here, we will try to extend the ambient noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method to study small heterogeneities in the crust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983ITCom..31..701F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983ITCom..31..701F"><span>XPSK - A new <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> phase-shift keying modulation technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feher, K.; Kato, S.</p> <p>1983-05-01</p> <p>A new modulation technique, <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> phase-shift keying (XPSK), has been developed for the bandwidth and power efficient digital transmission. The modulation scheme proposed here, in which a controlled amount of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> is introduced between the in-phase and quadrature channels, has improved the envelope fluctuation of the IJF-OQPSK (QORC) modulation scheme from 3 dB to approximately O dB. Therefore, in nonlinear channels, the power spectrum characteristics of XPSK are better than those of IJF-OQPSK. The Pe performance degradation of the XPSK scheme is within 1.15 dB of the theoretical linear channel performance of QPSK systems. The power spectra of XPSK signal can be controlled by adjusting the amplitude parameter according to the nonlinearity of a specific system to get minimum Pe degradation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9845E..05L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9845E..05L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> and image alignment for multi-band IR sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chen, Kang (Frank); Luong, Andrew; Dewees, Mallory; Yan, Xinyi; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We present the development of a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithm for correlating objects in the long wave, mid wave and short wave Infrared sensor arrays. The goal is to align the images in the multisensor suite by correlating multiple key features in the images. Due to the wavelength differences, the object appears very differently in the sensor images even the sensors focus on the same object. In order to perform accurate correlation of the same object in the multi-band images, we perform image processing on the images so that the features of the object become similar to each other. Fourier domain band pass filters are used to enhance the images. Mexican Hat and Gaussian Derivative Wavelets are used to further enhance the features of the object. A Python based QT graphical user interface has been implemented to carry out the process. We show reliable results of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the objects in multiple band videos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770010886','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770010886"><span>Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlated</span> with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlating</span> the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1820h0011L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1820h0011L"><span>Estimation of TOA based MUSIC algorithm and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> algorithm of appropriate interval</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Wei; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Yineng; Huang, Jiyan</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Localization of mobile station (MS) has now gained considerable attention due to its wide applications in military, environmental, health and commercial systems. Phrase angle and encode data of MSK system model are two critical parameters in time-of-arrival (TOA) localization technique; nevertheless, precise value of phrase angle and encode data are not easy to achieved in general. In order to meet the actual situation, we should consider the condition that phase angle and encode data is unknown. In this paper, a novel TOA localization method, which combine MUSIC algorithm and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> algorithm in an appropriate interval, is proposed. Simulations show that the proposed method has better performance than music algorithm and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> algorithm of the whole interval.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..320F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..463..320F"><span>Does the Euro crisis change the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> pattern between bank shares and national indexes?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ferreira, Paulo</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The objective of this paper is to analyze if the Euro crisis, which started in 2009, changes the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> pattern of bank shares with the national stock indexes in both in Eurozone and non-Eurozone countries. We study all banks listed in the main stock indexes of European Union countries, applying the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient. An increase in the correlation indicates that the banking sector now has a greater influence in the national index, while a decrease in the correlation means the opposite. Our results show that 19 of the 39 banks analyzed in the Eurozone increased their correlation with national indexes, whilst in the non-Eurozone countries this happened with 14 of the 24 studied banks. While some authors argue that the crisis may have been aggravated by the weight of banks in the economy, Eurozone policy makers should pay attention to this feature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PApGe.171..439B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PApGe.171..439B"><span>Perspectives of <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> in Seismic Monitoring at the International Data Centre</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bobrov, Dmitry; Kitov, Ivan; Zerbo, Lassina</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>We demonstrate that several techniques based on waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are able to significantly reduce the detection threshold of seismic sources worldwide and to improve the reliability of arrivals by a more accurate estimation of their defining parameters. A master event and the events it can find using waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) have to be close. For the purposes of the International Data Centre (IDC), one can use the spatial closeness of the master and slave events in order to construct a new automatic processing pipeline: all qualified arrivals detected using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> are associated with events matching the current IDC event definition criteria (EDC) in a local association procedure. Considering the repeating character of global seismicity, more than 90 % of events in the reviewed event bulletin (REB) can be built in this automatic processing. Due to the reduced detection threshold, waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> may increase the number of valid REB events by a factor of 1.5-2.0. Therefore, the new pipeline may produce a more comprehensive bulletin than the current pipeline—the goal of seismic monitoring. The analysts' experience with the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> event list (XSEL) shows that the workload of interactive processing might be reduced by a factor of two or even more. Since <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> produces a comprehensive list of detections for a given master event, no additional arrivals from primary stations are expected to be associated with the XSEL events. The number of false alarms, relative to the number of events rejected from the standard event list 3 (SEL3) in the current interactive processing—can also be reduced by the use of several powerful filters. The principal filter is the difference between the arrival times of the master and newly built events at three or more primary stations, which should lie in a narrow range of a few seconds. In this study, one event at a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.738a2077T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.738a2077T"><span>Dynamical Analysis of Stock Market Instability by <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Matrix</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Takaishi, Tetsuya</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We study stock market instability by using <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> constructed from the return time series of 366 stocks traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange from January 5, 1998 to December 30, 2013. To investigate the dynamical evolution of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, crosscorrelation matrices are calculated with a rolling window of 400 days. To quantify the volatile market stages where the potential risk is high, we apply the principal components analysis and measure the cumulative risk fraction (CRF), which is the system variance associated with the first few principal components. From the CRF, we detected three volatile market stages corresponding to the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers, the 2011 Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake, and the FRB QE3 reduction observation in the study period. We further apply the random matrix theory for the risk analysis and find that the first eigenvector is more equally de-localized when the market is volatile.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JaJAP..56a2701K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JaJAP..56a2701K"><span>High-dynamic-range <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for shot-to-shot measurement of temporal contrast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kon, Akira; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Koichi; Mori, Michiaki; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The temporal contrast of an ultrahigh-intensity laser is a crucial parameter for laser plasma experiments. We have developed a multichannel <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> (MCCC) for single-shot measurements of the temporal contrast in a high-power laser system. The MCCC is based on third-order <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, and has four channels and independent optical delay lines. We have experimentally demonstrated that the MCCC system achieves a high dynamic range of ˜1012 and a large temporal window of ˜1 ns. Moreover, we were able to measure the shot-to-shot fluctuations of a short-prepulse intensity at -26 ps and long-pulse (amplified spontaneous emission, ASE) intensities at -30, -450, and -950 ps before the arrival of the main pulse at the interaction point.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014585','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014585"><span>Background Noise Reduction Using Adaptive Noise Cancellation Determined by the <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Fuller, Christopher R.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background noise due to flow in wind tunnels contaminates desired data by decreasing the Signal-to-Noise Ratio. The use of Adaptive Noise Cancellation to remove background noise at measurement microphones is compromised when the reference sensor measures both background and desired noise. The technique proposed modifies the classical processing configuration based on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the reference and primary microphone. Background noise attenuation is achieved using a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> sample width that encompasses only the background noise and a matched delay for the adaptive processing. A present limitation of the method is that a minimum time delay between the background noise and desired signal must exist in order for the correlated parts of the desired signal to be separated from the background noise in the crosscorrelation. A simulation yields primary signal recovery which can be predicted from the coherence of the background noise between the channels. Results are compared with two existing methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10184153','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10184153"><span><span class="hlt">Function</span> analysis of the single-shell Tank Waste <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Manipulator System. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Draper, J.V.</p> <p>1993-08-01</p> <p>This document lists the <span class="hlt">functions</span> likely to be performed by each proposed component of the Tank Waste <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Manipulator System (TWRMS) and the user <span class="hlt">functions</span> that must be performed to operate each component. While the information contained in this document is tentative because the systems are still evolving, it provides a foundation for task analysis and control room design efforts. These efforts will support the design of a test-bed control room in the near future and an operational control room later. The information in this document is based on specifications published for the TWRMS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA568764','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA568764"><span>Analysis of the 2008 Chinese Earthquake Aftershocks Using <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>34 1M b Seltt~~k llyft 11M Snrn fusion ~ Q.- .M- 1!- .!- J."’ ~- - - - - -- Htlp~ ~ . I . ,,,,, .. "’" .t! • ,; .. "I"’ I .,, " f’ ’ "’" T...the lower crust and below when the surface reflected phases are far enough in time from the primary phase. For shallow events, <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.459...21K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.459...21K"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kirk, D.; Omori, Y.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Larsen, P.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Crawford, T. M.; Dodelson, S.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Holder, G.; Jain, B.; Kacprzak, T.; Lahav, O.; MacCrann, N.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Sheldon, E.; Story, K. T.; Troxel, M. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C. L.; Roodman, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Simard, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We measure the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg2 of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of zmed ˜ 0.7, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at z ˜ 2. The resulting <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at z ˜ 0.44. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fitting cosmology, the amplitude of the DES×SPT cross-power is found to be ASPT = 0.88 ± 0.30 and that from DES×Planck to be APlanck = 0.86 ± 0.39, where A = 1 corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of 2.9σ and 2.2σ, respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photo-z uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. We calculate a value of A = 1.08 ± 0.36 for DES×SPT when we correct the observations with a simple intrinsic alignment model. With three measurements of this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDM32001T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDM32001T"><span>Wall parallel <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of volumetric PTV measurements in a perturbed turbulent boundary layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tan, Yan Ming; Longmire, Ellen</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A canonical turbulent boundary layer (Reτ = 2500) was perturbed by a narrowly spaced (0.2 δ) array of cylinders extending normal to the wall. Two array heights were considered, H = 0.2 δ and H = δ . Volumetric PTV measurements were acquired to understand 3-D variations in large scale structures within the log region of the unperturbed and perturbed flow. The recovery in the streamwise velocity coherence across the depth of the log region was analyzed using <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between wall parallel planes. Conditional <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> are analyzed to examine the recovery in coherence specific to low momentum regions (LMRs), which can be signatures of vortex packets. The measurement volume was 0.70 δ (streamwise,x), 0.90 δ (spanwise,y), 0.12 δ (wall-normal,z). In the unperturbed flow, LMRs frequently extended through the entire depth (155 <=z+ <= 465). The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between planes at z+ = 155 and z+ = 465 exhibited strong skewness indicative of forward leaning structures. By comparison, downstream of the H = δ array, the wall normal extent of individual LMRs was frequently limited to the lower part of the measurement volume. The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> magnitude and skewness remained suppressed relative to unperturbed flow up to 4.7 δ downstream. These observations suggest reduced coherence of LMRs and high momentum regions across the log region. This result was consistent with previous planar PIV measurements at z+ = 500 that showed hardly any long LMRs over distances up to 7 δ downstream of the H = δ array.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4197649','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4197649"><span>Cross-matching: a modified <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Doi, Takahiro; Fujita, Ichiro</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye's image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye's image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs), because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs), in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model) can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, which we term “cross-matching,” represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS); this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric <span class="hlt">function</span> observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth), and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in stereoscopic depth</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25360107','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25360107"><span>Cross-matching: a modified <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Doi, Takahiro; Fujita, Ichiro</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye's image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye's image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs), because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs), in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model) can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, which we term "cross-matching," represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS); this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric <span class="hlt">function</span> observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth), and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in stereoscopic depth perception.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..117.2392K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..117.2392K"><span>Low-frequency interaural <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> discrimination in stereophonic reproduction of musical tones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Sungyoung; Martens, William L.</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>By industry standard (ITU-R. Recommendation BS.775-1), multichannel stereophonic signals within the frequency range of up to 80 or 120 Hz may be mixed and delivered via a single driver (e.g., a subwoofer) without significant impairment of stereophonic sound quality. The assumption that stereophonic information within such low-frequency content is not significant was tested by measuring discrimination thresholds for changes in interaural <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (IACC) within spectral bands containing the lowest frequency components of low-pitch musical tones. Performances were recorded for three different musical instruments playing single notes ranging in fundamental frequency from 41 Hz to 110 Hz. The recordings, made using a multichannel microphone array composed of five DPA 4006 pressure microphones, were processed to produce a set of stimuli that varied in interaural <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (IACC) within a low-frequency band, but were otherwise identical in a higher-frequency band. This correlation processing was designed to have minimal effect upon other psychoacoustic variables such as loudness and timbre. The results show that changes in interaural <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> (IACC) within low-frequency bands of low-pitch musical tones are most easily discriminated when decorrelated signals are presented via subwoofers positioned at extreme lateral angles (far from the median plane). [Work supported by VRQ.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1184381','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1184381"><span>Dual-color fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy for multicomponent diffusional analysis in solution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Schwille, P; Meyer-Almes, F J; Rigler, R</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>The present paper describes a new experimental scheme for following diffusion and chemical reaction systems of fluorescently labeled molecules in the nanomolar concentration range by fluorescence correlation analysis. In the dual-color fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy provided here, the concentration and diffusion characteristics of two fluorescent species in solution as well as their reaction product can be followed in parallel. By using two differently labeled reaction partners, the selectivity to investigate the temporal evolution of reaction product is significantly increased compared to ordinary one-color fluorescence autocorrelation systems. Here we develop the theoretical and experimental basis for carrying out measurements in a confocal dual-beam fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup and discuss conditions that are favorable for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis. The measurement principle is explained for carrying out DNA-DNA renaturation kinetics with two differently labeled complementary strands. The concentration of the reaction product can be directly determined from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> amplitude. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:9083691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145605','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145605"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> of diffuse noise in an ocean environment using eigenvalue based statistical inference.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Menon, Ravishankar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> of diffuse noise fields can be used to extract environmental information. The influence of directional sources (usually ships) often results in a bias of the travel time estimates obtained from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. Using an array of sensors, insights from random matrix theory on the behavior of the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix (SCM) in an isotropic noise field are used to isolate the diffuse noise component from the directional sources. A sequential hypothesis testing of the eigenvalues of the SCM reveals eigenvalues dominated by loud sources that are statistical outliers for the assumed diffuse noise model. Travel times obtained from <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> using only the diffuse noise component (i.e., by discarding or attenuating the outliers) converge to the predicted travel times based on the known array sensor spacing and measured sound speed at the site and are stable temporally (i.e., unbiased estimates). Data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach and that the signal-to-noise ratio builds up as the square root of time, as predicted by theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19926909','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19926909"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis of mechanomyographic signals detected in two axes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beck, Travis W; Dillon, Michael A; DeFreitas, Jason M; Stock, Matt S</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to use laser displacement sensors to examine the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of surface mechanomyographic (MMG) signals detected from the rectus femoris muscle in perpendicular and transverse axes during isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors. Ten healthy men (mean +/- SD age = 22.1 +/- 1.6 years) and ten healthy women (age = 24.4 +/- 2.8 years) volunteered to perform submaximal to maximal isometric muscle actions of the dominant leg extensors. During each muscle action, two separate MMG signals were detected from the rectus femoris with laser displacement sensors. One MMG sensor was oriented in an axis that was perpendicular (PERP) to the muscle surface, and the second sensor was oriented in an axis that was transverse (TRAN) to the muscle surface. For each subject and force level, the MMG signals from the PERP and TRAN sensors were <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span>. The results showed maximum <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients that ranged from R(x)(,y) = 0.273 to 0.989, but all subjects demonstrated at least one coefficient greater than 0.89. These findings showed a high level of association between the MMG signals detected in the perpendicular and transverse axes. Thus, it may not be necessary to detect MMG signals in multiple axes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740027904&hterms=1056&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231056','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740027904&hterms=1056&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231056"><span>Plasma fluctuations in a Kaufman thruster. [root mean square magnitude, spectra and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Serafini, J. S.; Terdan, F. F.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Measurements of the RMS magnitude, spectra and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> for the fluctuations in the beam, discharge and neutralizer keeper currents are presented for a 30-cm diameter dished grid ion thrustor for a range of magnetic baffle currents and up to 2.0 amperes beam current. The ratio of RMS to mean ion beam current varied from 0.04 to 0.23. The spectra of the amplitudes of the beam and discharge current fluctuations were taken up to 9 MHz and show that the predominant amplitudes occur at frequencies of 10 kHz or below. The fall-off with increasing frequency is rapid. Frequencies above 100 kHz the spectral levels are 45 kb or more below the maximum peak amplitudes. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> revealed the ion beam fluctuations to have large radial and axial scales which implied that the beam fluctuates as a whole or 'in-phase.' The <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of the beam and neutralizer keeper current fluctuations indicated the neutralizer contributions to the beam fluctuations to be small, but not negligible. The mode of operation of the thrustor (values of beam and magnetic baffle currents) was significant in determining the RMS magnitude and spectral shape of the beam fluctuations. The major oscillations were not found to be directly dependent on the power conditioner inverter frequencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhyA..378..345N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhyA..378..345N"><span>Eigenvalue density of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in Sri Lankan financial market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nilantha, K. G. D. R.; Ranasinghe; Malmini, P. K. C.</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>We apply the universal properties with Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of random matrices namely spectral properties, distribution of eigenvalues, eigenvalue spacing predicted by random matrix theory (RMT) to compare <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix estimators from emerging market data. The daily stock prices of the Sri Lankan All share price index and Milanka price index from August 2004 to March 2005 were analyzed. Most eigenvalues in the spectrum of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix of stock price changes agree with the universal predictions of RMT. We find that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix satisfies the universal properties of the GOE of real symmetric random matrices. The eigen distribution follows the RMT predictions in the bulk but there are some deviations at the large eigenvalues. The nearest-neighbor spacing and the next nearest-neighbor spacing of the eigenvalues were examined and found that they follow the universality of GOE. RMT with deterministic correlations found that each eigenvalue from deterministic correlations is observed at values, which are repelled from the bulk distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21460114','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21460114"><span>TENTATIVE DETECTION OF QUASAR FEEDBACK FROM WMAP AND SDSS <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chatterjee, Suchetana; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Ho, Shirley</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>We perform a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of microwave data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, testing for the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from quasars. A statistically significant (2.5{sigma}) temperature decrement exists in the 41 GHz microwave band. A two-component fit to the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectrum incorporating both dust emission and SZ yields a best-fit y parameter of (7.0 {+-} 3.4) x 10{sup -7}. A similar <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis with the luminous red galaxy sample from Sloan gives a best-fit y parameter of (5.3 {+-} 2.5) x 10{sup -7}. We discuss the possible physical origin of these signals, which is likely a combination of SZ effects from quasars and galaxy clusters. Both the Planck Surveyor satellite and the current ground-based arcminute-resolution microwave experiments will detect this signal with a higher statistical significance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017135','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017135"><span>Spatial <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of Antarctic Sea ice and seabed topography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Deveaux, Richard D.; Phelan, Michael J.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A time series of derived sea ice concentrations as observed about Antarctica by the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) satellite in 1983 is considered. The degree of spatial <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between these data and seabed topography is quantified. The approach is to implement a statistical image processing filter designed to extract local patterns of spatial <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> over the entire sea ice field as it undergoes daily changes. Throughout the sea ice, it was found that large scale variations in sea ice concentration correlate systematically with variations in the topography of the seabed. Generally speaking, high concentrations of sea ice occur over deep ocean, whereas areas of encavement, early dissipation and polynya formation develop over topographic features of high elevation. The latter was studied in detail with respect to the features Maud Rise, Astrid Ridge and the continental shelf in the Cosmonaut and Ross Seas. In each case, it is shown that an encavement in sea ice, a polynya, or both develops in the vicinity of the feature in question. As these results are quantified in terms of spatial <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>, a potential role is inferred for seabed topography in such fluctuations in the sea ice about Antarctica.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212852','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212852"><span>A new 'Implicit correlation' method for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> sampling in MCNPX-PoliMi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Marcath, M. J.; Larsen, E. W.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Monte Carlo particle transport codes used to accurately model detector response are traditionally run in fully analog mode. Analog simulations of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements with these codes are extremely time-consuming because the probability of correlated detection is extremely small, approximately equal to the product of the probabilities of a single detection in each detector. The new 'implicit correlation' method described here increases the number of correlation event scores thereby reducing variance and required computation times. The cost of the implicit correlation method is comparable to the cost of simulating single event detection for the lowest absolute detector efficiency in the problem. This method is especially useful in the nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards fields for simulating correlation measurements of shielded special nuclear material. The new method was implemented in MCNPX-PoliMi for neutron-neutron <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with a Cf-252 spontaneous fission source measured by two detectors of variable stand-offs. The method demonstrated good agreement with analog simulation results for multiple measurement geometries. Small differences between non-analog and analog <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distributions are attributed to known features of the specific problem simulated that will not be present in practical applications. (authors)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4035345','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4035345"><span>Dynamic Evolution of <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> in the Chinese Stock Market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ren, Fei; Zhou, Wei-Xing</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The analysis of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> is extensively applied for the understanding of interconnections in stock markets and the portfolio risk estimation. Current studies of correlations in Chinese market mainly focus on the static correlations between return series, and this calls for an urgent need to investigate their dynamic correlations. Our study aims to reveal the dynamic evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the Chinese stock market, and offer an exact interpretation for the evolution behavior. The correlation matrices constructed from the return series of 367 A-share stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange from January 4, 1999 to December 30, 2011 are calculated over a moving window with a size of 400 days. The evolutions of the statistical properties of the correlation coefficients, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors of the correlation matrices are carefully analyzed. We find that the stock correlations are significantly increased in the periods of two market crashes in 2001 and 2008, during which only five eigenvalues significantly deviate from the random correlation matrix, and the systemic risk is higher in these volatile periods than calm periods. By investigating the significant contributors of the deviating eigenvectors in different time periods, we observe a dynamic evolution behavior in business sectors such as IT, electronics, and real estate, which lead the rise (drop) before (after) the crashes. Our results provide new perspectives for the understanding of the dynamic evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the Chines stock markets, and the result of risk estimation is valuable for the application of risk management. PMID:24867071</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24867071','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24867071"><span>Dynamic evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the Chinese stock market.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ren, Fei; Zhou, Wei-Xing</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The analysis of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> is extensively applied for the understanding of interconnections in stock markets and the portfolio risk estimation. Current studies of correlations in Chinese market mainly focus on the static correlations between return series, and this calls for an urgent need to investigate their dynamic correlations. Our study aims to reveal the dynamic evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the Chinese stock market, and offer an exact interpretation for the evolution behavior. The correlation matrices constructed from the return series of 367 A-share stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange from January 4, 1999 to December 30, 2011 are calculated over a moving window with a size of 400 days. The evolutions of the statistical properties of the correlation coefficients, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors of the correlation matrices are carefully analyzed. We find that the stock correlations are significantly increased in the periods of two market crashes in 2001 and 2008, during which only five eigenvalues significantly deviate from the random correlation matrix, and the systemic risk is higher in these volatile periods than calm periods. By investigating the significant contributors of the deviating eigenvectors in different time periods, we observe a dynamic evolution behavior in business sectors such as IT, electronics, and real estate, which lead the rise (drop) before (after) the crashes. Our results provide new perspectives for the understanding of the dynamic evolution of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in the Chines stock markets, and the result of risk estimation is valuable for the application of risk management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B7...17P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B7...17P"><span>Kernel Feature <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> for Unsupervised Quantification of Damage from Windthrow in Forests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pirotti, F.; Travaglini, D.; Giannetti, F.; Kutchartt, E.; Bottalico, F.; Chirici, G.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>In this study estimation of tree damage from a windthrow event using feature detection on RGB high resolution imagery is assessed. An accurate quantitative assessment of the damage in terms of volume is important and can be done by ground sampling, which is notably expensive and time-consuming, or by manual interpretation and analyses of aerial images. This latter manual method also requires an expert operator investing time to manually detect damaged trees and apply relation <span class="hlt">functions</span> between measures and volume which are also error-prone. In the proposed method RGB images with 0.2 m ground sample distance are analysed using an adaptive template matching method. Ten images corresponding to ten separate study areas are tested. A 13x13 pixels kernel with a simplified linear-feature representation of a cylinder is applied at different rotation angles (from 0° to 170° at 10° steps). The higher values of the normalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (NCC) of all angles are recorded for each pixel for each image. Several features are tested: percentiles (75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, max) and sum and number of pixels with NCC above 0.55. Three regression methods are tested, multiple regression (mr), support vector machines (svm) with linear kernel and random forests. The first two methods gave the best results. The ground-truth was acquired by ground sampling, and total volumes of damaged trees are estimated for each of the 10 areas. Damaged volumes in the ten areas range from ~1.8 x102 m3 to ~1.2x104 m3. Regression results show that smv regression method over the sum gives an R-squared of 0.92, a mean of absolute errors (MAE) of 255 m3 and a relative absolute error (RAE) of 34% using leave-one-out cross validation from the 10 observations. These initial results are encouraging and support further investigations on more finely tuned kernel template metrics to define an unsupervised image analysis process to automatically assess forest damage from windthrow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41A2704S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41A2704S"><span>Optimization of Ambient Noise <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Imaging Across Large Dense Array</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sufri, O.; Xie, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Song, W.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Ambient Noise Tomography is currently one of the most studied topics of seismology. It gives possibility of studying physical properties of rocks from the depths of subsurface to the upper mantle depths using recorded noise sources. A network of new seismic sensors, which are capable of recording continuous seismic noise and doing the processing at the same time on-site, could help to assess possible risk of volcanic activity on a volcano and help to understand the changes in physical properties of a fault before and after an earthquake occurs. This new seismic sensor technology could also be used in oil and gas industry to figure out depletion rate of a reservoir and help to improve velocity models for obtaining better seismic reflection cross-sections. Our recent NSF funded project is bringing seismologists, signal processors, and computer scientists together to develop a new ambient noise seismic imaging system which could record continuous seismic noise and process it on-site and send Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> and/or tomography images to the network. Such an imaging system requires optimum amount of sensors, sensor communication, and processing of the recorded data. In order to solve these problems, we first started working on the problem of optimum amount of sensors and the communication between these sensors by using small aperture dense network called Sweetwater Array, deployed by Nodal Seismic in 2014. We downloaded ~17 day of continuous data from 2268 one-component stations between March 30-April 16 2015 from IRIS DMC and performed <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> to determine the lag times between station pairs. The lag times were then entered in matrix form. Our goal is to selecting random lag time values in the matrix and assuming all other elements of the matrix either missing or unknown and performing matrix completion technique to find out how close the results from matrix completion technique would be close to the real calculated values. This would give us better idea</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016FNL....1550012C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016FNL....1550012C"><span>Effect of Weather on Agricultural Futures Markets on the Basis of DCCA <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Coefficient Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Guangxi; He, Cuiting; Xu, Wei</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>This study investigates the correlation between weather and agricultural futures markets on the basis of detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients and q-dependent <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients. In addition, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is used to measure extreme weather and thus analyze further the effect of this condition on agricultural futures markets. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> exists between weather and agricultural futures markets on certain time scales. There are some correlations between temperature and soybean return associated with medium amplitudes. Under extreme weather conditions, weather exerts different influences on different agricultural products; for instance, soybean return is greatly influenced by temperature, and weather variables exhibit no effect on corn return. Based on the detrending moving-average <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DMCA) coefficient and DFA regression results are similar to that of DCCA coefficient.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19642890','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19642890"><span>Word <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> failures in old age: the relationship between structure and <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shafto, Meredith A; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A; Tam, Phyllis P; Tyler, L K</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>A common complaint of normal aging is the increase in word-finding failures such as tip-of-the-tongue states (TOTs). Behavioral research identifies TOTs as phonological <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> failures, and recent findings [Shafto, M. A., Burke, D. M., Stamatakis, E. A., Tam, P., & Tyler, L. K. On the tip-of-the-tongue: Neural correlates of increased word-finding failures in normal aging. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 19, 2060-2070, 2007] link age-related increases in TOTs to atrophy in left insula, a region implicated in phonological production. Here, younger and older adults performed a picture naming task in the fMRI scanner. During successful naming, left insula activity was not affected by age or gray matter integrity. Age differences only emerged during TOTs, with younger but not older adults generating a "boost" of activity during TOTs compared to successful naming. Older adults also had less activity than younger adults during TOTs compared to "don't know" responses, and across all participants, less TOT activity was affiliated with lower gray matter density. For older adults, lower levels of activity during TOTs accompanied higher TOT rates, supporting the role of an age-related neural mechanism impacting older more than younger adults. Results support a neural account of word <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in old age wherein, despite widespread age-related atrophy, word production processes are not universally impacted by age. However, atrophy undermines older adults' ability to modulate neural responses needed to overcome <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> failures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22560801','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22560801"><span>Ultrasonic distance and velocity measurement using a pair of LPM signals for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method: improvement of Doppler-shift compensation and examination of Doppler velocity estimation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hirata, Shinnosuke; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Real-time distance measurement of a moving object with high accuracy and high resolution using an ultrasonic wave is difficult due to the influence of the Doppler effect or the limit of the calculation cost of signal processing. An over-sampling signal processing method using a pair of LPM signals has been proposed for ultrasonic distance and velocity measurement of moving objects with high accuracy and high resolution. The proposed method consists of <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> by single-bit signal processing, high-resolution Doppler velocity estimation with wide measurement range and low-calculation-cost Doppler-shift compensation. The over-sampling <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is obtained from <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> by single-bit signal processing with low calculation cost. The Doppler velocity and distance of the object are determined from the peak interval and peak form in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by the proposed method of Doppler velocity estimation and Doppler-shift compensation. In this paper, the proposed method of Doppler-shift compensation is improved. Accuracy of the determined distance was improved from approximately within ±140μm in the previous method to approximately within ±10μm in computer simulations. Then, the proposed method of Doppler velocity estimation is evaluated. In computer simulations, accuracy of the determined Doppler velocity and distance were demonstrated within ±8.471mm/s and ±13.87μm. In experiments, Doppler velocities of the motorized stage could be determined within ±27.9mm/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MeScT..27h4007E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MeScT..27h4007E"><span>F2DPR: a fast and robust <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique for volumetric PIV</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Earl, Thomas; Jeon, Young Jin; Lecordier, Bertrand; David, Laurent</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The current state-of-the-art in <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> based time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques are the fluid trajectory correlation, FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013) and the fluid trajectory evaluation based on an ensemble-averaged <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, FTEE (Jeon et al 2014a). These techniques compute the velocity vector as a polynomial trajectory Γ in space and time, enabling the extraction of beneficial quantities such as material acceleration whilst significantly increasing the accuracy of the particle displacement prediction achieved by standard two-frame PIV. In the context of time-resolved volumetric PIV, the drawback of trajectory computation is the computational expense of the three-dimensional (3D) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, exacerbated by the requirement to perform N  -  1 <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, where N (for typically 5≤slant N≤slant 9 ) is the number of sequential particle volumes, for each velocity field. Therefore, the acceleration of this calculation is highly desirable. This paper re-examines the application of two-dimensional (2D) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> methods to three-dimensional (3D) datasets by Bilsky et al (2011) and the binning techniques of Discetti and Astarita (2012). A new and robust version of the 2D methods is proposed and described, called fast 2D projection—re-projection (f2dpr). Performance tests based on computational time and accuracy for both two-frame and multi-frame PIV are carried out on synthetically generated data. The cases presented herein include uniaxial uniform linear displacements and shear, and simulated turbulence data. The proposed algorithm is shown to be in the order of 10 times faster than a standard 3D FFT without loss of precision for a wide range of synthetic test cases, while combining with the binning technique can yield 50 times faster computation. The algorithm is also applied to reconstructed synthetic turbulent particle fields to investigate reconstruction noise on its performance and no</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22369757','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22369757"><span>Detection of thermal SZ-CMB lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> in Planck nominal mission data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The nominal mission maps from the Planck satellite contain a wealth of information about secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), including those induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing. As both the tSZ and CMB lensing signals trace the large-scale matter density field, the anisotropies sourced by these processes are expected to be correlated. We report the first detection of this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal, which we measure at 6.2σ significance using the Planck data. We take advantage of Planck's multifrequency coverage to construct a tSZ map using internal linear combination techniques, which we subsequently <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> with the publicly-released Planck CMB lensing potential map. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is subject to contamination from the cosmic infrared background (CIB), which is known to correlate strongly with CMB lensing. We correct for this contamination via <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> our tSZ map with the Planck 857 GHz map and confirm the robustness of our measurement using several null tests. We interpret the signal using halo model calculations, which indicate that the tSZ-CMB lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is a unique probe of the physics of intracluster gas in high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. Our results are consistent with extrapolations of existing gas physics models to this previously unexplored regime and show clear evidence for contributions from both the one- and two-halo terms, but no statistically significant evidence for contributions from diffuse, unbound gas outside of collapsed halos. We also show that the amplitude of the signal depends rather sensitively on the amplitude of fluctuations (σ{sub 8}) and the matter density (Ω{sub m}), scaling as σ{sub 8}{sup 6.1}Ω{sub m}{sup 1.5} at ℓ = 1000. We constrain the degenerate combination σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.282){sup 0.26} = 0.824±0.029, a result that is in less tension with primordial CMB constraints than some recent t</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...832..104M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...832..104M"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between X-Ray and Optical/Near-infrared Background Intensity Fluctuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Cooray, Asantha; Xue, Yongquan; Luo, Bin; Brandt, William; Koekemoer, Anton</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Angular power spectra of optical and infrared background anisotropies at wavelengths between 0.5 and 5 μm are a useful probe of faint sources present during reionization, in addition to faint galaxies and diffuse signals at low redshift. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of these fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths can be used to separate some of these signals. A previous study on the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between X-ray and Spitzer fluctuations at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm has been interpreted as evidence for direct collapse black holes present at z > 12. Here we return to this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and study its wavelength dependence from 0.5 to 4.5 μm using Hubble and Spitzer data in combination with a subset of the 4 Ms Chandra observations in GOODS-S/ECDFS. Our study involves five Hubble bands at 0.6, 0.7, 0.85, 1.25, and 1.6 μm, and two Spitzer-IRAC bands at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm. We confirm the previously seen <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between 3.6 μm (4.5 μm) and X-rays with 3.7σ (4.2σ) and 2.7σ (3.7σ) detections in the soft [0.5-2] keV and hard [2-8] keV X-ray bands, respectively, at angular scales above 20 arcsec. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of X-rays with Hubble is largely anticorrelated, ranging between the levels of 1.4σ-3.5σ for all the Hubble and X-ray bands. This lack of correlation in the shorter optical/NIR bands implies the sources responsible for the cosmic infrared background at 3.6 and 4.5 μm are at least partly dissimilar to those at 1.6 μm and shorter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S31C..03N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S31C..03N"><span>The devil's checkerboard: why <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> delay times require a finite frequency interpretation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nolet, G.; Mercerat, D.; Zaroli, C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We present the first complete test of finite frequency tomography with banana-doughnut kernels, from the generation of seismograms in a 3D model to the final inversion, and are able to lay to rest all of the so-called `controversies' that have slowed down its adoption. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> delay times are influenced by energy arriving in a time window that includes later arrivals, either scattered from, or diffracted around lateral heterogeneities. We present here the results of a 3D test in which we generate 1716 seismograms using the spectral element method in a cross-borehole experiment conducted in a checkerboard box. Delays are determined for the broadband signals as well as for five frequency bands (each one octave apart) by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> seismograms for a homogeneous pattern with those for a checkerboard. The large (10 per cent) velocity contrast and the regularity of the checkerboard pattern causes severe reverberations that arrive late in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> window. Data errors are estimated by comparing linearity between delays measured for a model with 10 per cent velocity contrast with those with a 4 per cent contrast. Sensitivity kernels are efficiently computed with ray theory using the `banana-doughnut' kernels from Dahlen et al. (GJI 141:157, 2000). The model resulting from the inversion with a data fit with reduced χ2red=1 shows an excellent correspondence with the input model and allows for a complete validation of the theory. Amplitudes in the (well resolved) top part of the model are close to the input amplitudes. Comparing a model derived from one band only shows the power of using multiple frequency bands in resolving detail - essentially the observed dispersion captures some of the waveform information. Finite frequency theory also allows us to image the checkerboard at some distance from the borehole plane. Most disconcertingly for advocates of ray theory are the results obtained when we interpret <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> delays with ray theory</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966450','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966450"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> of the Lyman-alpha forest with weak lensing convergence I: Analytical Estimates of S/N and Implications for Neutrino Mass and Dark Energy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vallinotto, Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>We expect a detectable correlation between two seemingly unrelated quantities: the four point <span class="hlt">function</span> of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the amplitude of flux decrements in quasar (QSO) spectra. The amplitude of CMB convergence in a given direction measures the projected surface density of matter. Measurements of QSO flux decrements trace the small-scale distribution of gas along a given line-of-sight. While the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between these two measurements is small for a single line-of-sight, upcoming large surveys should enable its detection. This paper presents analytical estimates for the signal to noise (S/N) for measurements of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the flux decrement and the convergence, {delta}F{kappa}, and for measurements of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the variance in flux decrement and the convergence, <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}>. For the ongoing BOSS (SDSS III) and Planck surveys, we estimate an S/N of 30 and 9.6 for these two correlations. For the proposed BigBOSS and ACTPOL surveys, we estimate an S/N of 130 and 50 respectively. Since <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}> {proportional_to} {delta}{sub s}{sup 4}, the amplitude of these <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> can potentially be used to measure the amplitude of {delta}{sub 8} at z {approx} 2 to 2.5% with BOSS and Planck and even better with future data sets. These measurements have the potential to test alternative theories for dark energy and to constrain the mass of the neutrino. The large potential signal estimated in our analytical calculations motivate tests with non-linear hydrodynamical simulations and analyses of upcoming data sets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1301404','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1301404"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis of inner-leaflet-anchored green fluorescent protein co-redistributed with IgE receptors and outer leaflet lipid raft components.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pyenta, P S; Holowka, D; Baird, B</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>To investigate the structural basis for membrane interactions that occur between Lyn tyrosine kinase and IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI or other components of lipid rafts, we prepared a green fluorescent protein analog of Lyn (PM-EGFP) and used <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis to quantify co-redistributions of aggregates that occur after IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI is cross-linked on the cell surface. PM-EGFP, which contains minimally the palmitoylation and myristoylation sites on Lyn, was compared with another inner leaflet probe, EGFP-GG, which contains a prenylation site and a polybasic sequence similar to K-ras. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to examine co-redistributions of these inner leaflet components with IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI and outer leaflet raft components, ganglioside GD1b and glycosylphosphotidylinositol-linked Thy-1, under conditions where the latter were cross-linked externally to form large patches at the cell surface. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis was developed and characterized with simulations representing cell surface distributions, and parameters from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> curves, rho(o) (peak height) and A (peak area), were shown to be reliable measures of the extent of co-redistributed aggregates and their size. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis was then applied to quantify co-redistributions of the fluorescently labeled inner and outer leaflet components on RBL-2H3 cells. As visually observed and parameterized in this manner, PM-EGFP was found to co-redistribute with lipid rafts significantly more than EGFP-GG or an endogenous prenylated protein, Cdc42. These quantitative results are consistent with previous analyses of Lyn co-redistributions and support the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">functionally</span> important interaction of Lyn with cross-linked IgE- Fc(epsilon)RI is due to their mutual co-association with lipid rafts. PMID:11325715</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21382387','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21382387"><span>Temporally and <span class="hlt">functionally</span> dissociable <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> processing operations revealed by event-related potentials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cruse, Damian; Wilding, Edward L</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>In a pair of recent studies, frontally distributed event-related potential (ERP) indices of two distinct post-<span class="hlt">retrieval</span> processes were identified. It has been proposed that one of these processes operates over any kinds of task relevant information in service of task demands, while the other operates selectively over recovered contextual (episodic) information. The experiment described here was designed to test this account, by requiring <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of different kinds of contextual information to that required in previous relevant studies. Participants heard words spoken in either a male or female voice at study and ERPs were acquired at test where all words were presented visually. Half of the test words had been spoken at study. Participants first made an old/new judgment, distinguishing via key press between studied and unstudied words. For words judged 'old', participants indicated the voice in which the word had been spoken at study, and their confidence (high/low) in the voice judgment. There was evidence for only one of the two frontal old/new effects that had been identified in the previous studies. One possibility is that the ERP effect in previous studies that was tied specifically to recollection reflects processes operating over only some kinds of contextual information. An alternative is that the index reflects processes that are engaged primarily when there are few contextual features that distinguish between studied stimuli.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..443..117Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..443..117Z"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis between Chinese TF contracts and treasury ETF based on high-frequency data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Yu; Chen, Shi</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate the high-frequency <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> relationship between Chinese treasury futures contracts and treasury ETF. We analyze the logarithmic return of these two price series, from which we can conclude that both return series are not normally distributed and the futures markets have greater volatility. We find significant <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between these two series. We further confirm the relationship using the DCCA coefficient and the DMCA coefficient. We quantify the long-range <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with DCCA method, and we further show that the relationship is multifractal. An arbitrage algorithm based on DFA regression with stable return is proposed in the last part.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22282871','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22282871"><span>The large-scale quasar-Lyman α forest <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> from BOSS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Font-Ribera, Andreu; Arnau, Eduard; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: edu.arnau.lazaro@gmail.com; and others</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We measure the large-scale <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption in redshift space, using ∼ 60000 quasar spectra from Data Release 9 (DR9) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is detected over a wide range of scales, up to comoving separations r of 80 h{sup −1}Mpc. For r > 15 h{sup −1}Mpc, we show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is well fitted by the linear theory prediction for the mean overdensity around a quasar host halo in the standard ΛCDM model, with the redshift distortions indicative of gravitational evolution detected at high confidence. Using previous determinations of the Lyα forest bias factor obtained from the Lyα autocorrelation, we infer the quasar bias factor to be b{sub q} = 3.64{sup +0.13}{sub −0.15} at a mean redshift z = 2.38, in agreement with previous measurements from the quasar auto-correlation. We also obtain a new estimate of the Lyα forest redshift distortion factor, β{sub F} = 1.1±0.15, slightly larger than but consistent with the previous measurement from the Lyα forest autocorrelation. The simple linear model we use fails at separations r < 15h{sup −1}Mpc, and we show that this may reasonably be due to the enhanced ionization due to radiation from the quasars. We also provide the expected correction that the mass overdensity around the quasar implies for measurements of the ionizing radiation background from the line-of-sight proximity effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JCAP...10..047H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JCAP...10..047H"><span>Dissecting the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich-gravitational lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with hydrodynamical simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hojjati, Alireza; McCarthy, Ian G.; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Hinshaw, Gary; Le Brun, Amandine M. C.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) y-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, ξyκ(θ), well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only (0θ lesssim 1 arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as σ8, Ωm and Ωb). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass (Mhalo lesssim 1014 Msolar) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial radius. We estimate that approximately 20% of the detected signal comes from low-mass clusters, which corresponds to about 30% of the baryon density of the Universe. The simulations also suggest that more than half of the baryons in the Universe are in the form of diffuse gas outside halos (gtrsim 5 times the virial radius) which is not hot or dense enough to produce a significant tSZ signal or be observed by X-ray experiments. Finally, we show that future high-resolution tSZ-lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> observations will serve as a powerful tool for discriminating between different galactic feedback models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525231','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525231"><span>Dissecting the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich-gravitational lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with hydrodynamical simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hojjati, Alireza; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Waerbeke, Ludovic Van; Hinshaw, Gary; McCarthy, Ian G.; Brun, Amandine M.C. Le; Ma, Yin-Zhe E-mail: i.g.mccarthy@ljmu.ac.uk E-mail: mayinzhe@manchester.ac.uk E-mail: hinshaw@phas.ubc.ca</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) y-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, ξ{sub yκ}(θ), well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only (0θ ∼< 1 arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as σ{sub 8}, Ω{sub m} and Ω{sub b}). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass (M{sub halo} ∼< 10{sup 14} M{sub ⊙}) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial radius. We estimate that approximately 20% of the detected signal comes from low-mass clusters, which corresponds to about 30% of the baryon density of the Universe. The simulations also suggest that more than half of the baryons in the Universe are in the form of diffuse gas outside halos (∼> 5 times the virial radius) which is not hot or dense enough to produce a significant tSZ signal or be observed by X-ray experiments. Finally, we show that future high-resolution tSZ-lensing <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> observations will serve as a powerful tool for discriminating between different galactic feedback models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3444116','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3444116"><span>Carriage Error Identification Based on <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis and Wavelet Transformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mu, Donghui; Chen, Dongju; Fan, Jinwei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feihu</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper proposes a novel method for identifying carriage errors. A general mathematical model of a guideway system is developed, based on the multi-body system method. Based on the proposed model, most error sources in the guideway system can be measured. The flatness of a workpiece measured by the PGI1240 profilometer is represented by a wavelet. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis performed to identify the error source of the carriage. The error model is developed based on experimental results on the low frequency components of the signals. With the use of wavelets, the identification precision of test signals is very high. PMID:23012558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988RaSc...23..141C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988RaSc...23..141C"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> analysis and interpretation of spaced-receiver measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Costa, Emanoel; Fougere, Paul F.; Basu, Santimay</p> <p>1988-04-01</p> <p>The results of two algorithms which provide a statistical treatment of the estimation parameters in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of spaced-receiver data are compared. The observations are found to be consistent with a previous morphological model for anisotropy of high latitude nighttime F region irregularities. It is suggested that a possible dependence of the results of the spaced-receiver measurements on the receiver baselines may be responsible for the relatively small values of the anisotropy of the diffraction pattern noted in Hilat satellite measurements. A procedure for estimating the anisotropy of the in situ irregularities from the anisotropy of the diffraction pattten is proposed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24742344','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24742344"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span> and joint gaussianity in multivariate level crossing models.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Di Bernardino, Elena; León, José; Tchumatchenko, Tatjana</p> <p>2014-04-17</p> <p>A variety of phenomena in physical and biological sciences can be mathematically understood by considering the statistical properties of level crossings of random Gaussian processes. Notably, a growing number of these phenomena demand a consideration of correlated level crossings emerging from multiple correlated processes. While many theoretical results have been obtained in the last decades for individual Gaussian level-crossing processes, few results are available for multivariate, jointly correlated threshold crossings. Here, we address bivariate upward crossing processes and derive the corresponding bivariate Central Limit Theorem as well as provide closed-form expressions for their joint level-<span class="hlt">crossing</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3990273','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3990273"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> and Joint Gaussianity in Multivariate Level Crossing Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A variety of phenomena in physical and biological sciences can be mathematically understood by considering the statistical properties of level crossings of random Gaussian processes. Notably, a growing number of these phenomena demand a consideration of correlated level crossings emerging from multiple correlated processes. While many theoretical results have been obtained in the last decades for individual Gaussian level-crossing processes, few results are available for multivariate, jointly correlated threshold crossings. Here, we address bivariate upward crossing processes and derive the corresponding bivariate Central Limit Theorem as well as provide closed-form expressions for their joint level-<span class="hlt">crossing</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span>. PMID:24742344</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2725W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S41B2725W"><span>Application of the energy reassignment method to measure accurate Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities from ambient seismic noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Witek, M.; Kang, T. S.; van der Lee, S.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We have collected three-component data from 122 Korean accelerometer stations for the month of December in 2014. We apply similar techniques described by Zha et al. (2013) to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> accurate station orientation angles, in order to rotate the horizontal component data into the radial and transverse frame of reference, and for subsequent measurement of Love wave group velocity dispersion. We simultaneously normalize all three components of a daily noise record via the frequency-time normalization (FTN) method. Each component is divided by the average signal envelope in an effort to retain relative amplitude information between all three components. Station orientations are found by a grid search for the orientation azimuth which maximizes the coherency between the radial-vertical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and the Hilbert transformed vertical-vertical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. After measuring orientation angles, we <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> and rotate the data. Typically, the group velocity dispersion curves are measured using the frequency time analysis technique (FTAN), effectively producing spectrograms with significant uncertainty in the time-frequency plane. The spectrogram approach retains only the amplitude information of the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). However, Kodera et al (1976) show that by taking into account the phase information, the concepts of instantaneous frequency and group-time delay can be used to compute the first moment of the signal power in the frequency and time domains. During energy reassignment, the signal power calculated using the STFT at a point (t0,f0t_0, f_0) is reassigned to the location of the first moment (t^g,f^ihat{t}_g,hat{f}_i), where t^ghat{t}_g is the group-time delay and f^ihat{f}_i is the instantaneous frequency. We apply the method of energy reassignment to produce precise Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity measurements in the frequency range 0.1 - 1.0 Hz. Tests on synthetic data show more accurate <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of group velocities at</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3946483','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3946483"><span>Brain Activity and <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Coupling Changes Associated with Self-Reference Effect during Both Encoding and <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Morel, Nastassja; Villain, Nicolas; Rauchs, Géraldine; Gaubert, Malo; Piolino, Pascale; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Chételat, Gaël</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Information that is processed with reference to oneself, i.e. Self-Referential Processing (SRP), is generally associated with better remembering compared to information processed in a condition not related to oneself. This positive effect of the self on subsequent memory performance is called as Self-Reference Effect (SRE). The neural basis of SRE is still poorly understood. The main goal of the present work was thus to highlight brain changes associated with SRE in terms of activity and <span class="hlt">functional</span> coupling and during both encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> so as to assess the relative contribution of both processes to SRE. For this purpose, we used an fMRI event-related self-referential paradigm in 30 healthy young subjects and measured brain activity during both encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of self-relevant information compared to a semantic control condition. We found that SRE was associated with brain changes during the encoding phase only, including both greater activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and greater <span class="hlt">functional</span> coupling between these brain regions and the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight the contribution of brain regions involved in both SRP and episodic memory and the relevance of the communication between these regions during the encoding process as the neural substrates of SRE. This is consistent with the idea that SRE reflects a positive effect of the reactivation of self-related memories on the encoding of new information in episodic memory. PMID:24608131</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9394E..17L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9394E..17L"><span>Temporal evolution of brain reorganization under cross-modal training: insights into the <span class="hlt">functional</span> architecture of encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Likova, Lora T.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>This study is based on the recent discovery of massive and well-structured cross-modal memory activation generated in the primary visual cortex (V1) of totally blind people as a result of novel training in drawing without any vision (Likova, 2012). This unexpected <span class="hlt">functional</span> reorganization of primary visual cortex was obtained after undergoing only a week of training by the novel Cognitive-Kinesthetic Method, and was consistent across pilot groups of different categories of visual deprivation: congenitally blind, late-onset blind and blindfolded (Likova, 2014). These findings led us to implicate V1 as the implementation of the theoretical visuo-spatial 'sketchpad' for working memory in the human brain. Since neither the source nor the subsequent 'recipient' of this non-visual memory information in V1 is known, these results raise a number of important questions about the underlying <span class="hlt">functional</span> organization of the respective encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> networks in the brain. To address these questions, an individual totally blind from birth was given a week of Cognitive-Kinesthetic training, accompanied by <span class="hlt">functional</span> magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) both before and just after training, and again after a two-month consolidation period. The results revealed a remarkable temporal sequence of training-based response reorganization in both the hippocampal complex and the temporal-lobe object processing hierarchy over the prolonged consolidation period. In particular, a pattern of profound learning-based transformations in the hippocampus was strongly reflected in V1, with the <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> showing massive growth as result of the Cognitive-Kinesthetic memory training and consolidation, while the initially strong hippocampal response during tactile exploration and encoding became non-existent. Furthermore, after training, an alternating patch structure in the form of a cascade of discrete ventral regions underwent radical transformations to reach complete <span class="hlt">functional</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25855807','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25855807"><span>The EBI Search engine: providing search and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> <span class="hlt">functionality</span> for biological data from EMBL-EBI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Squizzato, Silvano; Park, Young Mi; Buso, Nicola; Gur, Tamer; Cowley, Andrew; Li, Weizhong; Uludag, Mahmut; Pundir, Sangya; Cham, Jennifer A; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI-https://www.ebi.ac.uk) provides free and unrestricted access to data across all major areas of biology and biomedicine. Searching and extracting knowledge across these domains requires a fast and scalable solution that addresses the requirements of domain experts as well as casual users. We present the EBI Search engine, referred to here as 'EBI Search', an easy-to-use fast text search and indexing system with powerful data navigation and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> capabilities. API integration provides access to analytical tools, allowing users to further investigate the results of their search. The interconnectivity that exists between data resources at EMBL-EBI provides easy, quick and precise navigation and a better understanding of the relationship between different data types including sequences, genes, gene products, proteins, protein domains, protein families, enzymes and macromolecular structures, together with relevant life science literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA499645','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA499645"><span>Detecting Near-Earth Objects Using <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> with a Point Spread <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>3 Lincoln Near- Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) ....................................6 Catalina Sky Survey (CSS...NEOs, how these teams were formed, and the NEO search to date. NEOs A NEO is defined as a comet or asteroid that comes within 1.3 AU of Earth or...telescopes, they use Lincoln Near- Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) as a reference for comparison for their simulation results. For a 1 meter ground</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptFT..22....7A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptFT..22....7A"><span>Development of OCDMA system based on Flexible <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> (FCC) code with OFDM modulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aldhaibani, A. O.; Aljunid, S. A.; Anuar, M. S.; Arief, A. R.; Rashidi, C. B. M.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The performance of the OCDMA systems is governed by numerous quantitative parameters such as the data rate, simultaneous number of users, the powers of transmitter and receiver, and the type of codes. This paper analyzes the performance of the OCDMA system using OFDM technique to enhance the channel data rate, to save power and increase the number of user of OSCDMA systems compared with previous hybrid subcarrier multiplexing/optical spectrum code division multiplexing (SCM/OSCDM) system. The average received signal to noise ratio (SNR) with the nonlinearity of subcarriers is derived. The theoretical results have been evaluated based on BER and number of users as well as amount of power saved. The proposed system gave better performance and save around -6 dBm of the power as well as increase the number of users twice compare to SCM/OCDMA system. In addition it is robust against interference and much more spectrally efficient than SCM/OCDMA system. The system was designed based on Flexible <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> (FCC) code which is easier construction, less complexity of encoder/decoder design and flexible in-phase <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for uncomplicated to implement using Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) for the OCDMA systems for any number of users and weights. The OCDMA-FCC_OFDM improves the number of users (cardinality) 108% compare to SCM/ODCMA-FCC system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22254863','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22254863"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> measurement of quantum shot noise using homemade transimpedance amplifiers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hashisaka, Masayuki Ota, Tomoaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Muraki, Koji</p> <p>2014-05-15</p> <p>We report a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurement system, based on a new approach, which can be used to measure shot noise in a mesoscopic conductor at milliKelvin temperatures. In contrast to other measurement systems in which high-speed low-noise voltage amplifiers are commonly used, our system employs homemade transimpedance amplifiers (TAs). The low input impedance of the TAs significantly reduces the crosstalk caused by unavoidable parasitic capacitance between wires. The TAs are designed to have a flat gain over a frequency band from 2 kHz to 1 MHz. Low-noise performance is attained by installing the TAs at a 4 K stage of a dilution refrigerator. Our system thus fulfills the technical requirements for <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements: low noise floor, high frequency band, and negligible crosstalk between two signal lines. Using our system, shot noise generated at a quantum point contact embedded in a quantum Hall system is measured. The good agreement between the obtained shot-noise data and theoretical predictions demonstrates the accuracy of the measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvD..70h3536A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvD..70h3536A"><span>Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>: The observer's manual</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Afshordi, Niayesh</p> <p>2004-10-01</p> <p>The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a direct signature of the presence of dark energy in the universe, in the absence of spatial curvature. A powerful method for observing the ISW effect is through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the cosmic microwave background with a tracer of the matter in the low redshift universe. In this paper, we describe the dependence of the obtained <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal on the geometry and other properties of a survey of the low redshift universe. We show that an all-sky survey with about 10×106 galaxies, almost uniformly distributed within 0<z<1 should yield a near optimal ISW detection, at ˜5σ level. In order to achieve this level of signal-to-noise, the systematic anisotropies in the survey must be below ˜0.1%, on the scale of ˜10° on the sky, while the systematic error in redshift estimates must be less than 0.05. Then, we argue that, while an ISW detection will not be a good way of constraining the conventional properties of dark energy, it could be a valuable means of testing alternative theories of gravity on large physical scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4614064','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4614064"><span>Inverse dynamics modelling of upper-limb tremor, with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ketteringham, Laurence P.; Neild, Simon A.; Hyde, Richard A.; Jones, Rosie J.S.; Davies-Smith, Angela M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A method to characterise upper-limb tremor using inverse dynamics modelling in combination with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analyses is presented. A 15 degree-of-freedom inverse dynamics model is used to estimate the joint torques required to produce the measured limb motion, given a set of estimated inertial properties for the body segments. The magnitudes of the estimated torques are useful when assessing patients or evaluating possible intervention methods. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the estimated joint torques is proposed to gain insight into how tremor in one limb segment interacts with tremor in another. The method is demonstrated using data from a single patient presenting intention tremor because of multiple sclerosis. It is shown that the inertial properties of the body segments can be estimated with sufficient accuracy using only the patient's height and weight as a priori knowledge, which ensures the method's practicality and transferability to clinical use. By providing a more detailed, objective characterisation of patient-specific tremor properties, the method is expected to improve the selection, design and assessment of treatment options on an individual basis. PMID:26609379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12543073','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12543073"><span>A dynamic view of cellular processes by in vivo fluorescence auto- and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bacia, Kirsten; Schwille, Petra</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is becoming increasingly popular as a technique that aims at complementing live cell images with biophysical information. This article provides both a short overview over recent intracellular FCS applications and a practical guide for investigators, who are seeking to integrate FCS into live cell imaging to obtain information on particle mobility, local concentrations, and molecular interactions. A brief introduction to the principles of FCS is provided, particularly emphasizing practical aspects such as the choice of appropriate dyes and positioning of the measurement volume in the sample. Possibilities and limitations in extracting parameters from autocorrelation curves are discussed, and attention is drawn to potential artifacts, such as photobleaching and probe aggregation. The principle of dual-color <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is reviewed along with considerations for proper setup and adjustment. Practical implications of nonideal conditions including incomplete focus overlap and spectral cross-talk are considered. Recent examples of both auto- and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> applications demonstrate the potential of FCS for cell biology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10771','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10771"><span>In-vessel fluid flow measurements using thermocouples <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>NguyenLe, Q.</p> <p>1998-05-08</p> <p>Fluid flow rate in high temperature and pressure vessels can be difficult to measure due to the associated harsh environment, inaccessible locations and pressure boundary integrity concerns. However, by using quick response miniature thermocouples to measure the naturally occurring temperature variations within the flow, the fluid velocity can be inferred from the transit time analysis. This flow measurement technique has other advantages such as the flow profile is not significantly disturbed, no additional flow restrictions introduced and the system fiction factor is not increased. Furthermore, since the measured flow rate is generally unaffected by the global system dynamics, such as heat increases or losses, as well as changes in the flow regimes, the location of the thermocouple pairs is extremely flexible. Due to the mentioned advantages, the thermocouple <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> flow measurement method has been developed for use at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Currently, thermocouple <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique is used to measure the Reactor Pressure Vessel downcomer fluid velocity and the suppression pool in-vessel natural circulation velocity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22345710H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22345710H"><span>Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Lyman Alpha Forest - Quasar <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ho, Shirley; Aubourg, E.; Bailey, S. J.; Bautista, J.; Beutler, F.; Bizyaev, D.; Blomqvist, M.; Bolton, A. S.; Brewington, H.; Brinkmann, J. V.; Brownstein, J.; Busca, N. G.; Carithers, W.; Croft, R. A.; Dawson, K. S.; Delubac, T.; Ebelke, G.; Eisenstein, D.; Feng, Y.; Font-Ribera, A.; Hogg, D. W.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kirkby, D.; Le Goff, J.; Lee, K.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Marchante, M.; Margela, D.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Muna, D.; Myers, A. D.; Nichol, R.; Oravetz, D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pan, K.; Noterdaeme, P.; O'Connel, R.; Paris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Pieri, M.; Rollinde, E.; Ross, N.; Rossi, G.; Schlegel, D. J.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Slosar, A.; Viel, M.; Weinberg, D. H.; Xu, X.; Yeche, C.; York, D. G.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the signal of BAO in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between SDSS III-BOSS DR10 and DR11 quasars and Lyman Alpha Forest. We present two independent analyses that follow slightly different methodologies. In one, we fit the BAO using DR10 data only following multipole methods described in Xu et al. 2012 adapting to the fact that Lyman-Alpha forest is negatively biased, while in the other analyses, we analyze DR11 data following methodologies in Font-Ribera et al., 2012 and Kirkby et al. 2013. In the two analyses, we use different treatments of the Lyman Alpha Forest, different fitting methodologies and found consistent cosmological results. The expected signal-to-noise is weaker than the Lyman-Alpha Forest auto-correlations, however this will be a test of principle of finding BAO in <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>, where systematics can be more easily mitigated. This method also applies to future surveys with medium/dense coverage of multiple tracers in similar redshift range, such as SDSS IV, DESI, WFIRST and EUCLID.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4311241','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4311241"><span>Detrended Partial-<span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Analysis: A New Method for Analyzing Correlations in Complex System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yuan, Naiming; Fu, Zuntao; Zhang, Huan; Piao, Lin; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, a new method, detrended partial-<span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DPCCA), is proposed. Based on detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA), this method is improved by including partial-correlation technique, which can be applied to quantify the relations of two non-stationary signals (with influences of other signals removed) on different time scales. We illustrate the advantages of this method by performing two numerical tests. Test I shows the advantages of DPCCA in handling non-stationary signals, while Test II reveals the “intrinsic” relations between two considered time series with potential influences of other unconsidered signals removed. To further show the utility of DPCCA in natural complex systems, we provide new evidence on the winter-time Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the winter-time Nino3 Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly (Nino3-SSTA) affecting the Summer Rainfall over the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River (SRYR). By applying DPCCA, better significant correlations between SRYR and Nino3-SSTA on time scales of 6 ~ 8 years are found over the period 1951 ~ 2012, while significant correlations between SRYR and PDO on time scales of 35 years arise. With these physically explainable results, we have confidence that DPCCA is an useful method in addressing complex systems. PMID:25634341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.459.1586Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.459.1586Z"><span>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zieser, Britta; Merkel, Philipp M.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We present the first calculation of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect. Both signals are combined in a single formalism, which permits the computation of the full covariance matrix. In order to avoid the uncertainties presented by the non-linear evolution of the matter power spectrum and intrinsic alignments of galaxies, our analysis is restricted to large scales, i.e. multipoles below ℓ = 1000. We demonstrate in a Fisher analysis that this reduction compared to other studies of 3D weak lensing extending to smaller scales is compensated by the information that is gained if the additional iSW signal and in particular its <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with lensing data are considered. Given the observational standards of upcoming weak-lensing surveys like Euclid, marginal errors on cosmological parameters decrease by 10 per cent compared to a cosmic shear experiment if both types of information are combined without a cosmic wave background (CMB) prior. Once the constraining power of CMB data is added, the improvement becomes marginal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1200894-cross-correlation-spin-noise-spectroscopy-heterogeneous-interacting-spin-systems','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1200894-cross-correlation-spin-noise-spectroscopy-heterogeneous-interacting-spin-systems"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; ...</p> <p>2015-04-30</p> <p>Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe spin noise spectroscopy, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spinmore » ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using “two-color” optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1200894','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1200894"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> spin noise spectroscopy of heterogeneous interacting spin systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Roy, Dibyendu; Yang, Luyi; Crooker, Scott A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.</p> <p>2015-04-30</p> <p>Interacting multi-component spin systems are ubiquitous in nature and in the laboratory. As such, investigations of inter-species spin interactions are of vital importance. Traditionally, they are studied by experimental methods that are necessarily perturbative: e.g., by intentionally polarizing or depolarizing one spin species while detecting the response of the other(s). Here, we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on multi-probe <i>spin noise spectroscopy</i>, which can reveal inter-species spin interactions - under conditions of strict thermal equilibrium - by detecting and <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> the stochastic fluctuation signals exhibited by each of the constituent spin species. Specifically, we consider a two-component spin ensemble that interacts via exchange coupling, and we determine <i><span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></i> between their intrinsic spin fluctuations. The model is experimentally confirmed using “two-color” optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs vapors. Noise correlations directly reveal the presence of inter-species spin exchange, without ever perturbing the system away from thermal equilibrium. These non-invasive and noise-based techniques should be generally applicable to any heterogeneous spin system in which the fluctuations of the constituent components are detectable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JKPS...62..569N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JKPS...62..569N"><span>Random matrix theory and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in global financial indices and local stock market indices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nobi, Ashadun; Maeng, Seong Eun; Ha, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Jae Woo</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>We analyzed <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between price fluctuations of global financial indices (20 daily stock indices over the world) and local indices (daily indices of 200 companies in the Korean stock market) by using random matrix theory (RMT). We compared eigenvalues and components of the largest and the second largest eigenvectors of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix before, during, and after the global financial the crisis in the year 2008. We find that the majority of its eigenvalues fall within the RMT bounds [ λ -, λ +], where λ - and λ + are the lower and the upper bounds of the eigenvalues of random correlation matrices. The components of the eigenvectors for the largest positive eigenvalues indicate the identical financial market mode dominating the global and local indices. On the other hand, the components of the eigenvector corresponding to the second largest eigenvalue are positive and negative values alternatively. The components before the crisis change sign during the crisis, and those during the crisis change sign after the crisis. The largest inverse participation ratio (IPR) corresponding to the smallest eigenvector is higher after the crisis than during any other periods in the global and local indices. During the global financial the crisis, the correlations among the global indices and among the local stock indices are perturbed significantly. However, the correlations between indices quickly recover the trends before the crisis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5027S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyA..392.5027S"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between financial markets after the 2008 crisis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sensoy, A.; Yuksel, S.; Erturk, M.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>We analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix C of the index returns of the main financial markets after the 2008 crisis using methods of random matrix theory. We test the eigenvalues of C for universal properties of random matrices and find that the majority of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients arise from randomness. We show that the eigenvector of the largest deviating eigenvalue of C represents a global market itself. We reveal that high volatility of financial markets is observed at the same times with high correlations between them which lowers the risk diversification potential even if one constructs a widely internationally diversified portfolio of stocks. We identify and compare the connection and cluster structure of markets before and after the crisis using minimal spanning and ultrametric hierarchical trees. We find that after the crisis, the co-movement degree of the markets increases. We also highlight the key financial markets of pre and post crisis using main centrality measures and analyze the changes. We repeat the study using rank correlation and compare the differences. Further implications are discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..470..261W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..470..261W"><span>Multiple <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> noise induced transition in a stochastic bistable system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Can-Jun; Yang, Ke-Li; Du, Chun-Yan</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Based on the stochastic equivalent rules, the Fokker-Planck Equation for a general one-dimensional nonlinear system subjected to N-component noises and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> noises is derived, and the greatest advantage of the method lies in its simplicity. Applying this method, the effects of multiple sources of noise and the correlation forms of noises among them (i.e., two multiplicative noises, an additive noise and the correlation between the three noises) on the steady-state properties and the mean first passage time (MFPT) of a stochastic bistable system are discussed in details. The results show rich transition phenomena, such as the reentrance-like noise-induced phenomenon and the switch between the bimodal and the unimodal structure for different noise intensities. Moreover, the effects of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> among the three noise sources on the MFPT are also discussed, and the noise-enhanced stability phenomenon and the resonant activation phenomenon are observed. The numerical results are in basic agreement with the theoretical predictions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SMaS...26c5027L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SMaS...26c5027L"><span>Damage detection of structures with detrended fluctuation and detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analyses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Tzu-Kang; Fajri, Haikal</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Recently, fractal analysis has shown its potential for damage detection and assessment in fields such as biomedical and mechanical engineering. For its practicability in interpreting irregular, complex, and disordered phenomena, a structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) is proposed. First, damage conditions can be swiftly detected by evaluating ambient vibration signals measured from a structure through DFA. Damage locations can then be determined by analyzing the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of signals of different floors by applying DCCA. A damage index is also proposed based on multi-scale DCCA curves to improve the damage location accuracy. To verify the performance of the proposed SHM system, a four-story numerical model was used to simulate various damage conditions with different noise levels. Furthermore, an experimental verification was conducted on a seven-story benchmark structure to assess the potential damage. The results revealed that the DFA method could detect the damage conditions satisfactorily, and damage locations can be identified through the DCCA method with an accuracy of 75%. Moreover, damage locations can be correctly assessed by the damage index method with an improved accuracy of 87.5%. The proposed SHM system has promising application in practical implementations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23436496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23436496"><span>Nonlinear alignment of chromatograms by means of moving window fast Fourier transfrom <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Zhong; Wang, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lu, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Yi-Bao; Zhan, De-Jian; Liang, Yi-Zeng</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>The preprocessing of chromatograms is essential to modern chromatography for further qualitative and quantitative analysis, especially when chromatographic instruments are used for herb products analysis involving large number of samples. To accurately compare and analyze the obtained chromatograms, it is necessary to preprocess, especially align retention time shifts. Here moving window fast Fourier transform (FFT) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is introduced to perform nonlinear alignment of high-throughput chromatograms. Since elution characteristics of chromatograms will produce local similarity in retention time shifts, moving window procedure seems to be a better substitute of segmentation steps. The retention time shifts can be calculated and accelerated by FFT <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. The artifacts can be detected and eliminated from the retention time shifts profile since the continuity of moving window procedure. The proposed method is demonstrated in comparison with recursive alignment by FFT on chromatographic datasets from herb products analysis. It is shown that the proposed method can address nonlinear retention time shift problem in chromatograms with the simple moving window procedure, which will not introduce segments size optimization problem. In additional, the parameters are intuitive and easy to adjust, which makes it off-the-shelf toolbox for alignment of chromatograms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S13B2848S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S13B2848S"><span>Microevent Detection Based on Waveform <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> in the Dogye Mining Area, Korea</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Son, M.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, G.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We have studied induced seismicity associated with Dogye coal mine located in the eastern part of Korea. From May 2009 to March 2014, 222 events that occurred at the mining area were reported in our catalog with local magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 2.4. For 67 events we can observe that the epicenters relocated by the double difference technique with Lg waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> image location of the six clusters classified according to waveform similarity. On May 2014 a broadband seismometer is installed in the mine office to understand seismicity of the mining area. We <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> continuous data of the installed station recorded from May 2014 to April 2015 with a comb-like waveform observed regularly. The comb-like waveform with length of 30 to 60 minutes is a signal train composed of a blast every 30 seconds. We consider the comb-like signal related directly to mining activity from the fact that the signal train appears averagely four times a day on weekdays with its monotonic amplitude. Besides the comb-like signal, events with an irregular occurrence time and amplitude is detected from the one-year continuous record of the installed station. We suggests that most of the undefined events are formed from fracturing in response to stress-perturbation on an active mining face or represent slip in existing shear zones such as a fault or dike.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1430..697H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1430..697H"><span>Estimation of erosion/corrosion rate in pipe walls by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Honarvar, F.; Salehi, F.; Safavi, V.; Sinclair, A. N.</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>In process plants, most pipelines are subject to erosion and/or corrosion due to the presence of aggressive agents, turbulence, or high fluid velocity. Among other causes, changes in process parameters can be considered as an important cause of changes in pipe wall erosion/corrosion rate. Quick detection of these changes by continuous monitoring of the thinning rate of the pipe wall can help prevent further wall damage at early stages of development. In this paper, we apply the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique to ultrasonic signals for accurate estimation of fine changes in the erosion/corrosion rate. The resolution of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique is increased by combining it with curve fitting methods. The technique is applied to experimental data obtained from a test rig designed for simulating accelerated corrosion in pipes. The results of the new approach are compared with results obtained from a model-based estimation method and very good agreement is observed. The new approach is simple and fast and can be easily incorporated in ultrasonic measurement systems used in process plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998SPIE.3357..395V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998SPIE.3357..395V"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> at 250 MHz using high-performance FPGAs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>von Herzen, Brian</p> <p>1998-07-01</p> <p>This paper describes a 250 MHz <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for radio astronomy built using field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA's). Experimental results indicate that CMOS FPGA's can operate reliably at 250 MHz. Long-term integration tests of up to 10(superscript 12) samples have been taken, demonstrating the correlator accuracy down to the limits of the testing apparatus. Recent estimates indicate that higher-performance FPGA's available early in 1998 can attain speeds of over 300 MHz using 20% fewer logic elements than previous designs. The FPGA correlator can be reconfigured for 2, 3, 4, or even 9 levels of sensitivity, permitting a tradeoff of the number of lags with the sensitivity desired. Although FPGA's have historically been more expensive than custom chips, starting this year FPGA correlators are actually less expensive than custom correlator chips. This cost reduction is due to the fact that FPGA's are standard components in the electronics industry and are produced in much higher volumes than custom correlators. As an example, a 1024-lag 4-level <span class="hlt">cross</span>- <span class="hlt">correlator</span> can be produced for an FPG chip cost of less than $80 in 1998. FPGA's continue to drop in price faster than custom devices because volumes continue to increase and FPGA architectures continue to improve. The demonstrated high performance of FPGA's coupled with their extreme flexibility, reconfigurability and lower cost make FPGA's ideally suited for the next generation of large correlator arrays.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21074345','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21074345"><span>Automated vessel segmentation using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and pooled covariance matrix analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Du, Jiang; Karimi, Afshin; Wu, Yijing; Korosec, Frank R; Grist, Thomas M; Mistretta, Charles A</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) provides contrast dynamics in the vasculature and allows vessel segmentation based on temporal correlation analysis. Here we present an automated vessel segmentation algorithm including automated generation of regions of interest (ROIs), <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and pooled sample covariance matrix analysis. The dynamic images are divided into multiple equal-sized regions. In each region, ROIs for artery, vein and background are generated using an iterative thresholding algorithm based on the contrast arrival time map and contrast enhancement map. Region-specific multi-feature <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis and pooled covariance matrix analysis are performed to calculate the Mahalanobis distances (MDs), which are used to automatically separate arteries from veins. This segmentation algorithm is applied to a dual-phase dynamic imaging acquisition scheme where low-resolution time-resolved images are acquired during the dynamic phase followed by high-frequency data acquisition at the steady-state phase. The segmented low-resolution arterial and venous images are then combined with the high-frequency data in k-space and inverse Fourier transformed to form the final segmented arterial and venous images. Results from volunteer and patient studies demonstrate the advantages of this automated vessel segmentation and dual phase data acquisition technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApPhA.123..176H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApPhA.123..176H"><span>Inter-diffusion and its correlation with dynamical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> in liquid Ce80Ni20</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hu, J. L.; Zhong, L. X.; Zhu, C. A.; Zhang, B.</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We reported the inter-diffusion coefficients in liquid Ce_{80}Ni_{20} measured by the sliding cell technique. Combined with the self-diffusion data of Ni measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the literature, it was found that the relationship between inter-diffusion and self-diffusion in liquid Ce_{80}Ni_{20} was strongly deviated from the standard Darken equation with an abnormally small dynamical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> factor S (the so called Manning factor) in a range of 0.6-0.8, less than unity in standard systems. Through the calculated distinct diffusion coefficient and its deviation from the standard one, it was discovered that the small S value was directly originated from enhanced distinct diffusion between Ce and Ni atoms and reduced distinct diffusion between Ni and Ni atoms. Because the inter-atomic interaction was not considered in the standard liquids, the present small S factor and intrinsic distinct diffusion coefficients were believed to be resulted from the chemical interaction between Ce and Ni in the liquid. The results provide new evidence of the dynamic <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> in liquid diffusion, and thus shed light on the understanding of the correlation between dynamics and structure in liquid alloys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22412587','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22412587"><span>Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eckert, S. E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Beye, M. E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M.; Ochmann, M.; Huse, N.; Ross, M.; Khalil, M.; Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Föhlisch, A.</p> <p>2015-02-09</p> <p>The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26235799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26235799"><span>Age and markers of Leydig cell <span class="hlt">function</span>, but not of Sertoli cell <span class="hlt">function</span> predict the success of sperm <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in adolescents and adults with Klinefelter's syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rohayem, J; Fricke, R; Czeloth, K; Mallidis, C; Wistuba, J; Krallmann, C; Zitzmann, M; Kliesch, S</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (mTESE), combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) represents a chance for azoospermic men with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) to father children. The objective of this study was to identify predictive factors for the success of mTESE from adolescents and adults with KS. The clinical data of 50 late pubertal adolescents (13-19 years) and 85 adult patients (20-61 years) with non-mosaic KS, who underwent mTESE, were analysed with respect to factors, potentially predictive of active spermatogenesis; specifically a history of cryptorchidism, age, testicular volumes, serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone (T) and estradiol at the time of surgery. Inhibin B, AMH and INSL3 were additionally analysed in the adolescents. A younger age and a near-compensated Leydig cell <span class="hlt">function</span> were associated with higher success of sperm <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> via mTESE: In adolescents ≥15-19 years, spermatozoa were <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> in 45%, compared to 31% in adults; in adolescents aged 13-14 years, spermatozoa were collected in only 10%. Adolescents with an LH ≤17.5 U/L, along with a T level ≥7.5 nmol/L had the best success rate (54%), which fell to 44% with higher LH, whereas those with low T (<7.5 nmol/L), irrespective of LH had no sperm <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. In adults with T levels above and LH below these thresholds, the success rate was 51%, falling to 19%, if LH was higher. When T was lower than threshold, the rate was 17%. No association between testicular volumes, serum levels of FSH, Inhibin B, AMH, estradiol and mTESE success was found. A history of cryptorchidism was associated with lower <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> rates. A window of opportunity for an approximate 50% chance to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> spermatozoa via mTESE exists for young, late pubertal KS patients between age 15 and young adulthood, when Leydig cell <span class="hlt">function</span> is at its best. In these cases, referral to a centre of expertise should be considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19244014','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19244014"><span>Joint estimation and correction of geometric distortions for EPI <span class="hlt">functional</span> MRI using harmonic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Hien M; Sutton, Bradley P; Morrison, Robert L; Do, Minh N</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses applied spatial variations in the magnetic field to encode spatial position. Therefore, nonuniformities in the main magnetic field can cause image distortions. In order to correct the image distortions, it is desirable to simultaneously acquire data with a field map in registration. We propose a joint estimation (JE) framework with a fast, noniterative approach using harmonic <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> (HR) methods, combined with a multi-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition. The connection with HR establishes an elegant framework to solve the JE problem through a sequence of 1-D HR problems in which efficient solutions are available. We also derive the condition on the smoothness of the field map in order for HR techniques to recover the image with high signal-to-noise ratio. Compared to other dynamic field mapping methods, this method is not constrained by the absolute level of the field inhomogeneity over the slice, but relies on a generous pixel-to-pixel smoothness. Moreover, this method can recover image, field map, and T2* map simultaneously.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MNRAS.411...54L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MNRAS.411...54L"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> between damped Lyα systems and Lyman break galaxies in cosmological SPH simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, T. S.; Nagamine, K.; Hernquist, L.; Springel, V.</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>We calculate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF) between damped Lyα systems (DLAs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations at z= 3. We compute the CCF with two different methods. First, we assume that there is one DLA in each dark matter halo if its DLA cross-section is non-zero. In our second approach we weight the pair count by the DLA cross-section of each halo, yielding a cross-section-weighted CCF. We also compute the angular CCF for direct comparison with observations. Finally, we calculate the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">functions</span> of LBGs and DLAs, and their bias against the dark matter distribution. For these different approaches, we consistently find that there is good agreement between our simulations and observational measurements by Cooke et al. and Adelberger et al.. Our results thus confirm that the spatial distribution of LBGs and DLAs can be well described within the framework of the concordance Λ cold dark matter model. We find that the correlation strengths of LBGs and DLAs are consistent with the actual observations, and in the case of LBGs it is higher than would be predicted by low-mass galaxy merger models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41A2417L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41A2417L"><span>Seismic Investigation of Magmatic Unrest Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California Using Waveform <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, G.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We investigate the seismic and magmatic activity during an 11-month-long seismic swarm between 1989 and 1990 beneath Mammoth Mountain (MM) at the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern California. This swarm is believed to be results of a shallow intrusion of magma beneath MM. It was followed by the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas, which caused tree-killings in 1990 and posed a significant human health risk around MM. In this study, we develop a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model using first-arrival picks by applying the simul2000 tomographic algorithm. The resulting 3-D model is correlated with the surface geological features at shallow depths and is used to constrain absolute earthquake locations for all local events in our study. We compute both P- and S-wave differential times using a time-domain waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method. We then apply similar event cluster analysis and differential time location approach to further improve relative event location accuracy. A dramatic sharpening of seismicity pattern is obtained after these processes. The estimated uncertainties are a few meters in relative location and ~100 meters in absolute location. We also apply a high-resolution approach to estimate in situ near-source Vp/Vs ratios using differential times from waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. This method provides highly precise results because <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> can measure differential times to within a few milliseconds and can achieve a precision of 0.001 in estimated Vp/Vs ratio. Our results show a circular ring-like seismicity pattern with a diameter of 2 km between 3 and 8 km depth. These events are distributed in an anomalous body with low Vp and high Vp/Vs, which may be caused by over-pressured magmatically derived fluids. At shallower depths, we observe very low Vp/Vs anomalies beneath MM from the surface to 1 km below sea level whose locations agree with the proposed CO2 reservoir in previous studies. The systematic spatial and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6055B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6055B"><span>Big Data solution for CTBT monitoring: CEA-IDC joint global <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bobrov, Dmitry; Bell, Randy; Brachet, Nicolas; Gaillard, Pierre; Kitov, Ivan; Rozhkov, Mikhail</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> when applied to historical datasets of seismic records provides dramatic improvements in detection, location, and magnitude estimation of natural and manmade seismic events. With correlation techniques, the amplitude threshold of signal detection can be reduced globally by a factor of 2 to 3 relative to currently standard beamforming and STA/LTA detector. The gain in sensitivity corresponds to a body wave magnitude reduction by 0.3 to 0.4 units and doubles the number of events meeting high quality requirements (e.g. detected by three and more seismic stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). This gain is crucial for seismic monitoring under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The International Data Centre (IDC) dataset includes more than 450,000 seismic events, tens of millions of raw detections and continuous seismic data from the primary IMS stations since 2000. This high-quality dataset is a natural candidate for an extensive <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> study and the basis of further enhancements in monitoring capabilities. Without this historical dataset recorded by the permanent IMS Seismic Network any improvements would not be feasible. However, due to the mismatch between the volume of data and the performance of the standard Information Technology infrastructure, it becomes impossible to process all the data within tolerable elapsed time. To tackle this problem known as "BigData", the CEA/DASE is part of the French project "DataScale". One objective is to reanalyze 10 years of waveform data from the IMS network with the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique thanks to a dedicated High Performance Computer (HPC) infrastructure operated by the Centre de Calcul Recherche et Technologie (CCRT) at the CEA of Bruyères-le-Châtel. Within 2 years we are planning to enhance detection and phase association algorithms (also using machine learning and automatic classification) and process about 30 terabytes of data provided by the IDC to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720879','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720879"><span>Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21587366','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21587366"><span>THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: CALIBRATION WITH THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE USING <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATIONS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hajian, Amir; Bond, John R.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce; Appel, John William; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Brown, Ben; Chervenak, Jay; Doriese, W. Bertrand</p> <p>2011-10-20</p> <p>We present a new calibration method based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and map-making procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < l < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3506152','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3506152"><span>Changes in <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> as an Indicator for Systemic Risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zheng, Zeyu; Podobnik, Boris; Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The 2008–2012 global financial crisis began with the global recession in December 2007 and exacerbated in September 2008, during which the U.S. stock markets lost 20% of value from its October 11 2007 peak. Various studies reported that financial crisis are associated with increase in both <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> among stocks and stock indices and the level of systemic risk. In this paper, we study 10 different Dow Jones economic sector indexes, and applying principle component analysis (PCA) we demonstrate that the rate of increase in principle components with short 12-month time windows can be effectively used as an indicator of systemic risk—the larger the change of PC1, the higher the increase of systemic risk. Clearly, the higher the level of systemic risk, the more likely a financial crisis would occur in the near future. PMID:23185692</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27468169','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27468169"><span>Automatic counting of fungiform papillae by shape using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Valencia, Eréndira; Ríos, Homero V; Verdalet, Iñigo; Hernández, Jesús; Juárez, Sergio; Herrera, Rosa; Silva, Erik R</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>The determination of the number of fungiform papillae (FP) on the human tongue is important for taste sensitivity studies. Most of the time, the counting of the FP is done manually. In this paper we propose a novel algorithm to count the FP using shape characteristics measured by <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. The accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated by counting the FP manually on the same images and then doing a statistical analysis. A Poisson regression model is fitted using maximum likelihood. The result is that the algorithm counts are very similar to the human experts. Another advantage of the algorithm is its facility of use, velocity and that it can work on a plain tongue image, without the need to stain the tongue as is usual in manual counting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PMB....43.1645F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PMB....43.1645F"><span>Registration of synthetic tomographic projection data sets using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fitchard, E. E.; Aldridge, J. S.; Reckwerdt, P. J.; Mackie, T. R.</p> <p>1998-06-01</p> <p>Tomographic registration, a method that makes possible accurate patient registration directly from projection data, consists of three processing steps: (i) manual coarse positioning, (ii) tomographic projection set acquisition, and (iii) computer mediated refined positioning. In the coarse positioning stage, the degree of patient alignment is comparable with that achieved with the standard radiotherapy set-up. However, the accuracy requirements are somewhat more relaxed in that meticulous alignment of the patient using external laser indicators is not necessary. Instead, tomographic projection sets are compared with planning CTs in order to achieve improved patient set-up. The projection sets are <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> to obtain the best-fit translation and rotation offsets. The algorithm has been tested on synthetic data with the incorporation of varying amounts of Gaussian pseudo-random noise. These tests demonstrate the algorithm's stability and also confirm that alignment can be achieved with an accuracy of less than one projection pixel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910067044&hterms=keith+richards&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dkeith%2Brichards','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910067044&hterms=keith+richards&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dkeith%2Brichards"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of the X-ray background with nearby galaxies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jahoda, Keith; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Boldt, Elihu; Lahav, Ofer</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The detection of a signal in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the diffuse 2-10 keV HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray surface brightness with the galaxy surface density derived from diameter-limited samples from the Uppsala General Catalogue is reported. An ad hoc relationship between the X-ray flux and the galaxy counts is used to estimate the local X-ray volume emissivity at 2.8 + or - 1.0 x 10 to the 38th ergs/s/cu Mpc. This result implies that unevolved populations of X-ray sources correlated with present-epoch galaxies can contribute only 13 + or - 5 percent of the cosmic X-ray background.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780061485&hterms=turbojet&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dturbojet','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780061485&hterms=turbojet&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dturbojet"><span>Multitube turbojet noise-suppression studies using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Regan, D. R.; Meecham, W. C.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The noise-generating region of a suppressed turbojet exhaust is studied by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> static pressure fluctuations within the exhaust with far-field sound for Mach numbers up to 0.99, using a 31-tube nozzle having an area ratio of 3.1. Measurements made with an unsuppressed turbojet exhaust having an equivalent area ratio and operating under effectively equal thrust loads serve as the experimental control. Static pressure-level measurements, made with a calibrated high-temperature acoustically damped probe tube, show that noise suppression by multitube nozzles results from reduced turbulence levels. The maximum fluctuating static-pressure level in the unsuppressed turbojet exhaust is typically 5-6 dB higher than static-pressure levels in the suppressed exhaust under conditions of effectively equal static thrust. This suggests that the turbulence intensity in the multitube suppressor flow is reduced in excess of 20% compared with the unsuppressed jet exhaust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120002565&hterms=investigacion&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dinvestigacion','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120002565&hterms=investigacion&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dinvestigacion"><span>The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Calibration with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Using <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hajian, Amir; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, John R.; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Moseley, Harvey; Wollack, Ed</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We present a new calibration method based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and mapmaking procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < I < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NatSR...2E.888Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NatSR...2E.888Z"><span>Changes in <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> as an Indicator for Systemic Risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Zeyu; Podobnik, Boris; Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The 2008-2012 global financial crisis began with the global recession in December 2007 and exacerbated in September 2008, during which the U.S. stock markets lost 20% of value from its October 11 2007 peak. Various studies reported that financial crisis are associated with increase in both <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> among stocks and stock indices and the level of systemic risk. In this paper, we study 10 different Dow Jones economic sector indexes, and applying principle component analysis (PCA) we demonstrate that the rate of increase in principle components with short 12-month time windows can be effectively used as an indicator of systemic risk--the larger the change of PC1, the higher the increase of systemic risk. Clearly, the higher the level of systemic risk, the more likely a financial crisis would occur in the near future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhyA..388.3551E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhyA..388.3551E"><span>Network structure of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> among the world market indices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eryiğit, Mehmet; Eryiğit, Resul</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>We report the results of an investigation of the properties of the networks formed by the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of the daily and weekly index changes of 143 stock market indices from 59 different countries. Analysis of the asset graphs, minimum spanning trees (MST) and planar maximally filtered graphs (PMFG) of the afermentioned networks confirms that globalization has been increasing in recent years. North American and European markets are observed to be much more strongly connected among themselves compared to the integration with the other geographical regions. Surprisingly, the integration of East Asian markets among themselves as well as to the Western markets is found to be rather weak. MST and PMFG of both daily and weekly return correlations indicates that the clustering of the indices is mostly geographical. The French fsbf250 index is found to be most important node of the MST and PMFG based on several graph centrality measures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhyA..301..397M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhyA..301..397M"><span>Measures of globalization based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> of world financial indices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maslov, Sergei</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix of daily returns of stock market indices in a diverse set of 37 countries worldwide was analyzed. Comparison of the spectrum of this matrix with predictions of random matrix theory provides an empirical evidence of strong interactions between individual economies, as manifested by three largest eigenvalues and the corresponding set of stable, non-random eigenvectors. The observed correlation structure is robust with respect to changes in the time horizon of returns ranging from 1 to 10 trading days, and to replacing individual returns with just their signs. This last observation confirms that it is correlations between signs and not absolute values of fluctuations, which are mostly responsible for the observed effect. Negative changes in the index are somewhat more correlated than the positive ones. Also, in our data set the reaction of Asian stock indices to changes in European and American ones persists for about 3 days.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2703671','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2703671"><span>X-ray <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis uncovers hidden local symmetries in disordered matter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wochner, Peter; Gutt, Christian; Autenrieth, Tina; Demmer, Thomas; Bugaev, Volodymyr; Ortiz, Alejandro Díaz; Duri, Agnès; Zontone, Federico; Grübel, Gerhard; Dosch, Helmut</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We explore the different local symmetries in colloidal glasses beyond the standard pair correlation analysis. Using our newly developed X-ray <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis (XCCA) concept together with brilliant coherent X-ray sources, we have been able to access and classify the otherwise hidden local order within disorder. The emerging local symmetries are coupled to distinct momentum transfer (Q) values, which do not coincide with the maxima of the amorphous structure factor. Four-, 6-, 10- and, most prevalently, 5-fold symmetries are observed. The observation of dynamical evolution of these symmetries forms a connection to dynamical heterogeneities in glasses, which is far beyond conventional diffraction analysis. The XCCA concept opens up a fascinating view into the world of disorder and will definitely allow, with the advent of free electron X-ray lasers, an accurate and systematic experimental characterization of the structure of the liquid and glass states. PMID:20716512</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017OptL...42.1217X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017OptL...42.1217X"><span>Phase noise characterization of sub-hertz linewidth lasers via digital <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Lours, Michel; Alexandre, Christophe; Le Coq, Yann</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Phase noise or frequency noise is a key metrics to evaluate the short term stability of a laser. This property is of a great interest for the applications but delicate to characterize, especially for narrow line-width lasers. In this letter, we demonstrate a digital <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> scheme to characterize the absolute phase noise of sub-hertz line-width lasers. Three 1,542 nm ultra-stable lasers are used in this approach. For each measurement two lasers act as references to characterize a third one. Phase noise power spectral density from 0.5 Hz to 0.8 MHz Fourier frequencies can be derived for each laser by a mere change in the configuration of the lasers. This is the first time showing the phase noise of sub-hertz line-width lasers with no reference limitation. We also present an analysis of the laser phase noise performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5375924','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5375924"><span>DOA Estimation Based on Real-Valued <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Matrix of Coprime Arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Defu</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>A fast direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method using a real-valued <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix (CCM) of coprime subarrays is proposed. Firstly, real-valued CCM with extended aperture is constructed to obtain the signal subspaces corresponding to the two subarrays. By analysing the relationship between the two subspaces, DOA estimations from the two subarrays are simultaneously obtained with automatic pairing. Finally, unique DOA is determined based on the common results from the two subarrays. Compared to partial spectral search (PSS) method and estimation of signal parameter via rotational invariance (ESPRIT) based method for coprime arrays, the proposed algorithm has lower complexity but achieves better DOA estimation performance and handles more sources. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:28335536</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35.4195C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35.4195C"><span>A study of meteorological variables in some extreme environments via <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cruz-Kuri, L.; McKay, C. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.</p> <p></p> <p>Some of us have been studying soils in the Atacama Desert, Chile and in Pico de Orizaba, Mexico. The Atacama, is an extreme, arid, temperate desert that extends across 1000 km with monthly mean air temperatures between 16 to 14°C and is remarkably uniform throughout the year (±3°C). Pico de Orizaba (19° N) is a mountain that possesses a glacier and has tropical alpine environments. Both of such environments are of interest as models for Mars. Meteorological data for the Yungay area of the Atacama Desert, as well as meteorological data of the Northern and Southern faces of Pico de Orizaba have been collected. Both sets of data were analyzed using the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> technique of multivariate time series. In this report we describe some of the patterns found for these statistics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21340094','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21340094"><span>Dual-color fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy on a planar optofluidic chip.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, A; Eberle, M M; Lunt, E J; Liu, S; Leake, K; Rudenko, M I; Hawkins, A R; Schmidt, H</p> <p>2011-04-21</p> <p>Fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy (FCCS) is a highly sensitive fluorescence technique with distinct advantages in many bioanalytical applications involving interaction and binding of multiple components. Due to the use of multiple beams, bulk optical FCCS setups require delicate and complex alignment procedures. We demonstrate the first implementation of dual-color FCCS on a planar, integrated optofluidic chip based on liquid-core waveguides that can guide liquid and light simultaneously. In this configuration, the excitation beams are delivered in predefined locations and automatically aligned within the excitation waveguides. We implement two canonical applications of FCCS in the optofluidic lab-on-chip environment: particle colocalization and binding/dissociation dynamics. Colocalization is demonstrated in the detection and discrimination of single-color and double-color fluorescently labeled nanobeads. FCCS in combination with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is used to detect the denaturation process of double-stranded DNA at nanomolar concentration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PhRvL..83.1471P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PhRvL..83.1471P"><span>Universal and Nonuniversal Properties of <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlations</span> in Financial Time Series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plerou, Vasiliki; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Rosenow, Bernd; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Stanley, H. Eugene</p> <p>1999-08-01</p> <p>We use methods of random matrix theory to analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix C of stock price changes of the largest 1000 U.S. companies for the 2-year period 1994-1995. We find that the statistics of most of the eigenvalues in the spectrum of C agree with the predictions of random matrix theory, but there are deviations for a few of the largest eigenvalues. We find that C has the universal properties of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. Furthermore, we analyze the eigenvectors of C through their inverse participation ratio and find eigenvectors with large ratios at both edges of the eigenvalue spectrum-a situation reminiscent of localization theory results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASJ...68...86T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASJ...68...86T"><span>Development of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectrometry and the coherent structures of maser sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Imai, Hiroshi; Sekido, Mamoru</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We have developed a new method of data processing for radio telescope observation data to measure time-dependent temporal coherence, and we have named it "<span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectrometry" (XCS). XCS is an autocorrelation procedure that expands time lags over the integration time and is applied to data obtained from a single-dish observation. The temporal coherence property of received signals is enhanced by XCS. We tested the XCS technique using the data of strong H2O masers in W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N. We obtained the temporal coherent lengths of the maser emission to be 17.95 ± 0.33 μs, 26.89 ± 0.49 μs, and 15.95 ± 0.46 μs for W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N, respectively. These results may indicate the existence of a coherent astrophysical maser.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApJS..228....8B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApJS..228....8B"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlating</span> the γ-ray Sky with Catalogs of Galaxy Clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Branchini, Enzo; Camera, Stefano; Cuoco, Alessandro; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Viel, Matteo; Xia, Jun-Qing</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We report the detection of a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal between Fermi Large Area Telescope diffuse γ-ray maps and catalogs of clusters. In our analysis, we considered three different catalogs: WHL12, redMaPPer, and PlanckSZ. They all show a positive correlation with different amplitudes, related to the average mass of the objects in each catalog, which also sets the catalog bias. The signal detection is confirmed by the results of a stacking analysis. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal extends to rather large angular scales, around 1°, that correspond, at the typical redshift of the clusters in these catalogs, to a few to tens of megaparsecs, i.e., the typical scale-length of the large-scale structures in the universe. Most likely this signal is contributed by the cumulative emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) associated with the filamentary structures that converge toward the high peaks of the matter density field in which galaxy clusters reside. In addition, our analysis reveals the presence of a second component, more compact in size and compatible with a point-like emission from within individual clusters. At present, we cannot distinguish between the two most likely interpretations for such a signal, i.e., whether it is produced by AGNs inside clusters or if it is a diffuse γ-ray emission from the intracluster medium. We argue that this latter, intriguing, hypothesis might be tested by applying this technique to a low-redshift large-mass cluster sample.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.V31E3071F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.V31E3071F"><span>Imaging the Yellowstone Magmatic System Using Multi-Component Ambient Noise <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> and Tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Farrell, J.; Lin, F. C.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We present a new S-wave velocity model for the Yellowstone magmatic system derived from the inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase velocity measurements from periods from 6 to 35 s. All available data from 2007-2014 within and near the Yellowstone region was downloaded for the USArray TA network (TA), the Yellowstone Seismic Network (WY), the NOISY array (Z2), the USGS Intermountain West network (IW), the Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Seismic Network (PB), and the USGS National Seismic Network (US). For each station, we perform daily noise pre-processing (temporal normalization and spectrum whitening) simultaneously for all three components before multi-component noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> are calculated. Results for both Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase velocity inversions clearly show the low velocity anomaly associated with the upper-crustal magma reservoir seen previously using body wave tomography. In addition, low-velocity anomalies associated with sediment-filled basins are visible in Wyoming. Short period low Love-wave velocities are seen along the Snake River Plain, the track of the Yellowstone hotspot likely related to the shallow sediment layer. Based on the surface wave phase velocity maps, we invert for a 3D S-wave crustal model. The resulting model will be compared to previous, but spatially limited, body wave S-wave models as well as recent body wave P-wave velocity models to better constrain Vp/Vs ratios as well as the melt fraction of the magma chamber. Preliminary results using amplitude information of noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> to calculate Rayleigh-wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh-wave H/V (horizontal to vertical) amplitude ratios to better constrain the shallow velocity structure will also be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MeScT..24f5301C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MeScT..24f5301C"><span>Estimation of uncertainty bounds for individual particle image velocimetry measurements from <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> peak ratio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Numerous studies have established firmly that particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a robust method for non-invasive, quantitative measurements of fluid velocity, and that when carefully conducted, typical measurements can accurately detect displacements in digital images with a resolution well below a single pixel (in some cases well below a hundredth of a pixel). However, to date, these estimates have only been able to provide guidance on the expected error for an average measurement under specific image quality and flow conditions. This paper demonstrates a new method for estimating the uncertainty bounds to within a given confidence interval for a specific, individual measurement. Here, <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> peak ratio, the ratio of primary to secondary peak height, is shown to correlate strongly with the range of observed error values for a given measurement, regardless of flow condition or image quality. This relationship is significantly stronger for phase-only generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> PIV processing, while the standard correlation approach showed weaker performance. Using an analytical model of the relationship derived from synthetic data sets, the uncertainty bounds at a 95% confidence interval are then computed for several artificial and experimental flow fields, and the resulting errors are shown to match closely to the predicted uncertainties. While this method stops short of being able to predict the true error for a given measurement, knowledge of the uncertainty level for a PIV experiment should provide great benefits when applying the results of PIV analysis to engineering design studies and computational fluid dynamics validation efforts. Moreover, this approach is exceptionally simple to implement and requires negligible additional computational cost.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNS41B1925C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNS41B1925C"><span>Multi-channel analysis of passive surface waves based on <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cheng, F.; Xia, J.; Xu, Z.; Hu, Y.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Traditional active seismic survey can no longer be properly applied in highly populated urban areas due to restrictions in modern civilian life styles. Passive seismic methods, however, have gained much more attention from the engineering geophysics community because of their environmental friendly and deeper investigation depth. Due to extracting signal from noise has never been as comfortable as that in active seismic survey, how to make it more efficiently and accurately has been emphasized. We propose a multi-channel analysis of passive surface waves (MAPW) based on long noise sequences <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> to meet the demand for increasing investigation depth by acquiring surface-wave data at a relative low-frequency range (1 Hz ≤ f ≤ 10 Hz) in urban areas. We utilize seismic interferometry to produce common virtual source gathers from one-hour-long noise records and do dispersion measurements by using the classic passive multi-channel analysis of surface waves (PMASW). We used synthetic tests to demonstrate the advantages of MAPW for various noise distributions. Results show that our method has the superiority of maximizing the analysis accuracy. Finally, we used two field data applications to demonstrate the advantages of our MAPW over the classic PMASW on isolating azimuth of the predominant noise sources and the effectivity of combined survey of active multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and MAPW. We suggest, for the field operation using MAPW, that a parallel receiver line which is close to a main road or river, if any, with one or two hours noise observation will be an effective means for an unbiased dispersion image. Keywords: passive seismic method, MAPW, MASW, <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, directional noise source, spatial-aliasing effects, inversion</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..83d6121W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..83d6121W"><span>Quantifying and modeling long-range <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in multiple time series with applications to world stock indices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Duan; Podobnik, Boris; Horvatić, Davor; Stanley, H. Eugene</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>We propose a modified time lag random matrix theory in order to study time-lag <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in multiple time series. We apply the method to 48 world indices, one for each of 48 different countries. We find long-range power-law <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> in the absolute values of returns that quantify risk, and find that they decay much more slowly than <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between the returns. The magnitude of the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> constitutes “bad news” for international investment managers who may believe that risk is reduced by diversifying across countries. We find that when a market shock is transmitted around the world, the risk decays very slowly. We explain these time-lag <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> by introducing a global factor model (GFM) in which all index returns fluctuate in response to a single global factor. For each pair of individual time series of returns, the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between returns (or magnitudes) can be modeled with the autocorrelations of the global factor returns (or magnitudes). We estimate the global factor using principal component analysis, which minimizes the variance of the residuals after removing the global trend. Using random matrix theory, a significant fraction of the world index <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> can be explained by the global factor, which supports the utility of the GFM. We demonstrate applications of the GFM in forecasting risks at the world level, and in finding uncorrelated individual indices. We find ten indices that are practically uncorrelated with the global factor and with the remainder of the world indices, which is relevant information for world managers in reducing their portfolio risk. Finally, we argue that this general method can be applied to a wide range of phenomena in which time series are measured, ranging from seismology and physiology to atmospheric geophysics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1813580E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1813580E"><span>Inverting seismic noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> for noise source distribution: A step towards reducing source-induced bias in seismic noise interferometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Sager, Korbinian; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We report on the ongoing development of a new inversion method for the space- and time-dependent power spectral density distribution of ambient seismic noise sources. The method, once complete, will mainly serve two purposes: First, it will allow us to construct more realistic forward models for noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> waveforms, thereby opening new possibilities for waveform imaging by ambient noise tomography. Second, it may provide new insights about the properties of ambient noise sources, complementing studies based on beamforming or numerical modeling of noise based on oceanographic observations. To invert for noise sources, we consider surface wave signal energy measurements on the 'causal' (station A to B) and on the 'acausal' (station B to A) correlation branch, and the ratio between them. These and similar measurements have proven useful for locating noise sources using <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in several past studies. The inversion procedure is the following: We construct correlation forward models based on Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> from a spectral element wave propagation code. To construct these models efficiently, we use source-receiver reciprocity and assume spatial uncorrelation of noise sources. In such a setting, correlations can be calculated from a pre-computed set of Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> between the seismic receivers and sources located at the Earth's surface. We then calculate spatial sensitivity kernels for the noise source distribution with respect to the correlation signal energy measurements. These in turn allow us to construct a misfit gradient and optimize the source distribution model to fit our observed <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal energies or energy ratios. We will present the workflow for calculation of the forward model and sensitivity kernels, as well as results for both forward modeling and kernels for an example data set of long-period noise or 'hum' at a global scale. We will also provide an outlook on the noise source inversion considering the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20145717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20145717"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of motor activity signals from dc-magnetoencephalography, near-infrared spectroscopy, and electromyography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sander, Tilmann H; Leistner, Stefanie; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Macdonald, Rainer; Trahms, Lutz</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Neuronal and vascular responses due to finger movements were synchronously measured using dc-magnetoencephalography (dcMEG) and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (trNIRS). The finger movements were monitored with electromyography (EMG). Cortical responses related to the finger movement sequence were extracted by independent component analysis from both the dcMEG and the trNIRS data. The temporal relations between EMG rate, dcMEG, and trNIRS responses were assessed pairwise using the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (CCF), which does not require epoch averaging. A positive lag on a scale of seconds was found for the maximum of the CCF between dcMEG and trNIRS. A zero lag is observed for the CCF between dcMEG and EMG. Additionally this CCF exhibits oscillations at the frequency of individual finger movements. These findings show that the dcMEG with a bandwidth up to 8 Hz records both slow and faster neuronal responses, whereas the vascular response is confirmed to change on a scale of seconds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3867357','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3867357"><span>Age-Related Changes in the <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Network Underlying Specific and General Autobiographical Memory <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span>: A Pivotal Role for the Anterior Cingulate Cortex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Martinelli, Pénélope; Sperduti, Marco; Devauchelle, Anne-Dominique; Kalenzaga, Sandrine; Gallarda, Thierry; Lion, Stéphanie; Delhommeau, Marion; Anssens, Adèle; Amado, Isabelle; Meder, Jean François; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Oppenheim, Catherine; Piolino, Pascale</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Age-related changes in autobiographical memory (AM) recall are characterized by a decline in episodic details, while semantic aspects are spared. This deleterious effect is supposed to be mediated by an inefficient recruitment of executive processes during AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. To date, contrasting evidence has been reported on the neural underpinning of this decline, and none of the previous studies has directly compared the episodic and semantic aspects of AM in elderly. We asked 20 young and 17 older participants to recall specific and general autobiographical events (i.e., episodic and semantic AM) elicited by personalized cues while recording their brain activity by means of fMRI. At the behavioral level, we confirmed that the richness of episodic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> is specifically impoverished in aging and that this decline is related to the reduction of executive <span class="hlt">functions</span>. At the neural level, in both age groups, we showed the recruitment of a large network during episodic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> encompassing prefrontal, cortical midline and posterior regions, and medial temporal structures, including the hippocampus. This network was very similar, but less extended, during semantic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. Nevertheless, a greater activity was evidenced in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) during episodic, compared to semantic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in young participants, and a reversed pattern in the elderly. Moreover, activity in dACC during episodic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> was correlated with inhibition and richness of memories in both groups. Our findings shed light on the direct link between episodic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>, executive control, and their decline in aging, proposing a possible neuronal signature. They also suggest that increased activity in dACC during semantic AM <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in the elderly could be seen as a compensatory mechanism underpinning successful AM performance observed in aging. These results are discussed in the framework of recently proposed models of neural reorganization in aging</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Journal+AND+Operational+AND+Research+AND+Society&pg=2&id=EJ339151','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Journal+AND+Operational+AND+Research+AND+Society&pg=2&id=EJ339151"><span>Language Processing in Information <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Doszkocs, Tamase</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Examines role and contributions of natural-language processing in information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> and artificial intelligence research in context of large operational information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> systems and services. State-of-the-art information <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> systems combining the <span class="hlt">functional</span> capabilities of conventional inverted file term adjacency approach with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120008630','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120008630"><span>Interuser Interference Analysis for Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Systems Part I: Partial-Period <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ni, Jianjun (David)</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This presentation discusses an analysis approach to evaluate the interuser interference for Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum (DSSS) Systems for Space Network (SN) Users. Part I of this analysis shows that the correlation property of pseudo noise (PN) sequences is the critical factor which determines the interuser interference performance of the DSSS system. For non-standard DSSS systems in which PN sequence s period is much larger than one data symbol duration, it is the partial-period <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> that determines the system performance. This study reveals through an example that a well-designed PN sequence set (e.g. Gold Sequence, in which the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for a whole-period is well controlled) may have non-controlled partial-period <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> which could cause severe interuser interference for a DSSS system. Since the analytical derivation of performance metric (bit error rate or signal-to-noise ratio) based on partial-period <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is prohibitive, the performance degradation due to partial-period <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> will be evaluated using simulation in Part II of this analysis in the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4837049','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4837049"><span>Translating golden <span class="hlt">retriever</span> muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle <span class="hlt">function</span> in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Galindo, Cristi L.; Soslow, Jonathan H.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M.; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N.; Markham, Larry W.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac <span class="hlt">function</span> is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. Methods We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden <span class="hlt">retriever</span> muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ months) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. Results We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular <span class="hlt">function</span> and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle <span class="hlt">function</span>. Conclusion These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively. PMID:26672735</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760018547','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760018547"><span>The proper weighting <span class="hlt">function</span> for <span class="hlt">retrieving</span> temperatures from satellite measured radiances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arking, A.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>One class of methods for converting satellite measured radiances into atmospheric temperature profiles, involves a linearization of the radiative transfer equation: delta r = the sum of (W sub i) (delta T sub i) where (i=1...s) and where delta T sub i is the deviation of the temperature in layer i from that of a reference atmosphere, delta R is the difference in the radiance at satellite altitude from the corresponding radiance for the reference atmosphere, and W sub i is the discrete (or vector) form of the T-weighting (i.e., temperature weighting) <span class="hlt">function</span> W(P), where P is pressure. The top layer of the atmosphere corresponds to i = 1, the bottom layer to i = s - 1, and i = s refers to the surface. Linearization in temperature (or some <span class="hlt">function</span> of temperature) is at the heart of all linear or matrix methods. The weighting <span class="hlt">function</span> that should be used is developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25615212','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25615212"><span>Elastodynamic Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> through single-sided Marchenko inverse scattering.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>da Costa Filho, Carlos Alberto; Ravasi, Matteo; Curtis, Andrew; Meles, Giovanni Angelo</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The solution of the inverse scattering problem for the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation is given by the Marchenko equation. Recently, a Marchenko-type equation has been derived for three-dimensional (3D) acoustic wave fields, whose solution has been shown to recover the Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> from points within the medium to its exterior, using only single-sided scattered data. Here we extend this approach to 3D vectorial wave fields that satisfy the elastodynamic wave equation and recover Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> from points interior to an elastic, solid-state medium from purely external and one-sided measurements. The method is demonstrated in a solid-earth-like model to construct Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> using only subsurface sources, from earth-surface force and deformation sources and particle velocity and stress measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..414..308C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..414..308C"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the CSI 300 index futures and the spot markets based on high-frequency data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Guangxi; Han, Yan; Cui, Weijun; Guo, Yu</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the China Securities Index 300 (CSI 300) index futures and the spot markets based on high-frequency data is discussed in this paper. We empirically analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> by using the multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MF-DCCA), and investigate further the characteristics of asymmetry, frequency difference, and transmission direction of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. The results indicate that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the two markets is significant and multifractal. Meanwhile, weak asymmetries exist in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, and higher data frequency results in a lower multifractality degree of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. The causal relationship between the two markets is bidirectional, but the CSI 300 index futures market has greater impact on the spot market.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3876278','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3876278"><span>Prefrontal cortex activation during story encoding/<span class="hlt">retrieval</span>: a multi-channel <span class="hlt">functional</span> near-infrared spectroscopy study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Basso Moro, Sara; Cutini, Simone; Ursini, Maria Laura; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Encoding, storage and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> constitute three fundamental stages in information processing and memory. They allow for the creation of new memory traces, the maintenance and the consolidation of these traces over time, and the access and recover of the stored information from short or long-term memory. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that measures concentration changes of oxygenated-hemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HHb) in cortical microcirculation blood vessels by means of the characteristic absorption spectra of hemoglobin in the near-infrared range. In the present study, we monitored, using a 16-channel fNIRS system, the hemodynamic response during the encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> processes (EP and RP, respectively) over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of 13 healthy subjects (27.2 ± 2.6 years) while were performing the “Logical Memory Test” (LMT) of the Wechsler Memory Scale. A LMT-related PFC activation was expected; specifically, it was hypothesized a neural dissociation between EP and RP. The results showed a heterogeneous O2Hb/HHb response over the mapped area during the EP and the RP, with a O2Hb progressive and prominent increment in ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC) since the beginning of the EP. During the RP a broader activation, including the VLPFC, the dorsolateral PFC and the frontopolar cortex, was observed. This could be explained by the different contributions of the PFC regions in the EP and the RP. Considering the fNIRS applicability for the hemodynamic monitoring during the LMT performance, this study has demonstrated that fNIRS could be utilized as a valuable clinical diagnostic tool, and that it has the potential to be adopted in patients with cognitive disorders or slight working memory deficits. PMID:24427131</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24427131','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24427131"><span>Prefrontal cortex activation during story encoding/<span class="hlt">retrieval</span>: a multi-channel <span class="hlt">functional</span> near-infrared spectroscopy study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Basso Moro, Sara; Cutini, Simone; Ursini, Maria Laura; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Encoding, storage and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> constitute three fundamental stages in information processing and memory. They allow for the creation of new memory traces, the maintenance and the consolidation of these traces over time, and the access and recover of the stored information from short or long-term memory. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that measures concentration changes of oxygenated-hemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HHb) in cortical microcirculation blood vessels by means of the characteristic absorption spectra of hemoglobin in the near-infrared range. In the present study, we monitored, using a 16-channel fNIRS system, the hemodynamic response during the encoding and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> processes (EP and RP, respectively) over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of 13 healthy subjects (27.2 ± 2.6 years) while were performing the "Logical Memory Test" (LMT) of the Wechsler Memory Scale. A LMT-related PFC activation was expected; specifically, it was hypothesized a neural dissociation between EP and RP. The results showed a heterogeneous O2Hb/HHb response over the mapped area during the EP and the RP, with a O2Hb progressive and prominent increment in ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC) since the beginning of the EP. During the RP a broader activation, including the VLPFC, the dorsolateral PFC and the frontopolar cortex, was observed. This could be explained by the different contributions of the PFC regions in the EP and the RP. Considering the fNIRS applicability for the hemodynamic monitoring during the LMT performance, this study has demonstrated that fNIRS could be utilized as a valuable clinical diagnostic tool, and that it has the potential to be adopted in patients with cognitive disorders or slight working memory deficits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26977361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26977361"><span>Toward reliable <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of <span class="hlt">functional</span> information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase <span class="hlt">function</span> cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase <span class="hlt">function</span>. To accurately recover the optical properties and <span class="hlt">functional</span> information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4771470','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4771470"><span>Toward reliable <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of <span class="hlt">functional</span> information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase <span class="hlt">function</span> cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase <span class="hlt">function</span>. To accurately recover the optical properties and <span class="hlt">functional</span> information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..363D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..363D"><span>Dynamical mechanism in aero-engine gas path system using minimum spanning tree and detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dong, Keqiang; Zhang, Hong; Gao, You</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Identifying the mutual interaction in aero-engine gas path system is a crucial problem that facilitates the understanding of emerging structures in complex system. By employing the multiscale multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method to aero-engine gas path system, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> characteristics between gas path system parameters are established. Further, we apply multiscale multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> distance matrix and minimum spanning tree to investigate the mutual interactions of gas path variables. The results can infer that the low-spool rotor speed (N1) and engine pressure ratio (EPR) are main gas path parameters. The application of proposed method contributes to promote our understanding of the internal mechanisms and structures of aero-engine dynamics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..469..323F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..469..323F"><span>Long memory of abnormal investor attention and the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between abnormal investor attention and trading volume, volatility respectively</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fan, Xiaoqian; Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xintian; Jin, Xiu</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Taking Baidu Index as a proxy for abnormal investor attention (AIA), the long memory property in the AIA of Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE) 50 Index component stocks was empirically investigated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method. The results show that abnormal investor attention is power-law correlated with Hurst exponents between 0.64 and 0.98. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between abnormal investor attention and trading volume, volatility respectively are studied using detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) and the DCCA <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient (ρDCCA). The results suggest that there are positive correlations between AIA and trading volume, volatility respectively. In addition, the correlations for trading volume are in general higher than the ones for volatility. By carrying on rescaled range analysis (R/S) and rolling windows analysis, we find that the results mentioned above are effective and significant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S23B2267H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S23B2267H"><span>Automatic tremor detection with a combined <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and neural network approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Horstmann, T.; Harrington, R. M.; Cochran, E. S.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Low-amplitude, long-duration, and ambiguous phase arrivals associated with crustal tremor make automatic detection difficult. We present a new detection method that combines <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with a neural network clustering algorithm. The approach is independent of any a priori assumptions regarding tremor event duration; instead, it examines frequency content, amplitude, and motion products of continuous data to distinguish tremor from earthquakes and background noise in an automated fashion. Because no assumptions regarding event duration are required, the clustering algorithm is therefore able to detect short, burst-like events which may be missed by many current methods. We detect roughly 130 seismic events occurring over 100 minutes, including earthquakes and tremor, in a three-week long test data set of waveforms recorded near Cholame, California. The detection has a success rate of over 90% when compared to visually selected events. We use continuous broadband data from 13 STS-2 seismometers deployed from May 2010 to July 2011 along the Cholame segment of the San Andreas Fault, as well as stations from the HRSN network. The large volume of waveforms requires first reducing the amount of data before applying the neural network algorithm. First, we filter the data between 2 Hz and 8 Hz, calculate envelopes, and decimate them to 0.2 Hz. We <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> signals at each station with two master stations using a moving 520-second time window with a 5-sec time step. We calculate a mean <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient value between all station pairs for each time window and each master station, and select the master station with the highest mean value. Time windows with mean coefficients exceeding 0.3 are used in the neural network approach, and windows separated by less than 300 seconds are grouped together. In the second step, we apply the neural network algorithm, i.e., Self Organized Map (SOM), to classify the reduced data set. We first calculate feature</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23788460','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23788460"><span>Different aberrations raise contrast thresholds for single-letter identification in line with their effect on <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>-based confusability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, Laura K; Love, Gordon D; Smithson, Hannah E</p> <p>2013-06-20</p> <p>We previously showed that different types of aberration defocus, coma, and secondary astigmatism affect reading performance via different mechanisms. In this paper, we show the contrary result that, for identification of isolated letters, the effects of rendering different types of aberration can be described by a single <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>-based metric. Aberrations reduce the effective resolution of an optical system, quantified by the high-frequency fall-off of the modulation transfer <span class="hlt">function</span>. They additionally cause spatial-frequency-dependent phase and contrast changes, which have a size-dependent effect on letter forms. We used contrast threshold as our performance measure, instead of distance acuity, to separate the effects of form alterations from those of resolution limits. This measure is additionally appropriate in comparing single-letter-based performance to reading at a fixed distance. The relationship between a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>-based measure of letter confusability and performance was the same for all three types of aberration. For reading, we had found a different relationship for coma than for defocus and secondary astigmatism. We conclude that even when two tasks--letter identification and reading--use the same component stimulus set, the combination of multiple letters in a reading task produces <span class="hlt">functional</span> differences between the effects of these aberrations that are not present for isolated letters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17471715','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17471715"><span>Using <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's <span class="hlt">function</span>) between two receivers can be obtained from the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525325','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525325"><span><span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> OF NEAR- AND FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES AS TRACED BY SPITZER AND HERSCHEL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thacker, Cameron; Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Bernardis, Francesco De; Smidt, Joseph</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We present the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the far-infrared (far-IR) background fluctuations as measured with the Herschel Space Observatory at 250, 350, and 500 μm and the near-infrared (near-IR) background fluctuations with the Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the FIR and NIR background anisotropies is detected such that the correlation coefficient at a few to 10 arcminute angular scale decreases from 0.3 to 0.1 when the FIR wavelength increases from 250 to 500 μm. We model the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> using a halo model with three components: (a) FIR bright or dusty star-forming galaxies below the masking depth in Herschel maps, (b) NIR faint galaxies below the masking depth, and (c) intra-halo light (IHL), or diffuse stars in dark matter halos, that is likely dominating the large-scale NIR fluctuations. The model is able to reasonably reproduce the auto-correlations at each of the FIR wavelengths and at 3.6 μm and their corresponding <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span>. While the FIR and NIR auto-correlations are dominated by faint, dusty, star-forming galaxies and IHL, respectively, we find that roughly half of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the NIR and FIR backgrounds is due to the same dusty galaxies that remain unmasked at 3.6 μm. The remaining signal in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is due to IHL present in the same dark matter halos as those hosting the same faint and unmasked galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/973733','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/973733"><span>Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27828041','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27828041"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of the particle size distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> from the data of lidar sensing under the assumption of known refractive index.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Samoilova, S V; Sviridenkov, M A; Penner, I E</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>This paper presents a method to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> the particle size distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> from the data of vertical lidar sensing. We have used 462 data models obtained at the Zvenigorod AERONET site obtained in 2011-2012. For each laser shot, we considered both fine (with particle sizes in a range from 0.05 to 0.6 μm) and coarse aerosol fractions (from 0.6 to 10 μm), with emphasize on the coarse fraction. Our suggested method is a modification of the Tikhonov method. The Tikhonov method is not optimal for coarse particles because its stabilizer does not and cannot account for the presence of the coarse mode, i.e., existence of more than one maximum of the size distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. The components of the matrix Wu-1 located in quadrants II and IV are sensitive to the change of these parameters. Neglecting this fact will lead again to arbitrary estimates of the contribution of the coarse particles even for exact values on the main diagonal and the two diagonals adjacent to it. Our method allows the coarse fraction up to 2.5 μm to be determined unambiguously. For larger particles (>2.5  μm) we recommend using the available sets of the coefficients, but with the level of values to be determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014hitr.confE..31Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014hitr.confE..31Q"><span>A rapid <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> methodology based on the spectrally integrated Voigt <span class="hlt">function</span> for space observation spectral radiance data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quine, Brendan M.; Abrarov, Sanjar M.; Jagpal, Raj K.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>In our recent publication, we proposed the application of the spectrally integrated Voigt <span class="hlt">function</span> (SIVF) to a line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer modelling1. We applied the GENSPECT LBL radiative transfer model that utilizes the HITRAN database to generate synthetic spectral data due to thermal or solar radiation of the Earth or planetary atmosphere2. It has been shown that the SIVF methodology enables the computation of a LBL radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution model without loss in accuracy. In contrast to the traditional method of computation, the SIVF implementation accounts for the area under the Voigt <span class="hlt">function</span> between adjacent grid points resulting in well-preserved shape of a spectral radiance even at low spectral resolution. This significant advantage of the SIVF methodology can be applied in the rapid <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of the space observation data, required for real-time control and decision making in future generation of the Argus3 remote-sensing microspectrometers. The spectrally integrated methodology can be generalized to other linebroadening profiles, such as Galatry, Rautian-Sobelman or speed dependent profiles, to prevent underestimation of the spectral radiance that always occurs at reduced spectral resolution1 in any LBL radiative transfer model using a traditional method of computation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750008475','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750008475"><span>Measurements of V/STOL aircraft noise mechanisms using pressure <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> techniques in a reverberant wind tunnel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meecham, W. C.; Hurdle, P. M.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A 3.8 cm. model jet was operated in a wind tunnel with cross-flow in order to determine the effect on jet noise radiated characteristics. A method was developed for the determination of noise radiating characteristics of sources within reverberant wind tunnels; <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> measurements were used. The averaging time in the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is determined by the amount of background noise within the wind tunnel. It was found that cross-flow increases the radiated noise by 10 db. There was some indication of downstream radiation exceeding the sideline radiation.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..436..596P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..436..596P"><span>Multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis of coding and non-coding DNA sequences through chaos-game representation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pal, Mayukha; Satish, B.; Srinivas, K.; Rao, P. Madhusudana; Manimaran, P.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We propose a new approach combining the chaos game representation and the two dimensional multifractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis methods to examine multifractal behavior in power law <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between any pair of nucleotide sequences of unequal lengths. In this work, we analyzed the characteristic behavior of coding and non-coding DNA sequences of eight prokaryotes. The results show the presence of strong multifractal nature between coding and non-coding sequences of all data sets. We found that this integrative approach helps us to consider complete DNA sequences for characterization, and further it may be useful for classification, clustering, identification of class affiliation of nucleotide sequences etc. with high precision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25852981','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25852981"><span>A formalism for evaluating analytically the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> structure of a firing-rate network model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fasoli, Diego; Faugeras, Olivier; Panzeri, Stefano</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We introduce a new formalism for evaluating analytically the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> structure of a finite-size firing-rate network with recurrent connections. The analysis performs a first-order perturbative expansion of neural activity equations that include three different sources of randomness: the background noise of the membrane potentials, their initial conditions, and the distribution of the recurrent synaptic weights. This allows the analytical quantification of the relationship between anatomical and <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity, i.e. of how the synaptic connections determine the statistical dependencies at any order among different neurons. The technique we develop is general, but for simplicity and clarity we demonstrate its efficacy by applying it to the case of synaptic connections described by regular graphs. The analytical equations so obtained reveal previously unknown behaviors of recurrent firing-rate networks, especially on how correlations are modified by the external input, by the finite size of the network, by the density of the anatomical connections and by correlation in sources of randomness. In particular, we show that a strong input can make the neurons almost independent, suggesting that <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity does not depend only on the static anatomical connectivity, but also on the external inputs. Moreover we prove that in general it is not possible to find a mean-field description à la Sznitman of the network, if the anatomical connections are too sparse or our three sources of variability are correlated. To conclude, we show a very counterintuitive phenomenon, which we call stochastic synchronization, through which neurons become almost perfectly correlated even if the sources of randomness are independent. Due to its ability to quantify how activity of individual neurons and the correlation among them depends upon external inputs, the formalism introduced here can serve as a basis for exploring analytically the computational capability of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSV...385..350L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSV...385..350L"><span>Fault diagnosis of gearbox using empirical mode decomposition and multi-fractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Hongmei; Zhang, Jichang; Cheng, Yujie; Lu, Chen</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>A gearbox vibration signal is non-stationary and non-linear and has multiple components and multi-fractal properties, which make it difficult to effectively extract gearbox fault features. This paper proposes a method for gearbox fault feature extraction based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and multi-fractal detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (MFDCCA). First, EMD, a time-frequency analysis method, was employed to decompose the gearbox vibration signal into a number of intrinsic mode <span class="hlt">functions</span> (IMFs). Second, the multi-fractal features hidden in the non-linear vibration signal were extracted by applying the MFDCCA to the selected major IMFs, thus highlighting the multi-fractality information which can be used to characterize different fault modes and severities of the gearbox. Third, for each IMF, three multi-fractal feature parameters sensitive to gearbox faults were selected from the multi-fractal features, further constructing the multi-fractal fault feature vector. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) was introduced to reduce the dimensions of the extracted multi-fractal fault feature vectors and to enhance the accuracy of diagnosis. Finally, a radial basis <span class="hlt">function</span> neural network was utilized to classify gearbox faults. Several commonly occurring faults were used to validate the proposed method in this study. Experimental results provide evidence that the extracted multi-fractal fault features can effectively distinguish different fault modes, even under slight variation in working conditions. Simultaneously, the results of comparison show that the performance of the proposed EMD-MFDCCA-PCA method outperforms that of EMD-MFDFA (multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis) combined with the traditional PCA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9915E..1AR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9915E..1AR"><span>High fidelity point-spread <span class="hlt">function</span> <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in the presence of electrostatic, hysteretic pixel response</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rasmussen, Andrew; Guyonnet, Augustin; Lage, Craig; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Doherty, Peter; Gilmore, Kirk; Kotov, Ivan; Lupton, Robert; Nomerotski, Andrei; O'Connor, Paul; Stubbs, Christopher; Tyson, Anthony; Walter, Christopher</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We employ electrostatic conversion drift calculations to match CCD pixel signal covariances observed in at field exposures acquired using candidate sensor devices for the LSST Camera.1, 2 We thus constrain pixel geometry distortions present at the end of integration, based on signal images recorded. We use available data from several operational voltage parameter settings to validate our understanding. Our primary goal is to optimize flux point spread <span class="hlt">function</span> (FPSF) estimation quantitatively, and thereby minimize sensor-induced errors which may limit performance in precision astronomy applications. We consider alternative compensation scenarios that will take maximum advantage of our understanding of this underlying mechanism in data processing pipelines currently under development. To quantitatively capture the pixel response in high-contrast/high dynamic range operational extrema, we propose herein some straightforward laboratory tests that involve altering the time order of source illumination on sensors, within individual test exposures. Hence the word hysteretic in the title of this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28369159','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28369159"><span>Context-based <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of <span class="hlt">functional</span> modules in protein-protein interaction networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dobay, Maria Pamela; Stertz, Silke; Delorenzi, Mauro</p> <p>2017-03-27</p> <p>Various techniques have been developed for identifying the most probable interactants of a protein under a given biological context. In this article, we dissect the effects of the choice of the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) and the manipulation of PPI settings on the network neighborhood of the influenza A virus (IAV) network, as well as hits in genome-wide small interfering RNA screen results for IAV host factors. We investigate the potential of context filtering, which uses text mining evidence linked to PPI edges, as a complement to the edge confidence scores typically provided in PPIs for filtering, for obtaining more biologically relevant network neighborhoods. Here, we estimate the maximum performance of context filtering to isolate a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) network Ki from a union of KEGG networks and its network neighborhood. The work gives insights on the use of human PPIs in network neighborhood approaches for <span class="hlt">functional</span> inference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=320076','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=320076"><span>Estimating error <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in soil moisture data sets using extended collocation analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Consistent global soil moisture records are essential for studying the role of hydrologic processes within the larger earth system. Various studies have shown the benefit of assimilating satellite-based soil moisture data into water balance models or merging multi-source soil moisture <span class="hlt">retrievals</span> int...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21046273','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21046273"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of EEG frequency bands and heart rate variability for sleep apnoea classification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdullah, Haslaile; Maddage, Namunu C; Cosic, Irena; Cvetkovic, Dean</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Sleep apnoea is a sleep breathing disorder which causes changes in cardiac and neuronal activity and discontinuities in sleep pattern when observed via electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG). Using both statistical analysis and Gaussian discriminative modelling approaches, this paper presents a pilot study of assessing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between EEG frequency bands and heart rate variability (HRV) in normal and sleep apnoea clinical patients. For the study we used EEG (delta, theta, alpha, sigma and beta) and HRV (LF(nu), HF(nu) and LF/HF) features from the spectral analysis. The statistical analysis in different sleep stages highlighted that in sleep apnoea patients, the EEG delta, sigma and beta bands exhibited a strong correlation with HRV features. Then the correlation between EEG frequency bands and HRV features were examined for sleep apnoea classification using univariate and multivariate Gaussian models (UGs and MGs). The MG outperformed the UG in the classification. When EEG and HRV features were combined and modelled with MG, we achieved 64% correct classification accuracy, which is 2 or 8% improvement with respect to using only EEG or ECG features. When delta and acceleration coefficients of the EEG features were incorporated, then the overall accuracy improved to 71%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22462120','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22462120"><span>Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun</p> <p>2015-07-31</p> <p>The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.463.3674H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.463.3674H"><span>SKA weak lensing - I. Cosmological forecasts and the power of radio-optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harrison, Ian; Camera, Stefano; Zuntz, Joe; Brown, Michael L.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We construct forecasts for cosmological parameter constraints from weak gravitational lensing surveys involving the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Considering matter content, dark energy and modified gravity parameters, we show that the first phase of the SKA (SKA1) can be competitive with other Stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey and that the full SKA (SKA2) can potentially form tighter constraints than Stage IV optical weak lensing experiments, such as those that will be conducted with LSST, WFIRST-AFTA or Euclid-like facilities. Using weak lensing alone, going from SKA1 to SKA2 represents improvements by factors of ˜10 in matter, ˜10 in dark energy and ˜5 in modified gravity parameters. We also show, for the first time, the powerful result that comparably tight constraints (within ˜5 per cent) for both Stage III and Stage IV experiments, can be gained from <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> shear maps between the optical and radio wavebands, a process which can also eliminate a number of potential sources of systematic errors which can otherwise limit the utility of weak lensing cosmology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1034565','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1034565"><span>X-ray pump optical probe <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> study of GaAs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Durbin, S.M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.</p> <p>2012-09-10</p> <p>Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect - X-ray induced optical opacity - for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140006624','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140006624"><span>The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> of Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing and Quasars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sherwin, Blake D; Das, Sudeep; Haijian, Amir; Addison, Graeme; Bond, Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gralla, Megan B.; Halpern, Mark; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hughes, John P.; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hlozek, Renee; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Reese. Erik D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Sifon, Cristobal; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Ed.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We measure the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of Atacama cosmology telescope cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps with quasar maps made from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 SDSS-XDQSO photometric catalog. The CMB lensing quasar cross-power spectrum is detected for the first time at a significance of 3.8 sigma, which directly confirms that the quasar distribution traces the mass distribution at high redshifts z > 1. Our detection passes a number of null tests and systematic checks. Using this cross-power spectrum, we measure the amplitude of the linear quasar bias assuming a template for its redshift dependence, and find the amplitude to be consistent with an earlier measurement from clustering; at redshift z ap 1.4, the peak of the distribution of quasars in our maps, our measurement corresponds to a bias of b = 2.5 +/- 0.6. With the signal-to-noise ratio on CMB lensing measurements likely to improve by an order of magnitude over the next few years, our results demonstrate the potential of CMB lensing crosscorrelations to probe astrophysics at high redshifts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ITSP...64.3919R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ITSP...64.3919R"><span>Robust Adaptive Beamforming Based on Low-Rank and <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruan, Hang; de Lamare, Rodrigo C.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>This work presents cost-effective low-rank techniques for designing robust adaptive beamforming (RAB) algorithms. The proposed algorithms are based on the exploitation of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the array observation data and the output of the beamformer. Firstly, we construct a general linear equation considered in large dimensions whose solution yields the steering vector mismatch. Then, we employ the idea of the full orthogonalization method (FOM), an orthogonal Krylov subspace based method, to iteratively estimate the steering vector mismatch in a reduced-dimensional subspace, resulting in the proposed orthogonal Krylov subspace projection mismatch estimation (OKSPME) method. We also devise adaptive algorithms based on stochastic gradient (SG) and conjugate gradient (CG) techniques to update the beamforming weights with low complexity and avoid any costly matrix inversion. The main advantages of the proposed low-rank and mismatch estimation techniques are their cost-effectiveness when dealing with high dimension subspaces or large sensor arrays. Simulations results show excellent performance in terms of the output signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of the beamformer among all the compared RAB methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......419B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......419B"><span>Modified Multilook <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> technique for Doppler centroid estimation in SAR image signal processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bee Cheng, Sew</p> <p></p> <p>Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the widely used remote sensing sensors which produces high resolution image by using advance signal processing technique. SAR managed to operate in all sorts of weather and cover wide range of area. To produce a high-quality image, accurate parameters such as Doppler centroid are required for precise SAR signal processing. In the azimuth matched filtering of SAR signal processing, Doppler centroid is an important azimuth parameter that helps to focus the image pixels. Doppler centroid has always been overlooked during SAR signal processing. It is due to the fact that estimation of Doppler centroid involved complicated calculation and increased computational load. Therefore, researcher used to apply only the approximate Doppler value which is not precise and cause defocus effort in the generated SAR image. In this study, several conventional Doppler centroid estimation algorithms are reviewed and developed using Matlab software program to extract the Doppler parameter from received SAR data, namely Spectrum Fit Algorithm, Wavelength Diversity Algorithm (WDA), Multilook <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Algorithm (MLCC), and Multilook Beat Frequency Algorithm (MLBF). Two sets of SAR data are employed to evaluate the performance of each estimator, i.e. simulated point target data and RADARSAT-1 Vancouver scene raw data. These experiments gave a sense of accuracy for the estimated results together with computational time consumption. Point target is simulated to generate ideal case SAR data with pre-defined SAR system parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JPhCS..23...87M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JPhCS..23...87M"><span>A non linear analysis of human gait time series based on multifractal analysis and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muñoz-Diosdado, A.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We analyzed databases with gait time series of adults and persons with Parkinson, Huntington and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseases. We obtained the staircase graphs of accumulated events that can be bounded by a straight line whose slope can be used to distinguish between gait time series from healthy and ill persons. The global Hurst exponent of these series do not show tendencies, we intend that this is because some gait time series have monofractal behavior and others have multifractal behavior so they cannot be characterized with a single Hurst exponent. We calculated the multifractal spectra, obtained the spectra width and found that the spectra of the healthy young persons are almost monofractal. The spectra of ill persons are wider than the spectra of healthy persons. In opposition to the interbeat time series where the pathology implies loss of multifractality, in the gait time series the multifractal behavior emerges with the pathology. Data were collected from healthy and ill subjects as they walked in a roughly circular path and they have sensors in both feet, so we have one time series for the left foot and other for the right foot. First, we analyzed these time series separately, and then we compared both results, with direct comparison and with a <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> analysis. We tried to find differences in both time series that can be used as indicators of equilibrium problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..APR.S2004C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..APR.S2004C"><span>A <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> search for intermediate-duration gravitational waves from GRB magnetars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Coyne, Robert</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Since the discovery of the afterglow in 1997, the progress made in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been spectacular. Yet a direct proof of GRB progenitors is still missing. In the last few years, evidence for a long-lived and sustained central engine in GRBs has mounted. This has called attention to the so-called millisecond-magnetar model, which proposes that a highly magnetized, rapidly-rotating neutron star may exist at the heart of some of these events. The advent of advanced gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo may enable us to probe directly, for the first time, the nature of GRB progenitors and their byproducts. In this context, we describe a novel application of a generalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique optimized for the detection of long-duration gravitational wave signals that may be associated with bar-like deformations of GRB magnetars. The detection of these signals would allow us to answer some of the most intriguing questions on the nature of GRB progenitors, and serve as a starting point for a new class of intermediate-duration gravitational wave searches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091840','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091840"><span>Estimation of velocity vector angles using the directional <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt</p> <p>2006-11-01</p> <p>A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in any direction is suggested. The method uses focusing along the velocity direction and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> for finding the correct velocity magnitude. The angle is found from beamforming directional signals in a number of directions and then selecting the angle with the highest normalized correlation between directional signals. The approach is investigated using Field II simulations and data from the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and a circulating flow rig with a parabolic flow having a peak velocity of 0.3 m/s. A 7-MHz linear array transducer is used with a normal transmission of a focused ultrasound field. In the simulations the relative standard deviation of the velocity magnitude is between 0.7% and 7.7% for flow angles between 45 degrees and 90 degrees. The study showed that angle estimation by directional beamforming can be estimated with a high precision. The angle estimation performance is highly dependent on the choice of the time ktprf x Tprf (correlation time) between signals to correlate. One performance example is given with a fixed value of ktprf for all flow angles. The angle estimation on measured data for flow at 60 degrees to 90 degrees yields a probability of valid estimates between 68% and 98%. The optimal value of ktprf for each flow angle is found from a parameter study; with these values, the performance on simulated data yields angle estimates with no outlier estimates and with standard deviations below 2 degrees.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NaPho...6..111D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NaPho...6..111D"><span>X-ray pump optical probe <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> study of GaAs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Durbin, S. M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect--X-ray induced optical opacity--for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical <span class="hlt">cross-correlator</span> for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150008625&hterms=dependence&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddependence','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150008625&hterms=dependence&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddependence"><span>Dependence of Adaptive <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Algorithm Performance on the Extended Scene Image Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sidick, Erkin</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Recently, we reported an adaptive <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (ACC) algorithm to estimate with high accuracy the shift as large as several pixels between two extended-scene sub-images captured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. It determines the positions of all extended-scene image cells relative to a reference cell in the same frame using an FFT-based iterative image-shifting algorithm. It works with both point-source spot images as well as extended scene images. We have demonstrated previously based on some measured images that the ACC algorithm can determine image shifts with as high an accuracy as 0.01 pixel for shifts as large 3 pixels, and yield similar results for both point source spot images and extended scene images. The shift estimate accuracy of the ACC algorithm depends on illumination level, background, and scene content in addition to the amount of the shift between two image cells. In this paper we investigate how the performance of the ACC algorithm depends on the quality and the frequency content of extended scene images captured by a Shack-Hatmann camera. We also compare the performance of the ACC algorithm with those of several other approaches, and introduce a failsafe criterion for the ACC algorithm-based extended scene Shack-Hatmann sensors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24e8903Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24e8903Z"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> matrix analysis of Chinese and American bank stocks in subprime crisis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Shi-Zhao; Li, Xin-Li; Nie, Sen; Zhang, Wen-Qing; Yu, Gao-Feng; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>In order to study the universality of the interactions among different markets, we analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix of the price of the Chinese and American bank stocks. We then find that the stock prices of the emerging market are more correlated than that of the developed market. Considering that the values of the components for the eigenvector may be positive or negative, we analyze the differences between two markets in combination with the endogenous and exogenous events which influence the financial markets. We find that the sparse pattern of components of eigenvectors out of the threshold value has no change in American bank stocks before and after the subprime crisis. However, it changes from sparse to dense for Chinese bank stocks. By using the threshold value to exclude the external factors, we simulate the interactions in financial markets. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275186, 91024026, and FOM2014OF001) and the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology (USST) of Humanities and Social Sciences, China (Grant Nos. USST13XSZ05 and 11YJA790231).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPRS..122...68A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPRS..122...68A"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of forest leaf <span class="hlt">functional</span> traits from HySpex imagery using radiative transfer models and continuous wavelet analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ali, Abebe Mohammed; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; van Duren, Iris; Holzwarth, Stefanie; Mueller, Joerg</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Quantification of vegetation properties plays an important role in the assessment of ecosystem <span class="hlt">functions</span> with leaf dry mater content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) being two key <span class="hlt">functional</span> traits. For the first time, these two leaf traits have been estimated from the airborne images (HySpex) using the INFORM radiative transfer model and Continuous Wavelet Analysis (CWA). Ground truth data, were collected for 33 sample plots during a field campaign in July 2013 in the Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany, concurrent with the hyperspectral overflight. The INFORM model was used to simulate the canopy reflectance of the test site and the simulated spectra were transformed to wavelet features by applying CWA. Next, the top 1% strongly correlated wavelet features with the LDMC and SLA were used to develop predictive (regression) models. The two leaf traits were then <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> using the CWA transformed HySpex imagery and the predictive models. The results were validated using R2 and the RMSE of the estimated and measured variables. Our results revealed strong correlations between six wavelet features and LDMC, as well as between four wavelet features and SLA. The wavelet features at 1741 nm (scale 5) and 2281 nm (scale 4) were the two most strongly correlated with LDMC and SLA respectively. The combination of all the identified wavelet features for LDMC yielded the most accurate prediction (R2 = 0.59 and RMSE = 4.39%). However, for SLA the most accurate prediction was obtained from the single most correlated feature: 2281 nm, scale 4 (R2 = 0.85 and RMSE = 4.90). Our results demonstrate the applicability of Continuous Wavelet Analysis (CWA) when inverting radiative transfer models, for accurate mapping of forest leaf <span class="hlt">functional</span> traits.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24361232"><span>Inverse problem of the multislice method in <span class="hlt">retrieving</span> projected complex potentials from the exit-wave <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Fang; Jin, Chuanhong</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>We proposed a new algorithm that <span class="hlt">retrieves</span> the projected potentials from the EW of object. This algorithm is based on the traditional multislice method which involves the convolution operation in calculation. The <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> potential is complex including both the electrostatic and absorptive components. Tests with the simulated exit waves of a 200 K InP crystal prove the algorithm effective for objects in wide thickness range. For thick specimen where dynamical electron diffraction prevails, the <span class="hlt">retrieved</span> potential could present structure and chemical information of object by completely mapping an atom's scattering potential during interaction with incident electrons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S42A..08T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S42A..08T"><span>Automated Measurement of P- and S-Wave Differential Times for Imaging Spatial Distributions of Vp/Vs Ratio, with Moving-Window <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taira, T.; Kato, A.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>A high-resolution Vp/Vs ratio estimate is one of the key parameters to understand spatial variations of composition and physical state within the Earth. Lin and Shearer (2007, BSSA) recently developed a methodology to obtain local Vp/Vs ratios in individual similar earthquake clusters, based on P- and S-wave differential times. A waveform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> approach is typically employed to measure those differential times for pairs of seismograms from similar earthquakes clusters, at narrow time windows around the direct P and S waves. This approach effectively collects P- and S-wave differential times and however requires the robust P- and S-wave time windows that are extracted based on either manually or automatically picked P- and S-phases. We present another technique to estimate P- and S-wave differential times by exploiting temporal properties of delayed time as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of elapsed time on the seismograms with a moving-window <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (e.g., Snieder, 2002, Phys. Rev. E; Niu et al. 2003, Nature). Our approach is based on the principle that the delayed time for the direct S wave differs from that for the direct P wave. Two seismograms aligned by the direct P waves from a pair of similar earthquakes yield that delayed times become zero around the direct P wave. In contrast, delayed times obtained from time windows including the direct S wave have non-zero value. Our approach, in principle, is capable of measuring both P- and S-wave differential times from single-component seismograms. In an ideal case, the temporal evolution of delayed time becomes a step <span class="hlt">function</span> with its discontinuity at the onset of the direct S wave. The offset in the resulting step <span class="hlt">function</span> would be the S-wave differential time, relative to the P-wave differential time as the two waveforms are aligned by the direct P wave. We apply our moving-window <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique to the two different data sets collected at: 1) the Wakayama district, Japan and 2) the Geysers</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2542487','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2542487"><span>Direct measurement of dipole-dipole/CSA <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> relaxation by a constant-time experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Relaxation rates in NMR are usually measured by intensity modulation as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of a relaxation delay during which the relaxation mechanism of interest is effective. Other mechanisms are often suppressed during the relaxation delay by pulse sequences which eliminate their effects, or cancel their effects when two data sets with appropriate combinations of relaxation rate effects are added. <span class="hlt">Cross-correlated</span> relaxation (CCR) involving dipole-dipole and CSA interactions differ from auto-correlated relaxation (ACR) in that the signs of contributions can be changed by inverting the state of one spin involved in the dipole-dipole interaction. This property has been exploited previously using CPMG sequences to refocus CCR while ACR evolves. Here we report a new pulse scheme that instead eliminates intensity modulation by ACR and thus allows direct measurement of CCR. The sequence uses a constant time relaxation period for which the contribution of ACR does not change. An inversion pulse is applied at various points in the sequence to effect a decay that depends on CCR only. A 2-D experiment is also described in which chemical shift evolution in the indirect dimension can share the same constant period. This improves sensitivity by avoiding the addition of a separate indirect dimension acquisition time. We illustrate the measurement of residue specific CCR rates on the non-myristoylated yeast ARF1 protein and compare the results to those obtained following the conventional method of measuring the decay rates of the slow and fast-relaxing 15N doublets. The performances of the two methods are also quantitatively evaluated by simulation. The analysis shows that the shared constant-time CCR (SCT-CCR) method significantly improves sensitivity. PMID:18406649</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3936672','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3936672"><span>Dynamic Contact Stress Patterns on the Tibial Plateaus during Simulated Gait: A Novel Application of Normalized <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Torzilli, Peter; Warren, Russell; Maher, Suzanne</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The spatial distribution and pattern of local contact stresses within the knee joint during activities of daily living have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine if common contact stress patterns exist on the tibial plateaus of human knees during simulated gait. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel normalized <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (NCC) algorithm and applied it to the contact stresses on the tibial plateaus of twelve human cadaveric knees subjected to multi-directional loads mimicking gait. The contact stress profiles at different locations on the tibial plateaus were compared, where regions with similar contact stress patterns were identified across specimens. Three consistent regional patterns were found, among them two most prominent contact stress patterns were shared by 9 to 12 of all the knees and the third pattern was shared by 6 to 8 knees. The first pattern was located at the posterior aspect of the medial tibial plateau and had a single peak stress that occurred during the early stance phase. The second pattern was located at the central-posterior aspects of the lateral plateau and consisted of two peak stresses coincident with the timing of peak axial force at early and late stance. The third pattern was found on the anterior aspect of cartilage-to-cartilage contact region on the medial plateau consisted of double peak stresses. The differences in the location and profile of the contact stress patterns suggest that the medial and lateral menisci <span class="hlt">function</span> to carry load at different points in the gait cycle: with the posterior aspect of the medial meniscus consistently distributing load only during the early phase of stance, and the posterior aspect of the lateral meniscus consistently distributing load during both the early and late phases of stance. This novel approach can help identify abnormalities in knee contact mechanics and provide a better understanding of the mechanical pathways leading to post</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22136567','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22136567"><span>EVOLUTION OF THE <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> AND TIME LAG OF 4U 1735-44 ALONG THE BRANCHES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lei Yajuan; Zhang Haotong; Zhang Chengmin; Yuan Hailong; Dong Yiqiao; Zhao Yongheng; Zhang Yanxia; Qu Jinlu; Song Liming; Wang Dehua; Yin Hongxing</p> <p>2013-09-15</p> <p>We analyze the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between the soft and hard X-rays of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with RXTE data, and find anti-correlated soft and hard time lags of about a hecto-second. In the island state, the observations do not show any obvious correlations, and most observations of the banana branch show a positive correlation. However, anti-correlations are detected in the upper banana branch. These results are different from those of Z-sources (Cyg X-2, GX 5-1), where anti-correlations are detected in the horizontal branch and upper normal branch. In this case, the lag timescales of both this atoll and Z-sources are found to be similar, at a magnitude of several tens to hundreds of seconds. As a comparison, it is noted that anti-correlated lags lasting thousands of seconds have been reported from several black hole candidates in their intermediate states. In addition, for an observation containing four segments that show positive or anti-correlation, we analyze the spectral evolution with the hybrid model. In the observation, the anti-correlation is detected at the highest flux. The fitting results show that the Comptonized component is not the lowest at the highest flux, which suggests that the anti-correlation corresponds to the transition between the soft and hard states. Finally, we compare the corresponding results of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with those observed in Z-sources and black hole candidates, and the possible origins of the anti-correlated time lags are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20965817','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20965817"><span>[Improved weighted <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient with a new kernel and its application in predicting T cell epitopes].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huang, Jing; Ma, Jian-hua; Liu, Nan; Qian, Shan-shan</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>We designed a weighted <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficient considering the "anchor" of the T cell epitopes, and used an evolutionary algorithm to search for an optimal weight vector. A SVM model with this new peptide similarity kernel was evaluated on a T-cell data set. The results demonstrated a good performance of this method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25645318','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25645318"><span>Robust alignment of chromatograms by statistically analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window fast Fourier transform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Mingjing; Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lu, Hongmei; Liang, Yizeng; Zhan, Dejian</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Retention time shift is one of the most challenging problems during the preprocessing of massive chromatographic datasets. Here, an improved version of the moving window fast Fourier transform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithm is presented to perform nonlinear and robust alignment of chromatograms by analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window procedure. The shifts matrix in retention time can be estimated by fast Fourier transform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with a moving window procedure. The refined shift of each scan point can be obtained by calculating the mode of corresponding column of the shifts matrix. This version is simple, but more effective and robust than the previously published moving window fast Fourier transform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method. It can handle nonlinear retention time shift robustly if proper window size has been selected. The window size is the only one parameter needed to adjust and optimize. The properties of the proposed method are investigated by comparison with the previous moving window fast Fourier transform <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and recursive alignment by fast Fourier transform using chromatographic datasets. The pattern recognition results of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry dataset of metabolic syndrome can be improved significantly after preprocessing by this method. Furthermore, the proposed method is available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/MWFFT2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..173a2009K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..173a2009K"><span>Generalization of the mechanisms of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in the case of a multivariate time series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kravets, O. Ja; Abramov, G. V.; Beletskaja, S. Ju</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The article describes a generalization of the mechanisms of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in the case of a multivariate time series and how this allows the optimal lags to be identified for each of the independent variables (IV) using a number of algorithms. The use of generalized mechanisms will allow variables to be analysed and predicted based on the retrospective analysis of multidimensional data. In the available literature, <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> has been defined only for pairs of time series. However, the study of dependent variable (DV) dependencies on multidimensional independent variables that takes into account the vector of specially selected time lags will significantly improve the quality of models based on multiple regression. The idea of multiple <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> lies in the sequential forward shift of each IV row with respect to DV (it transpires that DV is delayed relative to IV) until we obtain a minimum error or the best test of multiple regression. After the completion of all stages of multiple <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, the synthesis of the model is not a difficult process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22413482','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22413482"><span>Detection of microcalcifications by characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects using MR phase image <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baheza, Richard A.; Welch, E. Brian; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Sanders, Melinda; Harvey, Sara; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.</p> <p>2015-03-15</p> <p>Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new method for detecting calcium deposits using their characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects on magnetic resonance (MR) images at high fields and demonstrate its potential in practice for detecting breast microcalcifications. Methods: Characteristic dipole signatures of calcium deposits were detected in magnetic resonance phase images by computing the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the acquired data and a library of templates containing simulated phase patterns of spherical deposits. The influence of signal-to-noise ratio and various other MR parameters on the results were assessed using simulations and validated experimentally. The method was tested experimentally for detection of calcium fragments within gel phantoms and calcium-like inhomogeneities within chicken tissue at 7 T with optimized MR acquisition parameters. The method was also evaluated for detection of simulated microcalcifications, modeled from biopsy samples of malignant breast cancer, inserted in silico into breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of healthy subjects at 7 T. For both assessments of calcium fragments in phantoms and biopsy-based simulated microcalcifications in breast MRIs, receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> index cutoff, for achieving optimal sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC), for measuring the method’s performance. Results: The method detected calcium fragments with sizes of 0.14–0.79 mm, 1 mm calcium-like deposits, and simulated microcalcifications with sizes of 0.4–1.0 mm in images with voxel sizes between (0.2 mm){sup 3} and (0.6 mm){sup 3}. In images acquired at 7 T with voxel sizes of (0.2 mm){sup 3}–(0.4 mm){sup 3}, calcium fragments (size 0.3–0.4 mm) were detected with a sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 78%–90%, 51%–68%, and 0.77%–0.88%, respectively. In images acquired with a human 7 T scanner, acquisition times below 12</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21265605','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21265605"><span>Color, context, and cognitive style: variations in color knowledge <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of task and subject variables.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hsu, Nina S; Kraemer, David J M; Oliver, Robyn T; Schlichting, Margaret L; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Neuroimaging tests of sensorimotor theories of semantic memory hinge on the extent to which similar activation patterns are observed during perception and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of objects or object properties. The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that some of the seeming discrepancies across studies reflect flexibility in the systems responsible for conceptual and perceptual processing of color. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of color knowledge can be influenced by both context (a task variable) and individual differences in cognitive style (a subject variable). In Experiment 1, we provide fMRI evidence for differential activity during color knowledge <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> by having subjects perform a verbal task, in which context encouraged subjects to <span class="hlt">retrieve</span> more- or less-detailed information about the colors of named common objects in a blocked experimental design. In the left fusiform, we found more activity during <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of more- versus less-detailed color knowledge. We also assessed preference for verbal or visual cognitive style, finding that brain activity in the left lingual gyrus significantly correlated with preference for a visual cognitive style. We replicated many of these effects in Experiment 2, in which stimuli were presented more quickly, in a random order, and in the auditory modality. This illustration of some of the factors that can influence color knowledge <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> leads to the conclusion that tests of conceptual and perceptual overlap must consider variation in both of these processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...833..153S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...833..153S"><span>Dissecting the High-z Interstellar Medium through Intensity Mapping <span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Serra, Paolo; Doré, Olivier; Lagache, Guilaine</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We explore the detection, with upcoming spectroscopic surveys, of three-dimensional power spectra of emission line fluctuations produced in different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) by forbidden transitions of ionized carbon [C ii] (157.7 μm), ionized nitrogen [N ii] (121.9 and 205.2 μm), and neutral oxygen [O i] (145.5 μm) at redshift z > 4. These lines are important coolants of both the neutral and the ionized medium, and probe multiple phases of the ISM. In the framework of the halo model, we compute predictions of the three-dimensional power spectra for two different surveys, showing that they have the required sensitivity to detect cross-power spectra between the [C ii] line and both the [O i] line and the [N ii] lines with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The importance of <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> multiple lines with the intensity mapping technique is twofold. On the one hand, we will have multiple probes of the different phases of the ISM, which is key to understanding the interplay between energetic sources, and the gas and dust at high redshift. This kind of study will be useful for a next-generation space observatory such as the NASA Far-IR Surveyor, which will probe the global star formation and the ISM of galaxies from the peak of star formation to the epoch of reionization. On the other hand, emission lines from external galaxies are an important foreground when measuring spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background spectrum with future space-based experiments like PIXIE; measuring fluctuations in the intensity mapping regime will help constrain the mean amplitude of these lines, and will allow us to better handle this important foreground.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V41B4806F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V41B4806F"><span>Monitoring volcanic systems through <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of coincident A-Train satellite data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Flower, V. J. B.; Carn, S. A.; Wright, R.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The remote location and inaccessibility of many active volcanic systems around the world hinders detailed investigation of their eruptive dynamics. One methodology for monitoring such locations is through the utilisation of multiple satellite datasets to elucidate underlying eruption dynamics and aid volcanic hazard mitigation. Whilst satellite datasets are often analysed individually, here we exploit the multi-platform NASA A-Train satellite constellation, including the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua. OMI measures volcanic emissions (e.g. sulphur dioxide, ash) whilst MODIS enables monitoring of thermal anomalies (e.g. lava flows, lava lakes, pyroclastic deposits), allowing analysis of a more diverse range of volcanic unrest than is possible using a single measurement technique alone, and permitting <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between datasets for specific locations to assess cyclic activity. A Multi-taper (MTM) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis was implemented at an initial sample site (Soufriere Hills volcano [SHV], Montserrat) facilitating cycle identification and subsequent comparison with existing ground-based data. Corresponding cycles at intervals of 8, 12 and ~50 days were identified in both the satellite-based SO2 and thermal infrared signals and ground-based SO2 measurements (Nicholson et al. 2013), validating the methodology. Our analysis confirms the potential for identification of cyclical volcanic activity through synergistic analysis of satellite data, which would be of particular value at poorly monitored volcanic systems. Following our initial test at SHV, further sample sites have been selected in locations with varied eruption dynamics and monitoring capabilities including Ambrym (Vanuatu), Kilauea (Hawaii), Nyiragongo (DR Congo) and Etna (Italy) with the intention of identifying not only cyclic signals that can be attributed to volcanic systems but also those which are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8581E..1UB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8581E..1UB"><span>Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brunker, J.; Beard, P.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18343587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18343587"><span>Auditory nerve inputs to cochlear nucleus neurons studied with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, E D; Sachs, M B</p> <p>2008-06-12</p> <p>The strength of synapses between auditory nerve (AN) fibers and ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons is an important factor in determining the nature of neural integration in VCN neurons of different response types. Synaptic strength was analyzed using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of spike trains recorded simultaneously from an AN fiber and a VCN neuron in anesthetized cats. VCN neurons were classified as chopper, primarylike, and onset using previously defined criteria, although onset neurons usually were not analyzed because of their low discharge rates. The correlograms showed an excitatory peak (EP), consistent with monosynaptic excitation, in AN-VCN pairs with similar best frequencies (49% 24/49 of pairs with best frequencies within +/-5%). Chopper and primarylike neurons showed similar EPs, except that the primarylike neurons had shorter latencies and shorter-duration EPs. Large EPs consistent with end bulb terminals on spherical bushy cells were not observed, probably because of the low probability of recording from one. The small EPs observed in primarylike neurons, presumably spherical bushy cells, could be derived from small terminals that accompany end bulbs on these cells. EPs on chopper or primarylike-with-notch neurons were consistent with the smaller synaptic terminals on multipolar and globular bushy cells. Unexpectedly, EPs were observed only at sound levels within about 20 dB of threshold, showing that VCN responses to steady tones shift from a 1:1 relationship between AN and VCN spikes at low sound levels to a more autonomous mode of firing at high levels. In the high level mode, the pattern of output spikes seems to be determined by the properties of the postsynaptic spike generator rather than the input spike patterns. The EP amplitudes did not change significantly when the presynaptic spike was preceded by either a short or long interspike interval, suggesting that synaptic depression and facilitation have little effect under the conditions studied</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462...67S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462...67S"><span>A study on Improvisation in a Musical performance using Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sanyal, Shankha; Banerjee, Archi; Patranabis, Anirban; Banerjee, Kaushik; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>MFDFA (the most rigorous technique to assess multifractality) was performed on four Hindustani music samples played on same 'raga' sung by the same performer. Each music sample was divided into six parts and 'multifractal spectral width' was determined for each part corresponding to the four samples. The results obtained reveal that different parts of all the four sound signals possess spectral width of widely varying values. This gives a cue of the so called 'musical improvisation' in all music samples, keeping in mind they belong to the bandish part of the same raga. Formal compositions in Hindustani raga are juxtaposed with the improvised portions, where an artist manoeuvers his/her own creativity to bring out a mood that is specific for that particular performance, which is known as 'improvisation'. Further, this observation hints at the association of different emotions even in the same bandish of the same raga performed by the same artist, this interesting observation cannot be revealed unless rigorous non-linear technique explores the nature of musical structure. In the second part, we applied MFDXA technique to explore more in-depth about 'improvisation' and association with emotion. This technique is applied to find the degree of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (γx) between the different parts of the samples. Pronounced correlation has been observed in the middle parts of the all the four samples evident from higher values of γx ​whereas the other parts show weak correlation. This gets further support from the values of spectral width from different parts of the sample - width of those parts is significantly different from other parts. This observation is extremely new both in respect of musical structure of so called improvisation and associated emotion. The importance of this study in application area of cognitive music therapy is immense.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2048714','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2048714"><span>A 4-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer with internal microchannel plate photomultiplier <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berndt, K W; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>We have developed and tested a multifrequency phase/modulation fluorometer based on the Hamamatsu Model R2024U gatable microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP-PMT), using internal MCP-PMT <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. This internal mixing is accomplished by biasing and modulating the gating mesh which is located 0.2 mm behind the photocathode. Near the photocathode center, no high-frequency photocurrent modulation was achieved. Within a circular area near the photocathode edge, however, the R2024U allows accurate phase shift and demodulation measurements up to at least 4.5 GHz, the frequency limit of our PMT-modulation amplifier. By mixing immediately after the photocathode, there is no decrease in the time resolution due to transit time spread, and the MCP has to process only low-frequency signals. This means no low-level high-frequency signal voltages have to be handled in this fluorometer, and the problems of RF shielding become much less critical. Also, the effective output impedance of the PMT has been increased, resulting in a 43-dB increase in the PMT output signal power. In principle, more MCPs could be built into the PMT, allowing an improved fluorescence detection limit. We have used the method of reference fluorophores in order to compensate for pronounced PMT color effects, a wavelength-dependent modulation, and a wavelength-dependent time shift. No color correction is required in the case of time-dependent depolarization. The performance of the instrument was verified by measurements of the intensity decay of perylene, which showed a single-exponential decay, and by measurements of the decay of tryptophan in water, which showed a double-exponential decay, as expected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23475913','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23475913"><span>Performance improvement of Fresnel beamforming using dual apodization with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Man M; Yen, Jesse T</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Fresnel beamforming is a beamforming method that has a delay profile with a shape similar to a physical Fresnel lens. With 4 to 8 transmit channels, 2 receive channels, and a network of single-pole/single-throw switches, Fresnel beamforming can reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a beamformer. The performance of Fresnel beamforming is highly dependent on focal errors resulting from phase wraparound and quantization of its delay profile. Previously, we demonstrated that the performance of Fresnel beamforming relative to delayand- sum (DAS) beamforming is comparable for linear arrays at f-number = 2 and 50% bandwidth. However, focal errors for Fresnel beamforming are larger because of larger path length differences between elements, as in the case of curvilinear arrays compared with linear arrays. In this paper, we present the concept and performance evaluation of Fresnel beamforming combined with a novel clutter suppression method called dual apodization with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (DAX) for curvilinear arrays. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of Fresnel beamforming followed by DAX are highest at f-number = 3. At f-number = 3, the experimental results show that using DAX, the CNR for Fresnel beamforming improves from 3.7 to 10.6, compared with a CNR of 5.2 for DAS beamforming. Spatial resolution is shown to be unaffected by DAX. At f-number = 3, the lateral beamwidth and axial pulse length for Fresnel beamforming with DAX are 1.44 and 1.00 mm larger than those for DAS beamforming (about 14% and 21% larger), respectively. These experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3609545','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3609545"><span>Performance Improvement of Fresnel Beamforming Using Dual Apodization With <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Man M.; Yen, Jesse T.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fresnel beamforming is a beamforming method that has a delay profile with a shape similar to a physical Fresnel lens. With 4 to 8 transmit channels, 2 receive channels, and a network of single-pole/single-throw switches, Fresnel beamforming can reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a beam-former. The performance of Fresnel beamforming is highly dependent on focal errors resulting from phase wraparound and quantization of its delay profile. Previously, we demonstrated that the performance of Fresnel beamforming relative to delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming is comparable for linear arrays at f-number = 2 and 50% bandwidth. However, focal errors for Fresnel beamforming are larger because of larger path length differences between elements, as in the case of curvilinear arrays compared with linear arrays. In this paper, we present the concept and performance evaluation of Fresnel beamforming combined with a novel clutter suppression method called dual apodization with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> (DAX) for curvilinear arrays. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of Fresnel beamforming followed by DAX are highest at f-number = 3. At f-number = 3, the experimental results show that using DAX, the CNR for Fresnel beamforming improves from 3.7 to 10.6, compared with a CNR of 5.2 for DAS beamforming. Spatial resolution is shown to be unaffected by DAX. At f-number = 3, the lateral beamwidth and axial pulse length for Fresnel beamforming with DAX are 1.44 and 1.00 mm larger than those for DAS beamforming (about 14% and 21% larger), respectively. These experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results. PMID:23475913</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...826..121M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApJ...826..121M"><span>A Bayesian Estimate of the CMB-Large-scale Structure <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Moura-Santos, E.; Carvalho, F. C.; Penna-Lima, M.; Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Evidences for late-time acceleration of the universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB-LSS <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089688','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089688"><span>STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> SAMPLE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross-correlating</span> the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6478K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6478K"><span>Automatic Event Bulletin Built By Waveform <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Using The Global Grid Of Master Events With Adjustable Templates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kitov, Ivan; Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We built an automatic seismic event bulletin for the whole globe using waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). To detect signals and associate them into robust event hypotheses in an automatic pipeline we created a global grid (GG) of master events with a diversity of waveform templates. For the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the GG provide an almost uniform distribution of monitoring capabilities and adjustable templates. For seismic areas, we select high quality signals at IMS stations from earthquakes. For test sites, signals from UNEs are best templates. Global detection and association with <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> technique for research and monitoring purposes demands templates from master events outside the regions of natural seismicity and test sites. We populate aseismic areas with masters having synthetic templates calculated for predefined sets of IMS array stations. We applied various technologies to synthesize most representative signals for <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> and tested them using the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) issued by the International Data Centre (IDC). At first, we tested these global sets of master events and synthetic templates using IMS seismic data for February 13, 2013 and demonstrated excellent detection and location capability. Then, using the REB and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> bulletins (XSELs) experienced analysts from the IDC compared the relative performance of various templates and built reliable sets of events and detections for machine learning. In this study, we carefully compile global training sets for machine learning in order to establish statistical decision lines between reliable and unreliable event hypotheses, then apply classification procedures to the intermediate automatic <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> bulletin based on the GG, and compile the final XSEL, which is more accurate and has lower detection threshold than the REB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSeis..21..193V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSeis..21..193V"><span>Real-time envelope <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> detector: application to induced seismicity in the Insheim and Landau deep geothermal reservoirs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vasterling, Margarete; Wegler, Ulrich; Becker, Jan; Brüstle, Andrea; Bischoff, Monika</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We develop and test a real-time envelope <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> detector for use in seismic response plans to mitigate hazard of induced seismicity. The incoming seismological data are <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> in real-time with a set of previously recorded master events. For robustness against small changes in the earthquake source locations or in the focal mechanisms we <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> the envelopes of the seismograms rather than the seismograms themselves. Two sequenced detection conditions are implemented: After passing a single trace <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> condition, a network <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is calculated taking amplitude ratios between stations into account. Besides detecting the earthquake and assigning it to the respective reservoir, real-time magnitudes are important for seismic response plans. We estimate the magnitudes of induced microseismicity using the relative amplitudes between master event and detected event. The real-time detector is implemented as a SeisComP3 module. We carry out offline and online performance tests using seismic monitoring data of the Insheim and Landau geothermal power plants (Upper Rhine Graben, Germany), also including blasts from a nearby quarry. The comparison of the automatic real-time catalogue with a manually processed catalogue shows, that with the implemented parameters events are always correctly assigned to the respective reservoir (4 km distance between reservoirs) or the quarry (8 km and 10 km distance, respectively, from the reservoirs). The real-time catalogue achieves a magnitude of completeness around 0.0. Four per cent of the events assigned to the Insheim reservoir and zero per cent of the Landau events are misdetections. All wrong detections are local tectonic events, whereas none are caused by seismic noise.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53B2824R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53B2824R"><span>Automatic Event Bulletin Built by Waveform <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlation</span> Using the Global Grid of Master Events with Adjustable Templates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rozhkov, M.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We built an automatic seismic event bulletin for the whole globe using waveform <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). To detect signals and associate them into robust event hypotheses in an automatic pipeline we created a global grid (GG) of master events with a diversity of waveform templates. For the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the GG provides an almost uniform distribution of monitoring capabilities and adjustable templates. For seismic areas, we select high quality signals at IMS stations from earthquakes. For test sites, signals from UNEs are best templates. Global detection and association with <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> technique for research and monitoring purposes demands templates from master events outside the regions of natural seismicity and test sites. We populate aseismic areas with masters having synthetic templates calculated for predefined sets of IMS array stations. We applied various technologies to synthesize most representative signals for <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> and tested them using the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) issued by the International Data Centre (IDC). At first, we tested these global sets of master events and synthetic templates using IMS seismic data for February 13, 2013 and demonstrated excellent detection and location capability. Then, using the REB and <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> bulletins (XSELs) experienced analysts from the IDC compared the relative performance of various templates and built reliable sets of events and detections for machine learning. In this study, we carefully compile global training sets for machine learning in order to establish statistical decision lines between reliable and unreliable event hypotheses, then apply classification procedures to the intermediate automatic <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> bulletin based on the GG, and compile the final XSEL, which is more accurate and has lower detection threshold than the REB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25451612','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25451612"><span>Systemic lipopolysaccharide administration impairs <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of context-object discrimination, but not spatial, memory: Evidence for selective disruption of specific hippocampus-dependent memory <span class="hlt">functions</span> during acute neuroinflammation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Czerniawski, Jennifer; Miyashita, Teiko; Lewandowski, Gail; Guzowski, John F</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Neuroinflammation is implicated in impairments in neuronal <span class="hlt">function</span> and cognition that arise with aging, trauma, and/or disease. Therefore, understanding the underlying basis of the effect of immune system activation on neural <span class="hlt">function</span> could lead to therapies for treating cognitive decline. Although neuroinflammation is widely thought to preferentially impair hippocampus-dependent memory, data on the effects of cytokines on cognition are mixed. One possible explanation for these inconsistent results is that cytokines may disrupt specific neural processes underlying some forms of memory but not others. In an earlier study, we tested the effect of systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of hippocampus-dependent context memory and neural circuit <span class="hlt">function</span> in CA3 and CA1 (Czerniawski and Guzowski, 2014). Paralleling impairment in context discrimination memory, we observed changes in neural circuit <span class="hlt">function</span> consistent with disrupted pattern separation <span class="hlt">function</span>. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation selectively disrupts memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in tasks requiring hippocampal pattern separation processes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats given LPS systemically prior to testing exhibited intact performance in tasks that do not require hippocampal pattern separation processes: novel object recognition and spatial memory in the water maze. By contrast, memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in a task thought to require hippocampal pattern separation, context-object discrimination, was strongly impaired in LPS-treated rats in the absence of any gross effects on exploratory activity or motivation. These data show that LPS administration does not impair memory <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> in all hippocampus-dependent tasks, and support the hypothesis that acute neuroinflammation impairs context discrimination memory via disruption of pattern separation processes in hippocampus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.1771K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.1771K"><span>Dynamical Behaviors between the PM10 and the meteorological factor using the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Kyungsik; Lee, Dong-In</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>There is considerable interest in <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in collective modes of real data from atmospheric geophysics, seismology, finance, physiology, genomics, and nanodevices. If two systems interact mutually, that interaction gives rise to collective modes. This phenomenon is able to be analyzed using the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of traditional methods, random matrix theory, and the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method. The detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method was used in the past to analyze several models such as autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average processes, stock prices and their trading volumes, and taxi accidents. Particulate matter is composed of the organic and inorganic mixtures such as the natural sea salt, soil particle, vehicles exhaust, construction dust, and soot. The PM10 is known as the particle with the aerodynamic diameter (less than 10 microns) that is able to enter the human respiratory system. The PM10 concentration has an effect on the climate change by causing an unbalance of the global radiative equilibrium through the direct effect that blocks the stoma of plants and cuts off the solar radiation, different from the indirect effect that changes the optical property of clouds, cloudiness, and lifetime of clouds. Various factors contribute to the degree of the PM10 concentration. Notable among these are the land-use types, surface vegetation coverage, as well as meteorological factors. In this study, we analyze and simulate <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> in time scales between the PM10 concentration and the meteorological factor (among temperature, wind speed and humidity) using the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis method through the removal of specific trends at eight cities in the Korean peninsula. We divide time series data into Asian dust events and non-Asian dust events to analyze the change of meteorological factors on the fluctuation of PM10 the concentration during Asian dust events. In particular, our result is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995STIN...9527173W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995STIN...9527173W"><span>Fuzzy inference enhanced information recovery from digital PIV using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> combined with particle tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wernet, Mark P.</p> <p>1995-05-01</p> <p>Particle Image Velocimetry provides a means of measuring the instantaneous 2-component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flowfield. In this work only two camera, single exposure images are considered where both cameras have the same view of the illumination plane. Two competing techniques which yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single exposure, multiple image data: <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. The correlation technique requires identification of the correlation peak on the correlation plane corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion. Noise on the images and particle dropout contribute to spurious peaks on the correlation plane, leading to misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true correlation displacement peak even when it is not the maximum peak on the correlation plane, hence maximizing the information recovery from the correlation operation, maintaining the number of independent measurements and minimizing the number of spurious velocity vectors. Correlation peaks are correctly identified in both high and low seed density cases. The correlation velocity vector map can then be used as a guide for the particle tracking operation. Again fuzzy logic techniques are used, this time to identify the correct particle image pairings between exposures to determine particle displacements, and thus velocity. The advantage of this technique is the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31A2737P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31A2737P"><span>Detailed Tremor Migration Styles in Guerrero, Mexico Imaged with Cross-station <span class="hlt">Cross-correlations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peng, Y.; Rubin, A. M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Tremor occurred downdip of the area that slipped the most during the 2006 slow slip event (SSE) in Guerrero, Mexico, as opposed to Cascadia, where tremor locations and rupture zones of SSEs largely overlap. Here we obtain high resolution tremor locations by applying cross-station <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> [Armbruster et al., 2014] to seismic data from the Meso-America Subduction Experiment deployment. A few 3-station detectors are adopted to capture detailed deformation styles in the tremor "transient zone" and the downdip "sweet spot" as defined in Frank et al., 2014. Similar to Cascadia, tremor activities in our study region were comprised mostly of short tremor bursts lasting minutes to hours. Many of these bursts show clear migration patterns with propagation velocities of hundreds of km/day, comparable to those in Cascadia. However, the propagation of the main tremor front was often not in a simple unilateral fashion. Before the 2006 SSE, we observe 4 large tremor episodes during which both the transient zone and the sweet spot participated, consistent with previous findings [Frank et al., 2014]. The transient zone usually became active a few days after the sweet spot. We find many along-dip migrations with recurrence intervals of about a half day within a region about 10 km along strike and 35 km along dip in the sweet spot, suggesting possible tidal modulation, after the main front moved beyond this region. These migrations appear not to originate at the main front, in contrast to tremor migrations from a few km to tens of km across observed in Cascadia [Rubin and Armbruster, 2013; Peng et al., 2015; Peng and Rubin, submitted], but possibly similar to Shikoku, Japan [Shelly et al., 2007]. We do not observe obvious half-day periodicity for the migrations farther downdip within the sweet spot. During the SSE, the recurrence interval of tremor episodes decreased significantly in both the transient zone and the sweet spot, with that of the former being much shorter</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950020753','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950020753"><span>Fuzzy inference enhanced information recovery from digital PIV using <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> combined with particle tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wernet, Mark P.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Particle Image Velocimetry provides a means of measuring the instantaneous 2-component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flowfield. In this work only two camera, single exposure images are considered where both cameras have the same view of the illumination plane. Two competing techniques which yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single exposure, multiple image data: <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. The correlation technique requires identification of the correlation peak on the correlation plane corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion. Noise on the images and particle dropout contribute to spurious peaks on the correlation plane, leading to misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true correlation displacement peak even when it is not the maximum peak on the correlation plane, hence maximizing the information recovery from the correlation operation, maintaining the number of independent measurements and minimizing the number of spurious velocity vectors. Correlation peaks are correctly identified in both high and low seed density cases. The correlation velocity vector map can then be used as a guide for the particle tracking operation. Again fuzzy logic techniques are used, this time to identify the correct particle image pairings between exposures to determine particle displacements, and thus velocity. The advantage of this technique is the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SenIm..18....7M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SenIm..18....7M"><span>Super-Resolution Defect Characterization Using Microwave Near-Field Resonance Reflectometry and <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Image Processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malyuskin, Oleksandr; Fusco, Vincent</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>A super-resolution defect characterization technique based on near-field resonance reflectometry and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> image processing is proposed in this paper. The hardware part of the microwave imaging system employs a novel loaded aperture (LA) probe which allows collimation of the electromagnetic field to approximately λ/10 focal spot(s) at λ/100 to λ/10 stand-off distances, λ being the wavelength of radiation in free space. The characteristic raw image spatial resolution of the LA probe is around λ/10 in one dimension with amplitude contrast/sensitivity exceeding 10-20 dB. It is demonstrated that the LA spatial resolution can be at least two times enhanced in two dimensions in the image plane using basic <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> image processing while retaining a very high level of amplitude contrast of at least 10 dB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7265283','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7265283"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> velocimetry for measurement of velocity and temperature profiles in low-speed, turbulent, nonisothermal flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Motevalli, V. ); Marks, C.H. ); McCaffrey, B.J. )</p> <p>1992-05-01</p> <p>A technique utilizing thermocouple pairs as sensors to measure velocity and temperature profiles in low-speed, turbulent, nonisothermal flows is described here. In this technique, <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Velocimetry (CCV), the temperature-time records from a pair of thermocouples, one downstream of the other, are <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> to determine the flow's preferred mean velocity while temperature is measured directly. The velocity measurements have undergone extensive verification using hotwire, pitot tube, and Laser-Doppler Velocimetry to determine the degree of confidence in this technique. This work demonstrates that the CCV technique is quite reliable and can measure the mean preferred component of the convective velocity with better than {plus minus}5 percent certainty. Application of this technique to the measurement of velocities in a ceiling jet induced by a fire plume is briefly presented here.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JApA...37...26S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JApA...37...26S"><span>Redshifted HI 21-cm Signal from the Post-Reionization Epoch: <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlations</span> with Other Cosmological Probes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sarkar, T. Guha; Datta, K. K.; Pal, A. K.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, S.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Tomographic intensity mapping of the HI using the redshifted 21-cm observations opens up a new window towards our understanding of cosmological background evolution and structure formation. This is a key science goal of several upcoming radio telescopes including the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). In this article, we focus on the post-reionization signal and investigate the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlating</span> of the 21-cm signal with other tracers of the large scale structure. We consider the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of the post-reionization 21-cm signal with the Lyman- α forest, Lyman-break galaxies and late time anisotropies in the CMBR maps like weak lensing and the integrated Sachs Wolfe effect. We study the feasibility of detecting the signal and explore the possibility of obtaining constraints on cosmological models using it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.628a2129C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.628a2129C"><span>Study of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signals in a data-driven approach for damage classification in aircraft wings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Camacho-Navarro, Jhonatan; Ruiz, Magda; Villamizar, Rodolfo; Mujica, Luis; Güemes, Alfredo; González-Requema, Ignacio</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>This paper discusses, experimental results of classifying several mass adding in a wing aircraft structure, using <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> piezoelectric signals, represented by principal components. Piezoelectric signals are applied and recorded at specific points of the structure under analysis. Then, statistical features are obtained by means of principal component analysis to the correlation between excitation and response signals. Unsupervised learning is implemented to the reduced feature space, in order to identify clusters of damaged cases. The main result of this paper is the advantage resulting from using <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> signals, evaluated through the performance of clustering indexes. Experimental data are collected from two test structures: i.) A turbine blade of a commercial aircraft and ii.) The skin panel of the torsion box of a wing. Damages are induced adding masses at different locations of the wing section surface. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the methodology to distinguish between different damage cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24745402','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24745402"><span>Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with the cosmic infrared background.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O</p> <p>2014-04-04</p> <p>We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and <span class="hlt">cross-correlate</span> it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..444..667S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..444..667S"><span>Optimal portfolio strategy with <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix composed by DCCA coefficients: Evidence from the Chinese stock market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Xuelian; Liu, Zixian</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, a new estimator of correlation matrix is proposed, which is composed of the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> coefficients (DCCA coefficients), to improve portfolio optimization. In contrast to Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), DCCA coefficients acquired by the detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (DCCA) method can describe the nonlinear correlation between assets, and can be decomposed in different time scales. These properties of DCCA make it possible to improve the investment effect and more valuable to investigate the scale behaviors of portfolios. The minimum variance portfolio (MVP) model and the Mean-Variance (MV) model are used to evaluate the effectiveness of this improvement. Stability analysis shows the effect of two kinds of correlation matrices on the estimation error of portfolio weights. The observed scale behaviors are significant to risk management and could be used to optimize the portfolio selection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h3511O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93h3511O"><span>Measuring the distance-redshift relation with the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of gravitational wave standard sirens and galaxies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oguri, Masamune</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries are known to be an excellent absolute distance indicator, yet it is unclear whether electromagnetic counterparts of these events are securely identified for measuring their redshifts, especially in the case of black hole-black hole mergers such as the one recently observed with the Advanced LIGO. We propose to use the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between spatial distributions of gravitational wave sources and galaxies with known redshifts as an alternative means of constraining the distance-redshift relation from gravitational waves. In our analysis, we explicitly include the modulation of the distribution of gravitational wave sources due to weak gravitational lensing. We show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis in next-generation observations will be able to tightly constrain the relation between the absolute distance and the redshift and therefore constrain the Hubble constant as well as dark energy parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..430..101Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyA..430..101Z"><span>Multifractality, efficiency analysis of Chinese stock market and its <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> with WTI crude oil price</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhuang, Xiaoyang; Wei, Yu; Ma, Feng</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>In this paper, the multifractality and efficiency degrees of ten important Chinese sectoral indices are evaluated using the methods of MF-DFA and generalized Hurst exponents. The study also scrutinizes the dynamics of the efficiency of Chinese sectoral stock market by the rolling window approach. The overall empirical findings revealed that all the sectoral indices of Chinese stock market exist different degrees of multifractality. The results of different efficiency measures have agreed on that the 300 Materials index is the least efficient index. However, they have a slight diffidence on the most efficient one. The 300 Information Technology, 300 Telecommunication Services and 300 Health Care indices are comparatively efficient. We also investigate the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the ten sectoral indices and WTI crude oil price based on Multifractal Detrended <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Analysis. At last, some relevant discussions and implications of the empirical results are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...606...46D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...606...46D"><span>Beyond the Damping Tail: <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlating</span> the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect with Cosmic Shear</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Doré, Olivier; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Spergel, David N.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Secondary anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have the potential to reveal intricate details about the history of our universe between the present and recombination epochs. However, because the CMB we observe is the projected sum of a multitude of effects, the interpretation of small-scale anisotropies by future high-resolution experiments will be marred by uncertainty and speculation without the handles provided by other observations. The recent controversy over the excess small-scale anisotropy detected by CBI and the BIMA array is a foretaste of potential challenges that will be faced when interpreting future experiments. In this paper we show that <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> the CMB with an overlapping weak-lensing survey will isolate the elusive kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect from secondary anisotropies generated at higher redshifts. We show that if upcoming high angular resolution CMB experiments, like Planck/ACT/SPT, cover the same area of sky as current and future weak-lensing surveys, like CFTHLS/SNAP/LSST, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of cosmic shear with the kSZ effect will be detected with high signal-to-noise ratio, increasing the potential science accessible to both sets of surveys. For example, if ACT and a CFHTLS-like survey were to overlap, this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> would be detected with a total signal-to-noise ratio greater than 220, reaching 1.8 per individual multipole around l~5000. Furthermore, this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> probes the three-point coupling between the underlying dark matter and the momentum of the ionized baryons in the densest regions of the universe at intermediate redshifts. Similar to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) power spectrum, its strength is extremely sensitive to the power spectrum normalization parameter, σ8, scaling roughly as σ78. It provides an effective mechanism to isolate any component of anisotropy due to patchy reionization and rule out primordial small-scale anisotropy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22520052','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22520052"><span>DARK MATTER SEARCHES IN THE GAMMA-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND VIA <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATIONS</span> WITH GALAXY CATALOGS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cuoco, Alessandro; Regis, Marco; Fornengo, Nicolao; Xia, Jun-Qing; Branchini, Enzo; Viel, Matteo E-mail: regis@to.infn.it E-mail: xiajq@bnu.edu.cn E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>We compare the measured angular <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between the Fermi-Large Area Telescope γ-ray sky and catalogs of extragalactic objects with the expected signal induced by weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM). We include a detailed description of the contribution of astrophysical γ-ray emitters such as blazars, misaligned active galactic nucleus (AGN), and star-forming galaxies, and perform a global fit to the measured <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>. Five catalogs are considered: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-DR6 quasars, Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxies, NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio galaxies, SDSS-DR8 Luminous Red Galaxies, and the SDSS-DR8 main galaxy sample. To model the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal, we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to estimate the number of galaxies of a given catalog in DM halos and their spatial correlation properties. We discuss uncertainties in the predicted <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal arising from the DM clustering and WIMP microscopic properties, which set the DM γ-ray emission. The use of different catalogs probing objects at different redshifts significantly reduces, though not completely, the degeneracy among the different γ-ray components. We find that the presence of a significant WIMP DM signal is allowed by the data but not significantly preferred by the fit, although this is mainly due to a degeneracy with the misaligned AGN component. With modest substructure boost, the sensitivity of this method excludes thermal annihilation cross sections at 95% level for WIMP masses up to few tens of GeV. Constraining the low-redshift properties of astrophysical populations with future data will further improve the sensitivity to DM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22348215','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22348215"><span>Using <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> to calibrate lensing source redshift distributions: Improving cosmological constraints from upcoming weak lensing surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>De Putter, Roland; Doré, Olivier; Das, Sudeep</p> <p>2014-01-10</p> <p><span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlations</span> between the galaxy number density in a lensing source sample and that in an overlapping spectroscopic sample can in principle be used to calibrate the lensing source redshift distribution. In this paper, we study in detail to what extent this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method can mitigate the loss of cosmological information in upcoming weak lensing surveys (combined with a cosmic microwave background prior) due to lack of knowledge of the source distribution. We consider a scenario where photometric redshifts are available and find that, unless the photometric redshift distribution p(z {sub ph}|z) is calibrated very accurately a priori (bias and scatter known to ∼0.002 for, e.g., EUCLID), the additional constraint on p(z {sub ph}|z) from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> technique to a large extent restores the cosmological information originally lost due to the uncertainty in dn/dz(z). Considering only the gain in photo-z accuracy and not the additional cosmological information, enhancements of the dark energy figure of merit of up to a factor of four (40) can be achieved for a SuMIRe-like (EUCLID-like) combination of lensing and redshift surveys, where SuMIRe stands for Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts). However, the success of the method is strongly sensitive to our knowledge of the galaxy bias evolution in the source sample and we find that a percent level bias prior is needed to optimize the gains from the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> method (i.e., to approach the cosmology constraints attainable if the bias was known exactly).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19882435','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19882435"><span>Effects of repeated collaborative <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> on individual memory vary as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of recall versus recognition tasks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blumen, Helena M; Rajaram, Suparna</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Our research examines how prior group collaboration modulates later individual memory. We recently showed that repeated collaborative recall sessions benefit later individual recall more than a single collaborative recall session (Blumen & Rajaram, 2008). Current research compared the effects of repeated collaborative recall and repeated collaborative recognition on later individual recall and later individual recognition. A total of 192 participants studied a list of nouns and then completed three successive <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> sessions in one of four conditions. While two collaborative recall sessions and two collaborative recognition sessions generated comparable levels of individual recall (CRecall-CRecall-I Recall approximately CRecognition-CRecognition-I Recall , Experiment 1a), two collaborative recognition sessions generated greater levels of individual recognition than two collaborative recall sessions (CRecognition-CRecognition- IRecognition > CRecall-CRecall- I Recognition , Experiment 1b). These findings are discussed in terms of two opposing mechanisms that operate during collaborative <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>-re-exposure and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> disruption-and in terms of transfer-appropriate processing across collaborative and individual <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> sessions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=6&id=EJ949396','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=6&id=EJ949396"><span>Color, Context, and Cognitive Style: Variations in Color Knowledge <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> as a <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Task and Subject Variables</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hsu, Nina S.; Kraemer, David J. M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Schlichting, Margaret L.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Neuroimaging tests of sensorimotor theories of semantic memory hinge on the extent to which similar activation patterns are observed during perception and <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of objects or object properties. The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that some of the seeming discrepancies across studies reflect flexibility in the systems responsible…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..889B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..462..889B"><span>Do foreign exchange and equity markets co-move in Latin American region? Detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bashir, Usman; Yu, Yugang; Hussain, Muntazir; Zebende, Gilney F.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the dynamics of the relationship between foreign exchange markets and stock markets through time varying co-movements. In this sense, we analyzed the time series monthly of Latin American countries for the period from 1991 to 2015. Furthermore, we apply Granger causality to verify the direction of causality between foreign exchange and stock market and detrended <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> approach (ρDCCA) for any co-movements at different time scales. Our empirical results suggest a positive <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between exchange rate and stock price for all Latin American countries. The findings reveal two clear patterns of correlation. First, Brazil and Argentina have positive correlation in both short and long time frames. Second, the remaining countries are negatively correlated in shorter time scale, gradually moving to positive. This paper contributes to the field in three ways. First, we verified the co-movements of exchange rate and stock prices that were rarely discussed in previous empirical studies. Second, ρDCCA coefficient is a robust and powerful methodology to measure the <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> when dealing with non stationarity of time series. Third, most of the studies employed one or two time scales using co-integration and vector autoregressive approaches. Not much is known about the co-movements at varying time scales between foreign exchange and stock markets. ρDCCA coefficient facilitates the understanding of its explanatory depth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1604...43F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1604...43F"><span>A novel approach in the WIMP quest: <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of gamma-ray anisotropies and cosmic shear</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fornengo, Nicolao</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The presence of large amounts of dark matter in the Universe is the expected source of two different cosmological effects: small gravitational distortions in the shapes of background galaxies (cosmic shear) and the cosmological emission of gamma rays. In fact, dark matter structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak lensing regime, and those same cosmological objects can emit gamma-rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by dark matter annihilations or decays. Gamma-rays emission should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this note we report on the computation of the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma-rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive composing particle dark matter, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that the shear/gamma-rays <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> provides novel information on the composition of the extra-galactic gamma-ray background and can represent a potentially detectable signal by combining Fermi-LAT data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, a detection of a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal would demonstrate that the weak lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of General Relativity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..416..259L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyA..416..259L"><span>Hidden <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> patterns in stock markets based on permutation cross-sample entropy and PCA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Aijing; Shang, Pengjian; Zhong, Bo</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>In this article, we investigate the hidden <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> structures in Chinese stock markets and US stock markets by performing PCSE combined with PCA approach. It is suggested that PCSE can provide a more faithful and more interpretable description of the dynamic mechanism between time series than <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> matrix. We show that this new technique can be adapted to observe stock markets especially during financial crisis. In order to identify and compare the interactions and structures of stock markets during financial crisis, as well as in normal periods, all the samples are divided into four sub-periods. The results imply that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between Chinese group are stronger than the US group in the most sub-periods. In particular, it is likely that the US stock markets are more integrated with each other during global financial crisis than during Asian financial crisis. However, our results illustrate that Chinese stock markets are not immune from the global financial crisis, although less integrated with other markets if they are compared with US stock markets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1244519','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1244519"><span><span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and <i>Planck</i> lensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kirk, D.; Omori, Y.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Larsen, P.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Crawford, T. M.; Dodelson, S.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Holder, G.; Jain, B.; Kacprzak, T.; Lahav, O.; MacCrann, N.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Sheldon, E.; Story, K. T.; Troxel, M. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C. L.; Roodman, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Simard, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.</p> <p>2016-03-10</p> <p>We measure the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg$^{2}$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of $z_{\\rm med} {\\sim} 0.7$, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at $z{\\sim}2$. The resulting <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at $z{\\sim}0.44$. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fit cosmology, the amplitude of the DES$\\times$SPT cross-power is found to be $A = 0.88 \\pm 0.30$ and that from DES$\\times$Planck to be $A = 0.86 \\pm 0.39$, where $A=1$ corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of $2.9 \\sigma$ and $2.2 \\sigma$ respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photometric redshift uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. Significant intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes would increase the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal inferred from the data; we calculate a value of $A = 1.08 \\pm 0.36$ for DES$\\times$SPT when we correct the observations with a simple IA model. With three measurements of this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span>, given the size of the statistical uncertainties and the significant impact of systematic errors, particularly IAs. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AJ....147...67L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AJ....147...67L"><span>The Properties of <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> and Spectra of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1608-52</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lei, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Yuan, Hai-Long; Wang, Ya-Nan; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Li, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>With RXTE data, we analyzed the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22339983','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22339983"><span>The properties of <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> and spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lei, Ya-Juan; Yuan, Hai-Long; Dong, Yi-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Cheng-Min; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Shu; Qu, Jin-Lu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Zhi-Bing</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>With RXTE data, we analyzed the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> between the soft and hard X-rays of the transient atoll source 4U 1608-52. We found anti-correlations in three outbursts occurred in 1998, 2002, and 2010, and we found significant time lags of several hundreds of seconds in the latter two outbursts. Our results show no correlation between the soft and hard X-rays in the extreme island state and a dominated positive correlation in the lower banana state. Anti-correlations are presented at the upper banana state for the outburst of 2010 and at the island and the lower left banana states for the other two outbursts. So far for atoll sources, the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> has been studied statistically only for 4U 1735-44, where anti-correlations showed up in the upper banana state. Here our investigation on 4U 1608-52 provides a similar result in its 2010 outburst. In addition, we notice that the luminosities in the upper banana of the 1998 and 2002 outbursts are about 1.5 times that of the 2010 outburst whose luminosity in the upper banana is close to that of 4U 1735-44. The results suggest that the states in the color-color diagram of a source could be correlated with the luminosity of the source. A further spectral analysis during the 2010 outburst is also shown, which suggests that the disk can be a little truncated in the upper banana. The feature on the upper banana is similar to the previous results of the flaring branch in Z sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040005916','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040005916"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Studies with LIDORT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Spurr, Robert J. D.; Chance, K. V.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>This short program of LIDORT-based research in atmospheric trace gas <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> was conducted over the 1 year period 01 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. After consultation with the NASA reporting officer, the first of the two original proposal activities (development of a direct-fitting total O3 column <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> algorithm with operational capability for GOME data) was replaced by other tasks. The three activities addressed were: (1) Sensitivity studies for column and profile <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> of NO2 distributions from a new generation of multi-axis ground-based spectrometers; (2) use of the LIDORT-RRS model to determine the effect of inelastic rotational Raman scattering at SBUV wavelengths; (3) an examination of ozone profile weighting <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the presence of optically thick tropospheric clouds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7152355','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7152355"><span><span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> of transuranic waste</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1988-07-19</p> <p>Soil removal and drum <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> equipment are being developed and demonstrated in support of the Transuranic Waste Facility (TWF) program. Accomplishments to date include: Soil removal equipment, a telescoping excavator and high velocity vacuum truck were selected for soil removal; Preliminary demonstrations, the capabilities of both the telescoping excavator and vacuum truck were demonstrated by the vendors; Shielding Lifting Canister, <span class="hlt">Functional</span> parameters were defined and design is 95% complete; and Full-scale demonstration, SRL test mounds were selected for a full-scale drum <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> demonstration. Further development will include an integrated full-scale demonstration. Several drums buried in non-radioactive TRU test mounds will be <span class="hlt">retrieved</span>. Planning for the demonstration is underway. A telescoping excavator is being acquired, the shielded lifting canister will be fabricated and pre-tested, and a vacuum truck will be leased. 5 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/751203','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/751203"><span>The roles of shear and <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> on the fluctuation levels in simple stochastic models. Revision</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Krommes, J.A.</p> <p>1999-11-03</p> <p>Highly simplified models of random flows interacting with background microturbulence are analyzed. In the limit of very rapid velocity fluctuations, it is shown rigorously that the fluctuation level of a passively advected scalar is not controlled by the rms shear. In a model with random velocities dependent only on time, the level of <span class="hlt">cross-correlations</span> between the flows and the background turbulence regulates the saturation level. This effect is illustrated by considering a simple stochastic-oscillator model, both exactly and with analysis and numerical solutions of the direct-interaction approximation. Implications for the understanding of self-consistent turbulence are discussed briefly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJS..217...15X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJS..217...15X"><span>Tomography of the Fermi-LAT γ-Ray Diffuse Extragalactic Signal via <span class="hlt">Cross</span> <span class="hlt">Correlations</span> with Galaxy Catalogs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xia, Jun-Qing; Cuoco, Alessandro; Branchini, Enzo; Viel, Matteo</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Building on our previous <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis (Xia et al. 2011) between the isotropic γ-ray background (IGRB) and different tracers of the large-scale structure of the universe, we update our results using 60 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We perform a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> analysis both in configuration and spherical harmonics space between the IGRB and objects that may trace the astrophysical sources of the IGRB: QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6, the SDSS DR8 Main Galaxy Sample, luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the SDSS catalog, infrared-selected galaxies in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). The benefit of correlating the Fermi-LAT signal with catalogs of objects at various redshifts is to provide tomographic information on the IGRB, which is crucial in separating the various contributions and clarifying its origin. The main result is that, unlike in our previous analysis, we now observe a significant (>3.5σ) <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal on angular scales smaller than 1° in the NVSS, 2MASS, and QSO cases and, at lower statistical significance (∼3.0σ), with SDSS galaxies. The signal is stronger in two energy bands, E > 0.5 GeV and E > 1 GeV, but it is also seen at E > 10 GeV. No <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal is detected between Fermi data and the LRGs. These results are robust against the choice of the statistical estimator, estimate of errors, map cleaning procedure, and instrumental effects. Finally, we test the hypothesis that the IGRB observed by Fermi-LAT originates from the summed contributions of three types of unresolved extragalactic sources: BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We find that a model in which the IGRB is mainly produced by SFGs (72-37+23% with 2σ errors), with BL Lacs and FSRQs giving a minor contribution, provides a good fit to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962842','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962842"><span>EM-21 <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Knowledge Center: Waste <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Challenges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.</p> <p>2009-04-10</p> <p>EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a <span class="hlt">Retrieval</span> Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for <span class="hlt">retrieval</span>. The primary participants involved in these workshops included <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1011477','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1011477"><span>The <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vallinotto, Alberto</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by <span class="hlt">cross-correlating</span> their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24233027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24233027"><span>Kalman/Map filtering-aided fast normalized <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>-based Wi-Fi fingerprinting location sensing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Yongliang; Xu, Yubin; Li, Cheng; Ma, Lin</p> <p>2013-11-13</p> <p>A Kalman/map filtering (KMF)-aided fast normalized <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span> (FNCC)-based Wi-Fi fingerprinting location sensing system is proposed in this paper. Compared with conventional neighbor selection algorithms that calculate localization results with received signal strength (RSS) mean samples, the proposed FNCC algorithm makes use of all the on-line RSS samples and reference point RSS variations to achieve higher fingerprinting accuracy. The FNCC computes efficiently while maintaining the same accuracy as the basic normalized <span class="hlt">cross</span> <span class="hlt">correlation</span>. Additionally, a KMF is also proposed to process fingerprinting localization results. It employs a new map matching algorithm to nonlinearize the linear location prediction process of Kalman filtering (KF) that takes advantage of spatial proximities of consecutive localization results. With a calibration model integrated into an indoor map, the map matching algorithm corrects unreasonable prediction locations of the KF according to the building interior structure. Thus, more accurate prediction locations are obtained. Using these locations, the KMF considerably improves fingerprinting algorithm performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the FNCC algorithm with reduced computational complexity outperforms other neighbor selection algorithms and the KMF effectively improves location sensing accuracy by using indoor map information and spatial proximities of consecutive localization results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22364786','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22364786"><span>PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATING</span> COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov</p> <p>2014-12-20</p> <p>The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be <span class="hlt">cross-correlated</span> with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.S41C1949D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.S41C1949D"><span>AN APPLICATION OF <span class="hlt">CROSS-CORRELATION</span> OF RANDOM FIELDS TO VOLCAN DE COLIMA, MÉXICO</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dominguez, T.; Rodríguez, M.; West, M. E.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We present preliminary results of an example of seismic noise processing to produce Rayleigh and Love waves group velocity maps for the region below Volcán de Colima, México. Data used is from a two years deployment of twenty three-component broadband seismometers located within 20 km around the volcán de Colima from the CODEX experiment, a collaborative project between University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Observatorio Vulcanológico, Universidad de Colima, México. Since the background seismic noise mainly consist of surface waves the emerging signal of the noise correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> allows us to retrive the Green’s <span class="hlt">function</span> between two stations. We correlated signals recorded on the components that correspond to the non zero terms of the theoretical elastic Green’s tensor : ZZ, ZR, RZ, RR and TT. We evaluated Rayleigh an Love waves dispersion curves from the emerging Green’s <span class="hlt">functions</span> for each of the inter-station paths and applied a tomographic inversion to obtain group velocity maps.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539490','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539490"><span>Arabidopsis thaliana GPAT8 and GPAT9 are localized to the ER and possess distinct ER <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> signals: <span class="hlt">functional</span> divergence of the dilysine ER <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> motif in plant cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gidda, Satinder K; Shockey, Jay M; Rothstein, Steven J; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; EC 2.3.1.15) catalyzes the committed step in the production of glycerolipids, which are major components of cellular membranes, seed storage oils, and epicuticular wax coatings. While the biochemical activities of GPATs have been characterized in detail, the cellular features of these enzymes are only beginning to emerge. Here we characterized the phylogenetic relationships and cellular properties of two GPAT enzymes from the relatively large Arabidopsis thaliana GPAT family, including GPAT8, which is involved in cutin biosynthesis, and GPAT9, which is a new putative GPAT that has extensive homology with a GPAT from mammalian cells involved in storage oil formation and, thus, may have a similar role in plants. Immunofluorescence microscopy of transiently-expressed myc-epitope-tagged GPAT8 and GPAT9 revealed that both proteins were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and differential permeabilization experiments indicated that their N- and C-termini were oriented towards the cytosol. However, these two proteins contained distinct types of ER <span class="hlt">retrieval</span> signals, with GPAT8 possessing a divergent type of dilysine motif (-KK-COOH rather than the prototypic -KKXX-COOH or -KXKXX-COOH motif) and GPAT9 possessing a hydrophobic pentapeptide motif (-phi-X-X-K/R/D/E-phi-; where phi are large hydrophobic amino acid residues). Notably, the divergent dilysine motif in GPAT8 only <span class="hlt">functioned</span> effectively when additional upstream residues were included to provide the proper protein context. Extensive mutational analyses of the divergent dilysine motif, based upon sequences present in the C-termini of other GPAT8s from various plant species, further expanded the <span class="hlt">functional</span> definition of this molecular targeting signal, thereby providing insight to the targeting signals in other GPAT family members as well as other ER-resident membrane proteins within plant cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JEI....24f1106L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JEI....24f1106L"><span>Tracking of electroencephalography signals across brain lobes using motion estimation and <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lim, Seng Hooi; Nisar, Humaira; Yap, Vooi Voon; Shim, Seong-O.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Electroencephalography (EEG) is the signal generated by electrical activity in the human brain. EEG topographic maps (topo-maps) give an idea of brain activation. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> connectivity helps to find <span class="hlt">functionally</span> integrated relationship between spatially separated brain regions. Brain connectivity can be measured by several methods. The classical methods calculate the coherence and correlation of the signal. We have developed an algorithm to map <span class="hlt">functional</span> neural connectivity in the brain by using a full search block matching motion estimation algorithm. We have used oddball paradigm to examine the flow of activation across brain lobes for a specific activity. In the first step, the EEG signal is converted into topo-maps. The flow of activation between consecutive frames is tracked using full search block motion estimation, which appears in the form of motion vectors. In the second step, vector median filtering is used to obtain a smooth motion field by removing the unwanted noise. For each topo-map, several activation paths are tracked across various brain lobes. We have also developed correlation activity maps by following the correlation coefficient paths between electrodes. These paths are selected when the correlation coefficient between electrodes is >70%. We have compared the motion estimation path with the correlation coefficient activation maps. The tracked paths obtained by using motion estimation and correlation give very similar results. The inter-subject comparison shows that four out of five subjects tracked path involves all four (occipital, temporal, parietal, frontal) brain lobes for the same stimuli. The intra-subject analysis shows that three out of five subjects show different tracked lobes for different stimuli.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011712','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130011712"><span>Investigation of a <span class="hlt">Cross-Correlation</span> Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting radial Growth on a Rotating Disk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA`s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is extremely interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements in the internal parts of a flow path, for in situ health monitoring of gas turbine engines. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. In the present study, a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> imaging technique is investigated in a proof-of-concept study as a possible optical technique to measure the radial growth and strain field on an already cracked sub-scale turbine engine disk under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center`s High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The optical strain measurement technique under investigation offers potential fault detection using an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern and imaging the pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-im in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be .shifted`. The resulting particle displacements between the two images will then be measured using the two-dimensional <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. In order to develop and validate this optical strain measurement technique an initial proof-of-concept experiment is carried out in a controlled environment. Using PIV optimization principles and guidelines, three potential speckle patterns, for future use on the rotating disk, are developed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140000460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140000460"><span>Progress of a <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASAs Fundamental Aeronautics Program is extremely interested in the development of fault detection technologies, such as optical surface measurements in the internal parts of a flow path, for in situ health monitoring of gas turbine engines. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. In the present study, a <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> imaging technique is investigated in a proof-of-concept study as a possible optical technique to measure the radial growth and strain field on an already cracked sub-scale turbine engine disk under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Centers High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The optical strain measurement technique under investigation offers potential fault detection using an applied background consisting of a high-contrast random speckle pattern and imaging the background under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.8-m in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will appear shifted. The resulting background displacements between the two images will then be measured using the two-dimensional <span class="hlt">cross-correlation</span> algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. In order to develop and validate this optical strain measurement technique an initial proof-of-concept experiment is carried out in a controlled environment. Using PIV optimization principles and guidelines, three potential backgrounds, for future use on the rotating disk, are developed and investigated in the controlled experiment. A range of known shifts are induced on the</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA630710','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA630710"><span>An Analytic Model of <span class="hlt">Cross-correlation</span> in a Bottom Bounce Environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-06-07</p> <p>source and receivers. Note the definition of the position of receiver 1, and of the bearing angle, s. L is the horizontal projection of the receiver...the true range to each receiver may be derived as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of bearing angle. It can be shown that ( 2) r 2 = [r2 + (LH/2)2 + LH·rcoss]l/2 (3...The results are indistinguishable by visual comparison. In the second case the source is again at 0° bearing , while receiver 2 is now at a depth of 60</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S21D0325H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S21D0325H"><span>Comprehensive Waveform <span class="hlt