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Sample records for retrograde irregular satellites

  1. Irregular Satellites of the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    2005-01-01

    This proposal is directed towards the observational exploration of the irregular satellite systems of the planets. Primarily we use large-format CCD cameras on the world's largest telescopes, on Mauna Kea, to discover new irregular satellites and then to monitor their positions in order to ascertain their orbital characteristics. Separate observations are taken to determine the physical properties of the irregular satellites. The big picture science objective is to determine how these satellites were captures, and to use the properties of the satellites and their orbits to place constraints on early solar system (including formation) processes. Work in the first year has focussed on a major investigation of the Saturn irregular satellite system. We secured observing time on the Subaru and Gemini 8-m diameter telescopes in December 2004, January, February and March 2005 for the conduct of a deep, wide-area survey. This has resulted in the detection and orbit determination for 12 new satellites to be announced in the next week or two. Additional satellites were lost, temporarily, due to unusually poor weather conditions on Mauna Kea. These objects will be recovered and their orbits published next year. A separate survey of the Uranus irregular satellites was published (Sheppard, Jewitt and Kleyna 2005). Away from the telescope, we have discovered the amazing result that the four giant planets possess similar numbers of irregular satellites. This flies in the face of the standard gas-drag model for satellite capture, since only two of the giant planets are gas giants and the others (Uranus and Neptune) formed by a different process and in the absence of much gas. The constancy of the satellite number (each giant holds approximately 100 irregular satellites measured down to the kilometer scale) is either a coincidence, with different capture mechanisms at different planets giving by chance the same total numbers of irregular satellites, or indicates that the satellites

  2. Cartography of irregularly shaped satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    Irregularly shaped satellites, such as Phobos and Amalthea, do not lend themselves to mapping by conventional methods because mathematical projections of their surfaces fail to convey an accurate visual impression of the landforms, and because large and irregular scale changes make their features difficult to measure on maps. A digital mapping technique has therefore been developed by which maps are compiled from digital topographic and spacecraft image files. The digital file is geometrically transformed as desired for human viewing, either on video screens or on hard copy. Digital files of this kind consist of digital images superimposed on another digital file representing the three-dimensional form of a body.

  3. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  4. Color Survey of the Irregular Planetary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graykowski, Ariel; Jewitt, David

    2016-10-01

    Irregular satellites are characterized by their larger orbital distance from their planet, their high eccentricity and their high inclination, all indicating that they were captured. However, the mechanism of capture and the location of origin of the satellites remain unknown. We are conducting a photometric survey of the irregular satellites of the giant planets using the LRIS instrument on the 10-meter telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The measured colors will be compared to other planetary bodies in search for similarities and differences that may reflect upon the origin of the satellites. For example, if irregular satellites were captured from the Kuiper Belt then some should contain the ultrared material that is common in the trans-Neptunian and Centaur populations. If the irregular satellites of Jupiter were captured from the same source population as the Jovian Trojans, then it is natural to expect that the surface properties of satellites and Trojans should be the same. We will present initial results of this work.

  5. Rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational histories of irregularly shaped satellites are studied and are found to differ from the standard picture of tidal evolution of satellite rotations. Prior to capture into the synchronous rotation resonance, a narrow attitude-unstable chaotic zone is entered and the satellite begins to tumble chaotically. It is noted that enhanced dissipation of energy during the chaotic-tumbling phase may effect the orbital evolution. The theory suggests that, eventually, the rotation stays close to one of the accessible attitude-stable islands long enough for the weak tidal torque to remove the satellite from the chaotic zone.

  6. Capture of Irregular Satellites during Planetary Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    More than 90 irregular moons of the Jovian planets have recently been discovered. These moons are an enigmatic part of the solar system inventory. Their origin, which is intimately linked with the origin of the planets themselves, has yet to be adequately explained. Here we investigate the possibility that the irregular moons were captured from the circumsolar planetesimal disk by three-body gravitational reactions. These reactions may have been a frequent occurrence during the time when the outer planets migrated within the planetesimal disk. We propose a new model for the origin of irregular satellites in which these objects are captured from the planetesimal disk during encounters between the outer planets themselves in the model for outer planet migration advocated by Tsiganis and collaborators. Through a series of numerical simulations we show that nearby planetesimals can be deflected into planet-bound orbits during close encounters between planets, and that the overall efficiency of this capture process is large enough to produce populations of observed irregular satellites at Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The orbits of captured objects are broadly similar to those of known distant satellites. Jupiter, which typically does not have close encounters with other planets in the model of Tsiganis and coworkers, must have acquired its irregular satellites by a different mechanism. Alternatively, the migration model should be modified to accommodate Jupiter's encounters. Moreover, we find that the original size-frequency distribution of the irregular moons must have significantly evolved by collisions to produce their present populations. Our new model may also provide a plausible explanation for the origin of Neptune's large moon Triton.

  7. How Iapetus is Painted by Saturn's Irregular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hedman, M. M.

    2010-10-01

    The leading hemisphere of Iapetus, Saturn's outermost regular satellite, is ten times darker than its trailing side. To explain this unique albedo distribution, Soter (1974) proposed that collisionally generated dust from the dark outer irregular satellite Phoebe has evolved inward due to radiation forces and coated Iapetus’ leading side. The recent discovery (Verbiscer et al. 2009) of the colossal Phoebe ring between the orbits of Iapetus and Phoebe indicates that Soter's mechanism is active at some level. . To calibrate the effectiveness of this source, we follow the histories of Phoebe-ring dust under the relevant perturbations and thereby evaluate the particles’ probability of striking Iapetus, as well as the expected spatial distribution on the Iapetan surface. We find that, of the long-lived particles (those larger than 4 µm), those larger than 10 µm are virtually certain to strike Iapetus. Their calculated distribution across the surface matches well the measured albedo pattern in longitude. To explain the observed bright polar caps, our computed polar-dust-deposition rates must be overwhelmed by sublimation products from equatorial regions as proposed in the thermal runaway model of Spencer & Denk (2010); we thus constrain the latter model. We also track the dust originating from all the other known irregular moons, finding that a substantial fraction of the material from retrograde moons would eventually coat Iapetus--perhaps explaining why the spectrum of Iapetus’ dark material differs somewhat from Phoebe's (Buratti et al. 2005). We find that dust from lower-eccentricity moons with inclinations nearer 180° is more likely to strike Iapetus. . Finally, of those dust particles that do not strike Iapetus, we find that most land on Titan, with a smaller fraction hitting Hyperion. As has been previously conjectured (Burns et al. 1996), such exogenous dust, coupled with Hyperion's chaotic rotation could explain Hyperion's roughly uniform, moderate

  8. A deeper look at the colors of the saturnian irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2007-11-01

    We have performed broadband color photometry of the twelve brightest irregular satellites of Saturn with the goal of understanding their surface composition, as well as their physical relationship. We find that the satellites have a wide variety of different surface colors, from the negative spectral slopes of the two retrograde satellites S IX Phoebe ( S=-2.5±0.4) and S XXV Mundilfari ( S=-5.0±1.9) to the fairly red slope of S XXII Ijiraq ( S=19.5±0.9). We further find that there exist a correlation between dynamical families and spectral slope, with the prograde clusters, the Gallic and Inuit, showing tight clustering in colors among most of their members. The retrograde objects are dynamically and physically more dispersed, but some internal structure is apparent.

  9. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Himalia An Irregular Jovian Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.

    2002-01-01

    Spectra of the irregular Jovian satellite Himalia were obtained with the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during the Jupiter Flyby on December 18-19, 2000. These are the first spectral data of an irregular satellite beyond 2.5 microns. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. A Survey for ``Normal'' Irregular Satellites around Neptune: Limits to Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Jewitt, David; Kleyna, Jan

    2006-07-01

    We surveyed 1.75 deg2 of sky near Neptune to an R-band 50% detection efficiency of 25.8 mag (corresponding to radii of about 17 km for an assumed albedo of 0.04). We discovered one new outer satellite, Psamathe (S/2003 N1), about 20 km in radius with a distant retrograde orbit and moderate eccentricity. Until 2003 Neptune was only known to have two satellites that exhibited orbital signatures indicative of capture. Both of these, Triton and Nereid, are unusual when compared to the irregular satellites of other giant planets. With recent discoveries of four additional satellites by Holman et al. it is now apparent that Neptune has a distant ``normal'' irregular satellite system in which the satellites have radii and orbital properties similar to those of the satellites of other giant planets. We find that the satellite size distribution at Neptune is not well determined given the few objects known to date, being especially sensitive to the inclusion of Triton and Nereid in the sample. Finally, we note that Psamathe and S/2002 N4 have similar semimajor axes, inclinations, and eccentricities. They may be fragments of a once-larger satellite. Based largely on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  11. The new view of the irregular planetary satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, J.-M.; Gladman, B.; Holman, M.; Grav, T.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Nicholson, P.

    2003-04-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System each have two groups of satellites. The regular satellites move along nearly circular orbits in the planet's orbital plane, revolving about it in the same sense as the planet spins. In contrast, the so-called irregular satellites are generally smaller in size and are characterized by large orbits with significant eccentricity, inclination or both. The differences in their characteristics suggest that the regular and irregular satellites formed by different mechanisms. The regular satellites have most certainly formed in an accretion disk extending out to tens of planetary radii, like miniature Solar Systems. Irregular satellites, on the contrary, are believed to be planetesimals captured during the final stages of the planet's formation. Before 1997, the irregular satellite inventories of the gas giants where pourly known (Jupiter: 8, Saturn: 1, Uranus: 2, Neptune: 2). Since then, our team have been conducting a series of systematic and complete searches around the giant planets, discovering 12 confirmed satellites around Saturn, 6 around Uranus and 3 around Neptune plus a handfull of candidates. Sheppard et al. have identifyed 11 new irregular satellites around Jupiter while searching a small fraction of its stable region. These discoveries yield insights into the capture process of the satellites. Our team's tracking efforts have shown that the orbits of the Saturnian and Uranian irregular satellites fall into 'groups' in orbital space, ruling out independent capture and indicating that most of the moons we see today are the `children' of larger bodies that were captured long ago and then collisionally fragmented during the lifetime of the solar system.

  12. Irregular Satellites in the Context of Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, D.; Sheppard, S.

    2004-11-01

    All four giant planets in the solar system possess irregular satellites, characterized by large, highly eccentric and/or highly inclined orbits. These bodies were likely captured from heliocentric orbit, probably in association with planet formation itself. Enabled primarily by the use of large-format digital imagers on Mauna Kea telescopes, new observational work has dramatically increased the known populations of irregular satellites, with 74 discoveries in the last few years. A new perspective on the irregular satellite systems is beginning to emerge. We find that the number of irregular satellites measured to a given diameter is approximately constant from planet to planet. This is surprising, given the radically different formation scenarios envisioned for the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn compared to the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. We discuss the new results on the irregular satellites and show how these objects might be used to discriminate amongst models of giant planet formation. This work is in press in the procedings of the International Space Science Institute, Bern, from their 12-16 January meeting on "Outer Planets Before the Exploration of Saturn by Cassini".

  13. THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES: THE MOST COLLISIONALLY EVOLVED POPULATIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bottke, William F.; Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-03-15

    The known irregular satellites of the giant planets are dormant comet-like objects that reside on stable prograde and retrograde orbits in a realm where planetary perturbations are only slightly larger than solar ones. Their size distributions and total numbers are surprisingly comparable to one another, with the observed populations at Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus having remarkably shallow power-law slopes for objects larger than 8-10 km in diameter. Recent modeling work indicates that they may have been dynamically captured during a violent reshuffling event of the giant planets {approx}3.9 billion years ago that led to the clearing of an enormous, 35 M {sub +} disk of comet-like objects (i.e., the Nice model). Multiple close encounters between the giant planets at this time allowed some scattered comets near the encounters to be captured via three-body reactions. This implies the irregular satellites should be closely related to other dormant comet-like populations that presumably were produced at the same time from the same disk of objects (e.g., Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt, scattered disk). A critical problem with this idea, however, is that the size distribution of the Trojan asteroids and other related populations do not look at all like the irregular satellites. Here we use numerical codes to investigate whether collisional evolution between the irregular satellites over the last {approx}3.9 Gyr is sufficient to explain this difference. Starting with Trojan asteroid-like size distributions and testing a range of physical properties, we found that our model irregular satellite populations literally self-destruct over hundreds of Myr and lose {approx}99% of their starting mass. The survivors evolve to a low-mass size distribution similar to those observed, where they stay in steady state for billions of years. This explains why the different giant planet populations look like one another and provides more evidence that the Nice model may be viable. Our work

  14. The Irregular Satellites: The Most Collisionally Evolved Populations in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    The known irregular satellites of the giant planets are dormant comet-like objects that reside on stable prograde and retrograde orbits in a realm where planetary perturbations are only slightly larger than solar ones. Their size distributions and total numbers are surprisingly comparable to one another, with the observed populations at Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus having remarkably shallow power-law slopes for objects larger than 8-10 km in diameter. Recent modeling work indicates that they may have been dynamically captured during a violent reshuffling event of the giant planets ~3.9 billion years ago that led to the clearing of an enormous, 35 M ⊕ disk of comet-like objects (i.e., the Nice model). Multiple close encounters between the giant planets at this time allowed some scattered comets near the encounters to be captured via three-body reactions. This implies the irregular satellites should be closely related to other dormant comet-like populations that presumably were produced at the same time from the same disk of objects (e.g., Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt, scattered disk). A critical problem with this idea, however, is that the size distribution of the Trojan asteroids and other related populations do not look at all like the irregular satellites. Here we use numerical codes to investigate whether collisional evolution between the irregular satellites over the last ~3.9 Gyr is sufficient to explain this difference. Starting with Trojan asteroid-like size distributions and testing a range of physical properties, we found that our model irregular satellite populations literally self-destruct over hundreds of Myr and lose ~99% of their starting mass. The survivors evolve to a low-mass size distribution similar to those observed, where they stay in steady state for billions of years. This explains why the different giant planet populations look like one another and provides more evidence that the Nice model may be viable. Our work also indicates that

  15. NEOWISE: OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF JUPITER AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R.; Sonnett, S.; Kramer, E.; Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.

    2015-08-10

    We present thermal model fits for 11 Jovian and 3 Saturnian irregular satellites based on measurements from the WISE/NEOWISE data set. Our fits confirm spacecraft-measured diameters for the objects with in situ observations (Himalia and Phoebe) and provide diameters and albedo for 12 previously unmeasured objects, 10 Jovian and 2 Saturnian irregular satellites. The best-fit thermal model beaming parameters are comparable to what is observed for other small bodies in the outer solar system, while the visible, W1, and W2 albedos trace the taxonomic classifications previously established in the literature. Reflectance properties for the irregular satellites measured are similar to the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations, implying common origins.

  16. Photometry of Irregular Satellites of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, Tommy; Holman, Matthew J.; Fraser, Wesley C.

    2004-09-01

    We present BVR photometric colors of six Uranian and two Neptunian irregular satellites, collected using the Magellan Observatory (Las Campanas, Chile) and the Keck Observatory (Manua Kea, Hawaii). The colors range from neutral to light red, and like the Jovian and the Saturnian irregular satellites (Grav et al.) there is an apparent lack of the extremely red objects found among the Centaurs and Kuiper Belt objects. The Uranian irregular satellites can be divided into three possible dynamical families, but the colors collected show that two of these dynamical families, the Caliban and Sycorax clusters, have heterogeneous colors. Of the third possible family, the 168° cluster containing two objects with similar average inclinations but quite different average semimajor axes, only one object (U XXI Trinculo) was observed. The heterogeneous colors and the large dispersion of the average orbital elements lead us to doubt that they are collisional families. We favor single captures as a more likely scenario. The two Neptunian satellites observed (N II Nereid and S/2002 N1) both have very similar neutral, Sun-like colors. Together with the high collisional probability between these two objects over the age of the solar system (Nesvorný et al.; Holman et al.), this suggests that S/2002 N1 is a fragment of Nereid, broken loose during a collision or cratering event with an undetermined impactor.

  17. The Orbits of Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozović, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2017-04-01

    We report on the improved ephemerides for the irregular Jovian satellites. We used a combination of numerically integrated equations of motion and a weighted least-squares algorithm to fit the astrometric measurements. The orbital fits for 59 satellites are summarized in terms of state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. The current data set appears to be sensitive to the mass of Himalia, which is constrained to the range of GM = 0.13–0.28 km3 s‑2. Here, GM is the product of the Newtonian constant of gravitation, G and the body's mass, M. Our analysis of the orbital uncertainties indicates that 11 out of 59 satellites are lost owing to short data arcs. The lost satellites hold provisional International Astronomical Union (IAU) designations and will likely need to be rediscovered.

  18. GBT Reveals Satellite of Milky Way in Retrograde Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    New observations with National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) suggest that what was once believed to be an intergalactic cloud of unknown distance and significance, is actually a previously unrecognized satellite galaxy of the Milky Way orbiting backward around the Galactic center. Path of Complex H Artist's rendition of the path of satellite galaxy Complex H (in red) in relation to the orbit of the Sun (in yellow) about the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The outer layers of Complex H are being stripped away by its interaction with the Milky Way. The hydrogen atmosphere (in blue) is shown surrounding the visible portion (in white) of the Galaxy. CREDIT: Lockman, Smiley, Saxton; NRAO/AUI Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia, discovered that this object, known as "Complex H," is crashing through the outermost parts of the Milky Way from an inclined, retrograde orbit. Lockman's findings will be published in the July 1 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, Letters. "Many astronomers assumed that Complex H was probably a distant neighbor of the Milky Way with some unusual velocity that defied explanation," said Lockman. "Since its motion appeared completely unrelated to Galactic rotation, astronomers simply lumped it in with other high velocity clouds that had strange and unpredictable trajectories." High velocity clouds are essentially what their name implies, fast-moving clouds of predominately neutral atomic hydrogen. They are often found at great distances from the disk of the Milky Way, and may be left over material from the formation of our Galaxy and other galaxies in our Local Group. Over time, these objects can become incorporated into larger galaxies, just as small asteroids left over from the formation of the solar system sometimes collide with the Earth. Earlier studies of Complex H were hindered because the cloud currently is passing almost exactly behind the outer disk of

  19. Gas-Assisted Capture of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuk, M.; Burns, J. A.

    2001-11-01

    Recent discoveries of ``irregular'' satellites about the giant planets have dramatically increased their number such that systematic studies of their origin can begin. Since irregulars move along large, inclined and eccentric orbits, capture from circumsolar orbit is usually suspected (Franklin and Colombo 1971, Heppenheimer and Porco 1977). Because permanent capture is not possible in a strictly gravitational three-body problem, a dissipative mechanism is needed. Many assume that gas drag by protojovian nebula led to their capture (cf. Pollack et al. 1979). We numerically simulate the gas-aided capture of a planetesimal by Jupiter. The distribution and velocity of gas come from hydrocode simulations (Lubow et al. 1999). In our simple replication of their model, gas is assumed to follow gravitational trajectories, except at the shockwave fronts (taken from Lubow et al.) which the gas is forbidden to cross. The planetesimal's motion is integrated using a mixture of modern and traditional techniques. We employ a symplectic integration algorithm (Malhotra 1994) within the circumsolar and circumjovian disks. In the transitional region we used a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator expressed in rotating coordinates. The method's timesteps are independent of the presence of the gas. Subsequent orbital evolution is handled in a symplectic way, thus avoiding ``fake captures'' due to energy leakage owing to integration errors. By incorporating more sophisticated models of protoJupiter's environs, we hope to refine the nebular models and/or to elucidate the capture process. Preliminary results indicate that the parent body of the prograde cluster of Jovian irregulars (Himalia's group) may have originated from the Hilda region, at around 4 AU from the Sun. This is consistent with the taxonomical types of the cluster members (Sykes et al. 2000) being similar to those of Hildas that are close in size to Himalia (Dahlgren and Lagerkvist 1995).

  20. Regional climate network analysis from irregularly sampled satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Sykioti, Olga; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, George; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing availability of remote sensing data Earth System Analysis has taken a great step forward. This type of data, however, also harbors a variety of conceptual complications. First, depending on whether the satellite is orbiting on an ascending or descending path systematic biases are induced into the data, and both measurements cannot be evaluated simultaneously without an appropriate preprocessing. Second, remote sensing data are usually not produced with equidistant temporal sampling, but might contain huge gaps and irregular time steps. Third, the time period covered by the data is often too short to perform an appropriate seasonal detrending. Here, we propose a general framework to create homogeneous anomalized time series for a (multivariate) satellite data set by combining time series from ascending and descending satellite paths or even different missions using principal component and singular spectrum analysis. We then exemplarily apply our method to sea surface temperature data obtained from the SMOS satellite mission to study small-scale regional correlative patterns covering different parts of the Aegean Sea. To address the issue of irregular temporal sampling we utilize a kernel weighted version of the linear cross-correlation function to compute lagged correlations between all pairs of grid points in the data set. By binarizing the thus obtained matrices, we obtain a network representation of the system's similarity structure. Ultimately, we use tools from complex network theory to study regional interdependencies in the study area for different time lags of up to forty days. We find that the obtained networks represent well the observed average wind directions and speeds and display interaction structures between small regions in the Aegean Sea, which are in good agreement with earlier observations. In a second step, we extend the study area to the whole Mediterranean and Black Sea and investigate lagged interactions between these two

  1. Stripping of satellites on prograde and retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Grzegorz; Łokas, Ewa L.

    2017-03-01

    We derived a revised expression for the tidal radius, which is a theoretical boundary of a satellite orbiting a host. Our expression properly takes into account possible rotation of the satellite. We verified our predictions against simulations and obtained satisfactory agreement.

  2. K2 and Herschel/PACS photometry of irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Andras; Kiss, Csaba; Molnar, Laszlo; Mueller, Thomas G.; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Szabo, Robert; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.

    2016-10-01

    The combination of optical and far-infrared photometric measurements yields an unambiguous method for characterizing the basic physical and surface properties of minor bodies in the Solar System. In principle, an object with a certain visible brightness can either be an object with a small but bright or a large but dim surface. To resolve this issue, conducting thermal emission measurements can also be acquired since both larger and dimmer objects have higher infrared radiations. In addition, the precise modelling of thermal emission should certainly take into account the rotation period of these bodies - otherwise the presence of surface thermal inertia can result in inaccurate conclusions regarding to the physical size and albedo.Since early 2014, Kepler Space Telescope surveys fields close to the Ecliptic in a framework of quarterly campaigns of the K2 initiative. This program makes possible to continuously observe Solar System bodies during this period of 80-90 days and hence provide an uninterrupted photometric series of moving Solar System objects down to the magnitude range of R = 23.5. This instrument hence an ideal observatory now for Solar System studies. Due to the fact that the expected rotational periods of these objects are commensurable to the diurnal characteristics of ground-based observations, such uninterrupted light curves are rather valuable for the accurate determination of rotational characteristics - including the physical rotation period, the amplitude and the confirmation of the presence of double- or multiple peaked features.In this presentation we summarize our results of current K2 and legacy Herschel/PACS observations regarding to some of the irregular satellites of Uranus and Neptune, namely Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos and Nereid. By comparing these results with similar kind of observations for trans-Neptunian objects (see Kiss et al., this DPS meeting), one can conclude how the formation and evolution of the outer Solar

  3. An Ultradeep Survey for Irregular Satellites of Uranus: Limits to Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Jewitt, David; Kleyna, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We present a deep optical survey of Uranus's Hill sphere for small satellites. The 8 m Subaru Telescope was used to survey about 3.5 square degrees with a 50% detection efficiency at limiting red magnitude mR=26.1. This magnitude corresponds to objects that are about 7 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.04). We detected (without prior knowledge of their positions) all previously known outer satellites and discovered two new irregular satellites (S/2001 U2 and S/2003 U3). The two inner satellites Titania and Oberon were also detected. One of the newly discovered bodies (S/2003 U3) is the first known irregular prograde satellite of the planet. The population, size distribution, and orbital parameters of Uranus's irregular satellites are remarkably similar to those of the irregular satellites of gas giant Jupiter. Both have shallow size distributions (power-law indices q~2 for radii larger than 7 km) with no correlation between the sizes of the satellites and their orbital parameters. However, unlike those of Jupiter, Uranus's irregular satellites do not appear to occupy tight, distinct dynamical groups in semimajor-axis versus inclination phase space. Two groupings in semimajor-axis versus eccentricity phase space appear to be statistically significant. Based largely on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership.

  4. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  5. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  6. Movement of Low-albedo Dust from Small Irregular Satellites to the Main Satellites of the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Hicks, M. D.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2009-09-01

    The origin and nature of the low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus represents one of the most intriguing problems in planetary science. Observations of the satellite have shown that the two hemispheres of the satellite are wholly different. The trailing hemisphere has an albedo, composition, and morphology typical of the other icy Saturnian satellites, while the surface of the leading side is composed of an extraordinarily low-albedo, reddish material that includes organic material and carbon. The study of pathological objects such as Iapetus offers clues to general alteration processes that might act throughout the outer Solar System. Bell et al. (1985, Icarus 61, 192) proposed just that by suggesting that Callisto was the Iapetus of the Jovian system in a less extreme manifestation. Unlike the other Galilean satellites, Callisto is darker on its leading side (except right at opposition), suggesting it may have swept up low-albedo dust in a process similar to that occurring on Iapetus. New medium resolution visible spectroscopy obtained from the Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain shows hemispheric diversity on the Uranian satellites. The outermost satellites (Titania and Oberon) tend to be darker and redder on the leading side. Our hypothesis is that all of the outermost major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus accrete reddish, low-albedo dust from the small, captured, outer retrograde satellites of these planets. The dust is kicked off by meteoritic impacts or by mutual collisions and spirals in by Poynting-Robertson drag to impact the leading sides of the outer larger satellites, including Iapetus, Callisto, Titania, and Oberon.

  7. THE 3 μm SPECTRUM OF JUPITER's IRREGULAR SATELLITE HIMALIA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Rhoden, A. R. E-mail: Alyssa.Rhoden@jhuapl.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present a medium resolution spectrum of Jupiter's irregular satellite Himalia covering the critical 3 μm spectral region. The spectrum shows no evidence for aqueously altered phyllosilicates, as had been suggested from the tentative detection of a 0.7 μm absorption, but instead shows a spectrum strikingly similar to the C/CF type asteroid 52 Europa. 52 Europa is the prototype of a class of asteroids generally situated in the outer asteroid belt between less distant asteroids which show evidence for aqueous alteration and more distant asteroids which show evidence for water ice. The spectral match between Himalia and this group of asteroids is surprising and difficult to reconcile with models of the origin of the irregular satellites.

  8. Ionospheric electron density irregularities observed by satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, low-low Doppler tracking link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A low-low, satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, Doppler tracking experiment was performed. The data are analyzed here for irregularities in electron density at the altitude of 212 km. The differential Doppler data with the relative motion term removed are integrated to obtain a representation of the electron density variation along the satellite path. Well-known large-scale features such as the equatorial geomagnetic anomaly and day/night ionization level differences are clearly observed in the integrated data. The larger crest of the morning geomagnetic anomaly is seen to occur in the southern (winter) hemisphere in agreement with previous observations. In addition, a sharp peak in the electron density at the day-to-night transition point is observed in two consecutive revolutions. This effect may be due to the previously postulated atmospheric shock wave generated by supersonic motion of the terminator.

  9. Dynamics and Fate of Dust from the Irregular Satellites at Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2011-04-01

    Spitzer has discovered a vast outer dust ring at Saturn (Verbiscer et al. 2009) apparently sourced from Saturn's largest irregular satellite Phoebe and likely coating Iapetus (Tamayo et al., 2011). This raises the question of whether similar rings might be detectable at Uranus and Neptune. We study the dynamics of dust arising off the irregular satellites in these systems, drawing comparisons to particle histories in the Saturn system. Particles are subject to radiation forces that cause the smallest particles to be lost onto heliocentric paths or strike the host planet. Most of the larger particles decay toward their central planet, and eventually strike the various inner regular-satellite surfaces. We undertake a numerical investigation to determine the final distribution of dust in these systems. We find that in the Uranian system, for a wide variety of plausible initial conditions, the majority of the dust strikes the outermost regular moon Oberon, with a small fraction reaching Titania. At Neptune, we find that Triton sweeps up nearly all the long-lived dust particles generated outside its orbit. Finally, we estimate the longitudinal reach of dust onto the satellites’ trailing sides as a result of particle-orbit eccentricities.

  10. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  11. IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF THE OUTER PLANETS: ORBITAL UNCERTAINTIES AND ASTROMETRIC RECOVERIES IN 2009-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Gladman, B.; Alexandersen, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Veillet, C.

    2012-11-01

    More than 100 small satellites have been identified orbiting the giant planets in distant, inclined, eccentric orbits. Detailed study of these objects requires that their orbits be known well enough to permit routine observations both from the Earth and from spacecraft. Unfortunately, many of the satellites have very poorly known orbits due to a scarcity of astrometric measurements. We have developed a reliable method to estimate the future on-sky position uncertainties of the satellites and have verified that those uncertainties provide a correct measure of the true on-sky positional uncertainty. Based on the uncertainties, we identified a set of satellites that are effectively 'lost' and another set that would be lost if additional observations were not obtained in the near future. We attempted recoveries of 26 of the latter group using the Hale 5 m and CFHT 3.6 m telescopes and found 23. This validated our method's predictions and led to significant improvements in our knowledge of the orbits of the recovered moons. There remains a handful of irregular moons which are recoverable and whose orbits will benefit from additional observations during the next decade, while 16 moons of Jupiter and Saturn are essentially lost and will require a re-survey to be located again.

  12. Frank Ross's Early Orbits of the First Irregular Satellites of Saturn and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2006-12-01

    Frank E. Ross, later the inventor of the wide-angle lens, photographic photometer, and correcting lens for large reflecting telescopes, developed for the 200-inch, that bear his name, was also an expert on celestial mechanics. After earning his PhD at Berkeley in 1901, he worked in Washington as chief assistant to Simon Newcomb, the leading astronomer of his time, until the latter's death in 1909. W. H. Pickering, who had discovered Phoebe, the first distant, irregular satellite of Saturn, was unable to calculate an orbit for it. He asked Newcomb to do it, but the "grim dean of American astronomy" was too busy, and turned the task over to Ross to do, mostly on his own time. The young assistant succeeded, but spent many sleepless nights on the job. He and his brother Walter were also running a cigar store in Washington at the time. Charles D. Perrine at Lick Observatory discovered J VI and J VII, the first two similar satellites of Jupiter, in 1904 and 1905, and could not obtain satisfactory orbits for them either, even with Director W. W. Campbell's help. Ross then calculated their orbits also, again at a tremendous cost of effort. He used log tables, pencil and paper, and a simple adding machine for his computing tasks, as all "computers" (persons) did at that time. These three satellites were the first to be discovered by photography.

  13. The Himalia Satellite Group: A Case Study on the Dynamical Self-spreading of Families of Irregular Satellites and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2015-11-01

    Many of the outer planets' irregular satellites are grouped into families, thought to originate from collisional fragmentation (Nesvorný et al 2004, AJ). Interestingly, families associated with the largest irregulars are either more dispersed than expected (e.g. J6 Himalia; Nesvorný et al 2003, AJ), or do not exist at all (e.g. S9 Phoebe; Ćuk et al 2003, DDA meeting #34). Christou (2005, Icarus) found that gravitational scattering by Himalia of its own group could explain the large velocity dispersion found by Nesvorný et al (2003, AJ). At the same time, Christou identified a new type of dynamical mechanism that intermittently locks the node of the satellite J10 Lysithea to that of Himalia. The same mechanism, but due to Ceres, was recently found to operate within the Hoffmeister family, dispersing its members and allowing an estimate of its age (Novaković et al 2015, ApJ).Here we revisit the issue of family self-dispersion, aiming to better understand it by studying its effects on the Himalia group. For this we utilise (a) intensive test particle simulations on a larger scale than those by Christou (2005, Icarus) (b) a semi-analytical treatment of the new resonance based on the secular theory of coorbital motion by Namouni (1999, Icarus). This has allowed us to obtain firmer constraints on the rate of dispersion over time and on how the resonance affects the long-term evolution of the orbital elements. A principal result of this work is that particles near the resonance evolve differently than those away from it. During the meeting, we will present a new estimate of the family’s age as well as an analysis of the resonant structure and how it affects Himalia family members. We will also discuss the broader implications for the long-term evolution of orbital concentrations of small bodies in the solar system.Astronomical research at the Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  14. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Kavelaars, J J; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J; Fraser, Wesley C; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D; Burns, Joseph A; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G; Jacobson, Robert A

    2004-08-19

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. 'Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The 'irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude m(R) = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50 km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  15. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J.; Fraser, Wesley C.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G.; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2004-08-01

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. `Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The `irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude mR = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  16. Ionospheric Irregularities Predictions and Plumes Characterization for Satellite Data Validation and Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-17

    VHF radar • Irregularity prediction model (Emanoel Costa) • Irregularity prediction • 6 different GNSS receivers campaign • References São Luís...GEC-PLESSEY Card – Cornell, Stanford - U Box ) Keith Groves, Cesar Valladares, Todd Walter, Geoff Crowley, Paul Kintner† 6 different GNSS ...receivers campaign Campaing of 6 different GNSS receivers(Stanford) Different GNSS receivers behavior under scintillation condictions during March 24 2013

  17. New orbits of irregular satellites designed for the predictions of stellar occultations up to 2020, based on thousands of new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Beauvalet, L.; Desmars, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Morgado, B. E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2016-10-01

    Gomes-Júnior et al. published 3613 positions for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and 1787 positions for the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe. These observations were made between 1995 and 2014 and have an estimated error of about 60-80 mas. Based on this set of positions, we derived new orbits for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter: Himalia, Elara, Pasiphae, Carme, Lysithea, Sinope, Ananke and Leda. For Phoebe we updated the ephemeris from Desmars et al. using 75 per cent more positions than the previous one. Because of their orbital characteristics, it is common belief that the irregular satellites were captured by the giant planets in the early Solar system, but there is no consensus for a single model explaining where they were formed. Size, shape, albedo and composition would help to trace back their true origin, but these physical parameters are yet poorly known for irregular satellites. The observation of stellar occultations would allow for the determination of such parameters. Indeed Jupiter will cross the galactic plane in 2019-2020 and Saturn in 2018, improving a lot the chances of observing such events in the near future. Using the derived ephemerides and the UCAC4 catalogue we managed to identify 5442 candidate stellar occultations between 2016 January and 2020 December for the nine satellites studied here. We discussed how the successful observation of a stellar occultation by these objects is possible and present some potential occultations.

  18. HILAT a multi-experiment satellite addressing the dynamics of irregularity formation in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    A combined beacon, in-situ, and optical satellite mission is being prepared for definitive investigation of the formation, development, and decay of plasma-density irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere. The satellite, named HILAT (P83-1), will carry a VHF-UHF-L-Band coherent beacon for scintillation and TEC measurements, three payloads for in-situ and ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling observations, and a vacuum-ultraviolet imager for meso-scale recording of dayside and nightside auroras and emissions from the F layer. Observations are planned at northern latitudes ranging from the plasmapause to the pole, employing beacon receiving stations which also will decode telemetry from the other payloads. Launch is planned for the boreal summer of 1983.

  19. Investigating GAIM-GM’s Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    interplanetary magnetic field , and the solar wind. These open magnetic field lines allow energetic particles to enter the ionosphere, and can cause large...GAIM for these simulations. Column # Property Descriptor 1 Year 2 Day (Julian Day) 3 Hour 4 Minute 5 Second 6 Satellite Number 7 Satellite Number 8 ... 8 3 . Example of IFM TEC Output

  20. Investigating GAIM-GM's Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, B.

    2015-12-01

    GAIM-GM is a modularized physics based data assimilation model, that ingests data from multiple data sources. One data source is slant total electron content (TEC) from a ground station network to satellites, and along the occultation path between multiple satellites. This study examines GAIM-GM's capability to sense a scintillation feature in the ionosphere, overlaid on an IFM electron density grid, from simulated satellite constellations ingesting the slant TEC values into GAIM-GM. Satellite constellations were developed in an extension of Matlab, called STK. A real ground station network generated from IGS was ingested into STK to calculate access times to the satellite constellation and use the access data to compute the slant TEC values on the perturbed IFM grid. It was discovered that a Walker constellation would give the most frequent revisit time to the scintillation feature, which co-rotates with the Earth, capturing both the day and nightside ionosphere throughout the evaluation period (96 hrs). The size of the feature was varied along with the number of satellites in the Walker constellation. 25 different scenarios with these parameters varied were created to determine the sensitivity of GAIM-GM to sense the feature. A simple heuristic algorithm was applied comparing the truth data, in this case the perturbed IFM grid, to the GAIM-GM output in each scenario across the entire grid, and for those grid points within the feature.

  1. The STP/S3-4 Satellite Experiment: Equatorial F-region Irregularities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-14

    mean i-n mass fluctuations at 5-20 meter resolution. The S3-4 experiment has been discussed by Szuszczewicz et al. (1981). In this paper , we discuss...observations of irregularities in an isolated and decaying plasma bubble", Paper presented at International Symposium on Equatorial Aeronomy, Aguidilla, P.R...backscatter plumes", DNA report, SRI International, (Nov. 1979). 12 Tsunoda, R.T.: M.J. Baron, J. Owen and D.M. Towle , "Altair: An incoherent

  2. Periods, Poles, and Shapes of Irregular Satellites of Saturn from Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    The lightcurve-observation campaign of irregular (outer) moons of Saturn with the Cassini Imaging experiment is ongoing successfully. 21 rotation periods are now known, ranging from 5.5 h to ~3 d. The position of the Cassini spacecraft inside the orbits of the irregular moons allows observations from unusual geometries, especially at various phase angles and rapidly changing aspect angles. Many lightcurves are non-symmetric, and the large diversity of lightcurves for different objects indicates very different shapes. Lightcurves with three prominent maxima and minima are quite common, especially at phase angles higher than ~50°. For several moons, recent observations from different viewing geometries provide the potential to reveal pole directions and convex-hull "photometric shapes". As seen from the poles, Ymir is now known to have a triangular shape with two about equally long sides and one shorter side. Its pole is approximately oriented antipodally to the major planets. Siarnaq data indicate that this moon has also a triangular cross-section, but with a very different pole direction and extreme seasons. Kiviuq’s lightcurves show a very large amplitude even at low phase angles, suggesting a very elongated configuration with a ratio of the equatorial axes of about 3:1.

  3. Temporary Capture of Asteroids by a Planet: Dependence of Prograde/Retrograde Capture on Asteroids’ Semimajor Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Ida, S.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the prograde/retrograde temporary capture of asteroids by a planet on their original heliocentric semimajor axes through analytical arguments and numerical orbital integrations in order to discuss the origins of irregular satellites of giant planets. We found that capture is mostly retrograde for the asteroids near the planetary orbit and is prograde for those from farther orbits. An analytical investigation reveals the intrinsic dynamics of these dependences and gives boundary semimajor axes for the change in prograde/retrograde capture. The numerical calculations support the idea of deriving analytical formulae and confirm their dependence. Our numerical results show that the capture probability is much higher for bodies from the inner region than for outer ones. These results imply that retrograde irregular satellites of Jupiter are most likely captured bodies from the nearby orbits of Jupiter that may have the same origin as Trojan asteroids, while prograde irregular satellites originate from far inner regions such as the main-belt asteroid region.

  4. On collisional capture rates of irregular satellites around the gas-giant planets and the minimum mass of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. Elliott; Hansen, Bradley M. S.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the probability that an inelastic collision of planetesimals within the Hill sphere of the Jovian planets could explain the presence and orbits of observed irregular satellites. Capture of satellites via this mechanism is highly dependent on not only the mass of the protoplanetary disc, but also the shape of the planetesimal size distribution. We performed 2000 simulations for integrated time intervals ˜2 Myr and found that, given the currently accepted value for the minimum mass solar nebula and planetesimal number density based upon the Nesvorný et al. and Charnoz & Morbidelli size distribution dN˜D-3.5dD, the collision rates for the different Jovian planets range between ˜0.6 and ≳170 Myr-1 for objects with radii 1 km ≤r≤ 10 km. Additionally, we found that the probability that these collisions remove enough orbital energy to yield a bound orbit was ≲10-5 and had very little dependence on the relative size of the planetesimals. Of these collisions, the collision energy between two objects was ≳103 times the gravitational binding energy for objects with radii ˜100 km. We find that capturing irregular satellites via collisions between unbound objects can only account for ˜0.1 per cent of the observed population, hence this cannot be the sole method of producing irregular satellites.

  5. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Alternative Names Ejaculation retrograde; Dry climax Images Male reproductive system References Bhasin S, Basson R. Sexual dysfunction in men and women. In: Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, eds. Williams ... management of male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . ...

  6. Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere (SIGMA) II: Inverse modeling with high-latitude observations to deduce irregularity physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K. B.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.; Scales, W. A.; Frissell, N. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Spogli, L.; Mitchell, C.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2016-09-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is caused by irregularities in the ionospheric electron density. The characterization of ionospheric irregularities is important to further our understanding of the underlying physics. Our goal is to characterize the intermediate (0.1-10 km) to medium (10-100 km) scale high-latitude irregularities which are likely to produce these scintillations. In this paper, we characterize irregularities observed by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) during a geomagnetically active period on 9 March 2012. For this purpose, along with the measurements, we are using the recently developed model: "Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere" (SIGMA). The model is particularly applicable at high latitudes as it accounts for the complicated geometry of the magnetic field lines in these regions and is presented in an earlier paper. We use an inverse modeling technique to derive irregularity parameters by comparing the high rate (50 Hz) GNSS observations to the modeled outputs. In this investigation, we consider experimental observations from both the northern and southern high latitudes. The results include predominance of phase scintillations compared to amplitude scintillations that imply the presence of larger-scale irregularities of sizes above the Fresnel scale at GPS frequencies, and the spectral index ranges from 2.4 to 4.2 and the RMS number density ranges from 3e11 to 2.3e12 el/m3. The best fits we obtained from our inverse method that considers only weak scattering mostly agree with the observations. Finally, we suggest some improvements in order to facilitate the possibility of accomplishing a unique solution to such inverse problems.

  7. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  8. Jupiter: its captured satellites.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M

    1971-08-27

    Because of the small size and irregular orbits of the seven outer satellites of Jupiter, it is often assumed that they were derived by capture. The conditions whereby Jupiter can capture satellites have therefore been examined. Relationships derived on the basis of the three-body problem for planets in elliptical orbits enable the dimensions of the capture orbits around Jupiter to be calculated. It is found that Jupiter may capture satellites through the inner Lagrangian point when at perihelion or at aphelion. Captures at perihelion should give rise to satellites in direct orbits of 11.48 x 10(6) kilometers and capture at aphelion to retrograde orbits of 21.7 x 10(6) kilometers. The correspondence with the seven outer satellites suggests that Jupiter VI, VIl, and X in direct orbits at 11.47, 11.74, and 11.85 x 10(6) kilometers were captured at Jupiter perihelion, whereas Jupiter VIII, IX, XI, and XII in retrograde orbits of 23.5, 23.7, 22.5, and 21.2 x 10(6) kilometers were captured when Jupiter was at aphelion. Examination of the precapture orbits indicates that the seven outer satellites were derived from the asteroid belt.

  9. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... may develop problems as a result of a hormone imbalance. For example, disorders of the thyroid gland can cause menstrual irregularities if the levels of thyroid hormone in the blood become too low or too ...

  10. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  11. Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception.

    PubMed

    David, S; Barkin, J S

    1992-01-01

    This is an initial report of spontaneous retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception in an adult. The patient is a 72-yr-old women with a history of ovarian cancer and hiatal hernia, who presented with symptoms of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. Retrograde intussusception was diagnosed endoscopically and confirmed radiographically with an upper gastrointestinal series. Heightened awareness of this entity may lead to its more frequent diagnosis.

  12. Functional (dissociative) retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Staniloiu, A

    2017-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia is described as condition which can occur after direct brain damage, but which occurs more frequently as a result of a psychiatric illness. In order to understand the amnesic condition, content-based divisions of memory are defined. The measurement of retrograde memory is discussed and the dichotomy between "organic" and "psychogenic" retrograde amnesia is questioned. Briefly, brain damage-related etiologies of retrograde amnesia are mentioned. The major portion of the review is devoted to dissociative amnesia (also named psychogenic or functional amnesia) and to the discussion of an overlap between psychogenic and "brain organic" forms of amnesia. The "inability of access hypothesis" is proposed to account for most of both the organic and psychogenic (dissociative) patients with primarily retrograde amnesia. Questions such as why recovery from retrograde amnesia can occur in retrograde (dissociative) amnesia, and why long-term new learning of episodic-autobiographic episodes is possible, are addressed. It is concluded that research on retrograde amnesia research is still in its infancy, as the neural correlates of memory storage are still unknown. It is argued that the recollection of episodic-autobiographic episodes most likely involves frontotemporal regions of the right hemisphere, a region which appears to be hypometabolic in patients with dissociative amnesia.

  13. Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated Electric and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Sub-Auroral, Middle, and Low Latitudes in the Topside Ionosphere Observed with the DEMETER and DMSP Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Liebrecht, C; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Detailed observations of the plasma structure and irregularities that characterize the topside ionosphere at sub-auroral, middle, and low-latitudes are gathered with probes on the DEMETER and DMSP satellites. In particular, we present DEMETER observations near 700 km altitude that reveal: (1) the electric field irregularities and density depletions at mid-latitudes are remarkably similar to those associated with equatorial spread-F at low latitudes; (2) the mid-latitude density structures contain both depletions and enhancements with scale lengths along the spacecraft trajectory that typically vary from 10's to 100's of km; (3) in some cases, ELF magnetic field irregularities are observed in association with the electric field irregularities on the walls of the plasma density structures and appear to be related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves; (4) during severe geomagnetic storms, broad regions of nightside plasma density structures are typically present, in some instances extending from the equator to the subauroral regions; and (5) intense, broadband electric and magnetic field irregularities are observed at sub-auroral latitudes during geomagnetic storm periods that are typically associated with the trough region. Data from successive DEMETER orbits during storm periods in both the daytime and nighttime illustrate how enhancements of both the ambient plasma density, as well as sub-auroral and mid-latitude density structures, correlate and evolve with changes in the Dst. The DEMETER data are compared with near simultaneous observations gathered by the DMSP satellites near 840 km. The observations are related to theories of sub-auroral and mid-latitude plasma density structuring during geomagnetic storms and penetration electric fields and are highly germane to understanding space weather effects regarding disruption of communication and navigation signals in the near-space environment.

  14. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  15. Irregular Applications: Architectures & Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, John T.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone

    2012-02-06

    Irregular applications are characterized by irregular data structures, control and communication patterns. Novel irregular high performance applications which deal with large data sets and require have recently appeared. Unfortunately, current high performance systems and software infrastructures executes irregular algorithms poorly. Only coordinated efforts by end user, area specialists and computer scientists that consider both the architecture and the software stack may be able to provide solutions to the challenges of modern irregular applications.

  16. Asteroid 2014 OL339: yet another Earth quasi-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-12-01

    Our planet has one permanently bound satellite - the Moon - a likely large number of mini-moons or transient irregular natural satellites, and three temporary natural retrograde satellites or quasi-satellites. These quasi-moons - (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35 and 2013 LX28 - are unbound companions to the Earth. The orbital evolution of quasi-satellites may transform them into temporarily bound satellites of our planet. Here, we study the dynamical evolution of the recently discovered Aten asteroid 2014 OL339 to show that it is currently following a quasi-satellite orbit with respect to the Earth. This episode started at least about 775 yr ago and it will end 165 yr from now. The orbit of this object is quite chaotic and together with 164207 are the most unstable of the known Earth quasi-satellites. This group of minor bodies is, dynamically speaking, very heterogeneous but three of them exhibit Kozai-like dynamics: the argument of perihelion of 164207 oscillates around -90°, the one of 277810 librates around 180° and that of 2013 LX28 remains around 0°. Asteroid 2014 OL339 is not currently engaged in any Kozai-like dynamics.

  17. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  18. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  19. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  20. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  1. Equatorial irregularity belt and its movement during a magnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vats, H. O.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Murthy, B. S.; Janve, A. V.; Rai, R. K.; Singh, M.; Gurm, H. S.; Jain, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence for an equatorial irregularity belt and its movement during a magnetic storm has been obtained from Faraday rotation measurements at a chain of 140-MHz radio beacons receiving from the ATS-6 satellite. The stations covered a latitude region from the magnetic equator to the 45 deg N dip on the Indian subcontinent. An irregularity belt extending from the magnetic equator to about 27 deg N latitude was observed during the main phase of the magnetic storm of 10 January, 1976.

  2. Forecasting morphology and dynamics of F-layer irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.

    1990-05-03

    Data and analyses are at hand to forecast the morphology and dynamics of global F-layer irregularities. For the planners of systems which are impaired by the scattering characteristics of F-layer irregularities, forecasting the morphology allows them to evaluate the utility of operating systems and to plan means for integrating back-ups. For the active users forecasting the dynamics of changes in intensity and characteristics of the irregularities as a function of geophysical conditions allows for warning operators about impending problems. For the polar region the morphological parameter used as the principal forcing function for intensification of F-layer irregularities is the solar flux. Intense irregularities appear during high sunspot number years. For the auroral region the parameter used as forcing function is magnetic activity as shown by studies of radio stars, low altitude satellites and synchronous satellites. Increased solar flux plays a role both pushing the F-layer irregularity region equatorwards in latitude and increasing the quiet day intensity. For the sub-auroral region the magnetic activity during the injection phase of the magnetic storm plays a leading role. During the recovery phase of the magnetic storm the effect of the decay of ring current ions on the sub-auroral region is such that irregularities are formed of low intensity without auroral or magnetic activity.

  3. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  4. Bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Hanson, W. B.; Mcclure, J. P.; Cragin, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    By using the Ogo 6 satellite, McClure and Hanson (1973) have discovered sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region ion number density. In the present investigation, a description is provided of the properties of a distinct category of sinusoidal irregularities found in equatorial data from the AE-C and AE-E satellites. The observed scale sizes vary from about 300 m to 3 km in the direction perpendicular to B, overlapping with and extending the range observed by using Ogo 6. Attention is given to low and high resolution data, a comparison with Huancayo ionograms, the confinement of 'bottomside sinusoidal' (BSS) irregularities essentially to the bottomside of the F layer, spectral characteristics, and BSS, scintillation, and ionosonde observations.

  5. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  6. Anisotropy of high-latitude nighttime F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.C.; Rino, C.L.; Owen, J.; Tsunoda, R.T.

    1982-12-01

    The anisotropy of intermediate-scale, F region irregularities in the nighttime auroral zone is described. The study is based upon spaced-receiver phase scintillation measurements made with the Wideband satellite at Poker Flat, Alaska. A systematic dependence of irregularity anisotropy with local time and magnetic latitude is observed, suggesting convective control. Sheetlike irregularities are confined to the zone of east-west drift near the equatorward boundary of the auroral zone, and at the flow reversal, or Harang discontinuity, the cross-field extension of the sheets is reduced. The extension of rodlike irregularities, which are observed poleward of the zonal convection boundary, also shows apparent convection dominance. Mechanisms for convection control of the anisotropy are discussed.

  7. Rocket-borne Langmuir probe for plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, H. S. S.

    2013-11-01

    Ionospheric plasma density exhibits very large spatial and temporal variations known as ionosphere irregularities. These irregularities are generated by a number of processes related to plasma as well as neutral dynamics. The rocket- or satellite-borne Langmuir probe (LP) is very simple and yet a very powerful tool to measure spatial variation of plasma density enabling one to study ionosphere irregularities. This article describes how a rocket-borne LP can be used to study ionosphere irregularities. It begins with the basic principle of the LP, the ionospheric regions where it can be used, various sizes and shapes of the LP sensors, the effect of geomagnetic field and vehicle wake on LP measurements. Mechanical and electronic details of typical LP instrument are given next. Strengths, weaknesses and specifications of LP instrument are also given. Rocket-borne LP has been used by a large number of scientists in the world to study ionospheric irregularities produced through plasma instabilities in the equatorial electrojet region, in spread F and those produced by neutral turbulence. Highlights of such irregularity measurements are presented to give the reader a flavor of the type of studies which can be undertaken using a rocket-borne LP. The present capability of rocket-borne LP is to detect vertical scale sizes of ionospheric irregularities from a few km down to about 10 cm with percentage amplitudes as small as 0.001%. Finally, a few suggestions are given for the improvement the LP instrumentation for future use.

  8. Variational electric fields at low latitudes and their relation to spread-F and plasma irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtet, J. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Heppner, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In situ measurements of variational electric fields at low latitudes, taken by OGO 6 satellite instruments, are analyzed. The observations are compared with other data on F region and spread-F structures. Conformity of the electric field fluctuations with the overall picture of low-latitude irregularities is examined empirically and theoretically, and candidate processes for generation of the observed irregularities are considered. Three distinct types of irregularities are delineated and compared.

  9. Does Perceptual Learning Suffer from Retrograde Interference?

    PubMed Central

    Aberg, Kristoffer C.; Herzog, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In motor learning, training a task B can disrupt improvements of performance of a previously learned task A, indicating that learning needs consolidation. An influential study suggested that this is the case also for visual perceptual learning [1]. Using the same paradigm, we failed to reproduce these results. Further experiments with bisection stimuli also showed no retrograde disruption from task B on task A. Hence, for the tasks tested here, perceptual learning does not suffer from retrograde interference. PMID:21151868

  10. Phonological Priming and Irregular Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemberger, Joseph Paul

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the processing of irregular past-tense forms is affected by phonological factors that are inherent in the relationship of the past-tense forms to other words in the lexicon (rhyming families of irregulars) or to their base forms (vowel dominance effects). This paper addresses more ephemeral phonological effects. In a…

  11. Images of Bottomside Irregularities Observed at Topside Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Shomo, S. R.; Roddy, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/ Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour interval on 13 - 14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (~100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (~1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles, the second and third do not. The data suggest that both they and embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvénic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  12. Images of bottomside irregularities observed at topside altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, William J.; Gentile, Louise C.; Shomo, Shannon R.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-03-01

    We analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour period on 13-14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (˜100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (˜1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles; the second and third do not. The data suggest that both downward moving depletions and upward moving density enhancements and the embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvénic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward-directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  13. Images of Bottomside Irregularities Observed at Topside Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, William J.; Gentile, Louise C.; Shomo, Shannon R.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/ Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour period on 13-14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (approx 100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (approx 1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles; the second and third do not. The data suggest that both downward moving depletions and upward moving density enhancements and the embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvenic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward-directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  14. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-02-10

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation.

  15. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  16. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Multisatellite scintillation observations and spaced receiver drift measurements are presented for a category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal waveforms in the ion number density. The observations were made at Huancayo, Peru, and the measurements at Ancon, Peru, associated with irregularities observed by the Atmospheric-Explorer-E satellite on a few nights in December 1979. Utilizing ray paths to various geostationary satellites, it was found that the irregularities grow and decay almost simultaneously in long-lived patches extending at least 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  17. Irregular migration: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S M

    1984-01-01

    Despite the heightened awareness of irregular migrations worldwide, a certain misappreciation or underestimation of the saliency of irregular migration issues persists. Conflict in the strife-torn Indian state of Assam, for example, has been widely publicized, but its roots in immigration issues linked to communal tensions are insufficiently understood. Conflict around the globe seems increasingly to involve, both as cause and effect, migrants in irregular status whose problematical or illegitimate presence itself is at issue. The global recession prompted governments in immigration-welcoming countries to adopt more restrictive stances vis-a-vis immigration at a time when global migratory pressures were expanding enormously. As if by a process of demonstration effect, 1 country after another began to view migratory flows with alarm--flows which previously had been regarded as benign or quantitatively unimportant. Part I of this special issue examines a variety of public responses to irregular migration. Part II looks at legalization issues in a number of national contexts. Part III contains 3 comparative reflections on immigration reform in industrial democracies. Part IV provides an overview and sampling of recent empirical and survey research findings on irregular status migrants, primarily in the US. This special issue is intended to encourage further research on irregular migration, foster better understanding of this complex phenomenon, and contribute to enlightened public policy-making.

  18. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  19. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  20. Approximate likelihood for large irregularly spaced spatial data

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Likelihood approaches for large irregularly spaced spatial datasets are often very difficult, if not infeasible, to implement due to computational limitations. Even when we can assume normality, exact calculations of the likelihood for a Gaussian spatial process observed at n locations requires O(n3) operations. We present a version of Whittle’s approximation to the Gaussian log likelihood for spatial regular lattices with missing values and for irregularly spaced datasets. This method requires O(nlog2n) operations and does not involve calculating determinants. We present simulations and theoretical results to show the benefits and the performance of the spatial likelihood approximation method presented here for spatial irregularly spaced datasets and lattices with missing values. We apply these methods to estimate the spatial structure of sea surface temperatures (SST) using satellite data with missing values. PMID:19079638

  1. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  2. Studies of retrograde memory: A long-term view

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Elizabeth K.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia are reviewed. First, the issues of temporal gradients of retrograde amnesia are discussed. Second, the question of the anatomical substrates of this syndrome are considered. Finally, some evidence for fractionation of different classes of memoranda within the retrograde time period are presented. PMID:8942966

  3. Lexical Semantics and Irregular Inflection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Ting; Pinker, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Whether a word has an irregular inflection does not depend on its sound alone: compare lie-lay (recline) and lie-lied (prevaricate). Theories of morphology, particularly connectionist and symbolic models, disagree on which nonphonological factors are responsible. We test four possibilities: (1) Lexical effects, in which two lemmas differ in whether they specify an irregular form; (2) Semantic effects, in which the semantic features of a word become associated with regular or irregular forms; (3) Morphological structure effects, in which a word with a headless structure (e.g., a verb derived from a noun) blocks access to a stored irregular form; (4) Compositionality effects, in which the stored combination of an irregular word’s meaning (e.g., the verb’s inherent aspect) with the meaning of the inflection (e.g., pastness) doesn’t readily transfer to new senses with different combinations of such meanings. In four experiments, speakers were presented with existing and novel verbs and asked to rate their past-tense forms, semantic similarities, grammatical structure, and aspectual similarities. We found (1) an interaction between semantic and phonological similarity, coinciding with reported strategies of analogizing to known verbs and implicating lexical effects; (2) weak and inconsistent effects of semantic similarity; (3) robust effects of morphological structure, and (4) robust effects of aspectual compositionality. Results are consistent with theories of language that invoke lexical entries and morphological structure, and which differentiate the mode of storage of regular and irregular verbs. They also suggest how psycholinguistic processes have shaped vocabulary structure over history. PMID:21151703

  4. GPS and in situ Swarm observations of the equatorial plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, Irina; Astafyeva, Elvira; Cherniak, Iurii

    2016-07-01

    Here we study the global distribution of the plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere by using the concurrent GPS and Langmuir probe measurements onboard the Swarm satellites. We analyze 18 months (from August 2014 till January 2016) of data from Swarm A and B satellites that flew at 460 and 510 km altitude, respectively. To identify the occurrence of the ionospheric irregularities, we have analyzed behavior of two indices ROTI and RODI based on the change rate of total electron content and electron density, respectively. The obtained results demonstrate a high degree of similarities in the occurrence pattern of the seasonal and longitudinal distribution of the topside ionospheric irregularities derived from both types of the satellite observations. Among the seasons with good data coverage, the maximal occurrence rates for the post-sunset equatorial irregularities reached 35-50 % for the September 2014 and March 2015 equinoxes and only 10-15 % for the June 2015 solstice. For the equinox seasons the intense plasma density irregularities were more frequently observed in the Atlantic sector, for the December solstice in the South American-Atlantic sector. The highest occurrence rates for the post-midnight irregularities were observed in African longitudinal sector during the September 2014 equinox and June 2015 solstice. The observed differences in SWA and SWB results could be explained by the longitude/LT separation between satellites, as SWB crossed the same post-sunset sector increasingly later than the SWA did.

  5. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  6. Doppler-guided retrograde catheterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Leon J.; Vonesh, Michael J.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Khasho, Fouad; Lanza, George M.; Talano, James V.; McPherson, David D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a Doppler guided catheterization system as an adjunctive or alternative methodology to overcome the disadvantages of left heart catheterization and angiography. These disadvantages include the biological effects of radiation and the toxic and volume effects of iodine contrast. Doppler retrograde guidance uses a 20 MHz circular pulsed Doppler crystal incorporated into the tip of a triple lumen multipurpose catheter and is advanced retrogradely using the directional flow information provided by the Doppler waveform. The velocity detection limits are either 1 m/second or 4 m/second depending upon the instrumentation. In a physiologic flow model of the human aortic arch, multiple data points revealed a positive wave form when flow was traveling toward the catheter tip indicating proper alignment for retrograde advancement. There was a negative wave form when flow was traveling away from the catheter tip if the catheter was in a branch or bent upon itself indicating improper catheter tip position for retrograde advancement. In a series of six dogs, the catheter was able to be accurately advanced from the femoral artery to the left ventricular chamber under Doppler signal guidance without the use of x-ray. The potential applications of a Doppler guided retrograde catheterization system include decreasing time requirements and allowing safer catheter guidance in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease and suspected aortic dissection. The Doppler system may allow left ventricular pressure monitoring in the intensive care unit without the need for x-ray and it may allow left sided contrast echocardiography. With pulse velocity detection limits of 4 m/second, this system may allow catheter direction and passage into the aortic root and left ventricle in patients with aortic stenosis. A modification of the Doppler catheter may include transponder technology which would allow precise catheter tip localization once the

  7. Is the pulse in atrial fibrillation irregularly irregular?

    PubMed Central

    Rawles, J M; Rowland, E

    1986-01-01

    The belief that there is total irregularity of the pulse in atrial fibrillation has been re-examined. In a computerised analysis of R-R intervals and pulse volumes, 100-500 (mean 237) consecutive cycles were examined in 74 patients with atrial fibrillation, of whom 36 were on digoxin and 38 were not taking any antiarrhythmic treatment. A Doppler ultrasound technique was used to assess pulse volumes, against which R-R intervals were correlated. Although the sequence of consecutive R-R intervals was random in 52 (70%), patients there was a significant correlation between consecutive intervals in 22 (30%), the correlation coefficient being negative in 11 and positive in 11. In 43 (58%) cases the sequence of consecutive pulse volumes was significantly non-random; 34 (46%) showed pulsus alternans, indicated by a negative correlation between consecutive volumes. The proportion of patients with a non-random sequence of R-R intervals or pulse volumes was the same whether or not they were taking digoxin. Thus patients with atrial fibrillation often have patterns of regularity of the pulse, with the ventricular rhythm being non-random in almost one third and the sequence of pulse volumes being non-random in over a half. Contrary to classic teaching, in many patients with atrial fibrillation the pulse is not irregularly irregular. PMID:3730206

  8. Retrograde transport on the COG railway.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Daniel; Oka, Toshihiko; Krieger, Monty; Hughson, Frederick M

    2006-02-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is essential for establishing and/or maintaining the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. The Golgi apparatus, in turn, has a central role in protein sorting and glycosylation within the eukaryotic secretory pathway. As a consequence, COG mutations can give rise to human genetic diseases known as congenital disorders of glycosylation. We review recent results from studies of yeast, worm, fly and mammalian COG that provide evidence that COG might function in retrograde vesicular trafficking within the Golgi apparatus. This hypothesis explains the impact of COG mutations by postulating that they impair the retrograde flow of resident Golgi proteins needed to maintain normal Golgi structure and function.

  9. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  10. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  11. Irregular Warfare: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Airman’s Assessment of FM 3-24 and the Case for Developing Truly Joint COIN Doctrine. Maxwell Air Force Base: U.S. Air University, 2007. 111pp. (UG635.33...handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA494289 Pinnell , Daniel A. The Tenets of Airpower in an Insurgent Environment. Strategy Research Project. Carlisle...Non-Kinetic Capabilities for Irregular Warfare: Four Case Studies. Alexandria: Institute for Defense Analyses, Joint Advanced Warfighting Program

  12. Study of electromagnetic wave scattering by periodic density irregularities in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, R.; Kuo, S.P.; Huang, J.

    1995-12-31

    A quasi-particle approach is used to formulate wave propagation and scattering in a periodically structured plasma. The theory is then applied to study the effect of bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities on the propagation of beacon satellites signals through the ionosphere. In this approach, the radio wave is treated as a distribution of quasi-particles described by a Wigner distribution function governed by a transport equation. The irregularities providing the collisional effect are modeled as a two dimensional density modulation on a uniform background plasma. The present work generalizes the previous work by including the spectral bandwidth ({Delta}k/k) effect of the spatially periodic irregularities on the transionospheric signal propagation. The collision of quasi-particles with the irregularities modifies the quasi-particle distribution and give rise to the wave scattering phenomenon. The multiple scattering process is generally considered in this deterministic analysis of radio wave scattering off the ionospheric density irregularities. The analysis shows that this two dimensional density grating effectively modulates the intensity of the beacon satellite signals. This spatial modulation of the wave intensity is converted into time modulation due to the drift of the ionospheric irregularities, which then results in the scintillation of the beacon satellite signals.

  13. Seth Nicholson's First Satellite Discovery: Jupiter IX and His Orbit for It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2006-12-01

    Seth B. Nicholson was a graduate astronomy student at the University of California in Berkeley when he discovered his first satellite in 1914. He was later to discover three more, after he had joined the Mount Wilson Observatory staff following his PhD in 1915. Nicholson had begun his thesis on the problem of computing an improved orbit for J VIII, which had been discovered by Melotte in England in 1908, a distant irregular satellite like J VI and J VII. Nicholson was taking photographic plates to measure the position of J VIII in the summer of 1914 with the Crossley 36-inch reflector of Lick Observatory. He was a teaching assistant at Berkeley that summer, but would go up to Mount Hamilton to observe on weekends in the dark of the moon, traveling by rail, stage (an automobile on a regular schedule between San Jose and the observatory) and interurban trolley car, and sleeping in a shed near the Crossley dome. He first saw J IX as a much fainter object with the same motion as J VIII on a plate he took in late July 1914, and realized it must be another satellite of the giant planet. Nicholson obtained his first orbit of J IX, which had by then become his new thesis topic, in September, and published a paper on it in early 1915. Its orbit, like that of J VIII, was retrograde and irregular, but it was considerably fainter. Nicholson, a loyal student of Armin O. Leuschner, the head of the Berkeley Astronomy Division, used his teacher's "short method" (or analytic method) to calculate the orbit.

  14. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  15. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases.

  16. High-latitude F Region irregularities observed simultaneously with ISIS 1 and the Chatanika radar

    SciTech Connect

    Muldrew, D.B.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1982-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the high-latitude ionosphere were made by the Chatanika radar and the ISIS 1 topside sounder and cylindrical electrostatic probe (CEP) when the satellite was at a height of about 700 km. The variation of enhancements and valleys of electron density with invariant latitude at the satellite on the scale of a few hundred kilometers agrees reasonably well with the radar results. These density enhancements comprise a collection of large-scale (tens of kilometers) irregularities or 'blobs.' Evidence for the formation of these blobs was obtained from the sounder. Natural, intense radio noise (Hiss) was observed on the sounder ionograms recorded on the poleward side of the auroral zone, indicating the presence of precipitating kiloelectron volt electrons. A few minutes after these ionograms were recorded the radar scanned the same invariant latitude region and a large-scale ionization enhancement, or 'blob,' not present 3 minutes earlier, had developed in the bottomside F layer. ISIS 1 telemetry dropouts resulting from medium-scale irregularities, and enhanced irregularities down to about 200 m, observed with the CEP, are observed in association with blobs. Scatter signatures observed on the ISIS ionograms may be associated with large-scale irregularities that can be identified in the radar data. The scattering detected by the sounder is caused by 30- to 60-m wavelength irregularities (small-scale) that presumably are created by instabilities operating on the edges of the large-scale irregularities. The small-scale irregularities, however, are observed on both poleward and equatorward directed gradients. If the gradient-drift instability is responsible for these irregularities, then they either convect to the point of observation, are due to zonal gradients, or are field-aligned extensions of irregularities generated at lower heights.

  17. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing

    PubMed Central

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  18. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  19. The inner satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Synott, S.

    1981-01-01

    The Jupiter moon Amalthea and the smaller satellites J1, J2, and J3, discovered by Voyagers 1 and 2, are discussed under the collective appellation of 'inner satellites', which distinguishes them from the Galilean satellites and the outer satellites, J6-J13. Amalthea is a dark, irregular body on which two large craters are visible, with an estimated surface gravity of 5-7 cm/sec-squared. It is speculated that Amalthea's unique color/reflectance characteristics are due to prolonged charged particle and high-velocity micrometeoroid exposure. Dimensional data are presented for J1-3.

  20. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  1. Mapa MEGNO para satélites irregulares de Satuno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, M. M.; Leiva, A. M.

    By implementing the elliptic restricted three-body model we obtain high resolution dynamical maps in the phase space region corresponding to that where Saturn's irregular satellites are currently found. The nature of the trajectories is characterized by the MEGNO chaos indicator (Cincotta P. and Simó C., 2000), which allows to identify regions of chaotic and quasi- periodic trajectories much faster than with other indicators (e.g. Lyapunov exponents). The results obtained allow to identify with great detail the boundaries of the regions of regular motion, chaotic motion, and substruc- tures associated to mean motion resonances. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  3. LDRD Report: Scheduling Irregular Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Boman, Erik G.

    2014-10-01

    This LDRD project was a campus exec fellowship to fund (in part) Donald Nguyen’s PhD research at UT-Austin. His work has focused on parallel programming models, and scheduling irregular algorithms on shared-memory systems using the Galois framework. Galois provides a simple but powerful way for users and applications to automatically obtain good parallel performance using certain supported data containers. The naïve user can write serial code, while advanced users can optimize performance by advanced features, such as specifying the scheduling policy. Galois was used to parallelize two sparse matrix reordering schemes: RCM and Sloan. Such reordering is important in high-performance computing to obtain better data locality and thus reduce run times.

  4. Increased damping of irregular resonators.

    PubMed

    Russ, S; Sapoval, B

    2002-03-01

    It is shown that fractal drums and jagged geometry resonators may be more damped than ordinary Euclidean systems. Several damping mechanisms are examined and studied by numerical calculations. The results depend on the dissipation mechanisms but globally they increase with localization, frequency, and the irregularity of the resonator. The increased dissipation is due to the uneven spatial distribution of the vibrational amplitude in two different ways. First, it is related to the partial confinement of the vibrational modes. Secondly, increased dissipation may be due to singularities in the amplitude distribution. This is the case when a few points exist where the vibration is pinned to zero inducing local logarithmic singularities. This last effect can be spectacular: a single defect can dominate the surface damping by viscous forces of a square drum.

  5. Preparation of irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hualin Zhai Linfeng; Li Yanhong; Shi Tiejun

    2008-06-03

    An irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite (meso-HA), Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, is successfully prepared from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} using surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results reveal that the positive head of CTAB is assembled on the surface precipitated HA and much NH{sub 4}{sup +} is enclosed in precipitated HA before calcination. Field scanning electron microscope (FSEM) reveals that there exist many interconnected pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment exhibits a mesoporous material type IV curve, and pore size distribution calculated from the desorption branch of the isotherms based on Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model shows that most pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton are sized at about 40 nm, but the pores are not uniform on the whole, owning to decomposition of the 'organic' CTAB templating structures and ammonium salt enclosed in the precipitated HA. The specific surface area of irregular meso-HA is calculated to be 37.6 m{sup 2}/g according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equation. Moreover, after polylactic acid/meso-HA (PLA/meso-HA) composites degraded 12 weeks in normal saline at 37 deg. C, the interconnected pores throughout the HA skeleton were enlarged and sized in micron degree, which resemble trabecular bone structure very much.

  6. Satellite observation of effusive volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Friedman, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Infrared emission from an active effusive volcanic eruption on Surtsey, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland, was recorded by airborne and satellite infrared systems at irregular intervals between 19 August and 3 October 1966. Ground and lava temperature measurements and volumetric lava outflow data permitted a comparison to be made between total thermal-energy yield and radiant emission recorded by the satellite system. The Nimbus HRIR recorded radiant emission at a level of about 3% of the estimated total thermal yield.

  7. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated.

  8. Asteroids in Retrograde Orbits: Interesting Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2014-12-01

    We present the most interesting examples of the orbital evolution of asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90°). First, we used the latest observational data to determine nominal and averaged orbital elements of these objects. Next, the equations of motion of these asteroids were integrated backward 1 My, taking into account the propagation of observational errors. We used so-called 'cloning' procedure to reproduce the reliability of initial data. We obtained some possible scenarios of the orbit inversion in the past, what is often caused by the long-term influence of outer planets. For two most interesting cases (Apollo and Amor type) we did additional calculations: 100 My in the future. Additionally, we investigated the potential influence of Yarkovski/YORP effects on the long-time orbital evolution.

  9. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  10. Selective retrograde transsynaptic transfer of a protein, tetanus toxin, subsequent to its retrograde axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, ME; Suda, K; Thoenen, H

    1979-01-01

    The fate of tetanus toxin (mol wt 150,000) subsequent to its retrograde axonal transport in peripheral sympathetic neurons of the rat was studied by both electron microscope autoradiography and cytochemistry using toxin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) coupling products, and compared to that of nerve growth factor (NGF), cholera toxin, and the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and ricin. All these macromolecules are taken up by adrenergic nerve terminals and transported retrogradely in a selective, highly efficient manner. This selective uptake and transport is a consequence of the binding of these macromolecules to specific receptive sites on the nerve terminal membrane. All these ligands are transported in the axons within smooth vesicles, cisternae, and tubules. In the cell bodies these membrane compartments fuse and most of the transported macromolecules are finally incorporated into lysosomes. The cell nuclei, the parallel golgi cisternae, and the extracellular space always remain unlabeled. In case the tetanus toxin, however, a substantial fraction of the labeled material appears in presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals which innervate the labeled ganglion cells. In these terminals tetanus toxin-HRP is localized in 500-1,000 A diam vesicles. In contrast, such a retrograde transsynaptic transfer is not at all or only very rarely detectable after retrograde transport of cholera toxin, NGF, WGA, PHA, or ricin. An atoxic fragment of the tetanus toxin, which contains the ganglioside-binding site, behaves like intact toxin. With all these macromolecules, the extracellular space and the glial cells in the ganglion remain unlabeled. We conclude that the selectivity of this transsynaptic transfer of tetanus toxin is due to a selective release of the toxin from the postsynaptic dendrites. This release is immediately followed by an uptake into the presynaptic terminals. PMID:92475

  11. The localized origin of equatorial F region irregularity patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aarons, J.; Buchau, J.; Mcclure, J. P.; Basu, S.

    1978-01-01

    An intensive study of nighttime irregularities of electron density in the equatorial ionosphere was performed in October 1976 by making 50-MHz radar backscatter measurements at Jicamarca, Peru, and scintillation measurements of 249-MHz transmissions from Les 9 at two ground stations (Ancon and Huancayo, both in Peru) as well as by aircraft flying in the vicinity of the stations. The 137-MHz scintillations from the orbiting Wideband satellite were also recorded at Huancayo. The results of such measurements made on October 16-17, 1976, are discussed in this report. We find that on this particular night a large-scale irregularity patch evolved first in the west, as was detected by the radar at Jicamarca, and drifted eastward to cause successive onsets of scintillation activity on propagation paths from Ancon and Huancayo. The observations indicate the east-west dimension of the large-scale structure to be 400 km drifting eastward at a speed of approximately 100 m/s, having a lifetime of several hours, and containing a hierarchy of irregularity scale sizes in the range of kilometers to meters causing both scintillations at 249 MHz and radar backscatter at 50 MHz.

  12. The role of TIDs in the creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Tae-yong, Y.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle latitude F region is often interpreted in association with traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). However, the occurrence climatology of the irregularities is somewhat different from that of TIDs, and therefore, a different source of the irregularities may exist. In this study, we investigate the variability of the middle-latitude irregularities with local time, season, and solar cycle by analyzing the measurements of the ion density by the CHAMP (2001-2009) and Swarm (2014-2015) satellite observations. The occurrence climatology of the field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude is also investigated with the VHF radar observations acquired since January 2010 at Daejeon in South Korea. The role of TIDs in the creation of the middle latitude irregularities and FAIs is investigated by comparing the their occurrence climatology with the climatology of TIDs. The conventional wisdom is that the activity of TID decreases with an increase of the solar activity. However, our preliminary results show that the occurrence rate of the FAI increases with an increase of the solar activity. The distribution of the irregularities derived from the analysis of the satellite observations may provide insight into the relationship between TIDs, FAIs, and irregularities.

  13. PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-20

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  14. Production of Near-Earth Asteroids on Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-01

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that ~0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for ~0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  15. Processing of Irregular Polysemes in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocher, Andreas; Foraker, Stephani; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The degree to which meanings are related in memory affects ambiguous word processing. We examined irregular polysemes, which have related senses based on similar or shared features rather than a relational rule, like regular polysemy. We tested to what degree the related meanings of irregular polysemes ("wire") are represented with…

  16. On the Relationship between Lightning and Equatorial Ionosphere Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Holzworth, R. H.; Willcockson, L.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The C/NOFS (Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System) satellite was launched in April 2008 and carries high time resolution vector electric field and optical transient detectors. Using calibrated optical power-time profiles from the C/NOFS lightning detector (LD), along with data from the WWLLN (World Wide Lightning Location Network) which provides timing, power, and source location for lightning events, we examine the detailed vector electric field wave data gathered by the C/NOFS probes during periods of lightning activity. Using 32 ksample/sec burst data, we demonstrate the close one-to-one coincidence of lightning sferics observed on the ground with the VLF whistler waves observed at the satellite. We then compare lightning electric field transients measured on the satellite within a plasma density cavity, such as a spread-F depletion, with those measured by the satellite probes within a stable ionosphere. We demonstrate that during lightning events, the ELF and VLF electric field amplitude within these density depletions and associated irregularities can be dominated by contributions from the electric field transients associated with lightning.

  17. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  18. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  19. Inhibition of retrograde transport protects mice from lethal ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Bahne; Bai, Siau-Kun; Gobbo, Emilie; Lopez, Roman; Merer, Goulven; Pinchard, Suzy; Panigai, Laetitia; Tenza, Danièle; Raposo, Graça; Beaumelle, Bruno; Sauvaire, Didier; Gillet, Daniel; Johannes, Ludger; Barbier, Julien

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial Shiga-like toxins are virulence factors that constitute a significant public health threat worldwide, and the plant toxin ricin is a potential bioterror weapon. To gain access to their cytosolic target, ribosomal RNA, these toxins follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, via endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify small molecule inhibitors that protect cells from ricin and Shiga-like toxins. We identified two compounds that selectively block retrograde toxin trafficking at the early endosome-TGN interface, without affecting compartment morphology, endogenous retrograde cargos, or other trafficking steps, demonstrating an unexpected degree of selectivity and lack of toxicity. In mice, one compound clearly protects from lethal nasal exposure to ricin. Our work discovers the first small molecule that shows efficacy against ricin in animal experiments and identifies the retrograde route as a potential therapeutic target.

  20. The 'SAFARI' Technique Using Retrograde Access Via Peroneal Artery Access

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Kun Da; Tan, Seck Guan; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2012-08-15

    The 'SAFARI' technique or subintimal arterial flossing with antegrade-retrograde intervention is a method for recanalisation of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) when subintimal angioplasty fails. Retrograde access is usually obtained via the popliteal, distal anterior tibial artery (ATA)/dorsalis pedis (DP), or distal posterior tibial artery (PTA). Distal access via the peroneal artery has not been described and has a risk of continued bleeding, leading to compartment syndrome due to its deep location. We describe our experience in two patients with retrograde access via the peroneal artery and the use of balloon-assisted hemostasis for these retrograde punctures. This approach may potentially give more options for endovascular interventions in lower limb CTOs.

  1. Plant Intracellular Transport: Tracing Functions of the Retrograde Kinesin.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2015-09-21

    Adding to its varied repertoire of functions in cell morphogenesis and cell division, a molecular motor protein of the kinesin-14 class has recently been implicated in rapid retrograde transport along cellular tracks in moss.

  2. Processing of irregular polysemes in sentence reading.

    PubMed

    Brocher, Andreas; Foraker, Stephani; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The degree to which meanings are related in memory affects ambiguous word processing. We examined irregular polysemes, which have related senses based on similar or shared features rather than a relational rule, like regular polysemy. We tested to what degree the related meanings of irregular polysemes (wire) are represented with shared semantic information versus unshared information represented separately, like homonyms (bank). Monitoring eye fixations, we found that later context supporting the less frequent meaning of an irregular polyseme did not slow down reading compared with control conditions, whereas for homonyms it did. This indicates that in the absence of preceding biasing context, readers access a shared component of an irregular polyseme's representation. Additionally, when the same context words preceded the ambiguous word, both irregular polysemes and homonyms initially elicited longer reading times, but the observed reading slow-down was weaker and less persistent for irregular polysemes than homonyms, indicating less competition between meaning components. We interpret these results as evidence of a shared features representation for irregular polysemes, which additionally incorporates unshared portions of meaning that can compete. When preceding, biasing context is available, readers activate shared and unshared components of the senses, producing a more fully instantiated meaning. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. On the Existence of Regular and Irregular Outer Moons Orbiting the Pluto–Charon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.; Grishin, Evgeni

    2017-02-01

    The dwarf planet Pluto is known to host an extended system of five co-planar satellites. Previous studies have explored the formation and evolution of the system in isolation, neglecting perturbative effects by the Sun. Here we show that secular evolution due to the Sun can strongly affect the evolution of outer satellites and rings in the system, if such exist. Although precession due to extended gravitational potential from the inner Pluto–Charon binary quench such secular evolution up to a crit ∼ 0.0035 au (∼0.09 R Hill the Hill radius; including all of the currently known satellites), outer orbits can be significantly altered. In particular, we find that co-planar rings and satellites should not exist beyond a crit; rather, satellites and dust particles in these regions secularly evolve on timescales ranging between 104 and 106 years, and quasi-periodically change their inclinations and eccentricities through secular evolution (Lidov–Kozai oscillations). Such oscillations can lead to high inclinations and eccentricities, constraining the range where such satellites (and dust particles) can exist without crossing the orbits of the inner satellites or crossing the outer Hill stability range. Outer satellites, if such exist are therefore likely to be irregular satellites, with orbits limited to be non-circular and/or highly inclined. Current observations, including the recent data from the New-Horizons mission explored only inner regions (<0.0012 au) and excluded the existence of additional satellites; however, the irregular satellites discussed here should reside farther, in the yet uncharted regions around Pluto.

  4. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  5. San Andreas Fault tremor and retrograde metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Diener, Johann F. A.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic tremor is an enigmatic low-frequency seismic phenomenon mainly observed in subduction zones, but also documented along the deep extension of the central San Andreas Fault. The physical mechanisms behind this unusual seismic event are not yet determined for any tectonic setting; however, low effective stress conditions arising from metamorphic fluid production are commonly inferred for subduction-related tremor. We investigate the petrologic conditions at which the San Andreas tectonic tremor is inferred to occur through calculations of the pressure - temperature - time evolution of stable mineral assemblages and their water content in the dominant lithologies of the Franciscan Complex. We find that tremor locations around Parkfield and Cholame are currently experiencing retrograde metamorphic conditions. Within the temperature-depth conditions of observed tremor activity, at approximately 500°C and 20 km depth, several mineralogical transitions may occur in cooling greywacke and mafic rocks, leading to localised, significant removal of free water and an associated volume decrease. This indicates that, contrary to subduction-related tremor, tremor on the San Andreas Fault is not linked to prograde, crustal metamorphic fluid production within the fault zone; rather it might be related to mantle-derived fluids from below the tremor zone, and/or fault zone weakening that occurs as phyllosilicates replace more competent and granular mineral phases.

  6. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Bilioenteric Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Taek

    2016-01-01

    For diagnosis and treatment of pancreatobiliary diseases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is useful method nowadays and its technically success rate is usually in about 90%-95% of patients with normal gastric and pancreaticobiliary anatomy. Recently ERCP is significantly challenging after intestinal reconstruction, particularly in patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, classic Whipple’s operation) or pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) with reconstruction. PD and PPPD relate to numerous techniques have been presented for reconstruction of the digestive tract and pancreaticobiliary tree during the resection bilioenteric stricture commonly occurs later in the postoperative course and developed in 5-year cumulative probability of biliary stricture rate of 8.2% and pancreaticoenteric stricture of 4.6%. This complication was no difference in incidence between patients with benign or malignant disease. In PD or PPPD with reconstruction, short pancreatobiliary limb with biliojejunal anastomosis site is made usually, modestly success rate of intubation to blind loop and cannulation with conventional endoscope. However, in combined Reux-en-Y anastomosis, longer pancreatobiliary limb and additional Reux limb are obstacle to success intubation and cannulation by using conventional endoscope. In this situation, new designed enetroscope with dedicated accessories is efficient. PMID:27838918

  7. Pleuropancreatic fistula: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, S.; Pellegrini, C.A.; Moss, A.A.; Way, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    The complementary use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of pleuropancreatic fistulas is described in relation to four cases in which computed tomography revealedthe thoracic extension of a pancreatic fistula not demonstrable by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, although the latter indicated an abnormal pancreatic duct. The complementary use of both techniques may be necessary to define the pathologic anatomy so that the appropriate therapy, particularly the surgical approach, can be decided.

  8. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  9. In situ irregularity identification and scintillation estimation using wavelets and CINDI on C/NOFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneback, R. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Caton, R. G.; Su, Y.-J.; Groves, K. M.

    2013-07-01

    Wavelets are a time-domain method that is able to extract both time and frequency information from a signal. The Morlet wavelet is used here to characterize the magnitude of ionospheric irregularities using measurements of the total ion density from the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation package onboard the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System spacecraft. The power in ionospheric irregularities at scale sizes less than 128 km is used to generate an irregularity amplitude index. This index is used with a phase screen analysis to form an estimate of scintillation at the satellite location. The temporal information retained in a wavelet analysis also allows for an accurate power spectrum calculation even when used on short segments of data which is useful for real-time processing of irregularity detection onboard a satellite or for analyzing the long data sets produced by a satellite. To validate the process, a comparison of the in situ scintillation estimate and Scintillation Network and Decision Aid measurements of the S4 index is presented.

  10. Ground- and Space-Based Observations of Ionospheric Irregularities over Nigeria during Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P. H.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Pedersen, T. R.; Groves, K. M.; Roddy, P. A.; Caton, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities and plasma turbulence can cause scintillation in the amplitude and phase of trans-ionospheric radio waves employed by satellite navigation and communication systems, leading to a degradation of system performance. Due to the relatively sparse distribution of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments in Africa, the climatology and morphology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa have not been adequately characterized. Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Universities of Ilorin and Lagos in Nigeria have collaborated to operate two high-rate GPS receivers capable of monitoring both Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation intensity. We use GPS measurements collected from 2007-2009 to 1) identify ionospheric irregularities and quantify their spatial extent, 2) estimate the zonal drift velocity by cross-correlating TEC measurements between pairs of GPS satellites, 3) relate ionospheric irregularities to the occurrence of weak scintillation at the GPS L1 frequency, 4) characterize the strength of amplitude and phase scintillations in terms of their power spectral densities, and 5) use phase screen theory to predict the intensity of scintillation that would be observed by ionospheric monitoring sensors operating at lower frequencies. Measurements of plasma density and zonal drift from the C/NOFS satellite during passes over Nigeria are used to corroborate and complement these ground-based GPS observations.

  11. Periods, poles, and shapes of Saturn's irregular moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We report rotational-lightcurve observations of irregular moons of Saturn based on disk-integrated observations with the Narrow-Angle Camera of the Cassini spacecraft. From 24 measured rotation periods, 20 are now known with an accuracy of ~2% or better. The numbers are as follows (in hours; an '*' marks the less reliable periods): Hati 5.42; Mundilfari 6.74; Loge 6.94*; Skoll 7.26; Kari 7.70; Suttungr 7.82*, Bergelmir 8.13; Phoebe 9.274; Siarnaq 10.188; Narvi 10.21; Tarvos 10.69; Skathi 11.30; Ymir 11.922; Hyrrokkin 12.76; Greip 12.79*; Ijiraq 13.03; Albiorix 13.32; Bestla 14.624; Bebhionn 16.40; Paaliaq 18.75; Kiviuq 21.96; Erriapus 28.15; Thrymr 35 or >45* Tarqeq 76.8.More recent data strengthen the notion that objects in orbits with an inclination supplemental angle i' > 27° have significantly slower spin rates than those at i' < 27° (i' = 180°-i for retrograde objects, and i' = i for prograde moons, with i being the orbit inclination). Actually, the fastest rotator with i' > 27°, Siarnaq, stands opposed to at least eight objects with faster spins and i' < 27°. A null hypothesis claiming that objects of the two inclination bins come from the same population is rejected at the 99% confidence level. The i' > 27° bin contains all nine known prograde moons and four retrograde objects.A total of 25 out of 38 known outer moons has been observed with Cassini, and there is no chance to observe the 13 missing objects until end-of-mission. However, all unobserved objects are part of the i' < 27° bin. This means that the periods of all known moons with i' > 27° are known, and none of them is a fast rotator, with no exception.Several objects were observed repeatedly to determine pole directions, sidereal periods, and convex shapes. A few lightcurves have been observed to show three maxima and three minima even at low phase angles, suggesting objects with a triangular equatorial cross-section. Some objects with 2 maxima/ 2 minima are probably quite elongated. One

  12. Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    CERC- CETA -81-17 N. IE D CETA 81-17 Z Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes by ot John P. Ahrens COASTAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AID NO. 81-17 DECEMBER...GOVT ACCESSION NO, 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER CETA 811 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Coastal Engineering IRREGULAR...Coastal Engineering Research Center, 1977); CETA 77-2 "Prediction of Irregular Wave Runup" by John P. Ahrens; and CETA 78-2 "Revised Wave Runup

  13. Acoustic and Linguistic Interdependencies of Irregular Phonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    in a stochastic increase in episodes of irregular phonation. 13 The relationship to dialect and gender (in at least English ) can be attributed to...speech production. We know properties of irregular phonation can be clues to a speaker’s dialect and even identity. We also have evidence that irregular...Descriptions 20 2.2.3 Acoustical 21 2.2.4 . For this Thesis 22 2.3 Known Correlated Prope.ties of Speech 23 2.3.1 Speaker, Dialect , and Gender Dependence 23

  14. Irregular Variability In Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecker, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The transit method is the most successful tool for exoplanet discovery to date. With more than half of all known exoplanets discovered by Kepler using this method, the mission also revealed a number of objects with dimming events that defy the common explanations, the most prominent being KIC 8462852 aka ``Tabby's star''. I embarked on a search for objects with such irregular transit signatures in the data of K2, the two-wheeled successor mission of Kepler. My method is a combination of automated pre-selection of targets showing downward flux excursions and visual light curve inspection of the selected subset comprising about SI{1.5}% of the initial sample. In addition, I developed a tool to constrain the effective temperature of a planet-hosting star from photometry alone. This software finds broad application in any science case where a photometric spectral type estimate is necessary. I used existing transit models and Bayesian inference to perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of a planetary candidate I discovered. This putative gas giant is in a SI{1.32}day circular orbit with an exceptionally tight orbital radius of a ≈ 0.012 AU. My analysis revealed a scaled planetary radius of R_{p}/R_star = 0.0927±0.0026 and an edge-on orientation with an inclination i=89.8+3.0-3.4. EPIC 217393088.01 is one of the closest-orbiting exoplanets ever detected and the first giant planet with such a small orbital radius. An additional major finding of my search is EPIC 220262993, which exhibits aperiodic, asymmetric dips in flux with rapid dimming rates and up to SI{˜25}% depth, lasting for SIrange{2}{4} day. In previous works based on optical and mid-infrared photometry, this object was inconsistently classified as a possible quasar or a white dwarf. We conducted follow-up observations both photometrically with GROND on the MPI/ESO SI{2.2} meter telescope in La Silla (Chile) and spectroscopically with FIRE on the Magellan/Baade SI{6.5} meter telescope. With

  15. Orbital simulations of satellite escape/capture and the origin of satellites such as Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Lance A. M.; Mckinnon, William B.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate satellite escape/capture in the context of the restricted, circular three body problem as applied to the Sun, Neptune, and Triton. We have computed a large number of coplanar prograde and retrograde orbital simulations over a range of initial distances and velocities. The satellite starts at superior conjunction within approximately 2 Hill radii of Neptune and has a velocity orthogonal to the Sun-planet line. Orbits with these initial conditions can be reflected with respect to time, so an escape is simply the reverse of a capture. We numerically integrate the equations of motion to compute the satellite's position until it escapes, collides with Neptune, or after 100 planetary years fails to escape, when computations cease. The initial distance x and velocity v in the restricted problem uniquely define the Jacobi constant C, a conserved energy-like quantity. Plots of the simulation outcomes in the prograde and retrograde C, x phase spaces reveal distinct zones in which temporary satellites approach the planet closely enough that permanent capture can be effected by gas drag with a protoplanetary nebula or by collision with a pre-existing satellite. Single and double close-flybys constitute the most common possible capture orbits. Long term multiple flyby orbits occur near the stability limits between bound and unbound orbits, and are more common among retrograde captures.

  16. Behavior of high-latitude irregularities during geomagnetic disturbances. Environmental research papers

    SciTech Connect

    Houminer, Z.; Aarons, J.

    1980-06-24

    Scintillation observations of VHF and UHF transmissions from geostationary satellites at Goose Bay have been used to study the average characteristics of the high latitude irregularity region. The paper describes the average time development and mean diurnal pattern of irregularities during 58 magnetic storms in 1971-1976. The diurnal variation at Goose Bay shows two peaks of scintillation activity. One peak occurs during the afternoon hours, while the second occurs during the night. The average diurnal pattern is independent of type of storm. diurnal and seasonal effects appear only in the first day of storm commencement and not in the following days which show a very similar diurnal picture. (Author)

  17. A new irregular diterpenoid from Opopanax chironium.

    PubMed

    Muckensturm, Bernard; Boulanger, Anna; Ouahabi, Souad; Reduron, Jean-Pierre

    2005-12-01

    The ethereal extract of the roots of Opopanax chironium yielded peucelinenoxide acetate (1), a new natural product with an irregular diterpene skeleton, besides the known coumarins gaudichaudin, columbianadin, peucedanin and officinalin isobutyrate.

  18. Irregular sesquiterpenoids from Ligusticum grayi roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root oil of Ligusticum grayi (Apiaceae) contains numerous irregular sesquiterpenoids. In addition to the known acyclic sesquilavandulol and a new sesquilavandulyl aldehyde, two thapsanes, one epithapsane, and fourteen sesquiterpenoids representing eight novel carbon skeletons were found. The new sk...

  19. Climatological study of ionospheric irregularities over the European mid-latitude sector with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, René

    2014-03-01

    High-frequency variability of the ionosphere, or irregularities, constitutes the main threat for real-time precise positioning techniques based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements. Indeed, during periods of enhanced ionospheric variability, GNSS users in the field—who cannot verify the integrity of their measurements—will experience positioning errors that can reach several decimeters, while the nominal accuracy of the technique is cm-level. In the frame of this paper, a climatological analysis of irregularities over the European mid-latitude region is presented. Based on a 10 years GPS dataset over Belgium, the work analyzes the occurrence rate (as a function of the solar cycle, season and local time) as well as the amplitude of ionospheric irregularities observed at a single GPS station. The study covers irregularities either due to space weather events (solar origin) or of terrestrial origin. If space weather irregularities are responsible for the largest effects in terms of ionospheric error, their occurrence rate highly depends on solar activity. Indeed, the occurrence rate of ionospheric irregularities is about 9 % during solar maximum, whereas it drops to about 0 % during medium or low solar activity periods. Medium-scale ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) occurring during daytime in autumn/winter are the most recurrent pattern of the time series, with yearly proportions slightly varying with the solar cycle and an amplitude of about 10 % of the TEC background. Another recurrent irregularity type, though less frequent than MSTIDs, is the noise-like variability in TEC observed during summer nighttime, under quiet geomagnetic conditions. These summer nighttime irregularities exhibit amplitudes ranging between 8 and 15 % of the TEC background.

  20. Geomagnetic storm effect on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities over African equatorial sector using GPS-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Paul; Oyeyemi, Elijah; Akala, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Total electron content (TEC) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) network have been used to study the occurrence of large scale ionospheric irregularities over the African equatorial sector. The rate of change of TEC (ROT) as well as its standard deviation over five minutes (ROTI) were used to monitor the level of irregularities over 3 stations distributed across the three longitudinal sectors of Africa (eastern, central and western longitudinal sectors). The storm effect on irregularities occurrence has been studied in conjunction with the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the z component of the Interplanetary magnetic field (IMFBz) indices during four intense storms which were classified according to their season of occurrence during the year 2015. Irregularities were associated with GPS-TEC fluctuations as seen in the increased ROT and ROTI values especially in the post sunset period. Irregularities were inhibited over all the stations during the storm of March plausibly as a result of electric field conditioned by the southward turning of IMFBz during the pre and post midnight periods. The triggering of irregularities over the western and central stations and their inhibition over the eastern station during the storm of June was controlled by the ring current. The storm effect on irregularities was not evident over the western and central stations but inhibition of irregularities was observed over the eastern station during the storm of September.

  1. Plasma irregularities caused by cycloid bunching of the CRRES G-2 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Pongratz, M. B.; Simons, D. J.; Wolcott, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft carried a number of barium thermite canisters for release into the upper atmosphere. The barium release labeled G-2 showed evidence of curved irregularities not aligned with the ambient magnetic field B. The newly discovered curved structures can be explained by a process called cycloid bunching. Cycloid bunching occurs when plasma is created by photoionization of a neutral cloud injected at high velocity perpendicular to B. If the injection velocity is much larger than the expansion speed of the cloud, the ion trail will form a cycloid that has irregularities spaced by the product of the perpendicular injection speed and the ion gyroperiod, Images of the solar-illuminated barium ions are compared with the results of a three-dimensional kinetic simulation. Cycloid bunching is shown to be responsible for the rapid generation of both curved and field-aligned irregularities in the CRRES G-2 experiment.

  2. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  3. Detecting chaos in irregularly sampled time series.

    PubMed

    Kulp, C W

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Wiebe and Virgin [Chaos 22, 013136 (2012)] developed an algorithm which detects chaos by analyzing a time series' power spectrum which is computed using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Their algorithm, like other time series characterization algorithms, requires that the time series be regularly sampled. Real-world data, however, are often irregularly sampled, thus, making the detection of chaotic behavior difficult or impossible with those methods. In this paper, a characterization algorithm is presented, which effectively detects chaos in irregularly sampled time series. The work presented here is a modification of Wiebe and Virgin's algorithm and uses the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) to compute a series' power spectrum instead of the DFT. The DFT is not appropriate for irregularly sampled time series. However, the LSP is capable of computing the frequency content of irregularly sampled data. Furthermore, a new method of analyzing the power spectrum is developed, which can be useful for differentiating between chaotic and non-chaotic behavior. The new characterization algorithm is successfully applied to irregularly sampled data generated by a model as well as data consisting of observations of variable stars.

  4. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  5. Yarkovsky effect in the motion of asteroids in retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    Since the last few years, many small bodies in retrograde orbits was discovered, classified as asteroids. %Most of these orbits are located in peripherals of the Solar System. Main aim of our work is the analysis of their dynamical past and future. For 56 asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90) we studied the orbital evolution and calculated median dynamical lifetimes. Due to important role of the Yarkovsky effect in the motion of small bodies, we decided to apply the model with the Yarkovsky forces. Because the physical properties of these objects are still not well determined, we collected thermal parameters from literature or calculated from available formulas. The complete set of 'thermal' properties of each body is still not available from observational data, so our approach is a kind of approximation. Results obtained with these parameters allowed us to estimate the influence of the Yarkovsky effect on the stability of retrograde orbits.

  6. Retrograde resonance in the planar three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2013-12-01

    We continue the investigation of the dynamics of retrograde resonances initiated in Morais and Giuppone (Mon Notices R Astron Soc 424:52-64, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21151.x, 2012). After deriving a procedure to deduce the retrograde resonance terms from the standard expansion of the three-dimensional disturbing function, we concentrate on the planar problem and construct surfaces of section that explore phase-space in the vicinity of the main retrograde resonances (2/1, 1/1 and 1/2). In the case of the 1/1 resonance for which the standard expansion is not adequate to describe the dynamics, we develop a semi-analytic model based on numerical averaging of the unexpanded disturbing function, and show that the predicted libration modes are in agreement with the behavior seen in the surfaces of section.

  7. Effect of irregularities of nanosatellites position and size on collective electric and magnetic plasmonic resonances in spherical nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Vallecchi, Andrea; Albani, Matteo; Capolino, Filippo

    2013-03-25

    Spherical nanoclusters (NCs) with a central dielectric core surrounded by several satellite plasmonic nanospheres have been recently investigated as aggregates supporting electric and magnetic collective resonances. Notably, the collective magnetic resonance has been exploited to provide magnetic properties in optics, i.e., materials with macroscopic relative permeability different from unity. The NCs discussed in this paper can be realized using state-of-the-art nanochemistry self-assembly techniques. Accordingly, perfectly regular disposition of the nanoplasmonic satellites is not possible and this paper constitutes the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of such irregularities onto the electric and magnetic collective resonances. In particular we will show that the peak of the scattering cross section associated to the magnetic resonance is very sensitive to certain irregularities and significantly less to others. It is shown here that "artificial magnetic" properties of NCs are preserved for certain degrees of irregularities of the nanosatellites positions, however they are strongly affected by irregularities in the plasmonic nanosatellites sizes and by the presence of "defects" caused by the absence of satellites in the process of self-assembly around the dielectric core. The "artificial electric" resonance is instead less affected by irregularities mainly because of its wider frequency bandwidth.

  8. Signature of ionospheric irregularities under different geophysical conditions on SBAS performance in the western African low-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Oladipo Emmanuel; Villamide, Xurxo Otero; Paparini, Claudia; Ngaya, Rodrigue Herbert; Radicella, Sandro M.; Nava, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Rate of change of TEC (ROT) and its index (ROTI) are considered a good proxy to characterize the occurrence of ionospheric plasma irregularities like those observed after sunset at low latitudes. SBASs (satellite-based augmentation systems) are civil aviation systems that provide wide-area or regional improvement to single-frequency satellite navigation using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) constellations. Plasma irregularities in the path of the GNSS signal after sunset cause severe phase fluctuations and loss of locks of the signals in GNSS receiver at low-latitude regions. ROTI is used in this paper to characterize plasma density ionospheric irregularities in central-western Africa under nominal and disturbed conditions and identified some days of irregularity inhibition. A specific low-latitude algorithm is used to emulate potential possible SBAS message using real GNSS data in the western African low-latitude region. The performance of a possible SBAS operation in the region under different ionospheric conditions is analysed. These conditions include effects of geomagnetic disturbed periods when SBAS performance appears to be enhanced due to ionospheric irregularity inhibition. The results of this paper could contribute to a feasibility assessment of a European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System-based SBAS in the sub-Saharan African region.

  9. Retrograde tibial nail: anatomical implantation and surgical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, S; Appelmann, P; Pairon, P; Gruszka, D; Rommens, P M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The treatment of distal tibial fractures requires a stable fixation while minimizing the secondary trauma to the soft tissues by the surgical approach and implant. The experimental Retrograde Tibial Nail is currently investigated as a minimally invasive alternative to plating and antegrade nailing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical feasibility in a cadaver model for all distal tibial fracture types generally considered treatable by nailing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Five different fracture types (AO/OTA 43-A1/A2/A3 and 43-C1/C2) were created on separate cadaveric limbs. In simple fractures (AO/OTA 43-A1/A2/A3) primary nailing was performed. In intraarticular fractures (AO/OTA 43-C1/2) reduction of the articular block and lag screw fixation was performed before nailing. Intraoperative complications, quality of reduction, fluoroscopy duration and operative time were evaluated. RESULTS Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps. Retrograde nailing is possible in fractures with simple intraarticular involvement after primary lag screw fixation. The duration of surgery averaged 51.8 minutes (range 40-62 min). No major complications occurred during nailing. CONCLUSIONS The minimally invasive retrograde nail combines a minimally invasive local osteosynthesis with the ability to adequately fix extraarticular and simple intraarticular distal tibial fractures. The results suggests that retrograde tibia nailing is a promising new concept for the treatment of distal tibia fractures. Key words: minimally invasive surgery, tibia, metaphyseal fractures, intramedullary nailing, retrograde nailing.

  10. Physiology and pathology of endosome-to-Golgi retrograde sorting.

    PubMed

    Burd, Christopher G

    2011-08-01

    Bidirectional traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the endosomal system sustains the functions of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in secretion and organelle biogenesis. Export of cargo from the TGN via anterograde trafficking pathways depletes the organelle of sorting receptors, processing proteases, SNARE molecules, and other factors, and these are subsequently retrieved from endosomes via the retrograde pathway. Recent studies indicate that retrograde trafficking is vital to early metazoan development, nutrient homeostasis, and for processes that protect against Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases.

  11. Orbital Evolution and Impact Hazard of Asteroids on Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2014-07-01

    We present the past evolutional scenarios of known group of asteroids in retrograde orbits. Applying the latest observational data, we determined their nominal and averaged orbital elements. Next, we studied the behaviour of their orbital motion 1~My in the past (100~My in the future for two NEAs) taking into account the limitations of observational errors. It has been shown that the influence of outer planets perturbations in many cases can import small bodies on high inclination or retrograde orbits into the inner Solar System.

  12. Rocket measurements of mesospheric ionization irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, R. B.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir probe technique for measurement of electron concentration in the mesosphere is capable of excellent altitude resolution, of order 1 m. Measurements from nine daytime rocket flights carrying an electron density fine structure experiment frequently show small scale ionization structures in the altitude region 70 to 90 km. The irregularities are believed to be the result of turbulent advection of ions and electrons. The fine structure experiment flown by the University of Illinois is described and methods of analyzing the collected data is presented. Theories of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are reviewed. Power spectra of the measured irregularities are calculated and compared to spectra predicted by turbulence theories.

  13. Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by multiple bouts of sleep within a 24-hour period. Patients present with symptoms of insomnia, including difficulty either falling or staying asleep, and daytime excessive sleepiness. The disorder is seen in a variety of individuals, ranging from children with neurodevelopmental disorders, to patients with psychiatric disorders, and most commonly in older adults with neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment of irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder requires a multimodal approach aimed at strengthening circadian synchronizing agents, such as daytime exposure to bright light, and structured social and physical activities. In addition, melatonin may be useful in some patients.

  14. Preliminary comparisons of VHF radar maps of F-region irregularities with scintillations in the equatorial region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Aarons, J.; Mcclure, J. P.; Lahoz, C.; Bushby, A.; Woodman, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Multiantenna 50 MHz radar backscatter maps of echo power from night-time F-region equatiorial irregularities obtained at Jicamarca, Peru were compared with simultaneous VHF scintillation observations from Huancayo at 137 and 254 MHz during the period 20 November to 12 December 1975. Saturation of VHF scintillations in excess of 20 dB was observed at both these frequencies during times when radar maps showed large intense plume structures rising into the topside ionosphere. On nights when only thin layers of bottomside irregularities were observed, moderate to weak scintillations were recorded at VHF. Preliminary values of east-west horizontal irregularity drift velocities were obtained and compared with scintillation rate observations. Using the 1.5-deg and 4.5-deg longitudinal separation between the Jicamarca radar and ionospheric observation points of the two satellites from Huancayo, information was derived regarding large-scale east-west structure during the development phase of the irregularities.

  15. Investigation of the role of plasma wave cascading processes in the formation of midlatitude irregularities utilizing GPS and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltrass, A.; Scales, W. A.; Erickson, P. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that midlatitude ionospheric irregularities are less understood due to lack of models and observations that can explain the characteristics of the observed wave structures. In this paper, the cascading processes of both the temperature gradient instability (TGI) and the gradient drift instability (GDI) are investigated as the cause of these irregularities. Based on observations obtained during a coordinated experiment between the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and the Blackstone Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar, a time series for the growth rate of both TGI and GDI is calculated for observations in the subauroral ionosphere under both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Recorded GPS scintillation data are analyzed to monitor the amplitude scintillations and to obtain the spectral characteristics of irregularities producing ionospheric scintillations. Spatial power spectra of the density fluctuations associated with the TGI from nonlinear plasma simulations are compared with both the GPS scintillation spectral characteristics and previous in situ satellite spectral measurements. The spectral comparisons suggest that initially, TGI or/and GDI irregularities are generated at large-scale size (kilometer scale), and the dissipation of the energy associated with these irregularities occurs by generating smaller and smaller (decameter scale) irregularities. The alignment between experimental, theoretical, and computational results of this study suggests that in spite of expectations from linear growth rate calculations, cascading processes involving TGI and GDI are likely responsible for the midlatitude ionospheric irregularities associated with GPS scintillations during disturbed times.

  16. Density Irregularities Inside the Plasmasphere: Cluster Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrouzet, F.; Lemaire, J. F.; Decreau, P. M. E.; DeKeyser, J.; Masson, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Santolik, O.; Trotignon, J. G.; Rauch, J. L.; LeGuirriec, E.

    2003-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments onboard the four Cluster spacecraft reveal small-scale density irregularities inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We review statistics of the plasmapause position and thickness, as well as statistics of these density structures. We focus on a particular plasmasphere crossing on 11 April 2002, with several density irregularities, as well as two plasma tails, observed by Cluster on the legs of the inbound and outbound passes. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We determine also the normal velocity of the surface of these irregularities, assuming they are planar boundaries, from the time delays between density structures in the four individual density profiles. These new observations yield novel insights about (1) the dimensions of plasma irregularities across and parallel to magnetic field lines, (2) the dynamics of these small-scale structures, (3) their bulk velocities, and (4) their position and distribution as a function of the magnetic local time (MLT) and the geomagnetic conditions (as determined by Kp).

  17. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  18. Spelling Pronunciations: Transforming Irregularity into Regularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Thaler, Verena; Reitsma, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    In a 10-day training, the efficacy of spelling pronunciations on German speaking 5th-graders' spelling skills for irregular words was examined. Poor spellers were less efficient in learning the spelling pronunciations than age-adequate spellers. On post-tests, 1 week after the last training day and between 5 and 12 weeks after post-test 1, poor…

  19. Generalisation of Regular and Irregular Morphological Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; and Pinker, Steven

    1993-01-01

    When it comes to explaining English verbs' patterns of regular and irregular generalization, single-network theories have difficulty with the former, rule-only theories with the latter process. Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence, based on observation during experiments and simulations in morphological pattern generation, independently call…

  20. Irregularity Decay in an Isolated Plasma Bubble.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    irregularities that they produce as they develop, are clearly associated with radar back- scatter, ionogram spread F, airglow depletions and radio-wave scintil...can structure as a result of the gra- dient drift instability. At these local times, the zonal neutral wind is large (; 2150 m/s) and eastward, so

  1. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-06

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage.

  2. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling.

  3. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma: an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Baudet, Juan-Salvador; Arguiñarena, Xabier; Redondo, Ignacio; Tadeo, Eva; Navazo, Lucía; Mendiz, Javier; Montiel, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the case of a patient who developed a subcapsular hepatic hematoma 48 hours after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. She was treated by embolizing the sites of bleeding and by surgically resecting the area. We review the literature and discuss the potential mechanisms that cause this complication.

  4. Selected properties of acetylated adipate of retrograded starch.

    PubMed

    Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Kapelko, M

    2014-01-01

    Native potato starch (NS) and retrograded starch (R - obtained via freezing and defrosting of a starch paste) were used to prepare starch acetates: NS-A and R-A, and then acetylated distarch adipates: NS-ADA and R-ADA. The chemically-modified preparations produced from retrograded starch (R-A; R-ADA) were characterized by a higher degree of esterification compared to the modified preparations produced under the same conditions from native potato starch (NS-A; NS-ADA). Starch resistance to amylolysis was observed to increase (to 30-40 g/100 g) as a result of starch retrogradation and acetylation. Starch cross-linking had a significant impact on the increased viscosity of the paste in the entire course of pasting characteristics and on the increased values of rheological coefficients determined from the equations describing flow curves. The produced preparation of acetylated retrograded starch cross-linked with adipic acid (R-ADA) may be deemed an RS3/4 preparation to be used as a food thickening agent.

  5. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  6. Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J. ); Valley, J.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

  7. Low and Midlatitude Ionospheric Plasma Density Irregularities and Their Effects on Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Stolle, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    Earth's magnetic field results from various internal and external sources. The electric currents in the ionosphere are major external sources of the magnetic field in the daytime. High-resolution magnetometers onboard low-Earth-orbit satellites such as CHAMP and Swarm can detect small-scale currents in the nighttime ionosphere, where plasma density gradients often become unstable and form irregular density structures. The magnetic field variations caused by the ionospheric irregularities are comparable to that of the lithospheric contribution. Two phenomena in the nighttime ionosphere that contribute to the magnetic field variation are presented: equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). EPB is formed by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability over the dip equator and grows nonlinearly to as high as 2000 km apex altitude. It is characterized by deep plasma density depletions along magnetic flux tubes, where the diamagnetic effect produced by a pressure-gradient-driven current enhances the main field intensity. MSTID is a few hundred kilometer-scale disturbance in the midlatitude ionosphere generated by the coupled electrodynamics between the ionospheric E and F regions. The field-aligned currents associated with EPBs and MSTIDs also have significant signatures in the magnetic field perpendicular to the main field direction. The empirical discovery of the variations in the magnetic field due to plasma irregularities has motivated the inclusion of electrodynamics in the physical modeling of these irregularities. Through an effective comparison between the model results and observations, the physical process involved has been largely understood. The prediction of magnetic signatures due to plasma irregularities has been advanced by modeling studies, and will be helpful in interpreting magnetic field observations from satellites.

  8. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    SciTech Connect

    Valladares, C.E.; DasGupta, A.; Whitney, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal wave forms in the ion number density N/sub i/ was observed by the Atmosphere Explorer satellites. Multisatellite scintillation observations made at Huancayo, Peru and spaced-receiver drive measurements made at Ancon, Peru are associated with such irregularities observed by AE-E on a few nights in December 1979. The scintillations continue for a period of almost 6 hours, at a level that varies from moderate to fairly intense (S4 = 0.1-0.8 at 250 MHz), and these S4 fluctuations are quite well correlated, even over a distance of 1000 km. The irregularities constituting the large patch are found to drift eastward at a velocity of approximately 140 m/s. This and other such events are accompanied by the frequency spread signatures on Huancayo ionograms, as previously reported. The unique feature of the Fourier spectra associated with such bottomside sinusiodal (BSS) irregularities is the presence of Fresnel oscillations, which allow a determination of the velocity of the diffraction pattern perpendicular to the direction of the ray from the satellite to the ground station. The velocity so determined agrees well with the results of simultaneously performed spaced-receiver drift measurements. The presence of Fresnel oscillations indicates that the BSS irregularities occur in a relatively thin layer. However, while the scintillation data indicate a high frequency, roll off with a spectral index of the order of -3 to -4, the in-situ data tend to indicate that the index is of the order -5 to -6. Modeling studies are necessary to resolve this difference.

  9. Low and Midlatitude Ionospheric Plasma Density Irregularities and Their Effects on Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Earth's magnetic field results from various internal and external sources. The electric currents in the ionosphere are major external sources of the magnetic field in the daytime. High-resolution magnetometers onboard low-Earth-orbit satellites such as CHAMP and Swarm can detect small-scale currents in the nighttime ionosphere, where plasma density gradients often become unstable and form irregular density structures. The magnetic field variations caused by the ionospheric irregularities are comparable to that of the lithospheric contribution. Two phenomena in the nighttime ionosphere that contribute to the magnetic field variation are presented: equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). EPB is formed by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability over the dip equator and grows nonlinearly to as high as 2000 km apex altitude. It is characterized by deep plasma density depletions along magnetic flux tubes, where the diamagnetic effect produced by a pressure-gradient-driven current enhances the main field intensity. MSTID is a few hundred kilometer-scale disturbance in the midlatitude ionosphere generated by the coupled electrodynamics between the ionospheric E and F regions. The field-aligned currents associated with EPBs and MSTIDs also have significant signatures in the magnetic field perpendicular to the main field direction. The empirical discovery of the variations in the magnetic field due to plasma irregularities has motivated the inclusion of electrodynamics in the physical modeling of these irregularities. Through an effective comparison between the model results and observations, the physical process involved has been largely understood. The prediction of magnetic signatures due to plasma irregularities has been advanced by modeling studies, and will be helpful in interpreting magnetic field observations from satellites.

  10. ESA' s novel gravitational modeling of irregular planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    A detailed understanding and modeling of the gravitational modeling is required for realistic investigation of the dynamics of orbits close to irregularly shaped bodies. Gravity field modelling up to a certain maximum spherical harmonic degree N involves N2 unkown spherical harmonic coefficients or complex harmonics. The corresponding number of matrix entries reaches till N4 . For missions like CHAMP, GRACE or GOCE, the maximum degree of resolution is 75, 150 and 300 respectively. Therefore, the number of unknowns for a satellite like GOCE will be around 100.000. Since these missions usually fly for a period of time of several years, the number of observations is huge. Hence, gravity field recovery from these missions is a high demanding task. The classical approaches like spherical expansion of the potential lead generally to a high number of coefficients, which reduce the software computational efficiency of the orbit propagation and which have mostly a limited physical meaning. One of the main targets of the activity is the modelling of asteroids, small moons, and cometary bodies. All celestial bodies are irregular by definition. However, the scope of the activity is broad enough as to be able to use the models and the software in quasy-regular bodies as well. Therefore the models and tools could be used for bodies such as the Moon, Mars, Venus, Deimos, Europa, Eros, Mathilda, and Churyumov-Gerasimenko, etc., being these applications relevant for scientific (Rosetta, Bepi Colombo), exploration (Exo-Mars), NEO mitigation (Don Quijote) and Earth observation (GOCE) missions of ESA.

  11. Trefftz difference schemes on irregular stencils

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2010-04-20

    The recently developed Flexible Local Approximation MEthod (FLAME) produces accurate difference schemes by replacing the usual Taylor expansion with Trefftz functions - local solutions of the underlying differential equation. This paper advances and casts in a general form a significant modification of FLAME proposed recently by Pinheiro and Webb: a least-squares fit instead of the exact match of the approximate solution at the stencil nodes. As a consequence of that, FLAME schemes can now be generated on irregular stencils with the number of nodes substantially greater than the number of approximating functions. The accuracy of the method is preserved but its robustness is improved. For demonstration, the paper presents a number of numerical examples in 2D and 3D: electrostatic (magnetostatic) particle interactions, scattering of electromagnetic (acoustic) waves, and wave propagation in a photonic crystal. The examples explore the role of the grid and stencil size, of the number of approximating functions, and of the irregularity of the stencils.

  12. Quantifying Irregularity in Pulsating Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Esteves, S.; Lin, A.; Menezes, C.; Wu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Hundreds of red giant variable stars are classified as “type L,” which the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) defines as “slow irregular variables of late spectral type...which show no evidence of periodicity, or any periodicity present is very poorly defined....” Self-correlation (Percy and Muhammed 2004) is a simple form of time-series analysis which determines the cycle-to-cycle behavior of a star, averaged over all the available data. It is well suited for analyzing stars which are not strictly periodic. Even for non-periodic stars, it provides a “profile” of the variability, including the average “characteristic time” of variability. We have applied this method to twenty-three L-type variables which have been measured extensively by AAVSO visual observers. We find a continuous spectrum of behavior, from irregular to semiregular.

  13. Parallel Programming Strategies for Irregular Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Achieving scalable performance for dynamic irregular applications is eminently challenging. Traditional message-passing approaches have been making steady progress towards this goal; however, they suffer from complex implementation requirements. The use of a global address space greatly simplifies the programming task, but can degrade the performance for such computations. In this work, we examine two typical irregular adaptive applications, Dynamic Remeshing and N-Body, under competing programming methodologies and across various parallel architectures. The Dynamic Remeshing application simulates flow over an airfoil, and refines localized regions of the underlying unstructured mesh. The N-Body experiment models two neighboring Plummer galaxies that are about to undergo a merger. Both problems demonstrate dramatic changes in processor workloads and interprocessor communication with time; thus, dynamic load balancing is a required component.

  14. Transforming USMC Intelligence to Address Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    nation’s 衟 force" demands that it be prepared to face these irregular warfare challenges with little or no preparation time. This presents a...rarely attribute these skills to a result of thorough preparation by the intelligence or military supporting establishment prior to the individual’s...identify areas where the Mmine Corps can improve its intelligence capabilities in order to be prepared to face the current and future IW threats. Although

  15. Kinematics in irregular galaxies: NGC 4449.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, M.; Rosado, M.

    1998-11-01

    A kinematical analysis of the irregular galaxy NGC 4449 is presented based on the Fabry-Perot interferometer PUMA observations. In NGC 4449 we analyse its global velocity field, HII regions population as well as the SNR population identified on radioastronomy studies. Our first results for NGC 4449 show that the optical velocity field, presents a decreasing gradient in velocity along the optical bar and an anticorrelation with respect to the velocity field of the HI halo.

  16. Effects of inulin with different degree of polymerization on gelatinization and retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Luo, Denglin; Li, Yun; Xu, Baocheng; Ren, Guangyue; Li, Peiyan; Li, Xuan; Han, Sihai; Liu, Jianxue

    2017-08-15

    The effects of three types of inulin, including FS (DP≤10), FI (DP of 2-60) and FXL (DP≥23), on the gelatinization and retrogradation characteristics of wheat starch were investigated. As the concentration of inulin added into starch increased, the gelatinization temperature increased whereas the breakdown value decreased, and the value of setback first decreased and then increased slightly. The three types of inulin with lower concentrations (<15%) all showed obvious suppression effects on the short-term retrogradation of wheat starch. After 7days of storage, the three types of inulin showed a significant suppression of starch retrogradation in the addition range of 5-7.5%. They can all inhibit amylose retrogradation, but accelerate amylopectin retrogradation. Inulin with lower DP has stronger effects on the starch retrogradation. Generally, the three types of inulin can all retard the retrogradation performance of wheat starch to some extent in the long-term storage.

  17. Effects of chitin nano-whiskers on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and potato starches.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Liu, Chengzhen; Zhang, Shuangling; Yu, Jing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Starch is very prone to retrogradation after gelatinization. Inhibition of starch retrogradation has been an important factor in improving the quality of food. For the first time, we investigated the effect of nano-materials, represented by chitin nano-whiskers (CNWs), on the short- and long-term retrogradation of maize and potato starches. Rapid Visco-Analyser results showed that the addition of CNWs significantly decreased the setback values of maize and potato starches, which suggested that CNWs could retard the short-term retrogradation of starch. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results showed that the percentage of retrogradation of maize and potato starches significantly decreased (P<0.05), suggesting the inhibition of long-term retrogradation. The CNWs could be used as a new inhibitor of starch retrogradation to develop starch-based food with longer shelf life.

  18. Parallel Computing Strategies for Irregular Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Shan, Hongzhang; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel computing promises several orders of magnitude increase in our ability to solve realistic computationally-intensive problems, but relies on their efficient mapping and execution on large-scale multiprocessor architectures. Unfortunately, many important applications are irregular and dynamic in nature, making their effective parallel implementation a daunting task. Moreover, with the proliferation of parallel architectures and programming paradigms, the typical scientist is faced with a plethora of questions that must be answered in order to obtain an acceptable parallel implementation of the solution algorithm. In this paper, we consider three representative irregular applications: unstructured remeshing, sparse matrix computations, and N-body problems, and parallelize them using various popular programming paradigms on a wide spectrum of computer platforms ranging from state-of-the-art supercomputers to PC clusters. We present the underlying problems, the solution algorithms, and the parallel implementation strategies. Smart load-balancing, partitioning, and ordering techniques are used to enhance parallel performance. Overall results demonstrate the complexity of efficiently parallelizing irregular algorithms.

  19. Irregular Wavelike Structure in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.

    2005-01-01

    We have searched Saturn's A, B, and C rings for irregular wavelike structure using Voyager Photopolarimeter (PPS), Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS), and Radio Science (RSS) occultation datasets, as well as ring reflectivity profiles derived from Voyager images. A maximum entropy technique for conducting spectral analysis was used to estimate wave frequency power in relation to radial location for each dataset. Using this method we have found irregular structure in the PPS and UVS inner B Ring occultation datasets previously identified in Voyager imaging data. Both finer structure, with a wavelength of around 20 km, and large structure with wavelengths of 200 to 1000 km, are visible in the occultation data and appear similar to that seen in the imaging data. After removing ringlets from the C-Ring data, we have identified what appears to be a 1000-km wave sustained throughout the ring. The large dominant wavelength appears in all datasets; however, tests are currently being conducted in an attempt to verify its existence. Irregular structure with a wavelength of approximately 20 km has been observed in the C Ring reflectivity profiles, but not within the occultation datasets. This leads us to doubt it is caused by ring surface mass density fluctuations detectable by the occultation experiments.

  20. Drift velocity of the ionospheric irregularities measured by closely-spaced GNSS receivers in Tromsoe, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Hosokawa, K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A radio signal passing through small-scale irregularities in the ionospheric electron density fluctuates in amplitude and phase because the irregularities act as diffraction gratings. This phenomenon is known as scintillation. The GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) scintillation is caused by irregularities with a scale-size of several hundred meters. In this study, we use three GNSS receivers at the EISCAT radar site in Tromsoe, Norway, where optical and radio measurements are carried out. On January, 2012, we have installed a GNSS receiver at EISCAT radar site in Tromsoe, Norway. The receiver measures phase and signal-to-noise ratio of the radio wave from the GNSS satellites at dual frequency (L1 and L2) at 50 Hz, so that total electron content (TEC) and phase and amplitude scintillations of the ionosphere can be obtained. On September, 2012, we have installed two more receivers at Tromsoe. The distances between the three GNSS receivers are 172m, 242m and 218m, respectively. Drift velocities of irregularities can be measured using cross-correlation analysis for the time series of the GNSS signal intensity and phase obtained from the three receivers. Weak scintillation with an S4 index of 0.15 was observed at 1545 - 1605 UT on November 20, 2012. Period of the signal intensity variation was approximately 0.5 seconds. Since the scale-size of the irregularity causing the GPS scintillation, which corresponds to the Fresnel scale, is approximately 200 m, drift velocity of the irregularity causing the scintillation is estimated 400 m/s. On the other hand, the drift velocity was also estimated to be 350-400 m/s west-northwestward using cross-correlation analysis with the time series of the GPS signal intensity obtained from the three receivers. This velocity is similar to that estimated from the period of the signal intensity variation. The direction of aurora movement observed simultaneously using a digital camera at Tromsoe is also similar to that of the velocity

  1. On the Longitudinal Morphology of Zonal Irregularity Drift Measured using Networks of GPS Scintillation Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Valladares, C. E.; Delay, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    A complete characterization of field-aligned ionospheric irregularities responsible for the scintillation of satellite signals includes not only their spectral properties (power spectral strength, spectral index, anisotropy ratio, and outer-scale) but also their horizontal drift velocity. From a system impacts perspective, the horizontal drift velocity is important in that it dictates the rate of signal fading and also, to an extent, the level of phase fluctuations encountered by the receiver. From a physics perspective, studying the longitudinal morphology of zonal irregularity may lead to an improved understanding of the F region dynamo and regional electrodynamics at low latitudes. The irregularity drift at low latitudes is predominantly zonal and is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of satellite signals made by a pair of closely-spaced antennas. The AFRL-SCINDA network operates a small number of VHF spaced-antenna systems at low latitude stations for this purpose. A far greater number of GPS scintillation monitors are operated by AFRL-SCINDA (25-30) and the Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are situated too far apart to monitor the drift using cross-correlation techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory (Rino, Radio Sci., 1979) to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GPS measurements of S4, sigma-phi, and the propagation geometry alone. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this technique requires assumptions for the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment show that the ratio of sigma-phi to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift, and hence the zonal drift can be estimated with reasonable accuracy. In

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  3. Effects of magnetic-storm phases on F-layer irregularities from auroral to equatorial latitudes. Quarterly report, 1 Oct-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.; Mendillo, M.

    1990-12-31

    Partial Contents: The effects of electric field and ring current energy increases on F-layer irregularities at auroral and sub-auroral latitudes; The role of the ring current in generating or inhibiting equatorial F-layer irregularities during magnetic storms; Auroral and sub-auroral F-layer irregularities and high plasma convection during the magnetically active periods of September 17-24, 1984; and Simultaneous All-Sky Optical Airglow Imaging Observations and San Marco Satellite Measurements in the Pacific Sector.

  4. A CCD comparison of outer Jovian satellites and Trojan asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1991-01-01

    The eight small outer Jovian satellites are not as well known as the brighter, more illustrious Galilean satellites. They are divided into two groups, each containing four satellites; the inner group travels in prograde orbits while the outer group travels in retrograde orbits. From the distinct orbital characteristics of the two groups, most of the theories of their origin involve the capture and breakup of two planetesimals upon entry into the atmosphere of proto-Jupiter. Their proximity to the Trojans asteroids has led to conjectures of a link between them and the Trojans. However, Tholen and Zellner (1984) found no red spectrum among six of the satellites and postulated that they were all C-type objects; therefore, they were unlikely to be derivatives of the Trojan population. Charge-coupled device (CCD) photometry and spectroscopy of the eight outer Jovian satellites obtained from 1987 to 1989 and a comparison between these eight satellites and the Trojan asteroids are presented.

  5. Retrograde amnesia induced by drugs acting on different molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bonini, Juliana S; Coitinho, Adriana S; Vianna, Monica R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2004-06-01

    The gamma aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-sub(A)) agonist, muscimol, the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), and the inhibitor of the extracellularly regulated kinases (ERKs), UO 126, cause retrograde amnesia when administered to the hippocampus. In the present study, the authors found that they all cause retrograde amnesia for 1-trial inhibitory avoidance, not only when infused into the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus, but also when infused into the basolateral amygdala or the entorhinal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices. The posttraining time course of the effect of each drug was, however, quite different across brain structures. Thus, in all of them, NMDA receptors and the ERK pathway are indispensable for memory consolidation, and GABA-sub(A) receptor activation inhibits memory consolidation: but in each case, their influence is interwoven differently.

  6. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  7. Retrograde amnesia following carbon monoxide poisoning: a case report.

    PubMed

    Acland, Peter R; Heaver, Catriona

    2008-07-01

    Retrograde amnesia is a recognised neurological complication of carbon monoxide poisoning. This article describes the case of a female found dead in her bath where initial post-mortem findings and the surrounding circumstances raised strong suspicions of homicide, especially when there was contradictory evidence from her husband who was the only other person present. He was later diagnosed as having retrograde amnesia between his two visits to the bathroom to attend to his wife which caused him to merge them into one event, thus arousing suspicions of foul play. The discussion explores the current clinical views on non-fatal carbon monoxide poisoning as well as problems of interpretation of information derived from case work.

  8. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  9. Stormtime Ionospheric Irregularities in SAPS-Related Troughs: Causes of GPS Scintillations at Mid Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Burke, W. J.; Basu, S.; Kintner, P. M.; Ledvina, B.

    2003-12-01

    Radio-wave scintillations are space weather effects caused by ionospheric plasma density irregularities. The subauroral ionosphere, at magnetic latitudes corresponding to the northeastern US, is generally free of such irregularities and consequently scintillations. Recently, Basu et al. [JGR, 106, 30389, 2001] and Ledvina et al. [GRL, 29, 10.1029/2002GL014770] reported observations of strong GPS phase and amplitude scintillations at 1.5 GHz at Hanscom AFB, MA and Ithaca, NY during the magnetic storms of 23 September, 1999 and 25 - 26 September, 2001, respectively. We report results of a survey of small-scale plasma density and electromagnetic oscillations detected by DMSP F13, 14, and 15 satellites while flying over the affected regions at altitude of 840 km. Langmuir probe data, sampled at a rate of 24 Hz, show that during the scintillation intervals the amplitudes of density oscillations in the frequency range of 3-10 Hz increased by a factor of 100. The enhanced fluctuations appeared at the poleward edges of large-scale density troughs, embedded within subauroral polarization streams. When Doppler-shifted from spacecraft frames of reference the oscillations correspond to irregularities with spatial scales of 2-0.7 km. Most likely these irregularities are responsible for radio-signal scintillations at frequencies near 1 GHz.

  10. Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities: Origins and Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    data at Hawaii. See http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EAE03/05826/EAE03-J-05826.pdf. REFERENCES Cerruti, A. P., B. M. Ledvina , and P. M. Kintner...Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite signal, Radio Sci., in press, 2006. Ledvina , B. M., P. M. Kintner, and J. J. Makela...2000. [published, refereed] Cerruti, A.P., B.M. Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite

  11. Region of permanent generation of large-scale irregularities in the daytime winter ionosphere of the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Zhbankov, G. A.; Telegin, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    With the use of data from topside sounding on board the Interkosmos-19 (IK-19) satellite, the region of permanent generation of large-scale irregularities in the daytime winter ionosphere of the Southern Hemisphere is differentiated. This region is characterized by low values of foF2 and hmF2 and occupies a rather large latitudinal band, from the equatorial anomaly ridge to ~70° S within the longitudinal range from 180° to 360°. Irregularities with a dimension of hundreds kilometers are regularly observed in the period from 0700-0800 to 1800-1900 LT, i.e., mainly in the daytime. In the IK-19 ionograms, they normally appear in the form of an extra trace with a critical frequency higher than that of the main trace reflected from the ionosphere with lower density. The electron density in the irregularity maximum sometimes exceeds the density of the background ionosphere by nearly a factor of 3. A model of the ionosphere with allowance for its irregular structure was created, and it was shown on the basis of trajectory calculations how the IK-19 ionograms related to these irregularities are formed. A possible mechanism of the generation of large-scale irregularities of the ionospheric plasma is discussed.

  12. Propofol use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny G; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are often lengthier and more complex, thus requiring higher doses of sedatives for patient comfort and compliance. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with information regarding the use, safety profile, and merits of propofol for sedation in advanced endoscopic procedures like ERCP and EUS, based on the current literature. PMID:24833847

  13. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR INCLINED AND RETROGRADE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-03-20

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0 deg. < i < 170 deg., only reducing in amplitude for i>170 deg. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45 deg., becoming approximately constant for 45 deg. < i < 135 deg., and then declining for i>135 deg. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0 deg. to 180 deg., whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135 deg. < i {<=} 180 deg.), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  14. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  15. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  16. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  17. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  18. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  19. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  20. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  1. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  2. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  3. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  4. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  5. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-29

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  6. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  7. Novel class of potential therapeutics that target ricin retrograde translocation.

    PubMed

    Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Lau, Zerlina; Morohashi, Keita; Felsenfeld, Dan; Tortorella, Domenico

    2013-12-23

    Ricin toxin, an A-B toxin from Ricinus communis, induces cell death through the inhibition of protein synthesis. The toxin binds to the cell surface via its B chain (RTB) followed by its retrograde trafficking through intracellular compartments to the ER where the A chain (RTA) is transported across the membrane and into the cytosol. Ricin A chain is transported across the ER membrane utilizing cellular proteins involved in the disposal of aberrant ER proteins by a process referred to as retrograde translocation. Given the current lack of therapeutics against ricin intoxication, we developed a high-content screen using an enzymatically attenuated RTA chimera engineered with a carboxy-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (RTA(E177Q)egfp) to identify compounds that target RTA retrograde translocation. Stabilizing RTA(E177Q)egfp through the inclusion of proteasome inhibitor produced fluorescent peri-nuclear granules. Quantitative analysis of the fluorescent granules provided the basis to discover compounds from a small chemical library (2080 compounds) with known bioactive properties. Strikingly, the screen found compounds that stabilized RTA molecules within the cell and several compounds limited the ability of wild type RTA to suppress protein synthesis. Collectively, a robust high-content screen was developed to discover novel compounds that stabilize intracellular ricin and limit ricin intoxication.

  8. THE ORBITS OF NEPTUNE'S OUTER SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brozovic, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.; Sheppard, Scott S. E-mail: raj@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-04-15

    In 2009, we used the Subaru telescope to observe all the faint irregular satellites of Neptune for the first time since 2004. These observations extend the data arcs for Halimede, Psamathe, Sao, Laomedeia, and Neso from a few years to nearly a decade. We also report on a search for unknown Neptune satellites in a half-square degree of sky and a limiting magnitude of 26.2 in the R band. No new satellites of Neptune were found. We numerically integrate the orbits for the five irregulars and summarize the results of the orbital fits in terms of the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. Sao and Neso are confirmed to be Kozai librators, while Psamathe is a 'reverse circulator'. Halimede and Laomedeia do not seem to experience any strong resonant effects.

  9. The detection of the ionospheric irregularities by GNSS signal and the incoherent scatter radio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Sieradsky, Rafal; Zakharenkova, Irina; Rietveld, Michael; Kapcia, Jacek

    2013-04-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere has a very complicated structure and high dynamics. The ionospheric irregularities can produce scintillations of radio waves that occur predominantly in the ionosphere F-layer. The strong fluctuations can influence on the performance of the different space communication and navigation radio systems. The fluctuations of GPS/GLONASS signals are caused by the ionospheric irregularities with spatial dimensions more than 10 km. These structures can be detected by high potential incoherent scatter radars. It was proposed and carried out at the beginning of June 2012 experiment for a detailed study of the nature of the ionospheric irregularities, influencing on GPS/GLONASS signals parameters, by incoherent scatter and trans-ionospheric radio measurements simultaneously. The EISCAT facilities position provides the unique opportunity to study the ionospheric irregularities' parameters associated with TEC fluctuations and GPS/GLONASS signals scintillations. The EISCAT heating facility provides unique possibility to generate the artificial ionospheric irregularities and to estimate the impact factor of these irregularities on GPS/GLONASS signals transionospheric propagation. In order to detect the ionosphere irregularities it is used the IS radar measurements (electron density and plasma temperatures profiles) and simultaneously registered on EISCAT site amplitude and phase fluctuations in GPS/GLONASS signals by use of the Javad multi-constellation GPS/GLONASS receiver with high samples rate (100 Hz) and special scintillation GPS receiver PolaRxS PRO that dedicated to ionospheric monitoring and space weather applications and provides TEC and S4 scintillation index measurements. The low frequency fluctuations can be directly measured due to the electron density changes along the radio ray path between a GPS/GLONASS satellite and a ground-based receiver on EISCAT site. The raw data (under scintillating conditions) obtained by use of the high samples

  10. Analysis of ionospheric irregularities during total solar eclipse 2016 based on GNSS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husin, A.; Jiyo; Anggarani, S.; Ekawati, S.; Dear, V.

    2016-11-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred over Indonesia in the morning hours on 9 March 2016. Ionisations in the ionosphere which is associated with the solar radiation during the total eclipse provided a good opportunity to study the ionospheric irregularities. Using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data taken from dual-frequency receivers in Manado, we investigated and analysed the total electron content (TEC) perturbations with a time resolution of 60 s to reveal ionospheric irregularities during total eclipse. Result showed that TEC conditions based on IPP were decreased during solar eclipse on March 9, comparing with the neighbour day. The maximum percentage deviation (DTEC) from the average value during eclipse period, 00:00 - 02:40 UT reach -41.5%. The duration of maximum decrement in TEC occurs were around 2-30 minutes after the maximum obscuration.

  11. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  12. Effects of irregularity anisotropy on Faraday polarization fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Nghiem, S. V.; Yoo, C.

    1989-01-01

    The previous model (Lee et al., 1982) of the Faraday polarization fluctuations (FPF) is extended after taking into account the anisotropic nature of the commonly observed, rodlike and sheetlike ionospheric irregularities. Striking effects of irregularity anisotropy are found in the longitudinal radio propagation. However, if the wave propagation angle is not small (say, greater than 5 deg), the effects of irregularity anisotropy on FPF introduced by rodlike irregularities weaken significantly, while those caused by sheetlike irregularities remain prominent. Therefore, under the same ionospheric propagation conditions, sheetlike ionospheric irregularities are more effective than rodlike ionospheric irregularities in causing the FPF of radio waves. It is expected that intense FPF of VHF radio signals can be observed not only near the equatorial anomaly but also in the auroral region.

  13. Clusters in irregular areas and lattices.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M; Rogerson, Peter A; Wong, David W S

    2012-01-01

    Geographic areas of different sizes and shapes of polygons that represent counts or rate data are often encountered in social, economic, health, and other information. Often political or census boundaries are used to define these areas because the information is available only for those geographies. Therefore, these types of boundaries are frequently used to define neighborhoods in spatial analyses using geographic information systems and related approaches such as multilevel models. When point data can be geocoded, it is possible to examine the impact of polygon shape on spatial statistical properties, such as clustering. We utilized point data (alcohol outlets) to examine the issue of polygon shape and size on visualization and statistical properties. The point data were allocated to regular lattices (hexagons and squares) and census areas for zip-code tabulation areas and tracts. The number of units in the lattices was set to be similar to the number of tract and zip-code areas. A spatial clustering statistic and visualization were used to assess the impact of polygon shape for zip- and tract-sized units. Results showed substantial similarities and notable differences across shape and size. The specific circumstances of a spatial analysis that aggregates points to polygons will determine the size and shape of the areal units to be used. The irregular polygons of census units may reflect underlying characteristics that could be missed by large regular lattices. Future research to examine the potential for using a combination of irregular polygons and regular lattices would be useful.

  14. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen’s vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons. PMID:23010929

  15. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-10-09

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen's vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons.

  16. Analysis of Slope Limiters on Irregular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of flux and slope limiters on non-uniform grids in multiple dimensions. Many slope limiters in standard use do not preserve linear solutions on irregular grids impacting both accuracy and convergence. We rewrite some well-known limiters to highlight their underlying symmetry, and use this form to examine the proper - ties of both traditional and novel limiter formulations on non-uniform meshes. A consistent method of handling stretched meshes is developed which is both linearity preserving for arbitrary mesh stretchings and reduces to common limiters on uniform meshes. In multiple dimensions we analyze the monotonicity region of the gradient vector and show that the multidimensional limiting problem may be cast as the solution of a linear programming problem. For some special cases we present a new directional limiting formulation that preserves linear solutions in multiple dimensions on irregular grids. Computational results using model problems and complex three-dimensional examples are presented, demonstrating accuracy, monotonicity and robustness.

  17. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  18. Chaos at Uranus Spreads Dust Across the Regular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-05-01

    The short collision timescales between the Uranian irregular satellites argue for the past generation of vast quantities of dust at the outer reaches of Uranus’ Hill sphere (Bottke et al. 2010). Uranus’ extreme obliquity (98 degrees) renders the orbits of large objects unstable to eccentricity perturbations in the radial range a ≈ 60 - 75 Rp. (Tremaine et al. 2009). We study the effect on dust by investigating how the instability is modified by radiation pressure. We find that dust particles generated at the orbits of the irregular satellites move inward as radiation forces cause their orbits to decay (Burns et al. 1979). When they reach the unstable region, grain orbits undergo chaotic large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations that bring their pericenters inside the orbits of the regular satellites. We argue that the impact probabilities and expected spatial distribution across the satellite surfaces might explain the observed hemispherical color asymmetries common to the outer four regular satellites.

  19. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  20. Grain-scale Sr isotope heterogeneity in amphibolite (retrograded UHP eclogite, Dabie terrane): Implications for the origin and flow behavior of retrograde fluids during slab exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Yang, Yueheng; Chen, Yi; Su, Bin; Gao, Yijie; Zhang, Lingmin; Liu, Jingbo; Mao, Qian

    2016-12-01

    To constrain the origin and flow behavior of amphibolite-facies retrograde fluids during slab exhumation, we investigate the textures, trace element contents, and in situ strontium (Sr) isotopic compositions (using LA-MC-ICP-MS) of multiple types of epidote and apatite in the UHP eclogite and amphibolites from the Hualiangting area (Dabie terrane, China). The UHP epidote porphyroblasts in the eclogite (Ep-E), which formed at 28-30 kbar and 660-720 °C, contain high amounts of Sr, Pb, Th, Ba, and light rare earth elements (LREEs) and have a narrow range of initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70431 ± 0.00012 to 0.70454 ± 0.00010). Two types of amphibolite-facies epidote were recognized in the amphibolites. The first type of epidote (Ep-AI) developed in all the amphibolites and has slightly lower trace element contents than Ep-E. The Ep-AI has a same initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio range as the Ep-E and represents the primary amphibolite-facies retrograde product that is associated with an internally buffered fluid at 8.0-10.3 kbar and 646-674 °C. The other type of epidote (Ep-AII) occurs as irregular fragments, veins/veinlets, or reaction rims on the Ep-AI in certain amphibolites. Elemental X-ray maps reveal the presence of Ep-AI relics in the Ep-AII domains (appearing as a patchy texture), which indicates that Ep-AII most likely formed by the partial replacement of the Ep-AI in the presence of an infiltrating fluid. The distinctly lower trace element contents of Ep-AII are ascribed to element scavenging by a mechanism of dissolution-transport-precipitation during replacement. The Ep-AII in an individual amphibolite exhibits large intra- and inter-grain variations in the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70493 ± 0.00030 to 0.70907 ± 0.00022), which are between those of the Ep-AI and granitic gneisses (wall rock of the amphibolites, 0.7097-0.7108). These results verify that the infiltrating fluid was externally derived from granitic gneisses. The matrix apatite in the amphibolites has

  1. Physicochemical and release kinetics of natural and retrograded starch of Indian palmyrah shoots.

    PubMed

    Kumar Varma, Ch Ashok; Panpalia, S G; Kumar, K Jayaram

    2014-05-01

    Starch was isolated from the shoots of Indian palmyrah (Borassus flabellifer L.) and it was subjected to the process of retrogradation. The influence of retrogradation on morphological, physicochemical and drug release properties was studied. Retrogradation of native starch changed its morphology from oval, elliptical to crystalline rods. Due to retrogradation there is an increase in amylose content and better hydration capacity, swelling and solubility power. The micromeritic properties of native and retrograded starch uncover its usage as excipients in tablet manufacturing. The retrograded starch showed better powder characteristics to that of native starch. The characteristic peaks for d-glucopyranosyl ring confirms the carbohydrate nature of starch. The TGA data reveals that the retrograded starch shows less bound water to that of native starch during the first decomposition step. In-vitro release study reveals that the retrograded starch attained a better release retardant property and was best explained by Hixson-Crowell model. The result showed that retrograded starches can be used for the preparation of sustained release tablets.

  2. Successful rescue of a perforated chronic total occlusion using retrograde technique.

    PubMed

    Nah, Jong Chun; Cho, Wook Hyun; Choi, Suk Koo

    2009-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention of chronic total occlusion (CTO) is one of the greatest challenges in coronary interventions. Retrograde wiring is suggested as a solution to improve the success rate of intervention for CTO. We experienced the coronary perforation during antegrade wiring at the CTO lesion and sealed it using retrograde wiring and antegrade stenting in a patient who underwent coronary arterial bypass grafting. We found that, in selected cases, the retrograde wire technique may provide a valuable rescue option for perforated CTO in a patient having a retrogradely accessible conduit vessel.

  3. Hemodynamic changes and retrograde flow in LVAD failure.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    In the event of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) failure, we hypothesized that rotary blood pumps will experience significant retrograde flow and induce adverse physiologic responses. Catastrophic LVAD failure was investigated in computer simulation with pulsatile, axial, and centrifugal LVAD, mock flow loop with pulsatile (PVAD) and centrifugal (ROTAFLOW), and healthy and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models with pulsatile (PVAD), axial (HeartMate II), and centrifugal (HVAD) pumps. Simulated conditions were LVAD "off" with outflow graft clamped (baseline), LVAD "off" with outflow graft unclamped (LVAD failure), and LVAD "on" (5 L/min). Hemodynamics (aortic and ventricular blood pressures, LVAD flow, and left ventricular volume), echocardiography (cardiac volumes), and end-organ perfusion (regional blood flow microspheres) were measured and analyzed. Retrograde flow was observed with axial and centrifugal rotary pumps during LVAD failure in computer simulation (axial = -3.4 L/min, centrifugal = -2.8 L/min), mock circulation (pulsatile = -0.1 L/min, centrifugal = -2.7 L/min), healthy (pulsatile = -1.2 ± 0.3 L/min, axial = -2.2 ± 0.2 L/min, centrifugal = -1.9 ± 0.3 L/min), and ischemic heart failure (centrifugal = 2.2 ± 0.7 L/min) bovine models for all test conditions (p < 0.05). Differences between axial and centrifugal LVAD were statistically indiscernible. Retrograde flow increased ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes and workload, and decreased myocardial and end-organ perfusion during LVAD failure compared with baseline, LVAD support, and pulsatile LVAD failure.

  4. Prevention of retrograde calculus migration with the Stone Cone.

    PubMed

    Pardalidis, N P; Papatsoris, A G; Kosmaoglou, E V

    2005-02-01

    Retrograde calculus migration during ureteroscopic lithotripsy remains a problem in 5-40% of cases. We assessed the safety and efficacy of the Stone Cone device, in comparison with the standard flat wire basket. A total of 56 consecutive patients with ureteral calculi, suitable for ureteroscopic extraction and/or lithotripsy, where included in this prospective study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In group A (30 patients), we used the Stone Cone, while in group B (26 patients) we used the standard flat wire basket. The Stone Cone was placed through a cystoscope under fluoroscopic guidance, or when necessary under direct ureteroscopic control. Whenever necessary, intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy took place in both groups. Statistical significance was assessed by the paired t-test. The mean operative time was 48.5 min in group A, and 42.4 min in group B. Intact calculus extraction was possible in 16.6% in group A, and in 7.6% in group B (P < 0.01). Retrograde stone migration was revealed in 23% in group B only (P < 0.001). Also, residual fragments > 3 mm were recorded in 30.7% in group B only (P < 0.001). None of the patients in group A required auxiliary procedures, in contrary to 23% in group B (P < 0.001). No major complications were recorded in group A, while in group B a case of major ureteral mucosal abrasion was recorded. The Stone Cone is safe and efficient in preventing retrograde stone migration and in minimizing residual fragments during ureteroscopic lithotripsy in comparison with the flat wire basket.

  5. Computing proton dose to irregularly moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods: The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results: A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  6. Computing Proton Dose to Irregularly Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, and 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  7. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  8. Irregular trajectories in vakonomic mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakov, E. R.; Oleinikov, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    In his works, V.V. Kozlov proposed a mathematical model for the dynamics of a mechanical system with nonintegrable constraints, which was called vakonomic. In contrast to the then conventional nonholonomic model, trajectories in the vakonomic model satisfy necessary conditions for a minimum in a variational problem with equality constraints. We consider the so-called irregular case of this variational problem, which was not covered by Kozlov, when the trajectory is a singular point of the constraints and the necessary minimum conditions based on the Lagrange principle make no sense. This situation is studied using the theory of abnormal problems developed by the first author. As a result, the classical necessary minimum conditions are strengthened and developed to this class of problems.

  9. Irregular employment amongst migrants in Spanish cities.

    PubMed

    Sole, C; Ribas, N; Bergalli, V; Parella, S

    1998-04-01

    This article presents the irregular employment situation of non-European union immigrants in Spanish cities. Foreign labor is remarkable for its heterogeneity in terms of country of origin, demographic characteristics, and the different ways in which immigrants have entered the job market. Legal immigrants tend to concentrate in five different branches of activity, such as domestic service (mostly women), hotel and restaurant industry, agriculture, building and retail trade. Migrants who work in agriculture suffer the worst labor conditions than all other migrants. However, all migrants experience difficulty in obtaining residency and labor permits. Four integration strategies among Moroccan immigrants in Catalonia are discussed and can be viewed as support networks of the immigrants.

  10. Artificial periodic irregularities in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietveld, M. T.; Turunen, E.; Matveinen, H.; Goncharov, N. P.; Pollari, P.

    1996-12-01

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) are produced in the ionospheric plasma by a powerful standing electromagnetic wave reflected off the F region. The resulting electron-density irregularities can scatter other high-frequency waves if the Bragg scattering condition is met. Such measurements have been performed at mid-latitudes for two decades and have been developed into a useful ionospheric diagnostic technique. We report here the first measurements from a high-latitude station, using the EISCAT heating facility near Tromsø, Norway. Both F-region and lower-altitude ionospheric echoes have been obtained, but the bulk of the data has been in the E and D regions with echoes extending down to 52-km altitude. Examples of API are shown, mainly from the D region, together with simultaneous VHF incoherent-scatter-radar (ISR) data. Vertical velocities derived from the rate of phase change during the irregularity decay are shown and compared with velocities derived from the ISR. Some of the API-derived velocities in the 75-115-km height range appear consistent with vertical neutral winds as shown by their magnitudes and by evidence of gravity waves, while other data in the 50-70-km range show an unrealistically large bias. For a comparison with ISR data it has proved difficult to get good quality data sets overlapping in height and time. The initial comparisons show some agreement, but discrepancies of several metres per second do not yet allow us to conclude that the two techniques are measuring the same quantity. The irregularity decay time-constants between about 53 and 70 km are compared with the results of an advanced ion-chemistry model, and height profiles of recorded signal power are compared with model estimates in the same altitude range. The calculated amplitude shows good agreement with the data in that the maximum occurs at about the same height as that of the measured amplitude. The calculated time-constant agrees very well with the data below 60 km but

  11. Parametric phase diffusion analysis of irregular oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabedal, Justus T. C.

    2014-09-01

    Parametric phase diffusion analysis (ΦDA), a method to determine variability of irregular oscillations, is presented. ΦDA is formulated as an analysis technique for sequences of Poincaré return times found in numerous applications. The method is unbiased by the arbitrary choice of Poincaré section, i.e. isophase, which causes a spurious component in the Poincaré return times. Other return-time variability measures can be biased drastically by these spurious return times, as shown for the Fano factor of chaotic oscillations in the Rössler system. The empirical use of ΦDA is demonstrated in an application to heart rate data from the Fantasia Database, for which ΦDA parameters successfully classify heart rate variability into groups of age and gender.

  12. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  13. Satellite Vulnerabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-18

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...allies. 8  Satellites and Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance We have become dependent also on our satellite surveillance assets...uninterrupted ISR”, with “space intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems…fundamental to air power—especially to the execution

  14. C/NOFS observations of intermediate and transitional scale-size equatorial spread F irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; Kelley, M. C.; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; de La Beaujardière, O.; Bust, G. S.

    We present initial results of the analysis of high sampling rate (512 Hz) measurements made by the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) instrument and the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) onboard the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. This letter focuses on the analysis of irregularities with scale-sizes in the intermediate (0.1-10 km) and transitional (10-100 m) domains observed when the satellite was flying through a large equatorial spread F (ESF) depletion on the night of October 9-10, 2008 over South America. The results presented in this letter suggest the operation of a diffusive subrange in the density power spectra and the possibility of an inertial plasma regime being observed at relatively low altitudes as a result of the long-lasting solar minimum conditions.

  15. Understanding the Unique Equatorial Density Irregularities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    monitoring devices. In addition, the Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites ion density observations show unique features for the African sector [Hei et al. 2005...installed in Africa [Amory-Mazaudier, et al. 2009] since 2007. Alongside this activity, universities in Africa (e.g. Bahir Dar Uni- versity, Ethiopia...African sector, show unique equatorial iono- spheric structure [Hei et al. 2005]. For example, this region equatorial plasma bubbles, which produce

  16. Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities: Origins and Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    and Ionospheric Scintillations that can be found at: GPS and ionospheric scintillations, P.M. Kintner, B.M. Ledvina , and E.R. de Paula, Space... Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite signal, Radio Sci., submitted, 2005. [refereed] 7...Adv. Space Res., 31(3), 741-747, 2003. [refereed] Humphreys, T.E., B.M. Ledvina , M.L. Psiaki, A.P. Cerruti, and P.M. Kintner, Analysis of

  17. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  18. Avoiding irregularities on the nasal dorsum in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Fernando Javier; Cardemil, Felipe

    2016-03-30

    Palpable irregularities along the nasal dorsum are a frequent complication of dorsal handling in rhinoplasty because resection techniques are used. This is often a result of improper management of the dorsum after resection. The surgical technique for handling of dorsal irregularities following dorsal resection is described. The key steps to avoid irregularities are diamond rasps, autospreader and morselized cartilage as camouflage. Following resection of the hump, the anatomy of the nasal dorsum should be adequately restructured; thereby we achieve an adequate aesthetic result and ideally preventing irregularities on palpation.

  19. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M.; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  20. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period.

  1. Role of phospholipase A(2) in retrograde transport of ricin.

    PubMed

    Klokk, Tove Irene; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2011-09-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin classified as a bioterror agent, for which there are no known treatment options available after intoxication. It is composed of an enzymatically active A-chain connected by a disulfide bond to a cell binding B-chain. After internalization by endocytosis, ricin is transported retrogradely to the Golgi and ER, from where the ricin A-chain is translocated to the cytosol where it inhibits protein synthesis and thus induces cell death. We have identified cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) as an important factor in ricin retrograde transport. Inhibition of PLA(2) protects against ricin challenge, however the toxin can still be endocytosed and transported to the Golgi. Interestingly, ricin transport from the Golgi to the ER is strongly impaired in response to PLA(2) inhibition. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that ricin is still colocalized with the trans-Golgi marker TGN46 in the presence of PLA(2) inhibitor, but less is colocalized with the cis-Golgi marker GM130. We propose that PLA(2) inhibition results in impaired ricin transport through the Golgi stack, thus preventing it from reaching the ER. Consequently, ricin cannot be translocated to the cytosol to exert its toxic action.

  2. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  3. Retrograde replacement, reaction-driven cracking and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Retrograde reactions involve hydration, carbonation and/or oxidation of volatile-poor, high grade metamorphic and igneous rocks. They can increase solid volume, via increasing solid mass and decreasing solid density, provided fluid is supplied in an open system, and dissolution does not remove significant solid mass. Increasing solid volume can create deviatoric stress, causing fractures to form. This can be a positive feedback, maintaining or increasing permeability and reactive surface area. Alternatively, high viscosity host rock can act as a rigid container. Transient stress rise due to initial volume change causes nearly equal volumetric rates of precipitation and pressure solution. Retrograde reactions can be self-limiting, consuming fluid that is required both as a reactant and as a catalyst, filling pore space with newly crystallized material, and armoring reactive surface areas. However, retrograde products, such as serpentine, talc and clays are common, and have important controls on crustal rheology and physical properties, e.g., in the "cold nose" above subduction zones, in subducting plates, and in fault zones. The best-known retrograde processes are hydration and carbonation of olivine, in igneous rocks and residual mantle peridotite, e.g. near the seafloor. Fully hydrated (serpentinites) or carbonated (listwanites) peridotites show that retrograde reactions can proceed to completion. It is common to find that replacement is nearly isochemical, with the exception of H2O and CO2, suggesting that large-scale dissolution did not take place and solid volume expansion was significant. The free energy changes driving hydration and carbonation of olivine could generate overpressures of 100's to 1000's of MPa. These thermodynamic upper bounds can be compared to estimates based on microstructure. Evans (Int Geol Rev 2004) and Jamtveit et al. (EPSL 2008) provide microphotographs of igneous troctolites, with interstitial plagioclase surrounding rounded olivine

  4. Modeling of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetically disturbed conditions over African low-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick; Habarulema, John Bosco; Jurua, Edward

    2016-10-01

    In this study, station-specific models of ionospheric irregularities over low-latitude African region during geomagnetically disturbed days (Dst≤-50 nT) have been developed. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-derived ionospheric total electron content (TEC) data during 1998-2014 were used. Ionospheric irregularities were represented with the rate of change of TEC index (ROTI). The inputs for the models are the local time, solar flux index, day number of the year, auroral electrojet, and the disturbance storm time indices, while the output is the hourly median ROTI during these given conditions. To develop the models, the ROTI index values were binned based on the input parameters and cubic B splines were then fitted to the binned data. Developed models were validated with independent data over stations within 680 km radius. The models reproduced fairly well the inhibitions and the occurrences of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetically disturbed days. The models even emulated these patterns in the various seasons, during medium and high solar activity conditions. During validations of the models, the percentages of the number of errors (difference between the observed and the modeled ROTI) <0.05 total electron content unit, 1TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU)/Min at all the stations were all >70% and the root-mean-square error were mostly < 0.1 TECU/Min. Furthermore, the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.47 to 0.76.

  5. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Thomas, Peter C.; Carcich, Brian T.; Veverka, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  6. Equatorial Density Irregularity Structures at Intermediate Scales and Their Temporal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We examine high resolution measurements of ion density in the equatorial ionosphere from the AE-E satellite during the years 1977-1981. Structure over spatial scales from 18 km to 200 m is characterized by the spectrum of irregularities at larger and smaller scales and at altitudes above 350 km and below 300 km. In the low-altitude region, only small amplitude large-scale (lambda greater than 5 km) density modulations are often observed, and thus the power spectrum of these density structures exhibits a steep spectral slope at kilometer scales. In the high-altitude region, sinusoidal density fluctuations, characterized by enhanced power near 1-km scale, are frequently observed during 2000-0200 LT. However, such fluctuations are confined to regions at the edges of larger bubble structures where the average background density is high. Small amplitude irregularity structures, observed at early local time hours, grow rapidly to high-intensity structures in about 90 min. Fully developed structures, which are observed at late local time hours, decay very slowly producing only-small differences in spectral characteristics even 4 hours later. The local time evolution of irregularity structure is investigated by using average statistics for low-(1% less than sigma less than 5%) and high-intensity (sigma greater than 10%) structures. At lower altitudes, little chance in the spectral slope is seen as a function of local time, while at higher attitudes the growth and maintenance of structures near 1 km scales dramatically affects the spectral slope.

  7. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  8. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  9. Splenic Subcapsular Hematoma After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Montenovo, Martin; Javed, Emran; Bakthavatsalam, Ramasamy; Reyes, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Splenic injuries after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are a rare but lethal complication. We describe a subcapsular splenic hematoma requiring emergent splenectomy after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a liver transplant recipient.

  10. Multi-station observation of ionospheric irregularities over South Africa during strong geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant Bertillas; Cilliers Pierre, J.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents results pertaining to the response of the mid-latitude ionosphere to strong geomagnetic storms that occurred from 31 March to 02 April 2001 and 07-09 September 2002. The results are based on (i) Global Positioning Systems (GPSs) derived total electron content (TEC) variations accompanying the storm, (ii) ionosonde measurements of the ionospheric electrodynamic response towards the storms and (iii) effect of storm induced travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) on GPS derived TEC. Ionospheric data comprising of ionospheric TEC obtained from GPS measurements, ionograms, solar wind data obtained from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and magnetic data from ground based magnetometers were used in this study. Storm induced features in vertical TEC (VTEC) have been obtained and compared with the mean VTEC of quiet days. The response of the mid-latitude ionosphere during the two storm periods examined may be characterised in terms of increased or decreased level of VTEC, wave-like structures in VTEC perturbation and sudden enhancement in hmF2 and h‧F. The study reveals both positive and negative ionospheric storm effects on the ionosphere over South Africa during the two strong storm conditions. These ionospheric features have been mainly attributed to the travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) as the driving mechanism for the irregularities causing the perturbations observed. TEC perturbations due to the irregularities encountered by the satellites were observed on satellites with pseudo random numbers (PRNs) 15, 17, 18 and 23 between 17:00 and 23:00 UT on 07 September 2002.

  11. Evaluating transport in irregular pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Dimitri A.; Hooman, Kamel; Klimenko, Alexander Y.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for investigating transport phenomena in porous media is presented. This approach has the capacity to represent various kinds of irregularity in porous media without the need for excessive detail or computational effort. The overall method combines a generalized effective medium approximation (EMA) with a macroscopic continuum model in order to derive a transport equation with explicit analytical expressions for the transport coefficients. The proposed form of the EMA is an anisotropic and heterogeneous extension of Kirkpatrick's EMA [Rev. Mod. Phys.RMPHAT0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.45.574 45, 574 (1973)] which allows the overall model to account for microscopic alterations in connectivity (with the locations of the pores and the orientation and length of the throat) as well as macroscopic variations in transport properties. A comparison to numerical results for randomly generated networks with different properties is given, indicating the potential for this methodology to handle cases that would pose significant difficulties to many other analytical models.

  12. Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts as a Source of Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) [1, 2]. SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. A numerical code in C language to solve the derived nonlinear equations for analysis of interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere was developed. This code was used to analyze competition between interchange and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities in the equatorial region [3]. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defence Military Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data [2] during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. [1] Mishin, E. (2013), Interaction of substorm injections with the subauroral geospace: 1. Multispacecraft observations of SAID, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 5782-5796, doi:10.1002/jgra.50548. [2] Mishin, E., and N. Blaunstein (2008), Irregularities within subauroral polarization stream-related troughs and GPS radio interference at midlatitudes. In: T. Fuller-Rowell et al. (eds), AGU Geophysical Monograph 181, MidLatitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances, pp. 291-295, doi:10.1029/181GM26, Washington, DC, USA. [3] V. Sotnikov, T. Kim, E. Mishin, T. Genoni, D. Rose, I. Paraschiv, Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 15 - 19 December, 2014.

  13. Sampling characteristics of satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1989-01-01

    The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended to account for both irregular data distributions and observational noise - the sampling irregularity making the system much more susceptible to noise than in regularly sampled cases. The problem is formulated here in terms of least-squares and applied to spacecraft in 10-day and 17-day repeating orbits. The 'diamond-pattern' laid down spatially in such repeating orbits means that either repeat period adequately samples the spatial variables, but the slow overall temporal coverage in the 17-day pattern leads to much greater uncertainty than in the shorter repeat cycle. The result is not definitive and it is not concluded that a 10-day orbit repeat is the most appropriate one. A major conclusion, however, is that different orbital choices have potentially quite different sampling characteristics which need to be analyzed in terms of the spectral characteristics of the moving sea surface.

  14. BATHYMETRIC IRREGULARITIES, JET FORMATION, AND SUBSEQUENT MIXING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that bathymetric contours influence and steer currents and that irregularities in bathymetry contribute to the formation of aquatic non-buoyant jets and buoyant plumes. For example, bathymetric irregularities can channel flow through canyons or accelerate flow ov...

  15. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  16. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  17. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  18. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  19. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  20. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  1. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  2. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  3. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  4. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  5. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  6. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  7. The Interplay Between Gas and Stars in Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, M.; Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Bullejos, A.; Arias, L.; Georgiev, L.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.

    2002-01-01

    Irregular galaxies are unique objects where the interrelationship between massive stars and gas can be studied without the contamination of other phenomena such as the density waves present in spiral galaxies. 3D spectrometers, in particular, scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers, are the best suited instruments to detect and study the kinematical behavior of bubbles and superbubbles in irregular galaxies. When we complement these results with the information on the stellar content of the bubbles and the distribution of massive stars in the irregular galaxies, we get a deeper insight on how the star formation process occur in irregular galaxies and how the massive stars shape the interestellar medium. We will present examples of the interplay between massive stars and superbubbles in irregular galaxies from the observations of these objects by means of the PUMA scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer.

  8. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  9. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives.

  10. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  11. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography associated pancreatitis: A 15-year review

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Kevin E; Willingham, Field F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the literature regarding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis. We searched for and evaluated all articles describing the diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, morbidity, mortality and prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) in adult patients using the PubMed database. Search terms included endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, pancreatitis, ampulla of vater, endoscopic sphincterotomy, balloon dilatation, cholangiography, adverse events, standards and utilization. We limited our review of articles to those published between January 1, 1994 and August 15, 2009 regarding human adults and written in the English language. Publications from the reference sections were reviewed and included if they were salient and fell into the time period of interest. Between the dates queried, seventeen large (> 500 patients) prospective and four large retrospective trials were conducted. PEP occurred in 1%-15% in the prospective trials and in 1%-4% in the retrospective trials. PEP was also reduced with pancreatic duct stent placement and outcomes were improved with endoscopic sphincterotomy compared to balloon sphincter dilation in the setting of choledocholithiasis. Approximately 34 pharmacologic agents have been evaluated for the prevention of PEP over the last fifteen years in 63 trials. Although 22 of 63 trials published during our period of review suggested a reduction in PEP, no pharmacologic therapy has been widely accepted in clinical use in decreasing the development of PEP. In conclusion, PEP is a well-recognized complication of ERCP. Medical treatment for prevention has been disappointing. Proper patient selection and pancreatic duct stenting have been shown to reduce the complication rate in randomized clinical trials. PMID:21160744

  13. Feasibility of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Thomas; Willard, Michael D; Ruhnke, Isabelle; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Cats are predisposed to diseases of the biliary tract and the exocrine pancreas and these can be challenging to diagnose. In humans and dogs > 10 kg, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has been successfully used to diagnose some of these disorders. The purpose of our study was to determine whether ERCP would also be feasible in cats using a pediatric duodenoscope. Four purpose-bred, clinically healthy, castrated domestic shorthair cats participated in two studies. Study 1 compared standard white light endoscopy with chromoendoscopy for localizing the major duodenal papilla. In Study 2 ERCP was performed. Repeated clinical examinations and measurements of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) were performed before and up to 18 hours after interventions on all cats. Chromoendoscopy was subjectively judged to be superior for localizing the major papilla. Insertion of the ERCP catheter was best accomplished when cats were in dorsal recumbency. Complete ERCP was successful in two cats. In the other cats, either retrograde cholangiography or pancreatography was possible. Serum fPLI concentrations increased temporarily in two cats during Study 2 when measured immediately, 2, 4, and 18 h after ERCP. Peak fPLI concentrations were detected either immediately after ERCP or 2 h later. No clinical signs of complications were observed within 18 h after the procedures. Findings indicated that ERCP is technically demanding but feasible in healthy cats. Future studies need to determine whether the temporary increases in serum fPLI concentrations are clinically important and to investigate the utility of ERCP in feline patients.

  14. Conscious Sedation for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Dexmedetomidine Versus Midazolam

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Neslihan; Sahin, Sukran; Aksu, Hale; Yavascaoglu, Belgin; Gurbet, Alp; Turker, Gurkan; Kadioglu, Asli Guler

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Midazolam and dexmedetomidine, which are used for sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, were compared to evaluate the differences in efficacy, hemodynamics, and side effects. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients aged between 18 and 80 were randomly assigned to two groups according to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification: Group M received midazolam with an initial bolus infusion of 0.04 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), followed by additional doses of 0.5 mg i.v. midazolam, titrated to achieve a Ramsay sedation scale score of 3–4. Group D received dexmedetomidine with an initial bolus infusion of 1 mcg/kg/hr i.v. over 10 minutes, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2–0.7 mcg/kg/hr, titrated to achieve an RSS of 3–4. A Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was performed prior to sedation and in the recovery room once the Modified Aldrete Score (MAS) reached 9–10. Patient heart rates, arterial pressure and pain were evaluated. Results: Patients in Group D had lower heart rates at 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 minutes following the initiation of sedation (p<0.05). There was no statistical difference in arterial pressure, RSS, MMSE or respiratory rate between the two groups. Coughing, nausea and vomiting occurred in 3 patients in Group M (12%), whereas no patient in Group D experienced these symptoms. The procedure elicited a gag response in 7 patients in Group M (28%) and in 4 patients in Group D (16%), with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). When patient and surgeon satisfaction was compared between the two groups, Group D showed higher surgeon satisfaction scores (p<0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine for conscious sedation during short, invasive procedures, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, could be a superior alternative to the use of midazolam. PMID:25610153

  15. Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Intermediate -scale Irregularities in the Post-sunset Low-latitude Ionosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.

    2013-12-01

    Efforts to forecast the strength and latitudinal extent of scintillations on VHF and higher frequency trans-ionospheric radio signals recorded in low-latitude regions require a knowledge of the evolution of the spectrum of ionospheric irregularities in the intermediate scale range (~ 100m - few km), and dynamics of the irregularities. At present, the 3-D models that have been developed to simulate the evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs), capture the dynamics of EPBs but do not have adequate spatial resolution to yield the intermediate scale irregularity spectrum. Power spectra of weak scintillations recorded on a VHF, UHF, or L-band signal provide direct information about the intermediate scale irregularity spectrum. However, for strong scintillations, it is not possible to derive the irregularity spectral slopes from scintillation spectra, and information about the irregularity spectrum is deduced from other characteristics, such as the coherence scale of the ground scintillation pattern of intensity, which depends on the irregularity spectrum as seen from model calculation results presented here. Information about the spatio-temporal evolution of intermediate scale irregularities is derived from scintillation data on the basis of these theoretical results. For this study, spaced receiver measurements of intensity scintillations on a VHF signal transmitted from a geo-stationary satellite and recorded at an equatorial station are used. Generally, in the initial phase of EPB development after sunset, there is a large de-correlation between the spaced receiver signals, that may be attributed to fluctuations in the velocity of the irregularities due to the perturbation electric fields associated with the interchange instability, which gives rise to the irregularities. The 'random velocity' parameter, computed from spaced receiver intensity scintillation measurements, is a measure of the de-correlation. The coherence scale and the random velocity, together

  16. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of <4.2 ± 1.8 μG, three times lower than in the normal spirals. The strongest field among all LG dwarfs of 10 μG (at 2.64 GHz) is observed in the starburst dwarf IC 10. The production of total magnetic fields in dwarf systems appears to be regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization

  17. Ionosphere Explorer I Satellite: First Observations from the Fixed-Frequency Topside Sounder.

    PubMed

    Calvert, W; Knecht, R W; Vanzandt, T E

    1964-10-16

    The satellite has yielded new information on the arrangement of irregularities in sheets and the structure of plasma resonances in the ionosphere. Studies of the geographical distributions of the different kinds of spread F, sporadic E, and other phenomena will be facilitated by the satellite. More phenomena will undoubtedly be recognized as the records are studied.

  18. The retromer complex and clathrin define an early endosomal retrograde exit site.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Vincent; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Tenza, Danièle; Rojas, Raúl; Lamaze, Christophe; Bonifacino, Juan S; Raposo, Graça; Johannes, Ludger

    2007-06-15

    Previous studies have indicated a role for clathrin, the clathrin adaptors AP1 and epsinR, and the retromer complex in retrograde sorting from early/recycling endosomes to the trans Golgi network (TGN). However, it has remained unclear whether these protein machineries function on the same or parallel pathways. We show here that clathrin and the retromer subunit Vps26 colocalize at the ultrastructural level on early/recycling endosomes containing Shiga toxin B-subunit, a well-studied retrograde transport cargo. As previously described for clathrin, we find that interfering with Vps26 expression inhibits retrograde transport of the Shiga toxin B-subunit to the TGN. Under these conditions, endosomal tubules that take the Shiga toxin B-subunit out of transferrin-containing early/recycling endosomes appear to be stabilized. This situation differs from that previously described for low-temperature incubation and clathrin-depletion conditions under which Shiga toxin B-subunit labeling was found to overlap with that of the transferrin receptor. In addition, we find that the Shiga toxin B-subunit and the transferrin receptor accumulate close to multivesicular endosomes in clathrin-depleted cells, suggesting that clathrin initiates retrograde sorting on vacuolar early endosomes, and that retromer is then required to process retrograde tubules. Our findings thus establish a role for the retromer complex in retrograde transport of the B-subunit of Shiga toxin, and strongly suggest that clathrin and retromer function in consecutive retrograde sorting steps on early endosomes.

  19. Effects of protein in wheat flour on retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Xijun, Lian; Junjie, Guo; Danli, Wang; Lin, Li; Jiaran, Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Albumins, globulins, gliadins, and glutenins were isolated from wheat flour and the effects of those proteins on retrogradation of wheat starch were investigated. The results showed that only glutenins retarded retrogradation of wheat starch and other 3 proteins promoted it. The results of IR spectra proved that no S-S linkage formed during retrogradation of wheat starch blended with wheat proteins. Combination of wheat starch and globulins or gliadins through glucosidic bonds hindered the hydrolysis of wheat starch by α-amylase. The melting peak temperatures of retrograded wheat starch attached to different proteins were 128.46, 126.14, 132.03, 121.65, and 134.84 °C for the control with no protein, albumins, glutenins, globulins, gliadins groups, respectively, and there was no second melting temperature for albumins group. Interaction of wheat proteins and starch in retrograded wheat starch greatly decreased the endothermic enthalpy (△H) of retrograded wheat starch. Retrograded wheat starch bound to gliadins might be a new kind of resistant starch based on glycosidic bond between starch and protein.

  20. The Yeast Retrograde Response as a Model of Intracellular Signaling of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jazwinski, S. Michal; Kriete, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates intracellular signaling pathways that impact yeast longevity, and the best known of these pathways is the retrograde response. More recently, similar responses have been discerned in other systems, from invertebrates to human cells. However, the identity of the signal transducers is either unknown or apparently diverse, contrasting with the well-established signaling module of the yeast retrograde response. On the other hand, it has become equally clear that several other pathways and processes interact with the retrograde response, embedding it in a network responsive to a variety of cellular states. An examination of this network supports the notion that the master regulator NFκB aggregated a variety of mitochondria-related cellular responses at some point in evolution and has become the retrograde transcription factor. This has significant consequences for how we view some of the deficits associated with aging, such as inflammation. The support for NFκB as the retrograde response transcription factor is not only based on functional analyses. It is bolstered by the fact that NFκB can regulate Myc–Max, which is activated in human cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and impacts cellular metabolism. Myc–Max is homologous to the yeast retrograde response transcription factor Rtg1–Rtg3. Further research will be needed to disentangle the pro-aging from the anti-aging effects of NFκB. Interestingly, this is also a challenge for the complete understanding of the yeast retrograde response. PMID:22629248

  1. Is retrograde drilling really useful for osteochondral lesion of talus with subchondral cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong-Yup; Kim, Jong-Kil; Lee, Kwang-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Retrograde drilling is a well accepted procedure for osteochondral lesion of the talus and subchondral cyst with intact overlying cartilage. It has good results in most reports. Compared to anterograde drilling, retrograde drilling can protect the integrity of the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of using retrograde drilling for osteochondral lesion with subchondral cyst and discuss the mechanism involved in the development of subchondral cyst. Patient concerns: We report a 53-year-old man who had complained left ankle pain that lasted over 6 months which was exacerbated by walking. Diagnoses: We diagnosed it as osteochondral lesion of the talus with subchondral cyst. Interventions: Plain X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. Outcomes: He undertook retrograde drilling without debridement of cartilage. After the surgery, the pain had been subsided for 1 year, although arthritic change had progressed. However, after 5 years of retrograde drilling, he revisited our hospital due to severe ankle pain. Plain X-ray and MRI showed arthritic change of the ankle and multiple cystic formation of talus. Lessons: Retrograde drilling has some problem because this procedure is not theoretically correct when the development of a subchondral cyst in osteochondral lesion of the talus is considered. In addition, retrograde drilling may impair uninjured bone marrow of the talus, resulting in the development of multiple cystic formations. PMID:27930520

  2. Origins, Evolutions and Processes of the Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; D'Angelo, G.; Hubickyj, O.

    2012-12-01

    Recent simulations of the late stages growth of Jupiter presented by Lissauer et al. (2009, Icarus 199, 338) are used to test the model of capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites within proto-Jupiter's distended and thermally-supported envelope. We find such capture highly unlikely, since the envelope shrinks too slowly for a large number of moons to be retained, and many of those that would be retained would orbit closer to the planet than do the observed jovian irregulars. Our calculations do not address (and therefore do not exclude) the possibility that the irregular satellites were captured as a result of gas drag within a circumjovian disk. Support for this research from NASA Outer Planets Research Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Analysis of Plasma Irregularities and Electromagnetic Signals Based on Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometer Burst Mode Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Coisson, P.; Brocco, L.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Vigneron, P.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.

    2015-12-01

    The commissioning phase of Swarm satellites provided opportunities to acquire measurement during special acquisitions sessions. The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) instrument of each satellite were operated in "burst mode": the recording frequency of the instruments were risen from the nominal 1 Hz to 250 Hz. A total of seven burst mode sessions, covering between 3 and 48 hours of continuous recording, were realized between December 2013 and February 2014. During that time, the local time of Swarm satellites orbits shifted from midnight-noon to post sunrise-post sunset. The last burst-mode session occurred during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. Therefore ASM burst mode data allow to investigate both quiet and geomagnetic active periods. The analysis of burst mode data was focused on the phenomena that can be investigated only using this higher sampling rate, providing insight in the frequency band between few Hz to 125 Hz. From the analysis of the magnetic field data we could observe typical signals related to different geomagnetic phenomena, showing distinct features at low, mid and high latitude. We were able to detect fast magnetic field fluctuations with a typical pattern, associated with low-latitudes irregularities in the ionospheric plasma during the development of post-sunset plasma bubbles. We also present results of the analysis of short electromagnetic signals that were detected mostly in the mid-to-low latitudes evening sector, investigating their correlation with the occurrence of lightning on the ground. Over the high latitudes, we detected fast variations in the intensity of the magnetic field during the active periods and analyse their correlations with plasma irregularities.

  4. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions.

  5. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions. PMID:26891225

  6. Determining Ionospheric Irregularity Spectral Density Function from Japan GEONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, E. H.; Light, M. E.; Parker, P. A.; Carrano, C. S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Japan's GEONET GPS network is the densest GPS monitoring network in the world, with 1200+ receivers over the area of Japan. Measuring and calibrating the integrated total electron content (TEC) from each station has been done in many cases to provide detailed maps of ionospheric disturbances over Japan. We use TEC measurements from Japan's GEONET array to determine an empirically derived description of the 2-dimensional scale sizes of spatial irregularities above Japan. The contributions from various scale sizes will be included in a statistical description for the irregularity spectral density (ISD) function. We will compare the statistics of the spatial irregularities between calm and moderately scintillated conditions.

  7. Coronary perforation with tamponade successfully managed by retrograde and antegrade coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Boukhris, Marouane; Tomasello, Salvatore Davide; Azzarelli, Salvatore; Elhadj, Zied Ibn; Marzà, Francesco; Galassi, Alfredo Ruggero

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, retrograde approach for chronic total occlusions has rapidly evolved, enabling a higher rate of revascularization success. Compared to septal channels, epicardial collaterals tend to be more tortuous, more difficult to negotiate, and more prone to rupture. Coronary perforation is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of coronary angioplasty, often leading to emergency cardiac surgery. We report a case of a retrograde chronic total occlusion revascularization through epicardial collaterals, complicated by both retrograde and antegrade coronary perforation with tamponade, and successfully managed by coil embolization.

  8. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  9. Star Formation in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm-Palmer, Robbie Christopher

    I have explored the star formation histories of the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A and GR 8. I measured photometry of individual stars from images taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. With the photometry I constructed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in the B, V, and I. I investigated the errors in the photometry extraction, and conducted artificial star tests to measure the photometric limits. The high resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope allowed photometric measurements that were far more accurate than ground-based observations. For galaxies at these distances (1-2 Mpc), the accuracy of stellar photometry from ground-based observations is limited by crowding of stellar images. The high accuracy photometry showed a clear separation of the main sequence from the massive, blue, core He-burning stars (HeB). These are stars in the bluest extent of the so-called 'blue-loop' phase of stellar evolution. This is the first time this phase of evolution has been clearly identified in a low metallicity system. The distributions of stars in the CMDs agreed very well with stellar evolution model predictions. I have used the CMDs to calculate the recent star formation histories of both galaxies. The main sequence luminosity function provided the star formation rate (SFR) over the past ~50 Myr. I developed a new technique for calculating the SFR from the blue HeB luminosity function. Furthermore, the blue HeB evolutionary phase has a one-to-one relation between age and magnitude. This allowed me to calculate the position, as well as the strength of star formation over the past ~500 Myr. The star formation was found in concentrated regions. These regions are of order 100 pc across and last of order 100 Myr. The regions were found near the highest density HI gas. I estimated the gas-to-star conversion efficiency to be 5-10%. The results from GR 8 suggest that the star forming gas clouds may be self-gravitating, and that each cloud

  10. STABILITY OF SATELLITES IN CLOSELY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Deck, Katherine M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to ∼0.4 R{sub H} (where R{sub H} is the Hill radius) as opposed to 0.5 R{sub H} in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5-4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if a ∼ 0.65 R{sub H} . In very close planetary pairs (e.g., the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of circumplanetary semi-major axes. The majority of systems investigated stably harbored satellites over a wide parameter-space, suggesting that STIPs can generally offer a dynamically stable home for satellites, albeit with a slightly smaller stable parameter-space than the single-planet case. As we demonstrate that multi-planet systems are not a priori poor candidates for hosting satellites, future measurements of satellite occurrence rates in multi-planet systems versus single-planet systems could be used to constrain either satellite formation or past periods of strong dynamical interaction between planets.

  11. First evidence of anisotropy of GPS phase slips caused by the mid-latitude field-aligned ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Ishin, A. B.; Tinin, M. V.; Yasyukevich, Yu. V.; Jin, S. G.

    2011-05-01

    The mid-latitude field-aligned irregularity (FAI) along the magnetic field line is a common phenomenon in the ionosphere. However, few data reveal the field-aligned ionospheric irregularities. They are insufficient to identify FAIs effects so far, particularly effect on global positioning system (GPS) signals. In this paper, the mid-latitude FAIs by line-of-sight angular scanning relative to the local magnetic field vector are investigated using the denser GPS network observations in Japan. It has been the first found that total GPS L2 phase slips over Japan, during the recovery phase of the 12 Feb 2000 geomagnetic storm were caused by GPS signal scattering on FAIs both for the lines-of-sight aligned to the magnetic field line (the field of aligned scattering, FALS) and across the magnetic field line (the field of across scattering, FACS). The FALS results are also in a good agreement with the data of the magnetic field orientation control of GPS occultation observations of equatorial scintillation during thorough low earth orbit (LEO) satellites measurements, e.g. Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C). The role of large-angle scattering almost along the normal to the magnetic field line in GPS scintillation is determined by attenuation of the irregularity anisotropy factor as compared with the other factors.

  12. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  13. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  14. On the long range propagation of sound over irregular terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation over randomly irregular, nominally plane terrain of finite impedance is discussed. The analysis is an extension of the theory of coherent scatter originally proposed by Biot for an irregular rigid surface. It combines Biot's approach, wherein the surface irregularities are modeled by a homogeneous distribution of hemispherical bosses, with more conventional analyses in which the ground is modeled as a smooth plane of finite impedance. At sufficiently low frequencies the interaction of the surface irregularities with the nearfield of a ground-based source leads to the production of surface waves, which are effective in penetrating the ground shadow zone predicted for a smooth surface of the same impedance.

  15. Context effects on orthographic learning of regular and irregular words.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Chen; Castles, Anne; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nation, Kate

    2011-05-01

    The self-teaching hypothesis proposes that orthographic learning takes place via phonological decoding in meaningful texts, that is, in context. Context is proposed to be important in learning to read, especially when decoding is only partial. However, little research has directly explored this hypothesis. The current study looked at the effect of context on orthographic learning and examined whether there were different effects for novel words given regular and irregular pronunciations. Two experiments were conducted using regular and irregular novel words, respectively. Second-grade children were asked to learn eight novel words either in stories or in a list of words. The results revealed no significant effect of context for the regular items. However, in an orthographic decision task, there was a facilitatory effect of context on irregular novel word learning. The findings support the view that contextual information is important to orthographic learning, but only when the words to be learned contain irregular spelling-sound correspondences.

  16. Traffic dispersion through a series of signals with irregular split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study the traffic behavior of a group of vehicles moving through a sequence of signals with irregular splits on a roadway. We present the stochastic model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals. The dynamic behavior of vehicular traffic is clarified by analyzing traffic pattern and travel time numerically. The group of vehicles breaks up more and more by the irregularity of signal's split. The traffic dispersion is induced by the irregular split. We show that the traffic dispersion depends highly on the cycle time and the strength of split's irregularity. Also, we study the traffic behavior through the series of signals at the green-wave strategy. The dependence of the travel time on offset time is derived for various values of cycle time. The region map of the traffic dispersion is shown in (cycle time, offset time)-space.

  17. 13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT THE BASE OF THE LEFT (EAST) BUTTRESS. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. The Peculiar Velocities of Satellites of External Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzaro, Marco; Zentner, Andrew R.; Prada, Francisco; Klypin, Anatoly A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the angular distribution and the orbital rotation directions of a sample of carefully selected satellite galaxies about disk galaxy primaries extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We complement this analysis with a theoretical study of these statistics in an N-body simulation of cosmological structure formation set within the ΛCDM paradigm under various assumptions for the orientations of disk angular momenta. Under the assumption that the angular momenta of the disks are aligned with the angular momenta of the inner regions of their host dark matter halos, we find that the fraction of simulated satellite halos that exhibit prograde motion is fprog~0.55-0.60, with larger satellites more likely to be prograde. In our observational sample, approximately 60% of the satellites exhibit prograde motion, a result that is broadly consistent with the simulated sample. Our observational sample of satellite galaxies shows no evidence for an anisotropic satellite distribution relative to disk primaries; however, the small sample size does not yet support a statistically significant comparison to previous studies of satellite anisotropy. Again, this result is broadly consistent with our simulated sample of satellites under the assumption that disk and halo angular momenta are aligned. However, the small size of our observational sample does not yet allow us to distinguish between various assumptions regarding the orientations of disks in their halos. Finally, we present an assessment of the importance of contamination by interlopers on the measured prograde and retrograde statistics.

  19. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance.

  20. Friction in the U.S. Army During Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    and great friction during irregular warfare. Historic analysis confirms this trend, and reveals a dominant grammar of traditional warfare supported by...dominant grammar of traditional warfare, the alternate grammar of irregular warfare is visible only when politicians force the Army to conduct...operations in that manner. Doctrine and theory from other nations, although available, did not facilitate maturation of this second grammar in the U.S. Army

  1. Suppression of resonance of offshore platform in irregular waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Komura, T.

    1994-12-31

    A theoretical solution of the vibration of offshore platforms due to irregular waves has been presented by using the equivalent linearized method. This solution has been verified by comparison with the experimental data from the viewpoint of time variation and the spectrum analysis. In the case of irregular waves as well as periodic waves, the resonance can be suppressed by bringing the resonance point close to the cancellation point.

  2. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Topical report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-12-31

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  3. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour.

  4. Retrograde left ventricular catheterization in patients with an aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Karsh, D L; Michaelson, S P; Langou, R A; Cohen, L S; Wolfson, S

    1978-05-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive patients with an aortic valve prosthesis were evaluated with retrograde left ventricular catheterization. The prosthesis was successfully crossed, permitting hemodynamic and angiographic evaluation of function of the prosthetic valve, left ventricle and mitral valve in all 27 cases. No complications were encountered. In patients with active endocarditis or recent embolization, the retrograde technique was avoided when possible, and attempts were made to utilize other techniques for study. However, three such patients were evaluated with the retrograde technique without complication. Examination of pressure tracings and cineangiographic films suggested only minor interference with valve poppet movement induced by the catheter transversing the valve. In three cases, hemodynamic data were recorded with the catheter crossing the prosthesis at one time and a paraprosthetic valve defect at another time. Identical gradients were recorded. This series documents the safety and efficacy of the retrograde approach, which is proposed as an alternative to the transseptal technique and left ventricular puncture.

  5. A photographic approach to the possible mechanism of retrogradation of sweet potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Zhao, Shuyi; Liu, Qinsheng; Zhang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Although the subject of starch retrogradation has been studied for about 20 years, the mechanism of starch retrogradation seems not yet to be completely established. In this paper, the possible retrogradation mechanism of sweet potato starch was postulated from four optical micrographs at the stages of melting of the starch granules, autoclaving treatment and aging. The possible process of retrogradation consists of three stages. Firstly, starch granules was swelled and melted with loss of X-ray crystallinity and formation of both crystalline and amorphous lamellae; secondly, in crystalline lamellae, amylopectin began to form nucleation when they were autoclaved; finally, the nucleus grew up to great rod-like crystals as the result of congregating of amylose on plates which were composed of and prolongated by amylopectin.

  6. Fiberoptic Guided Retrograde Intubation in an Anticipated Difficult Airway: Revival of an Antiquated Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ninu, Marie; Yunus, Md.; Syiemiong, Newstar

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde intubation is an invaluable technique which can be helpful in anticipated difficult airway situation. In this advanced era where fiberoptic intubation and video laryngoscopes are in abundant use, retrograde intubation is a forgotten technique. However, it may be useful in various difficult airway situations in this advanced era. In our case the patient had a bitter experience with previous fiberoptic intubation. Owing to that we had planned and performed a fiber optic guided retrograde intubation, where we had kept the fiberoptic bronchoscope in the pharynx keeping larynx and vocal cords in the focus to facilitate the emergence of guide wire through one of the nostrils as well as direct visual confirmation of intubation. This fiber optic guided retrograde intubation is a first reported case of its kind in a predicted difficult airway which can be beneficial in different difficult airway situations. PMID:27891428

  7. Veiled right kidney sign in retroperitoneal duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Banerji, John Samuel

    2011-08-01

    Retropneumoperitoneum due to duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is rare. Recognizing the presence of free air, which outlines the right kidney, is essential for its early diagnosis and appropriate management.

  8. Pancreatitis with an unusual fatal complication following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kanen, Boris; Loffeld, Ruud JLF

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography has been the treatment of choice for stones in the common bile duct. Although the procedure is usually safe, procedure-related complications do occur. Case presentation A case of pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is described in a 55-year-old woman. After an uneventful recovery the patient's condition deteriorated rapidly 16 days after the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and the patient died within 1 hour. Post-mortem examination revealed massive intrapulmonary fat embolism. The complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and pancreatitis are described. Conclusion Fat embolism can occur after the remission of pancreatitis and pancreatic necrosis may be overlooked on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning. PMID:18577211

  9. Statistical mechanical description of supercritical fluid extraction and retrograde condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. J.; Kwak, T. Y.; Mansoori, G. A.

    1987-07-01

    The phenomena of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and its reverse effect, which is known as retrograde condensation (RC), have found new and important applications in industrial separation of chemical compounds and recovery and processing of natural products and fossil fuels. Full-scale industrial utilization of SFE/RC processes requires knowledge about thermodynamic and transport characteristics of the asymmetric mixtures involved and the development of predictive modeling and correlation techniques for performance of the SFE/RC system under consideration. In this report, through the application of statistical mechanical techniques, the reasons for the lack of accuracy of existing predictive approaches are described and they are improved. It is demonstrated that these techniques also allow us to study the effect of mixed supercritical solvents on the solubility of heavy solutes (solids) at different compositions of the solvents, pressures, and temperatures. Fluid phase equilibrium algorithms based on the conformal solution van der Waals mixing rules and different equations of state are presented for the prediction of solubilities of heavy liquid in supercritical gases. It is shown that the Peng-Robinson equation of state based on conformal solution theory can predict solubilites of heavy liquid in supercritical gases more accurately than the van der Waals and Redlich-Kwong equations of state.

  10. Characterization of the human GARP (Golgi associated retrograde protein) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liewen, Heike; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Oliveira, Vasco; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Luo Guorong; Wadle, Andreas; Jung, Martin; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stenner-Liewen, Frank . E-mail: stenlie@t-online.de

    2005-05-15

    The Golgi associated retrograde protein complex (GARP) or Vps fifty-three (VFT) complex is part of cellular inter-compartmental transport systems. Here we report the identification of the VFT tethering factor complex and its interactions in mammalian cells. Subcellular fractionation shows that human Vps proteins are found in the smooth membrane/Golgi fraction but not in the cytosol. Immunostaining of human Vps proteins displays a vesicular distribution most concentrated at the perinuclear envelope. Co-staining experiments with endosomal markers imply an endosomal origin of these vesicles. Significant accumulation of VFT complex positive endosomes is found in the vicinity of the Trans Golgi Network area. This is in accordance with a putative role in Golgi associated transport processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GARP is the main effector of the small GTPase Ypt6p and interacts with the SNARE Tlg1p to facilitate membrane fusion. Accordingly, the human homologue of Ypt6p, Rab6, specifically binds hVps52. In human cells, the 'orphan' SNARE Syntaxin 10 is the genuine binding partner of GARP mediated by hVps52. This reveals a previously unknown function of human Syntaxin 10 in membrane docking and fusion events at the Golgi. Taken together, GARP shows significant conservation between various species but diversification and specialization result in important differences in human cells.

  11. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bao-Ying; Li, Cai-Hong

    2013-03-07

    Subcapsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and there are few reports about this unusual complication worldwide. The primary symptom of most cases reported in the literature is abdominal pain. We report an unusual case with the primary symptom of fever. A 56-year-old man who had a six-month history of recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed, and stones from the common bile duct were successfully extracted with a basket. The patient had a persistent fever after ERCP, and treatment with intravenous antibiotics was unsuccessful. Computed tomography showed a 13 cm × 6 cm subcapsular hepatic haematoma filled with air and liquid on the surface of the right hepatic lobe. The patient was successfully treated with peritoneal drainage under B-ultra guidance. Subcapsular liver haematoma should be considered when hard-to- explain symptoms persist in the early period after ERCP. Percutaneous drainage is an effective treatment.

  12. Retrograde dacryocystography (RDC) utilizing a round-tipped needle.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Masaaki; Kamiishi, Hiroshi

    2001-09-01

    Because the application of conventional anterograde dacryocystography has been restricted in cases with an intact lacrimal punctum, the indications are rather limited. The authors developed a new method for retrograde dacryocystography (RDC) using a hand-made round-tipped needle inserted directly into the orifice of the nasolacrimal duct. A 60 mm long aluminum tube (3 mm in diameter) was used to prepare the round-tipped needle. The distal portion of the tube was bent to an angle of about 80 degrees. The tip was then coated with synthetic resin adhesive to make it round. Following the insertion of the round-tipped needle directly into the inferior meatus, the tip was moved back and forth to find the orifice without visual observation. The complete insertion of the tip of the needle into the nasolacrimal duct was recognized by a fixed sensation of the tip. Contrast medium was then injected, and PA radiography was carried out. In the present paper, the authors report the usefulness of RDC, which is applicable even in cases of injury or obstruction in the upper lacrimal system. In 16 of 20 patients, the quality of the RDC images was judged as excellent. RDC can be carried out within a few seconds after acquiring the technical skills, and is thought to be a useful method, especially in cases of upper lacrimal injury.

  13. Management of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Seup; Kim, In-Gyu; Ryu, Byoung Yoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Jin Bong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to analyze the treatment strategies of patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations. This is a retrospective study. Methods We experienced 13 perforations associated with ERCP. We reviewed the medical recordsand classified ERCP-related perforations according to mechanism of injury in terms of perforating device. Injury by endoscopic tip or insertion tube was classified as type I, injury by cannulation catheter or sphincterotomy knife as type II, and injury by guidewire as type III. Results Of four type I injuries, one case was managed by conservative management after primary closure with a hemoclip during ERCP. The other three patients underwent surgical treatments such as primary closure orpancreatico-duodenectomy. Of five type II injuries, two patients underwent conservative management and the other three cases were managed by surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy, duodenal diverticulization and pancreatico-duodenectomy. Of four type III injuries, three patients were managed conservatively and the remaining patient was managed by T-tube choledochostomy. Conclusion Type I injuries require immediate surgical management after EPCP or immediate endoscopic closure during ERCP whenever possible. Type II injuries require surgical or conservative treatment according to intra- and retro-peritoneal dirty fluid collection findings following radiologic evaluation. Type III injuries almost always improve after conservative treatment with endoscopic nasobilliary drainage. PMID:22066121

  14. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.

  15. Radiation exposure to personnel performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, L; Singhal, S; Preece, D; Vohrah, A; Loft, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) relies on the use of ionising radiation but risks to operator and patient associated with radiation exposure are unclear. The aim of this prospective study was to estimate the radiation dose received by personnel performing fluoroscopic endoscopic procedures, mainly ERCP. Methods: Consecutive procedures over a two month period were included. The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure radiation exposure to the abdomen, thyroid gland, and hands of the operator permitted an estimation of the annual whole body effective dose equivalent. Results: During the study period 66 procedures (61 ERCP) were performed and the estimated annual whole body effective dose equivalent received by consultant operators ranged between 3.35 and 5.87 mSv. These values are similar to those received by patients undergoing barium studies and equate to an estimated additional lifetime fatal cancer risk between 1 in 7000 and 1 in 3500. While within legal safety limits for radiation exposure to personnel, these doses are higher than values deemed acceptable for the general public. Conclusions: It is suggested that personnel as well as patients may be exposed to significant values of radiation during ERCP. The study emphasises the need to carefully assess the indication for, and to use measures that minimise radiation exposure during any fluoroscopic procedure. PMID:16210465

  16. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Amer, Syed; Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Menias, Christine O; Pannala, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), can be more challenging compared to those with a normal anatomy. Detailed assessment of cross-sectional imaging features by the radiologist, especially the pancreaticobiliary anatomy, strictures, and stones, is very helpful to the endoscopist in planning the procedure. In addition, any information on enteral anastomoses (for e.g., gastrojejunal strictures and afferent limb obstruction) is also very useful. The endoscopist should review the operative note to understand the exact anatomy prior to procedure. RYGB, which is performed for medically complicated obesity, is the most commonly encountered altered anatomy ERCP procedure. Other situations include patients who have had a pancreaticoduodenectomy or a hepaticojejunostomy. Balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy (single and double-balloon enteroscopy) or rotational endoscopy is often used to traverse the length of the intestine to reach the papilla. In addition, ERCP in these patients is further challenging due to the oblique orientation of the papilla relative to the forward viewing endoscope and the limited enteroscopy-length therapeutic accessories that are currently available. Overall, reported therapeutic success is approximately 70-75% with a complication rate of 3-4%. Alternative approaches include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, or surgery. Given the complexity, ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy should be performed in close collaboration with body imagers, interventional radiology, and surgical services.

  17. Intraparenchymal hematoma as a late complication of retrograde intrarenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Yahsi, Sedat; Tonyali, Senol; Ceylan, Cavit; Yildiz, Kenan Y; Ozdal, Levent

    2017-01-01

    A 34 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain. A non-contrast enhanced computerized tomography (NCCT) revealed a 1.5x2cm left proximal ureter stone. Patient was scheduled for ureterorenoscopy (URS) and stone removal. She was submitted to retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). At the postoperative 1st day, the patient began to suffer from left flank pain. A NCCT was taken, which revealed a subcapsular hematoma and perirenal fluid. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous fluid, antibiotic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and was discharged at the postoperative 6th day. Two weeks after the discharge the patient was admitted to emergency department with severe left flank pain, palpitation and malaise. KUB (kidney-ureter-bladder) radiography showed double-J stent (DJS) to be repositioned to the proximal ureter. Patient was evaluated with contrast enhanced CT which revealed an 8cm intraparenchymal hematoma/abscess in the middle part of the kidney. A percutaneous drainage catheter was inserted into the collection. The percutaneous drainage catheter and the DJS were removed at the 10th day of second hospitalization. RIRS surgery is an effective and feasible choice for renal stones with high success and acceptable complication rates. However, clinician should be alert to possible complications.

  18. Retrograde guidewire fracture complicated with pericardial tamponade in chronic total occlusive coronary lesion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Rha, Seung-Woon; Her, Keun

    2015-10-01

    Along with various coronary devices progress, there is a now growing trend to percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion (CTO). However, the risk of guidewire fracture rate might be increased in complex lesion such as tortuous, calcific lesion or retrograde route. We report a case of successful surgical removal of fractured and entrapped guidewire in a septal channel during retrograde CTO intervention in a patient complicated with pericardial tamponade by delayed penetration of broken guidewire into pericardium.

  19. Optimizing Cost Versus Time Shipping of U.S. Navy Retrograde Materiel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    bS ATAIqTA-\\PER S C IE NTL4AMj•. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS OPTIMIZING COST VERSUS TIME SHIPPING OF U.S. NAVY ...SUBTITLE: 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Optimizing Cost Versus Time Shipping of U.S. Navy Retrograde Materiel 6. AUTHOR(S) Colbert, Charles W. 7. PERFORMING...materiel. This thesis models the NAVICP shipping of unserviceable but repairable (retrograde) Navy materiel or Depot Level Repairables (DLRs). It

  20. Pulmonary arterial intimal sarcoma with retrograde extension: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Pillai, Raji

    2013-01-01

    Most of the pulmonary arterial sarcomas arise from multi-potential mesenchymal intimal cells and are designated as intimal sarcomas. These tumors grow in the direction of blood flow into peripheral arteries producing clinical features mimicking pulmonary thromboembolism. Retrograde extension is rare. We report one such case of intimal sarcoma that had a retrograde extension into the right ventricular outflow tract, and review such a presentation in the last ten years.

  1. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  2. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  3. Retrograde reactions in coal processing: The behavior of ether and sulfide model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Skeen, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    Retrograde reactions that produce more refractory molecular structures are undesirable in coal liquefaction. The authors previously found that restricted mass transport, induced by immobilization on a silica support, promotes retrograde reactions for 1,2-diphenylethane (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) by both skeletal rearrangement and ring growth (cyclization-dehydrogenation) pathways involving free-radical intermediates. They are now examining the influence of heteroatoms on the retrograde pathways for the corresponding surface-immobilized ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) and sulfide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) model compounds at 275--350 C. Cyclization-dehydrogenation pathways are not detected for either model compound. However, retrograde skeletal rearrangements involving 1,2-phenyl shifts in C{sub 6}H{sub 5}XCH{center_dot}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} (X = O,S) are found to be significant under restricted diffusion, and for X = O, radical coupling at ring carbons to form benzylphenols is also observed as a major pathway. For surface-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether, the two retrograde processes account for ca. 50% of the thermolysis products, and also generate reactive hydroxyl and keto functionalities that can be involved in additional retrograde reactions.

  4. Clathrin adaptor epsinR is required for retrograde sorting on early endosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pol, Agnès; Yélamos, Belén; Amessou, Mohamed; Mills, Ian G; Dugast, Marc; Tenza, Danièle; Schu, Peter; Antony, Claude; McMahon, Harvey T; Lamaze, Christophe; Johannes, Ludger

    2004-04-01

    Retrograde transport links early/recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), thereby connecting the endocytic and the biosynthetic/secretory pathways. To determine how internalized molecules are targeted to the retrograde route, we have interfered with the function of clathrin and that of two proteins that interact with it, AP1 and epsinR. We found that the glycosphingolipid binding bacterial Shiga toxin entered cells efficiently when clathrin expression was inhibited. However, retrograde transport of Shiga toxin to the TGN was strongly inhibited. This allowed us to show that for Shiga toxin, retrograde sorting on early/recycling endosomes depends on clathrin and epsinR, but not AP1. EpsinR was also involved in retrograde transport of two endogenous proteins, TGN38/46 and mannose 6-phosphate receptor. In conclusion, our work reveals the existence of clathrin-independent and -dependent transport steps in the retrograde route, and establishes a function for clathrin and epsinR at the endosome-TGN interface.

  5. Impaired motoneuronal retrograde transport in two models of SBMA implicates two sites of androgen action.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael Q; Poort, Jessica L; Baqri, Rehan M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2011-11-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) impairs motor function in men and is linked to a CAG repeat mutation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Defects in motoneuronal retrograde axonal transport may critically mediate motor dysfunction in SBMA, but the site(s) where AR disrupts transport is unknown. We find deficits in retrograde labeling of spinal motoneurons in both a knock-in (KI) and a myogenic transgenic (TG) mouse model of SBMA. Likewise, live imaging of endosomal trafficking in sciatic nerve axons reveals disease-induced deficits in the flux and run length of retrogradely transported endosomes in both KI and TG males, demonstrating that disease triggered in muscle can impair retrograde transport of cargo in motoneuron axons, possibly via defective retrograde signaling. Supporting the idea of impaired retrograde signaling, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor treatment of diseased muscles reverses the transport/trafficking deficit. Transport velocity is also affected in KI males, suggesting a neurogenic component. These results demonstrate that androgens could act via both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms to disrupt axonal transport in motoneurons affected by SBMA.

  6. Real-time Visualization and Quantification of Retrograde Cardioplegia Delivery using Near Infrared Fluorescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraj, Aravind T.; Ghanta, Ravi K.; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Soltesz, Edward G.; Laurence, Rita G.; Fox, John; Cohn, Lawrence H.; Bolman, R. M.; Frangioni, John V.; Chen, Frederick Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aim of the Study Homogeneous delivery of cardioplegia is essential for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. Presently, there exist no established methods to quantitatively assess cardioplegia distribution intraoperatively and determine when retrograde cardioplegia is required. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for real-time visualization of cardioplegia distribution in a porcine model. Methods A portable, intraoperative, real-time NIR imaging system was utilized. NIR fluorescent cardioplegia solution was developed by incorporating indocyanine green (ICG) into crystalloid cardioplegia solution. Real-time NIR imaging was performed while the fluorescent cardioplegia solution was infused via the retrograde route in 5 ex-vivo normal porcine hearts and in 5 ex-vivo porcine hearts status post left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation. Horizontal cross-sections of the hearts were obtained at proximal, middle, and distal LAD levels. Videodensitometry was performed to quantify distribution of fluorophore content. Results The progressive distribution of cardioplegia was clearly visualized with NIR imaging. Complete visualization of retrograde distribution occurred within 4 minutes of infusion. Videodensitometry revealed that retrograde cardioplegia primarily distributed to the left ventricle and anterior septum. In hearts with LAD ligation, antegrade cardioplegia did not distribute to the anterior left ventricle. This deficiency was compensated for with retrograde cardioplegia supplementation. Conclusions Incorporation of ICG into cardioplegia allows real-time visualization of cardioplegia delivery via NIR imaging. This technology may prove useful in guiding intraoperative decisions pertaining to when retrograde cardioplegia is mandated. PMID:19016995

  7. Post-Golgi anterograde transport requires GARP-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Fujita, Morihisa; Nakamura, Shota; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-09-01

    The importance of endosome-to-trans-Golgi network (TGN) retrograde transport in the anterograde transport of proteins is unclear. In this study, genome-wide screening of the factors necessary for efficient anterograde protein transport in human haploid cells identified subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, a tethering factor involved in endosome-to-TGN transport. Knockout (KO) of each of the four GARP subunits, VPS51-VPS54, in HEK293 cells caused severely defective anterograde transport of both glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins from the TGN. Overexpression of VAMP4, v-SNARE, in VPS54-KO cells partially restored not only endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport, but also anterograde transport of both GPI-anchored and transmembrane proteins. Further screening for genes whose overexpression normalized the VPS54-KO phenotype identified TMEM87A, encoding an uncharacterized Golgi-resident membrane protein. Overexpression of TMEM87A or its close homologue TMEM87B in VPS54-KO cells partially restored endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport and anterograde transport. Therefore GARP- and VAMP4-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport is required for recycling of molecules critical for efficient post-Golgi anterograde transport of cell-surface integral membrane proteins. In addition, TMEM87A and TMEM87B are involved in endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport.

  8. Retrogradation of Waxy Rice Starch Gel in the Vicinity of the Glass Transition Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Udomrati, Sunsanee

    2013-01-01

    The retrogradation rate of waxy rice starch gel was investigated during storage at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature of a maximally concentrated system (Tg′), as it was hypothesized that such temperatures might cause different effects on retrogradation. The Tg′ value of fully gelatinized waxy rice starch gel with 50% water content and the enthalpy of melting retrograded amylopectin in the gels were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Starch gels were frozen to −30°C and stored at 4, 0, −3, −5, and −8°C for 5 days. The results indicated that the Tg′ value of gelatinized starch gel annealed at −7°C for 15 min was −3.5°C. Waxy rice starch gels retrograded significantly when stored at 4°C with a decrease in the enthalpy of melting retrograded starch in samples stored for 5 days at −3, −5, and −8°C, respectively, perhaps due to the more rigid glass matrix and less molecular mobility facilitating starch chain recrystallization at temperatures below Tg′. This suggests that retardation of retrogradation of waxy rice starch gel can be achieved at temperature below Tg′. PMID:26904602

  9. Phase scintillations due to equatorial F region irregularities with two-component power law spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R. G.

    1986-10-01

    Power spectra of weak phase scintillations on a 140-MHz signal, transmitted from the geostationary satellite ATS 6 and observed during premidnight and postmidnight periods at an equatorial station Ootacamund (magnetic dip 6 N), show that the nighttime equatorial F region irregularities in the wavelength range of about hundred meters to a few kilometers exhibit a two-component power law spectrum. The long- and short-wavelength spectral indices and the break scale at which the transition from a shallow to a steep slope occurs are determined self-consistently using both the phase and amplitude scintillation data. As the power spectra of phase scintillations do not exhibit the effect of Fresnel filtering, they provide fairly accurate estimates of the spectral indices and the break scale. These estimated parameters are utilized in a model calculation of the dependence of the S4 index on signal frequency based on weak scattering theory.

  10. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  11. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  12. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated. 15 references.

  13. Dynamics of small- and large-scale irregularities at sub-auroral latitudes. Final report, 1 May 1985-31 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.; Mendillo, M.

    1987-10-10

    In order to study the dynamics of ionospheric F-layer irregularities at latitudes below the auroral oval, radio, optical, and incoherent-scatter observations were initiated primarily in the region of 75/sup 0/W longitude. In addition, earlier observations including in-situ satellite measurements were used. The principal conclusions were: (1) the sub-auroral ionospheric observations could be understood by correlating F-layer irregularities with ring-current intensities as measured by Dst, the magnetic field measurement made near the magnetic equator; and sub-auroral irregularities that affect HF communications and over-the-horizon observations last over several nights while the ring current recovers from an injection of ions during a magnetic storm; and (2) local observations of Stable Auroral Red (SAR) Arcs and by Millstone Hill incoherent scatter data reveal that the weaker SAR Arcs detected are important in determining the physics of the generation of these emissions.

  14. Satellite and Rocket Observations of Equatorial Spread-F Irregularities: A Two Dimensional Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-17

    DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C. 20305 COMM, DMD , CONT & INTELL 01CY ATTN STVL WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301 04CY ATTN...92409 OICY ATTN NSSP-2722 FRED WIMBERLY (MINUTEMAN) 01CY ATTN MNNL LTC KENNEDY NAVAL SPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY P.O. BOX 92960 COMMANDER WORLDWAY POSTAL

  15. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  16. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Boming; Li, Quanpeng; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jiang, Guobing; Ge, Xianxiu; Nie, Junjie; Zhang, Xiuyun; Wu, Ping; Ji, Jie; Miao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered anatomy is challenging. Results of ERCP in those patients varied. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of various endoscopes-assisted ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy. Fifty-two patients with Billroth II reconstruction (group A), 20 patients with subtotal or total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis (group B), 25 patients with pancreatoduodenectomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy reconstruction (group C) were included. Gastroscope, duodenoscope, colonoscope, and double-balloon enteroscope were used. The endoscope insertion success rate of groups A, B, C was 96.2% (50/52), 85.0% (17/20), 80% (20/25), respectively. χ2 test showed that there was no significant difference between the 3 groups (P = 0.068). The mean insertion time was 36.7, 68.4, and 84.0 minutes, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the insertion time of group C was significantly longer than that of groups B and C (both P <0.001). The endoscopic cannulation success rates of groups A, B, C were 90%, 82.4%, and 100%, respectively. χ2 test showed that there was no significant difference between the 3 groups (P = 0.144). The mean cannulation time was 19.4, 28.1, and 20.4 minutes, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the cannulation time of group B was longer than that of groups A and C (P <0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). In total, 74 patients with successful biliary cannulation achieved the therapeutic goal; thus, the clinical success rate was 76.3% (74/97). Our study showed that ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy was safe and feasible. PMID:28033284

  17. Procedure for decellularization of porcine heart by retrograde coronary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Wearden, Peter D; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2012-12-06

    Perfusion-based whole organ decellularization has recently gained interest in the field of tissue engineering as a means to create site-specific extracellular matrix scaffolds, while largely preserving the native architecture of the scaffold. To date, this approach has been utilized in a variety of organ systems, including the heart, lung, and liver (1-5). Previous decellularization methods for tissues without an easily accessible vascular network have relied upon prolonged exposure of tissue to solutions of detergents, acids, or enzymatic treatments as a means to remove the cellular and nuclear components from the surrounding extracellular environment(6-8). However, the effectiveness of these methods hinged upon the ability of the solutions to permeate the tissue via diffusion. In contrast, perfusion of organs through the natural vascular system effectively reduced the diffusion distance and facilitated transport of decellularization agents into the tissue and cellular components out of the tissue. Herein, we describe a method to fully decellularize an intact porcine heart through coronary retrograde perfusion. The protocol yielded a fully decellularized cardiac extracellular matrix (c-ECM) scaffold with the three-dimensional structure of the heart intact. Our method used a series of enzymes, detergents, and acids coupled with hypertonic and hypotonic rinses to aid in the lysis and removal of cells. The protocol used a Trypsin solution to detach cells from the matrix followed by Triton X-100 and sodium deoxycholate solutions to aid in removal of cellular material. The described protocol also uses perfusion speeds of greater than 2 L/min for extended periods of time. The high flow rate, coupled with solution changes allowed transport of agents to the tissue without contamination of cellular debris and ensured effective rinsing of the tissue. The described method removed all nuclear material from native porcine cardiac tissue, creating a site-specific cardiac ECM

  18. Retrograde degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in homonymous hemianopsia

    PubMed Central

    Herro, Angela M; Lam, Byron L

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between topographic reduction in macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness as detected with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and visual field defects caused by ischemic occipital cortical injury. Methods This study was a retrospective review of all patients who presented to our eye institution between January 2012 and July 2014 with visual field defects secondary to ischemic cortical injury. The visual field defect pattern and mean deviation were analyzed. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular GCC were both assessed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Patients with any ocular pathology that could affect these measurements were excluded. The topographic relationship of visual field defect to reduction in GCC was specifically analyzed. Results Nine patients met the inclusion criteria. Their average age was 65 (57–73) years; eight were men and six had right hemianopsias. The laterality of the visual field defect was used to assign an affected and unaffected side of analysis for RNFL and GCC layer thickness. A right hemianopsia meant that the nasal fibers of the right eye and temporal fibers of the left eye were assigned as the “affected side”, and the temporal fibers of the right eye and nasal fibers of the left eye were assigned as “unaffected”. There was no statistically significant difference between affected and unaffected RNFL. However, there was a significant difference in GCC layer reduction between the affected and unaffected sides (P=0.029). Conclusion There is evidence of retrograde trans-synaptic retinal ganglion cell loss in patients with homonymous hemianopsias from cortical visual impairment. This relationship is reflected in thinning of the GCC and maintains the topographic relationship of the visual field defect. PMID:26089638

  19. Novel Method for Border Irregularity Assessment in Dermoscopic Color Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most important lesion features predicting malignancy is border irregularity. Accurate assessment of irregular borders is clinically important due to significantly different occurrence in benign and malignant skin lesions. Method. In this research, we present a new approach for the detection of border irregularities, as one of the major parameters in a widely used diagnostic algorithm the ABCD rule of dermoscopy. The proposed work is focused on designing an efficient automatic algorithm containing the following steps: image enhancement, lesion segmentation, borderline calculation, and irregularities detection. The challenge lies in determining the exact borderline. For solving this problem we have implemented a new method based on lesion rotation and borderline division. Results. The algorithm has been tested on 350 dermoscopic images and achieved accuracy of 92% indicating that the proposed computational approach captured most of the irregularities and provides reliable information for effective skin mole examination. Compared to the state of the art, we obtained improved classification results. Conclusions. The current study suggests that computer-aided system is a practical tool for dermoscopic image assessment and could be recommended for both research and clinical applications. The proposed algorithm can be applied in different fields of medical image analysis including, for example, CT and MRI images. PMID:26604980

  20. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  1. Stability Of Magnetic Remanence In Grains With Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W.; Evans, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic minerals, such as magnetite, often have morphologies that depart from their ideal crystalline shapes. A spectrum of irregular grain geometries is possible, from simple distorted surfaces of an octahedron to that of the extreme case of the "Christmas tree" patterns formed by constitutional supercooling of mixed metal oxides that can occur in submarine basalts. In this presentation we will examine the domain structures and stability of magnetic remanences that such irregular grain structures may have. We use a three-dimensional finite-element/boundary-element micromagnetic model, which provides the flexibility to generate the exact geometry required, unrestricted by the regular cell structure of finite difference models. Two sets of results will be presented. The first examines the effect of irregular surfaces on spherical grains of magnetite. The spherical grains are free from any form of shape or configurational anisotropy, so that the effects of the irregular surfaces are easily quantified. The surface irregularities are examined in terms of the amplitude inside or outside the mean surface radius, and their frequency distribution over the sphere. The second set attempts to reconstruct the dendritic geometries of iron oxides often observed in oceanic basalts that have been rapidly quenched.

  2. A possible structure of retrograded maize starch speculated by UV and IR spectra of it and its components.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Luo, Qingfeng; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xueyan

    2012-01-01

    "Retrogradation" has been used to describe the changes that occur in starch after gelatinization, from an initially amorphous state to a more ordered or crystalline state, which has a significant impact on starch application in food, textiles and materials fields. But mechanism of starch retrogradation is still unclear until now and there is no breakthrough in this area. Here we are speculating a possible structure of retrograded maize starch by UV (binding with iodine) and IR spectra of it and its compositions. We speculate that nucleation of retrograded starch origins from combination of reducing end of amylopectin and non-reducing end of amylose, and retrogradation terminates at combining of non-reducing end of amylopectin and reducing end of amylose. The chain length of resistant digestion retrograded starch should be nearly same. The hydroxyl associated with sixth carbon atoms of glucan must form hydrogen bond with other hydroxyl of starch.

  3. Percutaneous radiologically guided gastrostomy tube placement: comparison of antegrade transoral and retrograde transabdominal approaches

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Zachary M.; Charles, Hearns W.; Gross, Jonathan S.; Pflager, Daniel; Deipolyi, Amy R.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to compare the antegrade transoral and the retrograde transabdominal approaches for fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement. METHODS Following institutional review board approval, all G-tubes at two academic hospitals (January 2014 to May 2015) were reviewed retrospectively. Retrograde approach was used at Hospital 1 and both antegrade and retrograde approaches were used at Hospital 2. Chart review determined type of anesthesia used during placement, dose of radiation used, fluoroscopy time, procedure time, medical history, and complications. RESULTS A total of 149 patients (64 women, 85 men; mean age, 64.4±1.3 years) underwent G-tube placement, including 93 (62%) placed via the retrograde transabdominal approach and 56 (38%) placed via the antegrade transoral approach. Retrograde placement entailed fewer anesthesiology consultations (P < 0.001), less overall procedure time (P = 0.023), and less fluoroscopy time (P < 0.001). A comparison of approaches for placement within the same hospital demonstrated that the retrograde approach led to significantly reduced radiation dose (P = 0.022). There were no differences in minor complication rates (13%–19%; P = 0.430), or major complication rates (6%–7%; P = 0.871) between the two techniques. CONCLUSION G-tube placement using the retrograde transabdominal approach is associated with less fluoroscopy time, procedure time, radiation exposure, and need for anesthesiology consultation with similar safety profile compared with the antegrade transoral approach. Additionally, it is hypothesized that decreased procedure time and anesthesiology consultation using the transoral approach are likely associated with reduced cost. PMID:27911264

  4. Retrograde approach to an ostial left anterior descending chronic total occlusion through a left internal mammary artery graft.

    PubMed

    Hari, Pawan; Kirtane, Ajay J; Bangalore, Sripal

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde approach to chronic total occlusions (CTO) has been described via saphenous vein grafts, septal and epicardial collaterals. We report for the first time a successful retrograde approach to an ostial left anterior descending (LAD) artery CTO through a failed left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to LAD anastamosis. This case demonstrates the technical aspects of using a LIMA conduit as a retrograde approach to CTO. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  6. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  7. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics. PMID:27185280

  8. Dynamical configurations of celestial systems comprised of multiple irregular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Yun; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2016-09-01

    This manuscript considers the main features of the nonlinear dynamics of multiple irregular celestial body systems. The gravitational potential, static electric potential, and magnetic potential are considered. Based on the three established potentials, we show that three conservative values exist for this system, including a Jacobi integral. The equilibrium conditions for the system are derived and their stability analyzed. The equilibrium conditions of a celestial system comprised of n irregular bodies are reduced to 12n - 9 equations. The dynamical results are applied to simulate the motion of multiple-asteroid systems. The simulation is useful for the study of the stability of multiple irregular celestial body systems and for the design of spacecraft orbits to triple-asteroid systems discovered in the solar system. The dynamical configurations of the five triple-asteroid systems 45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 93 Minerva, 216 Kleopatra, and 136617 1994CC, and the six-body system 134340 Pluto are calculated and analyzed.

  9. Exploring Manycore Multinode Systems for Irregular Applications with FPGA Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Ceriani, Marco; Palermo, Gianluca; Secchi, Simone; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2013-04-29

    We present a prototype of a multi-core architecture implemented on FPGA, designed to enable efficient execution of irregular applications on distributed shared memory machines, while maintaining high performance on regular workloads. The architecture is composed of off-the-shelf soft-core cores, local interconnection and memory interface, integrated with custom components that optimize it for irregular applications. It relies on three key elements: a global address space, multithreading, and fine-grained synchronization. Global addresses are scrambled to reduce the formation of network hot-spots, while the latency of the transactions is covered by integrating an hardware scheduler within the custom load/store buffers to take advantage from the availability of multiple executions threads, increasing the efficiency in a transparent way to the application. We evaluated a dual node system irregular kernels showing scalability in the number of cores and threads.

  10. Irregular-Moons Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, T.; Mottola, S.

    2014-12-01

    The outer or irregular moons belong to the by far most numerous, but least investigated group of moons in the Saturnian system. The group is comprised of at least 38, mainly small objects which orbit at quite large distances to the planet, the rings, the inner regular moon system, and the Cassini spacecraft. As seen from Earth, their apparent visual magnitudes mainly range from ~20 to >25, the phase angles from 0 to 6°. From Cassini, some irregular moons can reach <12th mag, while most are at least occasionally brighter than ~16.5 mag. Their phase angles can assume any value from 0 to 180°. The Cassini ISS camera regularly observed the irregular moons over the last few years at various phase angles, with this research program now also being part of an accepted Participating Scientist proposal. Because of the large distances, the objects appear as unresolved point sources to the ISS. By means of photometric time series, rotational periods and minimum equatorial-axis ratios (a/b)min for 21 out of the 38 known objects could be determined. The rotation periods range from ~5½ hours for Hati to ~3 days for Tarqeq (Fig. top row). The largest (a/b)min are 2.9 for Kiviuq and 1.7 for Erriapus and Bestla (Fig. middle row). Many objects are subject of repeated observations under varying illumination and viewing geometries, with the aim of determining pole-axis directions, convex-hull shapes, and sidereal periods. So far, lightcurve inversion of Ymir revealed a convex shape reminiscent to a triangular prism and a spin-axis direction close to the South Ecliptic pole. The figure shows the lightcurve at 64° phase (bottom left panel), and four equatorial and two polar views of the derived shape model are shown at bottom right. Within Cassini's final three years in Saturn orbit, further observations offer the potential of pole and shape determinations for up to 15 irregular moons and up to 30 rotational periods total. These data may reveal (or already do so) hemispherical color

  11. The retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starches as observed with FT-IR, 13C NMR and DSC.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wang, Changjun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Li, Lin

    2014-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starch with wavelengths of maximum absorbance, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and DSC. The results show that the starches in retrograded glutinous rice starch and glutinous rice amylopectin could not form double helix. The IR results show that protein inhabits in glutinous rice and maize starches in a different way and appearance of C-H symmetric stretching vibration at 2852 cm(-1) in starch might be appearance of protein. Retrogradation untied the protein in glutinous amylopectin. Enthalpies of sweet potato and maize granules are higher than those of their retrograded starches. The (13)C NMR results show that retrogradation of those two starches leads to presence of β-anomers and retrogradation might decompose lipids in glutinous rice amylopectin into small molecules. Glutinous rice starch was more inclined to retrogradation than buckwheat starch. The DSC results show that the second peak temperatures for retrograded glutinous rice and buckwheat starches should be assigned to protein. The SEM results show that an obvious layer structure exists in retrograded glutinous rice amylopectin.

  12. The use of a cutting balloon in contemporary reverse controlled antegrade and retrograde subintimal tracking (reverse CART) technique.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Okada, Hisayuki; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-07-11

    The key concept of reverse controlled antegrade and retrograde tracking (CART) technique is retrograde puncture with a tapered wire to an antegrade balloon (contemporary reverse CART) or new connections between the antegrade and retrograde subintimal space (classical reverse CART). In our case, a 75-year-old man with severe chronic total occlusion of the right coronary artery, reverse CART with conventional balloons could not be accomplished. Externalization wiring was completed by contemporary reverse CART using a cutting balloon as an antegrade balloon to improve the fenestration force of the retrograde guidewire. Thus, the use of a cutting balloon for contemporary reverse CART might be promising.

  13. Irregular Repeat-Accumulate Codes for Volume Holographic Memory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishro-Nik, Hossein; Fekri, Faramarz

    2004-09-01

    We investigate the application of irregular repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes in volume holographic memory (VHM) systems. We introduce methodologies to design efficient IRA codes. We show that a judiciously designed IRA code for a typical VHM can be as good as the optimized irregular low-density-parity-check codes while having the additional advantage of lower encoding complexity. Moreover, we present a method to reduce the error-floor effect of the IRA codes in the VHM systems. This method explores the structure of the noise pattern in holographic memories. Finally, we explain why IRA codes are good candidates for the VHM systems.

  14. Phycomyces: irregular growth patterns in stage IVb sporangiophores

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Net rotation and net elongation of a stage IVb Phycomyces growing zone were simultaneously measured minute by minute with a photographic apparatus coupled with a rotating stage. A direct correlation between a growth response and a twist response after either a light stimulus or a house stimulus was found. There were significant irregularities in growth rate in both the elongation and rotation that were not a result of measurement error; these irregularities were poorly, if at all, correlated. We believe that these fluctuations reflect the underlying molecular mechanism of cell wall synthesis. PMID:7205194

  15. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Kearns, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere. Irregular topography is understood to imply a ground surface that is not idealizable as being perfectly flat or that is no idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The focus is on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low-altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  16. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, A. D.; Main, G. L.; Kearns, J. A.; Benator, D. R.; Parish, J. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere is discussed. Irregular topography here is understood to imply a ground surface that (1) is not idealizable as being perfectly flat or (2) that is not idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The study focuses on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low-altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  17. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Pierce, Allan D.; Kearns, James A.; Zhou, Ji-Xun

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques were developed for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere. Irregular topography is understood to imply a ground surface that: (1) is not idealizable as being perfectly flat, or (2) that is not idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The focus is on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  18. [Artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion for irregular menstruation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Yang, Lijie; Chen, Yajie; Li, Qing; Chen, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Through the discussion on TCM physiological characters of females in follicular, ovulatory, luteal and menstrual phases and treatment principles, the clinical application of artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion was introduced for irregular menstruation and the typical cases were attached. It is suggested that the menstrual cycle follows the growth-consumption rule of yin, yang, qi and blood. The corresponding treatment principles should be applied in accordance with the change rule of menstrual cycle. Hence, it is worth to adopt the artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion for irregular menstruation in clinical application.

  19. On the co-orbital motion in the planar restricted three-body problem: the quasi-satellite motion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse, Alexandre; Robutel, Philippe; Vienne, Alain

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the planar and circular restricted three-body problem, we consider an asteroid that orbits the Sun in quasi-satellite motion with a planet. A quasi-satellite trajectory is a heliocentric orbit in co-orbital resonance with the planet, characterized by a nonzero eccentricity and a resonant angle that librates around zero. Likewise, in the rotating frame with the planet, it describes the same trajectory as the one of a retrograde satellite even though the planet acts as a perturbator. In the last few years, the discoveries of asteroids in this type of motion made the term "quasi-satellite" more and more present in the literature. However, some authors rather use the term "retrograde satellite" when referring to this kind of motion in the studies of the restricted problem in the rotating frame. In this paper, we intend to clarify the terminology to use, in order to bridge the gap between the perturbative co-orbital point of view and the more general approach in the rotating frame. Through a numerical exploration of the co-orbital phase space, we describe the quasi-satellite domain and highlight that it is not reachable by low eccentricities by averaging process. We will show that the quasi-satellite domain is effectively included in the domain of the retrograde satellites and neatly defined in terms of frequencies. Eventually, we highlight a remarkable high eccentric quasi-satellite orbit corresponding to a frozen ellipse in the heliocentric frame. We extend this result to the eccentric case (planet on an eccentric motion) and show that two families of frozen ellipses originate from this remarkable orbit.

  20. The effect of partial gelatinization of corn starch on its retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zong-qiang; Wang, Li-jun; Li, Dong; Zhou, Yu-guang; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-09-12

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of partial gelatinization of starch on its retrogradation using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The Avrami equation was used to predict the evolution of starch retrogradation kinetics. The degree of retrogradation in starch samples partially gelatinized 64°C (S64), 68°C (S68) and 70°C (S70) and control (S25) increased with storage time. The retrogradation enthalpies of S68 and S70 were almost four times as high as that of S64. The S25 and S64 had dominant A-type crystalline pattern while S68 and S70 showed dominant B-type crystalline pattern. The growth of remainder crystals was faster in S25 and S64, while both the nucleation and growth rates of new crystals were faster in S68 and S70. The Avrami model was found to represent the retrogradation kinetics data of these partially gelatinized starch samples quite satisfactorily (R(2)>0.95).

  1. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia. PMID:24834048

  2. Retrograde versus Antegrade Approach for the Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Mykoniatis, Ioannis; Isid, Ayman; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Rosenberg, Shilo; Hidas, Guy; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of retrograde versus antegrade ureteroscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with proximal ureteral stones >15 mm, treated in our institution from January 2011 to January 2016. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative outcomes, and complications were recorded and compared between the two techniques. Results. Our analysis included 57 patients. Thirty-four patients (59.6%) underwent retrograde and 23 patients (40.4%) underwent antegrade ureteroscopy. There was no significant difference in patients' demographics and stone characteristics between the groups. Stone-free rate was significantly higher (p = 0.033) in the antegrade group (100%) compared to retrograde one (82.4%). Fluoroscopy time, procedure duration, and length of hospitalization were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in retrograde approach. On the other hand, the need for postoperative stenting was significantly lower in the antegrade group (p < 0.001). No difference was found between the groups (p = 0.745) regarding postoperative complications. Conclusions. Antegrade ureteroscopy is an efficient and safe option for the management of large proximal ureteral stones. It may achieve high stone-free rates compared to retrograde ureteroscopy with the drawback of longer operative time, fluoroscopy time, and length of hospitalization. PMID:27766263

  3. Preparation of chitosan oligomers COS and their effect on the retrogradation of intermediate amylose rice starch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Lin, Qin Lu; Chen, Zheng Xing; Wu, Wei; Xiao, Hua Xi

    2012-12-01

    Chitosan oligomers (COS) were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis and H2O2 oxidative treatment, and then separated into different fractions using ultra-filtration membranes. Each COSM fraction prepared using enzymatic hydrolysis retained its structure, especially the reduced end residue (-NH2 group), and had a peak for molecular weight. On the other hand, each COSH fraction prepared by oxidative treatment had partly damaged -NH2 groups and two peaks for molecular weight. These results indicate that the same COS fractions prepared by the two methods differ in their amino groups and in their molecular weights, though they can both pass through the same size ultra-filtration membrane. The effect of COS on the retrogradation of intermediate amylose rice starch (IA-RS) was also investigated. The 5 k < COSM < 10 k fraction had the best anti-retrogradation ability; the retrogradation ratio of IA-RS with this fraction was reduced by 14.5%, compared to the control, and its relative crystallinity was only 59.69%. 10 k < COSM < 30 k fraction was second best, while the COSM < 5 k fraction had no effect. Therefore, the molecular size of COS determined its anti-retrogradation capability. All COSH fractions from oxidative treatment had no effect on the retrogradation.

  4. Mechanisms influencing retrograde flow in the atrioventricular canal during early embryonic cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bulk, Alexander; Bark, David; Johnson, Brennan; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2016-10-03

    Normal development of the heart is regulated, in part, by mechanical influences associated with blood flow during early stages of embryogenesis. Specifically, the potential for retrograde flow at the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is particularly important in valve development. However, the mechanisms causing this retrograde flow have received little attention. In this study, a numerical analysis was performed on images of the embryonic zebrafish heart between 48 and 55hpf. During these stages, normal retrograde flow is prevalent. To manipulate this flow, zebrafish were placed in a centrifuge and subjected to a hypergravity environment to alter the cardiac preload at various six-hour intervals between 24 and 48hpf. Parameters of the pumping mechanics were then analyzed through a spatiotemporal analysis of processed image sequences. We find that the loss of retrograde flow in experimentally manipulated embryos occurs in part because of a greater resistance in the form of atrial and AVC contractile closure. Additionally, during retrograde flow, these embryos exhibit significantly greater pressure difference across the AVC based on calculations of expansive and contractile rates of the atrium and ventricle. These results elucidated that the developing heart is highly sensitive to small changes in pumping mechanics as it strives to maintain normal hemodynamic conditions necessary for later cardiac development.

  5. Retrogradation of Maize Starch after High Hydrostatic Pressure Gelation: Effect of Amylose Content and Depressurization Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Swedlund, Peter; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been employed to gelatinize or physically modify starch dispersions. In this study, waxy maize starch, normal maize starch, and two high amylose content starch were processed by a HHP of the order of 600 MPa, at 25°C for 15min. The effect of HHP processing on the crystallization of maize starches with various amylose content during storage at 4°C was investigated. Crystallization kinetics of HHP treated starch gels were investigated using rheology and FTIR. The effect of crystallization on the mechanical properties of starch gel network were evaluated in terms of dynamic complex modulus (G*). The crystallization induced increase of short-range helices structures were investigated using FTIR. The pressure releasing rate does not affect the starch retrogradation behaviour. The rate and extent of retrogradation depends on the amylose content of amylose starch. The least retrogradation was observed in HHP treated waxy maize starch. The rate of retrogradation is higher for HHP treated high amylose maize starch than that of normal maize starch. A linear relationship between the extent of retrogradation (phase distribution) measured by FTIR and G* is proposed. PMID:27219066

  6. Characterization of the primary spinal afferent innervation of the mouse colon using retrograde labelling.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D R; McNaughton, P A; Evans, M L; Hicks, G A

    2004-02-01

    Visceral pain is the most common form of pain produced by disease and is thus of interest in the study of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints such as irritable bowel syndrome, in which sensory signals perceived as GI pain travel in extrinsic afferent neurones with cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The DRG from which the primary spinal afferent innervation of the mouse descending colon arises are not well defined. This study has combined retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry to identify and characterize these neurones. Small to medium-sized retrogradely labelled cell bodies were found in the DRG at levels T8-L1 and L6-S1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and P2X3-like immunoreactivity (LI) was seen in 81 and 32%, respectively, of retrogradely labelled cells, and 20% bound the Griffonia simplicifolia-derived isolectin IB4. CGRP-LI and IB4 were co-localized in 22% of retrogradely labelled cells, whilst P2X3-LI and IB4 were co-localized in 7% (vs 34% seen in the whole DRG population). Eighty-two per cent of retrogradely labelled cells exhibited vanilloid receptor 1-like immunoreactivity (VR1-LI). These data suggest that mouse colonic spinal primary afferent neurones are mostly peptidergic CGRP-containing, VR1-LI, C fibre afferents. In contrast to the general DRG population, a subset of neurones exist that are P2X3 receptor-LI but do not bind IB4.

  7. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    accretion only explores the late evolution stages of the binary in an otherwise unperturbed retrograde disc to illustrate how eccentricity evolves with time in relation to the shape of the underlying surface density distribution.

  8. Pharmacological prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pande, Hemant; Thuluvath, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of clinically significant pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) ranges from 1-13.5%. It is more common after therapeutic procedures such as sphincterotomy or balloon dilatation of the sphincter, and diagnostic procedures such as biliary or pancreatic manometry. The severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis may vary from very mild to extremely severe disease with multiple organ failure and fatal outcome. Several factors including papillary oedema, injection of hyperosmolar contrast-material, introduction of previously activated enzymes during repeated cannulation, bacterial contamination and thermal injury from endoscopic sphincterotomy have been implicated as triggering factors that initiate the sequential cascade of pancreatic autodigestion and release of proinflammatory cytokines leading to acute pancreatitis. Recovery from post-ERCP pancreatitis is usually rapid when the injury is confined to the pancreas. However, systemic production of inflammatory mediators may lead to the development of more serious manifestations including multiorgan failure.A wide range of pharmacological agents has been tested in experimental and clinical trials, but the results have been largely disappointing. Several drugs are discussed in this review, but only somatostatin and gabexate (gabexate mesilate) have consistently shown a moderate beneficial effect. In clinical trials, both gabexate and somatostatin appear equally effective in reducing the incidence of pancreatitis by two-thirds compared with controls. However, both drugs need to be given by continuous infusion for about 12 hours and this makes them less cost-effective than conventional treatment. One potential strategy is to reserve these drugs for high-risk patients undergoing ERCP. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results with nitroglycerin, antibacterials and heparin. However, these observations need to be corroborated in a rigorous fashion in large, randomised, double

  9. VHF coherent scatter radar observations of mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Lee, J.; Hwang, J.; Kil, H.; Park, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularity (FAI) activity during 2010-2011 by using the VHF coherent scatter radar data in Daejeon (36.2°N, 127.1°E; dip latitude 26.7°N), South Korea. The VHF radar has been operated since December 2009 and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the variability of the FAI activity with local time, season, solar flux, and magnetic activity. Our preliminary results during the solar minimum show that FAIs preferentially occur at post-sunset and pre-sunrise and during the June solstice. The seasonal variation of the FAI occurrence frequency is similar to that of the electron density irregularities observed by the C/NOFS satellite. For one event, we observed the association of the FAIs with a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). Our study extends to the investigation of the correlations between the irregularities in the equatorial region and middle latitudes and between the conjugate F regions, and the causal linkage of the FAIs with the E-region perturbations. For this purpose, we analyze the VHF radar and C/NOFS data during 2010-2011.

  10. Ionospheric storm effects and equatorial plasma irregularities during the 17-18 March 2015 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun-Liang; Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2016-09-01

    The intense magnetic storm on 17-18 March 2015 caused large disturbances of the ionosphere. Based on the plasma density (Ni) observations performed by the Swarm fleet of satellites, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment mission, and the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite, we characterize the storm-related perturbations at low latitudes. All these satellites sampled the ionosphere in morning and evening time sectors where large modifications occurred. Modifications of plasma density are closely related to changes of the solar wind merging electric field (Em). We consider two mechanisms, prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF), as the main cause for the Ni redistribution, but effects of meridional wind are also taken into account. At the start of the storm main phase, the PPEF is enhancing plasma density on the dayside and reducing it on the nightside. Later, DDEF takes over and causes the opposite reaction. Unexpectedly, there appears during the recovery phase a strong density enhancement in the morning/prenoon sector and a severe Ni reduction in the afternoon/evening sector, and we suggest a combined effect of vertical plasma drift, and meridional wind is responsible for these ionospheric storm effects. Different from earlier studies about this storm, we also investigate the influence of storm dynamics on the initiation of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs). Shortly after the start of the storm main phase, EPIs appear in the postsunset sector. As a response to a short-lived decline of Em, EPI activity appears in the early morning sector. Following the second start of the main phase, EPIs are generated for a few hours in the late evening sector. However, for the rest of the storm main phase, no more EPIs are initiated for more than 12 h. Only after the onset of recovery phase does EPI activity start again in the postmidnight sector, lasting more than 7 h. This comprehensive view of

  11. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight... aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical irregularities and their correction. (b) The pilot in command shall enter or have entered in the...

  12. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight... aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical irregularities and their correction. (b) The pilot in command shall enter or have entered in the...

  13. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight... aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical irregularities and their correction. (b) The pilot in command shall enter or have entered in the...

  14. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight... aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical irregularities and their correction. (b) The pilot in command shall enter or have entered in the...

  15. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight... aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical irregularities and their correction. (b) The pilot in command shall enter or have entered in the...

  16. An Analysis of the Incidence of Recruiter Irregularities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    provided data and answered our questions about the incidence of recruiter irregularities. The people are Ted Disney at the U.S. Army Recruiting...are more likely to ultimately be substantiated. The Army and the Navy, in contrast, have fairly expansive inter- nal reporting requirements that

  17. IUE observations of luminous blue star associations in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    1987-01-01

    Two regions of recent star formation in blue irregular galaxies were observed with the IUE in the short wavelength, low dispersion mode. The spectra indicate that the massive star content is similar in these regions and is best fit by massive stars formed in a burst and now approximately 2.5 to 3.0 million years old.

  18. Irregular clustered-dot periodic halftone screen design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chuohao; Veis, Alex; Ulichney, Robert; Allebach, Jan

    2014-01-01

    With digital printing systems, the achievable screen angles and frequencies are limited by the finite address- ability of the marking engine. In order for such screens to generate dot clusters in which each cluster is identical, the elements of the periodicity matrix must be integer-valued, when expressed in units of printer-addressable pixels. To achieve a better approximation to the screen sets used for commercial offset printing, irregular screens can be used. With an irregular screen, the elements of the periodicity matrix are rational numbers. In this paper, we describe a procedure for design of high-quality irregular screens. We start with the design of the midtone halftone pattern. We then propose an algorithm to determine how to add dots from midtone to shadow and how to remove dots from mid-tone to highlight. We present experimental results illustrating the quality of the halftones resulting from our design procedure by comparing images halftoned with irregular screens using our approach and a template-based approach. Publisher's Note: The first printing of this volume was completed prior to the SPIE Digital Library publication and this paper has since been replaced with a corrected/revised version.

  19. Effect of surface irregularities on bellows fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. H.; Sheaffer, E. F.; Turner, J. D.; Zeimer, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents test data on the bending fatigue life of notched sheet specimens. The influence of a surface irregularity on the fatigue life of a metal bellows is evaluated, with emphasis on accidental defects in ducting bellows which are impossible to avoid short of completely eliminating human contact.

  20. HII regions in dwarf irregular galaxies of the local group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Paul; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    1990-01-01

    Deep, narrowband H alpha Charge Coupled Device (CCD) surveys of HII regions were carried out in several dwarf irregular galaxies in and near the local group. Data are now complete for these galaxies: NGC 6822, GR 8, IC 10, IC 1613, Sextans A, Sextans B, and Sag Irr. Observations are complete for DDO 47, 53, 167, 168 and 187. Details of some of the results for the surveys completed so far are discussed. For NGC 6822, CCD survey at H alpha resulted in the detection of 145 HII regions in the local group irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Most of them are newly detected, faint surface-brightness objects. Positions, maps and dimensions are being published elsewhere. For GR 8, a deep narrowband H alpha imaging of the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy GR 8 revealed a total of 32 HII regions. Positions, H alpha luminosities, and sizes of these objects were determined. The H alpha luminosity function has the same shape as that for more luminous galaxies, except for size of sample effects. Most HII regions detected are at the very low luminosity end of the general luminosity function. For IC 10, a deep CCD narrowband H alpha imaging of the local group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 10 revealed a total of 144 HII regions. Positions, H alpha luminosities, and sizes of these objects were determined. The H alpha luminosity function has the same shape as that for more luminous galaxies.

  1. Quantification of confocal images of biofilms grown on irregular surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stacy Sommerfeld; Tu, Mai Han; Falsetta, Megan L.; Ketterer, Margaret R.; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Apicella, Michael A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms grow on many types of surfaces, including flat surfaces such as glass and metal and irregular surfaces such as rocks, biological tissues and polymers. While laser scanning confocal microscopy can provide high-resolution images of biofilms grown on any surface, quantification of biofilm-associated bacteria is currently limited to bacteria grown on flat surfaces. This can limit researchers studying irregular surfaces to qualitative analysis or quantification of only the total bacteria in an image. In this work, we introduce a new algorithm called modified connected volume filtration (MCVF) to quantify bacteria grown on top of an irregular surface that is fluorescently labeled or reflective. Using the MCVF algorithm, two new quantification parameters are introduced. The modified substratum coverage parameter enables quantification of the connected-biofilm bacteria on top of the surface and on the imaging substratum. The utility of MCVF and the modified substratum coverage parameter were shown with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms grown on human airway epithelial cells. A second parameter, the percent association, provides quantified data on the colocalization of the bacteria with a labeled component, including bacteria within a labeled tissue. The utility of quantifying the bacteria associated with the cell cytoplasm was demonstrated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae biofilms grown on cervical epithelial cells. This algorithm provides more flexibility and quantitative ability to researchers studying biofilms grown on a variety of irregular substrata. PMID:24632515

  2. System remotely inspects, measures, and records internal irregularities in piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burry, F. H.; Cunningham, J. Y.; Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Norwood, L. B.

    1968-01-01

    Video electromechanical probe visually inspects and measures internal offset and peaking of welds in relatively large piping. Irregularity dimensions are recorded on peripheral equipment consisting of video tape and X-Y plotter. The probe is used for inspection of vacuum-jacketed liquid lines that cannot be inspected externally.

  3. Integral estimates for differentiable functions on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    Besov, Oleg V

    2011-02-11

    Integral representations for functions and their partial derivatives in terms of some fixed system of partial derivatives are constructed on irregular domains in a Euclidean space. Embedding theorems for Sobolev-type spaces into a Lebesgue space are established and the norms of the derivatives are estimated. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  4. 50 KPC radio trails behind irregular galaxies in A1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Jaffe, W.

    1987-11-01

    The authors report the discovery of exceptionally bright and extended trails of radio emission behind three irregular galaxies in the periphery of the cluster A 1367, in the Coma Supercluster. Turbulent interaction with the intergalactic medium or a past catastrophic collision between galaxies could have produced the observed phenomenon.

  5. Role of foods in irregular aggravation of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Hisashi; Uehara, Masami

    2003-02-01

    Although it is well known that patients with atopic dermatitis often show unpredictable, irregular aggravation of skin lesions, there are no previously published studies examining trigger factors for such unpredictable aggravation. We investigated whether foods play a role in the unpredictable, irregular worsening of atopic dermatitis. The patient group included 195 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis who showed unpredictable, irregular aggravation of skin lesions. They were hospitalized and openly challenged with suspected foods. Photographs of representative skin lesion sites were taken at baseline and before and after the challenge. Challenge-positive foods were determined by evaluating the comparable before-after challenge photographs. One to three (average: 1.7) challenge-positive foods were confirmed in 86 (44%) of the 195 patient examined. Predominant offending foods were chocolate, cheese, coffee, yogurt and some Japanese foods such as glutinous rice cake, soy sauce and fermented soybeans. Specific IgE values to the offending foods were mostly negative. Patients were asked to exclude challenge-positive foods from their diets. They were then discharged and followed up for 3 months at our outpatient clinic. Exclusion of the offending foods for 3 months brought about a progressive improvement of the disease. These results suggest that foods play an important role in unpredictable, irregular aggravation of skin lesions in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  6. Organizing for Irregular Warfare: Implications for the Brigade Combat Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    5 Irregular conflicts such as counterinsurgency and stability operations are typically protracted in nature ...but growing audience began to question the nature of future threats.30 Martin Van Creveld’s, The Transformation of War31 described recent changes in...the nature of military conflict and the future of warfare. Van Creveld argued that conventional warfare between states was being replaced with the

  7. Irregularly calcified eggs and eggshells of Caiman latirostris (Alligatoridae: Crocodylia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Mariela Soledad; Simoncini, Melina Soledad; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-05-01

    We describe irregularly calcified egg and eggshell morphologies for the first time in nests of the broad-snouted caiman, Caiman latirostris. Research is based on detailed descriptions of 270 eggs from a total sample of 46,800 collected between 2005 and 2011 in Santa Fe Province, Argentina, and encompasses animals from both natural habitats and held in captivity. We discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of eggs with different mineralisation patterns in our extensive C. latirostris field sample and its conservation significance; the chemistry of egg laying in amniotes is sensitive to environmental contamination which, in turn, has biological implications. Based on our egg sample, we identify two caiman eggshell abnormalities: (1) regularly calcified eggs with either calcitic nodules or superficial wrinkles at one egg end and (2) irregularly calcified eggs with structural gaps that weaken the shell. Some recently laid clutches we examined included eggs with most of the shell broken and detached from the flexible membrane. Most type 1 regularly calcified eggs lost their initial calcified nodules during incubation, suggesting that these deposits do not affect embryo survival rates. In contrast, irregularly calcified caiman eggs have a mean hatching success rate of 8.9 % (range 0-38 %) across our sample compared to a mean normal success of 75 %. Most irregularly calcified caiman eggs probably die because of infections caused by fungi and bacteria in the organic nest material, although another possible explanation that merits further investigation could be an increase in permeability, leading to embryo dehydration.

  8. Interstellar Medium Abundances in the Pegasus Dwarf Irregular Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Bomans, Dominik J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.

    1997-01-01

    We report Hα imaging and optical spectrophotometry of a faint H II region in the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy, a low-luminosity, possible Local Group member. We find that the emission-line spectrum is consistent with excitation by a single star with a temperature of less than 35,000 K, in agreement with Aparicio & Gallart (1995). Although we cannot measure the electron temperature of the ionized gas directly, we can infer a narrow range in electron temperature by comparing the emission-line spectrum with photoionization models. Then we derive a relatively low oxygen abundance of approximately 10% of the solar value, in accordance with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relationship for dwarf irregular galaxies. We also find an N/O ratio of 6%, which is higher than the typical value of 3% found in more actively star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies. By comparing this high N/O ratio with the recent star formation history of the Pegasus dwarf irregular derived by Aparicio & Gallart, we hypothesize that this may be evidence of delayed N production.

  9. The Effects of Some Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drag, Manley

    1939-01-01

    The N.A.C.A. has conducted tests to provide more complete data than were previously available for estimating the effects of common surface irregularities on wing drag. The irregularities investigated included: brazier-head and countersunk rivets, spot welds, several types of sheet-metal joints, and surface roughness. Tests were also conducted to determine the over-all effect of manufacturing irregularities incidental to riveted aluminum alloy and to spot-welded stainless-steel construction. The tests were made in the 8-foot high speed wind tunnel at Reynolds Numbers up to 18,000,000. The results show that any of the surface irregularities investigated may increase wing drag enough to have important adverse effects on high-speed performance and economy. A method of estimating increases in wing drag caused by brazier-head rivets and lapped joints under conditions outside the range of the tests is suggested. Estimated drag increases due to rivets and lapped joints under conditions outside the range of the tests is suggested. Estimated drag increases due to rivets and lapped joints on a wing of 20-foot chord flying at 250 miles per hour are shown.

  10. Possible origin of the Saturn satellite, Phoebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sisto, R. P.; Brunini, A.

    The orbit of the outermost Saturn's irregular moon, Phoebe, suggests that it was captured by Saturn rather than formed in situ. The Cassini-Huygens mission results allowed to find that Phoebe's composition is similar to that derived for the outer solar system bodies and very different from the composition of the Saturn regular satellites. In this paper we present new results suggesting that Phoebe could be a component of a binary centaur captured by Saturn during a three-body gravitational encounter. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  11. Ionospheric limitations to time transfer by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ionosphere can contribute appreciable group delay and phase change to radio signals traversing it; this can constitute a fundamental limitation to the accuracy of time and frequency measurements using satellites. Because of the dispersive nature of the ionosphere, the amount of delay is strongly frequency-dependent. Ionospheric compensation is necessary for the most precise time transfer and frequency measurements, with a group delay accuracy better than 10 nanoseconds. A priori modeling is not accurate to better than 25%. The dual-frequency compensation method holds promise, but has not been rigorously experimentally tested. Irregularities in the ionosphere must be included in the compensation process.

  12. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1988--November 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  13. Effect of high-speed jet on flow behavior, retrogradation, and molecular weight of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Luo, Shun-Jing; BeMiller, James N; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei

    2015-11-20

    Effects of high-speed jet (HSJ) treatment on flow behavior, retrogradation, and degradation of the molecular structure of indica rice starch were investigated. Decreasing with the number of HSJ treatment passes were the turbidity of pastes (degree of retrogradation), the enthalpy of melting of retrograded rice starch, weight-average molecular weights and weight-average root-mean square radii of gyration of the starch polysaccharides, and the amylopectin peak areas of SEC profiles. The areas of lower-molecular-weight polymers increased. The chain-length distribution was not significantly changed. Pastes of all starch samples exhibited pseudoplastic, shear-thinning behavior. HSJ treatment increased the flow behavior index and decreased the consistency coefficient and viscosity. The data suggested that degradation of amylopectin was mainly involved and that breakdown preferentially occurred in chains between clusters.

  14. Transport According to GARP: Receiving Retrograde Cargo at the Trans-Golgi Network

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hierro, Aitor

    2010-01-01

    Tethering factors are large protein complexes that capture transport vesicles and enable their fusion with acceptor organelles at different stages of the endomembrane system. Recent studies have shed new light on the structure and function of a heterotetrameric tethering factor named Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP), which promotes fusion of endosome-derived, retrograde transport carriers to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). X-ray crystallography of the Vps53 and Vps54 subunits of GARP has revealed that this complex is structurally related to other tethering factors such as the exocyst, COG and Dsl1, indicating that they all might work by a similar mechanism. Loss of GARP function compromises the growth, fertility and/or viability of the defective organisms, underscoring the essential nature of GARP-mediated retrograde transport. PMID:21183348

  15. Subintimal arterial flossing with antegrade-retrograde intervention (SAFARI) and rertograde access for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nicholas J; Sabri, Saher S

    2014-09-01

    Retrograde access techniques involve the addition of a retrograde access into the distal target vessel to aid in recanalization of chronic total occlusions. Many patients with critical limb ischemia are also poor surgical candidates because of comorbidities or lack of suitable landing zone for bypass procedures. This approach may be helpful in the setting of chronic occlusions that cannot be crossed via conventional antegrade true-lumen approaches. Subintimal arterial flossing with antegrade-retrograde intervention technique can be used when the occlusion was crossed in the subintimal plane and antegrade re-entry techniques failed. It may also be useful for flush superficial femoral artery occlusions or those lesions that extend into the trifurcation vessels. Proficiency in these techniques allows limb salvage in patients who lack surgical options and would otherwise undergo amputation.

  16. [Shock wave lithotripsy, retrograde intrarenal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole renal stones?].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alejandro; Gallegos, Héctor; Salvadó, José A

    2015-09-09

    Among the therapeutic alternatives available for the treatment of lower pole renal calculi are extracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and retrograde intrarenal surgery. There is controversy about which of these techniques is more effective, especially for stones smaller than 20 mm. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded percutaneous nephrolithotomy probably increases success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In comparison to retrograde intrarenal surgery, it may increase success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment. Retrograde intrarenal surgery may increase success rate, and probably decreases need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

  17. Retrograded maize starch used as a medium to enrich Monascus from the air in winter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizeng; Wang, Danli; Lian, Xijun; Wu, Hong

    2014-06-01

    Red pigments extracted from fungus Monascus are used for food coloration in China. Wild-growing Monascus spores are usually enriched in the yeast and mold media in the air, but those media are also favorable for yeast and bacteria. In the paper, Monascus species have grown in retrograded maize starch lain in air outdoors in winter, molds, yeast or bacteria colonies have been absent. Then a medium of the retrograded maize starch for enriching Monascus in the air is explored and its physicochemical properties are determined by ordinary camera photos, NMR, SEM spectra and X-ray diffraction. The lamellar structure of frozen retrograded maize starch, whose interlamellar spacing is about 2μm, provides a favorable condition for Monascus spore to germinate and grow.

  18. Transport according to GARP: receiving retrograde cargo at the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Bonifacino, Juan S; Hierro, Aitor

    2011-03-01

    Tethering factors are large protein complexes that capture transport vesicles and enable their fusion with acceptor organelles at different stages of the endomembrane system. Recent studies have shed new light on the structure and function of a heterotetrameric tethering factor named Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP), which promotes fusion of endosome-derived, retrograde transport carriers to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). X-ray crystallography of the Vps53 and Vps54 subunits of GARP has revealed that this complex is structurally related to other tethering factors such as the exocyst, the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) and Dsl1 (dependence on SLY1-20) complexes, indicating that they all might work by a similar mechanism. Loss of GARP function compromises the growth, fertility and/or viability of the defective organisms, emphasizing the essential nature of GARP-mediated retrograde transport.

  19. Failure of conventional retrograde cystography to detect bladder ruptures in pelvic trauma.

    PubMed

    Berber, O; Emeagi, C; Perry, M; Rickman, M S

    2011-03-01

    Conventional retrograde cystography is often used to investigate patients with suspected bladder ruptures in pelvic trauma. Clinical indicators suggestive of a rupture include haematuria and suprapubic tenderness and should increase the suspicion of bladder and urinary tract injury and prompt the clinician to undertake further investigations. Two patients with high-energy pelvic fractures had bladder ruptures detected intraoperatively despite normal preoperative retrograde cystogram. Both patients had significant clinical indicators suggestive of underlying bladder and urinary tract injury. In both cases, a routine conventional retrograde cystogram was performed but failed to identify the full extent of the bladder injury. A possible reason for misdiagnosis in these cases is the delay between injury and investigation due to tertiary referral of care.

  20. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with (/sup 3/H)choline

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-07-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following (/sup 3/H)choline application in their zone of termination. (/sup 3/H)Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After (/sup 3/H)choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic.

  1. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2017-01-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  2. Retrograde Gene Delivery to Hypoglossal Motoneurons Using Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 9

    PubMed Central

    ElMallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Lee, Kun-Ze; Shafi, Nadeem I.; Reier, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Retrograde viral transport (i.e., muscle to motoneuron) enables targeted gene delivery to specific motor pools. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) robustly infects motoneurons, but the retrograde transport capabilities of AAV9 have not been systematically evaluated. Accordingly, we evaluated the retrograde transduction efficiency of AAV9 after direct tongue injection in 129SVE mice as well as a mouse model that displays neuromuscular pathology (Gaa−/−). Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons were histologically evaluated 8 weeks after tongue injection with AAV9 encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) with expression driven by the chicken β-actin promoter (1×1011 vector genomes). On average, GFP expression was detected in 234±43 XII motoneurons 8 weeks after AAV9-GFP tongue injection. In contrast, tongue injection with a highly efficient retrograde anatomical tracer (cholera toxin β subunit, CT-β) resulted in infection of 818±88 XII motoneurons per mouse. The retrograde transduction efficiency of AAV9 was similar between the 129SVE mice and those with neuromuscular disease (Gaa−/−). Routine hematoxylin and eosin staining and cluster of differentiation (CD) immunostaining for T cells (CD3) indicated no persistent inflammation within the tongue or XII nucleus after AAV9 injection. Additional experiments indicated no adverse effects of AAV9 on the pattern of breathing. We conclude that AAV9 can retrogradely infect a significant portion of a given motoneuron pool in normal and dystrophic mice, and that its transduction efficiency is approximately 30% of what can be achieved with CT-β. PMID:22693957

  3. Twelve months follow-up after retrograde recanalization of superficial femoral artery chronic total occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wojtasik-Bakalarz, Joanna; Arif, Salech; Chyrchel, Michał; Rakowski, Tomasz; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Dudek, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fifty percent of cases of peripheral artery disease are caused by chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Ten–fifteen percent of percutaneous SFA recanalization procedures are unsuccessful. In those cases the retrograde technique can increase the success rate of the procedure, but the long-term follow-up of such procedures is still unknown. Aim To assess the efficacy and clinical outcomes during long-term follow-up after retrograde recanalization of the SFA. Material and methods We included patients after at least one unsuccessful percutaneous antegrade recanalization of the SFA. Patients were evaluated for the procedural and clinical follow-up of mean time 13.9 months. Results The study included 17 patients (7 females, 10 males) who underwent percutaneous retrograde recanalization of the SFA from June 2011 to June 2015. The mean age of patients was 63 ±7 years. Retrograde puncture of the distal SFA was successful in all cases. A retrograde procedure was performed immediately after antegrade failure in 4 (23.5%) patients and after a previously failed attempt in 13 (76.5%) patients. The procedure was successful in 15 (88.2%) patients, and unsuccessful in 2 (11.8%) patients. Periprocedural complications included 1 peripheral distal embolization (successfully treated with aspiration thrombectomy), 1 bleeding event from the puncture site and 7 puncture site hematomas. During follow-up the all-cause mortality rate was 5.8% (1 patient, non-cardiac death). The primary patency rate at 12 months was 88.2% and secondary patency 100%. Conclusions The retrograde SFA puncture seems to be a safe and successful technique for CTO recanalization and is associated with a low rate of perioperative and long-term follow-up complications. PMID:28344617

  4. Analysis of articulation between clathrin and retromer in retrograde sorting on early endosomes.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Vincent; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Bai, Siau-Kun; Chambon, Valérie; Tenza, Danièle; Burgos, Patricia V; Shi, Anbing; Benaroch, Philippe; Urbé, Sylvie; Lamaze, Christophe; Grant, Barth D; Raposo, Graça; Johannes, Ludger

    2009-12-01

    Clathrin and retromer have key functions for retrograde trafficking between early endosomes and the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies on Shiga toxin suggested that these two coat complexes operate in a sequential manner. Here, we show that the curvature recognition subunit component sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) of retromer interacts with receptor-mediated endocytosis-8 (RME-8) protein, and that RME-8 and SNX1 colocalize on early endosomes together with a model cargo of the retrograde route, the receptor-binding B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB). RME-8 has previously been found to bind to the clathrin uncoating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) Hsc70, and we now report that depletion of RME-8 or Hsc70 affects retrograde trafficking at the early endosomes-TGN interface of STxB and the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, an endogenous retrograde cargo protein. We also provide evidence that retromer interacts with the clathrin-binding protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) not only via SNX1, as previously published (Chin Raynor MC, Wei X, Chen HQ, Li L. Hrs interacts with sorting nexin 1 and regulates degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. J Biol Chem 2001;276:7069-7078), but also via the core complex component Vps35. Hrs codistributes at the ultrastructural level with STxB on early endosomes, and interfering with Hrs function using antibodies or mild overexpression inhibits retrograde transport. Our combined data suggest a model according to which the functions in retrograde sorting on early endosomes of SNX1/retromer and clathrin are articulated by RME-8, and possibly also by Hrs.

  5. Coping with Irregular Operations: Implications for a Free Flight Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Davison, Jeannie; Rodvold, Michelle; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Irregular operations involve disruption of scheduled airline operations. They ate of concern to the carriers because they cost money, require personnel effort, and may harm customer good will. Irregular operations may result from aircraft system malfunctions that take planes out of service or result in cancellations, Might system problems or passenger medical emergencies that require diversions, local airport problems that may close down a runway, or weather systems that restrict flow into airports or regions. At the heart of responding to irregular operations is distributed decision making by members of airline operations centers, pilots, and the air traffic control system. Six U.S. carriers participated in a study in which we observed strategies used by operations center personnel to handle various classes of irregular operations. We focused on situations that are most disruptive to regular operations and are most difficult to cope with. We also sought to identify classes of events that would be most affected by changes in the air traffic management system. How a carrier deals with disruptions to its schedule reflects its philosophy and primary goals, as well as its resources. Size and type of operations (short or long-haul) determine which problems have priority. Each airline has different technological support tools to aid in flight planning and replanning, and some carriers have established contingency procedures for coping with various situations. We also examined differences in extent and type of interaction between ABC personnel and various elements of the air traffic system as they managed various problems: who interacts with AM what situations prompt interaction, how often these occur, and the outcomes and Perceived benefits. Use of the expanded NRP program was also studied, along with its advantages to the individual companies. We also examined the implications of the proposed change to a free flight environment on airline strategies for coping with

  6. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  7. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  8. Redshift, metallicity and size of two extended dwarf Irregular galaxies. A link between dwarf Irregulars and ultra diffuse galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Belokurov, V.; Magrini, L.; Fraternali, F.; Testa, V.; Beccari, G.; Marchetti, A.; Carini, R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the spectroscopic and photometric follow-up of two field galaxies that were selected as possible stellar counterparts of local high velocity clouds. Our analysis shows that the two systems are distant (D>20 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxies unrelated to the local H I clouds. However, the newly derived distance and structural parameters reveal that the two galaxies have luminosities and effective radii very similar to the recently identified ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs). At odds with classical UDGs, they are remarkably isolated, having no known giant galaxy within ˜2.0 Mpc. Moreover, one of them has a very high gas content compared to galaxies of similar stellar mass, with a H I to stellar mass ratio MHI/M⋆ ˜ 90, typical of almost-dark dwarfs. Expanding on this finding, we show that extended dwarf irregulars overlap the distribution of UDGs in the MV vs. log re plane and that the sequence including dwarf spheroidals, dwarf irregulars and UDGs appears as continuously populated in this plane. This may suggest an evolutionary link between dwarf irregulars and UDGs.

  9. Observational study of ionospheric irregularities and GPS scintillations associated with the 2012 tropical cyclone Tembin passing Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Liu, Zhizhao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the ionospheric responses observed in Hong Kong to a Typhoon, namely, Tembin, from the aspects of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities and scintillations, using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from a ground-based GPS scintillation monitoring station in Hong Kong and from GPS receivers on board the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites. The ionospheric irregularities and scintillations are characterized by the rate of total electron content variation index (ROTI) and the amplitude scintillation index S4, respectively. The typhoon Tembin formed over the western North Pacific during 18-30 August 2012 and approached Hong Kong during 24-27 August 2012 with the closest distance 290 km from Hong Kong at around 17 universal time (UT) on 25 August 2012. The ground-based observations indicate that in the nighttime period of 20:00-02:00 local time (LT = UT + 8 h) on 26 August when Tembin passed closely to Hong Kong, the ionospheric irregularities and scintillations of GPS signals were observed in the south of Hong Kong, over the area of 13°N ~ 23°N in latitude and 110°E ~ 120°E in longitude. From the COSMIC observations, it shows that the number of radio occultation scintillation events peaks on 26 August 2012 during the passage of Tembin. Without the presence of strong geomagnetic or solar activity, it is suspected that gravity waves might be generated in the lower atmosphere and likely seed the formation of ionospheric plasma irregularities. This work for the first time from Hong Kong observes the sign of coupling between the lower atmosphere and ionosphere in a tropical cyclone event, combining both ground- and space-based GPS observation data.

  10. A technique for inferring zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of intensity (S4) and phase (σφ) scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Rino, Charles L.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2016-08-01

    The zonal drift of ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of a scintillating satellite signal made with a pair of closely spaced antennas. The Air Force Research Laboratory-Scintillation Network Decision Aid (AFRL-SCINDA) network operates a small number of very high frequency (VHF) spaced-receiver systems at low latitudes for this purpose. A far greater number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) scintillation monitors are operated by the AFRL-SCINDA network (25-30) and the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are too widely separated from each other for cross-correlation techniques to be effective. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of S4, σφ, and the propagation geometry. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this approach requires assumptions regarding the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment suggest that the ratio of σφ to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift. We validate the technique using VHF spaced-receiver measurements of zonal irregularity drift obtained from the AFRL-SCINDA network. While the spaced-receiver technique remains the preferred way to monitor the drift when closely spaced antenna pairs are available, our technique provides a new opportunity to monitor zonal irregularity drift using regional or global networks of widely separated GNSS scintillation monitors.

  11. Retrograde shear rate in formerly preeclamptic and healthy women before and after exercise training: relationship with endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Green, Daniel J; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-01

    Blood flow patterns in conduit arteries characterized by high levels of retrograde shear stress can be detrimental for vascular health. In this study we examined whether retrograde shear rate and endothelial function are related in healthy and formerly preeclamptic (PE) women and whether this relationship is altered by exercise training. Formerly PE women (32 ± 4 yr, n = 20) and controls (32 ± 4 yr, n = 20), all 6-12 mo postpartum, performed 12-wk aerobic exercise training. We measured brachial artery shear rate (SR) and endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD, echo-Doppler). We additionally performed power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and calculated low-frequency/high-frequency (LF/HF) ratio. Antegrade SR was not different between groups, while retrograde SR was significantly higher and FMD% lower in PE women compared with controls (both P < 0.05). Retrograde shear correlated strongly with FMD% in PE women and controls (P < 0.05). LF/HF ratio inversely correlated with brachial artery retrograde SR and FMD% (both P < 0.05) in PE women and controls. Exercise training reduced retrograde shear, improved FMD%, and reduced LF/HF ratios similarly in both groups (all P < 0.05). Training-induced changes in retrograde SR correlated with changes in FMD% and LF/HF ratio. A higher brachial artery retrograde SR relates to lower brachial artery endothelial function, in both controls and formerly PE women. Exercise training improves retrograde SR, while the magnitude of this change correlated strongly with improvements in FMD and reductions in LF/HF ratio. Therefore, the impact of PE and exercise training on endothelial health may, at least partly, be related to retrograde shear rate.

  12. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  13. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Kearns, James A.; Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere. Irregular topography here is understood to imply a ground surface that is not idealizable as being perfectly flat or that is not idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The interest of this study focuses on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low-attitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence. The activities and developments that have resulted during the period, August 1986 through February 1987, are discussed.

  14. Bispectral analysis of equatorial spread F density irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labelle, J.; Lund, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    Bispectral analysis has been applied to density irregularities at frequencies 5-30 Hz observed with a sounding rocket launched from Peru in March 1983. Unlike the power spectrum, the bispectrum contains statistical information about the phase relations between the Fourier components which make up the waveform. In the case of spread F data from 475 km the 5-30 Hz portion of the spectrum displays overall enhanced bicoherence relative to that of the background instrumental noise and to that expected due to statistical considerations, implying that the observed f exp -2.5 power law spectrum has a significant non-Gaussian component. This is consistent with previous qualitative analyses. The bicoherence has also been calculated for simulated equatorial spread F density irregularities in approximately the same wavelength regime, and the resulting bispectrum has some features in common with that of the rocket data. The implications of this analysis for equatorial spread F are discussed, and some future investigations are suggested.

  15. An irregularly portioned FDF solver for turbulent flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick H.

    A new computational methodology is developed for large eddy simulation (LES) with the filtered density function (FDF) formulation of turbulent reacting flowss. This methodology is termed the "irregularly portioned Lagrangian Monte Carlo finite difference" (IPLMCFD). It takes advantage of modern parallel platforms and mitigates the computational cost of LES/FDF significantly. The embedded algorithm addresses the load balancing issue by decomposing the computational domain into a series of irregularly shaped and sized subdomains. The resulting algorithm scales to thousands of processors with an excellent efficiency. Thus it is well suited for LES of reacting flowss in large computational domains and under complex chemical kinetics. The efficiency of the IPLMCFD; and the realizability, consistency and the predictive capability of FDF are demonstrated by LES of several turbulent flames.

  16. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  17. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  18. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  19. Effect of phospholipids transesterified enzymatically with polyunsaturated fatty acids on gelatinization and retrogradation of starch.

    PubMed

    Siswoyo, L A; Morita, N

    2000-10-01

    The effects of phospholipids (PLs) transesterified with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with lipase (Aspergillus niger) on gelatinization and retrogradation of starch during storage were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The resulting transesterified PLs were rich in PUFAs and linoleic acid, while the total percentage of PUFAs incorporated was 20.2%. The addition of PLs or PLs enzymatically transesterified with PUFAs (PUFA-PLs) to the starch sample decreased the gelatinization enthalpy of starch (deltah(g)) slightly, but clearly increased the starch-lipid complexes (deltah(s-1)) by DSC. After 21 days of storage, the percent of retrogradation of starch became lower by the addition of 4%, PLs or 4% PUFA-PLs to the starch sample when compared with the control. These results suggest that PLs retard retrogradation of starch during storage, whereas PUFA-PLs retard it greatly. The addition of PLs or PUFA-PLs increased the amount of deltah(s-1), while re-gelatinization enthalpy decreased during storage, which suggests that PLs or PUFA-PLs could retard the retrogradation of starch.

  20. Reexposure to the Amnestic Agent Alleviates Cycloheximide-Induced Retrograde Amnesia for Reactivated and Extinction Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, James F.; Olson, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both…

  1. Behavioral and Functional Neuroanatomical Correlates of Anterograde Autobiographical Memory in Isolated Retrograde Amnesic Patient M. L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Brian; Svoboda, Eva; Turner, Gary R.; Mandic, Marina; Mackey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Patient M. L. [Levine, B., Black, S. E., Cabeza, R., Sinden, M., Mcintosh, A. R., Toth, J. P., et al. (1998). "Episodic memory and the self in a case of isolated retrograde amnesia." "Brain", "121", 1951-1973], lost memory for events occurring before his severe traumatic brain injury, yet his anterograde (post-injury) learning and memory appeared…

  2. Compatibility of DAPl and silver staining for combined anterograde and retrograde tracing of neural connections.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, R W

    1980-11-10

    The geniculocortical and corticogeniculate pathways in hamster were used to test the compatibility of 4'6 diamidino-2 phenylindole 2HCl (DAPl)6,10 and anterograde degeneration techniques for tracing reciprocal connections in the brain. The two methods were compatible within a single brain and, with some loss of sensitivity in the retrograde labeling, within a single section.

  3. A Hands-on Exploration of the Retrograde Motion of Mars as Seen from the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincelli, M. M.; Otranto, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a set of activities based on the use of a celestial simulator to gain insights into the retrograde motion of Mars as seen from the Earth. These activities provide a useful link between the heliocentric concepts taught in schools and those tackled in typical introductory physics courses based on classical mechanics for…

  4. In vitro analyses of resistant starch in retrograded waxy and normal corn starches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2013-04-01

    Gelatinized waxy and normal corn starches (40% starch) were subjected to temperature cycling between 4 and 30°C (1 day at each temperature) or isothermal storage (4°C) to induce retrogradation. The in vitro analysis methods that are currently used for the measurement of resistant starch (RS), i.e. Englyst, AACC 32-40 and Goni methods, were compared with homogenized retrograded starch gels and freeze-dried powders of the gels. RS contents obtained by the three analysis methods were in the following order: Goni>Englyst>AACC. Although different RS values were obtained among the analysis methods, similar trends in regards to the starch type and storage conditions could be observed. Little or no RS was found in freeze-dried powders of the retrograded starch gels and storage conditions had no effect, indicating that the physical state for RS analysis is important. More RS was found in normal corn starch gels than in waxy corn starch gels under identical storage conditions and in the gels stored under temperature cycling than those under isothermal storage (4°C), indicating that the presence of amylose inhibits starch digestion and the level of crystalline structure of re-crystallized amylopectin also affects the RS formation during retrogradation.

  5. Effects of HIV-1 Nef on retrograde transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezo, Valérie; Mallard, Frédéric; Tenza, Danièle; Wiltz, Aimée; Saint-Pol, Agnès; Helft, Julie; Antony, Claude; Benaroch, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein down-regulates several important immunoreceptors through interactions with components of the intracellular sorting machinery. Nef expression is also known to induce modifications of the endocytic pathway. Here, we analyzed the effects of Nef on retrograde transport, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum using Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Nef expression inhibited access of STxB to the endoplasmic reticulum, but did not modify the surface expression level of STxB receptor, Gb3, nor its internalization rate as measured with a newly developed assay. Mutation of the myristoylation site or of a di-leucine motif of Nef involved in the interaction with the clathrin adaptor complexes AP1 and AP2 abolished the inhibition of retrograde transport. In contrast, mutations of Nef motifs known to interact with PACS-1, beta COP or a subunit of the v-ATPase did not modify the inhibitory activity of Nef on retrograde transport. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Nef was present in clusters located on endosomal or Golgi membranes together with internalized STxB. Furthermore, in strongly Nef-expressing cells, STxB accumulated in endosomal structures that labeled with AP1. Our observations show that Nef perturbs retrograde transport between the early endosome and the endoplasmic reticulum. The potential transport steps targeted by Nef are discussed.

  6. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms.

  7. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Gastric Varix Via the Pericardiacophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimatsu, Rika Yamagami, Takuji; Tanaka, Osamu; Miura, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kotaro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a case of gastric varix without a gastrorenal shunt that drained through the left pericardiacophrenic vein, which entered the left brachiocephalic vein. For this case we successfully performed balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration, in which sclerotic agents were infused via the left pericardiacophrenic vein approached from the left subclavian vein.

  8. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  9. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Scalone, Olivia; Penigaud, Marianne; Barbeys, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Subcapsular hepatic hematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The mechanism of this lesion has not been clearly established. The following observation clarifies the physiopathology, as well as providing a review of the various cases described in the literature.

  10. Self-repair in a bidirectionally coupled astrocyte-neuron (AN) system based on retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wade, John; McDaid, Liam; Harkin, Jim; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Kelso, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that retrograde signaling via astrocytes may underpin self-repair in the brain. Faults manifest themselves in silent or near silent neurons caused by low transmission probability (PR) synapses; the enhancement of the transmission PR of a healthy neighboring synapse by retrograde signaling can enhance the transmission PR of the “faulty” synapse (repair). Our model of self-repair is based on recent research showing that retrograde signaling via astrocytes can increase the PR of neurotransmitter release at damaged or low transmission PR synapses. The model demonstrates that astrocytes are capable of bidirectional communication with neurons which leads to modulation of synaptic activity, and that indirect signaling through retrograde messengers such as endocannabinoids leads to modulation of synaptic transmission PR. Although our model operates at the level of cells, it provides a new research direction on brain-like self-repair which can be extended to networks of astrocytes and neurons. It also provides a biologically inspired basis for developing highly adaptive, distributed computing systems that can, at fine levels of granularity, fault detect, diagnose and self-repair autonomously, without the traditional constraint of a central fault detect/repair unit. PMID:23055965

  11. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  12. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, A K; Carstens, R P; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, N G

    2014-11-06

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs.

  13. On Common Ground: Jost's (1897) Law of Forgetting and Ribot's (1881) Law of Retrograde Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2004-01-01

    T. Ribot's (1881) law of retrograde amnesia states that brain damage impairs recently formed memories to a greater extent than older memories, which is generally taken to imply that memories need time to consolidate. A. Jost's (1897) law of forgetting states that if 2 memories are of the same strength but different ages, the older will decay more…

  14. Structure of Waxy Maize Starch Hydrolyzed by Maltogenic α-Amylase in Relation to Its Retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Navneet; Faubion, Jon; Feng, Guohua; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-04-29

    Maltogenic α-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different degrees by a maltogenic amylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine saccharides formed and the molecular weight (Mw) distributions of the residual starch structure, respectively. Chain length (CL) distributions of debranched starch samples were further related to amylopectin (AP) retrogradation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed the complete inhibition of retrogradation when starches were hydrolyzed to >20% DH. Mw and CL distributions of residual AP structure indicated that with an increase in %DH, a higher proportion of unit chains with degree of polymerization (DP) ≤9 and a lower proportion of unit chains with DP ≥17 were formed. A higher proportion of short outer AP chains that cannot participate in the formation of double helices supports the decrease in and eventual inhibition of retrogradation observed with the increase in %DH. These results suggest that the maltogenic amylase could play a powerful role in inhibiting the staling of baked products even at limited starch hydrolysis.

  15. Retrogradation behavior of corn starch treated with 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Li, Caiming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Qiu, Yijing; Cheng, Li; Hong, Yan; Li, Zhaofeng

    2016-07-15

    The retrogradation behavior of corn starch treated with 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme (GBE) was investigated using rheometry, pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (PNMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Dynamic time sweep analysis confirmed that the storage modulus (G') of corn starch stored at 4 °C decreased with increasing GBE treatment time. PNMR analysis demonstrated that the transverse relaxation times (T2) of corn starches treated with GBE were higher than that of control during the storage at 4 °C. DSC results demonstrated that the retrogradation enthalpy (ΔHr) of corn starch was reduced by 22.3% after GBE treatment for 10h. Avrami equation analysis showed that GBE treatment reduced the rate of starch retrogradation. FTIR analysis revealed that GBE treatment led to a decrease in hydrogen bonds within the starch. Overall, these results demonstrate that both short- and long-term retrogradation of corn starch were retarded by GBE treatment.

  16. Excimer laser coronary atherectomy in septal collaterals during retrograde recanalization of a chronic total occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ohlow, Marc-Alexander; Lotze, Ullrich; Lauer, Bernward

    2011-01-01

    Management of chronic total occlusions has been refined through the development of a retrograde approach via collateral pathways. We describe here the use of excimer laser coronary atherectomy in the septal collaterals. This appraoch was not yet described in the literature. PMID:22355487

  17. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  18. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-05-06

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation.

  19. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  20. Institutional Challenges to Developing Metrics of Success in Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    War ISF Iraqi Security Forces IW Irregular Warfare JSS Joint Security Station JUSMAPG Joint United States Military Advisory and Planning Group...concept to Iraq by installing Joint Security Stations ( JSS ) in every district to collect actionable intelligence and launch reaction forces.154...158 Thus, during the surge, every few weeks another JSS or Coalition outpost (COP) was constructed, and within a short time the residents and

  1. The Harer-Zagier recursion for an irregular spectral curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhov, Leonid O.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the Do and Norbury recursion formula for the one-loop mean of an irregular spectral curve from a variant of replica method by Brezín and Hikami. We express this recursion in special times in which all terms W1(g) of the genus expansion of the one-loop mean are polynomials. We generalize this recursion to the case of generalized Laguerre ensembles corresponding to unicellular bicolored maps with different weights of vertices of different colors.

  2. Multi-Band Cable Antenna with Irregular Reactive Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-04

    08-2015 Publication Multi-Band Cable Antenna with Irregular Reactive Loading David A. Tonn Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport 1176...Newport, RI 02841 NUWC 300035 Distribution A An antenna includes a first antenna section that can be joined to an antenna feed. The first section...optimized for operation of the first section at the highest frequency. Additional antenna sections having successively lower frequencies are joined

  3. Generalizing Lifted Tensor-Product Wavelets to Irregular Polygonal Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2002-04-11

    We present a new construction approach for symmetric lifted B-spline wavelets on irregular polygonal control meshes defining two-manifold topologies. Polygonal control meshes are recursively refined by stationary subdivision rules and converge to piecewise polynomial limit surfaces. At every subdivision level, our wavelet transforms provide an efficient way to add geometric details that are expanded from wavelet coefficients. Both wavelet decomposition and reconstruction operations are based on local lifting steps and have linear-time complexity.

  4. Momentum Transfer by Laser Ablation of Irregularly Shaped Space Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, Duane A.; Libby, Stephen B.; Rubenchik, Alexander

    2010-10-08

    Proposals for ground-based laser remediation of space debris rely on the creation of appropriately directed ablation-driven impulses to either divert the fragment or drive it into an orbit with a perigee allowing atmospheric capture. For a spherical fragment, the ablation impulse is a function of the orbital parameters and the laser engagement angle. If, however, the target is irregularly shaped and arbitrarily oriented, new impulse effects come into play. Here we present an analysis of some of these effects.

  5. An Amino Acid Code for Irregular and Mixed Protein Packing

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyun; Chavan, Archana; Fraga, Keith; Tsai, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    To advance our understanding of protein tertiary structure, the development of the knob-socket model is completed in an analysis of the packing in irregular coil and turn secondary structure packing as well as between mixed secondary structure. The knob-socket model simplifies packing based on repeated patterns of 2 motifs: a 3 residue socket for packing within 2° structure and a 4 residue knob-socket for 3° packing. For coil and turn secondary structure, knob-sockets allow identification of a correlation between amino acid composition and tertiary arrangements in space. Coil contributes almost as much as α-helices to tertiary packing. Irregular secondary structure involves 3 residue cliques of consecutive contacting residues or XYZ sockets. In irregular sockets, Gly, Pro, Asp and Ser are favored, while Cys, His, Met and Trp are not. For irregular knobs, the preference order is Arg, Asp, Pro, Asn, Thr, Leu, and Gly, while Cys, His, Met and Trp are not. In mixed packing, the knob amino acid preferences are a function of the socket that they are packing into, whereas the amino acid composition of the sockets does not depend on the secondary structure of the knob. A unique motif of a coil knob with an XYZ β-sheet socket may potentially function to inhibit β-sheet extension. In addition, analysis of the preferred crossing angles for strands within a β-sheet and mixed α-helices/β-sheets identifies canonical packing patterns useful in protein design. Lastly, the knob-socket model abstracts the complexity of protein tertiary structure into an intuitive packing surface topology map. PMID:26370334

  6. 16. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING IRREGULAR SOUTH CORNER WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING IRREGULAR SOUTH CORNER WITH RECESSED CHINA CABINET. DOORWAY AT PHOTO RIGHT LEADS TO KITCHEN. NOTE VERTICAL DIVIDER BETWEEN GLAZING IN INDIVIDUAL SASHES OF 2-LIGHT OVER 2-LIGHT WINDOW AT PHOTO LEFT. 2-LIGHT OVER 2-LIGHT WINDOWS IN LIVING ROOM ARE DIVIDED HORIZONTALLY. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  7. Momentum Transfer by Laser Ablation of Irregularly Shaped Space Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Libby, S B; Rubenchik, A

    2010-02-04

    Proposals for ground-based laser remediation of space debris rely on the creation of appropriately directed ablation-driven impulses to either divert the fragment or drive it into an orbit with a perigee allowing atmospheric capture. For a spherical fragment, the ablation impulse is a function of the orbital parameters and the laser engagement angle. If, however, the target is irregularly shaped and arbitrarily oriented, new impulse effects come into play. Here we present an analysis of some of these effects.

  8. An Impact Ejecta Behavior Model for Small, Irregular Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, spacecraft observations of asteroids 951 Gaspra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, and 433 Eros have shown the overriding dominance of impact processes with regard to the structure and surface morphology of these small, irregular bodies. In particular, impact ejecta play an important role in regolith formation, ranging from small particles to large blocks, as well as surface feature modification and obscuration. To investigate these processes, a numerical model has been developed based upon the impact ejecta scaling laws provided by Housen, Schmidt, and Holsapple, and modified to more properly simulate the late-stage ejection velocities and ejecta plume shape changes (ejection angle variations) shown in impact cratering experiments. A target strength parameter has also been added to allow the simulation of strength-dominated cratering events in addition to the more familiar gravity-dominated cratering events. The result is a dynamical simulation which models -- via tracer particles -- the ejecta plume behavior, ejecta blanket placement, and impact crater area resulting from a specified impact on an irregularly shaped target body, which is modeled in 3-dimensional polygon fashion. This target body can be placed in a simple rotation state about one of its principal axes, with the impact site and projectile/target parameters selected by the user. The gravitational force from the irregular target body (on each tracer particle) is determined using the polygonized surface (polyhedron) gravity technique developed by Werner.

  9. Neutral hydrogen and star formation in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.

    1987-01-01

    The Very Large Array and WSTR H I synthesis observations of seven irregular galaxies are presented. The total H I images of four Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and three larger more distant irregular galaxies are constructed at the identical resolution of 500 pc. When compared to H II region distributions derived from H alpha images, all galaxies studied show an excellent correlation between the H I surface density and the presence of H II regions. This correlation is most easily interpreted in terms of a requisite threshold H I surface density for massive star formation. This threshold is 1 x 10 to the 21st power H I atoms/sq cm for a resolution of 500 pc. Giant extragalactic H II regions are only found near H I surface densities of a factor of 3 to 5 times this threshold level. The observed threshold implies a Jeans length of 150 pc, which is the same as the size scale at which the structure in the H I complexes correlates well with the H II region distribution. This, combined with the fact that in none of the galaxies observed is there H I above the threshold level with concomitant H II regions, implies an exclusively gravitational origin for the star formation events. That is, there is no need to involve a trigger as in the SSPSF theory (Seiden 1983) or feedback as in Dopita (1985).

  10. Flow induced vibrations in arrays of irregularly spaced cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taub, Gordon; Michelin, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Historically the main industrial applications of cylinder arrays in cross flows favored regular arrangements of cylinders. For this reason, most past studies of Flow Induced Vibrations (FIV) in large cylinder arrays have focused on such arrangements. Recently there has been some interest in generating renewable energy using FIV of bluff bodies. In such applications it will likely be beneficial to enhance, rather than suppress FIV. It is not known a priori if regular or irregularly spaced arrays are most adequate for this type of application. In this study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on one regularly spaced array and four different irregularly spaced arrays of cylinders in a cross flow. Each arrangement of cylinders was examined under eight different orientations to a cross flow ranging between 10 m/s and 17 m/s. The average amplitude of vibration of the cylinders was found to highly depend on arrangement and orientation. The typical amplitude of vibration of the rods in the irregular arrangements were found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of the regular array. A simple model was proposed in order to predict if a given arrangement was likely to produce large oscillations, and the validity of the model was examined. This research was supported by a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant within the 7th European Community Framework Program (Grant PIRG08-GA-2010-276762).

  11. Gas and Dust Properties in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. P.; Madden, S. C.; Colgan, S. W. J.; Geis, N.; Haas, M.; Maloney, P.; Nikola, T.; Poglitsch, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the 158 (micron)meter [C II] fine structure emission line from a sample of 11 low metallicity irregular galaxies using the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). Our preliminary results demonstrate that the ratio of the 158 (micron)meter [C II] emission to the CO-12(1 yields 0) emission ranges from 6,000 to 46,000. These ratios are significantly enhanced relative to clouds within the Galaxy and to normal metallicity galaxies, which typically have values in the range 2,000 to 6,300. We also find that the [C II] emission in dwarf irregular galaxies can be up to 5% of the far-infrared (FIR) emission, a higher fraction of the FIR than in normal metallicity galaxies. We discuss these results for the dwarf irregular galaxies and compare them to those observed in normal metallicity galaxies. The enhanced 158 (micron)meter [C II] emission relative to CO-12(1 yields 0) emission can be understood in terms of the increased penetration depth of ultraviolet (UV) photons into the clouds in low metallicity environments.

  12. Observation of artificial ionospheric irregularities on Doppler complex ``Spectr''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Inna; Latypov, Ruslan; Bochkarev, Vladimir

    At present there is a growing interest to research irregularities at the ionosphere both natural and artificial origin. This research has not only fundamental, but also practical importance for the questions connected with the radio wave propagation. This paper reports the results of our first experiments on registration as radio broadcast signals passed through the disturbed region of the ionosphere ( in this case, we received signals of Moscow exact time station at a frequency of 4996 kHz ) and a powerful radio wave signals used to heat the ionosphere (this method called self-scattering method when the pump wave creates artificial ionospheric irregularities and is scattered on them). Excitation of artificial ionospheric irregularities carried out using heating facility "Sura" , located 100 km eastward of Nizhny Novgorod (coordinates : f = 56,15 N , l = 46.1 E ). Receiving equipment was located in the Kazan (Volga ) Federal University , about 170 km eastward of Sura. Experiment which results are discussed in this paper was carried out from 19 to 22 March 2012. We used the window Fourier transform to analyze the change of radio wave spectrum with time. Quasi-periodic variations with significant amplitude were detected. The periods were equal or multiple to exposure period. The generation of artificial ionospheric disturbances by powerful radio emission of complex “Sura” can be cause of this variation which carries information about the excitation (gain) of internal gravity waves during periodic heating of the ionosphere by powerful HF radio waves.

  13. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  14. Tethered Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes concept for placing several communication satellites in geostationary orbit without taking up more space than assigned to single satellite. Proposed scheme eases orbital crowding more economically than space platforms. Concept requires minimal redesign of existing satellites and accommodates many satellites in just one orbital slot. System much lighter in weight than geostationary platform and easier and more economical to transport.

  15. High-latitutde scintillations using NNSS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersley, L.

    1985-11-01

    An experiment is described which has been established in Northern Sweden since September 1984 to monitor scintillations using transmissions from NNSS satellites. Designed for long-term nearly-unattended operation, with control and data handling based around a PDP 11/23 minicomputer, the equipment records and processes data from more than 20 NNSS passes per day. Stored on magnetic tape for further study for each 20s segment of received signal after suitable detrending, are S4-indices for both frequencies, the r.m.s. differential phase fluctuations, the differential phase rotation (differential doppler), together with statistics of signal fading below selected thresholds and durations of individual fades. Determination of satellite position in nearly-real time from the transmitted ephemeris parameters enables estimates of effective ionospheric irregularity height to be made for high-elevation passes by means of the cross correlation of signals received on two separated antennas. A second mode of operation allows the raw data to be stored for subsequent analysis. This has been used successfully for coordinated special program experiments in conjunction with the EISCAT ionospheric radar facility in the study of the physical processes reponsible for the scintillation-producing irregularities.

  16. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  17. Morphology and Immunoreactivity of Retrogradely Double-Labeled Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Samuel M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the specificity and reliability of a retrograde double-labeling technique that was recently established for identification of retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and to characterize the morphology of displaced (d)GCs (dGs). Methods. A mixture of the gap-junction–impermeable dye Lucifer yellow (LY) and the permeable dye neurobiotin (NB) was applied to the optic nerve stump for retrograde labeling of GCs and the cells coupled with them. A confocal microscope was adopted for morphologic observation. Results. GCs were identified by LY labeling, and they were all clearly labeled by NB. Cells coupled to GCs contained a weak NB signal but no LY. LY and NB revealed axon bundles, somas and dendrites of GCs. The retrogradely identified GCs numbered approximately 50,000 per retina, and they constituted 44% of the total neurons in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Somas of retrogradely identified dGs were usually negative for glycine, ChAT (choline acetyltransferase), bNOS (brain-type nitric oxidase), GAD (glutamate decarboxylase), and glial markers, and occasionally, they were weakly GABA-positive. dGs averaged 760 per retina and composed 1.7% of total GCs. Sixteen morphologic subtypes of dGs were encountered, three of which were distinct from known GCs. dGs sent dendrites to either sublaminas of the IPL, mostly sublamina a. Conclusions. The retrograde labeling is reliable for identification of GCs. dGs participate in ON and OFF light pathways but favor the OFF pathway. ChAT, bNOS, glycine, and GAD remain reliable AC markers in the GCL. GCs may couple to GABAergic ACs, and the gap junctions likely pass NB and GABA. PMID:21482641

  18. Continuous butanol fermentation and feed starch retrogradation: butanol fermentation sustainability using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, T C; Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    2005-01-26

    Use of starch solution as feed for butanol bioconversion processes employing Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 may have added economic advantage over the use of glucose. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced from 30 gL(-1) starch solution using a continuous process. The bioreactor was fed at a dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1) and starch solution/feed volume (3 L) was replaced every 72 h. The continuous reactor fed with cornstarch solution (feed temperature 19 degrees C) produced approximately 6.0 gL(-1) total ABE. Increasing the feed storage temperature to 37 degrees C improved ABE production to 7.2 gL(-1) suggesting that retrogradation was occurring more rapidly at 19 degrees C. In both these cases the fermentation drifted toward acid production after approximately 260 h, consistent with the retrogradation of starch overtime. The use of soluble starch, which is less prone to retrogradation, resulted in the production of 9.9 gL(-1) ABE at 37 degrees C feed storage temperature, as compared to 7.2 gL(-1) ABE when cornstarch was used. It should be noted that gelatinized starch retrogradation takes place after sterilization and prior to use of the feed medium, and does not occur during long-term storage of the raw corn material in the months leading up to processing. The degree of hydrolysis of gelatinized starch decreased from 68.8 to 56.2% in 3 days when stored at 37 degrees C. Soluble starch which does not retrograde demonstrated no change in the degree of hydrolysis.

  19. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  20. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons.

  1. Using a Calculated Pulse Rate with an Artificial Neural Network to Detect Irregular Interbeats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Bih-Chyun; Lin, Wen-Piao

    2016-03-01

    Heart rate is an important clinical measure that is often used in pathological diagnosis and prognosis. Valid detection of irregular heartbeats is crucial in the clinical practice. We propose an artificial neural network using the calculated pulse rate to detect irregular interbeats. The proposed system measures the calculated pulse rate to determine an "irregular interbeat on" or "irregular interbeat off" event. If an irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system produces a danger warning, which is helpful for clinicians. If a non-irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system displays the calculated pulse rate. We include a flow chart of the proposed software. In an experiment, we measure the calculated pulse rates and achieve an error percentage of < 3% in 20 participants with a wide age range. When we use the calculated pulse rates to detect irregular interbeats, we find such irregular interbeats in eight participants.

  2. Accretion of Low-albedo Dust by the Outer Satellites of the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2009-05-01

    The origin and nature of the low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus represents one of the most intriguing problems in planetary science. Observations of the satellite have shown that the two hemispheres of the satellite are wholly different. The trailing hemisphere has an albedo, composition, and morphology typical of the other icy Saturnian satellites, while the surface of the leading side is composed of an extraordinarily low-albedo, reddish material that includes organic material and carbon. The study of pathological objects such as Iapetus offers clues to general alteration processes that might act throughout the outer Solar System. Bell et al. (1985, Icarus 61, 192) proposed just that by suggesting that Callisto was the Iapetus of the Jovian system in a less extreme manifestation. Unlike the other Galilean satellites, Callisto is darker on its leading side (except right at opposition), suggesting it may have swept up low-albedo dust in a process similar to that occurring on Iapetus. Our recent work seeking hemispheric diversity on the Uranian satellites also shows that the outermost satellites (Titania and Oberon) tend to be darker and redder on the leading side. Our hypothesis is that all of the outermost major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus accrete reddish, low-albedo dust from the small, captured, outer retrograde satellites of these planets. The dust is kicked off by meteoritic impacts and spirals in by Poynting-Robertson drag to impact the leading sides of the outer larger satellites, including Iapetus, Callisto, Titania, and Oberon. Work funded by NASA.

  3. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  4. Exploring the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert Hamilton

    1986-01-01

    Data on the Uranian satellites from the January 25, 1986 flyby of Voyager 2 are presented. Ten new satellites were discovered by Voyager 2; the features and orbits of these ten satellites are examined. The main geological characteristics for Oberon, Umbriel, Titania, Ariel, and Miranda discovered in the Voyager 2 images are described. Possible relationships between the Uranian satellites and Jovian and Saturnian satellites are being researched.

  5. Retrograded eclogite xenoliths from mid-Tertiary potassic lavas along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, T. J.; Riggs, N.; Ort, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    A suite of xenolith-bearing, alkalic volcanic rocks erupted in small domes and plugs along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau (current Transition Zone) in Arizona between 30 Ma and 22 Ma. The onset of volcanic activity slightly precedes the earliest phase of mid-Tertiary extension and metamorphic core complex denudation in western/southern Arizona (27-25 Ma), which occurred along detachment faults that dip gently beneath the CP margin. Lavas are highly potassic (up to 6% Wt. K2O) and rich in incompatible trace elements (Ba up to 1900 ppm and Sr up to 1250 ppm), suggesting an enriched mantle melting source. Xenoliths are dominantly eclogite and pyroxenite that have been slightly to completely retrograded to amphibolite assemblages. The most common xenolith mineral assemblage consists of: 1) omphacite that has been completely replaced by an irregular symplectite of cpx and low-Ca plagioclase, 2) garnet that is partially replaced and rimmed by a fine, lamellar symplectite of high-Ca plagioclase, pargasitic amphibole, and Fe-Ti oxides, 3) coarse pargasitic amphibole that has overgrown or partially replaced the cpx-plag symplectite, 4) rutile that has been partially replaced by ilmenite and magnetite, and 4) apatite, zircon, and other accessory minerals. Xenoliths contain evidence for melt interaction prior to entrainment, including plagioclase veins containing hercynite and hogbomite that are cut by sharp contacts with the host lava. Results of this and other studies suggest that these veins formed by reactions between the eclogite assemblage (likely including spinel) and a locally derived melt. However, textural relations and geochemical differences suggest that this melt was not the host melt that entrained the xenoliths. Pyroxene and garnet thermobarometry from this and other studies on the primary eclogitic assemblages indicate temperatures from 500 to 900C at 11 to 20 kb. Mineral chemistry analyses of amphibole, plagioclase, hornblende, and garnet in the

  6. Study of Track Irregularity Time Series Calibration and Variation Pattern at Unit Section

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chaolong; Wei, Lili; Wang, Hanning; Yang, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on problems existing in track irregularity time series data quality, this paper first presents abnormal data identification, data offset correction algorithm, local outlier data identification, and noise cancellation algorithms. And then proposes track irregularity time series decomposition and reconstruction through the wavelet decomposition and reconstruction approach. Finally, the patterns and features of track irregularity standard deviation data sequence in unit sections are studied, and the changing trend of track irregularity time series is discovered and described. PMID:25435869

  7. Modelling of Ionospheric Irregularities and Total Electron Content.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    SThe Trustees of Emmanuel College 400 The Fenway Boston, Massachusetts 02115 I Final Report 14 November 1980 - 13 November 1983 December 1983...prior to those of the larger scales the near-gcostationary satellite LES 9. For geo- [Basu et al., 1978, 1980 ]. As a result, VHF-UHF stationary satellite...noted [Basu et at., 1980 , 1983: Lit- tillations. -- ingsion et at., 1981, Rino et ai.. 19811. Further, on RSLSADDSUSO many occasions, the spectral

  8. Counting forbidden patterns in irregularly sampled time series. II. Reliability in the presence of highly irregular sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariou, Konstantinos; McCullough, Michael; Stemler, Thomas; Small, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We are motivated by real-world data that exhibit severe sampling irregularities such as geological or paleoclimate measurements. Counting forbidden patterns has been shown to be a powerful tool towards the detection of determinism in noisy time series. They constitute a set of ordinal symbolic patterns that cannot be realised in time series generated by deterministic systems. The reliability of the estimator of the relative count of forbidden patterns from irregularly sampled data has been explored in two recent studies. In this paper, we explore highly irregular sampling frequency schemes. Using numerically generated data, we examine the reliability of the estimator when the sampling period has been drawn from exponential, Pareto and Gamma distributions of varying skewness. Our investigations demonstrate that some statistical properties of the sampling distribution are useful heuristics for assessing the estimator's reliability. We find that sampling in the presence of large chronological gaps can still yield relatively accurate estimates as long as the time series contains sufficiently many densely sampled areas. Furthermore, we show that the reliability of the estimator of forbidden patterns is poor when there is a high number of sampling intervals, which are larger than a typical correlation time of the underlying system.

  9. 5 CFR 734.601 - Employees who work on an irregular or occasional basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employees who work on an irregular or...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Employees Who Work on An Irregular or Occasional Basis § 734.601 Employees who work on an irregular or occasional basis. An...

  10. Occurrence climatology of the electron density irregularities in the mid-latitude E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Kil, H.

    2013-12-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere interrupt the propagation of electromagnetic waves and are problematic for navigation and communication systems. For this practical importance, significant efforts have been made to establish information on the occurrence climatology of such irregularities, to understand the onset conditions of such irregularities, and to predict or avoid the impact of these irregularities on the society. While the irregularities occur in all latitudes, less attention has been paid to the irregularities in middle latitudes. This may be because the irregularities in middle latitudes are not as severe as those in other latitude regions. However, middle latitudes are also the place where various forms of irregularities occur. A 40.8 MHz VHF radar was built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea aiming at continuous monitoring of the behavior of the middle-latitude electron density irregularities in the Far East Asian sector. The radar has been continuously operated by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) since December 2009. Using the Daejeon VHF radar data acquired since December 2009, we examine the occurrence types of the irregularities and the dependence of the irregularities on geophysical conditions (local time, altitude, season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity). These results can be used as a tool for investigating the onset conditions of the middle-latitude irregularities.

  11. Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-27

    organizations that have a role in IW operations. The Navy established the Navy Irregular Warfare Office in July 2008, published a vision statement for...7 2010 Navy Vision Statement for Countering Irregular...Appendix D. 2010 Navy Irregular Warfare Vision Statement ....................................................... 30 Contacts Author Contact

  12. Formation of ionospheric irregularities over Southeast Asia during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spogli, Luca; Cesaroni, Claudio; Di Mauro, Domenico; Pezzopane, Michael; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Musicò, Elvira; Povero, Gabriella; Pini, Marco; Dovis, Fabio; Romero, Rodrigo; Linty, Nicola; Abadi, Prayitno; Nuraeni, Fitri; Husin, Asnawi; Le Huy, Minh; Lan, Tran Thi; La, The Vinh; Pillat, Valdir Gil; Floury, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the geospace response to the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm leveraging on instruments spread over Southeast Asia (SEA), covering a wide longitudinal sector of the low-latitude ionosphere. A regional characterization of the storm is provided, identifying the peculiarities of ionospheric irregularity formation. The novelties of this work are the characterization in a broad longitudinal range and the methodology relying on the integration of data acquired by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers, magnetometers, ionosondes, and Swarm satellites. This work is a legacy of the project EquatoRial Ionosphere Characterization in Asia (ERICA). ERICA aimed to capture the features of both crests of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) and trough (EIT) by means of a dedicated measurement campaign. The campaign lasted from March to October 2015 and was able to observe the ionospheric variability causing effects on radio systems, GNSS in particular. The multiinstrumental and multiparametric observations of the region enabled an in-depth investigation of the response to the largest geomagnetic storm of the current solar cycle in a region scarcely reported in literature. Our work discusses the comparison between northern and southern crests of the EIA in the SEA region. The observations recorded positive and negative ionospheric storms, spread F conditions, scintillation enhancement and inhibition, and total electron content variability. The ancillary information on the local magnetic field highlights the variety of ionospheric perturbations during the different storm phases. The combined use of ionospheric bottomside, topside, and integrated information points out how the storm affects the F layer altitude and the consequent enhancement/suppression of scintillations.

  13. Asteroid 243 IDA and its satellite. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Klaasen, K.; Belton, M. J. S.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution mosaic of Ida shows a highly irregular body (roughly 56 km long), heavily covered with craters, with many interesting geological features, including grooves, blocks, chutes, dark-floored craters, and crater chains. A satellite of Ida, with a preliminary designation of 1993 (243) 1, was discovered in orbit around Ida. It is approximately 1.5 km in diameter, has an albedo and spectral reflectance not grossly different from Ida, and orbits Ida in a prograde direction with a period of roughly 20 hr. No other comparable-sized satellites have been found near Ida. New pictures of the opposite side of Ida reveal an irregular, dog-bone shape, with a prominent gouge that seems to separate Ida into two chief components. A V-shaped valley, well shown in the highest-resolution view of Ida returned in April, may mark a modest expression on the September face of the more dramatic feature on the back side. Ida's dense population of craters shows a wide diversity of morphologies, consistent with the surface having been subjected to saturated bombardment by smaller projectiles. Assuming the same projectile flux applies to Ida was used in deriving Gaspra's cratering age of about 200 m.y., and assuming that Gaspra and Ida both have the same impact strength, then the age of Ida's surface is calculated to be 1-2 b.y. This is considerably older than expected from other evidence concerning the Koronis family. Our favored explanation of Ida's satellite is that it (or a precursor satellite from which the present satellite was derived) formed during the catastrophic disruption event that formed Ida itself and formed the Koronis family of asteroids. Perhaps, instead, the satellite is a block ejected from a cratering impact. In any case, smaller blocks visible on some parts of Ida are more certain to be crater ejecta, whether or not they were ever temporary satellites.

  14. An amino acid code for irregular and mixed protein packing.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun; Chavan, Archana G; Fraga, Keith J; Tsai, Jerry

    2015-12-01

    To advance our understanding of protein tertiary structure, the development of the knob-socket model is completed in an analysis of the packing in irregular coil and turn secondary structure packing as well as between mixed secondary structure. The knob-socket model simplifies packing based on repeated patterns of two motifs: a three-residue socket for packing within secondary (2°) structure and a four-residue knob-socket for tertiary (3°) packing. For coil and turn secondary structure, knob-sockets allow identification of a correlation between amino acid composition and tertiary arrangements in space. Coil contributes almost as much as α-helices to tertiary packing. In irregular sockets, Gly, Pro, Asp, and Ser are favored, while in irregular knobs, the preference order is Arg, Asp, Pro, Asn, Thr, Leu, and Gly. Cys, His,Met, and Trp are not favored in either. In mixed packing, the knob amino acid preferences are a function of the socket that they are packing into, whereas the amino acid composition of the sockets does not depend on the secondary structure of the knob. A unique motif of a coil knob with an XYZ β-sheet socket may potentially function to inhibit β-sheet extension. In addition, analysis of the preferred crossing angles for strands within a β-sheet and mixed α-helice/β-sheet identifies canonical packing patterns useful in protein design. Lastly, the knob-socket model abstracts the complexity of protein tertiary structure into an intuitive packing surface topology map.

  15. Scaling Irregular Applications through Data Aggregation and Software Multithreading

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Villa, Oreste; Valero, Mateo

    2014-05-30

    Bioinformatics, data analytics, semantic databases, knowledge discovery are emerging high performance application areas that exploit dynamic, linked data structures such as graphs, unbalanced trees or unstructured grids. These data structures usually are very large, requiring significantly more memory than available on single shared memory systems. Additionally, these data structures are difficult to partition on distributed memory systems. They also present poor spatial and temporal locality, thus generating unpredictable memory and network accesses. The Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model seems suitable for these applications, because it allows using a shared memory abstraction across distributed-memory clusters. However, current PGAS languages and libraries are built to target regular remote data accesses and block transfers. Furthermore, they usually rely on the Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel control model, which is not well suited to the fine grained, dynamic and unbalanced parallelism of irregular applications. In this paper we present {\\bf GMT} (Global Memory and Threading library), a custom runtime library that enables efficient execution of irregular applications on commodity clusters. GMT integrates a PGAS data substrate with simple fork/join parallelism and provides automatic load balancing on a per node basis. It implements multi-level aggregation and lightweight multithreading to maximize memory and network bandwidth with fine-grained data accesses and tolerate long data access latencies. A key innovation in the GMT runtime is its thread specialization (workers, helpers and communication threads) that realize the overall functionality. We compare our approach with other PGAS models, such as UPC running using GASNet, and hand-optimized MPI code on a set of typical large-scale irregular applications, demonstrating speedups of an order of magnitude.

  16. The Spatial Distribution of HII Regions in Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roye, E. W.; Hunter, D. A.

    1999-12-01

    CCD Hα and V-band images were used to examine the distributions of star-forming regions in 34 irregular galaxies, 29 of which are normal Ims and 6 of which are Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD)/starburst irregulars. The V-band images were used to determine the center, position angle, and inclination of the galaxies. The Hα images were used to trace the star-formation through the HII regions. HII region distributions in the planes of the galaxies were compared to turnovers in the rotation curves, the sizes of the galaxies, and locations relative to stellar bars. The overall symmetry and concentration of the HII distributions were also determined. In general, the HII regions are concentrated towards the centers of the galaxies, with the giant HII regions and complexes being even more centrally concentrated. Furthermore, most of the HII regions and complexes are located within R25, the radius at a B surface brightness of 25 magnitudes per arcsec2, as well as within the radius at which the rotation curve turns over. The locations of HII regions, giant HII regions, and complexes are not otherwise correlated with these particular radii. There are no obvious differences in the distribution of HII regions in BCDs and starburst galaxies relative to that of typical irregulars. However, in the two BCD/starburst galaxies for which rotation curves are available, both had HII complexes located well beyond the turnover in the rotation curve. There appears to be no preferential location of giant HII regions or complexes relative to stellar bars. Finally, the overall distribution of HII regions tends to be symmetric. I would like to thank the National Science Foundation for providing funding for the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, and Kathy Eastwood for directing the program.

  17. Geostationary satellite log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. H.

    The present listing of current and planned geostationary satellites for the Fixed Satellite Service, Maritime Mobile Satellite Service, Broadcasting Satellite Service, and Space Research Service, are ordered along increasing East longitude orbit position; they update previously published lists through December, 1985. Also given is a key to the frequency bands used by current and planned satellites and replacement satellites; subband locations are designated by an up/down-link frequency column. Service allocations and the applicable ITU region for bands not allocated worldwide are included.

  18. China's satellite communications discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhou, Z.

    1986-04-01

    In 1972, China began to enter the age of satellite comunications, and it was realized that satellites could play a large role in television transmission in China. The experimental broadcasting of satellite television programs was begun in 1978, and satisfactory results were obtained. The success of the television transmission demonstration has led to important decisions regarding development of a domestic satellite communications system. Before specialized communications satellites are launched, the decision was made to lease an international communications satellite transmitter. The responsibility of the ground stations were discussed.

  19. Small satellite product assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontlivault, J.; Cadelec, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the interest in small satellites, their cost must be reduced; reducing product assurance costs induced by quality requirements is a major objective. For a logical approach, small satellites are classified in three main categories: satellites for experimental operations with a short lifetime, operational satellites manufactured in small mass with long lifetime requirements, operational satellites (long lifetime required), of which only a few models are produced. The various requirements as regards the product assurance are examined for each satellite category: general requirements for space approach, reliability, electronic components, materials and processes, quality assurance, documentation, tests, and management. Ideal product assurance system integrates quality teams and engineering teams.

  20. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  1. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  2. Irregular oscillations of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macayeal, Douglas R.

    1993-01-01

    Model simulations of the West Antarctic ice sheet suggest that sporadic, perhaps chaotic, collapse (complete mobilization) of the ice sheet occurred throughout the past one million years. The irregular behavior is due to the slow equilibration time of the distribution of basal till, which lubricates ice-sheet motion. This nonlinear response means that predictions of future collapse of the ice sheet in response to global warming must take into account its past history, and in particular, whether the present basal till distribution predisposes the ice sheet towards rapid change.

  3. Irregularity, volatility, risk, and financial market time series

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Steve; Kalman, Rudolf E.

    2004-01-01

    The need to assess subtle, potentially exploitable changes in serial structure is paramount in the analysis of financial data. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of approximate entropy (ApEn), a model-independent measure of sequential irregularity, toward this goal, by several distinct applications. We consider both empirical data and models, including composite indices (Standard and Poor's 500 and Hang Seng), individual stock prices, the random-walk hypothesis, and the Black–Scholes and fractional Brownian motion models. Notably, ApEn appears to be a potentially useful marker of system stability, with rapid increases possibly foreshadowing significant changes in a financial variable. PMID:15358860

  4. Similarity estimators for irregular and age-uncertain time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, K.; Kurths, J.

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate time series are often irregularly sampled and age uncertain, which is an important technical challenge to overcome for successful reconstruction of past climate variability and dynamics. Visual comparison and interpolation-based linear correlation approaches have been used to infer dependencies from such proxy time series. While the first is subjective, not measurable and not suitable for the comparison of many data sets at a time, the latter introduces interpolation bias, and both face difficulties if the underlying dependencies are nonlinear. In this paper we investigate similarity estimators that could be suitable for the quantitative investigation of dependencies in irregular and age-uncertain time series. We compare the Gaussian-kernel-based cross-correlation (gXCF, Rehfeld et al., 2011) and mutual information (gMI, Rehfeld et al., 2013) against their interpolation-based counterparts and the new event synchronization function (ESF). We test the efficiency of the methods in estimating coupling strength and coupling lag numerically, using ensembles of synthetic stalagmites with short, autocorrelated, linear and nonlinearly coupled proxy time series, and in the application to real stalagmite time series. In the linear test case, coupling strength increases are identified consistently for all estimators, while in the nonlinear test case the correlation-based approaches fail. The lag at which the time series are coupled is identified correctly as the maximum of the similarity functions in around 60-55% (in the linear case) to 53-42% (for the nonlinear processes) of the cases when the dating of the synthetic stalagmite is perfectly precise. If the age uncertainty increases beyond 5% of the time series length, however, the true coupling lag is not identified more often than the others for which the similarity function was estimated. Age uncertainty contributes up to half of the uncertainty in the similarity estimation process. Time series irregularity

  5. Similarity estimators for irregular and age uncertain time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, K.; Kurths, J.

    2013-09-01

    Paleoclimate time series are often irregularly sampled and age uncertain, which is an important technical challenge to overcome for successful reconstruction of past climate variability and dynamics. Visual comparison and interpolation-based linear correlation approaches have been used to infer dependencies from such proxy time series. While the first is subjective, not measurable and not suitable for the comparison of many datasets at a time, the latter introduces interpolation bias, and both face difficulties if the underlying dependencies are nonlinear. In this paper we investigate similarity estimators that could be suitable for the quantitative investigation of dependencies in irregular and age uncertain time series. We compare the Gaussian-kernel based cross correlation (gXCF, Rehfeld et al., 2011) and mutual information (gMI, Rehfeld et al., 2013) against their interpolation-based counterparts and the new event synchronization function (ESF). We test the efficiency of the methods in estimating coupling strength and coupling lag numerically, using ensembles of synthetic stalagmites with short, autocorrelated, linear and nonlinearly coupled proxy time series, and in the application to real stalagmite time series. In the linear test case coupling strength increases are identified consistently for all estimators, while in the nonlinear test case the correlation-based approaches fail. The lag at which the time series are coupled is identified correctly as the maximum of the similarity functions in around 60-55% (in the linear case) to 53-42% (for the nonlinear processes) of the cases when the dating of the synthetic stalagmite is perfectly precise. If the age uncertainty increases beyond 5% of the time series length, however, the true coupling lag is not identified more often than the others for which the similarity function was estimated. Age uncertainty contributes up to half of the uncertainty in the similarity estimation process. Time series irregularity

  6. Experimental studies of ionospheric irregularities and related plasma processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Kay D.

    1992-01-01

    Utah State University (USU) continued its program of measuring and interpreting electron density and its variations in a variety of ionospheric conditions with the Experimental Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities and Related Plasma Processes program. The program represented a nearly ten year effort to provide key measurements of electron density and its fluctuations using sounding rockets. The program also involved the joint interpretation of the results in terms of ionospheric processes. A complete campaign summary and a brief description of the major rocket campaigns are also included.

  7. Refinable C(1) spline elements for irregular quad layout.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thien; Peters, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Building on a result of U. Reif on removable singularities, we construct C(1) bi-3 splines that may include irregular points where less or more than four tensor-product patches meet. The resulting space complements PHT splines, is refinable and the refined spaces are nested, preserving for example surfaces constructed from the splines. As in the regular case, each quadrilateral has four degrees of freedom, each associated with one spline and the splines are linearly independent. Examples of use for surface construction and isogeometric analysis are provided.

  8. Irregular Grid Generation and Rapid 3D Color Display Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson D. Chin, Ph.D.

    2000-05-10

    Computationally efficient and fast methods for irregular grid generation are developed to accurately characterize wellbore and fracture boundaries, and farfield reservoir boundaries, in oil and gas petroleum fields. Advanced reservoir simulation techniques are developed for oilfields described by such ''boundary conforming'' mesh systems. Very rapid, three-dimensional color display algorithms are also developed that allow users to ''interrogate'' 3D earth cubes using ''slice, rotate, and zoom'' functions. Based on expert system ideas, the new methods operate much faster than existing display methodologies and do not require sophisticated computer hardware or software. They are designed to operate with PC based applications.

  9. A survey of satellite galaxies around NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Meghin; Loebman, Sarah; Yoachim, Peter

    2014-06-20

    We conduct a survey of satellite galaxies around the nearby spiral NGC 4258 by combining spectroscopic observations from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. New spectroscopy is obtained for 15 galaxies. Of the 47 observed objects, we categorize 8 of them as probable satellites, 8 as possible satellites, and 17 as unlikely to be satellites. We do not speculate on the membership of the remaining 14 galaxies due to a lack of velocity and distance information. Radially integrating our best-fit NFW profile for NGC 4258 yields a total mass of 1.8 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} within 200 kpc. We find that the angular distribution of the satellites appears to be random, and not preferentially aligned with the disk of NGC 4258. In addition, many of the probable satellite galaxies have blue u–r colors and appear to be star-forming irregulars in SDSS images; this stands in contrast to the low number of blue satellites in the Milky Way and M31 systems at comparable distances.

  10. In situ measurements of plasma irregularity growth in the cusp ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksavik, K.; Moen, J.; Lester, M.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Bekkeng, J. K.

    2012-11-01

    The Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI-2) sounding rocket was launched on 5 December 2008 from Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. The high-resolution rocket data are combined with data from an all-sky camera, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar, and the SuperDARN Hankasalmi radar. These data sets are used to characterize the spatial structure of F region irregularities in the dayside cusp region. We use the data set to test two key mechanisms for irregularity growth; the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and gradient drift (GD) instabilities. Except for a promising interval of 4-6 km irregularities, the KH growth rate was found to be too slow to explain the observed plasma irregularities. The time history of the plasma gives further support that structured particle precipitation could be an important source of kilometer- to hectometer-scale “seed” irregularities, which are then efficiently broken down into decameter-scale irregularities by the GD mechanism.

  11. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  12. High-latitude ionospheric irregularities: differences between ground- and space-based GPS measurements during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of ionospheric irregularities at high latitudes during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm. Our study used measurements from ~2700 ground-based GPS stations and GPS receivers onboard five low earth orbit (LEO) satellites—Swarm A, B and C, GRACE and TerraSAR-X—that had close orbit altitudes of ~500 km, and the Swarm in situ plasma densities. An analysis of the rate of TEC index (ROTI) derived from LEO-GPS data, together with Swarm in situ plasma probe data, allowed us to examine the topside ionospheric irregularities and to compare them to the main ionospheric storm effects observed in ground-based GPS data. We observed strong ionospheric irregularities in the topside ionosphere during the storm's main phase that were associated with storm-enhanced density (SED) formation at mid-latitudes and further evolution of the SED plume to the polar tongue of ionization (TOI). Daily ROTI maps derived from ground-based and LEO-GPS measurements show the pattern of irregularities oriented in the local noon-midnight direction, which is a signature of SED/TOI development across the polar cap region. Analysis of the Swarm in situ plasma measurements revealed that, during the storm's main phase, all events with extremely enhanced plasma densities (>106 el/cm3) in the polar cap were observed in the Southern Hemisphere. When Swarm satellites crossed these enhancements, degradation of GPS performance was observed, with a sudden decrease in the number of GPS satellites tracked. Our findings indicate that polar patches and TOI structures in the topside ionosphere were predominantly observed in the Southern Hemisphere, which had much higher plasma densities than the Northern Hemisphere, where SED/TOI structures have already been reported earlier. LEO-GPS data (ROTI and topside TEC) were consistent with these results.

  13. The electromotor system of the electric eel investigated with horseradish peroxidase as a retrograde tracer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M V; Sandri, C

    1989-05-29

    The electromotor system of the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, was studied by injection of horseradish peroxidase as a retrograde tracer. The electromotor neurons, which innervate the electrocytes, comprise a midline nucleus, largely dorsal to the spinal canal. Spinal motoneurons lie ventrolaterally. The electromotor and skeletal motor neuron populations correspond to the acetylcholinesterase-negative and -positive cells previously described. The medullary relay neurons were labeled following HRP injection into the spinal cord at a level where electromotor neurons occurred, but not after injection into the cord in the abdominal region rostral to these cells. Other medullary neurons, presumably bulbospinal motor fibers, were labeled after both levels of spinal cord injection. The results suggest that these axosomatic synapses, which are electrically transmitting but morphologically mixed, take up retrograde tracers in a manner similar to chemical synapses and that tracer uptake is at least largely at terminal regions.

  14. LRRK2 regulates retrograde synaptic compensation at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Jay; Tsurudome, Kazuya; Liao, Edward H.; Kauwe, Grant; Gray, Lindsay; Yanagiya, Akiko; R. Calderon, Mario; Sonenberg, Nahum; Haghighi, A. Pejmun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease gene leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in a number of processes including the regulation of mitochondrial function, autophagy and endocytic dynamics; nevertheless, we know little about its potential role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Here we demonstrate that postsynaptic knockdown of the fly homologue of LRRK2 thwarts retrograde, homeostatic synaptic compensation at the larval neuromuscular junction. Conversely, postsynaptic overexpression of either the fly or human LRRK2 transgene induces a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release by increasing the size of the release ready pool of vesicles. We show that LRRK2 promotes cap-dependent translation and identify Furin 1 as its translational target, which is required for the synaptic function of LRRK2. As the regulation of synaptic homeostasis plays a fundamental role in ensuring normal and stable synaptic function, our findings suggest that aberrant function of LRRK2 may lead to destabilization of neural circuits. PMID:27432119

  15. Air embolism after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a patient with budd Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wills-Sanin, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Yenny R; Polanco, Lucas; Rivero, Oscar; Suarez, Sebastian; Buitrago, Andrés F

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a procedure commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of various pancreatic and biliary diseases. Air embolism is a rare complication, which may be associated with this procedure. This condition can be manifested as cardiopulmonary instability and/or neurological symptoms. Known risk factors include: sphincterotomy; application of air with high intramural pressure; anatomic abnormalities; and chronic hepatobiliary inflammation. It is important for the health-care staff, including anesthesiologists, interventional gastroenterologists, and critical care specialists, amongst others, to promptly recognize air embolism and to initiate therapy in a timely fashion, thus preventing potentially fatal outcomes. We submit a brief review of the literature and a case report of air embolism which occurred in the immediate postoperative stage of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, performed in a woman with a history of liver transplantation due to Budd Chiari syndrome and biliary stricture.

  16. Air Embolism after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Patient with Budd Chiari Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wills-Sanin, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Yenny R.; Polanco, Lucas; Rivero, Oscar; Suarez, Sebastian; Buitrago, Andrés F.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a procedure commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of various pancreatic and biliary diseases. Air embolism is a rare complication, which may be associated with this procedure. This condition can be manifested as cardiopulmonary instability and/or neurological symptoms. Known risk factors include: sphincterotomy; application of air with high intramural pressure; anatomic abnormalities; and chronic hepatobiliary inflammation. It is important for the health-care staff, including anesthesiologists, interventional gastroenterologists, and critical care specialists, amongst others, to promptly recognize air embolism and to initiate therapy in a timely fashion, thus preventing potentially fatal outcomes. We submit a brief review of the literature and a case report of air embolism which occurred in the immediate postoperative stage of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, performed in a woman with a history of liver transplantation due to Budd Chiari syndrome and biliary stricture. PMID:25478242

  17. Combined retrograde labeling and calcium imaging in spinal cord and brainstem neurons of the lamprey.

    PubMed

    McClellan, A D; McPherson, D; O'Donovan, M J

    1994-11-07

    Neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord of the lamprey were retrogradely labeled with Calcium Green-dextran, an indicator dye that increases its fluorescence when intracellular calcium levels increase. Optical signals could be recorded from these labeled neurons during spinal cord stimulation, nerve stimulation, or spontaneous activity, up to 4 days after dye application and for distances of 5-14 mm away from the application site. Optical signals were enhanced by 4-AP, a potassium channel blocker, and blocked by cadmium, a calcium channel blocker. Taken together, the results suggest that the optical signals recorded from labeled neurons were due to calcium influx during electrical activity. Thus, retrograde labeling with calcium indicator dyes may provide a general purpose method for simultaneously monitoring the activity-related changes of intracellular calcium in anatomically identified groups of neurons in the lamprey nervous system.

  18. Relative importance of moisture migration and amylopectin retrogradation for pound cake crumb firming.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Delcour, J A

    2013-12-15

    Moisture migration largely impacts cake crumb firmness during storage at ambient temperature. To study the importance of phenomena other than crumb to crust moisture migration and to exclude moisture and temperature gradients during baking, crustless cakes were baked using an electrical resistance oven (ERO). Cake crumb firming was evaluated by texture analysis. First, ERO cakes with properties similar to those baked conventionally were produced. Cake batter moisture content (MC) was adjusted to ensure complete starch gelatinisation in the baking process. In cakes baked conventionally, most of the increase in crumb firmness during storage was caused by moisture migration. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) showed that the population containing protons of crystalline starch grew during cake storage. These and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data pointed to only limited amylopectin retrogradation. The limited increase in amylopectin retrogradation during cake storage cannot solely account for the significant firming of ERO cakes and, hence, other phenomena are involved in cake firming.

  19. A light microscope-based double retrograde tracer strategy to chart central neuronal connections.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Tom J H; Apps, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes a double retrograde tracing method to chart divergent projections in the CNS using light microscope techniques. It is based on immunohistochemical visualization of retrograde transport of cholera toxin b-subunit (CTb) and silver enhancement of a gold-lectin conjugate. Production of the gold-lectin is explained in detail, and a technique is offered to record through the injection pipettes, to help guide accurate placement of injections. Visualization of the two tracers results in light brown staining of CTb-labeled neurons and labeling by black particles of gold-lectin-containing neurons. Both types of label are easily recognized in the same neuron. The labeling is permanent and is well suited for studies in which large areas of the brain need to be surveyed. The whole procedure (excluding survival time) takes approximately 5-7 d to complete.

  20. Effect of retrogradation time on preparation and characterization of proso millet starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjie; Gong, Min; Li, Ying; Xiong, Liu

    2014-10-13

    Starch nanoparticles were prepared from proso millet starch using a green and facile method combined with enzymolysis and recrystallization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the starch nanoparticles prepared with different retrogradation time (0.5, 4, 12, and 24h). The results showed that the sizes of the starch nanoparticles were between 20 nm and 100 nm. The crystal pattern changed from A-type (native starch) to B-type (nanoparticles), and the relative crystallinity of the nanoparticles increased obviously, as compared with the native starch. The nanoparticles prepared with the 12h retrogradation time had the highest degree of crystallinity (47.04%). Compared to conventional acid hydrolysis to make starch nanoparticles, the present approach has the advantage of being quite rapid and presenting a higher yield (about 55%).