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Sample records for retrograde irregular satellites

  1. Cartography of irregularly shaped satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    Irregularly shaped satellites, such as Phobos and Amalthea, do not lend themselves to mapping by conventional methods because mathematical projections of their surfaces fail to convey an accurate visual impression of the landforms, and because large and irregular scale changes make their features difficult to measure on maps. A digital mapping technique has therefore been developed by which maps are compiled from digital topographic and spacecraft image files. The digital file is geometrically transformed as desired for human viewing, either on video screens or on hard copy. Digital files of this kind consist of digital images superimposed on another digital file representing the three-dimensional form of a body.

  2. An abundant population of small irregular satellites around Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Scott S; Jewitt, David C

    2003-05-15

    Irregular satellites have eccentric orbits that can be highly inclined or even retrograde relative to the equatorial planes of their planets. These objects cannot have formed by circumplanetary accretion, unlike the regular satellites that follow uninclined, nearly circular and prograde orbits. Rather, they are probably products of early capture from heliocentric orbits. Although the capture mechanism remains uncertain, the study of irregular satellites provides a window on processes operating in the young Solar System. Families of irregular satellites recently have been discovered around Saturn (thirteen members, refs 6, 7), Uranus (six, ref. 8) and Neptune (three, ref. 9). Because Jupiter is closer than the other giant planets, searches for smaller and fainter irregular satellites can be made. Here we report the discovery of 23 new irregular satellites of Jupiter, so increasing the total known population to 32. There are five distinct satellite groups, each dominated by one relatively large body. The groups were most probably produced by collisional shattering of precursor objects after capture by Jupiter.

  3. An abundant population of small irregular satellites around Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Scott S; Jewitt, David C

    2003-05-15

    Irregular satellites have eccentric orbits that can be highly inclined or even retrograde relative to the equatorial planes of their planets. These objects cannot have formed by circumplanetary accretion, unlike the regular satellites that follow uninclined, nearly circular and prograde orbits. Rather, they are probably products of early capture from heliocentric orbits. Although the capture mechanism remains uncertain, the study of irregular satellites provides a window on processes operating in the young Solar System. Families of irregular satellites recently have been discovered around Saturn (thirteen members, refs 6, 7), Uranus (six, ref. 8) and Neptune (three, ref. 9). Because Jupiter is closer than the other giant planets, searches for smaller and fainter irregular satellites can be made. Here we report the discovery of 23 new irregular satellites of Jupiter, so increasing the total known population to 32. There are five distinct satellite groups, each dominated by one relatively large body. The groups were most probably produced by collisional shattering of precursor objects after capture by Jupiter. PMID:12748634

  4. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  5. Irregular Satellite Capture by Exchange Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Levison, Harold F.

    2008-10-01

    The study of the origin of irregular satellites remains important in planetary science because it provides constraints on the formation process of giant planets and probes the properties of a now-extinct planetesimal disk that existed at 5-30 AU early in solar system history. While several putative scenarios of irregular-satellite capture around giant planets have been developed, various uncertainties and the lack of an accurate model of the evolutionary history of the solar system usually prevent an assessment of their overall likelihood. Here we study a three-body interaction scenario in which irregular satellites are formed by dissociation of a planetesimal binary in the gravity field of a planet. Within the frame of the Nice model, we determine how many irregular satellites are expected to be formed about each of the giant planets. We pay special attention to a possible capture of Triton via this mechanism. We find that Triton could have been captured via a binary dissociation very soon after Neptune's formation when the planetesimal disk was still dynamically cold. Triton was most likely captured by a dissociation of a binary system where the more massive component was ~2-5 times heavier than Triton. Our results suggest that Neptune, the formation of Triton's binary, and the capture of Triton around Neptune all occurred within the first ~5-10 Myr of solar system formation when the gas disk was still present. This would rule out the late formation of ice giants. Our results also indicate that binary dissociation is a highly unlikely process for the origin of small irregular satellites for two reasons. First, the orbital distribution of the captured bodies is inconsistent with that of the observed irregular satellites. Second, the efficiency of the captures is too low to explain the numerous populations of small irregular satellites.

  6. Color Survey of the Irregular Planetary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graykowski, Ariel; Jewitt, David

    2016-10-01

    Irregular satellites are characterized by their larger orbital distance from their planet, their high eccentricity and their high inclination, all indicating that they were captured. However, the mechanism of capture and the location of origin of the satellites remain unknown. We are conducting a photometric survey of the irregular satellites of the giant planets using the LRIS instrument on the 10-meter telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The measured colors will be compared to other planetary bodies in search for similarities and differences that may reflect upon the origin of the satellites. For example, if irregular satellites were captured from the Kuiper Belt then some should contain the ultrared material that is common in the trans-Neptunian and Centaur populations. If the irregular satellites of Jupiter were captured from the same source population as the Jovian Trojans, then it is natural to expect that the surface properties of satellites and Trojans should be the same. We will present initial results of this work.

  7. Rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational histories of irregularly shaped satellites are studied and are found to differ from the standard picture of tidal evolution of satellite rotations. Prior to capture into the synchronous rotation resonance, a narrow attitude-unstable chaotic zone is entered and the satellite begins to tumble chaotically. It is noted that enhanced dissipation of energy during the chaotic-tumbling phase may effect the orbital evolution. The theory suggests that, eventually, the rotation stays close to one of the accessible attitude-stable islands long enough for the weak tidal torque to remove the satellite from the chaotic zone.

  8. Black rain: The burial of the Galilean satellites in irregular satellite debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2013-04-01

    Irregular satellites are dormant comet-like bodies that reside on distant prograde and retrograde orbits around the giant planets. They are likely to be captured objects. Dynamical modeling work indicates they may have been caught during a violent reshuffling of the giant planets ˜4 Gy ago (Ga) as described by the so-called Nice model. According to this scenario, giant planet migration scattered tens of Earth masses of comet-like bodies throughout the Solar System, with some comets finding themselves near giant planets experiencing mutual encounters. In these cases, gravitational perturbations between the giant planets were often sufficient to capture the comet-like bodies onto irregular satellite-like orbits via three-body reactions. Modeling work suggests these events led to the capture of on the order of ˜0.001 lunar masses of comet-like objects on isotropic orbits around the giant planets. Roughly half of the population was readily lost by interactions with the Kozai resonance. The remaining half found themselves on orbits consistent with the known irregular satellites. From there, the bodies experienced substantial collisional evolution, enough to grind themselves down to their current low-mass states. Here we explore the fate of the putative irregular satellite debris in the Jupiter system. Pulverized by collisions, we hypothesize that the carbonaceous chondrite-like material was beaten into small enough particles that it could be driven toward Jupiter by Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag forces. Assuming its mass distribution was dominated by D > 50 μm particles, we find that >40% ended up striking the Galilean satellites. The majority were swept up by Callisto, with a factor of 3-4 and 20-30 fewer particles reaching Ganymede and Europa/Io, respectively. Collision evolution models indicate most of this material arrived about 4 Ga, but some is still arriving today. We predict that Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, and Io were buried about 4 Ga by ˜120-140 m, 25

  9. THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES: THE MOST COLLISIONALLY EVOLVED POPULATIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bottke, William F.; Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-03-15

    The known irregular satellites of the giant planets are dormant comet-like objects that reside on stable prograde and retrograde orbits in a realm where planetary perturbations are only slightly larger than solar ones. Their size distributions and total numbers are surprisingly comparable to one another, with the observed populations at Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus having remarkably shallow power-law slopes for objects larger than 8-10 km in diameter. Recent modeling work indicates that they may have been dynamically captured during a violent reshuffling event of the giant planets {approx}3.9 billion years ago that led to the clearing of an enormous, 35 M {sub +} disk of comet-like objects (i.e., the Nice model). Multiple close encounters between the giant planets at this time allowed some scattered comets near the encounters to be captured via three-body reactions. This implies the irregular satellites should be closely related to other dormant comet-like populations that presumably were produced at the same time from the same disk of objects (e.g., Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt, scattered disk). A critical problem with this idea, however, is that the size distribution of the Trojan asteroids and other related populations do not look at all like the irregular satellites. Here we use numerical codes to investigate whether collisional evolution between the irregular satellites over the last {approx}3.9 Gyr is sufficient to explain this difference. Starting with Trojan asteroid-like size distributions and testing a range of physical properties, we found that our model irregular satellite populations literally self-destruct over hundreds of Myr and lose {approx}99% of their starting mass. The survivors evolve to a low-mass size distribution similar to those observed, where they stay in steady state for billions of years. This explains why the different giant planet populations look like one another and provides more evidence that the Nice model may be viable. Our work

  10. NEOWISE: OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF JUPITER AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R.; Sonnett, S.; Kramer, E.; Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.

    2015-08-10

    We present thermal model fits for 11 Jovian and 3 Saturnian irregular satellites based on measurements from the WISE/NEOWISE data set. Our fits confirm spacecraft-measured diameters for the objects with in situ observations (Himalia and Phoebe) and provide diameters and albedo for 12 previously unmeasured objects, 10 Jovian and 2 Saturnian irregular satellites. The best-fit thermal model beaming parameters are comparable to what is observed for other small bodies in the outer solar system, while the visible, W1, and W2 albedos trace the taxonomic classifications previously established in the literature. Reflectance properties for the irregular satellites measured are similar to the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations, implying common origins.

  11. Dynamics of asteroid families and irregular satellites of jovian planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, Valerio

    2004-08-01

    This thesis is divided in two parts. First, we consider the dynamical mobility for members of asteroid families, while the second part concerns irregular satellites of jovian planets. Asteroid families are groupings of minor planets identified by clustering in their proper orbital elements, these objects have spectral signatures consistent with an origin in the break-up of a common parent body. From the current values of proper semimajor axes a of family members one can estimate the ejection velocities with which the fragments left the break-up event. However the ejection velocities so inferred are consistently higher than N-body and hydro-code simulations, as well as laboratory experiments, suggest. To explain this discrepancy, we study whether asteroid family members might have been ejected from the collision at low speeds and then gradually drifted to their current positions, via two mechanisms: (i)close encounters with massive asteroids, and (ii)the Yarkovsky non-gravitational effect. Because the Yarkovsky effect for km-sized bodies decreases with asteroid diameter D, it is unlikely to have appreciably moved large asteroids (say those with D > 15km) over the typical family age (1 2 Gyr). Our results show that, for ≃10% of the simulated bodies, close encounters increased the “inferred” ejection velocities from sub-100 m/s up to values of 150 m/s, beyond what hydro-code and N-body simulations suggest are the maximum possible initial ejection velocity for members of the Adeona and Gefion families with D > 15 km. Thus this mechanism of mobility may be responsible for the unusually high “inferred” ejection speeds of a few of the largest family members. The second part of the thesis concerns the dynamics of irregular satellites of jovian planets, moons that occupy large orbits of significant eccentricity e and/or inclination I, and circle each of the giant planets. The irregulars often extend close to the orbital stability limit, about 1/3 1/2 of the size

  12. Reconstructing regional climate networks from irregularly sampled satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donner, Reik V.; Sykioti, Olga; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    With the increasing availability of remote sensing data Earth System Analysis has taken a great step forward. Satellite data with high resolution in time and space allow for an in-depth analysis of small-scale processes in the climate as well as ecosystems. This data type, however, also harbors crucial conceptual complications. First, depending on whether the satellite is orbiting on an ascending or descending path systematic biases are induced into the dataset and both measurements can not be evaluated simultaneously without an appropriate preprocessing. Second, remote sensing data are usually not produced with equidistant temporal sampling, but might contain huge gaps, due to cloud cover or maintenance work and irregular time steps, due to the orbiting time of the satellite. In this work, we utilize sea surface temperature (SST) data obtained from the SMOS satellite as part of ESA's Earth Explorer Mission to study small-scale regional interactions between different parts of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Sea. In a first step, we create homogeneous time series for each grid point by combining data from ascending and descending satellite paths by utilizing principal component and singular spectrum analysis. To address the issue of irregular temporal sampling we utilize a kernel weighted version of the linear cross-correlation function to compute lagged correlations between all pairs of grid points in the dataset. By setting a threshold to the thus obtained correlation matrix we obtain a binary matrix which can be interpreted as the adjacency matrix of a complex network. We then use tools from complex network theory to study regional interdependencies in the study area for different time lags of up to forty days. We find that the obtained networks represent well the observed average wind directions and speeds and display interaction structures between small regions in the Aegean Sea, which are in good agreement with earlier observations. The methods presented

  13. Regional climate network analysis from irregularly sampled satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Sykioti, Olga; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, George; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing availability of remote sensing data Earth System Analysis has taken a great step forward. This type of data, however, also harbors a variety of conceptual complications. First, depending on whether the satellite is orbiting on an ascending or descending path systematic biases are induced into the data, and both measurements cannot be evaluated simultaneously without an appropriate preprocessing. Second, remote sensing data are usually not produced with equidistant temporal sampling, but might contain huge gaps and irregular time steps. Third, the time period covered by the data is often too short to perform an appropriate seasonal detrending. Here, we propose a general framework to create homogeneous anomalized time series for a (multivariate) satellite data set by combining time series from ascending and descending satellite paths or even different missions using principal component and singular spectrum analysis. We then exemplarily apply our method to sea surface temperature data obtained from the SMOS satellite mission to study small-scale regional correlative patterns covering different parts of the Aegean Sea. To address the issue of irregular temporal sampling we utilize a kernel weighted version of the linear cross-correlation function to compute lagged correlations between all pairs of grid points in the data set. By binarizing the thus obtained matrices, we obtain a network representation of the system's similarity structure. Ultimately, we use tools from complex network theory to study regional interdependencies in the study area for different time lags of up to forty days. We find that the obtained networks represent well the observed average wind directions and speeds and display interaction structures between small regions in the Aegean Sea, which are in good agreement with earlier observations. In a second step, we extend the study area to the whole Mediterranean and Black Sea and investigate lagged interactions between these two

  14. K2 and Herschel/PACS photometry of irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Andras; Kiss, Csaba; Molnar, Laszlo; Mueller, Thomas G.; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Szabo, Robert; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.

    2016-10-01

    The combination of optical and far-infrared photometric measurements yields an unambiguous method for characterizing the basic physical and surface properties of minor bodies in the Solar System. In principle, an object with a certain visible brightness can either be an object with a small but bright or a large but dim surface. To resolve this issue, conducting thermal emission measurements can also be acquired since both larger and dimmer objects have higher infrared radiations. In addition, the precise modelling of thermal emission should certainly take into account the rotation period of these bodies - otherwise the presence of surface thermal inertia can result in inaccurate conclusions regarding to the physical size and albedo.Since early 2014, Kepler Space Telescope surveys fields close to the Ecliptic in a framework of quarterly campaigns of the K2 initiative. This program makes possible to continuously observe Solar System bodies during this period of 80-90 days and hence provide an uninterrupted photometric series of moving Solar System objects down to the magnitude range of R = 23.5. This instrument hence an ideal observatory now for Solar System studies. Due to the fact that the expected rotational periods of these objects are commensurable to the diurnal characteristics of ground-based observations, such uninterrupted light curves are rather valuable for the accurate determination of rotational characteristics - including the physical rotation period, the amplitude and the confirmation of the presence of double- or multiple peaked features.In this presentation we summarize our results of current K2 and legacy Herschel/PACS observations regarding to some of the irregular satellites of Uranus and Neptune, namely Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos and Nereid. By comparing these results with similar kind of observations for trans-Neptunian objects (see Kiss et al., this DPS meeting), one can conclude how the formation and evolution of the outer Solar

  15. Three-body capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites and resonant history of the Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Catherine M.

    We examine the capture of small, irregular satellites, which, with their distant, eccentric, and inclined paths, must have originated in heliocentric orbits. We investigate a new theory: capture of one member of a pair of ˜100-km asteroids after tidal disruption. The energy loss from disruption is sufficient for capture, but it cannot deliver the bodies directly to the currently observed orbits. Instead, the long-lived capture orbits must evolve inward after capture, perhaps due to interactions with a tenuous circumplanetary gas disk. We find that at Jupiter, binaries offer an increase of a factor of ˜10 in the capture rate of 100-km objects as compared to single bodies, for objects separated by tens of radii that approach the planet on relatively low-energy trajectories. These bodies are at risk of collision with Callisto, but may be preserved by gas drag if their pericenters are raised quickly enough. We conclude that our mechanism is as capable of producing large irregular satellites as previous suggestions, and it avoids several problems faced by alternative models. To investigate possible source populations for these captured satellites, we simulated escaping asteroids from Jupiter's Trojan region and the outer main belt, calculating the Jacobi constant during close approaches and comparing with three-body capture statistics. We found that Trojans' high approach speeds make them unlikely source bodies, but asteroids from the outer main belt, especially those interior to Jupiter's 4:3 resonance, approach with low speeds that favor capture. Unlike irregular satellites, regular satellites formed with their planets. Gravitational resonances are important for these bodies, and we study the most famous of them. Io, Europa, and Ganymede are in the Laplace resonance, meaning that they have orbital periods in the ratio of 1:2:4. We focused our work on Io and Europa's orbital lock and modeled passage through the 2:1 resonances. We discovered cases where damping from

  16. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  17. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  18. Detection of the plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere with GPS measurements onboard Swarm satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, Irina; Cherniak, Iurii

    2016-07-01

    We present new results on the detection of the topside ionospheric irregularities/plasma bubbles using GPS measurements from Precise Orbit Determination (POD) GPS antenna onboard Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. For this purpose we analyze the GPS measurements onboard the ESA's constellation mission Swarm, consisted of three identical satellites with orbit altitude of 450-550 km. We demonstrate that LEO GPS can be an effective tool for monitoring the occurrence of the topside ionospheric irregularities and may essentially contribute to the multi-instrumental analysis of the ground-based and in situ data. In the present study we analyze the occurrence and global distribution of the equatorial ionospheric irregularities during post-sunset period. To support our observations and conclusions, we involve into our analysis in situ plasma density provided by Swarm constellation. Joint analysis of the Swarm GPS and in situ measurements allows us to estimate the occurrence rate of the topside ionospheric irregularities during 2014-2015. The obtained results demonstrate a high degree of similarities in the occurrence pattern of the seasonal and longitudinal distribution of the topside ionospheric irregularities derived on both types of the satellite observations. This work was partially funded by RFBR according to the research project No.16-05-01077 a.

  19. Autonomous Orbit Determination between a Lunar Satellite and a Distant Retrograde Orbit Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Tang, Jingshi; Liu, Lin; Liu, Peng

    Currently, orbit determination of lunar satellites heavily rely on ground stations on the Earth. The observation data suffers from problems such as low accuracy and bad visibility. An efficient way to release the burden of the ground stations and to enhance the observation accuracy is to use the inter-satellite range data between two lunar satellites. However, a well-known problem of only using this type of data is the overall rotation of the orbital plane (undetermined orbit inclination, ascending nod and perigee). Some external reference sources should be introduced into the system to avoid the overall rotation. Recently, an interesting idea is to use a probe around the Earth-Moon CLP (collinear libration point) as the reference source. The orbit of the CLP probe is unknown a priori. It is determined simultaneously with the lunar satellite’s orbit by using the inter-satellite range data between them. There are many advantages of this idea, but also some problems. One main problem is caused by the strong instability of the motions around the CLPs. Probes usually need a frequent orbit control, but the accuracy of the orbit determination of the CLP probes from a short arc between two maneuvers is usually unsatisfied. In this contribution, another kind of special probe other than the CLP probe is considered. It lies on a DRO (distant retrograde orbit) around the Moon. The DROs usually have much better stability property than the CLP orbits, so DRO probes don’t need a frequent orbit control. At the same time, our studies show that the OD accuracy is comparable to that of the CLP probe. The work is firstly done in the CRTBP (circular restricted three-body problem) model, by studying the OD results of different amplitude (both in plane and out of plane) for the DROs. Then, the study is generated to the real force model of the Earth-Moon system.

  20. Astrometric positions for 18 irregular satellites of giant planets from 23 years of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Arlot, J.-E.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Andrei, A. H.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Morgado, B. E.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Duchemin, Y.; Desmars, J.; Lainey, V.; Thuillot, W.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The irregular satellites of the giant planets are believed to have been captured during the evolution of the solar system. Knowing their physical parameters, such as size, density, and albedo is important for constraining where they came from and how they were captured. The best way to obtain these parameters are observations in situ by spacecrafts or from stellar occultations by the objects. Both techniques demand that the orbits are well known. Aims: We aimed to obtain good astrometric positions of irregular satellites to improve their orbits and ephemeris. Methods: We identified and reduced observations of several irregular satellites from three databases containing more than 8000 images obtained between 1992 and 2014 at three sites (Observatório do Pico dos Dias, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, and European Southern Observatory - La Silla). We used the software Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically (PRAIA) to make the astrometric reduction of the CCD frames. The UCAC4 catalog represented the International Celestial Reference System in the reductions. Identification of the satellites in the frames was done through their ephemerides as determined from the SPICE/NAIF kernels. Some procedures were followed to overcome missing or incomplete information (coordinates, date), mostly for the older images. Results: We managed to obtain more than 6000 positions for 18 irregular satellites: 12 of Jupiter, 4 of Saturn, 1 of Uranus (Sycorax), and 1 of Neptune (Nereid). For some satellites the number of obtained positions is more than 50% of what was used in earlier orbital numerical integrations. Conclusions: Comparison of our positions with recent JPL ephemeris suggests there are systematic errors in the orbits for some of the irregular satellites. The most evident case was an error in the inclination of Carme. Position tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  1. The shape of the F-region irregularities which produce satellite scintillations Evidence for axial asymmetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorcroft, D. R.; Arima, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Correlation analysis of three-station observations of satellite amplitude scintillations, recorded at London, Canada during the summer of 1968, have been interpreted to give information on the height, size and shape of the ionospheric irregularities. The irregularities had a mean height of 390 km, and when interpreted in terms of the usual axially-symmetric, field-aligned model, had a mean axial ratio of 6.5, and a mean dimension transverse to the magnetic field of 0.7 km. None of these parameters showed any systematic trend with geomagnetic latitude. The data for one of the passes analyzed were inconsistent with axial symmetry, and when examined in terms of a more general model, 3 of 9 passes showed evidence of irregularities which were elongated both along and transverse to the earth's magnetic field, the elongation transverse to the field tending to lie in a north-south direction.

  2. THE 3 μm SPECTRUM OF JUPITER's IRREGULAR SATELLITE HIMALIA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Rhoden, A. R. E-mail: Alyssa.Rhoden@jhuapl.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present a medium resolution spectrum of Jupiter's irregular satellite Himalia covering the critical 3 μm spectral region. The spectrum shows no evidence for aqueously altered phyllosilicates, as had been suggested from the tentative detection of a 0.7 μm absorption, but instead shows a spectrum strikingly similar to the C/CF type asteroid 52 Europa. 52 Europa is the prototype of a class of asteroids generally situated in the outer asteroid belt between less distant asteroids which show evidence for aqueous alteration and more distant asteroids which show evidence for water ice. The spectral match between Himalia and this group of asteroids is surprising and difficult to reconcile with models of the origin of the irregular satellites.

  3. The Phase Curve Survey of the Irregular Saturnian Satellites: A Possible Method of Physical Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Hicks, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    During its 2005 January opposition, the saturnian system could be viewed at an unusually low phase angle. We surveyed a subset of Saturn's irregular satellites to obtain their true opposition magnitudes, or nearly so, down to phase angle values of 0.01 deg. Combining our data taken at the Palomar 200-inch and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory's 4-m Blanco telescope with those in the literature, we present the first phase curves for nearly half the irregular satellites originally reported by Gladman et al. [2001. Nature 412, 163-166], including Paaliaq (SXX), Siarnaq (SXXIX), Tarvos (SXXI), Ijiraq (SXXII), Albiorix (SXVI), and additionally Phoebe's narrowest angle brightness measured to date. We find centaur-like steepness in the phase curves or opposition surges in most cases with the notable exception of three, Albiorix and Tarvos, which are suspected to be of similar origin based on dynamical arguments, and Siarnaq.During its 2005 January opposition, the saturnian system could be viewed at an unusually low phase angle. We surveyed a subset of Saturn's irregular satellites to obtain their true opposition magnitudes, or nearly so, down to phase angle values of 0.01 deg. Combining our data taken at the Palomar 200-inch and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory's 4-m Blanco telescope with those in the literature, we present the first phase curves for nearly half the irregular satellites originally reported by Gladman et al. [2001. Nature 412, 163-166], including Paaliaq (SXX), Siarnaq (SXXIX), Tarvos (SXXI), Ijiraq (SXXII), Albiorix (SXVI), and additionally Phoebe's narrowest angle brightness measured to date. We find centaur-like steepness in the phase curves or opposition surges in most cases with the notable exception of three, Albiorix and Tarvos, which are suspected to be of similar origin based on dynamical arguments, and Siarnaq.

  4. Ionospheric electron density irregularities observed by satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, low-low Doppler tracking link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A low-low, satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, Doppler tracking experiment was performed. The data are analyzed here for irregularities in electron density at the altitude of 212 km. The differential Doppler data with the relative motion term removed are integrated to obtain a representation of the electron density variation along the satellite path. Well-known large-scale features such as the equatorial geomagnetic anomaly and day/night ionization level differences are clearly observed in the integrated data. The larger crest of the morning geomagnetic anomaly is seen to occur in the southern (winter) hemisphere in agreement with previous observations. In addition, a sharp peak in the electron density at the day-to-night transition point is observed in two consecutive revolutions. This effect may be due to the previously postulated atmospheric shock wave generated by supersonic motion of the terminator.

  5. Distributions of irregularities, patches, and scintillation in the high-latitude F region seen by Swarm satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. K.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    High-latitude F region is a place where intense radio scintillation is produced by various types of electron density irregularities. The irregularities are known to be associated with plasma patches (enhancements of plasma density with respect to the background density), but the irregularities of other types also frequently occur. The distribution of different types of irregularities has not yet been clearly understood. In this study, we classify the irregularity types based on the morphology and investigate their distribution by analyzing the measurements of the electron density in 2014-2015 by the Langmuir probe onboard the Swarm satellites. We also process the GPS scintillation data provided by the Swarm mission to investigate the dependence of the scintillation occurrence and intensity on the irregularity type.

  6. STP/S3-4 satellite experiment: high latitude large scale density irregularities. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.; Singh, M.; Szuszczewicz, E.P.; Walker, D.N.; Holmes, J.C.

    1981-05-26

    Large scale density irregularities in the nighttime auroral zone F-region are routinely detected by a pair of pulsed plasma probes on the S3-4 satellite. The absolute density variations can be as large as an order of magnitude and in the case of a quiet diffuse aurora, the irregularities appear to be consistent with the sheet-like structures that have been postulated to explain high latitude scintillation enhancements. In a more dynamic situation, which we believe to be a surging aurora, the density variations may be associated with a density gradient and/or current-driven plasma instability. We have made preliminary analyses of the density fluctuations and FFT power spectra for evidence of characteristic scale sizes and power law dependence. Scale sizes from 10 to 300 km are clearly evident in the irregularities; power law fits to the spectra have spectral indices in the range -1.5 to -1.7. For the diffuse aurora our results suggest support for a recent numerical study of the nonlinear evolution of the current convective instability.

  7. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  8. IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF THE OUTER PLANETS: ORBITAL UNCERTAINTIES AND ASTROMETRIC RECOVERIES IN 2009-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Gladman, B.; Alexandersen, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Veillet, C.

    2012-11-01

    More than 100 small satellites have been identified orbiting the giant planets in distant, inclined, eccentric orbits. Detailed study of these objects requires that their orbits be known well enough to permit routine observations both from the Earth and from spacecraft. Unfortunately, many of the satellites have very poorly known orbits due to a scarcity of astrometric measurements. We have developed a reliable method to estimate the future on-sky position uncertainties of the satellites and have verified that those uncertainties provide a correct measure of the true on-sky positional uncertainty. Based on the uncertainties, we identified a set of satellites that are effectively 'lost' and another set that would be lost if additional observations were not obtained in the near future. We attempted recoveries of 26 of the latter group using the Hale 5 m and CFHT 3.6 m telescopes and found 23. This validated our method's predictions and led to significant improvements in our knowledge of the orbits of the recovered moons. There remains a handful of irregular moons which are recoverable and whose orbits will benefit from additional observations during the next decade, while 16 moons of Jupiter and Saturn are essentially lost and will require a re-survey to be located again.

  9. The Himalia Satellite Group: A Case Study on the Dynamical Self-spreading of Families of Irregular Satellites and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2015-11-01

    Many of the outer planets' irregular satellites are grouped into families, thought to originate from collisional fragmentation (Nesvorný et al 2004, AJ). Interestingly, families associated with the largest irregulars are either more dispersed than expected (e.g. J6 Himalia; Nesvorný et al 2003, AJ), or do not exist at all (e.g. S9 Phoebe; Ćuk et al 2003, DDA meeting #34). Christou (2005, Icarus) found that gravitational scattering by Himalia of its own group could explain the large velocity dispersion found by Nesvorný et al (2003, AJ). At the same time, Christou identified a new type of dynamical mechanism that intermittently locks the node of the satellite J10 Lysithea to that of Himalia. The same mechanism, but due to Ceres, was recently found to operate within the Hoffmeister family, dispersing its members and allowing an estimate of its age (Novaković et al 2015, ApJ).Here we revisit the issue of family self-dispersion, aiming to better understand it by studying its effects on the Himalia group. For this we utilise (a) intensive test particle simulations on a larger scale than those by Christou (2005, Icarus) (b) a semi-analytical treatment of the new resonance based on the secular theory of coorbital motion by Namouni (1999, Icarus). This has allowed us to obtain firmer constraints on the rate of dispersion over time and on how the resonance affects the long-term evolution of the orbital elements. A principal result of this work is that particles near the resonance evolve differently than those away from it. During the meeting, we will present a new estimate of the family’s age as well as an analysis of the resonant structure and how it affects Himalia family members. We will also discuss the broader implications for the long-term evolution of orbital concentrations of small bodies in the solar system.Astronomical research at the Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  10. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Kavelaars, J J; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J; Fraser, Wesley C; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D; Burns, Joseph A; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G; Jacobson, Robert A

    2004-08-19

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. 'Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The 'irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude m(R) = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50 km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  11. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Kavelaars, J J; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J; Fraser, Wesley C; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D; Burns, Joseph A; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G; Jacobson, Robert A

    2004-08-19

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. 'Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The 'irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude m(R) = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50 km, were presumably captured by Neptune. PMID:15318214

  12. HILAT a multi-experiment satellite addressing the dynamics of irregularity formation in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    A combined beacon, in-situ, and optical satellite mission is being prepared for definitive investigation of the formation, development, and decay of plasma-density irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere. The satellite, named HILAT (P83-1), will carry a VHF-UHF-L-Band coherent beacon for scintillation and TEC measurements, three payloads for in-situ and ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling observations, and a vacuum-ultraviolet imager for meso-scale recording of dayside and nightside auroras and emissions from the F layer. Observations are planned at northern latitudes ranging from the plasmapause to the pole, employing beacon receiving stations which also will decode telemetry from the other payloads. Launch is planned for the boreal summer of 1983.

  13. Large-scale irregularities of electron concentration in the southern magnetic anomaly area according to Intercosmos 19 satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fligel', M. D.

    1992-02-01

    Using Intercosmos 19 satellite topside sounding data, a type of complex ionogram for which the lowest frequency of the radio-wave which has pased through the ionosphere is smaller than the greatest frequency of the radio-wave reflected from the ionosphere is considered. (Under normal conditions these frequencies are identically equal). A mechanism is suggested by which radio-waves transmitted by the satellite propagate over 3000 km in the topside ionosphere in the presence of inclined large-scale plasma structure, which can explain the main features of such ionograms. The space-time distribution of this phenomenon on a global scale is analyzed. It is shown that it manifests itself mainly in the local winter, in the daytime and in the Southern Hemisphere. It is hypothesized that these large-scale irregularities are formed in the vicinity of the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly, and then move westward.

  14. New orbits of irregular satellites designed for the predictions of stellar occultations up to 2020, based on thousands of new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Beauvalet, L.; Desmars, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Morgado, B. E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2016-10-01

    Gomes-Júnior et al. published 3613 positions for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and 1787 positions for the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe. These observations were made between 1995 and 2014 and have an estimated error of about 60-80 mas. Based on this set of positions, we derived new orbits for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter: Himalia, Elara, Pasiphae, Carme, Lysithea, Sinope, Ananke and Leda. For Phoebe we updated the ephemeris from Desmars et al. using 75 per cent more positions than the previous one. Because of their orbital characteristics, it is common belief that the irregular satellites were captured by the giant planets in the early Solar system, but there is no consensus for a single model explaining where they were formed. Size, shape, albedo and composition would help to trace back their true origin, but these physical parameters are yet poorly known for irregular satellites. The observation of stellar occultations would allow for the determination of such parameters. Indeed Jupiter will cross the galactic plane in 2019-2020 and Saturn in 2018, improving a lot the chances of observing such events in the near future. Using the derived ephemerides and the UCAC4 catalogue we managed to identify 5442 candidate stellar occultations between 2016 January and 2020 December for the nine satellites studied here. We discussed how the successful observation of a stellar occultation by these objects is possible and present some potential occultations.

  15. Investigating GAIM-GM's Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, B.

    2015-12-01

    GAIM-GM is a modularized physics based data assimilation model, that ingests data from multiple data sources. One data source is slant total electron content (TEC) from a ground station network to satellites, and along the occultation path between multiple satellites. This study examines GAIM-GM's capability to sense a scintillation feature in the ionosphere, overlaid on an IFM electron density grid, from simulated satellite constellations ingesting the slant TEC values into GAIM-GM. Satellite constellations were developed in an extension of Matlab, called STK. A real ground station network generated from IGS was ingested into STK to calculate access times to the satellite constellation and use the access data to compute the slant TEC values on the perturbed IFM grid. It was discovered that a Walker constellation would give the most frequent revisit time to the scintillation feature, which co-rotates with the Earth, capturing both the day and nightside ionosphere throughout the evaluation period (96 hrs). The size of the feature was varied along with the number of satellites in the Walker constellation. 25 different scenarios with these parameters varied were created to determine the sensitivity of GAIM-GM to sense the feature. A simple heuristic algorithm was applied comparing the truth data, in this case the perturbed IFM grid, to the GAIM-GM output in each scenario across the entire grid, and for those grid points within the feature.

  16. Secular resonances between bodies on close orbits: a case study of the Himalia prograde group of jovian irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2016-06-01

    The gravitational interaction between two objects on similar orbits can effect noticeable changes in the orbital evolution even if the ratio of their masses to that of the central body is vanishingly small. Christou (Icarus 174:215-229, 2005) observed an occasional resonant lock in the differential node Δ Ω between two members in the Himalia irregular satellite group of Jupiter in the N-body simulations (corresponding mass ratio ˜ 10^{-9}). Using a semianalytical approach, we have reproduced this phenomenon. We also demonstrate the existence of two additional types of resonance, involving angle differences Δ ω and Δ (Ω +π) between two group members. These resonances cause secular oscillations in eccentricity and/or inclination on timescales ˜ 1 Myr. We locate these resonances in ( a, e, i) space and analyse their topological structure. In subsequent N-body simulations, we confirm these three resonances and find a fourth one involving Δ π. In addition, we study the occurrence rates and the stability of the four resonances from a statistical perspective by integrating 1000 test particles for 100 Myr. We find ˜ 10 to 30 librators for each of the resonances. Particularly, the nodal resonance found by Christou is the most stable: 2 particles are observed to stay in libration for the entire integration.

  17. DISCOVERY OF TWO ADDITIONAL JOVIAN IRREGULARS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Veillet, C.; Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Rousselot, P.

    2012-07-15

    We report on the discovery of two previously undetected irregular satellites of Jupiter (S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2) during recovery observations of other known satellites. S/2010 J 1 was discovered with the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope on September 7 UT of 2011, while S/2010 J 2 was discovered on September 8 with the 3.5 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The satellites have r-band magnitudes of 23.2 {+-} 0.3 and 24.0 {+-} 0.3, for S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2, respectively, indicating diameters of {approx}2-3 km. Both S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2 are on bound retrograde orbits. Time-averaged integrated orbits suggest the association to the Carme and Ananke groups, respectively. Given that the satellites were discovered within a small field during the routine observations of the previously known irregulars, their discovery agrees with predictions that other moons of similar sizes remain undetected in the Jovian Hill sphere.

  18. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Alternative Names Ejaculation retrograde; Dry climax Images Male reproductive system References Bhasin S, Basson R. Sexual dysfunction in men and women. In: Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, eds. Williams ... management of male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . ...

  19. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  20. Effects of transionospheric signal decorrelation on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) performance studied from irregularity dynamics around the northern crest of the EIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T.; Roy, B.; Paul, A.

    2014-10-01

    Transionospheric satellite navigation links operate primarily at L band and are frequently subject to severe degradation of performances arising out of ionospheric irregularities. Various characteristic features of equatorial ionospheric irregularity bubbles like the drift velocity, characteristic velocity, decorrelation time, and decorrelation distance can be determined using spaced aerial measurements at VHF. These parameters measured at VHF from a station Calcutta situated near the northern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) in the geophysically sensitive Indian longitude sector have been correlated with L band scintillation indices and GPS position accuracy parameters for identifying possible proxies to L band scintillations. Good correspondences have been observed between decorrelation times and distances at VHF with GPS S4 and Position Dilution of Precision during periods of GPS scintillations (S4 > 0.3) for February-April 2011, August-October 2011, and February-April 2012. A functional relation has been developed between irregularity drift velocity measured at VHF and S4 at L band during February-April 2011, and validation of measured S4 and predicted values performed during August-October 2011 and February-April 2012. Significant improvement in L band scintillation prediction and consequent navigational accuracy will result using such relations derived from VHF irregularity measurements which are much simpler and inexpensive.

  1. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  2. Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated Electric and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Sub-Auroral, Middle, and Low Latitudes in the Topside Ionosphere Observed with the DEMETER and DMSP Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Liebrecht, C; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Detailed observations of the plasma structure and irregularities that characterize the topside ionosphere at sub-auroral, middle, and low-latitudes are gathered with probes on the DEMETER and DMSP satellites. In particular, we present DEMETER observations near 700 km altitude that reveal: (1) the electric field irregularities and density depletions at mid-latitudes are remarkably similar to those associated with equatorial spread-F at low latitudes; (2) the mid-latitude density structures contain both depletions and enhancements with scale lengths along the spacecraft trajectory that typically vary from 10's to 100's of km; (3) in some cases, ELF magnetic field irregularities are observed in association with the electric field irregularities on the walls of the plasma density structures and appear to be related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves; (4) during severe geomagnetic storms, broad regions of nightside plasma density structures are typically present, in some instances extending from the equator to the subauroral regions; and (5) intense, broadband electric and magnetic field irregularities are observed at sub-auroral latitudes during geomagnetic storm periods that are typically associated with the trough region. Data from successive DEMETER orbits during storm periods in both the daytime and nighttime illustrate how enhancements of both the ambient plasma density, as well as sub-auroral and mid-latitude density structures, correlate and evolve with changes in the Dst. The DEMETER data are compared with near simultaneous observations gathered by the DMSP satellites near 840 km. The observations are related to theories of sub-auroral and mid-latitude plasma density structuring during geomagnetic storms and penetration electric fields and are highly germane to understanding space weather effects regarding disruption of communication and navigation signals in the near-space environment.

  3. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  4. Emerging Trends in Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Shivamurthy, M C

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde signaling is defined as the signaling events leading from the plastids to the nucleus in plants and across the chemical synapse, from the postsynaptic neuron to the presynaptic neuron in animals. The discovery of various retrograde messengers has opened many avenues and clouds of thoughts as to the role of retrograde signaling. They have been implicated particularly in long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity. But the basic assumptions about retrograde signaling have not been studied upon for many years. This review focuses on established facts and hypothesis put forward in retrograde signaling.

  5. Retrograde and submental intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Cyrus A; Dhaliwal, Sukhdeep S

    2010-03-01

    Direct laryngoscopy remains the technique of choice for placing an endotracheal tube (ETT). However, alternative techniques are needed for the difficult airway or unsuccessful intubation. Retrograde intubation may be used in adult or pediatric patients, whether awake, sedated, or obtunded. Contraindications include nonpalpable neck landmarks, pretracheal mass, severe flexion deformities of the neck, tracheal stenosis, coagulopathies, and infections. Submental intubation allows simultaneous access to the dental occlusion and nasal pyramid without the morbidity associated with tracheostomy. Contraindications include patients who require long periods of assisted ventilation and a severe traumatic wound on the floor of mouth. Complications include localized infection and sepsis, poor wound healing or scarring, and postoperative salivary fistula.

  6. Irregularities in Imperfective Derivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Maurice I.

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses presentation of Russian conjugation via the one-stem system advocated by Lipson and Townsend, and attempts a more unified and complete presentation of irregularities in imperfect derivation. Two major irregularities are occurrence of an unexpected suffix and unpredictable alternation in the root of the derived imperfective.…

  7. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  8. What Causes Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual flow Smoking Depression Never having given birth Endometriosis Chronic uterine infection Additional causes of menstrual irregularity include 1 : Endometriosis Endocrine gland-related causes Poorly controlled diabetes Polycystic ...

  9. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  10. Adolescent menstrual irregularity.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, M J; Emans, S J

    1984-06-01

    Amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea in the adolescent female are often the result of anovulation due to an immature hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. A careful history, physical examination and selected laboratory tests can help to differentiate this type of transient menstrual irregularity from the large number of endocrine and anatomic abnormalities that also present in this age group.

  11. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  12. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  13. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  14. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Umut; Duncan, Olivia F.; Gatt, Ariana P.; Dionne, Marc S.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Mitochondria communicate their bioenergetic status to the cell via mitochondrial retrograde signaling. To investigate the role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in neurons, we induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the Drosophila nervous system. Neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction causes reduced viability, defects in neuronal function, decreased redox potential, and reduced numbers of presynaptic mitochondria and active zones. We find that neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction stimulates a retrograde signaling response that controls the expression of several hundred nuclear genes. We show that the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIFα) ortholog Similar (Sima) regulates the expression of several of these retrograde genes, suggesting that Sima mediates mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Remarkably, knockdown of Sima restores neuronal function without affecting the primary mitochondrial defect, demonstrating that mitochondrial retrograde signaling is partly responsible for neuronal dysfunction. Sima knockdown also restores function in a Drosophila model of the mitochondrial disease Leigh syndrome and in a Drosophila model of familial Parkinson’s disease. Thus, mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal activity and can be manipulated to enhance neuronal function, despite mitochondrial impairment. PMID:26489648

  15. Contraception and irregular menses.

    PubMed

    Hopayian, K; Houston, A; Cooke, I

    1989-03-22

    A fictitious patient with obesity, hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome is discussed by 3 British general practitioners to illuminate management of this type of case. The patient is 24 years old, expects to marry next year, has irregular menses averaging 6 weeks apart, and is requesting an explanation for her irregular periods as well as oral contraception. The 1st physician would exclude hypothyroidism, then evaluate polycystic ovary syndrome by assaying testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the grounds that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an essay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the ground that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an assay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH ration between Days 2-6 of the cycle, and rule out congenital adrenal hyperplasia with an assay for 17-alpha-OH-progesterone. Since the patient might be anovulatory because of obesity, major long-term weight lose is a priority. Prescription of pills would depend on family history, smoking, and the degree of hirsutism and endocrine status

  16. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  17. Anisotropy of high-latitude nighttime F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.C.; Rino, C.L.; Owen, J.; Tsunoda, R.T.

    1982-12-01

    The anisotropy of intermediate-scale, F region irregularities in the nighttime auroral zone is described. The study is based upon spaced-receiver phase scintillation measurements made with the Wideband satellite at Poker Flat, Alaska. A systematic dependence of irregularity anisotropy with local time and magnetic latitude is observed, suggesting convective control. Sheetlike irregularities are confined to the zone of east-west drift near the equatorward boundary of the auroral zone, and at the flow reversal, or Harang discontinuity, the cross-field extension of the sheets is reduced. The extension of rodlike irregularities, which are observed poleward of the zonal convection boundary, also shows apparent convection dominance. Mechanisms for convection control of the anisotropy are discussed.

  18. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for ~500 km-scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Klenzing, J. H.; Liebrecht, M. C.; Valladares, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field insrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983]. We

  19. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  20. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation.

  1. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  2. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  3. In situ measurements of the spectral characteristics of F region ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Mcclure, J. P.; Hanson, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The retarding potential analyzer aboard Ogo 6 has provided high-resolution observations of the ion concentration along the satellite path. Changes in ion concentration as small as 0.03% and at times as small as 0.01% could be measured. Spatial resolution varied from 35 to 380 m. Samples of data have been analyzed to determine the spectral properties of the F region irregularities observed. The most common frequency spectrum observed suggests that the responsible irregularities result from the turbulent dissipation of larger irregularities. At the equator, the larger irregularities are probably produced by convective electric fields. At high latitudes, electric fields may also be involved, but other factors such as precipitating particles may contribute to, or be primarily responsible for, the production of large irregularities. Examples of other types of spectra associated with wavelike irregularities and with 'ground glass' (high-frequency noise) irregularities are also shown.

  4. Images of Bottomside Irregularities Observed at Topside Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, William J.; Gentile, Louise C.; Shomo, Shannon R.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/ Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour period on 13-14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (approx 100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (approx 1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles; the second and third do not. The data suggest that both downward moving depletions and upward moving density enhancements and the embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvenic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward-directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  5. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Kanuther N, Harrington J, Lee-Chiong T. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Clin Chest Med . 2010;31:319-325. Zee PC, Vitello MV. Circadian rhythm sleep disorder: irregular sleep wake rhythm. Sleep Med ...

  6. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  7. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  8. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  9. Recovery from retrograde amnesia: a learning process.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A M; Tyler, J; Jinich, D

    1974-04-01

    Retrograde amnesia was produced in rats by electroconvulsive shock. Memory recovered if the animals were given repeated test trials. Memory did not recover if steps were taken to reduce the conditioning properties of the test trials; the manipulations included eliminating the response, altering the apparatus cues, or extinguishing conditioned "fear" by confining animals to the apparatus during the first test trial.

  10. Retrograde replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    A technique is described for replacement of the entire thoracic aorta. In this "pull-through" technique, which utilizes hypothermic circulatory arrest, the graft is implanted in a retrograde fashion, thus providing protection for the spinal cord and brain and avoiding injury to the vagus and phrenic nerves. PMID:7647599

  11. Lexical Semantics and Irregular Inflection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Ting; Pinker, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Whether a word has an irregular inflection does not depend on its sound alone: compare lie-lay (recline) and lie-lied (prevaricate). Theories of morphology, particularly connectionist and symbolic models, disagree on which nonphonological factors are responsible. We test four possibilities: (1) Lexical effects, in which two lemmas differ in whether they specify an irregular form; (2) Semantic effects, in which the semantic features of a word become associated with regular or irregular forms; (3) Morphological structure effects, in which a word with a headless structure (e.g., a verb derived from a noun) blocks access to a stored irregular form; (4) Compositionality effects, in which the stored combination of an irregular word’s meaning (e.g., the verb’s inherent aspect) with the meaning of the inflection (e.g., pastness) doesn’t readily transfer to new senses with different combinations of such meanings. In four experiments, speakers were presented with existing and novel verbs and asked to rate their past-tense forms, semantic similarities, grammatical structure, and aspectual similarities. We found (1) an interaction between semantic and phonological similarity, coinciding with reported strategies of analogizing to known verbs and implicating lexical effects; (2) weak and inconsistent effects of semantic similarity; (3) robust effects of morphological structure, and (4) robust effects of aspectual compositionality. Results are consistent with theories of language that invoke lexical entries and morphological structure, and which differentiate the mode of storage of regular and irregular verbs. They also suggest how psycholinguistic processes have shaped vocabulary structure over history. PMID:21151703

  12. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  13. Properties of Cores Formed by Retrograde Minor Mergers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J.

    1999-09-01

    In the last 10 years over a dozen elliptical galaxies have been observed to posses a core which rotates counter to the rest of the galaxy. In one formation scenario, dynamical friction causes a compact companion to spiral into the center of a much larger elliptical galaxy on a retrograde orbit relative to the larger galaxy's rotation. If the core of the smaller galaxy is not tidally disrupted it may carry some of it's orbital angular momentum to the center. I present results from N-body simulations, which cover the parameter space over which satellite accretion is most likely to form counter rotating cores. The kinematic parts of the results are analyzed using the penalized likelihood method of Merritt to calculate 2D line-of-sight velocity fields, including third and fourth order Gauss-Hermite terms. By combining this method with IRAF, the photometric aspects of the results are analyzed and compared with observations. The results indicate that dissipationless satellite accretion can only form counter rotating cores when the larger galaxy's intrinsic angular momentum is almost perfectly antiparallel to the orbital angular momentum of the satellite. In most other cases a kinematically distinct core is formed. I present statistical properties of the cores, which include the deviations from pure isophote ellipses as well as deviations of the line-of-sight velocity profiles from a pure Gaussian form. To test the robustness of the results, some of the simulations are redone with a minor amount of dissipation added to the satellite. These simulations indicate that including small amounts of gas does not significantly effect the conclusions. I would like to thank the Student Stipend Committee for making this presentation possible.

  14. Stability of artificial and natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebehely, V.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative measure of stability based on Hill's definition is evaluated for direct and retrograde satellite orbits. These orbits are known as Poincare's first kind in the restricted problem of three bodies. Onsets of possible instabilities and captures are established. A critical (maximum) value of the satellites orbital radius is found for stability as a remarkably simple function of the mass-parameter. The results are applied to the natural satellites of the solar system.

  15. GPS and in situ Swarm observations of the equatorial plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, Irina; Astafyeva, Elvira; Cherniak, Iurii

    2016-07-01

    Here we study the global distribution of the plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere by using the concurrent GPS and Langmuir probe measurements onboard the Swarm satellites. We analyze 18 months (from August 2014 till January 2016) of data from Swarm A and B satellites that flew at 460 and 510 km altitude, respectively. To identify the occurrence of the ionospheric irregularities, we have analyzed behavior of two indices ROTI and RODI based on the change rate of total electron content and electron density, respectively. The obtained results demonstrate a high degree of similarities in the occurrence pattern of the seasonal and longitudinal distribution of the topside ionospheric irregularities derived from both types of the satellite observations. Among the seasons with good data coverage, the maximal occurrence rates for the post-sunset equatorial irregularities reached 35-50 % for the September 2014 and March 2015 equinoxes and only 10-15 % for the June 2015 solstice. For the equinox seasons the intense plasma density irregularities were more frequently observed in the Atlantic sector, for the December solstice in the South American-Atlantic sector. The highest occurrence rates for the post-midnight irregularities were observed in African longitudinal sector during the September 2014 equinox and June 2015 solstice. The observed differences in SWA and SWB results could be explained by the longitude/LT separation between satellites, as SWB crossed the same post-sunset sector increasingly later than the SWA did.

  16. From retrograde signaling to flowering time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changquan; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Plant's transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is balanced by intricate cascade of genes regulated by both endogenous and environmental inputs. Stress causes suppression of vegetative growth and acceleration of flowering as an emergency response for preservation of the species. Recently, we determined that expression levels of a transcription factor with 2 B-Box motifs, BBX19, is notably reduced in response to accumulation of high levels of Methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), a plastidial produced isoprenoids intermediate that also functions as a stress-specific retrograde signaling metabolite. We now have identified BBX19 as a repressor of Flower locus T (FT) expression and the corresponding downstream genes, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), Leafy (LFY) and Fruitful (FUL), through competition with CONSTANS (CO). Collectively our finding identifies BBX19 as a link between the stress-specific retrograde signal MEcPP and regulation of flowering time by depleting the active CO pool required for transcription of FT.

  17. The surgical correction of retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, J I; Solish, G I; Boorjian, P; Waterhouse, R K

    1975-12-01

    Two patients with retrograde ejaculation subsequent to Y-V plasty of the bladder neck underwent a surgical procedure to reconstruct the internal vesical sphincter and correct the phenomenon. The approach is transvesical and the internal vesical sphincter is reconstructed to the diameter of a No. 16 Foley catheter. The normal muscle of the bladder neck is approximated after the mucosa and scar tissue are excised. Both patients now have normal ejaculation and one has fathered a child.

  18. SNAP-tagging the retrograde route.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a chemical biology strategy to identify proteins that follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus, via endosomes. The general principle is the following: plasma membrane proteins are covalently tagged with a first probe. Only the ones that are then transported to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes are covalently bound to a capture reagent that has been engineered into this compartment. Specifically, the first probe is benzylguanine (BG) that is conjugated onto primary amino groups of plasma-membrane proteins. The capture reagent includes an O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase-derived fragment, the SNAP-tag, which forms a covalent linkage with BG. The SNAP-tag is fused to the GFP-tagged Golgi membrane anchor from galactosyl transferase for proper targeting to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes. Cell-surface BG-tagged proteins that are transported to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes (i.e., that are retrograde cargoes) are thereby covalently captured by the SNAP-tag fusion protein. For identification, the latter is immunopurified using GFP-Trap, and associated retrograde cargo proteins are identified by mass spectrometry. We here provide a step-by-step protocol of this method.

  19. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  20. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  1. Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities and Electromagnetic Wave Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Rose, D.; Paraschiv, I.

    2015-11-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. These types of density irregularities play important roles in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the Earth's ionosphere, inside the plasma sheath of reentry and hypersonic vehicles, and in many other applications.

  2. Study of electromagnetic wave scattering by periodic density irregularities in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, R.; Kuo, S.P.; Huang, J.

    1995-12-31

    A quasi-particle approach is used to formulate wave propagation and scattering in a periodically structured plasma. The theory is then applied to study the effect of bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities on the propagation of beacon satellites signals through the ionosphere. In this approach, the radio wave is treated as a distribution of quasi-particles described by a Wigner distribution function governed by a transport equation. The irregularities providing the collisional effect are modeled as a two dimensional density modulation on a uniform background plasma. The present work generalizes the previous work by including the spectral bandwidth ({Delta}k/k) effect of the spatially periodic irregularities on the transionospheric signal propagation. The collision of quasi-particles with the irregularities modifies the quasi-particle distribution and give rise to the wave scattering phenomenon. The multiple scattering process is generally considered in this deterministic analysis of radio wave scattering off the ionospheric density irregularities. The analysis shows that this two dimensional density grating effectively modulates the intensity of the beacon satellite signals. This spatial modulation of the wave intensity is converted into time modulation due to the drift of the ionospheric irregularities, which then results in the scintillation of the beacon satellite signals.

  3. Case study of polar cap scintillation modeling using DE 2 irregularity measurements at 800 km

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Weber, E.J.; Coley, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    High-resolution in situ Dynamics Explorer 2 data on thermal plasma densities are used here to study the small-scale irregularity structure of the F layer patches. It is shown that spatially discrete density structures associated with polar cap patches can be detected fairly high in the topside by an in situ irregularity sensor and that they correspond to temporally discrete scintillation patches. It is also shown that it is possible to model phase and amplitude scintillation occurrence from a knowledge of irregularity amplitude at a satellite altitude of about 800 km provided that independent measurements of the peak density and scale height of the F region are available. 19 references.

  4. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  5. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases.

  6. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  7. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  8. Seth Nicholson's First Satellite Discovery: Jupiter IX and His Orbit for It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2006-12-01

    Seth B. Nicholson was a graduate astronomy student at the University of California in Berkeley when he discovered his first satellite in 1914. He was later to discover three more, after he had joined the Mount Wilson Observatory staff following his PhD in 1915. Nicholson had begun his thesis on the problem of computing an improved orbit for J VIII, which had been discovered by Melotte in England in 1908, a distant irregular satellite like J VI and J VII. Nicholson was taking photographic plates to measure the position of J VIII in the summer of 1914 with the Crossley 36-inch reflector of Lick Observatory. He was a teaching assistant at Berkeley that summer, but would go up to Mount Hamilton to observe on weekends in the dark of the moon, traveling by rail, stage (an automobile on a regular schedule between San Jose and the observatory) and interurban trolley car, and sleeping in a shed near the Crossley dome. He first saw J IX as a much fainter object with the same motion as J VIII on a plate he took in late July 1914, and realized it must be another satellite of the giant planet. Nicholson obtained his first orbit of J IX, which had by then become his new thesis topic, in September, and published a paper on it in early 1915. Its orbit, like that of J VIII, was retrograde and irregular, but it was considerably fainter. Nicholson, a loyal student of Armin O. Leuschner, the head of the Berkeley Astronomy Division, used his teacher's "short method" (or analytic method) to calculate the orbit.

  9. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  10. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  11. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques.

  12. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25520276

  13. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  14. Preparation of irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hualin Zhai Linfeng; Li Yanhong; Shi Tiejun

    2008-06-03

    An irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite (meso-HA), Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, is successfully prepared from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} using surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results reveal that the positive head of CTAB is assembled on the surface precipitated HA and much NH{sub 4}{sup +} is enclosed in precipitated HA before calcination. Field scanning electron microscope (FSEM) reveals that there exist many interconnected pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment exhibits a mesoporous material type IV curve, and pore size distribution calculated from the desorption branch of the isotherms based on Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model shows that most pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton are sized at about 40 nm, but the pores are not uniform on the whole, owning to decomposition of the 'organic' CTAB templating structures and ammonium salt enclosed in the precipitated HA. The specific surface area of irregular meso-HA is calculated to be 37.6 m{sup 2}/g according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equation. Moreover, after polylactic acid/meso-HA (PLA/meso-HA) composites degraded 12 weeks in normal saline at 37 deg. C, the interconnected pores throughout the HA skeleton were enlarged and sized in micron degree, which resemble trabecular bone structure very much.

  15. Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting for acute mesenteric arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie; Wisniewski, Paul; Sarmiento, Jose; Vo, Trung; Aka, Paul K; Hsu, Jeffrey H; Tayyarah, Majid

    2010-08-01

    Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting (ROMS) represents a significant development in the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia. Compared to traditional surgical mesenteric bypass, ROMS is a less invasive technique that avoids many complications associated with emergent mesenteric bypass. This case report illustrates that retrograde superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenting is an option for the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia for patients in extremis.

  16. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  17. Neurexin and neuroligin mediate retrograde synaptic inhibition in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhitao; Hom, Sabrina; Kudze, Tambudzai; Tong, Xia-Jing; Choi, Seungwon; Aramuni, Gayane; Zhang, Weiqi; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2012-08-24

    The synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin alter the development and function of synapses and are linked to autism in humans. Here, we found that Caenorhabditis elegans neurexin (NRX-1) and neuroligin (NLG-1) mediated a retrograde synaptic signal that inhibited neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. Retrograde signaling was induced in mutants lacking a muscle microRNA (miR-1) and was blocked in mutants lacking NLG-1 or NRX-1. Release was rapid and abbreviated when the retrograde signal was on, whereas release was slow and prolonged when retrograde signaling was blocked. The retrograde signal adjusted release kinetics by inhibiting exocytosis of synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are distal to the site of calcium entry. Inhibition of release was mediated by increased presynaptic levels of tomosyn, an inhibitor of SV fusion.

  18. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated.

  19. Asteroids in Retrograde Orbits: Interesting Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2014-12-01

    We present the most interesting examples of the orbital evolution of asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90°). First, we used the latest observational data to determine nominal and averaged orbital elements of these objects. Next, the equations of motion of these asteroids were integrated backward 1 My, taking into account the propagation of observational errors. We used so-called 'cloning' procedure to reproduce the reliability of initial data. We obtained some possible scenarios of the orbit inversion in the past, what is often caused by the long-term influence of outer planets. For two most interesting cases (Apollo and Amor type) we did additional calculations: 100 My in the future. Additionally, we investigated the potential influence of Yarkovski/YORP effects on the long-time orbital evolution.

  20. PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-20

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  1. OGO 6 ion concentration irregularity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported concerning the ionospheric F-region irregularities. The results are based on in-situ OGO-6 measurements of the total ion concentration N sub i. A proposed mechanism for the generation of equatorial F-region irregularities and the morphological results, and the occurrence of Fe(+) ions in the equatorial F-region are discussed. Related research papers are included.

  2. The role of TIDs in the creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Tae-yong, Y.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle latitude F region is often interpreted in association with traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). However, the occurrence climatology of the irregularities is somewhat different from that of TIDs, and therefore, a different source of the irregularities may exist. In this study, we investigate the variability of the middle-latitude irregularities with local time, season, and solar cycle by analyzing the measurements of the ion density by the CHAMP (2001-2009) and Swarm (2014-2015) satellite observations. The occurrence climatology of the field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude is also investigated with the VHF radar observations acquired since January 2010 at Daejeon in South Korea. The role of TIDs in the creation of the middle latitude irregularities and FAIs is investigated by comparing the their occurrence climatology with the climatology of TIDs. The conventional wisdom is that the activity of TID decreases with an increase of the solar activity. However, our preliminary results show that the occurrence rate of the FAI increases with an increase of the solar activity. The distribution of the irregularities derived from the analysis of the satellite observations may provide insight into the relationship between TIDs, FAIs, and irregularities.

  3. Satellite observation of effusive volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Friedman, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Infrared emission from an active effusive volcanic eruption on Surtsey, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland, was recorded by airborne and satellite infrared systems at irregular intervals between 19 August and 3 October 1966. Ground and lava temperature measurements and volumetric lava outflow data permitted a comparison to be made between total thermal-energy yield and radiant emission recorded by the satellite system. The Nimbus HRIR recorded radiant emission at a level of about 3% of the estimated total thermal yield.

  4. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  5. Global Distribution of Density Irregularities in the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed measurements of ion number density made by the retarding potential analyzer aboard the Atmosphere Explorer-E (AE-E) satellite, which was in an approximately circular orbit at an altitude near 300 km in 1977 and later at an altitude near 400 km. Large-scale (greater than 60 km) density measurements in the high-altitude regions show large depletions of bubble-like structures which are confined to narrow local time longitude, and magnetic latitude ranges, while those in the low-altitude regions show relatively small depletions which are broadly distributed,in space. For this reason we considered the altitude regions below 300 km and above 350 km and investigated the global distribution of irregularities using the rms deviation delta N/N over a path length of 18 km as an indicator of overall irregularity intensity. Seasonal variations of irregularity occurrence probability are significant in the Pacific regions, while the occurrence probability is always high in die Atlantic-African regions and is always low in die Indian regions. We find that the high occurrence probability in the Pacific regions is associated with isolated bubble structures, while that near 0 deg longitude is produced by large depictions with bubble structures which are superimposed on a large-scale wave-like background. Considerations of longitude variations due to seeding mechanisms and due to F region winds and drifts are necessary to adequately explain the observations at low and high altitudes. Seeding effects are most obvious near 0 deg longitude, while the most easily observed effect of the F region is the suppression of irregularity growth by interhemispheric neutral winds.

  6. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  7. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in cross-fused ectopic kidney.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Kabar, Mucahit; Resorlu, Berkan; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Kilinc, Muhammet Fatih; Karakan, Tolga

    2015-02-01

    Cross-fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly in which both kidneys are fused and located on the same side. We report a case of right-to-left cross-fused renal ectopia and nephrolithiasis, in whom retrograde intrarenal surgery was used to treat the stone disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of retrograde intrarenal surgery of a crossed-fused ectopic kidney. PMID:25481231

  8. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-02-09

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  9. Periods, poles, and shapes of Saturn's irregular moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We report rotational-lightcurve observations of irregular moons of Saturn based on disk-integrated observations with the Narrow-Angle Camera of the Cassini spacecraft. From 24 measured rotation periods, 20 are now known with an accuracy of ~2% or better. The numbers are as follows (in hours; an '*' marks the less reliable periods): Hati 5.42; Mundilfari 6.74; Loge 6.94*; Skoll 7.26; Kari 7.70; Suttungr 7.82*, Bergelmir 8.13; Phoebe 9.274; Siarnaq 10.188; Narvi 10.21; Tarvos 10.69; Skathi 11.30; Ymir 11.922; Hyrrokkin 12.76; Greip 12.79*; Ijiraq 13.03; Albiorix 13.32; Bestla 14.624; Bebhionn 16.40; Paaliaq 18.75; Kiviuq 21.96; Erriapus 28.15; Thrymr 35 or >45* Tarqeq 76.8.More recent data strengthen the notion that objects in orbits with an inclination supplemental angle i' > 27° have significantly slower spin rates than those at i' < 27° (i' = 180°-i for retrograde objects, and i' = i for prograde moons, with i being the orbit inclination). Actually, the fastest rotator with i' > 27°, Siarnaq, stands opposed to at least eight objects with faster spins and i' < 27°. A null hypothesis claiming that objects of the two inclination bins come from the same population is rejected at the 99% confidence level. The i' > 27° bin contains all nine known prograde moons and four retrograde objects.A total of 25 out of 38 known outer moons has been observed with Cassini, and there is no chance to observe the 13 missing objects until end-of-mission. However, all unobserved objects are part of the i' < 27° bin. This means that the periods of all known moons with i' > 27° are known, and none of them is a fast rotator, with no exception.Several objects were observed repeatedly to determine pole directions, sidereal periods, and convex shapes. A few lightcurves have been observed to show three maxima and three minima even at low phase angles, suggesting objects with a triangular equatorial cross-section. Some objects with 2 maxima/ 2 minima are probably quite elongated. One

  10. Discovery of 12 satellites of Saturn exhibiting orbital clustering.

    PubMed

    Gladman, B; Kavelaars, J J; Holman, M; Nicholson, P D; Burns, J A; Hergenrother, C W; Petit, J M; Marsden, B G; Jacobson, R; Gray, W; Grav, T

    2001-07-12

    The giant planets in the Solar System each have two groups of satellites. The regular satellites move along nearly circular orbits in the planet's orbital plane, revolving about it in the same sense as the planet spins. In contrast, the so-called irregular satellites are generally smaller in size and are characterized by large orbits with significant eccentricity, inclination or both. The differences in their characteristics suggest that the regular and irregular satellites formed by different mechanisms: the regular satellites are believed to have formed in an accretion disk around the planet, like a miniature Solar System, whereas the irregulars are generally thought to be captured planetesimals. Here we report the discovery of 12 irregular satellites of Saturn, along with the determinations of their orbits. These orbits, along with the orbits of irregular satellites of Jupiter and Uranus, fall into groups on the basis of their orbital inclinations. We interpret this result as indicating that most of the irregular moons are collisional remnants of larger satellites that were fragmented after capture, rather than being captured independently. PMID:11449267

  11. Orbital maneuvers around irregular shaped bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, Flaviane; Rocco, E. M.; Almeida Prado, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the solar system there are many small bodies called asteroids. The large majority of these bodies are located in the asteroid belt, between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. The Near- Earth Objects, or NEOs, are objects with perihelion below 1.3AU, which include comets and asteroids. The NEOs are considered to have orbits passing close to the Earth’s orbit and, in the case of asteroids, are called Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Among the NEAs there are bodies considered potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), whose minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.05AU and that have absolute magnitude (H) of 22, which would mean an asteroid of at least 110-240 meters, depending on its albedo. One of the major characteristic of the asteroids is the irregular shape, causing the dynamics of orbits around these bodies to be different from a spherical shaped one. The fact that an object is not spherical generates a perturbation on the gravitational field. The disturbing force can be determined considering the shape of the specific body. A satellite orbiting this body would suffer the effects of this perturbation, but knowing the disturbing force, it’s possible to correct and control the orbit according to the desired mission. The polyhedron method is a traditional way to model an asteroid by dividing the object into smaller parts. The data used on this work are composed by a combination of triangular faces. The total disturbing force is a sum of the force on each piece of the model. Therefore, after the simulations are obtained, it’s possible to apply the desired corrections of the perturbation using continuous low thrust in closed loop, making it possible to perform maneuvers near these bodies. One of the important applications of the study shown above is in the ASTER mission, that is under study by INPE and several other Brazilian academic institutions, which goal is to send a spacecraft to an asteroid and then

  12. Continuous normothermic retrograde cardioplegia for valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Martella, A T; Hoffman, D M; Nakao, T; Frater, R W

    1994-07-01

    We have studied warm heart surgery, deemed as continuous warm blood cardioplegia and normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as an alternative to the technique of intermittent cold cardioplegia for valvular surgery. Between August 1990 and January 1994, 137 consecutive patients underwent valve repair or replacement using normothermic CPB. Eighty-six of these patients received continuous normothermic retrograde blood cardioplegia via the coronary sinus (CNRC). Fifty-one patients received intermittent cold blood cardioplegia (ICBC). All procedures were performed by the same surgeon (RWMF). The two groups were matched for age, sex, NYHA class, preoperative ejection fraction, diagnosis, procedure and activated clotting time. Warm blood cardioplegia was delivered continuously via the coronary sinus after antegrade arrest (oxygenated blood 1:4 to 1:3, 37 degrees C, 250-300 ml/min, maintaining coronary sinus pressures of 40-60 mmHg. Perioperative myocardial infarction was significantly less prevalent (4.6 vs. 8.0%; p < 0.05) in the warm cardioplegia group. Cardiac output immediately after bypass was significantly higher than before bypass only in the CNRC group (4.1 +/- 0.8 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 L/min; p < 0.01). CNRC patients had significantly higher incidence of spontaneous resumption of sinus rhythm at cross-clamp removal (80 of 86, 93%) compared to the hypothermic patients (14 of 51, 27%, p < 0.001). The time from removal of the aortic cross-clamp to discontinuation of CPB (reperfusion time) was significantly shorter in the warm cardioplegia group (43 +/- 7.4 versus 75 +/- 10.2 min; p < 0.001.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Behavior of high-latitude irregularities during geomagnetic disturbances. Environmental research papers

    SciTech Connect

    Houminer, Z.; Aarons, J.

    1980-06-24

    Scintillation observations of VHF and UHF transmissions from geostationary satellites at Goose Bay have been used to study the average characteristics of the high latitude irregularity region. The paper describes the average time development and mean diurnal pattern of irregularities during 58 magnetic storms in 1971-1976. The diurnal variation at Goose Bay shows two peaks of scintillation activity. One peak occurs during the afternoon hours, while the second occurs during the night. The average diurnal pattern is independent of type of storm. diurnal and seasonal effects appear only in the first day of storm commencement and not in the following days which show a very similar diurnal picture. (Author)

  14. Orbital simulations of satellite escape/capture and the origin of satellites such as Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Lance A. M.; Mckinnon, William B.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate satellite escape/capture in the context of the restricted, circular three body problem as applied to the Sun, Neptune, and Triton. We have computed a large number of coplanar prograde and retrograde orbital simulations over a range of initial distances and velocities. The satellite starts at superior conjunction within approximately 2 Hill radii of Neptune and has a velocity orthogonal to the Sun-planet line. Orbits with these initial conditions can be reflected with respect to time, so an escape is simply the reverse of a capture. We numerically integrate the equations of motion to compute the satellite's position until it escapes, collides with Neptune, or after 100 planetary years fails to escape, when computations cease. The initial distance x and velocity v in the restricted problem uniquely define the Jacobi constant C, a conserved energy-like quantity. Plots of the simulation outcomes in the prograde and retrograde C, x phase spaces reveal distinct zones in which temporary satellites approach the planet closely enough that permanent capture can be effected by gas drag with a protoplanetary nebula or by collision with a pre-existing satellite. Single and double close-flybys constitute the most common possible capture orbits. Long term multiple flyby orbits occur near the stability limits between bound and unbound orbits, and are more common among retrograde captures.

  15. Using TEC and radio scintillation data from the CITRIS radio beacon receiver to study low and midlatitude ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, Carl L.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Koch, Douglas E.; Galysh, Ivan J.

    2011-12-01

    Unique data on ionospheric plasma irregularities from the Naval Research Laboratory Scintillation and TEC Receiver in Space (CITRIS) instrument is presented. CITRIS is a multiband receiver that recorded Total Electron Content (TEC) and radio scintillations from Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) on STPSat1. The 555 ± 5 km altitude 35° inclination orbit covers low and midlatitudes. The measurements require propagation from a transmitter to a receiver through the F region plasma. CITRIS used both 1) satellite beacons in LEO and 2) the French sponsored global network of ground-based Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) beacons. This paper is both a brief review of the CITRIS experiment and the first combined TEC and scintillation study of ionospheric irregularities using a satellite-borne beacon receiver. It primarily focuses on CITRIS/DORIS observations and is a case study of the ionospheric irregularities and associated scintillation characteristics at 401.25 MHz during the 2008 equinox solar minimum. In addition, CITRIS was operated in a complementary fashion with the Communication/Navigations Outages Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during C/NOFS' first year of operations and comparison with measured C/NOFS irregularity characteristics are made. Several types of irregularities have been studied including Spread-F and the newly discovered dawn-side depletions.

  16. Climatological study of ionospheric irregularities over the European mid-latitude sector with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, René

    2014-03-01

    High-frequency variability of the ionosphere, or irregularities, constitutes the main threat for real-time precise positioning techniques based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements. Indeed, during periods of enhanced ionospheric variability, GNSS users in the field—who cannot verify the integrity of their measurements—will experience positioning errors that can reach several decimeters, while the nominal accuracy of the technique is cm-level. In the frame of this paper, a climatological analysis of irregularities over the European mid-latitude region is presented. Based on a 10 years GPS dataset over Belgium, the work analyzes the occurrence rate (as a function of the solar cycle, season and local time) as well as the amplitude of ionospheric irregularities observed at a single GPS station. The study covers irregularities either due to space weather events (solar origin) or of terrestrial origin. If space weather irregularities are responsible for the largest effects in terms of ionospheric error, their occurrence rate highly depends on solar activity. Indeed, the occurrence rate of ionospheric irregularities is about 9 % during solar maximum, whereas it drops to about 0 % during medium or low solar activity periods. Medium-scale ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) occurring during daytime in autumn/winter are the most recurrent pattern of the time series, with yearly proportions slightly varying with the solar cycle and an amplitude of about 10 % of the TEC background. Another recurrent irregularity type, though less frequent than MSTIDs, is the noise-like variability in TEC observed during summer nighttime, under quiet geomagnetic conditions. These summer nighttime irregularities exhibit amplitudes ranging between 8 and 15 % of the TEC background.

  17. Airborne studies of equatorial F layer ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Buchau, J.; Moore, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    Radio wave and optical experiments were conducted onboard a U.S. Air Force research aircraft in March 1977 and March 1978 at low magnetic latitudes to investigate the effects of F region electron density amplitude. Scintillation measurements were used to monitor the development and motion of F region 6300-A O I airglow depletions, spread F, and scintillation producing irregularities that are all associated with low-density bubbles in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere. The 6300-A airglow depletions are the bottomside signature of low plasma density within the bubbles. Examples of multiple airglow depletions and their relation to variations in the F layer virtual height (h'F) and to the occurrence of amplitude scintillations on 250-MHz satellite signals are described. Estimates of the average bottomside electron density, from simultaneous ionosonde measurements and 6300-A airglow intensities, show electron density decreases of approx.66% within the bubbles. These decreases are approximately the same for bubbles observed at the magnetic equator and near Ascension Island (18 /sup 0/S magnetic latitude). The measurements at Ascension Island show that airglow depletions extend away from the magnetic equator into the southern 6300-A intertropical arc. Variations in the maximum poleward extent of airglow depletions and of associated ionospheric irregularities that give rise to amplitude scintillations were observed. These latitudinal variations are interpreted, using field line mapping considerations, as variations in the maximum altitude of plasma bubbles over the magnetic equator. A north-south flight confirms that the overall pattern of airglow depletions and associated ionospheric irregularities extends continuously across the magnetic equator to +-15/sup 0/ magnetic latitude.

  18. Geomagnetic storm effect on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities over African equatorial sector using GPS-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Paul; Oyeyemi, Elijah; Akala, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Total electron content (TEC) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) network have been used to study the occurrence of large scale ionospheric irregularities over the African equatorial sector. The rate of change of TEC (ROT) as well as its standard deviation over five minutes (ROTI) were used to monitor the level of irregularities over 3 stations distributed across the three longitudinal sectors of Africa (eastern, central and western longitudinal sectors). The storm effect on irregularities occurrence has been studied in conjunction with the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the z component of the Interplanetary magnetic field (IMFBz) indices during four intense storms which were classified according to their season of occurrence during the year 2015. Irregularities were associated with GPS-TEC fluctuations as seen in the increased ROT and ROTI values especially in the post sunset period. Irregularities were inhibited over all the stations during the storm of March plausibly as a result of electric field conditioned by the southward turning of IMFBz during the pre and post midnight periods. The triggering of irregularities over the western and central stations and their inhibition over the eastern station during the storm of June was controlled by the ring current. The storm effect on irregularities was not evident over the western and central stations but inhibition of irregularities was observed over the eastern station during the storm of September.

  19. Illumination of mesospheric irregularity by lightning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; Velde, Oscar; Evans, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical model calculations recently predicted the existence of mesospheric irregularities which assist the initiation of sprites. Here we report the experimental detection of a ˜3-19 km3 large mesospheric irregularity at ˜80-85 km height which is illuminated by the electromagnetic field of an intense positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharge. While the lightning discharge causes a prompt group of four sprites above the lightning discharge, the mesospheric irregularity is found at a horizontal distance at least ˜15-20 km away from the sprite group and it rebrightens ˜40-60 ms after the sprite group occurrence. This rebrightening is driven by a local quasi-static electric field enhancement with a charge moment ˜4-20 Ckm which causes the irregularity to develop a downward descending luminous column from ˜75-85 km height. The quasi-static electric field enhancement is caused by the reorganization of residual charge inside the thundercloud during a high-level activity of intracloud discharges with ˜10-20 pulses per ms. Such mesospheric irregularities might have an effect on the wave propagation of 100 kHz radio waves which are used for atomic time transfer and marine navigation.

  20. Detecting chaos in irregularly sampled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, C. W.

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Wiebe and Virgin [Chaos 22, 013136 (2012)] developed an algorithm which detects chaos by analyzing a time series' power spectrum which is computed using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Their algorithm, like other time series characterization algorithms, requires that the time series be regularly sampled. Real-world data, however, are often irregularly sampled, thus, making the detection of chaotic behavior difficult or impossible with those methods. In this paper, a characterization algorithm is presented, which effectively detects chaos in irregularly sampled time series. The work presented here is a modification of Wiebe and Virgin's algorithm and uses the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) to compute a series' power spectrum instead of the DFT. The DFT is not appropriate for irregularly sampled time series. However, the LSP is capable of computing the frequency content of irregularly sampled data. Furthermore, a new method of analyzing the power spectrum is developed, which can be useful for differentiating between chaotic and non-chaotic behavior. The new characterization algorithm is successfully applied to irregularly sampled data generated by a model as well as data consisting of observations of variable stars.

  1. Detecting chaos in irregularly sampled time series.

    PubMed

    Kulp, C W

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Wiebe and Virgin [Chaos 22, 013136 (2012)] developed an algorithm which detects chaos by analyzing a time series' power spectrum which is computed using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Their algorithm, like other time series characterization algorithms, requires that the time series be regularly sampled. Real-world data, however, are often irregularly sampled, thus, making the detection of chaotic behavior difficult or impossible with those methods. In this paper, a characterization algorithm is presented, which effectively detects chaos in irregularly sampled time series. The work presented here is a modification of Wiebe and Virgin's algorithm and uses the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) to compute a series' power spectrum instead of the DFT. The DFT is not appropriate for irregularly sampled time series. However, the LSP is capable of computing the frequency content of irregularly sampled data. Furthermore, a new method of analyzing the power spectrum is developed, which can be useful for differentiating between chaotic and non-chaotic behavior. The new characterization algorithm is successfully applied to irregularly sampled data generated by a model as well as data consisting of observations of variable stars. PMID:24089946

  2. Detecting chaos in irregularly sampled time series.

    PubMed

    Kulp, C W

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Wiebe and Virgin [Chaos 22, 013136 (2012)] developed an algorithm which detects chaos by analyzing a time series' power spectrum which is computed using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Their algorithm, like other time series characterization algorithms, requires that the time series be regularly sampled. Real-world data, however, are often irregularly sampled, thus, making the detection of chaotic behavior difficult or impossible with those methods. In this paper, a characterization algorithm is presented, which effectively detects chaos in irregularly sampled time series. The work presented here is a modification of Wiebe and Virgin's algorithm and uses the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) to compute a series' power spectrum instead of the DFT. The DFT is not appropriate for irregularly sampled time series. However, the LSP is capable of computing the frequency content of irregularly sampled data. Furthermore, a new method of analyzing the power spectrum is developed, which can be useful for differentiating between chaotic and non-chaotic behavior. The new characterization algorithm is successfully applied to irregularly sampled data generated by a model as well as data consisting of observations of variable stars.

  3. Plasma irregularities caused by cycloid bunching of the CRRES G-2 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Pongratz, M. B.; Simons, D. J.; Wolcott, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft carried a number of barium thermite canisters for release into the upper atmosphere. The barium release labeled G-2 showed evidence of curved irregularities not aligned with the ambient magnetic field B. The newly discovered curved structures can be explained by a process called cycloid bunching. Cycloid bunching occurs when plasma is created by photoionization of a neutral cloud injected at high velocity perpendicular to B. If the injection velocity is much larger than the expansion speed of the cloud, the ion trail will form a cycloid that has irregularities spaced by the product of the perpendicular injection speed and the ion gyroperiod, Images of the solar-illuminated barium ions are compared with the results of a three-dimensional kinetic simulation. Cycloid bunching is shown to be responsible for the rapid generation of both curved and field-aligned irregularities in the CRRES G-2 experiment.

  4. Retrograde resonance in the planar three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2013-12-01

    We continue the investigation of the dynamics of retrograde resonances initiated in Morais and Giuppone (Mon Notices R Astron Soc 424:52-64, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21151.x, 2012). After deriving a procedure to deduce the retrograde resonance terms from the standard expansion of the three-dimensional disturbing function, we concentrate on the planar problem and construct surfaces of section that explore phase-space in the vicinity of the main retrograde resonances (2/1, 1/1 and 1/2). In the case of the 1/1 resonance for which the standard expansion is not adequate to describe the dynamics, we develop a semi-analytic model based on numerical averaging of the unexpanded disturbing function, and show that the predicted libration modes are in agreement with the behavior seen in the surfaces of section.

  5. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  6. Choledocholithiasis diagnostics - endoscopic ultrasound or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography?

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław

    2014-06-01

    It is estimated that 3.4% of patients qualified for cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis have a coexisting choledocholithiasis. For decades, endoscopic ascending retrograde cholangiopancreatography has been the golden diagnostic standard in cases of suspected choledocholithiasis. The method is associated with a relatively high rate of complications, including acute pancreatitis, the incidence of which is estimated to range between 0.74% and 1.86%. The mechanism of this ERCP-induced complication is not fully understood, although factors increasing the risk of acute pancreatitis, such as sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, previous acute pancreatitis, narrow bile ducts or difficult catheterization of Vater's ampulla are known. It has been suggested to discontinue the diagnostic endoscopic retrograde ascending cholangiopancreatography and replace it with endoscopic ultrasonography due to possible and potentially dangerous complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography has sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 95% regardless of gallstone diameter, as opposed to magnetic resonance cholangiography. However, both of these parameters depend on the experience of the performing physician. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography allows to limit the number of performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures by more than 2/3. Ascending endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography combined with an endoscopic incision into the Vater's ampulla followed by a mechanical evacuation of stone deposits from the ducts still remains a golden standard in the treatment of choledocholithiasis. Despite some limitations such as potentially increased treatment costs as well as the necessity of the procedure to be performed by a surgeon experienced in both endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography as well as endoscopic ultrasonography, the diagnostic endoscopic ultrasonography followed by a simultaneous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography aimed at gallstone removal is

  7. Dynein is the motor for retrograde axonal transport of organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapp, B.J.; Reese, T.S.

    1989-03-01

    Vesicular organelles in axons of nerve cells are transported along microtubules either toward their plus ends (fast anterograde transport) or toward their minus ends (retrograde transport). Two microtubule-based motors were previously identified by examining plastic beads induced to move along microtubules by cytosol fractions from the squid giant axon: (i) an anterograde motor, kinesin, and (ii) a retrograde motor, which is characterized here. The retrograde motor, a cytosolic protein previously termed HMW1, was purified from optic lobes and extruded axoplasm by nucleotide-dependent microtubule affinity and release; microtubule gliding was used as the assay of motor activity. The following properties of the retrograde motor suggest that it is cytoplasmic dynein: (i) sedimentation at 20-22 S with a heavy chain of Mr greater than 200,000 that coelectrophoreses with the alpha and beta subunits of axonemal dynein, (ii) cleavage by UV irradiation in the presence of ATP and vanadate, and (iii) a molecular structure resembling two-headed dynein from axonemes. Furthermore, bead movement toward the minus end of microtubules was blocked when axoplasmic supernatants were treated with UV/vanadate. Treatment of axoplasmic supernatant with UV/vanadate also blocks the retrograde movement of purified organelles in vitro without changing the number of anterograde moving organelles, indicating that dynein interacts specifically with a subgroup of organelles programmed to move toward the cell body. However, purified optic lobe dynein, like purified kinesin, does not by itself promote the movement of purified organelles along microtubules, suggesting that additional axoplasmic factors are necessary for retrograde as well as anterograde transport.

  8. ABI4 and its role in chloroplast retrograde communication

    PubMed Central

    León, Patricia; Gregorio, Josefat; Cordoba, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of plastids is a landmark event in plant evolution. The proper functionality of these organelles depends on strict and continuous communication between the plastids and the nucleus to precisely adjust gene expression in response to the organelle’s requirements. Signals originating from the plastids impact the expression of a variety of nuclear genes, and this retrograde communication is essential to couple the nuclear expression of plastid-localized products with organelle gene expression and, ultimately, functionality. Major advances have been made in this field over the past few years with the characterization of independent retrograde signaling pathways and the identification of some of their components. One such factor is the nuclear transcriptional factor ABI4 (ABA-INSENTIVE 4). ABI4, together with the plastid PPR GUN1 protein, has been proposed to function as a node of convergence for multiple plastid retrograde signaling pathways. ABI4 is conserved among plants and also plays important roles in various critical developmental and metabolic processes. ABI4 is a versatile regulator that positively and negatively modulates the expression of many genes, including other transcriptional factors. However, its mode of action during plastid retrograde signaling is not fully understood. In this review, we describe the current evidence that supports the participation of ABI4 in different retrograde communication pathways. ABI4 is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. A known regulator of ABI4 includes the PTM transcription factor, which moves from the chloroplast to the nucleus. This transcription factor is a candidate for the transmission of retrograde signals between the plastid and ABI4. PMID:23335930

  9. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  10. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm with retrograde approach.

    PubMed

    Narin, Nazmi; Ozyurt, Abdullah; Baykan, Ali; Uzüm, Kazım

    2014-04-01

    A three-year-old girl with multiple heart malformations admitted to the pediatric cardiology unit because of excessive sweating and fatigue. Abnormal color Doppler flow was detected into the right atrium from the dilated coronary sinus on the echocardiographic examination, and ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) was diagnosed. Although in most such cases, an antegrade transcatheter approach has been used, a retrograde approach can be used as a cost-effective treatment modality in those cases with selective high-risk surgery. In this report, we present a patient with ruptured SVA, which was closed via Amplatzer vascular plug-4 by retrograde approach. PMID:24769826

  11. Irregular short period variations in Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosek, Wieslaw

    Irregular variations in Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) were detected by the autocovariance and autoregressive prediction methods applied in the forward and backward directions of time. Time variable Fourier Transform Band Pass Filter (FTBPF) spectra of the unpredictable variations of the ERP reveal that pole coordinates data are mostly disturbed in the spectral range from about 50 to 250 days while length of day (LOD) data are mostly disturbed in the spectral range from about 20 to 110 days. The most energetic irregular variations in the ERP occurred in the beginning of 1988 and 1995 years.

  12. Rocket measurements of mesospheric ionization irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, R. B.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir probe technique for measurement of electron concentration in the mesosphere is capable of excellent altitude resolution, of order 1 m. Measurements from nine daytime rocket flights carrying an electron density fine structure experiment frequently show small scale ionization structures in the altitude region 70 to 90 km. The irregularities are believed to be the result of turbulent advection of ions and electrons. The fine structure experiment flown by the University of Illinois is described and methods of analyzing the collected data is presented. Theories of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are reviewed. Power spectra of the measured irregularities are calculated and compared to spectra predicted by turbulence theories.

  13. Recent studies of the structure and morphology of auroral zone F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Livingston, R.C.

    1983-11-01

    Recent analyses of auroral-zone spaced-receiver measurements have shown that the regions where sheetlike irregularities occur are confined to the equatorward portion of the nighttime scintillation zone where the westward and eastward electrojets flow. Poleward of this region, the irregularities are rodlike. For satellites in highly eccentric orbits, the spaced-receiver technique can be used to measure ionospheric drifts. Simultaneous incoherent-scatter radar measurements have revealed two types of F region ionization enhancements that are believed to be the source regions of persistent scintillation features on polar satellite transmissions. One type is found at the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora and can persist for more than 10 hours. More dynamic structures often occur in pairs, which suggests an association with 'inverted-V' precipitation events. Radar data have also revealed large-scale east-west structure in the poleward enhancements. 16 references.

  14. Effect of irregularities of nanosatellites position and size on collective electric and magnetic plasmonic resonances in spherical nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Vallecchi, Andrea; Albani, Matteo; Capolino, Filippo

    2013-03-25

    Spherical nanoclusters (NCs) with a central dielectric core surrounded by several satellite plasmonic nanospheres have been recently investigated as aggregates supporting electric and magnetic collective resonances. Notably, the collective magnetic resonance has been exploited to provide magnetic properties in optics, i.e., materials with macroscopic relative permeability different from unity. The NCs discussed in this paper can be realized using state-of-the-art nanochemistry self-assembly techniques. Accordingly, perfectly regular disposition of the nanoplasmonic satellites is not possible and this paper constitutes the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of such irregularities onto the electric and magnetic collective resonances. In particular we will show that the peak of the scattering cross section associated to the magnetic resonance is very sensitive to certain irregularities and significantly less to others. It is shown here that "artificial magnetic" properties of NCs are preserved for certain degrees of irregularities of the nanosatellites positions, however they are strongly affected by irregularities in the plasmonic nanosatellites sizes and by the presence of "defects" caused by the absence of satellites in the process of self-assembly around the dielectric core. The "artificial electric" resonance is instead less affected by irregularities mainly because of its wider frequency bandwidth.

  15. Scintillation and irregularities from the nightside part of a Sun-aligned polar cap arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeren, Christer; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Paxton, Larry J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study the presence of irregularities and scintillation in relation to the nightside part of a long-lived, Sun-aligned transpolar arc on 15 January 2015. The arc was observed in DMSP UV and particle data and lasted at least 3 h between 1700 and 2000 UT. The arc was more intense than the main oval during this time. From all-sky imagers on Svalbard we were able to study the evolution of the arc, which drifted slowly westward toward the dusk cell. The intensity of the arc as observed from ground was 10-17 kR in 557.7 nm and 2-3.5 kR in 630.0 nm, i.e., significant emissions in both green and red emission lines. We have used high-resolution raw data from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers and backscatter from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars to study irregularities and scintillation in relation to the polar cap arc. Even though the literature has suggested that polar cap arcs are potential sources for irregularities, our results indicate only very weak irregularities. This may be due to the background density in the northward IMF polar cap being too low for significant irregularities to be created.

  16. Spelling Pronunciations: Transforming Irregularity into Regularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Thaler, Verena; Reitsma, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    In a 10-day training, the efficacy of spelling pronunciations on German speaking 5th-graders' spelling skills for irregular words was examined. Poor spellers were less efficient in learning the spelling pronunciations than age-adequate spellers. On post-tests, 1 week after the last training day and between 5 and 12 weeks after post-test 1, poor…

  17. Holding Irregularly Shaped Parts For Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Burt W.; Wilson, Rick R.

    1988-01-01

    Part with complicated, irregular outside contours clamped for precise machining of internal passages with aid of simple method. Exterior of part cast in Rigidex, or equivalent epoxy. Forms wall to be clamped. Interior of part machined to finish of 125 microinches or finer. When machining finished, epoxy melted away by heating part to 200 degree F.

  18. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  19. Irregularities in ionospheric plasma clouds: their evolution and effect on radio communication. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Vesecky, J.F.; Chamberlain, J.W.; Cornwall, J.M.; Hammer, D.A.; Perkins, F.W.

    1980-09-01

    Both satellite radio communications, which travel through the Earth's ionosphere, and high frequency (HF) sky wave circuits, which use the ionosphere as a refracting medium, can be strongly affected by radio wave scintillation. High altitude nuclear explosions cause scintillation (by strongly disturbing the ionosphere) and thus severely degrade satellite radio communications over a large region. Since further atmospheric nuclear tests are banned, a thorough understanding of the physics involved in both the disturbed ionosphere and its interaction with radio waves is necessary in order to design radio communications systems which will operate satisfactorily in a nuclear environment. During the 1980 JASON Summer Study we addressed some aspects of the evolution of ionospheric irregularities following a high altitude nuclear explosion--the radio wave propagation theory being apparently well understood for the satellite link case. In particular, we have worked on irregularity evolution at late times (approx. hours) after an explosion and the impact of early time irregularity structure on late time evolution. We also raise the question of scintillation effects on HF sky wave communications.

  20. Tracking retrograde flow in keratocytes: news from the front.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, Pascal; Danuser, Gaudenz; Bohnet, Sophie; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2005-03-01

    Actin assembly at the leading edge of the cell is believed to drive protrusion, whereas membrane resistance and contractile forces result in retrograde flow of the assembled actin network away from the edge. Thus, cell motion and shape changes are expected to depend on the balance of actin assembly and retrograde flow. This idea, however, has been undermined by the reported absence of flow in one of the most spectacular models of cell locomotion, fish epidermal keratocytes. Here, we use enhanced phase contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle tracking to analyze the motion of the actin network in keratocyte lamellipodia. We have detected retrograde flow throughout the lamellipodium at velocities of 1-3 microm/min and analyzed its organization and relation to the cell motion during both unobstructed, persistent migration and events of cell collision. Freely moving cells exhibited a graded flow velocity increasing toward the sides of the lamellipodium. In colliding cells, the velocity decreased markedly at the site of collision, with striking alteration of flow in other lamellipodium regions. Our findings support the universality of the flow phenomenon and indicate that the maintenance of keratocyte shape during locomotion depends on the regulation of both retrograde flow and actin polymerization. PMID:15635099

  1. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  2. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  3. Preliminary comparisons of VHF radar maps of F-region irregularities with scintillations in the equatorial region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Aarons, J.; Mcclure, J. P.; Lahoz, C.; Bushby, A.; Woodman, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Multiantenna 50 MHz radar backscatter maps of echo power from night-time F-region equatiorial irregularities obtained at Jicamarca, Peru were compared with simultaneous VHF scintillation observations from Huancayo at 137 and 254 MHz during the period 20 November to 12 December 1975. Saturation of VHF scintillations in excess of 20 dB was observed at both these frequencies during times when radar maps showed large intense plume structures rising into the topside ionosphere. On nights when only thin layers of bottomside irregularities were observed, moderate to weak scintillations were recorded at VHF. Preliminary values of east-west horizontal irregularity drift velocities were obtained and compared with scintillation rate observations. Using the 1.5-deg and 4.5-deg longitudinal separation between the Jicamarca radar and ionospheric observation points of the two satellites from Huancayo, information was derived regarding large-scale east-west structure during the development phase of the irregularities.

  4. Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J. ); Valley, J.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

  5. Investigation of the role of plasma wave cascading processes in the formation of midlatitude irregularities utilizing GPS and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltrass, A.; Scales, W. A.; Erickson, P. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that midlatitude ionospheric irregularities are less understood due to lack of models and observations that can explain the characteristics of the observed wave structures. In this paper, the cascading processes of both the temperature gradient instability (TGI) and the gradient drift instability (GDI) are investigated as the cause of these irregularities. Based on observations obtained during a coordinated experiment between the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and the Blackstone Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar, a time series for the growth rate of both TGI and GDI is calculated for observations in the subauroral ionosphere under both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Recorded GPS scintillation data are analyzed to monitor the amplitude scintillations and to obtain the spectral characteristics of irregularities producing ionospheric scintillations. Spatial power spectra of the density fluctuations associated with the TGI from nonlinear plasma simulations are compared with both the GPS scintillation spectral characteristics and previous in situ satellite spectral measurements. The spectral comparisons suggest that initially, TGI or/and GDI irregularities are generated at large-scale size (kilometer scale), and the dissipation of the energy associated with these irregularities occurs by generating smaller and smaller (decameter scale) irregularities. The alignment between experimental, theoretical, and computational results of this study suggests that in spite of expectations from linear growth rate calculations, cascading processes involving TGI and GDI are likely responsible for the midlatitude ionospheric irregularities associated with GPS scintillations during disturbed times.

  6. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    SciTech Connect

    Valladares, C.E.; DasGupta, A.; Whitney, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal wave forms in the ion number density N/sub i/ was observed by the Atmosphere Explorer satellites. Multisatellite scintillation observations made at Huancayo, Peru and spaced-receiver drive measurements made at Ancon, Peru are associated with such irregularities observed by AE-E on a few nights in December 1979. The scintillations continue for a period of almost 6 hours, at a level that varies from moderate to fairly intense (S4 = 0.1-0.8 at 250 MHz), and these S4 fluctuations are quite well correlated, even over a distance of 1000 km. The irregularities constituting the large patch are found to drift eastward at a velocity of approximately 140 m/s. This and other such events are accompanied by the frequency spread signatures on Huancayo ionograms, as previously reported. The unique feature of the Fourier spectra associated with such bottomside sinusiodal (BSS) irregularities is the presence of Fresnel oscillations, which allow a determination of the velocity of the diffraction pattern perpendicular to the direction of the ray from the satellite to the ground station. The velocity so determined agrees well with the results of simultaneously performed spaced-receiver drift measurements. The presence of Fresnel oscillations indicates that the BSS irregularities occur in a relatively thin layer. However, while the scintillation data indicate a high frequency, roll off with a spectral index of the order of -3 to -4, the in-situ data tend to indicate that the index is of the order -5 to -6. Modeling studies are necessary to resolve this difference.

  7. Low and Midlatitude Ionospheric Plasma Density Irregularities and Their Effects on Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Earth's magnetic field results from various internal and external sources. The electric currents in the ionosphere are major external sources of the magnetic field in the daytime. High-resolution magnetometers onboard low-Earth-orbit satellites such as CHAMP and Swarm can detect small-scale currents in the nighttime ionosphere, where plasma density gradients often become unstable and form irregular density structures. The magnetic field variations caused by the ionospheric irregularities are comparable to that of the lithospheric contribution. Two phenomena in the nighttime ionosphere that contribute to the magnetic field variation are presented: equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). EPB is formed by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability over the dip equator and grows nonlinearly to as high as 2000 km apex altitude. It is characterized by deep plasma density depletions along magnetic flux tubes, where the diamagnetic effect produced by a pressure-gradient-driven current enhances the main field intensity. MSTID is a few hundred kilometer-scale disturbance in the midlatitude ionosphere generated by the coupled electrodynamics between the ionospheric E and F regions. The field-aligned currents associated with EPBs and MSTIDs also have significant signatures in the magnetic field perpendicular to the main field direction. The empirical discovery of the variations in the magnetic field due to plasma irregularities has motivated the inclusion of electrodynamics in the physical modeling of these irregularities. Through an effective comparison between the model results and observations, the physical process involved has been largely understood. The prediction of magnetic signatures due to plasma irregularities has been advanced by modeling studies, and will be helpful in interpreting magnetic field observations from satellites.

  8. Plasma irregularities in the comet's tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Scintillation theory is invoked to explain fluctuations in radio intensity observed during occultation of the extragalactic radio source PKS 2025-15 by the plasma tail of comet 1973 XII on Jan. 5, 1975. Plasma irregularities and turbulence in the tail of the comet (Kohoutek 1973f) are fitted to a Gaussian spectrum and to a Kolmogorov power-law spectrum in analyzing the scintillation data. The rms fluctuation of electron density in the cometary tail is reported at 80 electrons per cu mm, the inner scale of the fluctuation at 800 km, and the largest scale of fluctuation at possibly 400,000 km. A hump in the comet power-law spectrum is noted. Use of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations to predict the power spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations for irregularities associated with hydromagnetic turbulence is recommended.

  9. Trefftz difference schemes on irregular stencils

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2010-04-20

    The recently developed Flexible Local Approximation MEthod (FLAME) produces accurate difference schemes by replacing the usual Taylor expansion with Trefftz functions - local solutions of the underlying differential equation. This paper advances and casts in a general form a significant modification of FLAME proposed recently by Pinheiro and Webb: a least-squares fit instead of the exact match of the approximate solution at the stencil nodes. As a consequence of that, FLAME schemes can now be generated on irregular stencils with the number of nodes substantially greater than the number of approximating functions. The accuracy of the method is preserved but its robustness is improved. For demonstration, the paper presents a number of numerical examples in 2D and 3D: electrostatic (magnetostatic) particle interactions, scattering of electromagnetic (acoustic) waves, and wave propagation in a photonic crystal. The examples explore the role of the grid and stencil size, of the number of approximating functions, and of the irregularity of the stencils.

  10. Quantifying Irregularity in Pulsating Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Esteves, S.; Lin, A.; Menezes, C.; Wu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Hundreds of red giant variable stars are classified as “type L,” which the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) defines as “slow irregular variables of late spectral type...which show no evidence of periodicity, or any periodicity present is very poorly defined....” Self-correlation (Percy and Muhammed 2004) is a simple form of time-series analysis which determines the cycle-to-cycle behavior of a star, averaged over all the available data. It is well suited for analyzing stars which are not strictly periodic. Even for non-periodic stars, it provides a “profile” of the variability, including the average “characteristic time” of variability. We have applied this method to twenty-three L-type variables which have been measured extensively by AAVSO visual observers. We find a continuous spectrum of behavior, from irregular to semiregular.

  11. Parallel Programming Strategies for Irregular Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Achieving scalable performance for dynamic irregular applications is eminently challenging. Traditional message-passing approaches have been making steady progress towards this goal; however, they suffer from complex implementation requirements. The use of a global address space greatly simplifies the programming task, but can degrade the performance for such computations. In this work, we examine two typical irregular adaptive applications, Dynamic Remeshing and N-Body, under competing programming methodologies and across various parallel architectures. The Dynamic Remeshing application simulates flow over an airfoil, and refines localized regions of the underlying unstructured mesh. The N-Body experiment models two neighboring Plummer galaxies that are about to undergo a merger. Both problems demonstrate dramatic changes in processor workloads and interprocessor communication with time; thus, dynamic load balancing is a required component.

  12. ESA' s novel gravitational modeling of irregular planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    A detailed understanding and modeling of the gravitational modeling is required for realistic investigation of the dynamics of orbits close to irregularly shaped bodies. Gravity field modelling up to a certain maximum spherical harmonic degree N involves N2 unkown spherical harmonic coefficients or complex harmonics. The corresponding number of matrix entries reaches till N4 . For missions like CHAMP, GRACE or GOCE, the maximum degree of resolution is 75, 150 and 300 respectively. Therefore, the number of unknowns for a satellite like GOCE will be around 100.000. Since these missions usually fly for a period of time of several years, the number of observations is huge. Hence, gravity field recovery from these missions is a high demanding task. The classical approaches like spherical expansion of the potential lead generally to a high number of coefficients, which reduce the software computational efficiency of the orbit propagation and which have mostly a limited physical meaning. One of the main targets of the activity is the modelling of asteroids, small moons, and cometary bodies. All celestial bodies are irregular by definition. However, the scope of the activity is broad enough as to be able to use the models and the software in quasy-regular bodies as well. Therefore the models and tools could be used for bodies such as the Moon, Mars, Venus, Deimos, Europa, Eros, Mathilda, and Churyumov-Gerasimenko, etc., being these applications relevant for scientific (Rosetta, Bepi Colombo), exploration (Exo-Mars), NEO mitigation (Don Quijote) and Earth observation (GOCE) missions of ESA.

  13. Parallel Computing Strategies for Irregular Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Shan, Hongzhang; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel computing promises several orders of magnitude increase in our ability to solve realistic computationally-intensive problems, but relies on their efficient mapping and execution on large-scale multiprocessor architectures. Unfortunately, many important applications are irregular and dynamic in nature, making their effective parallel implementation a daunting task. Moreover, with the proliferation of parallel architectures and programming paradigms, the typical scientist is faced with a plethora of questions that must be answered in order to obtain an acceptable parallel implementation of the solution algorithm. In this paper, we consider three representative irregular applications: unstructured remeshing, sparse matrix computations, and N-body problems, and parallelize them using various popular programming paradigms on a wide spectrum of computer platforms ranging from state-of-the-art supercomputers to PC clusters. We present the underlying problems, the solution algorithms, and the parallel implementation strategies. Smart load-balancing, partitioning, and ordering techniques are used to enhance parallel performance. Overall results demonstrate the complexity of efficiently parallelizing irregular algorithms.

  14. Effects of chitin nano-whiskers on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and potato starches.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Liu, Chengzhen; Zhang, Shuangling; Yu, Jing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Starch is very prone to retrogradation after gelatinization. Inhibition of starch retrogradation has been an important factor in improving the quality of food. For the first time, we investigated the effect of nano-materials, represented by chitin nano-whiskers (CNWs), on the short- and long-term retrogradation of maize and potato starches. Rapid Visco-Analyser results showed that the addition of CNWs significantly decreased the setback values of maize and potato starches, which suggested that CNWs could retard the short-term retrogradation of starch. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results showed that the percentage of retrogradation of maize and potato starches significantly decreased (P<0.05), suggesting the inhibition of long-term retrogradation. The CNWs could be used as a new inhibitor of starch retrogradation to develop starch-based food with longer shelf life. PMID:27507508

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  16. Retrograde enhancement by alcohol of delayed free recall performance.

    PubMed

    Mann, R E; Cho-Young, J; Vogel-Sprott, M

    1984-04-01

    Two experiments are reported in which retrograde enhancement of human memory by alcohol was observed. In both studies male undergraduate volunteers performed an immediate free recall task before and after consuming either alcohol (0.66 abs alc/kg) or placebo. About two hours later, many words as they could delayed free recall was tested when subjects were asked to write down as many words as they could remember from the free recall trials in the session. Subjects given alcohol recalled significantly more words from lists heard before drinking than subjects given placebo; this effect appeared more pronounced for words from the primacy portion of the lists. The possibility that this retrograde enhancement effect is due to alcohol's effects on brain reward systems is raised.

  17. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  18. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL. PMID:22924043

  19. Retrograde trafficking of AB₅ toxins: mechanisms to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Linstedt, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial AB5 toxins are a clinically relevant class of exotoxins that include several well-known members such as Shiga, cholera, and pertussis toxins. Infections with toxin-producing bacteria cause devastating human diseases that affect millions of individuals each year and have no definitive medical treatment. The molecular targets of AB5 toxins reside in the cytosol of infected cells, and the toxins reach the cytosol by trafficking through the retrograde membrane transport pathway that avoids degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Focusing on Shiga toxin as the archetype member, we review recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the retrograde trafficking of AB5 toxins and highlight how these basic science advances are leading to the development of a promising new therapeutic approach based on inhibiting toxin transport.

  20. Ureteroscopy assisted retrograde nephrostomy for complete staghorn renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus.

  1. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL.

  2. Subversion of Retrograde Trafficking by Translocated Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Personnic, Nicolas; Bärlocher, Kevin; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert the endocytic bactericidal pathway to form specific replication-permissive compartments termed pathogen vacuoles or inclusions. To this end, the pathogens employ type III or type IV secretion systems, which translocate dozens, if not hundreds, of different effector proteins into their host cells, where they manipulate vesicle trafficking and signaling pathways in favor of the intruders. While the distinct cocktail of effectors defines the specific processes by which a pathogen vacuole is formed, the different pathogens commonly target certain vesicle trafficking routes, including the endocytic or secretory pathway. Recently, the retrograde transport pathway from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network emerged as an important route affecting pathogen vacuole formation. Here, we review current insight into the host cell's retrograde trafficking pathway and how vacuolar pathogens of the genera Legionella, Coxiella, Salmonella, Chlamydia, and Simkania employ mechanistically distinct strategies to subvert this pathway, thus promoting intracellular survival and replication. PMID:26924068

  3. Retrograde amnesia induced by drugs acting on different molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bonini, Juliana S; Coitinho, Adriana S; Vianna, Monica R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2004-06-01

    The gamma aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-sub(A)) agonist, muscimol, the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), and the inhibitor of the extracellularly regulated kinases (ERKs), UO 126, cause retrograde amnesia when administered to the hippocampus. In the present study, the authors found that they all cause retrograde amnesia for 1-trial inhibitory avoidance, not only when infused into the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus, but also when infused into the basolateral amygdala or the entorhinal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices. The posttraining time course of the effect of each drug was, however, quite different across brain structures. Thus, in all of them, NMDA receptors and the ERK pathway are indispensable for memory consolidation, and GABA-sub(A) receptor activation inhibits memory consolidation: but in each case, their influence is interwoven differently.

  4. Length measurements of mid-latitude scintillation irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Macdougall, J.W. )

    1992-04-01

    The lengths of irregularities which produce 150-MHz amplitude scintillations have been measured at 43 deg N, 81 deg W (geographic) using arrays of receivers with large spacings. The average length (major axis radius) of the irregularities was 6.1 km. This is much shorter than expected and implies that the measurements are of 'young' irregularities, less than 1 minute old. These irregularities appear to be a large, 25-50-percent perturbation of the background density. 8 refs.

  5. On the origin of ringing irregularities - A meteor hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. R.; Vats, H. O.; Trivedi, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    Isolated ionospheric irregularities produce oscillating diffraction patterns on the ground. In the present study typical physical properties such as density, size, etc. of these irregularities are estimated on the basis of diffraction pattern characteristics. These properties agree well with those of meteor trail ionization and it has been found that most of these oscillating irregularities occur on meteor shower days. It is therefore suggested that the oscillating irregularities are caused by meteor showers.

  6. Retrograde approach for closure of ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jayaranganath, M; Subramanian, Anand; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa

    2010-07-01

    Though ruptured sinuses of Valsalva have been traditionally managed surgically, they are amenable to transcatheter closure. Various devices have been used for closure of these defects. We describe a novel technique of closure of a ruptured right sinus of Valsalva into the right ventricular outflow tract. A muscular ventricular septal defect occluder was deployed retrogradely, without resorting to the usual antegrade technique involving formation of an arteriovenous loop. PMID:20603510

  7. Air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, M; Chiaramonte, G; Arcadipane, A; Burgio, G; Traina, M

    2011-01-01

    This is a case of a venous air embolism in a pediatric patient with splenomesenteric portal shunt for portal cavernoma, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography under inhalator general anesthesia, without using N2O. There is ample data in the literature about the occurrence of venous air embolism during an endoscopic procedure. We believe it is important to call attention to this rare, but possible, and sometimes fatal, complication.

  8. [Successful recanalisation of RCA CTO using retrograde approach].

    PubMed

    Król, Marek; Skwarna, Bartosz; Buszman, Paweł

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old female two years after CABG presented with unstable angina and inferior wall ischaemia. Coronary angiography revealed occluded graft to RCA and chronic total occlusion of RCA with good collateral flow from distal LAD to RCA. The CTO was successfully crossed and dilated through epicardial collaterals from distal LAD (retrograde approach). Finally, antegrade angioplasty with two stents implantation was performed achieving TIMI 3 flow.

  9. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Synapses by Retrograde Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, Wade G.; Carey, Megan R.; Best, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Throughout the brain postsynaptic neurons release substances from their cell bodies and dendrites that regulate the strength of the synapses they receive. Diverse chemical messengers have been implicated in retrograde signaling from postsynaptic neurons to presynaptic boutons. Here we provide an overview of the signaling systems that lead to rapid changes in synaptic strength. We consider the capabilities, specializations and physiological roles of each type of signaling system. PMID:19640475

  10. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  11. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  12. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  13. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  14. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  15. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  16. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  17. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities...

  18. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  19. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  20. Remote sensing of irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere using the radio scintillation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental measurements of signal level fluctuations (scintillation) on VHF and microwave signals from two geostationary communications satellites are studied in detail. The signals were recorded at an equatorial location which is almost directly beneath the satellites. The scintillation is caused by refraction and diffraction of the signals by variations of the refractive index in the Flayer of the ionosphere. This study is directed toward using the observed multifrequency scintillation to remotely sense the characteristics of the ionospheric irregularities. This is done by considering both statistical and deterministic models for the scintillation producing irregularities. The models are combined with existing propagation theory using analytical and numerical simulation techniques in order to predict the spatial and temporal characteristics of the multifrequency scintillation. Comparison with the observations is used to verify the models. Extensive use is made of numerical simulation. This makes it possible to study both weak and strong scintillations which occur simultaneously on the microwave and VHF frequencies, respectively. In all cases, the models are chosen to be consistent with results from other remote sensing techniques and in situ measurements. Geophysical implications of the results are discussed in light of what is known about equatorial irregularities from previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  1. Short-term magnetic field alignment variations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.

    1988-06-01

    The ionospheric irregularities that cause equatorial scintillation are elongated along the north-south magnetic field lines. During a 1981 field campaign at Ascension Island, 250-MHz receivers were spaced from 300 m to 1.6 km along the field lines, and the signals received from the Marisat satellite were cross correlated. Data collected during eight nights of fading showed a linear relationship between fading rate and cross correlation. The alignment of the antennas was adjusted to give a zero time lag between the widely spaced receivers with a measurement accuracy of 0.03 s. Since the average irregularity velocity was 125 m/s, this time accuracy translated to an angular measurement accuracy of 0.1 deg. During a 4-hour period of nightly fading, occasional differences in time of arrival were noted that corresponded to a tilt in the north-south alignment of + or - 1 deg. Data from several nights of fading were analyzed, and each night exhibited the same variance in the north-south irregularity alignment. It is postulated that the shift in the measured peak correlation may have been caused by patches of irregularities at different altitudes where the magnetic field lines have a slightly different direction. 13 references.

  2. A CCD comparison of outer Jovian satellites and Trojan asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1991-01-01

    The eight small outer Jovian satellites are not as well known as the brighter, more illustrious Galilean satellites. They are divided into two groups, each containing four satellites; the inner group travels in prograde orbits while the outer group travels in retrograde orbits. From the distinct orbital characteristics of the two groups, most of the theories of their origin involve the capture and breakup of two planetesimals upon entry into the atmosphere of proto-Jupiter. Their proximity to the Trojans asteroids has led to conjectures of a link between them and the Trojans. However, Tholen and Zellner (1984) found no red spectrum among six of the satellites and postulated that they were all C-type objects; therefore, they were unlikely to be derivatives of the Trojan population. Charge-coupled device (CCD) photometry and spectroscopy of the eight outer Jovian satellites obtained from 1987 to 1989 and a comparison between these eight satellites and the Trojan asteroids are presented.

  3. The Stellar Kinematics of Several Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, D. A.; Rubin, V. C.; Swaters, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present long-slit spectra of three irregular galaxies from which we determine the stellar kinematics in two of the galaxies (NGC 1156 and NGC 4449) and ionized-gas kinematics in all three (including NGC 2366). We compare the stellar and ionized gas kinematics to the morphology of the galaxies and their HI kinematics. We find surprising differences between the kinematics of the stars, ionized gas, and neutral gas in these systems. Support for this work was provided to DAH by the Lowell Research Fund and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-9616940.

  4. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  5. Geophysical properties of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for radio scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of F-region ionospheric irregularities are described based on in-situ measurements of the actual waveforms of ion concentration. The spectral properties of the irregularities are discussed. In high, middle and low latitudes most of the irregularities observed fall into a single 'noiselike' category having power spectra which can be approximated by f to the negative n-th power and S to the n-th power, where S is the irregularity scale size and n is approximately 2. Thus the spectral components have a maximum gradient which is almost independent of their size. Other categories of irregularities are also observed occasionally.

  6. A Closer Look at Irregular Galaxies in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E.; Hunter, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Irregular (Im) galaxies have received limited attention with infrared satellites because of the difficulty in studying objects of such low surface brightness. The Spitzer Space Telescope allows us a deeper and higher resolution view into the infrared emission of the Im galaxies than has been possible before. Archival data obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) was used to examine a sample of Im galaxies in four passbands: 3.6μm, 4.5μm, 5.8μm and 8.0μm. The [3.6] image is primarily starlight, which was compared to optical images. The [4.5] passband emission was separated into stars and hot dust. The [5.8] and [8.0] images are dominated by PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The distributions of hot dust and PAHs are compared to Halpha images that map the star-forming regions. Analysis also includes surface photometry of each galaxy and integrated emission. Support to this project is from the NSF for the REU program at NAU with grant 9988007, as well as NSF grant AST-0204922 to DAH.

  7. Weighted statistical parameters for irregularly sampled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Unevenly spaced time series are common in astronomy because of the day-night cycle, weather conditions, dependence on the source position in the sky, allocated telescope time and corrupt measurements, for example, or inherent to the scanning law of satellites like Hipparcos and the forthcoming Gaia. Irregular sampling often causes clumps of measurements and gaps with no data which can severely disrupt the values of estimators. This paper aims at improving the accuracy of common statistical parameters when linear interpolation (in time or phase) can be considered an acceptable approximation of a deterministic signal. A pragmatic solution is formulated in terms of a simple weighting scheme, adapting to the sampling density and noise level, applicable to large data volumes at minimal computational cost. Tests on time series from the Hipparcos periodic catalogue led to significant improvements in the overall accuracy and precision of the estimators with respect to the unweighted counterparts and those weighted by inverse-squared uncertainties. Automated classification procedures employing statistical parameters weighted by the suggested scheme confirmed the benefits of the improved input attributes. The classification of eclipsing binaries, Mira, RR Lyrae, Delta Cephei and Alpha2 Canum Venaticorum stars employing exclusively weighted descriptive statistics achieved an overall accuracy of 92 per cent, about 6 per cent higher than with unweighted estimators.

  8. a Study of Ionospheric Low Latitude Velocity and Density Irregularity Correlations during Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaser, R. A.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Klenzing, J. H.; Coley, W. R.; Stoneback, R. A.; Burrell, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The C/NOFS satellite has measured ionospheric plasma density irregularities at low latitudes on scales larger than 10 km over a full set of seasons. The focus of this study is on data from the Ion Velocity Meter (IVM) from Jan-Dec 2009 for pre-midnight and post-midnight times when the data are most reliable. Correlations between the normalized changes in density and velocity (dni/n and dv-horz,vert) during spread-F events (plasma bubbles through the f-peak) and localized plasma enhancements associated with those events are analyzed and compared to investigate seasonal, spatial, and temporal properties during the 2009 solar minimum conditions. The correlations presented and their relationship to the unusually quiescent background conditions in this epoch challenge our understanding and add significantly to our knowledge of ionospheric irregularity events and distribution statistics at low latitudes during solar minimum.

  9. Analysis of Slope Limiters on Irregular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of flux and slope limiters on non-uniform grids in multiple dimensions. Many slope limiters in standard use do not preserve linear solutions on irregular grids impacting both accuracy and convergence. We rewrite some well-known limiters to highlight their underlying symmetry, and use this form to examine the proper - ties of both traditional and novel limiter formulations on non-uniform meshes. A consistent method of handling stretched meshes is developed which is both linearity preserving for arbitrary mesh stretchings and reduces to common limiters on uniform meshes. In multiple dimensions we analyze the monotonicity region of the gradient vector and show that the multidimensional limiting problem may be cast as the solution of a linear programming problem. For some special cases we present a new directional limiting formulation that preserves linear solutions in multiple dimensions on irregular grids. Computational results using model problems and complex three-dimensional examples are presented, demonstrating accuracy, monotonicity and robustness.

  10. Clusters in irregular areas and lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, William F.; Delmerico, Alan M.; Rogerson, Peter A.; Wong, David W.S.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic areas of different sizes and shapes of polygons that represent counts or rate data are often encountered in social, economic, health, and other information. Often political or census boundaries are used to define these areas because the information is available only for those geographies. Therefore, these types of boundaries are frequently used to define neighborhoods in spatial analyses using geographic information systems and related approaches such as multilevel models. When point data can be geocoded, it is possible to examine the impact of polygon shape on spatial statistical properties, such as clustering. We utilized point data (alcohol outlets) to examine the issue of polygon shape and size on visualization and statistical properties. The point data were allocated to regular lattices (hexagons and squares) and census areas for zip-code tabulation areas and tracts. The number of units in the lattices was set to be similar to the number of tract and zip-code areas. A spatial clustering statistic and visualization were used to assess the impact of polygon shape for zip- and tract-sized units. Results showed substantial similarities and notable differences across shape and size. The specific circumstances of a spatial analysis that aggregates points to polygons will determine the size and shape of the areal units to be used. The irregular polygons of census units may reflect underlying characteristics that could be missed by large regular lattices. Future research to examine the potential for using a combination of irregular polygons and regular lattices would be useful. PMID:24282627

  11. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen’s vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons. PMID:23010929

  12. THE ORBITS OF NEPTUNE'S OUTER SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brozovic, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.; Sheppard, Scott S. E-mail: raj@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-04-15

    In 2009, we used the Subaru telescope to observe all the faint irregular satellites of Neptune for the first time since 2004. These observations extend the data arcs for Halimede, Psamathe, Sao, Laomedeia, and Neso from a few years to nearly a decade. We also report on a search for unknown Neptune satellites in a half-square degree of sky and a limiting magnitude of 26.2 in the R band. No new satellites of Neptune were found. We numerically integrate the orbits for the five irregulars and summarize the results of the orbital fits in terms of the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. Sao and Neso are confirmed to be Kozai librators, while Psamathe is a 'reverse circulator'. Halimede and Laomedeia do not seem to experience any strong resonant effects.

  13. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  14. Computing proton dose to irregularly moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods: The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results: A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  15. Computing Proton Dose to Irregularly Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, and 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  16. Road and track irregularities: measurement, assessment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigermoser, Andreas; Luber, Bernd; Rauh, Jochen; Gräfe, Gunnar

    2015-07-01

    Road and track irregularities have an important influence on the dynamic behaviour of vehicles. Knowledge of their characteristics and magnitude is essential for the design of the vehicle but also for comparable homologation and acceptance tests as well as for the planning and management of track maintenance. Irregularities of tracks and roads are regularly measured using various measurement technologies. All have advantages and weaknesses and require several processing steps. Characterisation of irregularities is done in the distance as well as in the wavelength domain. For rail irregularities, various distance domain description methods have been proposed and are in use. Methods have been analysed and compared with regard to their processing steps. Several methods have been analysed using measured irregularity and vehicle response data. Characterisation in the wavelength domain is done in a similar way for track and road irregularities. Here, an important issue is the estimation of the power spectral densities and the approximation by analytical formulas. For rail irregularities, periodic defects also play an important role. The use of irregularities in simulations requires various processing steps if measured irregularities are used, as well as if synthetic data are utilised. This paper gives a quite complete overview of rail irregularities and points out similarities and differences to the road.

  17. Dark material on the classical Uranian satellites: What is it and where did it come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard J.; Emery, Joshua P.; Lucas, Michael P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Trilling, David E.; Rivkin, Andy S.

    2015-11-01

    During Voyager 2’s flyby of Uranus, its Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) camera captured tantalizing images of the icy, gray-toned surfaces of the classical Uranian satellites. Additionally, ground-based near-infrared (NIR) observations of these moons have detected a mixture of H2O ice and a low albedo, and potentially carbonaceous, constituent on their surfaces. Analysis of ISS color maps demonstrated that the leading hemispheres of these moons are spectrally redder than their trailing hemispheres, and both the degree of reddening and the correlation between low albedo and spectrally red regions increases with distance from Uranus. However, ISS almost exclusively observed the southern hemispheres of these moons (subsolar point ~81º S), and we have collected new observations of their northern hemispheres (current subsolar point ~29º N). By characterizing the distribution of the dark material, we will be able to constrain the primary production mechanism for this low albedo constituent. Our preferred hypothesis is that the dark material represents accumulated intraplanetary dust that originated on Uranus’ retrograde irregular satellites.To characterize the distribution of the spectrally red, low albedo material on these moons, we are measuring their spectral slopes using visible wavelength (VIS) spectra and photometry gathered over similar wavelengths to those sensed by ISS (~0.4 - 0.6 µm). Additionally, we have collected NIR spectra of these satellites in order to characterize the relative strengths of 1.52 and 2.02 µm H2O ice bands, which are modified by the presence of low albedo contaminants. Our results indicate that the 1.52 and 2.02 µm H2O bands are stronger on the leading hemispheres of these moons, and the hemispherical asymmetry in H2O band strengths decreases with distance from Uranus. Spectral modeling of these NIR spectra will help discern between contaminant mixing and grain size effects on the relative strength of the H2O bands. We will

  18. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  19. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related adverse events: general overview.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) represents a monumental advance in the management of patients with pancreaticobiliary diseases, but is a complex and technically demanding procedure with the highest inherent risk of adverse events of all routine endoscopic procedures. Overall adverse event rates for ERCP are typically reported as 5-10%. The most commonly reported adverse events include post-ERCP pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, infection (cholangitis), and cardiopulomary or "sedation related" events. This article evaluates patient-related and procedure-related risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events, and discusses strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and management of these events.

  20. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  1. Cigarette smoke, asbestos, and small irregular opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W.

    1984-08-01

    The long-term inhalation of cigarette smoke is associated with the appearance of diffuse small irregular opacities of mild profusion on chest roentogenograms of some subjects in a limited number of reports. Human histologic and experimental animal studies have shown the presence of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. The radiographic abnormalities may be explained by interstitial fibrosis, although bronchiolar wall thickening may also be involved. Because asbestos causes diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, the literature was reviewed for evidence concerning an interaction between cigarette smoke and asbestos in the frequency of pulmonary asbestosis. A majority of 14 prevalence studies and 7 cohort studies of asbestos workers with information on smoking habits have shown a positive interaction between the 2 agents. The interaction appears to be additive rather than synergistic. Smoking may exert an effect on the frequency of pulmonary asbestosis by increasing the effective fiber dose retained in the lungs through interference with clearance.

  2. Phased Array Inspection of Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to research and develop new conformable phased arrays that allow reliable ultrasonic inspection of components with an irregular surface. Two alternative approaches have been considered: flexible contact arrays in which the array itself conforms to the surface and a membrane device in which a standard array is coupled to the surface via a fluid-filled membrane. A linear flexible contact phased array was purchased from CEA France and a conformable membrane device was designed and manufactured at Imperial College. Initial investigations were conducted to evaluate both approaches when coupling to test pieces with machined surfaces representative of typical welded pipes without removal of the weld caps. The research incorporated beam modelling using the CEA CIVA software and comparisons with experimental measurements. It is shown that the conformable membrane approach using a standard array transducer is competitive with the bespoke flexible array.

  3. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  4. Motor neurons control locomotor circuit function retrogradely via gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianren; Ampatzis, Konstantinos; Björnfors, E Rebecka; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2016-01-21

    Motor neurons are the final stage of neural processing for the execution of motor behaviours. Traditionally, motor neurons have been viewed as the 'final common pathway', serving as passive recipients merely conveying to the muscles the final motor program generated by upstream interneuron circuits. Here we reveal an unforeseen role of motor neurons in controlling the locomotor circuit function via gap junctions in zebrafish. These gap junctions mediate a retrograde analogue propagation of voltage fluctuations from motor neurons to control the synaptic release and recruitment of the upstream V2a interneurons that drive locomotion. Selective inhibition of motor neurons during ongoing locomotion de-recruits V2a interneurons and strongly influences locomotor circuit function. Rather than acting as separate units, gap junctions unite motor neurons and V2a interneurons into functional ensembles endowed with a retrograde analogue computation essential for locomotor rhythm generation. These results show that motor neurons are not a passive recipient of motor commands but an integral component of the neural circuits responsible for motor behaviour.

  5. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  6. Functional focal retrograde amnesia: lost access to abstract autobiographical knowledge?

    PubMed

    Stracciari, Andrea; Mattarozzi, Katia; Fonti, Cristina; Guarino, Maria

    2005-10-01

    We describe three patients exhibiting an acute reversible amnesia characterised by an impaired recollection of past events with preserved anterograde memory, thus consistent with a focal retrograde amnesia (FRA). This occurred after variable events: state of fugue, road accident, post-traumatic headache. Retrograde amnesia affected autobiographical memory so severely as to cover all of the patients' lives and to erase knowledge of their own identity. The retrieval of public events was variably affected, ranging from normality to severe impairment. No lesions were found on neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings were unimpressive. FRA subsided in a few days, leaving a gap for the onset. The hypothesis of a psychogenic amnesia is considered, but overcoming the organic/psychogenic dichotomy the episodes appear as examples of "functional" memory inhibition, potentially triggered by different conditions, including events classifiable as psychic trauma. The clinical and neuropsychological traits of functional FRA are discussed. According to a current theory of autobiographical memory, the memory profile may be explained by a lost access to abstract autobiographical knowledge. Given some analogies with the more common transient global amnesia, a mechanism of spreading depression may also be hypothesised for functional FRA. PMID:16191819

  7. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in Nepal: an early experience.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, P R; Luitel, B R; Luitel, B R

    2013-06-01

    With the advancement in technology and miniaturization of instruments, retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) with flexible ureteroscope is gaining popularity. Flexible ureteroscope is introduced into renal collecting system through the urethra. Holmium YAG (Ho-YAG) Laser fiber of different sizes is introduced through the ureteroscope and renal stones are pulverized. Removal of renal stones less than 15 mm in size with RIRS has sharply reduced post operative morbidity. This is a Prospective study comprised of 58 RIRS performed from January 2013 to July 2013. Preoperative investigations like full blood count (FBC), renal function test (RFT), serological investigations, urine culture, intravenous urogram or CT-urogram, chest ray and electrocardiogram were done in all patients. Renal stones less than 15 mm in size were included for RIRS. Intra renal stones were treated with 7.5 Fr flexible ureteroscope (Flex - X2) using Holmium-YAG laser. Mean stone burden in our study was 10.5 +/- 3.3 mm. Out of 32 male patients, 29 (90.6%) required pre-stenting before RIRS and all 58 patients with successful dusting of stones in single sitting were discharged on next day. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery is advanced and successful technique and a viable alternative to Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) and Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the treatment of selected intrarenal stones with minimum morbidity.

  8. Control of synaptic function by endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    KANO, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Since the first reports in 2001, great advances have been made towards the understanding of endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that one of the two major endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is produced from membrane lipids upon postsynaptic Ca2+ elevation and/or activation of Gq/11-coupled receptors, and released from postsynaptic neurons. The released 2-AG then acts retrogradely onto presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and induces suppression of neurotransmitter release either transiently or persistently. These forms of 2-AG-mediated retrograde synaptic modulation are functional throughout the brain. The other major endocannabinoid, anandamide, mediates a certain form of endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (LTD). Anandamide also functions as an agonist for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) and mediates endocannabinoid-independent and TRPV1-dependent forms of LTD. It has also been demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system itself is plastic, which can be either up- or down-regulated by experimental or environmental conditions. In this review, I will make an overview of the mechanisms underlying endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation. PMID:25169670

  9. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  10. Avoiding irregularities on the nasal dorsum in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Fernando Javier; Cardemil, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Palpable irregularities along the nasal dorsum are a frequent complication of dorsal handling in rhinoplasty because resection techniques are used. This is often a result of improper management of the dorsum after resection. The surgical technique for handling of dorsal irregularities following dorsal resection is described. The key steps to avoid irregularities are diamond rasps, autospreader and morselized cartilage as camouflage. Following resection of the hump, the anatomy of the nasal dorsum should be adequately restructured; thereby we achieve an adequate aesthetic result and ideally preventing irregularities on palpation. PMID:27097285

  11. Avoiding irregularities on the nasal dorsum in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Fernando Javier; Cardemil, Felipe

    2016-03-30

    Palpable irregularities along the nasal dorsum are a frequent complication of dorsal handling in rhinoplasty because resection techniques are used. This is often a result of improper management of the dorsum after resection. The surgical technique for handling of dorsal irregularities following dorsal resection is described. The key steps to avoid irregularities are diamond rasps, autospreader and morselized cartilage as camouflage. Following resection of the hump, the anatomy of the nasal dorsum should be adequately restructured; thereby we achieve an adequate aesthetic result and ideally preventing irregularities on palpation.

  12. Evidence for a continuous, power law, electron density irregularity spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral form of the irregularities in electron density that cause interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of small angular diameter radio sources is discussed. The intensity scintillation technique always yields an irregularity scale size, which is of the order of the first Fresnel zone for the wavelength at which the observations are taken. This includes not only the radio wavelength measurements of the structure of the interplanetary medium, but also radio wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the ionosphere and interstellar medium, and optical wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the atmosphere.

  13. Case study of polar scintillation modeling using DE (Dynamics Explorer) 2 irregularity measurements at 800 km. Scientific report No. 2, 5 October 1987-30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Weber, E.J.; Coley, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Although a satellite-borne irregularity sensor obviously cannot measure scintillations, the question of what contribution such a sensor can make to model or predict scintillations is addressed. To pursue the problem, the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) ionospheric electron density irregularity data obtained at approximately 800-km altitude in the winter polar cap during sunspot maximum conditions were utilized. During this period an all-sky imaging photometer located at Thule, Greenland, within the polar cap, detected the presence of convecting ionization patches, and polar beacon satellite measurements detected several discrete, intense scintillation structures associated with these patches (E. J. Weber et al., 1984). The electron-density deviation (delta N) obtained by combining irregularity amplitudes (delta N/N)rms processed over 8-s intervals and the in-situ density (N) data acquired by the DE 2 satellite also showed the presence of spatially discrete structures. These irregularity structures, both in N and delta N, had spatial extents of approx. 1000 km in the N-S direction. The density associated with these structures, even at 800 km, showed a twofold to threefold to increase in comparison to the background, and irregularity amplitudes (delta N/N)rms as large as 20% were observed at the edges of the patches.

  14. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  15. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  16. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  17. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Thomas, Peter C.; Carcich, Brian T.; Veverka, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  18. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, D. P.; Thomas, P. C.; Carcich, B. T.; Veverka, J.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  19. Equatorial Density Irregularity Structures at Intermediate Scales and Their Temporal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We examine high resolution measurements of ion density in the equatorial ionosphere from the AE-E satellite during the years 1977-1981. Structure over spatial scales from 18 km to 200 m is characterized by the spectrum of irregularities at larger and smaller scales and at altitudes above 350 km and below 300 km. In the low-altitude region, only small amplitude large-scale (lambda greater than 5 km) density modulations are often observed, and thus the power spectrum of these density structures exhibits a steep spectral slope at kilometer scales. In the high-altitude region, sinusoidal density fluctuations, characterized by enhanced power near 1-km scale, are frequently observed during 2000-0200 LT. However, such fluctuations are confined to regions at the edges of larger bubble structures where the average background density is high. Small amplitude irregularity structures, observed at early local time hours, grow rapidly to high-intensity structures in about 90 min. Fully developed structures, which are observed at late local time hours, decay very slowly producing only-small differences in spectral characteristics even 4 hours later. The local time evolution of irregularity structure is investigated by using average statistics for low-(1% less than sigma less than 5%) and high-intensity (sigma greater than 10%) structures. At lower altitudes, little chance in the spectral slope is seen as a function of local time, while at higher attitudes the growth and maintenance of structures near 1 km scales dramatically affects the spectral slope.

  20. Chemical evolution in spiral and irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of models of chemical evolution of the interstellar medium in our galaxy and other galaxies is presented. These models predict the time variation and radial dependence of chemical composition in the gas as function of the input parameters; initial mass function, stellar birth rate, chemical composition of mass lost by stars during their evolution (yields), and the existence of large scale mass flows, like infall from the halo, outflow to the intergalactic medium or radial flows within a galaxy. At present there is a considerable wealth of observational data on the composition of HII regions in spiral and irregular galaxies to constrain the models. Comparisons are made between theory and the observed physical conditions. In particular, studies of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are reviewed. In many molecular clouds the information we have on the amount of H2 is derived from the observed CO column density, and a standard CO/H2 ratio derived for the solar neighborhood. Chemical evolution models and the observed variations in O/H and N/O values, point out the need to include these results in a CO/H2 relation that should be, at least, a function of the O/H ratio. This aspect is also discussed.

  1. Multiresolution Analysis Adapted to Irregularly Spaced Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokraoui, Anissa; Duhamel, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    This paper investigates the mathematical background of multiresolution analysis in the specific context where the signal is represented by irregularly sampled data at known locations. The study is related to the construction of nested piecewise polynomial multiresolution spaces represented by their corresponding orthonormal bases. Using simple spline basis orthonormalization procedures involves the construction of a large family of orthonormal spline scaling bases defined on consecutive bounded intervals. However, if no more additional conditions than those coming from multiresolution are imposed on each bounded interval, the orthonormal basis is represented by a set of discontinuous scaling functions. The spline wavelet basis also has the same problem. Moreover, the dimension of the corresponding wavelet basis increases with the spline degree. An appropriate orthonormalization procedure of the basic spline space basis, whatever the degree of the spline, allows us to (i) provide continuous scaling and wavelet functions, (ii) reduce the number of wavelets to only one, and (iii) reduce the complexity of the filter bank. Examples of the multiresolution implementations illustrate that the main important features of the traditional multiresolution are also satisfied.

  2. Retrograded starches as potential anodes in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wen, Yan; Zhu, Wei; Li, Lin; Zhang, Kunsheng; Wang, Wanyu

    2012-11-01

    Retrograded starch is a crystal formed by starch molecules with hydrogen bonds. Many literatures have reported its physicochemical character, but its crystal structure is so far unclear. As we isolate amylose and amylopectin from retrograded maize, sweet potato and potato starches in 4.0 M KOH solutions and make them retrograde alone in neutral solution (adjusted by HCl) to form crystal, a new phenomenon appears, crystals of KCl do not appear in retrograded potato amylose, potato amylopectin, and maize amylose, indicating that those crystals may absorb K⁺ and (or) Cl⁻, and those ions probably act with aldehyde of starch or hydroxy of fatty acid attached in starch, such characteristic may make retrograded starches replace graphite as anode with high-capacity in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

  3. Coherence properties of wideband satellite signals caused by ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufenach, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Radio scintillation on satellite signals caused by small-scale irregularities in F-region ionospheric electron density can be an important limitation on earth-satellite communication and navigation systems. Scintillation imposes distortion in both amplitude and phase on wideband signals. In the present work, the shallow-modulated phase screen theory is developed in terms of coherence bandwidth including a model based on a turbulent-like power-law description of the irregularities. The model results usually show a greater coherence bandwidth in the signal phase than in the signal amplitude. Therefore, systems that require phase coherence over a large bandwidth should be less affected than those requiring amplitude coherence.

  4. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all...

  5. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 135.65... Operations § 135.65 Reporting mechanical irregularities. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring...

  6. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 135.65... Operations § 135.65 Reporting mechanical irregularities. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring...

  7. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all...

  8. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 135.65... Operations § 135.65 Reporting mechanical irregularities. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring...

  9. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all...

  10. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all...

  11. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all...

  12. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 135.65... Operations § 135.65 Reporting mechanical irregularities. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring...

  13. 14 CFR 135.65 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 135.65... Operations § 135.65 Reporting mechanical irregularities. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft maintenance log to be carried on board each aircraft for recording or deferring...

  14. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations. 375... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may,...

  15. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations. 375... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may,...

  16. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations. 375... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may,...

  17. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations. 375... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may,...

  18. BATHYMETRIC IRREGULARITIES, JET FORMATION, AND SUBSEQUENT MIXING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that bathymetric contours influence and steer currents and that irregularities in bathymetry contribute to the formation of aquatic non-buoyant jets and buoyant plumes. For example, bathymetric irregularities can channel flow through canyons or accelerate flow ov...

  19. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations. 375.33 Section 375.33 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft...

  20. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives. PMID:26428142

  1. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  2. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives.

  3. Antegrade versus retrograde intramedullary nailing of proximal third femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kevin M; Ali, Ashley; Boudreau, John A; Cannada, Lisa K; Watson, John T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the results of proximal third femur fractures treated with retrograde nailing (RGN) and compare those results to a cohort from the same period treated with antegrade nailing (AGN). Adult patients with femur fractures within 10 cm of the lesser trochanter who were treated with intramedullary nails were reviewed. Two groups, patients treated with AGN (n = 35) and RGN (n = 34), were compiled. Demographic information, comorbidities, associated injuries, radiographic outcomes, complications, and secondary procedures were compared. There were two malunions in the AGN group and three in the RGN group. The AGN group had two nonunions while the RGN group had one. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that a higher body mass index (BMI) (p = .011) and a higher AO/OTA fracture classification (p = .019) were the only factors predictive of malunion. Regardless of starting point, there were no differences between groups in the number of secondary procedures, nonunions, malunions, or time until union.

  4. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  5. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  6. Ultrasound assessment of the endometrium for irregular vaginal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Barbara L

    2006-01-01

    Irregular vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of women seeking gynecologic care. Etiologies of irregular vaginal bleeding can be classified into the following categories: pregnancy related (retained products of conception, threatened or missed abortion, or ectopic pregnancy), hormonal (disorders of ovulation, menopause, or hormonal contraceptive use), structural (polyps, myomas, or arteriovenous malformation), neoplasm (endometrial cancer), and infection (endometritis). After the history and physical examination, the initial evaluation of irregular vaginal bleeding has traditionally involved an endometrial biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound has revolutionized the evaluation of the gynecologic ultrasound examination by providing a minimally invasive means to determine the etiology for the bleeding. Transvaginal ultrasound assessment of the endometrial cavity allows treatment to be tailored to the specific cause of irregular vaginal bleeding, thus saving women time, money, and exposure to unnecessary interventions. The purpose of this article is to give the clinician critical information regarding the capabilities of ultrasound to evaluate women with irregular vaginal bleeding.

  7. Irregular conformal block, spectral curve and flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Kwan; Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Irregular conformal block is motivated by the Argyres-Douglas type of N=2 super conformal gauge theory. We investigate the classical/NS limit of irregular conformal block using the spectral curve on a Riemann surface with irregular punctures, which is equivalent to the loop equation of irregular matrix model. The spectral curve is reduced to the second order (Virasoro symmetry, SU(2) for the gauge theory) and third order (W 3 symmetry, SU(3)) differential equations of a polynomial with finite degree. The conformal and W symmetry generate the flow equations in the spectral curve and determine the irregular conformal block, hence the partition function of the Argyres-Douglas theory ala AGT conjecture.

  8. Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts as a Source of Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) [1, 2]. SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. A numerical code in C language to solve the derived nonlinear equations for analysis of interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere was developed. This code was used to analyze competition between interchange and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities in the equatorial region [3]. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defence Military Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data [2] during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. [1] Mishin, E. (2013), Interaction of substorm injections with the subauroral geospace: 1. Multispacecraft observations of SAID, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 5782-5796, doi:10.1002/jgra.50548. [2] Mishin, E., and N. Blaunstein (2008), Irregularities within subauroral polarization stream-related troughs and GPS radio interference at midlatitudes. In: T. Fuller-Rowell et al. (eds), AGU Geophysical Monograph 181, MidLatitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances, pp. 291-295, doi:10.1029/181GM26, Washington, DC, USA. [3] V. Sotnikov, T. Kim, E. Mishin, T. Genoni, D. Rose, I. Paraschiv, Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 15 - 19 December, 2014.

  9. Comparison of antegrade and retrograde laparoscopic radical prostatectomy techniques.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Volkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Resorlu, Berkan; Yigitbasi, Ismail; Yavuzsan, Abdullah H; Tasci, Ali I

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of antegrade and retrograde approaches on functional recovery and surgical outcomes of extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). We analyzed 135 patients who underwent extraperitoneal LRP, with the retrograde technique performed on 42 (31%; Group 1) and the antegrade technique on 93 (69%; Group 2). Both groups were statistically similar with respect to age, clinical stage, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, prostate volume, and previous surgical history. Mean operative time was significantly longer in Group 1 (244±18.3 vs. 203.3±18.4 min, p<0.001), whereas mean anastomosis times for both groups were similar (35.8±7.2 vs. 34.7±5.8 min, p=0.155). Estimated blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in Group 2. A significant difference was observed for both hospitalization (6.79±3.3 vs. 5.46±3.08 days, respectively; p=0.026) and catheterization times (12.24±2.1 vs. 11±1.08 days, respectively; p=0.001) for Group 2. The total complication rate was 47.6% in Group 1, and 11.8% in Group 2 (p<0.01). Rates of positive surgical margins were 14.2% and 15% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. At the 12-month interval from operation, similar recoveries in urinary continence were obtained for both groups (81% in Group 1; 91% in Group 2). Upon comparison of the two LRP techniques, we found that both were effective; however, the latter resulted in lower minor complication rate, lower blood loss, shorter operation time, and shorter length of hospital stay. PMID:27523453

  10. Feasibility of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Thomas; Willard, Michael D; Ruhnke, Isabelle; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Cats are predisposed to diseases of the biliary tract and the exocrine pancreas and these can be challenging to diagnose. In humans and dogs > 10 kg, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has been successfully used to diagnose some of these disorders. The purpose of our study was to determine whether ERCP would also be feasible in cats using a pediatric duodenoscope. Four purpose-bred, clinically healthy, castrated domestic shorthair cats participated in two studies. Study 1 compared standard white light endoscopy with chromoendoscopy for localizing the major duodenal papilla. In Study 2 ERCP was performed. Repeated clinical examinations and measurements of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) were performed before and up to 18 hours after interventions on all cats. Chromoendoscopy was subjectively judged to be superior for localizing the major papilla. Insertion of the ERCP catheter was best accomplished when cats were in dorsal recumbency. Complete ERCP was successful in two cats. In the other cats, either retrograde cholangiography or pancreatography was possible. Serum fPLI concentrations increased temporarily in two cats during Study 2 when measured immediately, 2, 4, and 18 h after ERCP. Peak fPLI concentrations were detected either immediately after ERCP or 2 h later. No clinical signs of complications were observed within 18 h after the procedures. Findings indicated that ERCP is technically demanding but feasible in healthy cats. Future studies need to determine whether the temporary increases in serum fPLI concentrations are clinically important and to investigate the utility of ERCP in feline patients.

  11. Right medial thalamic lesion causes isolated retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Miller, L A; Caine, D; Harding, A; Thompson, E J; Large, M; Watson, J D

    2001-01-01

    Pervasive retrograde amnesia without anterograde memory impairment has rarely been described as a consequence of circumscribed brain damage. We report this phenomenon in a 33 yr-old, right-handed man (JG) in association with the extension in the right thalamus of a previously small, bilateral thalamic lesion. JG presented with a dense amnesia for autobiographical material more than a few years old, with some sparing of recent memories. Furthermore, he was completely unable to recognise famous people or world events. Many other aspects of semantic knowledge were intact and there was no evidence of general intellectual impairment, executive dysfunction or loss of visual imagery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an acute lesion in the right thalamus and two small, symmetrical, bilateral non-acute thalamic lesions. Follow-up neuropsychological assessment indicated a stable pattern of impaired retrograde and spared anterograde memory over 18 months and psychiatric assessments yielded no evidence of confabulation, malingering or other symptoms to suggest psychogenic amnesia. JG's profile indicates that the division of declarative memory into just two categories - episodic and semantic - is inadequate. Rather, his case adds to the growing body evidence to suggest that world knowledge pertaining to people and events is stored or accessed similarly to autobiographical information and differently from other types of more general factual knowledge. We hypothesize that the right mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and immediately surrounding regions comprise the central processing mechanism referred to by McClelland (Revue Neurologique, 150 (1994) 570) and Markowitsch (Brain Research Review, 21 (1995) 117) as responsible for inducing and co-ordinating the recall of these sorts of cortically stored memory engrams.

  12. Capillary flow in irregular surface grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.; Yost, F.G.; O`Toole, E.J.

    1998-07-07

    1-Heptanol flow in irregularly shaped surface grooves in Pd-coated Cu is shown to be an example of Poiseuille flow with simple Washburn kinetics of the form z{sup 2} = C({gamma}/{mu})t, where {gamma} is the liquid surface tension, {mu} is the viscosity, and C is a function of the groove dimensions and the contact angle {theta}. A shape independent expression is derived for the geometric factor, C(S,{omega},{theta}) = (S cos({theta}) {minus} {omega})/4{pi}, where {omega} is the width of the groove at the surface and S is the arc length, or total length of groove surface in a plane perpendicular to the groove axis. This expression is general for any groove shape and reduces to the form derived previously for V-shaped grooves. Along with scanning electron microscopy, three different techniques, stylus profilometry, laser profilometry, and optical interferometry, were used to characterize the groove geometry, especially to determine S and {omega}. While reasonable agreement is obtained between literature values of {gamma}/{mu} and values obtained from the experimental kinetics, the main conclusion is that measurement of the groove dimensions is the main limitation to experimental verification of the form of C and to the use of the kinetics of groove flow as an absolute measure of the factor {gamma}/{mu}. However, the authors show that if C is calibrated for a specific groove with a known liquid, the kinetics of capillary flow in open surface grooves furnishes a simple, easily applied method for measurement of the surface tension-to-viscosity ratio, {gamma}/{mu}.

  13. Satellite myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Roger L.; Hall, David

    2008-01-01

    Richard Corfield's article “Sputnik's legacy” (October 2007 pp23-27) states that the satellite on board the US Vanguard rocket, which exploded during launch on 6 December 1957 two months after Sputnik's successful take-off, was “a hastily put together contraption of wires and circuitry designed only to send a radio signal back to Earth”. In fact, the Vanguard satellite was developed over a period of several years and put together carefully using the best techniques and equipment available at the time - such as transistors from Bell Laboratories/Western Electric. The satellite contained not one but two transmitters, in which the crystal-controlled oscillators had been designed to measure both the temperature of the satellite shell and of the internal package.

  14. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  15. Origin and evolution of the Jupiter satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Fanale, F.

    1982-01-01

    The current understanding of the history of the Jovian satellites is assessed, paying particular attention to the conditions in the early Jovian nebula that may have led to the formation of the regular satellites and the capture of the irregular satellites, and to the thermal and chemical development of the interiors of the planet-sized Galilean satellites. Relevant observational constraints are reviewed, dealing separately with groundbased and spacecraft data obtained prior to Voyager and then with the Voyager results. Theories of the origin of the Jovian system are discussed and used to investigate the origin of the satellite system. The subsequent evolution of the larger satellites is then considered. Finally, the present understanding of the origin and evolution of the Jovian satellites is summarized, and ways are considered in which future investigations can help to resolve areas of uncertainty.

  16. Satellite positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.; Watkins, Michael M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in satellite positioning techniques and their applications are reviewed on the basis of the theoretical and practical work published by U.S. researchers in 1987-1990. Current techniques are classified into two main categories: satellite laser tracking and radio tracking. Particular attention is given to the Geoscience Laser Ranging System, the Lunar Laser Ranging concept; GPS ephemerides determination, fiducial networks, and reference frame; static GPS positioning; and kinematic GPS positioning.

  17. Sampling characteristics of satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1989-01-01

    The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended to account for both irregular data distributions and observational noise - the sampling irregularity making the system much more susceptible to noise than in regularly sampled cases. The problem is formulated here in terms of least-squares and applied to spacecraft in 10-day and 17-day repeating orbits. The 'diamond-pattern' laid down spatially in such repeating orbits means that either repeat period adequately samples the spatial variables, but the slow overall temporal coverage in the 17-day pattern leads to much greater uncertainty than in the shorter repeat cycle. The result is not definitive and it is not concluded that a 10-day orbit repeat is the most appropriate one. A major conclusion, however, is that different orbital choices have potentially quite different sampling characteristics which need to be analyzed in terms of the spectral characteristics of the moving sea surface.

  18. Effects of protein in wheat flour on retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Xijun, Lian; Junjie, Guo; Danli, Wang; Lin, Li; Jiaran, Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Albumins, globulins, gliadins, and glutenins were isolated from wheat flour and the effects of those proteins on retrogradation of wheat starch were investigated. The results showed that only glutenins retarded retrogradation of wheat starch and other 3 proteins promoted it. The results of IR spectra proved that no S-S linkage formed during retrogradation of wheat starch blended with wheat proteins. Combination of wheat starch and globulins or gliadins through glucosidic bonds hindered the hydrolysis of wheat starch by α-amylase. The melting peak temperatures of retrograded wheat starch attached to different proteins were 128.46, 126.14, 132.03, 121.65, and 134.84 °C for the control with no protein, albumins, glutenins, globulins, gliadins groups, respectively, and there was no second melting temperature for albumins group. Interaction of wheat proteins and starch in retrograded wheat starch greatly decreased the endothermic enthalpy (△H) of retrograded wheat starch. Retrograded wheat starch bound to gliadins might be a new kind of resistant starch based on glycosidic bond between starch and protein.

  19. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions. PMID:26891225

  20. Phoebe and the Icy Saturnian Satellites: Implications for Satellite Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2004-11-01

    Phoebe's retrograde, eccentric and inclined orbit marks it as an object captured from heliocentric orbit. Accordingly, its composition may be indicative of its origin in the solar nebula. Analogous arguments have been made extensively in connection with the origin of Pluto-Charon (see, e.g., McKinnon et al. 1997) as well as Triton (McKinnon and Mueller 1989). Indeed, the demarcation between nebula and subnebula objects has led a number of workers (see, e.g., Johnson et al. 1987; Lunine et al. 1993; Podolak et al. 1993) to argue that the regular satellites of the giant planets did not derive the bulk of their material directly from heliocentric orbit. The recent Cassini flyby of Phoebe has yielded a mass for this object of GM = 0.5527 ± 0.001 km3/s2 Jacobson et al. 2004 (this conference). Its density of 1.6 g/cm3 indicates a rock to ice ratio of at least 50 % (Porco et al. 2004; Science, to be submitted). Phoebe's high rock/ice ratio when compared to the icy Saturnian satellites reinforces the argument that Phoebe is an object that formed in heliocentric orbit and became captured. Yet, given that it may be misleading to lump together satellites with quite different formation histories, we refine the comparison on the basis of models for regular satellite formation. Because it derives condensables directly from heliocentric orbit and fails to consider planetesimals, the model of Canup and Ward (2002) does not provide a context for understanding such compositional differences. We will therefore discuss two models of satellite formation we are developing, which differ mainly in their treatment of turbulence (decaying vs steady). In both models the inner (located inside Titan's orbit), icy Saturnian satellites represent a second generation of objects. Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a,b) has these satellites forming 104-10^5 years after Titan as the disk became optically thin and water rich due to preferential gas drag loss of silicates as Saturn cooled. On the other hand

  1. Phoebe and the Icy Saturnian Satellites: Implications for Satellite Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Phoebe's retrograde, eccentric and inclined orbit marks it as an object captured from heliocentric orbit. Accordingly, its composition may be indicative of its origin in the solar nebula. Analogous arguments have been made extensively in connection with the origin of Pluto-Charon (see, e.g., McKinnon et al. 1997) as well as Triton (McKinnon and Mueller 1989). Indeed, the demarcation between nebula and subnebula objects has led a number of workers (see, e.g., Johnson et al. 1987; Lunine et al. 1993; Podolak et al. 1993) to argue that the regular satellites of the giant planets did not derive the bulk of their material directly from heliocentric orbit. The recent Cassini flyby of Phoebe has yielded a mass for this object of GM = 0.5527 ± 0.001 km3/s2 Jacobson et al. 2004. Its density of 1.6 g/cm3 indicates a rock to ice ratio of at least 50 % (Porco et al. 2004; Science, to be submitted). Phoebe's high rock/ice ratio when compared to the icy Saturnian satellites reinforces the argument that Phoebe is an object that formed in heliocentric orbit and became captured. Yet, given that it may be misleading to lump together satellites with quite different formation histories, we refine the comparison on the basis of models for regular satellite formation. Because it derives condensables directly from heliocentric orbit and fails to consider planetesimals, the model of Canup and Ward (2002) does not provide a context for understanding such compositional differences. We will therefore discuss two models of satellite formation we are developing, which differ mainly in their treatment of turbulence (decaying vs steady). In both models the inner (located inside Titan's orbit), icy Saturnian satellites represent a second generation of objects. Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a,b) has these satellites forming 104-10^5 years after Titan as the disk became optically thin and water rich due to preferential gas drag loss of silicates as Saturn cooled. On the other hand, the gas

  2. Retrograde mechanochemical ablation of the small saphenous vein for the treatment of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hayley M; Lane, Tristan R A; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-10-01

    We present the first case of retrograde ablation of the small saphenous vein to treat active venous ulceration. A 73-year-old gentleman with complicated varicose veins of the left leg and a non-healing venous ulcer despite previous successful endovenous treatment to his left great saphenous vein underwent mechanochemical ablation of his small saphenous vein with the ClariVein® system, under local anaesthetic, using a retrograde cannulation technique. Post-operatively the patient had improved symptomatically and the ulcer size had reduced. This report highlights that patients with small saphenous vein incompetence and active ulceration can be treated successfully with retrograde mechanochemical ablation.

  3. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R; Mans, Dorus A; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J F; Taylor, S Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A; Scambler, Peter J; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M; Beales, Philip L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M; Witman, George B

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  4. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  5. Retrograde Proximal Anterior Tibial Artery Access for Treating Femoropopliteal Segment Occlusion: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Affonso, Breno Boueri; Golghetto Domingos, Fernanda Uchiyama; da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Bortolini, Edgar; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Some challenges have been detected when there are long and complex lesions of femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease, even with descriptions of the retrograde pedal approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the retrograde proximal anterior tibial artery access for treatment of femoropopliteal segment occlusion when antegrade recanalization failed (retrograde recanalization and rearranging the system into an antegrade position). Technical and clinical success was achieved in 100% of 4 cases, with an improvement of at least 2 Rutherford classes. Minor complication, small hematoma in an anterior compartment of the limb, occurred in 1 patient. No sign of compartmental syndrome was observed. PMID:26902943

  6. Satellites of Mars - Geologic history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Bell, J.; Lunine, J.; Cruikshank, D.

    1992-01-01

    The small, irregularly shaped satellites of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, provide the most detailed view of the geomorphic forms and processes important on small solar system bodies. The satellites appear to be very similar in composition, strongly resembling carbonaceous asteroids; however, recent groundbased spectra suggest that their surfaces have little bound or interlayer water. Despite their similar compositions, sizes and environments, Phobos and Deimos have radically different surface features. Phobos is densely covered by craters that are nearly lunar in appearance; Deimos' craters are subdued and largely filled in by debris. Phobos shows only local downslope movement of regolith; Deimos has it on a global scale. Phobos is criss-crossed by linear depressions; Deimos has none. Crater ejecta appear to be retained near their sources on Phobos while the ejecta are widespread on Deimos. The reasons for the differences between the satellites are not known; imaging of asteroids should tell us which, if either, satellite is typical of the many small bodies that populate the asteroid belt.

  7. On the long range propagation of sound over irregular terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation over randomly irregular, nominally plane terrain of finite impedance is discussed. The analysis is an extension of the theory of coherent scatter originally proposed by Biot for an irregular rigid surface. It combines Biot's approach, wherein the surface irregularities are modeled by a homogeneous distribution of hemispherical bosses, with more conventional analyses in which the ground is modeled as a smooth plane of finite impedance. At sufficiently low frequencies the interaction of the surface irregularities with the nearfield of a ground-based source leads to the production of surface waves, which are effective in penetrating the ground shadow zone predicted for a smooth surface of the same impedance.

  8. Analysis of cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Cavities behind a surface irregularity appear in vortices drifting downstream of it. Cavitation can occur there substantially earlier than over smooth surfaces of the same bodies. Cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities have been intensively studied in the course of water tunnel experiments several decades ago, but no corresponding quantitative theoretical (numerical) analysis was reported. This numerical study is aimed at elaboration of a general approach to the prediction of cavitation desinence numbers for various irregularities over various surfaces and on determination of the major factors influencing these numbers in both computations and experiments. The developed multi-level computational method employs diverse models for flow zones of diverse scale. The viscous-inviscid interaction approach is used for the flow around irregularities submerged (or partially submerged) in the turbulent boundary layer. Combinations of the semi-empirical and asymptotic analyses are used for vortices and cavities in their cores. The computational method is validated with various known experimental data.

  9. Traffic dispersion through a series of signals with irregular split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study the traffic behavior of a group of vehicles moving through a sequence of signals with irregular splits on a roadway. We present the stochastic model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals. The dynamic behavior of vehicular traffic is clarified by analyzing traffic pattern and travel time numerically. The group of vehicles breaks up more and more by the irregularity of signal's split. The traffic dispersion is induced by the irregular split. We show that the traffic dispersion depends highly on the cycle time and the strength of split's irregularity. Also, we study the traffic behavior through the series of signals at the green-wave strategy. The dependence of the travel time on offset time is derived for various values of cycle time. The region map of the traffic dispersion is shown in (cycle time, offset time)-space.

  10. [Reversible irregular corneal astigmation in disseminated neurodermatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Treumer, H

    1978-08-01

    Neurodermitis disseminata may often involve the eyes. A case report is described with development of an irregular astigmatism of the cornea, which resolved spontaneously. Possibilities of transitory alteration of refraction are discussed. PMID:703151

  11. On the definition of albedo and application to irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Giese, R. H.; Weiss, K.; Zerull, R.

    1981-01-01

    The various definitions of albedo used in planetary astronomy are reviewed. In particular, the Bond albedo, which refers only to the reflected and refracted components, is not applicable to small particles or highly irregular particles, where diffraction is not restricted to a well-defined lobe at small scattering angles. Measured scattering functions for irregular particles are presented in a normalized form and are applied to the case of zodiacal light.

  12. STABILITY OF SATELLITES IN CLOSELY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Deck, Katherine M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to ∼0.4 R{sub H} (where R{sub H} is the Hill radius) as opposed to 0.5 R{sub H} in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5-4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if a ∼ 0.65 R{sub H} . In very close planetary pairs (e.g., the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of circumplanetary semi-major axes. The majority of systems investigated stably harbored satellites over a wide parameter-space, suggesting that STIPs can generally offer a dynamically stable home for satellites, albeit with a slightly smaller stable parameter-space than the single-planet case. As we demonstrate that multi-planet systems are not a priori poor candidates for hosting satellites, future measurements of satellite occurrence rates in multi-planet systems versus single-planet systems could be used to constrain either satellite formation or past periods of strong dynamical interaction between planets.

  13. Observations of artificially produced scintillations using satellite transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The ionospheric modification experiment, utilizing a high-powered transmitter, provides an opportunity to study ionospheric irregularities under relatively known conditions. The irregularities were studied by means of transionospheric signals from the polar-orbiting satellite ESSA 8 transmitting at 137 MHz. These observations show that scintillations occur when the satellite to ground station geometry is such that the ray from the satellite passes through the region in the ionosphere under modification. In general, a cut across the illuminated volume is obtained; thus an active region of about 100 km in diameter is indicated. For the most part, the artificial scintillations appear to be similar to those obtained from naturally occurring irregularities, but a systematic change from 3 to 1 sec in the fluctuation period is usually observed as the satellite traverses from the northern to the southern portions of the active region. The change in period appears to be produced by a systematic change in irregularity scale size from about 4 to about 1 km.

  14. Investigations of the ionospheric using radio signals from artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of ionospheric irregularities in medium latitudes and in polar regions were measured using radio signals from artificial satellites. Ionospheric changes during quiet and disturbed conditions were also measured. Electron density, elevation angle, and amplitude and frequency of these high frequency signals were determined as well as the direction of their arrival.

  15. Retrograde amnesia in patients with rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Margaret G; Lafleche, Ginette M C

    2004-03-01

    The retrograde amnesia of patients with memory loss related to rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms is compared with the retrograde amnesia of temporal amnesic patients and nonamnesic control participants. Two tests which focus on popular culture but which differ according to extent of news exposure and the cognitive processes necessary for task performance were used to measure retrograde memory. ACoA patients demonstrated more significant retrograde memory problems than did nonamnesic controls; however, the severity and pattern of their memory loss was less severe than that seen in association with temporal amnesia. Different factors influenced the remote memory loss of respective groups: ACoA patients' problems were related to impaired lexical retrieval whereas temporal amnesic patients had problems secondary to both retrieval and storage deficits. PMID:15012842

  16. Yeast as a tool to study mitochondrial retrograde pathway en route to cell stress response.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling is a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, by which dysfunctional mitochondria relay signals that lead to cell stress adaptation in physiopathological conditions by changes in nuclear gene expression. The best comprehension of components and regulation of retrograde signaling have been obtained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where retrograde target gene expression is regulated by RTG genes. In this chapter, we describe the methods to measure mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation in yeast cells by monitoring the mRNA levels of RTG target genes, such as those encoding for peroxisomal citrate synthase, aconitase, and NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit 1, as well as the phosphorylation status of Rtg1/3p transcriptional factor which controls RTG target gene transcription. PMID:25634284

  17. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour. PMID:26868561

  18. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization of a Pelvic Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuzaki, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Sumi, Seiya; Ogata, Ichiro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Kawakami, Shigeo; Ueda, Shohichi

    1999-11-15

    We successfully performed embolization therapy for a pelvic arteriovenous malformation by the retrograde transvenous approach using a liquid embolic material. This malformation was unique in that it had a single draining vein, which allowed this technique employing an occlusion balloon.

  19. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour.

  20. Hippocampal lesions produce both nongraded and temporally graded retrograde amnesia in the same rat.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Sekeres, Melanie J; Binns, Malcolm A; Moscovitch, Morris

    2013-05-01

    Rats were administered contextual fear conditioning and trained on a water-maze, spatial memory task 28 days or 24 h before undergoing hippocampal lesion or control surgery. When tested postoperatively on both tasks, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited retrograde amnesia for spatial memory at both delays but temporally graded retrograde amnesia for the contextual fear response. In demonstrating both types of retrograde amnesia in the same animals, the results parallel similar observations in human amnesics with hippocampal damage and provide compelling evidence that the nature of the task and the type of information being accessed are crucial factors in determining the pattern of retrograde memory loss associated with hippocampal damage. The results are interpreted as consistent with our transformation hypothesis (Winocur et al. (2010a) Neuropsychologia 48:2339-2356; Winocur and Moscovitch (2011) J Int Neuropsychol Soc 17:766-780) and at variance with standard consolidation theory and other theoretical models of memory. PMID:23401223

  1. Retrograde Tibiopedal Access as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Intervention Complications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Retrograde pedal access has been well described in the literature as a secondary approach for limb salvage in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. In this manuscript we are presenting a case where retrograde tibiopedal access has been used as a bail-out procedure for the management of superficial femoral artery (SFA) intervention complications. Procedure/Technique. After development of a perforation while trying to cross the totally occluded mid SFA using the conventional CFA access, we were able to cross the mid SFA lesion after accessing the posterior tibial artery in a retrograde fashion and delivered a self-expanding stent which created a flap that sealed the perforation without the need for covered stent. Conclusion. Retrograde tibiopedal access is a safe and effective approach for delivery of stents from the distal approach and so can be used as a bail-out technique for SFA perforation. PMID:27803837

  2. Patient and staff exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Buls, N; Pages, J; Mana, F; Osteaux, M

    2002-05-01

    Despite a number of efforts being put into the radiological protection of both patient and staff during interventional radiological (IR) procedures during recent years, information about radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures remains scarce. The purpose of this study was to estimate both patient and staff radiation doses during therapeutic ERCP procedures by direct measurement and to compare these results with data from other IR procedures. For 54 patients, effective dose and skin dose were estimated by measuring the dose-area product. For staff, entrance surface doses to the lens of the eye, thyroid and hands were estimated by thermoluminescent dosemeters. A median effective dose of 7.3 mSv and a median entrance surface dose of 271 mGy per procedure were estimated for patients. The gastroenterologist received a median dose of 0.34 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0.30 mGy to the skin at the level of the thyroid and 0.44 mGy to the skin of the hands, per procedure. When comparing the dosimetric quantities presented in this study with data from other IR procedures, it is clear that patient skin doses and doses to staff are high owing to the use of inappropriate X-ray equipment. ERCP requires the same radiation protection practice as all IR procedures. It should be consistently included in future multicentre IR patient and staff dose survey studies at national or international level.

  3. Interferon gamma induces retrograde dendritic retraction and inhibits synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Jung; Beck, Hiroko Nagasawa; Lein, Pamela J; Higgins, Dennis

    2002-06-01

    The expression of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) increases after neural injury, and it is sustained in chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. To understand how exposure to this proinflammatory cytokine might affect neural function, we examined its effects on cultures of neurons derived from the central and peripheral nervous systems. IFNgamma inhibits initial dendritic outgrowth in cultures of embryonic rat sympathetic and hippocampal neurons, and this inhibitory effect on process growth is associated with a decrease in the rate of synapse formation. In addition, in older cultures of sympathetic neurons, IFNgamma also selectively induces retraction of existing dendrites, ultimately leading to an 88% decrease in the size of the arbor. Dendritic retraction induced by IFNgamma represents a specific cellular response because it occurs without affecting axonal outgrowth or cell survival, and it is not observed with tumor necrosis factor alpha or other inflammatory cytokines. IFNgamma-induced dendritic retraction is associated with the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), and expression of a dominant-negative STAT1 construct attenuates the inhibitory effect of IFNgamma. Moreover, retrograde dendritic retraction is observed when distal axons are selectively exposed to IFNgamma. These data imply that IFNgamma-mediated STAT1 activation induces both dendritic atrophy and synaptic loss and that this occurs both at the sites of IFNgamma release and at remote loci. Regressive actions of IFNgamma on dendrites may contribute to the neuropathology of inflammatory diseases.

  4. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations.

  5. HUMERAL NAIL: COMPARISON OF THE ANTEGRADE AND RETROGRADE APPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Bencić, Ivan; Cengić, Tomislav; Prenc, Jakov; Bulatović, Nikola; Matejcić, Aljoša

    2016-03-01

    Application of humeral nail in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures is a relatively novel method of fracture fixation. Its application at Clinical Department of Traumatology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center began in 2001. The operative procedure should be performed using a minimally invasive technique without fracture opening in order to maintain optimal conditions for fracture healing including hematoma management. However, in everyday practice it is often impossible to obtain satisfactory fracture reduction using the closed procedure, so open reduction and additional fixation with wires or screws are mandatory. Over the last 14 years, fixation of fractures with the locking nail was performed in more than 400 patients. Cases of pseudarthrosis and pathological fractures were also managed successfully. There were more female patients. The mean time from injury to surgery was 2.4 days. Surgery was performed immediately upon admission to the emergency service whenever possible. This study comprised 234 patients with humeral shaft fractures treated with the humeral nail (antegrade insertion was applied in 103 and retrograde in 131 patients). The aim of the study was to stress out the complexity of appropriate operative treatment of humeral shaft fractures using intramedullary fixation, as well as the importance of proper reduction and stable fixation. PMID:27333726

  6. Retrograde amnesia and the volume of critical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Lasserson, D; Kingsley, D R; Bello, F; Rush, C; Stanhope, N; Stevens, T G; Goodman, G; Buckman, J R; Heilpern, G; Kendall, B E; Colchester, A C F

    2003-01-01

    There are many controversies concerning the structural basis of retrograde amnesia (RA). One view is that memories are held briefly within a medial temporal store ("hippocampal complex") before being "consolidated" or reorganised within temporal neocortex and/or networks more widely distributed within the cerebral cortex. An alternative view is that the medial temporal lobes are always involved in the storage and retrieval (reactivation) of autobiographical memories (multiple trace theory). The present study used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 40 patients with focal pathology/volume loss in different sites, to examine the correlates of impairment on three different measures of RA. The findings supported the view that widespread neural networks are involved in the storage and retrieval of autobiographical and other remote memories. Brain volume measures in critical structures could account for 60% of variance on autobiographical memory measures (for incidents and facts) in diencephalic patients and for 60-68% of variance in patients with frontal lesions. Significant correlations with medial temporal lobe volume were found only in the diencephalic group, in whom they were thought to reflect thalamic changes, but not in patients with herpes encephalitis or hypoxia in whom the temporal lobes were particularly implicated. The latter finding fails to support one of the main predictions of multiple trace theory, as presently expounded. PMID:14750651

  7. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.

  8. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignancy of the bile ducts that carries high morbidity and mortality. Patients with CCA typically present with obstructive jaundice, and associated complications of CCA include cholangitis and biliary sepsis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a valuable treatment modality for patients with CCA, as it enables internal drainage of blocked bile ducts and hepatic segments by using plastic or metal stents. While there remains debate as to if bilateral (or multi-segmental) hepatic drainage is required and/or superior to unilateral drainage, the underlying tenant of draining any persistently opacified bile ducts is paramount to good ERCP practice and good clinical outcomes. Endoscopic therapy for malignant biliary strictures from CCA has advanced to include ablative therapies via ERCP-directed photodynamic therapy (PDT) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). While ERCP techniques cannot cure CCA, advancements in the field of ERCP have enabled us to improve upon the quality of life of patients with inoperable and incurable disease. ERCP-directed PDT has been used in lieu of brachytherapy to provide neoadjuvant local tumor control in patients with CCA who are awaiting liver transplantation. Lastly, mounting evidence suggests that palliative ERCP-directed PDT, and probably ERCP-directed RFA as well, offer a survival advantage to patients with this difficult-to-treat malignancy. PMID:26140095

  9. Retrograde amnesia in praying mantis after two successive learning processes.

    PubMed

    Zabala, N A; Maldonado, H

    1990-01-01

    Learning and memory consolidation was investigated in the mantis Stagmatoptera biocellata, by two successive trainings: a) the attack (A) avoidance training in which animals were not allowed to catch a mobile star, followed by the deimatic reaction (DR) avoidance training of not displaying this defensive response, or b) DR-avoidance training followed by A-avoidance training. The results showed that the presence and the 1 of A-avoidance learning and DR-avoidance learning did not affect the learning of the other training. Total retention of A-avoidance memory was demonstrated when A-avoidance training was given first, whereas DR-avoidance memory was significantly lost (716%) when the DR-avoidance training was given first. The retroactive forgetting of DR-avoidance memory is considered as retrograde amnesia rather than retroactive memory inhibition because it depends on the activity during A-avoidance training (number of attacks) and not the quantity of A-avoidance learning. The magnitude of the amnesic effect due to this distracting activity in the A-avoidance training appears to be remarkably similar to that reported in a previous work using nitrogen-induced anoxia as the amnesic factor. PMID:2152377

  10. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  11. Posterior tibial artery access using transradial techniques: retrograde approach to inaccessible lower extremity lesions.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Juan Carlos; Singh, Vikas; Martinez, Claudia A

    2012-06-01

    Percutaneous intervention of chronic limb ischemia is often limited by vascular access especially in patients with previous surgical interventions. This warrants development of alternative endovascular techniques, particularly for patients in whom traditional ipsilateral antegrade or contralateral retrograde access has failed or is not possible. We describe a novel approach to the posterior tibial artery using retrograde access with transradial techniques including closure devices in two patients with inaccessible antegrade access. PMID:21432983

  12. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  13. Retrograde labelling of serotonergic projections onto the neuroendocrine bag cells of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; Blankenship, J E

    1991-02-25

    Injection of rhodamine-conjugated latex microspheres into the right bag cell cluster of Aplysia brasiliana yielded retrograde labelling of a small number of cells in the cerebral and abdominal ganglia. Subsequent staining for serotonin immunoreactivity demonstrated consistent double-labelling in specific cerebral and abdominal ganglion serotonergic cells. The double-labelled populations were also stained in vivo by prior treatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. These retrogradely labelled serotonergic neurons may represent sources of inhibitory input to the neuroendocrine bag cells.

  14. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  15. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome.

  16. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  17. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Karim, Abdul-Rahman R; Vo, Minh; Main, Michael L; Grantham, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  18. Control of respiration-driven retrograde flow in the subdiaphragmatic venous return of the Fontan circulation

    PubMed Central

    Vukicevic, M; Conover, T; Jaeggli, M; Zhou, J; Pennati, G; Hsia, TY; Figliola, RS

    2014-01-01

    Respiration influences the subdiaphragmatic venous return in the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) of the Fontan circulation whereby both the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein flows can experience retrograde motion. Controlling retrograde flows could improve patient outcomes. Using a patient-specific model within a Fontan mock circulatory system with respiration, we inserted a valve into the IVC to examine its effects on local hemodynamics while varying retrograde volumes by changing vascular impedances. A bovine valved conduit reduced IVC retrograde flow to within 3% of antegrade flow in all cases. The valve closed only under conditions supporting retrograde flow and its effects on local hemodynamics increased with larger retrograde volume. Liver and TCPC pressures improved only while the valve leaflets were closed while cycle-averaged pressures improved only slightly (italic>1 mm Hg). Increased pulmonary vascular resistance raised mean circulation pressures but the valve functioned and cardiac output improved and stabilized. Power loss across the TCPC improved by 12–15% (pbold>0.05) with a valve. The effectiveness of valve therapy is dependent on patient vascular impedance. PMID:24814833

  19. Retrogradation of Waxy Rice Starch Gel in the Vicinity of the Glass Transition Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Udomrati, Sunsanee

    2013-01-01

    The retrogradation rate of waxy rice starch gel was investigated during storage at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature of a maximally concentrated system (Tg′), as it was hypothesized that such temperatures might cause different effects on retrogradation. The Tg′ value of fully gelatinized waxy rice starch gel with 50% water content and the enthalpy of melting retrograded amylopectin in the gels were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Starch gels were frozen to −30°C and stored at 4, 0, −3, −5, and −8°C for 5 days. The results indicated that the Tg′ value of gelatinized starch gel annealed at −7°C for 15 min was −3.5°C. Waxy rice starch gels retrograded significantly when stored at 4°C with a decrease in the enthalpy of melting retrograded starch in samples stored for 5 days at −3, −5, and −8°C, respectively, perhaps due to the more rigid glass matrix and less molecular mobility facilitating starch chain recrystallization at temperatures below Tg′. This suggests that retardation of retrogradation of waxy rice starch gel can be achieved at temperature below Tg′. PMID:26904602

  20. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance. PMID:25979201

  1. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance.

  2. Nighttime VHF scintillations at 23 deg N magnetic latitude and their association with equatorial F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, R.S.; Reddy, B.M.

    1986-06-01

    Based on ETS-II geostationary satellite (130 deg E) 136-MHz radio beacon amplitudes, a study of postsunset VHF scintillations observed during the January-February 1980 solar maximum period confirms that they are essentially controlled by the generation of equatorial F region irregularities. This latitude is substantially beyond the 84.4 deg E geographic meridian equatorial anomaly daytime crest. Good agreement between the observed scintillation occurrence pattern and characteristics, and previous results reported up to 21 deg N (Somayajulu et al., 1984), is found, and the occurrence of 23 deg N scintillations is found to be conditional to their prior occurrence at lower latitudes. It is also shown that, at least during high solar activity, the equator irregularities extend to altitudes in excess of 1300 km in the Indian sector, and consequently, cause scintillations in a much wider latitudinal belt. 36 references.

  3. Tuberculosis Penis with ‘Watering Can Penis’ Appearance: Report of a Rare Case with Retrograde Urethrography and Voiding Cystourethrography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Mayilvaganan, Kamala Retnam; Naren Satya Srinivas, M.; Reddy, Vikram N.; Singh, Ranjeet Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A ‘watering can penis’ secondary to penile tuberculosis is an extremely rare clinical entity. Retrograde Urethrography – Voiding Cystourethrography evaluation of the urethra and the urinary bladder plays a very important role in the diagnostics as well as further management of the urethral abnormalities. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case in literature where a ‘watering can penis’ was noted secondary to penile TB. This is also the first documented case of ‘watering can penis’ as a consequence of venereal transmission of TB. Case Report A 50-year-old male presented with multiple discharging sinuses along the penis. RGU revealed multiple, contrast-filled, narrow, irregular, fistulous tracts arising from the pendulous part of the anterior urethra. This distal segment of the pendulous part of the anterior urethra also showed significant distortion and irregular, beaded narrowing. VCUG showed a markedly-contracted and small-capacity urinary bladder with a thickened, irregular and edematous wall with multiple hypertrophied trabeculae along its walls. The patient was administered anti-tubercular treatment. At the end of this treatment regimen, a repeat RGU-VCUG will be performed and decision regarding urethroplasty and further management will be planned depending upon the presence of any remaining fistulas or strictures involving the urethra. Conclusions ‘Watering can penis’ as a result of penile TB is a very rare clinical entity. The differential diagnoses of a ‘watering can penis’ should be kept in mind in the evaluation of these patients. RGU and VCUG evaluation is an important conventional imaging modality used in the evaluation of urethral strictures and fistulas in case of ‘watering can penis’. PMID:27733889

  4. Equatorial spread F/plasma bubble irregularities under storm time disturbance electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is responsible for storm time disturbance electric field propagation to equatorial latitudes, by processes of direct penetration and disturbance wind dynamo. New results have been forthcoming in recent years from satellite and ground based observations and modeling studies on the important characteristics of these electric fields as well their effects on the electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere and thermosphere, especially, in terms of their impact on the equatorial spread F (ESF) plasma bubble irregularity development conditions that is in focus here. The disturbance zonal electric fields, when superimposed on equatorial evening pre-reversal enhancement electric field, PRE, can drastically modify the post-sunset, and night time, F layer heights, a basic control factor for the instability growth by Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism leading to plasma bubble development. Based on published results and some new data we present here a comprehensive, but brief, analysis and discussion of the processes of ESF development, suppression or disruption under different phases of a storm activity sequence. Consequences for ESF occurrence from under-shielding and over-shielding penetration electric fields as well as from the disturbance winds and wind dynamo electric field occurring in different local time sectors of the night, as also the irregularity dynamics and longitude extension, etc., are highlighted in this paper. Some outstanding problems for further research are also presented.

  5. The development of approaches for ionosphere irregularities modeling on the base of GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Krankowski, Andrzej; Zakharenkova, Irina; Shagimuratov, Irk

    The ionosphere plays an important role in GNSS applications because it influences on the radio wave propagation through out. The ionosphere delay is the biggest error source for satellite navigation systems, but it can be directly measured and mitigated with using dual frequency GNSS receivers. However GNSS signal fading due to electron density gradients and irregularities in the ionosphere can decrease the operational availability of navigation system. There were developed several models in order to represent ionospheric fluctuations and scintillation activity under different geophysical conditions, but they were calibrated with data sets, that do not include GNSS derived data. It is very actual to develop empirical or semi-empirical model based on GNSS derived measurements which can represent strong ionosphere fluctuation events. In this work we use the data provided by the existing permanent GNSS network in order to produce information and products that can be used to investigate and formalize dependences of ionospheric fluctuation indices on the space weather conditions and to determine the background levels. Our investigation is based on the classical approach when Rate of TEC (ROT), detrended rate of line-of-sight TEC change and ROTI - indexes are calculated from GPS measurements. For analysis there are produced the daily dependences of the ROTI index as a function of geomagnetic local time on the variable grid and averaging parameters. The paper presents the statistical and correlation dependences between sets of geomagnetic indices and parameters that characterized the ionosphere irregularities activity for period of 2010 - 2013 years.

  6. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  7. Continued evidence for safety of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Sean; Beirne, Joshua; Delgi-Esposti, Silvia; Habr, Fadlallah

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To report the safety of continued use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) during pregnancy at various maternal ages. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of pregnant patients who underwent ERCP at a tertiary academic center was undertaken between 2002 and 2012. Pertinent past medical history and initial presenting laboratory data were collected. Review of the procedure note for each ERCP performed provided documentation of lead shielding, type of sedation, fluoroscopy time, and post-procedure complications. Patients’ clinical courses were reviewed until the time of delivery and pregnancy complications with fetal outcomes were examined. Data was stratified based upon the mother’s age at the time of ERCP: 18-21, 22-29, and ≥ 30 years of age. RESULTS: Twenty pregnant patients who underwent ERCP between 2002 and 2012 were identified. The mean age at the time of ERCP was 26.4 years (18-38 years) and the average trimester was the second. The indications for ERCP were choledocholithiasis in 17 patients, gallstone pancreatitis in 2 patients, and cholangitis in 1 patient. The mean fluoroscopy time of ERCP was 3.8 min (0.3-23.6 min). Sphincterotomy was performed in 18 patients with therapeutic intent and not as a prophylactic measure to prevent recurrences. Clinical documentation of use of protective shielding was found in only 8 notes (40%). Post procedure complications were limited to two cases of post-ERCP pancreatitis (10%). Elective cholecystectomy was performed shortly after ERCP in 11 of the pregnant patients. Birth records were available for 16 patients, of which 15 had full-term pregnancies. Cesarean sections were performed in 5 (31%) patients. Term birth weight was greater than 2500 g in all cases except one in which the mother had a known hypercoagulable state. CONCLUSION: ERCP during pregnancy is both safe and efficacious regardless of maternal age or trimester. PMID:25132918

  8. Equatorial ionospheric irregularities using GPS TEC derived index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladipo, O. A.; Schüler, Torben

    2013-01-01

    We have used the rate of change of TEC (ROT) derived fluctuation index to study irregularities in the ionosphere at Franceville in Gabon (Lat.= -1.63°, Long.=13.55°, Geomag. Lat.= -0.71°), an equatorial station in the African sector. Based on a preliminary study at two equatorial stations at different longitude an average ROTI index which gives the fluctuation level over half an hour at a particular station was put forward. This index eliminates the noise spikes or extreme value usually present in ROTI index estimate. The new index ROTI was used to study ionospheric irregularity occurrence at Franceville. As far as we know, this is the first time irregularity occurrence study is being done at this station using GNSS data. The results obtained showed that ionospheric irregularity season at Franceville is from March to November and that there is a kind of minimum around June. Very low irregularities activity is also observed around January. Pre-midnight fluctuation is observed to be more pronounced at Franceville during the period studied.

  9. Structure of ionospheric irregularities from amplitude and phase scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R.G. )

    1991-04-01

    The mutual coherence function Gamma 2, or the second moment of the complex amplitude of a radio wave which traverses through equatorial F region irregularities, is computed from amplitude and phase scintillation data. Theoretically, the equation satisfied by the coherence function has an analytic solution over the whole range of scintillation strength. This solution is directly related to the structure function for the phase fluctuations produced by the irregularities. Hence, the shape of the correlation function for variations in the total electron content along the signal path can be derived from the computed values of Gamma 2. With a suitable power-law model for the irregularities, an 'intermediate break scale', this scale, as well as the rms density fluctuation are deduced from a comparison of computed values for short-time lags with those expected from theory. During a postsunset scintillation event, this scale is found to increase with local time. In the context of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the likely source of the irregularities, this increase may be attributed to a decline in the effective electric field prevailing in the region of the irregularities. 26 refs.

  10. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  11. Novel Method for Border Irregularity Assessment in Dermoscopic Color Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most important lesion features predicting malignancy is border irregularity. Accurate assessment of irregular borders is clinically important due to significantly different occurrence in benign and malignant skin lesions. Method. In this research, we present a new approach for the detection of border irregularities, as one of the major parameters in a widely used diagnostic algorithm the ABCD rule of dermoscopy. The proposed work is focused on designing an efficient automatic algorithm containing the following steps: image enhancement, lesion segmentation, borderline calculation, and irregularities detection. The challenge lies in determining the exact borderline. For solving this problem we have implemented a new method based on lesion rotation and borderline division. Results. The algorithm has been tested on 350 dermoscopic images and achieved accuracy of 92% indicating that the proposed computational approach captured most of the irregularities and provides reliable information for effective skin mole examination. Compared to the state of the art, we obtained improved classification results. Conclusions. The current study suggests that computer-aided system is a practical tool for dermoscopic image assessment and could be recommended for both research and clinical applications. The proposed algorithm can be applied in different fields of medical image analysis including, for example, CT and MRI images. PMID:26604980

  12. Light Pollution in Leo-Satellite Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, L. S.; Marsakova, V. I.; Golubovskaya, T. A.; Terpan, S. S.; Melikyants, S. M.; Korobeynikova, E. A.

    Because of the high level of the light pollution in Odessa city, only the observations of LEO (low Earth orbit)-satellites are performed in the main office of the Astronomical observatory of Odessa National University named after I.I. Mechnikov. As the one of the observation results we obtain the sky background measurements along the satellite's way through the sky (at different azimuths and altitudes that change during the satellite tracking). We propose the method of irregular extinction changes diagnostics that realized by using the different data filtration methods. Also as the result of our analysis of these observations we present azimuth-altitude diagram of sky background that shows the most significant light pollution at the north-western and northern directions caused by the Port of Odessa and the stadium "Chernomorets".

  13. Managing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Integral Systems, Inc.'s EPOCH 2000 forms the core of NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission's command and control center. EPOCH 2000, which allows ground operators to monitor and control satellites over a wide area network, owes part of its heritage from work completed to support Goddard Space Flight Center. The software automates telemetry processing, commanding, anomaly detection, and archiving collected data. The NEAR spacecraft, launched in February 1996, will rendezvous in early 1999 and orbit the Asteroid Eros for a year. Integral Systems also provided Low Earth Orbit Autonomous Ground Terminals (LEO-Ts) to NASA. The LEO-T is designed to make it easier and less expensive for principal investigators to obtain telemetry, tracking and control services for their science missions. The company products have supported well over 70 satellite missions aimed at scientific research, meteorology, or communications applications.

  14. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  15. Laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients

    PubMed Central

    Snauwaert, Christophe; Laukens, Pierre; Dillemans, Bruno; Himpens, Jacques; De Looze, Danny; Deprez, Pierre Henri; Badaoui, Abdenor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bariatric patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is challenging due to the long anatomical route required to reach the biliopancreatic limb. Aim: Assessment of the feasibility and performance of laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Methods: A retrospective multicenter observational consecutive-patient cohort study of all patients in the period May 2008 to September 2014 with a history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who presented with complicated biliary disease and who underwent a laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure was similar in all centers and was performed through a 15 mm or 18 mm trocar that was inserted in the gastric remnant. Cholecystectomy was performed concomitantly when indicated. Results: In total, 23 patients underwent a laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure. Two patients required a mini-laparotomy for transgastric access because of a complex surgical history resulting in multiple adhesions. Indications included ascending cholangitis, choledocholithiasis, and biliary pancreatitis. Of the 23 patients, 13 underwent concomitant cholecystectomy. All patients successfully underwent biliary cannulation and sphincterotomy. No endoscopic procedure-related complications (i. e. bleeding, pancreatitis or retroperitoneal perforation) occurred. Mean hospital stay was 2.8 days (range 2 – 4). Conclusions: Transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a feasible approach in the treatment of pancreaticobiliary disease in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients, without major complications in our series and allows endoscopic treatment and cholecystectomy to be performed consecutively in a single procedure. In Roux-en-Y gastric

  16. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts.

  17. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts. PMID:22884958

  18. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics. PMID:27185280

  19. Exploring Manycore Multinode Systems for Irregular Applications with FPGA Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Ceriani, Marco; Palermo, Gianluca; Secchi, Simone; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2013-04-29

    We present a prototype of a multi-core architecture implemented on FPGA, designed to enable efficient execution of irregular applications on distributed shared memory machines, while maintaining high performance on regular workloads. The architecture is composed of off-the-shelf soft-core cores, local interconnection and memory interface, integrated with custom components that optimize it for irregular applications. It relies on three key elements: a global address space, multithreading, and fine-grained synchronization. Global addresses are scrambled to reduce the formation of network hot-spots, while the latency of the transactions is covered by integrating an hardware scheduler within the custom load/store buffers to take advantage from the availability of multiple executions threads, increasing the efficiency in a transparent way to the application. We evaluated a dual node system irregular kernels showing scalability in the number of cores and threads.

  20. Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structures using density-sensitive extreme ultraviolet line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet-Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of 3-10 and corresponding filling factors of about 10%-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.

  1. Dynamical configurations of celestial systems comprised of multiple irregular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Yun; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2016-09-01

    This manuscript considers the main features of the nonlinear dynamics of multiple irregular celestial body systems. The gravitational potential, static electric potential, and magnetic potential are considered. Based on the three established potentials, we show that three conservative values exist for this system, including a Jacobi integral. The equilibrium conditions for the system are derived and their stability analyzed. The equilibrium conditions of a celestial system comprised of n irregular bodies are reduced to 12n - 9 equations. The dynamical results are applied to simulate the motion of multiple-asteroid systems. The simulation is useful for the study of the stability of multiple irregular celestial body systems and for the design of spacecraft orbits to triple-asteroid systems discovered in the solar system. The dynamical configurations of the five triple-asteroid systems 45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 93 Minerva, 216 Kleopatra, and 136617 1994CC, and the six-body system 134340 Pluto are calculated and analyzed.

  2. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  3. [Artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion for irregular menstruation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Yang, Lijie; Chen, Yajie; Li, Qing; Chen, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Through the discussion on TCM physiological characters of females in follicular, ovulatory, luteal and menstrual phases and treatment principles, the clinical application of artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion was introduced for irregular menstruation and the typical cases were attached. It is suggested that the menstrual cycle follows the growth-consumption rule of yin, yang, qi and blood. The corresponding treatment principles should be applied in accordance with the change rule of menstrual cycle. Hence, it is worth to adopt the artificial cycle therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion for irregular menstruation in clinical application.

  4. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Pierce, Allan D.; Kearns, James A.; Zhou, Ji-Xun

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques were developed for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere. Irregular topography is understood to imply a ground surface that: (1) is not idealizable as being perfectly flat, or (2) that is not idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The focus is on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  5. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearns, J. A.; Pierce, A. D.; Main, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere was developed. Irregular topography here is understood to imply a ground surface that is not idealized as being perfectly flat or that is not idealized as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The interest focuses on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  6. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Yves H.; Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Kearns, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere. Irregular topography is understood to imply a ground surface that is not idealizable as being perfectly flat or that is no idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The focus is on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low-altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  7. Uniform irradiation of irregularly shaped cavities for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rem, Alex I.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Gijsbers, Geert H. M.; Beek, Johan F.

    1997-03-01

    It is difficult to achieve a uniform light distribution in irregularly shaped cavities. We have conducted a study on the use of hollow `integrating' moulds for more uniform light delivery of photodynamic therapy in irregularly shaped cavities such as the oral cavity. Simple geometries such as a cubical box, a sphere, a cylinder and a `bottle-neck' geometry have been investigated experimentally and the results have been compared with computed light distributions obtained using the `radiosity method'. A high reflection coefficient of the mould and the best uniform direct irradiance possible on the inside of the mould were found to be important determinants for achieving a uniform light distribution.

  8. Sound propagation over uneven ground and irregular topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, A. D.; Main, G. L.; Kearns, J. A.; Benator, D. R.; Parish, J. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques for predicting the effects of irregular topography on long range sound propagation in the atmosphere is discussed. Irregular topography here is understood to imply a ground surface that (1) is not idealizable as being perfectly flat or (2) that is not idealizable as having a constant specific acoustic impedance. The study focuses on circumstances where the propagation is similar to what might be expected for noise from low-altitude air vehicles flying over suburban or rural terrain, such that rays from the source arrive at angles close to grazing incidence.

  9. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  10. The retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starches as observed with FT-IR, 13C NMR and DSC.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wang, Changjun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Li, Lin

    2014-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starch with wavelengths of maximum absorbance, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and DSC. The results show that the starches in retrograded glutinous rice starch and glutinous rice amylopectin could not form double helix. The IR results show that protein inhabits in glutinous rice and maize starches in a different way and appearance of C-H symmetric stretching vibration at 2852 cm(-1) in starch might be appearance of protein. Retrogradation untied the protein in glutinous amylopectin. Enthalpies of sweet potato and maize granules are higher than those of their retrograded starches. The (13)C NMR results show that retrogradation of those two starches leads to presence of β-anomers and retrogradation might decompose lipids in glutinous rice amylopectin into small molecules. Glutinous rice starch was more inclined to retrogradation than buckwheat starch. The DSC results show that the second peak temperatures for retrograded glutinous rice and buckwheat starches should be assigned to protein. The SEM results show that an obvious layer structure exists in retrograded glutinous rice amylopectin.

  11. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    accretion only explores the late evolution stages of the binary in an otherwise unperturbed retrograde disc to illustrate how eccentricity evolves with time in relation to the shape of the underlying surface density distribution.

  12. Retrograde versus Antegrade Approach for the Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Mykoniatis, Ioannis; Isid, Ayman; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Rosenberg, Shilo; Hidas, Guy; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of retrograde versus antegrade ureteroscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with proximal ureteral stones >15 mm, treated in our institution from January 2011 to January 2016. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative outcomes, and complications were recorded and compared between the two techniques. Results. Our analysis included 57 patients. Thirty-four patients (59.6%) underwent retrograde and 23 patients (40.4%) underwent antegrade ureteroscopy. There was no significant difference in patients' demographics and stone characteristics between the groups. Stone-free rate was significantly higher (p = 0.033) in the antegrade group (100%) compared to retrograde one (82.4%). Fluoroscopy time, procedure duration, and length of hospitalization were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in retrograde approach. On the other hand, the need for postoperative stenting was significantly lower in the antegrade group (p < 0.001). No difference was found between the groups (p = 0.745) regarding postoperative complications. Conclusions. Antegrade ureteroscopy is an efficient and safe option for the management of large proximal ureteral stones. It may achieve high stone-free rates compared to retrograde ureteroscopy with the drawback of longer operative time, fluoroscopy time, and length of hospitalization. PMID:27766263

  13. Kinematical evolution of tidally limited star clusters: the role of retrograde stellar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The presence of an external tidal field often induces significant dynamical evolutionary effects on the internal kinematics of star clusters. Previous studies investigating the restricted three-body problem with applications to star cluster dynamics have shown that unbound stars on retrograde orbits (with respect to the direction of the cluster's orbit) are more stable against escape than prograde orbits, and predicted that a star cluster might acquire retrograde rotation through preferential escape of stars on prograde orbits. In this study, we present evidence of this prediction, but we also illustrate that there are additional effects that cannot be accounted for by the preferential escape of prograde orbits alone. Specifically, in the early evolution, initially underfilling models increase their fraction of retrograde stars without losing significant mass, and acquire a retrograde angular velocity. We attribute this effect to the development of preferentially eccentric/radial orbits in the outer regions of star clusters as they are expanding into their tidal limitation. We explore the implications of the evolution of the fraction of prograde and retrograde stars for the evolution of the cluster internal rotation, and its dependence on the initial structural properties. Although all the systems studied here evolve towards an approximately solid-body internal rotation with angular velocity equal to about half of the angular velocity of the cluster orbital motion around the host galaxy, the evolutionary history of the radial profile of the cluster internal angular velocity depends on the cluster initial structure.

  14. Recruitment of actin modifiers to TrkA endosomes governs retrograde NGF signaling and survival

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Anthony W.; Hillaire, Coryse St.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Glebova, Natalia O.; Philippidou, Polyxeni; Halegoua, Simon; Ginty, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary NGF and NT3 collaborate to support development of sympathetic neurons. Although both neurotrophins activate TrkA-dependent axonal extension, NGF is unique in its ability to promote retrograde transport of TrkA endosomes and retrograde survival. Here, we report that actin depolymerization is essential for initiation of NGF/TrkA endosome trafficking and that a Rac1–cofilin signaling module associated with TrkA early endosomes supports their maturation to retrograde transport-competent endosomes. Moreover, the actin-regulatory endosomal components are absent from NT3-formed TrkA endosomes, explaining the failure of NT3 to support retrograde TrkA transport and survival. The inability of NT3 to activate Rac1-GTP–cofilin signaling is likely due to the labile nature of NT3/TrkA complexes within the acidic environment of TrkA early endosomes. Thus, TrkA endosomes associate with actin-modulatory proteins to promote F-actin disassembly enabling their maturation into transport-competent signaling endosomes. Differential control of this process explains how NGF in final targets, but not NT3 from intermediate targets, supports retrograde survival of sympathetic neurons. PMID:21816277

  15. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia. PMID:24834048

  16. Retrogradation of Maize Starch after High Hydrostatic Pressure Gelation: Effect of Amylose Content and Depressurization Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Swedlund, Peter; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been employed to gelatinize or physically modify starch dispersions. In this study, waxy maize starch, normal maize starch, and two high amylose content starch were processed by a HHP of the order of 600 MPa, at 25°C for 15min. The effect of HHP processing on the crystallization of maize starches with various amylose content during storage at 4°C was investigated. Crystallization kinetics of HHP treated starch gels were investigated using rheology and FTIR. The effect of crystallization on the mechanical properties of starch gel network were evaluated in terms of dynamic complex modulus (G*). The crystallization induced increase of short-range helices structures were investigated using FTIR. The pressure releasing rate does not affect the starch retrogradation behaviour. The rate and extent of retrogradation depends on the amylose content of amylose starch. The least retrogradation was observed in HHP treated waxy maize starch. The rate of retrogradation is higher for HHP treated high amylose maize starch than that of normal maize starch. A linear relationship between the extent of retrogradation (phase distribution) measured by FTIR and G* is proposed. PMID:27219066

  17. Effect of storage time on the retrogradation of banana starch extrudate.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Ottenhof, M-A; Agama-Acevedo, E; Farhat, I A

    2005-02-23

    Starch was isolated from banana starch and the retrogradation phenomenon was studied using diverse techniques, including an enzymatic measurement. Wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) showed that the sample stored for 7 h presented small peaks and when the storage time increased the peaks increased in intensity. The type of diffraction pattern found in banana extrudates is typical of the A-type crystal polymorph. The crystallinity index from the diffractograms, showed a plateau after approximately 20 h of storage. The short-range order measurement with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that banana starch retrogradation reached a maximum value at approximately 11 h of storage, a value that agrees with the results obtained with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), because the maximum enthalpy value (approximately 5 J/g) was calculated in the stored sample for 8 h, without changes in the stored samples for more time. Retrograded resistant starch values did not change after 12 h of storage, obtaining the maximum starch retrogradation level. FTIR, DSC, and the enzymatic technique showed the changes at the molecular level in starch during storage; in the case of WAXS, they determine the long-range order that explains the differences found in the starch retrogradation pattern measurement in banana starch.

  18. Second-order accurate difference schemes on highly irregular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A.; White, A.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper compact-as-possible second-order accurate difference schemes will be constructed for boundary-value problems of arbitrary order on highly irregular meshes. It will be shown that for equations of order (K) these schemes will have truncation error of order (3/endash/K). This phenomena is known as supraconvergence. 7 refs.

  19. System remotely inspects, measures, and records internal irregularities in piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burry, F. H.; Cunningham, J. Y.; Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Norwood, L. B.

    1968-01-01

    Video electromechanical probe visually inspects and measures internal offset and peaking of welds in relatively large piping. Irregularity dimensions are recorded on peripheral equipment consisting of video tape and X-Y plotter. The probe is used for inspection of vacuum-jacketed liquid lines that cannot be inspected externally.

  20. Alignment tool facilitates pin placement on irregular horizontal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. V.

    1966-01-01

    Alignment tool facilitates spotting and cementing plastic pins on the true vertical to irregular concave and convex surfaces. The tool consists of a wood tripod with individually adjustable legs, a wood block with a hole for placing the pins and two spirit levels at a 90 degree angle for easy alignment.

  1. Theory vs. Taxonomy: On Teaching 'Syntactically Irregular' Verbs in Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plewes, S. Frank

    This paper suggests methods for teaching the Russian verbs that govern what are loosely termed "objects" in oblique cases. The case government of such verbs is not necessarily an individual irregularity. Definite patterns emerge, both morphological and semantic, to facilitate grouping these verbs into classes. Russian verbs requiring genitive…

  2. 37 CFR 7.14 - Correcting irregularities in international application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... international application. 7.14 Section 7.14 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... THE MADRID AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE INTERNATIONAL REGISTRATION OF MARKS International Application Originating From the United States § 7.14 Correcting irregularities in international application. (a)...

  3. 37 CFR 7.14 - Correcting irregularities in international application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... international application. 7.14 Section 7.14 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... THE MADRID AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE INTERNATIONAL REGISTRATION OF MARKS International Application Originating From the United States § 7.14 Correcting irregularities in international application. (a)...

  4. 37 CFR 7.14 - Correcting irregularities in international application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... international application. 7.14 Section 7.14 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... THE MADRID AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE INTERNATIONAL REGISTRATION OF MARKS International Application Originating From the United States § 7.14 Correcting irregularities in international application. (a)...

  5. Effect of surface irregularities on bellows fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. H.; Sheaffer, E. F.; Turner, J. D.; Zeimer, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents test data on the bending fatigue life of notched sheet specimens. The influence of a surface irregularity on the fatigue life of a metal bellows is evaluated, with emphasis on accidental defects in ducting bellows which are impossible to avoid short of completely eliminating human contact.

  6. The Effects of Some Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drag, Manley

    1939-01-01

    The N.A.C.A. has conducted tests to provide more complete data than were previously available for estimating the effects of common surface irregularities on wing drag. The irregularities investigated included: brazier-head and countersunk rivets, spot welds, several types of sheet-metal joints, and surface roughness. Tests were also conducted to determine the over-all effect of manufacturing irregularities incidental to riveted aluminum alloy and to spot-welded stainless-steel construction. The tests were made in the 8-foot high speed wind tunnel at Reynolds Numbers up to 18,000,000. The results show that any of the surface irregularities investigated may increase wing drag enough to have important adverse effects on high-speed performance and economy. A method of estimating increases in wing drag caused by brazier-head rivets and lapped joints under conditions outside the range of the tests is suggested. Estimated drag increases due to rivets and lapped joints under conditions outside the range of the tests is suggested. Estimated drag increases due to rivets and lapped joints on a wing of 20-foot chord flying at 250 miles per hour are shown.

  7. Irregularly calcified eggs and eggshells of Caiman latirostris (Alligatoridae: Crocodylia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Mariela Soledad; Simoncini, Melina Soledad; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-05-01

    We describe irregularly calcified egg and eggshell morphologies for the first time in nests of the broad-snouted caiman, Caiman latirostris. Research is based on detailed descriptions of 270 eggs from a total sample of 46,800 collected between 2005 and 2011 in Santa Fe Province, Argentina, and encompasses animals from both natural habitats and held in captivity. We discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of eggs with different mineralisation patterns in our extensive C. latirostris field sample and its conservation significance; the chemistry of egg laying in amniotes is sensitive to environmental contamination which, in turn, has biological implications. Based on our egg sample, we identify two caiman eggshell abnormalities: (1) regularly calcified eggs with either calcitic nodules or superficial wrinkles at one egg end and (2) irregularly calcified eggs with structural gaps that weaken the shell. Some recently laid clutches we examined included eggs with most of the shell broken and detached from the flexible membrane. Most type 1 regularly calcified eggs lost their initial calcified nodules during incubation, suggesting that these deposits do not affect embryo survival rates. In contrast, irregularly calcified caiman eggs have a mean hatching success rate of 8.9 % (range 0-38 %) across our sample compared to a mean normal success of 75 %. Most irregularly calcified caiman eggs probably die because of infections caused by fungi and bacteria in the organic nest material, although another possible explanation that merits further investigation could be an increase in permeability, leading to embryo dehydration.

  8. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    Meteor-2 (second generation meteorological satellite) and an experimental satellite on which instruments are being tested and modified for the requirements of hydrometeorology and a determination of natural resources are presently operational in the U.S.S.R. Television devices with a 1-10 km terrain image resolution operating in the visible and infrared region are used to determine the space system, velocity and direction of cloud movements and provide information about the snow and ice cover, cyclones, storms, vortices in the atmosphere, and velocity and direction of wind. Images with a 50-1000 m resolution make possible geological and hydrological surveys, an evaluation of the state of vegetation and crops, detection of forest fires, determination of pollution of the atmosphere and sea and determination of optimal fishing regions in the ocean. Measurement of the intensity of atmospheric radiation in narrow infrared regions and very high frequencies allows remote evaluation of the temperature and humidity distribution in the vertical cross section of the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  10. Evidence for a unidirectional retrograde communication between distal His bundle and atria.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J W

    1980-01-01

    Intracardiac electrogram recordings are presented suggesting the existence in one patient with recurrent supraventricular tachycardia of a functionally unidirectional retrograde connection between the distal His bundle and the low right atrium. Recordings obtained during junctional rhythm showed a short ventriculoatrial conduction time which did not lengthen during rapid or premature ventricular pacing. During an episode of supraventricular tachycardia induced by a single atrial premature stimulus, an infra-His Wenckebach period occurred during which retrograde ventriculoatrial conduction remained constant until ventricular capture was blocked, but atrial activation persisted with the same retrograde atrial activation sequence seen in the previous beats of supraventricular tachycardia. The findings appear to document participation in supraventricular tachycardia of a type of atrio-His fibre originally described by Brechenmacher. PMID:7378222

  11. Effect of high-speed jet on flow behavior, retrogradation, and molecular weight of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Luo, Shun-Jing; BeMiller, James N; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei

    2015-11-20

    Effects of high-speed jet (HSJ) treatment on flow behavior, retrogradation, and degradation of the molecular structure of indica rice starch were investigated. Decreasing with the number of HSJ treatment passes were the turbidity of pastes (degree of retrogradation), the enthalpy of melting of retrograded rice starch, weight-average molecular weights and weight-average root-mean square radii of gyration of the starch polysaccharides, and the amylopectin peak areas of SEC profiles. The areas of lower-molecular-weight polymers increased. The chain-length distribution was not significantly changed. Pastes of all starch samples exhibited pseudoplastic, shear-thinning behavior. HSJ treatment increased the flow behavior index and decreased the consistency coefficient and viscosity. The data suggested that degradation of amylopectin was mainly involved and that breakdown preferentially occurred in chains between clusters.

  12. A new link between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    The retrograde actin flow, continuous centripetal movement of the cell peripheral actin networks, is widely observed in adherent cells. The retrograde flow is believed to facilitate cell migration when linked to cell adhesion molecules. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the functional relationship between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions (FAs). We also introduce our recent study in which single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy dissected the complex interactions between FAs and the local actin flow. FAs do not simply impede the actin flow, but actively attract and remodel the local actin network. Our findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms for protrusion and traction force generation at the cell leading edge. Furthermore, we discuss possible roles of the actin flow-FA interaction based on the accumulated knowledge and our SiMS study. PMID:25190817

  13. [Shock wave lithotripsy, retrograde intrarenal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole renal stones?].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alejandro; Gallegos, Héctor; Salvadó, José A

    2015-09-09

    Among the therapeutic alternatives available for the treatment of lower pole renal calculi are extracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and retrograde intrarenal surgery. There is controversy about which of these techniques is more effective, especially for stones smaller than 20 mm. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded percutaneous nephrolithotomy probably increases success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In comparison to retrograde intrarenal surgery, it may increase success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment. Retrograde intrarenal surgery may increase success rate, and probably decreases need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

  14. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  15. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with (/sup 3/H)choline

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-07-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following (/sup 3/H)choline application in their zone of termination. (/sup 3/H)Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After (/sup 3/H)choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic.

  16. VHF coherent scatter radar observations of mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Lee, J.; Hwang, J.; Kil, H.; Park, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularity (FAI) activity during 2010-2011 by using the VHF coherent scatter radar data in Daejeon (36.2°N, 127.1°E; dip latitude 26.7°N), South Korea. The VHF radar has been operated since December 2009 and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the variability of the FAI activity with local time, season, solar flux, and magnetic activity. Our preliminary results during the solar minimum show that FAIs preferentially occur at post-sunset and pre-sunrise and during the June solstice. The seasonal variation of the FAI occurrence frequency is similar to that of the electron density irregularities observed by the C/NOFS satellite. For one event, we observed the association of the FAIs with a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). Our study extends to the investigation of the correlations between the irregularities in the equatorial region and middle latitudes and between the conjugate F regions, and the causal linkage of the FAIs with the E-region perturbations. For this purpose, we analyze the VHF radar and C/NOFS data during 2010-2011.

  17. Coping with Irregular Operations: Implications for a Free Flight Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orasanu, Judith; Davison, Jeannie; Rodvold, Michelle; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Irregular operations involve disruption of scheduled airline operations. They ate of concern to the carriers because they cost money, require personnel effort, and may harm customer good will. Irregular operations may result from aircraft system malfunctions that take planes out of service or result in cancellations, Might system problems or passenger medical emergencies that require diversions, local airport problems that may close down a runway, or weather systems that restrict flow into airports or regions. At the heart of responding to irregular operations is distributed decision making by members of airline operations centers, pilots, and the air traffic control system. Six U.S. carriers participated in a study in which we observed strategies used by operations center personnel to handle various classes of irregular operations. We focused on situations that are most disruptive to regular operations and are most difficult to cope with. We also sought to identify classes of events that would be most affected by changes in the air traffic management system. How a carrier deals with disruptions to its schedule reflects its philosophy and primary goals, as well as its resources. Size and type of operations (short or long-haul) determine which problems have priority. Each airline has different technological support tools to aid in flight planning and replanning, and some carriers have established contingency procedures for coping with various situations. We also examined differences in extent and type of interaction between ABC personnel and various elements of the air traffic system as they managed various problems: who interacts with AM what situations prompt interaction, how often these occur, and the outcomes and Perceived benefits. Use of the expanded NRP program was also studied, along with its advantages to the individual companies. We also examined the implications of the proposed change to a free flight environment on airline strategies for coping with

  18. Origin and Evolution of the Uranian and Neptunian Satellites: Some Dynamical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The satellite system of Neptune is so irregular that some formation mechanism or subsequent dynamical evolution that sets it apart from the other, more regular, satellite systems is obviously indicated. McKinnon argued that satellite capture is the most likely possibility and has shown that tidal circularization of Triton's presumably highly eccentric initial orbit probably resulted in melting of the satellite's interior. The satellite system of Uranus, although somewhat bland, also has a number of special features that indicate an interesting dynamical history. These include the anomalously high orbital inclination of Miranda and the probable coexistence of small satellites and narrow rings inside the plant's Roche limit. The possibility that orbital evolution due to tidal dissipation is involved in both of these phenomena is discussed. Other topics discussed are: the origin of rings; the formation of coorbital satellites; the lack of stable orbit-orbit resonances in the Uranian satellite system; and chaos, tidal heating and the shapes of Miranda and Ariel.

  19. Interactions among endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, and retrograde movements of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and bead movements on the cell surface were investigated in the thin peripheral region of A6 cells, a frog kidney cell line. ER tubules were often aligned with microtubules, as shown by double-labeling with DiOC6(3) and anti-tubulin in fixed cells. In living cells stained with DiOC6(3) and observed in time lapse, there were frequent extensions, but few retractions, of ER tubules. In addition, there was a steady retrograde (towards the cell center) movement of all of the ER at approximately 0.3 microns/min. Since microtubules are often aligned with the ER, microtubules must also be moving retrogradely. By simultaneous imaging, it was found that the ER moves retrogradely at the same rate as aminated latex beads on the cell surface. This indicates that the mechanisms for ER and bead movement are closely related. Cytochalasin B stopped bead and ER movement in most of the cells, providing evidence that actin is involved in both retrograde movements. The ER retracted towards the cell center in nocodazole while both ER and microtubules retracted in taxol. Time lapse observations showed that for both drugs, the retraction of the ER is the result of retrograde movement in the absence of new ER extensions. Presumably, ER extensions do not occur in nocodazole because of the absence of microtubules, and do not occur in taxol because taxol-stabilized microtubules move retrogradely and there is no polymerization of new microtubule tracks for ER elongation. PMID:7859292

  20. Outer planet satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon.

  1. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  2. Combined Retrograde/Antegrade Approach to Transcatheter Closure of an Aortic Paravalvular Leak

    PubMed Central

    Damluji, Abdulla A.; Kaynak, Husnu E.

    2015-01-01

    New interventional techniques have made transcatheter closure of aortic paravalvular leaks a viable therapeutic option to treat the sequelae of these defects, including congestive heart failure and hemolysis. We report the transcatheter closure of an aortic paravalvular leak via a combined retrograde/antegrade approach. This was necessary because of difficulty in crossing the defect with a sheath from the retrograde approach. This technique might be useful in application to other difficult structural heart interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a treated paravalvular leak around a Mitroflow® Aortic Pericardial Heart Valve. PMID:26504437

  3. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  4. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related adverse events: post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and not uncommonly is the reason behind ERCP-related lawsuits. Patients at high risk for PEP include young women with abdominal pain, normal liver tests, and unremarkable imaging. Procedure-related factors include traumatic and persistent cannulation attempts, multiple injections of the pancreatic duct, pancreatic sphincterotomy, and, possibly, use of precut sphincterotomy. Aggressive hydration, use of rectal indomethacin, and prophylactic pancreatic stenting can diminish the risk (and likely severity) of PEP. Though hugely beneficial, these measures do not supersede careful patient selection and technique.

  5. Satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Since altimetry data are not really old enough to use the term data archaeology, Mr. Cheney referred to the stewardship of these data. He noted that it is very important to document the basis for an altimetry data set as the algorithms and corrections used to arrive at the Geophysical Data Record (GDR) have been improving and are continuing to improve the precision of sea level data derived from altimetry. He noted that the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data set has recently been reprocessed by his organization in the National Ocean Service of NOAA and made available to the scientific community on CD/ROM disks by the National Oceanographic Data Center of the U.S. (NODC). The new data set contains a satellite orbit more precise by an order of magnitude together with an improved water vapor correction. A new, comprehensive GDR Handbook has also been prepared.

  6. Early morning irregularities detected with spaceborne GPS measurements in the topside ionosphere: A multisatellite case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, Irina; Astafyeva, Elvira; Cherniak, Iurii

    2015-10-01

    We present observations of the equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB) in the topside ionosphere at early morning hours (05-08 LT) in the recovery phase of the 18-19 February 2014 geomagnetic storm. This rare type of irregularities was detected in the Pacific sector using GPS measurements on board several low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. We use a multisatellite constellation consisted of the three Swarm and one TerraSAR-X satellites, that on 19 February flew in the same region and at similar altitudes ~500 km. The EPB occurrence in the LEO GPS data was observed for several consecutive orbits from ~11 UT to 16-17 UT on 19 February 2014, which suggests the following: (1) rather long duration (hours) of favorable conditions for EPB generation, (2) formation and evolution of EPB over wide longitude range of the Pacific Ocean, and (3) possible movement of the EPB region in the westward direction (with dawn). Registration of the early morning EPB in LEO GPS data was supported by concurrent in situ (Swarm and DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program)) and ground-based (ionosonde and GPS) measurements. LEO-based GPS technique is found to be essential and promising data source to study the topside EPB over regions with lack of the ground-based facilities. In addition, we use the Prompt Penetration Model and the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) to identify the possible mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomenon. The model simulation results indicate the occurrence of the zone with the enhanced vertical plasma drift (~40-45 m/s) owing to the disturbance dynamo action in the predawn/dawn sector during 09-17 UT.

  7. Ionospheric limitations to time transfer by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ionosphere can contribute appreciable group delay and phase change to radio signals traversing it; this can constitute a fundamental limitation to the accuracy of time and frequency measurements using satellites. Because of the dispersive nature of the ionosphere, the amount of delay is strongly frequency-dependent. Ionospheric compensation is necessary for the most precise time transfer and frequency measurements, with a group delay accuracy better than 10 nanoseconds. A priori modeling is not accurate to better than 25%. The dual-frequency compensation method holds promise, but has not been rigorously experimentally tested. Irregularities in the ionosphere must be included in the compensation process.

  8. The HiLat satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.; Carlson, H. C.; Huffman, R. E.; Hardy, D. A.; Potemra, T. A.; Bythrow, P. F.; Meng, C.-I.; Rino, C. L.; Vickrey, J. F.; Livingston, R. L.

    1985-06-01

    The equipment, experiments and early results with the HILAT P83-1 satellite for studying high latitude ionospheric structures with scales from ten of meters to thousands of kilometers are outlined. HILAT carries a beacon, plasma monitor, electron spectrometer, magnetometer and photometers for recording scintillations, the total electron count, suprathermal electrons, electron flux and energies, the magnetic field characteristics and auroral spectra at 3914 and 6300 A. Data are gathered only on irregularities which are fully developed, and not during formative stages. Sample data are provided from traverses of an auroral arc.

  9. Monitoring and Modeling of Ionosphere Irregularities Caused By Space Weather Activity on the Base of GNSS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, I.; Zakharenkova, I.; Krankowski, A.; Shagimuratov, I.

    2014-12-01

    The ionosphere plays an important role in GNSS applications because it influences on the radio wave propagation through out. The ionosphere delay is the biggest error source for satellite navigation systems, but it can be directly measured and mitigated with using dual frequency GNSS receivers. However GNSS signal fading due to electron density gradients and irregularities in the ionosphere can decrease the operational availability of navigation system. The intensity of such irregularities on high and mid latitudes essentially rises during space weather events. For monitoring of the ionospheric irregularities data collected from all available permanent GNSS stations in the Northern Hemisphere are processed and analyzed. Here we used parameters ROT (rate of GPS TEC change) and ROTI (index of ROT) to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations. ROTI maps are constructed with the grid of 2 deg x 2 deg resolution as a function of the magnetic local time and corrected magnetic latitude. The ROTI maps allow to estimate the overall fluctuation activity and auroral oval evolutions, in general the ROTI values are corresponded to the probability of GPS signals phase fluctuations. There were developed several models in order to represent ionospheric fluctuations and scintillation activity under different geophysical conditions, but they were calibrated with data sets, that did not include GNSS derived data. It is very actual to develop empirical model based on GNSS derived measurements which can represent strong fluctuations of the ionosphere plasma density at high latitudes. The measurements provided by the existing permanent GNSS networks accumulated in order to develop the empirical model of ionospheric irregularities over the Northern hemisphere. As initial data the daily dependences of the ROTI index are used as a function of geomagnetic Local Time on the specific grid. With ROTI index maps it was determined the irregularities oval border and averaging parameter - semi

  10. Obesity with irregular menstrual cycle in young girls.

    PubMed

    Mustaqeem, M; Sadullah, S; Waqar, W; Farooq, M Z; Khan, A; Fraz, T R

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Obese women are at increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipidemia, rectal carcinoma and gynecological problems including sub fertility, menstrual dysfunction and polycystic ovarian disease. The aim of this study was to assess relationship of obesity with menstrual irregularity in young girls that can help to create awareness among young girls about obesity and how it can affect fertility. It was a case controlled cross sectional study comprising of 220 participants from different colleges and universities of Karachi and from outpatients department of private clinic and Civil Hospital Karachi. A questionnaire was designed to assess the relationship of obesity with irregular menstrual cycle. Questionnaires were filled by co-authors after taking verbal consent. Data was collected from March 2013 to December 2013 and entered and analyzed on SPSS 16.0. Out of 220 participants obese and overweight were 67(30.4%) and 49(22.2%) respectively. Significant association was found between body composition and menstrual cycle irregularity as menstrual irregularity was present in only 9.5% when the BMI was normal and 14.09% and 24% girls in the overweight and obese categories respectively. Waist to hip ratio was found increased in 61.36% of girls. Sixty four point forty four percent (64.44%) of the girls with increased waist to hip ratio reported menstrual irregularity which makes 39.55% of the total sample population. Dysmenorrhea was reported by 63.6% of participants and family history was positive in 77.3%. Hirsutism was reported in 36.7% and 49.2%, acne in 34.6% and 43.2%, weight gain tendency in 85.7% and 98.5%, types 2 diabetes in 0% and 4.4% and hypertension in 8.16% and 31.3% of overweight and obese participants respectively. This study shows considerable association between overall and central obesity with menstrual cycle irregularity. This study provides the

  11. Satellites in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    1988-01-01

    Describes the methods and materials used to obtain satellite pictures from weather satellites. Discusses possible physics lessons which can be done using this equipment including orbital mechanics, and how the satellite works. (CW)

  12. Observational study of ionospheric irregularities and GPS scintillations associated with the 2012 tropical cyclone Tembin passing Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Liu, Zhizhao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the ionospheric responses observed in Hong Kong to a Typhoon, namely, Tembin, from the aspects of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities and scintillations, using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from a ground-based GPS scintillation monitoring station in Hong Kong and from GPS receivers on board the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites. The ionospheric irregularities and scintillations are characterized by the rate of total electron content variation index (ROTI) and the amplitude scintillation index S4, respectively. The typhoon Tembin formed over the western North Pacific during 18-30 August 2012 and approached Hong Kong during 24-27 August 2012 with the closest distance 290 km from Hong Kong at around 17 universal time (UT) on 25 August 2012. The ground-based observations indicate that in the nighttime period of 20:00-02:00 local time (LT = UT + 8 h) on 26 August when Tembin passed closely to Hong Kong, the ionospheric irregularities and scintillations of GPS signals were observed in the south of Hong Kong, over the area of 13°N ~ 23°N in latitude and 110°E ~ 120°E in longitude. From the COSMIC observations, it shows that the number of radio occultation scintillation events peaks on 26 August 2012 during the passage of Tembin. Without the presence of strong geomagnetic or solar activity, it is suspected that gravity waves might be generated in the lower atmosphere and likely seed the formation of ionospheric plasma irregularities. This work for the first time from Hong Kong observes the sign of coupling between the lower atmosphere and ionosphere in a tropical cyclone event, combining both ground- and space-based GPS observation data.

  13. Inverse Modeling Using a Novel Scintillation Model Sigma to Characterize High Latitude Irregularities During a Storm and a Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.; Kim, H.; Weimer, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high fidelity ``Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere" (SIGMA) which is a full 3D EM wave propagation model to simulate GPS scintillations globally. We demonstrate in this work that the results from this model can form a basic framework on the use of inverse method to understand the physics of high latitude irregularities using GPS scintillations. We are using SIGMA and an inverse method to understand the physics of the irregularities observed with GPS receivers from six different inter-hemispheric high latitude stations during a geomagnetic storm on 9 March 2012, and from Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) Antarctic stations during a substorm on 9 January 2014. We utilize ancillary observations from SuperDARN, ISRs, riometers etc. to obtain some of the input parameters of SIGMA. Further, we implement a uniform-grid SIGMA simulation or a non-linear optimization of the model to obtain the rest of the unknowns that give us the best fit with data. The input parameters of SIGMA thus derived represent the physical and propagation parameters related to the physics of the irregularity that produced those GNSS scintillations. Some of our findings from this investigation include that the spectral indices and outer scales for ionospheric heights of 350~km are higher than those at 120~km. The best fits we obtained from our inverse method mostly agree with the observations except for some cases, which might be because the spectral model we use is insufficient to describe irregularity physics. We need more auxiliary data in order to facilitate the possibility of accomplishing a unique solution to the inverse problem.

  14. Rotation histories of the natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory of rotation are combined with traditional approaches to study the rotational evolution of the 33 known natural satellites. A calculation similar to that reported by Burns and Safronov (1973) is applied to each satellite to obtain the characteristic time of decay of any wobble motion to smooth rotation about the principal axis of maximum moment of inertia. Stability criteria and capture probabilities are calculated for the 3/2 spin resonance. Results show that only the regular satellites and Iapetus, Hyperion, Triton, and the moon are tidally evolved. Of these, 13 have confirmed synchronous rotation periods; capture probabilities into the 3/2 resonance indicate that none of the remaining 10 should be captured in nonsynchronous, commensurate spin states. For the most part, the irregular satellites retain their original spins except for a relaxation to principal axis rotation. Tidal evolution of the obliquities of the satellites is evaluated in the framework of the generalization of Cassini's laws for the moon. Nearly resonant, forced librations in longitude of 4.8 and 0.5 deg are calculated on the basis of the observed shapes of Phobos and Deimos, respectively.

  15. Comparison of nerve terminal events in vivo effecting retrograde transport of vesicles containing neurotrophins or synaptic vesicle components.

    PubMed

    Weible, M W; Ozsarac, N; Grimes, M L; Hendry, I A

    2004-03-15

    Although vesicular retrograde transport of neurotrophins in vivo is well established, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that underlie vesicle endocytosis and formation before transport. We demonstrate that in vivo not all retrograde transport vesicles are alike, nor are they all formed using identical mechanisms. As characterized by density, there are at least two populations of vesicles present in the synaptic terminal that are retrogradely transported along the axon: those containing neurotrophins (NTs) and those resulting from synaptic vesicle recycling. Vesicles containing nerve growth factor (NGF), NT-3, or NT-4 had similar densities with peak values at about 1.05 g/ml. Synaptic-derived vesicles, labeled with anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), had densities with peak values at about 1.16 g/ml. We assayed the effects of pharmacologic agents in vivo on retrograde transport from the anterior eye chamber to the superior cervical ganglion. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH (PI-3) kinase and actin function blocked transport of both anti-DBH and NGF, demonstrating an essential role for these molecules in retrograde transport of both vesicle types. Dynamin, a key element in synaptic vesicle recycling, was axonally transported in retrograde and anterograde directions, and compounds able to interfere with dynamin function had a differential effect on retrograde transport of NTs and anti-DBH. Okadaic acid significantly decreased retrograde axonal transport of anti-DBH and increased NGF retrograde transport. We conclude that there are both different and common proteins involved in endocytosis and targeting of retrograde transport of these two populations of vesicles. PMID:14994338

  16. A technique for inferring zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of intensity (S4) and phase (σφ) scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Rino, Charles L.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2016-08-01

    The zonal drift of ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of a scintillating satellite signal made with a pair of closely spaced antennas. The Air Force Research Laboratory-Scintillation Network Decision Aid (AFRL-SCINDA) network operates a small number of very high frequency (VHF) spaced-receiver systems at low latitudes for this purpose. A far greater number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) scintillation monitors are operated by the AFRL-SCINDA network (25-30) and the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are too widely separated from each other for cross-correlation techniques to be effective. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of S4, σφ, and the propagation geometry. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this approach requires assumptions regarding the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment suggest that the ratio of σφ to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift. We validate the technique using VHF spaced-receiver measurements of zonal irregularity drift obtained from the AFRL-SCINDA network. While the spaced-receiver technique remains the preferred way to monitor the drift when closely spaced antenna pairs are available, our technique provides a new opportunity to monitor zonal irregularity drift using regional or global networks of widely separated GNSS scintillation monitors.

  17. Four years of IUE research on clumpy irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benvenuti, P.; Casini, C.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-01

    During the first four years of IUE operations seven shifts were used to observe 4 clumpy irregular galaxies: Markarian 7, 8, 297, and 325. All spectra were obtained at low resolution in both short and long wavelength, with exposure time ranging from half to a full shift. The IUE spectra of clumpy irregular galaxies show that the clumps contain a very large number of early O and B type stars, with a large number of supergiants with respect to the main sequence stars. Possibly Wolf-Rayet stars and massive objects of the type of R 136a could also contribute to the clump luminosity. On the average, each clump radiates in the UV 100 times more than 30 Dor. On the other end the liner dimension of a clump is not much larger than the one of 30 Dor.

  18. Evaluating Operational Irregularities at Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Albright, W.H.; Ray, D.P.; Smegal, J.S.; Robertson, Jr.O.C.; Gupta, D.C.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the findings of an independent technical review that investigated operational irregularities at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford. The ERDF is a large-scale disposal facility authorized by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. The irregularities included (i) failure to recognize that pumps for the leachate collection system were not functioning for an extended period and (ii) falsification of compaction data by a technician responsible for monitoring waste placement in the ERDF. Other issues related to compaction of the waste were also considered during the independent technical review. A number of important lessons were learned as part of this review. These lessons are summarized in the paper. They are relevant to the ERDF as well as other landfill operations at Department of Energy facilities. (authors)

  19. Causes of irregular energy density in f (R ,T ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bamba, Kazuharu; Bhatti, M. Zaeem-ul-Haq

    2016-06-01

    We investigate irregularity factors for a self-gravitating spherical star evolving in the presence of an imperfect fluid. We explore the gravitational field equations and the dynamical equations with the systematic construction in f (R ,T ) gravity, where T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Furthermore, we analyze two well-known differential equations (which occupy principal importance in the exploration of causes of energy density inhomogeneities) with the help of the Weyl tensor and the conservation laws. The irregularity factors for a spherical star are examined for particular cases of dust and isotropic and anisotropic fluids in dissipative and nondissipative regimes in the framework of f (R ,T ) gravity. It is found that, as the complexity of the matter with the anisotropic stresses increases, the inhomogeneity factor corresponds more closely to one of the structure scalars.

  20. Structure irregularity impedes drop roll-off at superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Søgaard, Emil; Taboryski, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    We study water drop roll-off at superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface patterns. Superhydrophobic microcavity surfaces were fabricated in silicon and coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). For the more irregular surface patterns, the observed increase in roll-off angles is found to be caused by a decrease of the receding contact angle, which in turn is caused by an increase of the triple phase contact line of the drops for those more irregular surfaces. To understand the observation, we propose to treat the microdrops as rigid bodies and apply a torque balance between the torque exerted by the projected gravity force and the torque exerted by the adhesion force acting along the triple line on the receding side of the drop. This simple model provides a proper order of magnitude estimate of the measured effects.

  1. Rocket measurements of electron density irregularities during MAC/SINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulwick, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Four Super Arcas rockets were launched at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as part of the MAC/SINE campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution in the cold summer polar mesosphere. They were launched as part of two salvos: the turbulent/gravity wave salvo (3 rockets) and the EISCAT/SOUSY radar salvo (one rocket). In both salvos meteorological rockets, measuring temperature and winds, were also launched and the SOUSY radar, located near the launch site, measured mesospheric turbulence. Electron density irregularities and strong gradients were measured by the rocket probes in the region of most intense backscatter observed by the radar. The electron density profiles (8 to 4 on ascent and 4 on descent) show very different characteristics in the peak scattering region and show marked spatial and temporal variability. These data are intercompared and discussed.

  2. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  3. Bispectral analysis of equatorial spread F density irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labelle, J.; Lund, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    Bispectral analysis has been applied to density irregularities at frequencies 5-30 Hz observed with a sounding rocket launched from Peru in March 1983. Unlike the power spectrum, the bispectrum contains statistical information about the phase relations between the Fourier components which make up the waveform. In the case of spread F data from 475 km the 5-30 Hz portion of the spectrum displays overall enhanced bicoherence relative to that of the background instrumental noise and to that expected due to statistical considerations, implying that the observed f exp -2.5 power law spectrum has a significant non-Gaussian component. This is consistent with previous qualitative analyses. The bicoherence has also been calculated for simulated equatorial spread F density irregularities in approximately the same wavelength regime, and the resulting bispectrum has some features in common with that of the rocket data. The implications of this analysis for equatorial spread F are discussed, and some future investigations are suggested.

  4. Retrograde approach for percutaneous closure in a patient with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    İlkay, Erdoğan; Çelebi, Özlem Özcan; Kaçmaz, Fehmi; Pampal, Kutluk

    2014-12-01

    In this report, we present a 37-year-old male with ruptured right sinus of Valsalva. He was treated by percutaneous closure of the rupture using the retrograde approach. The procedure was performed successfully within 26 minutes. We think this approach may be used in future instead of the antegrade approach. PMID:25620339

  5. Tracking Retrograde Flow in Keratocytes: News from the FrontV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vallotton, Pascal; Danuser, Gaudenz; Bohnet, Sophie; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2005-01-01

    Actin assembly at the leading edge of the cell is believed to drive protrusion, whereas membrane resistance and contractile forces result in retrograde flow of the assembled actin network away from the edge. Thus, cell motion and shape changes are expected to depend on the balance of actin assembly and retrograde flow. This idea, however, has been undermined by the reported absence of flow in one of the most spectacular models of cell locomotion, fish epidermal keratocytes. Here, we use enhanced phase contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle tracking to analyze the motion of the actin network in keratocyte lamellipodia. We have detected retrograde flow throughout the lamellipodium at velocities of 1–3 μm/min and analyzed its organization and relation to the cell motion during both unobstructed, persistent migration and events of cell collision. Freely moving cells exhibited a graded flow velocity increasing toward the sides of the lamellipodium. In colliding cells, the velocity decreased markedly at the site of collision, with striking alteration of flow in other lamellipodium regions. Our findings support the universality of the flow phenomenon and indicate that the maintenance of keratocyte shape during locomotion depends on the regulation of both retrograde flow and actin polymerization. PMID:15635099

  6. Self-repair in a bidirectionally coupled astrocyte-neuron (AN) system based on retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wade, John; McDaid, Liam; Harkin, Jim; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Kelso, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that retrograde signaling via astrocytes may underpin self-repair in the brain. Faults manifest themselves in silent or near silent neurons caused by low transmission probability (PR) synapses; the enhancement of the transmission PR of a healthy neighboring synapse by retrograde signaling can enhance the transmission PR of the “faulty” synapse (repair). Our model of self-repair is based on recent research showing that retrograde signaling via astrocytes can increase the PR of neurotransmitter release at damaged or low transmission PR synapses. The model demonstrates that astrocytes are capable of bidirectional communication with neurons which leads to modulation of synaptic activity, and that indirect signaling through retrograde messengers such as endocannabinoids leads to modulation of synaptic transmission PR. Although our model operates at the level of cells, it provides a new research direction on brain-like self-repair which can be extended to networks of astrocytes and neurons. It also provides a biologically inspired basis for developing highly adaptive, distributed computing systems that can, at fine levels of granularity, fault detect, diagnose and self-repair autonomously, without the traditional constraint of a central fault detect/repair unit. PMID:23055965

  7. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  8. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-10-01

    Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine how water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Coal drying experiments were begun using thermal, microwave, and chemical methods; NMR data were collected. A stirred microautoclave reactor system was acquired.

  9. A comparison of Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities

    PubMed Central

    Roghanizad, Nasrin; Kalhori, Katayoun AM; Khalilak, Zohreh; Esmaeili, Maryam Ali; de Fatima Zanirato Lizarelli, Rosane

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight maxillary anterior teeth were used in this study. After removing the crowns, the canals were prepared with the step-back technique and filled with guttapercha. Three millimeters below the apex; each root was cut with a fissure diamond bur. The root surfaces were then covered with nail polish and three millimeters deep retrograde class I cavities were prepared, using Er, Cr: YSGG laser (group L=12 roots) or ultrasonic retro-tip (group U=12 roots). Four roots were arranged for negative and positive control groups. Retrograde cavities were then filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and teeth were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 72 hours. The amount of dye penetration in sagittal sections of each tooth was measured with a stereomicroscope. An independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cavities prepared with the Er, Cr: YSGG laser (1.61 + 0.81) showed significantly less micro-leakage than those prepared with the ultrasound (2.55+ 1.84) (P value =0.02). Conclusions: Under the conditions of this research, the use of Er, Cr: YSGG laser for retrograde cavity preparation causes significantly less apical leakage and may increase the success rate of endodontic surgeries. PMID:25941423

  10. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells.

  11. A Hands-on Exploration of the Retrograde Motion of Mars as Seen from the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincelli, M. M.; Otranto, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a set of activities based on the use of a celestial simulator to gain insights into the retrograde motion of Mars as seen from the Earth. These activities provide a useful link between the heliocentric concepts taught in schools and those tackled in typical introductory physics courses based on classical mechanics for…

  12. Behavioral and Functional Neuroanatomical Correlates of Anterograde Autobiographical Memory in Isolated Retrograde Amnesic Patient M. L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Brian; Svoboda, Eva; Turner, Gary R.; Mandic, Marina; Mackey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Patient M. L. [Levine, B., Black, S. E., Cabeza, R., Sinden, M., Mcintosh, A. R., Toth, J. P., et al. (1998). "Episodic memory and the self in a case of isolated retrograde amnesia." "Brain", "121", 1951-1973], lost memory for events occurring before his severe traumatic brain injury, yet his anterograde (post-injury) learning and memory appeared…

  13. Persistence and variability of ice-stream grounding lines on retrograde bed slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, Alexander A.; Schoof, Christian; Tziperman, Eli

    2016-08-01

    In many ice streams, basal resistance varies in space and time due to the dynamically evolving properties of subglacial till. These variations can cause internally generated oscillations in ice-stream flow. However, the potential for such variations in basal properties is not considered by conventional theories of grounding-line stability on retrograde bed slopes, which assume that bed properties are static in time. Using a flow-line model, we show how internally generated, transient variations in ice-stream state interact with retrograde bed slopes. In contrast to predictions from the theory of the marine ice-sheet instability, our simulated grounding line is able to persist and reverse direction of migration on a retrograde bed when undergoing oscillations in the grounding-line position. In turn, the presence of a retrograde bed may also suppress or reduce the amplitude of internal oscillations in ice-stream state. We explore the physical mechanisms responsible for these behaviors and discuss the implications for observed grounding-line migration in West Antarctica.

  14. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells. PMID:26641717

  15. On Common Ground: Jost's (1897) Law of Forgetting and Ribot's (1881) Law of Retrograde Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2004-01-01

    T. Ribot's (1881) law of retrograde amnesia states that brain damage impairs recently formed memories to a greater extent than older memories, which is generally taken to imply that memories need time to consolidate. A. Jost's (1897) law of forgetting states that if 2 memories are of the same strength but different ages, the older will decay more…

  16. Rare complication of anterior communicating artery aneurysm coiling: Transient retrograde amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Jayaraman, Anand; Chandramouli, BA

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is an unusual and rare complication following endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysms. We present a case of anterior communicating artery (ACOM) aneurysm in which the patient developed retrograde amnesia following endovascular coiling of the aneurysm. On imaging there was infarct involving bilateral fornices. The patient showed significant clinical improvement on follow up. PMID:26246104

  17. [Tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis by retrograde intramedullary nail--a case report].

    PubMed

    Lipiński, Łukasz; Synder, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    We described a case of 64 year old overweight women, who was treated with revision tibio-talo-calcaneal artrodesis with the use of retrograde intramedullary nail. The procedure was performed after failed primary arthrodesis with the use of lateral approach and fibula osteotomy. Stabilization with intramedullary nail gave good clinical and functional result with a good bone healing. PMID:22235644

  18. Seizures and retrograde amnesia with cerebrospinal fluid changes following H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mitrakrishnan, Shivanthan; Ranjanie, Gamage; Thirunavakarasu, Thivakaran; Manjula, Caldera; Nayananjani, Karunasena

    2011-08-26

    Vaccination against H1N1 influenza of healthcare workers of has been a standard measure to control the epidemic in many countries. Most side effects are minor and transient. Guillain Barre Syndrome and optic neuritis have been major concerns. We report a case of seizures with retrograde amnesia associated with cerebrospinal fluid changes following the H1N1 vaccine.

  19. Differential proteomics reveals multiple components in retrogradely transported axoplasm after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Perlson, Eran; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I; Burlingame, Alma L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2004-05-01

    Information on axonal damage is conveyed to neuronal cell bodies by a number of signaling modalities, including the post-translational modification of axoplasmic proteins. Retrograde transport of a subset of such proteins is thought to induce or enhance a regenerative response in the cell body. Here we report the use of a differential 2D-PAGE approach to identify injury-correlated retrogradely transported proteins in nerves of the mollusk Lymnaea. A comprehensive series of gels at different pI ranges allowed resolution of approximately 4000 spots by silver staining, and 172 of these were found to differ between lesioned versus control nerves. Mass spectrometric sequencing of 134 differential spots allowed their assignment to over 40 different proteins, some belonging to a vesicular ensemble blocked by the lesion and others comprising an up-regulated ensemble highly enriched in calpain cleavage products of an intermediate filament termed RGP51 (retrograde protein of 51 kDa). Inhibition of RGP51 expression by RNA interference inhibits regenerative outgrowth of adult Lymnaea neurons in culture. These results implicate regulated proteolysis in the formation of retrograde injury signaling complexes after nerve lesion and suggest that this signaling modality utilizes a wide range of protein components.

  20. Hydrogen transfer in the formation and destruction of retrograde products in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, D.F.; Malhotra, R.

    2006-06-01

    The conversion of coals to volatiles or liquids during pyrolysis and liquefaction is notoriously limited by the formation of retrograde products. Analysis of literature data for coals with grafted structures and for polymeric coal models demonstrates that the formation of volatile products from these materials does not correlate primarily with the weakness of the original bonding but correlates with the facility for retrogressive reaction. This analysis suggests further that simple recombination of resonance-stabilized radicals does not tend to yield true retrograde products, except in the case of aryloxy radicals. For pure hydrocarbon structural elements, radical addition to aromatic systems appears to be a key class of retrograde reactions, where the key factor is the kinetics of radical or H-atom loss from a cyclohexadienyl intermediate. We have used a mechanistic numerical model with a detailed set of radical reactions and thermochemically based kinetic parameters operating on a limited set of hydrocarbon structures to delineate important factors in mitigating retrograde processes. This showed that, not only the cleavage of critical bonds in the original coal structures but also the net prevention of retrogression may be due to the H-transfer-induced cleavage of strong bonds.

  1. Malingering and retrograde amnesia: the historic case of the Collegno amnesic.

    PubMed

    Zago, Stefano; Sartori, Giuseppe; Scarlato, Guglielmo

    2004-06-01

    Assessment of feigned cognitive disorders is an important field of neuropsychology because of its applications to forensic settings. Strategies for detecting malingering in amnesia are available for anterograde amnesia. Less attention has been given to malingering in retrograde amnesia. The case of the 'Smemorato di Collegno' (The Collegno Amnesic) is probably the most famous case of malingered retrograde amnesia ever known in Italy. In 1926, a man who appeared to have lost all his autobiographical memories and identity spent nearly a year in the Collegno asylum of Turin without a name. He was later initially identified as Giulio Canella, Director of the 'Scuola Normale di Verona' who had disappeared during the war in 1916. He was suspected of later identified as being Mario Bruneri, a petty crook from Turin who played the part of an amnesic whose retrograde memory gradually returned. A lengthy investigation was required before this conclusion was reached. Several clinicians and renowned academics evaluated the case, but only Alfredo Coppola, diagnosed "malingered retrograde amnesia" using a method that was extremely innovative for the times. The aim of the present paper is to review the original cognitive evaluation and the strategies used for malingering detection in the "Collegno case". The outcome of the case is then discussed in the light of present-day forensic neuropsychology and the level of advancement of mental examination achieved in the 1920s in Europe is highlighted. PMID:15259331

  2. Reconsidering the nature and mode of action of metabolite retrograde signals from the chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Estavillo, Gonzalo M.; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant organelles produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression in order to coordinate their biogenesis, maintain homeostasis, or optimize their performance under adverse conditions. Many signals of different chemical nature have been described in the past decades, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and adenosine derivatives. While the effects of retrograde signaling on gene expression are well understood, the initiation and transport of the signals and their mode of action have either not been resolved, or are a matter of speculation. Moreover, retrograde signaling should be considered as part of a broader cellular network, instead of as separate pathways, required to adjust to changing physiologically relevant conditions. Here we summarize current plastid retrograde signaling models in plants, with a focus on new signaling pathways, SAL1-PAP, methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), and β-cyclocitral (β-CC), and outline missing links or future areas of research that we believe need to be addressed to have a better understanding of plant intracellular signaling networks. PMID:23316207

  3. Reexposure to the Amnestic Agent Alleviates Cycloheximide-Induced Retrograde Amnesia for Reactivated and Extinction Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, James F.; Olson, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both…

  4. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  5. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  6. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  7. Supercontinuum Generation in a Microstructured Fiber with an Irregular Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkovich, V. P.; Sotsky, A. B.; Vaca Pereira G., M.; Dzen, I. S.; Sotskaya, L. I.

    2016-05-01

    A broad-band supercontinuum generation was obtained at excitation of a microstructured optical fiber with an irregular cladding by femtosecond laser pulses. To explain the experimental data, calculations of the mode characteristics of microstructured fibers were performed. It was shown that the creation of air channels with different radii in the fiber cladding makes it possible to involve both the fundamental and high fiber modes in the supercontinuum generation that helps to increase the width of the generation spectrum.

  8. Irregular and adaptive sampling for automatic geophysic measure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagnina, Davide; Lo Presti, Letizia; Mulassano, Paolo

    2000-07-01

    In this paper a sampling method, based on an irregular and adaptive strategy, is described. It can be used as automatic guide for rovers designed to explore terrestrial and planetary environments. Starting from the hypothesis that a explorative vehicle is equipped with a payload able to acquire measurements of interesting quantities, the method is able to detect objects of interest from measured points and to realize an adaptive sampling, while badly describing the not interesting background.

  9. 16. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING IRREGULAR SOUTH CORNER WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING IRREGULAR SOUTH CORNER WITH RECESSED CHINA CABINET. DOORWAY AT PHOTO RIGHT LEADS TO KITCHEN. NOTE VERTICAL DIVIDER BETWEEN GLAZING IN INDIVIDUAL SASHES OF 2-LIGHT OVER 2-LIGHT WINDOW AT PHOTO LEFT. 2-LIGHT OVER 2-LIGHT WINDOWS IN LIVING ROOM ARE DIVIDED HORIZONTALLY. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  10. Understanding the Irregular Data from the Large Block Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sumit Mukhopadhyay

    2001-05-31

    The Large Block Test (LBT) is one of three thermal tests at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. While two of those three tests (the Single Heater Test and the Drift Scale Test) were large underground tests, the LBT was above ground. The test block, with a size of 3 x 3 x 4.5 m, has a highly heterogeneous permeability field, with at least four orders of magnitude variation in permeability. Some of the temperature data from the LBT appear irregular at first glance, but on closer examination can be attributed to this heterogeneous nature of the fractured block. In this project, we attempt to develop a better understanding of these irregular temperature data from the LBT. The test block in the LBT was excavated from the surrounding Topopah Spring fractured nonlithophysal tuff in the Fran Ridge area of Yucca Mountain. The bottom of the block remained attached to the underlying rock, while the top and the four side faces were kept open to the atmosphere. Mapping of all the fractures from the four sides and the top surface of the block revealed the existence of some large fractures in the block. The presence of such large fractures indicates that the flow of water and heat-induced vapor can be very different in different zones of the block, with vapor and water flowing more easily through the highly permeable fractures than elsewhere. It is our hypothesis that the irregular temperature data arise out of thermal-hydrological processes taking place in the heterogeneous fracture system. We show, through simulations performed with a 3D dual-permeability numerical model based on the TOUGH2 simulator, that such a heterogeneous fracture system can indeed give rise to irregular temperature data.

  11. Characteristic velocity of equatorial F region irregularities determined from spaced receiver scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Franke, S.J.; Yeh, K.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Spaced receiver scintillation data for a 250-MHz signal transmitted from a geosynchronous satellite and received at an equatorial station are subjected to correlation analysis to determine the averge drift of equatorial {ital F} region irregularities transverse to the signal path, as well as the characteristic velocity which is a measure of the temporal variability of the irregularities. These parameters are computed for periods wtih significant amplitude scintillations during different seasons and magnetic activity levels. Three features of the characteristic velocity V{sub c} have been observed in this study. Firstly, a steep decline in V{sub c} following the onset of scintillation during the pre-midnight period is reconfirmed as has been observed previously. Secondly, the characteristic velocity shows a gradual increase in the post-midnight period which, when combined with the pre-midnight decline, gives a minimum around 0100 LT. Thirdly, the pattern followed by the characteristic velocity in the course of a magnetically disturbed night is on some occasions substantially different from that of a quiet period. Theoretical calculations of the space-time correlation function of moderate to strong intensity scintillations show that the steep decline of V{sub c}, which is almost the same as the standard deviation of the velocity fluctuations, calls for a geophysical explanation while the minimum around 0100 LT may be attributed to the phenomenon of scintillation itself. The possibility that the velocity fluctuations are caused by electric field fluctuations associated with the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability is explored in this paper. This conjecture provides a plausible explanation for the steep decline of the characteristic velocity observed in the pre-midnight hours. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  12. Characteristic velocity of equatorial F region irregularities determined from spaced receiver scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Franke, S.J.; Yeh, K.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Spaced receiver scintillation data for a 250-MHz signal transmitted from a geosynchronous satellite and received at an equatorial station are subjected to correlation analysis to determine the average drift of equatorial F region irregularities transverse to the signal path, as well as the characteristic velocity which is a measure of the temporal variability of the irregularities. These parameters are computed for periods with significant amplitude scintillations during different seasons and magnetic activity levels. Three features of the characteristic velocity V{sub c} have been observed in this study. Firstly, a steep decline in V{sub c} following the onset of scintillation during the pre-midnight period is reconfirmed as has been observed previously. Secondly, the characteristic velocity shows a gradual increase in the post-midnight period which, when combined with the pre-midnight decline, gives a minimum around 0100 LT. Thirdly, the pattern followed by the characteristic velocity in the course of a magnetically disturbed night is on some occasions substantially different from that of a quiet period. Theoretical calculations of the space-time correlation function of moderate to strong intensity scintillations show that the steep decline of V{sub c}, which is almost the same as the standard deviation of the velocity fluctuations, calls for a geophysical explanation while the minimum around 0100 LT may be attributed to the phenomenon of scintillation itself. The possibility that the velocity fluctuations are caused by electric field fluctuations associated with the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability is explored in this paper.

  13. Kinematics of the Ionized Gas in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Rosado, Margarita

    2007-05-01

    Introduction: Some preliminary results focused on the kinematics and dynamics of the ionized gas in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy IC10 are presented. Method: Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometry was performed in the Hα, [SII], [NII] and [OIII] lines. The dedicated ADHOC package was used in the reduction process. Results: On galactic scales the radial velocity field in this galaxy is relatively well behaved, however, the rotation curve has been difficult to obtain. On local scales the kinematics reflects the superposition of shells, filaments, SNRs and diffuse gas. At many of these locations the velocity widths are supersonic and many times larger than those found in the adjacent HII regions. Discussion: This is the first time that the kinematics of the ionized gas in the dwarf irregular IC10 is studied in great detail, literally pixel to pixel with moderate spectral and spatial resolutions. From these preliminary results a very complex behavior of the ionized gas is unveiled, as has been the case for the dwarf irregulars IC1613 and NGC4449, previously studied by our group of collaborators. Further analysis is being carried out.

  14. Dynamics of equatorial irregularity patch formation, motion, and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.; Mullen, J.P.; Whitney, H.E.; MacKenzie, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Using scintillation observations from a series of equatorial propagation paths as well as backscatter and airglow data, the development, motion, and decay of equatorial irregularity patches have been studied. Assembling the results of earlier studies in the field with our observations, we find the following: the patch has limited east-west dimensions with a minimum of 100 km. Several patches may be melded together to reach an extent of 1500 km. Its magnetic north-south dimensions are often greater than 2000 km; the most intense irregularities (as evidenced by the Jicamarca radar at the dip equator) are from 225 to 450 km in altitude, although irregularities are found as high as 1000 km. The patch initially has a westward expansion following the solar terminator, then, maintaining its integrity, moves eastward. Evidence over a limited series of experiments suggests that premidnight patches are formed within 1 1/2 hours after ionospheric sunset in the absence of special magnetic conditions. From Ascension Island (approx.16 /sup 0/S dip latitude) the individual patches can be clearly distinguished. The decay of patches in the midnight time period was studied, pointing to a rapid decrease in scintillation intensity in this time period.

  15. On tethered sample and mooring systems near irregular asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-10-01

    A tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is investigated in this paper. In this system the spacecraft is moored to the surface of an irregular asteroid such as 216 Kleopatra by using a rocket-propelled anchor with a cable. The rocket-propelled anchor is a kind of space penetrator, which can inject into asteroids at high speeds generated by its own rocket engine. It can be used to explore the interior structure of asteroids, and it can also be used as a sample collector. When the sampling mission is done, the sample can be pulled back to the spacecraft with the anchor. Using this method, the spacecraft can be kept in a safe region in which it cannot be trapped by the gravitational field of the asteroid. This work is concerned with the dynamics of the tethered system near irregular asteroids. First, a shape model and gravitational field model of irregular asteroids are built. Then, the configuration and the stability of the tethered system are investigated, and the quasi-periodic motion near the equilibrium point of the tethered system is analyzed. Finally, the non-uniform density distribution of the asteroids is considered. The deployment process and the oscillation of the tethered system in the uncertain asteroid gravity field are simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The feasibility of the tethered asteroid sample and mooring system is proved.

  16. Flow induced vibrations in arrays of irregularly spaced cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taub, Gordon; Michelin, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Historically the main industrial applications of cylinder arrays in cross flows favored regular arrangements of cylinders. For this reason, most past studies of Flow Induced Vibrations (FIV) in large cylinder arrays have focused on such arrangements. Recently there has been some interest in generating renewable energy using FIV of bluff bodies. In such applications it will likely be beneficial to enhance, rather than suppress FIV. It is not known a priori if regular or irregularly spaced arrays are most adequate for this type of application. In this study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on one regularly spaced array and four different irregularly spaced arrays of cylinders in a cross flow. Each arrangement of cylinders was examined under eight different orientations to a cross flow ranging between 10 m/s and 17 m/s. The average amplitude of vibration of the cylinders was found to highly depend on arrangement and orientation. The typical amplitude of vibration of the rods in the irregular arrangements were found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of the regular array. A simple model was proposed in order to predict if a given arrangement was likely to produce large oscillations, and the validity of the model was examined. This research was supported by a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant within the 7th European Community Framework Program (Grant PIRG08-GA-2010-276762).

  17. Irregular behavior in an excitatory-inhibitory neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choongseok; Terman, David

    2010-06-01

    Excitatory-inhibitory networks arise in many regions throughout the central nervous system and display complex spatiotemporal firing patterns. These neuronal activity patterns (of individual neurons and/or the whole network) are closely related to the functional status of the system and differ between normal and pathological states. For example, neurons within the basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei that are responsible for the generation of movement, display a variety of dynamic behaviors such as correlated oscillatory activity and irregular, uncorrelated spiking. Neither the origins of these firing patterns nor the mechanisms that underlie the patterns are well understood. We consider a biophysical model of an excitatory-inhibitory network in the basal ganglia and explore how specific biophysical properties of the network contribute to the generation of irregular spiking. We use geometric dynamical systems and singular perturbation methods to systematically reduce the model to a simpler set of equations, which is suitable for analysis. The results specify the dependence on the strengths of synaptic connections and the intrinsic firing properties of the cells in the irregular regime when applied to the subthalamopallidal network of the basal ganglia.

  18. Small-scale plasma irregularities in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The individual volt-ampere curves from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter electron temperature probe showed evidence for small-scale density irregularities, or short-period plasma waves, in regions of the nightside ionosphere where the Orbiter electric field detector observed waves in its 100-Hz channel. A survey of the nightside volt-ampere curves has revealed several hundred examples of such irregularities. The I-V structures correspond to plasma density structure with spatial scale sizes in the range of about 100-2000 m, or alternatively they could be viewed as waves having frequencies extending toward 100 Hz. They are often seen as isolated events, with spatial extent along the orbit frequently less than 80 km. The density irregularities or waves occur in or near prominent gradients in the ambient plasma concentrations both at low altitudes where molecular ions are dominant and at higher altitudes in regions of reduced plasma density where O(+) is the major ion. Electric field 100-Hz bursts occur simultaneously, with the majority of the structured I-V curves providing demonstrative evidence that at least some of the E field signals are produced within the ionosphere.

  19. Surface motion relative to the irregular celestial bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Yun; Baoyin, Hexi

    2016-08-01

    We study the motion and equilibria of the grains on the surface of the irregular celestial body (hereafter called irregular bodies). Motions for the grains on the smooth and unsmooth surfaces are discussed, respectively. The linearized equations of motion relative to a surface equilibrium point and its characteristic equations are presented. Considering the stick-slip effect, the damping forces and the spring forces for the grain are calculated, then the linearized equations of motion and the characteristic equations relative to the surface equilibrium points are derived. The number of non-degenerate surface equilibria is an even number. We compute the motion of a grain released above three different regions relative to the irregular asteroid 6489 Golevka, including the flat surface, the concave region, and the convex region. Following the grain release and initial bounce, three kinds of motions exist: the orbital motion, the impact motion and the surface motion. We find that the maximum height of the next hop may be bigger than the maximum height of the current hopping. We also used Monte Carlo simulations to calculate 100 grains' hopping motions, the results shows that the stable surface equilibria are on the concave region and flat surface of the asteroid.

  20. An Impact Ejecta Behavior Model for Small, Irregular Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, spacecraft observations of asteroids 951 Gaspra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, and 433 Eros have shown the overriding dominance of impact processes with regard to the structure and surface morphology of these small, irregular bodies. In particular, impact ejecta play an important role in regolith formation, ranging from small particles to large blocks, as well as surface feature modification and obscuration. To investigate these processes, a numerical model has been developed based upon the impact ejecta scaling laws provided by Housen, Schmidt, and Holsapple, and modified to more properly simulate the late-stage ejection velocities and ejecta plume shape changes (ejection angle variations) shown in impact cratering experiments. A target strength parameter has also been added to allow the simulation of strength-dominated cratering events in addition to the more familiar gravity-dominated cratering events. The result is a dynamical simulation which models -- via tracer particles -- the ejecta plume behavior, ejecta blanket placement, and impact crater area resulting from a specified impact on an irregularly shaped target body, which is modeled in 3-dimensional polygon fashion. This target body can be placed in a simple rotation state about one of its principal axes, with the impact site and projectile/target parameters selected by the user. The gravitational force from the irregular target body (on each tracer particle) is determined using the polygonized surface (polyhedron) gravity technique developed by Werner.

  1. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  2. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  3. Using a Calculated Pulse Rate with an Artificial Neural Network to Detect Irregular Interbeats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Bih-Chyun; Lin, Wen-Piao

    2016-03-01

    Heart rate is an important clinical measure that is often used in pathological diagnosis and prognosis. Valid detection of irregular heartbeats is crucial in the clinical practice. We propose an artificial neural network using the calculated pulse rate to detect irregular interbeats. The proposed system measures the calculated pulse rate to determine an "irregular interbeat on" or "irregular interbeat off" event. If an irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system produces a danger warning, which is helpful for clinicians. If a non-irregular interbeat is detected, the proposed system displays the calculated pulse rate. We include a flow chart of the proposed software. In an experiment, we measure the calculated pulse rates and achieve an error percentage of < 3% in 20 participants with a wide age range. When we use the calculated pulse rates to detect irregular interbeats, we find such irregular interbeats in eight participants. PMID:26643078

  4. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  5. Retrograded eclogite xenoliths from mid-Tertiary potassic lavas along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, T. J.; Riggs, N.; Ort, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    A suite of xenolith-bearing, alkalic volcanic rocks erupted in small domes and plugs along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau (current Transition Zone) in Arizona between 30 Ma and 22 Ma. The onset of volcanic activity slightly precedes the earliest phase of mid-Tertiary extension and metamorphic core complex denudation in western/southern Arizona (27-25 Ma), which occurred along detachment faults that dip gently beneath the CP margin. Lavas are highly potassic (up to 6% Wt. K2O) and rich in incompatible trace elements (Ba up to 1900 ppm and Sr up to 1250 ppm), suggesting an enriched mantle melting source. Xenoliths are dominantly eclogite and pyroxenite that have been slightly to completely retrograded to amphibolite assemblages. The most common xenolith mineral assemblage consists of: 1) omphacite that has been completely replaced by an irregular symplectite of cpx and low-Ca plagioclase, 2) garnet that is partially replaced and rimmed by a fine, lamellar symplectite of high-Ca plagioclase, pargasitic amphibole, and Fe-Ti oxides, 3) coarse pargasitic amphibole that has overgrown or partially replaced the cpx-plag symplectite, 4) rutile that has been partially replaced by ilmenite and magnetite, and 4) apatite, zircon, and other accessory minerals. Xenoliths contain evidence for melt interaction prior to entrainment, including plagioclase veins containing hercynite and hogbomite that are cut by sharp contacts with the host lava. Results of this and other studies suggest that these veins formed by reactions between the eclogite assemblage (likely including spinel) and a locally derived melt. However, textural relations and geochemical differences suggest that this melt was not the host melt that entrained the xenoliths. Pyroxene and garnet thermobarometry from this and other studies on the primary eclogitic assemblages indicate temperatures from 500 to 900C at 11 to 20 kb. Mineral chemistry analyses of amphibole, plagioclase, hornblende, and garnet in the

  6. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  7. Navy satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, William C.

    1992-03-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of Navy satellite communications are reviewed. Particular attention is given to Fleet Satellites; the Defense Satellite Communications System; the International Maritime Satellite; Core Command and Control (Core C2), General Purpose Communications, and Navy EHF SATCOM program; and the Copernicus architecture.

  8. Tethered Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes concept for placing several communication satellites in geostationary orbit without taking up more space than assigned to single satellite. Proposed scheme eases orbital crowding more economically than space platforms. Concept requires minimal redesign of existing satellites and accommodates many satellites in just one orbital slot. System much lighter in weight than geostationary platform and easier and more economical to transport.

  9. Study of Track Irregularity Time Series Calibration and Variation Pattern at Unit Section

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chaolong; Wei, Lili; Wang, Hanning; Yang, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on problems existing in track irregularity time series data quality, this paper first presents abnormal data identification, data offset correction algorithm, local outlier data identification, and noise cancellation algorithms. And then proposes track irregularity time series decomposition and reconstruction through the wavelet decomposition and reconstruction approach. Finally, the patterns and features of track irregularity standard deviation data sequence in unit sections are studied, and the changing trend of track irregularity time series is discovered and described. PMID:25435869

  10. Scintillation and in-situ irregularity parameters in the auroral oval and polar cap. Report for 28 November 1989-28 November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, E.; Basu, S.; Pruneau, P.

    1990-12-28

    The orbiting HiLat satellite launched by the Defense Nuclear Agency in 1983 offered a unique opportunity for studying ionospheric scintillation parameters in relation to in-situ irregularity parameters. An earlier report (AFGL-TR-87-0245) summarized the authors findings during the sunspot minimum period of 1983-1985 for data obtained at Tromso, Norway. In this report, they extend their study to the sunspot maximum period of 1988-1989. For completeness, they augment the HiLat scintillation data by phase and amplitude scintillation morphology obtained with the help of the quasi-geostationary polar beacon satellites at Tromso during the period 1988 to 1990. To contrast these two distinct high latitude regions, they provide scintillation morphology using polar beacon satellites from Thule, Greenland for the period 1987 to 1990. Some new findings emerge on the UT and seasonal variation of high latitude scintillation as a result of this study.

  11. Occurrence climatology of the electron density irregularities in the mid-latitude E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Kil, H.

    2013-12-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere interrupt the propagation of electromagnetic waves and are problematic for navigation and communication systems. For this practical importance, significant efforts have been made to establish information on the occurrence climatology of such irregularities, to understand the onset conditions of such irregularities, and to predict or avoid the impact of these irregularities on the society. While the irregularities occur in all latitudes, less attention has been paid to the irregularities in middle latitudes. This may be because the irregularities in middle latitudes are not as severe as those in other latitude regions. However, middle latitudes are also the place where various forms of irregularities occur. A 40.8 MHz VHF radar was built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea aiming at continuous monitoring of the behavior of the middle-latitude electron density irregularities in the Far East Asian sector. The radar has been continuously operated by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) since December 2009. Using the Daejeon VHF radar data acquired since December 2009, we examine the occurrence types of the irregularities and the dependence of the irregularities on geophysical conditions (local time, altitude, season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity). These results can be used as a tool for investigating the onset conditions of the middle-latitude irregularities.

  12. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  13. Vertical Accretion in Microtidal Regularly and Irregularly Flooded Estuarine Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, C. B.; Seneca, E. D.; Broome, S. W.

    1993-10-01

    Vertical accretion rates were measured in microtidal (tidal amplitude less than 0·3 m) regularly (flooded twice daily by the astronomical tides), and irregularly flooded (inundated only during spring and storm tides) estuarine marshes in North Carolina to determine whether these marshes are keeping pace with rising sea-level and to quantify the relative contribution of organic matter and mineral sediment to vertical growth. Accretion rates in streamside and backmarsh locations of each marsh were determined by measuring the Cesium-137 ( 137Cs) activity in 2 cm soil depth increments. Soil bulk density, organic carbon (C), total nitrogen (N) and particle density also were measured to estimate rates of accumulation of organic matter (OM), mineral sediment and nutrients. With the exception of the backmarsh location of the regularly flooded marsh, vertical accretion rates in the marshes studied matched or exceeded the recent (1940-80) rate of sea-level rise (1·9 mm year -1) along the North Carolina coast. Accretion rates in the irregularly flooded marsh averaged 3·6 ± 0·5 mm year -1 along the streamside and 2·4 ± 0·2 mm year -1 in the backmarsh. The regularly flooded marsh had lower accretion rates, averaging 2·7 ± 0·3 mm year -1 along the streamside and 0·9 ± 0·2 mm year -1 in the backmarsh. Vertical accretion in the irregularly flooded marsh occurred via in situ production and accumulation of organic matter. Rates of soil OM (196-280 g m -2 year -1), organic C (106-146 g m -2 year -1) and total N (6·9-10·3 g m -2 year -1) accumulation were much higher in the irregularly flooded marsh as compared to the regularly flooded marsh (OM = 51-137 g m -2 year -1, C = 21-59 g m -2 year -1, N = 1·3-4·1 g m -2 year -1). In contrast, vertical accretion in the regularly flooded marsh was sustained by allochthonous inputs of mineral sediment. Inorganic sediment deposition contributed 677-1139 g m -2 year -1 mineral matter to the regularly flooded marsh as compared

  14. Irregular breakfast eating and health status among adolescents in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rea-Jeng; Wang, Edward K; Hsieh, Yeu-Sheng; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2006-01-01

    Background Regular breakfast eating (RBE) is an important contributor to a healthy lifestyle and health status. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the relationships among irregular breakfast eating (IRBE), health status, and health promoting behavior (HPB) for Taiwanese adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used to investigate a cluster sample of 1609 (7th -12th grade) adolescents located in the metropolitan Tao-Yuan area during the 2005 academic year. The main variables comprised breakfast eating pattern, body weight, and health promoting behaviors. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Results A total of 1609 participants were studied, 64.1% in junior high school and 35.9% in high school, boys (47.1%) and girls (52.9%) ranging in age from 12–20 years. Of the total participant population, 28.8% were overweight and nearly one quarter (23.6%) reported eating breakfast irregularly during schooldays. The findings indicated that adolescents with RBE had a lower risk of overweight (OR for IRBE vs. RBE = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.04), and that the odds of becoming overweight were 51% greater for IRBE than for RBE even after controlling for demographical and HPB variables. IRBE also was a strong indicator for HPB. However, the profile of the high-risk IRBE group was predominantly junior high schoolchildren and/or children living without both parents. Conclusion This study provides valuable information about irregular breakfast eating among adolescents, which is associated with being overweight and with a low frequency of health promoting behavior. School and family health promotion strategies should be used to encourage all adolescents to eat breakfast regularly. PMID:17150112

  15. Scaling Irregular Applications through Data Aggregation and Software Multithreading

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Villa, Oreste; Valero, Mateo

    2014-05-30

    Bioinformatics, data analytics, semantic databases, knowledge discovery are emerging high performance application areas that exploit dynamic, linked data structures such as graphs, unbalanced trees or unstructured grids. These data structures usually are very large, requiring significantly more memory than available on single shared memory systems. Additionally, these data structures are difficult to partition on distributed memory systems. They also present poor spatial and temporal locality, thus generating unpredictable memory and network accesses. The Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model seems suitable for these applications, because it allows using a shared memory abstraction across distributed-memory clusters. However, current PGAS languages and libraries are built to target regular remote data accesses and block transfers. Furthermore, they usually rely on the Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel control model, which is not well suited to the fine grained, dynamic and unbalanced parallelism of irregular applications. In this paper we present {\\bf GMT} (Global Memory and Threading library), a custom runtime library that enables efficient execution of irregular applications on commodity clusters. GMT integrates a PGAS data substrate with simple fork/join parallelism and provides automatic load balancing on a per node basis. It implements multi-level aggregation and lightweight multithreading to maximize memory and network bandwidth with fine-grained data accesses and tolerate long data access latencies. A key innovation in the GMT runtime is its thread specialization (workers, helpers and communication threads) that realize the overall functionality. We compare our approach with other PGAS models, such as UPC running using GASNet, and hand-optimized MPI code on a set of typical large-scale irregular applications, demonstrating speedups of an order of magnitude.

  16. Features of highly structured equatorial plasma irregularities deduced from CHAMP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Stolle, C.; Fejer, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    In this study five years of CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Payload) fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data is used to investigate the characteristics of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). We filtered the FGM data by using band-passes with four different cut-off periods to get the EPBs with different maximum spatial scale sizes in the meridional plane ranging from 76-608 km. Associated with the EPB observations at about 400 km, the typical altitude of CHAMP during the year 2000-2005, we also investigate the post-sunset equatorial vertical plasma drift data from ROCSAT-1 (Republic of China Satellite 1). Since the height of the F-layer is highly correlated with the vertical plasma drift and solar flux, we sorted the ROCSAT-1 data into different groups by F10.7. From the integrated vertical drift we have estimated the post-sunset uplift of the ionosphere. By comparing the properties of EPB occurrence for different scale sizes with the global distribution of plasma vertical uplift, we have found that EPBs reaching higher altitudes are more structured than those which are sampled by CHAMP near the top side of the depleted fluxtube. Such a result is in accord with 3-D model simulations (Aveiro and Hysell, 2010). Small-scale EPB structures are observed by CHAMP when the irregularities reach apex heights of 800 km and more. Such events are encountered primarily in the Brazilian sector during the months around November, when the post-sunset vertical plasma drift is high.

  17. Experimental studies of ionospheric irregularities and related plasma processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Kay D.

    1992-01-01

    Utah State University (USU) continued its program of measuring and interpreting electron density and its variations in a variety of ionospheric conditions with the Experimental Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities and Related Plasma Processes program. The program represented a nearly ten year effort to provide key measurements of electron density and its fluctuations using sounding rockets. The program also involved the joint interpretation of the results in terms of ionospheric processes. A complete campaign summary and a brief description of the major rocket campaigns are also included.

  18. Mesoscopic Simulations of Microfluidic Flow in Irregular Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Slater, Gary W.

    2009-03-01

    Stochastic Rotation Dynamics, a particle-based model for mesoscopic fluid dynamics, is used to study two and three-dimensional flow in a variety of complex boundaries and for a range of low Reynolds numbers (between 10 and 200). The systems considered are of two types: they consist of either irregular geometries such as dimpled pipes or require adaptive boundary conditions such as particle impact on a solid boundary. We apply out techniques to microfluidic devices with complex channel walls such as those used for slalom chromatography and sinusoidal undulation surface patterning chromatography. Numerical results showing good agreement with experimental data and previous computational simulations are presented.

  19. Irregularity, volatility, risk, and financial market time series.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Steve; Kalman, Rudolf E

    2004-09-21

    The need to assess subtle, potentially exploitable changes in serial structure is paramount in the analysis of financial data. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of approximate entropy (ApEn), a model-independent measure of sequential irregularity, toward this goal, by several distinct applications. We consider both empirical data and models, including composite indices (Standard and Poor's 500 and Hang Seng), individual stock prices, the random-walk hypothesis, and the Black-Scholes and fractional Brownian motion models. Notably, ApEn appears to be a potentially useful marker of system stability, with rapid increases possibly foreshadowing significant changes in a financial variable.

  20. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  1. Irregularity, volatility, risk, and financial market time series

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Steve; Kalman, Rudolf E.

    2004-01-01

    The need to assess subtle, potentially exploitable changes in serial structure is paramount in the analysis of financial data. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of approximate entropy (ApEn), a model-independent measure of sequential irregularity, toward this goal, by several distinct applications. We consider both empirical data and models, including composite indices (Standard and Poor's 500 and Hang Seng), individual stock prices, the random-walk hypothesis, and the Black–Scholes and fractional Brownian motion models. Notably, ApEn appears to be a potentially useful marker of system stability, with rapid increases possibly foreshadowing significant changes in a financial variable. PMID:15358860

  2. Drag of Exposed Fittings and Surface Irregularities on Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1928-01-01

    Measurements of drag were made on fittings taken from a typical fuselage to determine whether the difference between the observed full size fuselage drag and model fuselage drag could be attributed to the effects of fittings and surface irregularities found on the full size fuselage and not on the model. There are wide variations in the drag coefficients for the different fittings. In general those which protrude little from the surface or are well streamlined show very low and almost negligible drag. The measurements show, however, that a large part of the difference between model and full scale test results may be attributed to these fittings.

  3. Relationship of Treponema denticola periplasmic flagella to irregular cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, J D; Li, H; Kuramitsu, H; Norris, S J; Goldstein, S F; Buttle, K F; Charon, N W

    1997-01-01

    Treponema denticola is an anaerobic, motile, oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. We found that the periplasmic flagella (PFs), which are located between the outer membrane sheath and cell cylinder, influence its morphology in a unique manner. In addition, the protein composition of the PFs was found to be quite complex and similar to those of other spirochetes. Dark-field microscopy revealed that most wild-type cells had an irregular twisted morphology, with both planar and helical regions, and a minority of cells had a regular right-handed helical shape. High-voltage electron microscopy indicated that the PFs, especially in those regions of the cell which were planar, wrapped around the cell body axis in a right-handed sense. In those regions of the cell which were helical or irregular, the PFs tended to lie along the cell axis. The PFs caused the cell to form the irregular shape, as two nonmotile, PF-deficient mutants (JR1 and HL51) were no longer irregular but were right-handed helices. JR1 was isolated as a spontaneously occurring nonmotile mutant, and HL51 was isolated as a site-directed mutant in the flagellar hook gene flgE. Consistent with these results is the finding that wild-type cells with their outer membrane sheath removed were also right-handed helices similar in shape to JR1 and HL51. Purified PFs were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and several protein species were identified. Western blot analysis using antisera to Treponema pallidum PF proteins along with N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated T. denticola PFs are composed of one class A sheath protein of 38 kDa (FlaA) and three class B proteins of 35 kDa (FlaB1 and FlaB2) and one of 34 kDa (FlaB3). The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the FlaA and FlaB proteins of T. denticola were most similar to those of T. pallidum and Treponema phagedenis. Because these proteins were present in markedly reduced amounts or were absent in HL51, PF synthesis is

  4. Percutaneous transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leak via transarterial retrograde approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ho-Ping; Huang, Chi-Hung; Hou, Shaw-Min; Hsiung, Ming-Chon; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Yin, Wei-Hsian

    2015-01-01

    Repeat surgery has usually been considered the first choice to solve paravalvular leaks of prosthetic valves, but it carries a high operative risk, a high mortality rate and an increased risk for re-leaks. Percutaneous closure of such defects is possible, and different approaches and devices are used for this purpose. For mitral paravalvular leaks, constructing an arterio-venous wire loop for delivering the closure device through an antegrade approach is the most commonly used technique. Transcatheter closure can also be performed through a transapical approach or retrograde transfemoral arterial approach. We present a case of 68-year-old man with a mitral paravalvular leak that was successfully closed using an Amplatzer® Duct Occluder II, via retrograde transfemoral arterial approach under three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic guidance, without the use of a wire loop. The initial attempt to cross the paravalvular defect was unsuccessful, but the obstacle was finally overcome by introducing complex interventional techniques. PMID:26788047

  5. Retrograde enhancement of memory by mild flurothyl treatment in the chick.

    PubMed

    Cherkin, A; Meinecke, R O; Garman, M W

    1975-02-01

    Strong flurothyl treatment (1.7% v/v for 8 min) produces retrograde amnesia in chicks when administered as long as 24 hr after one-trial avoidance training with a strongly aversive stimulus. Mild flurothyl treatment (0.2% v/v for 8 min) produced retrograde enhancement when administered as long as 16 min after similar training with a moderately aversive stimulus. The moderate training followed by mild flurothyl treatment enhanced 24-hr retention to the level found after strong training alone. Enhanced retention persisted for at least 72 hr; nonspecific performance effects faded within 48 hr. The predominant dose-dependent and time-dependent enhancement effect of mild flurothyl treatment is interpreted as improved memory consolidation.

  6. [The evaluation of the retrograde memory in the Quebec population aged: PUB-40 and PUB-12].

    PubMed

    Langlois, Roxane; Joubert, Sven; Benoit, Sophie; Dostie, Valérie; Rouleau, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    Memory assessment represents an important part of the clinical neuropsychologist's duties in a geriatric context. In fact, in Canada, about one-third of seniors report memory complaints, with different causes. Based on the underlying etiology, different components of memory may be affected in older adults. Nonautobiographical retrograde memory (public or semantic) is an important aspect of memory to assess; nevertheless, there is currently no reliable and standardized clinical tool to evaluate this aspect of memory in the elderly Quebecer population. The aims of this research were therefore: (1) to develop a protocol specifically aimed at assessing non-autobiographical retrograde memory in this population, the PUB-40; (2) to obtain reference data among 105 healthy subjects; and (3) to develop a short version based on the items which discriminated a group of 20 patients with amnestic Mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) from older healthy subjects.

  7. Detection of retrograde gas streaming in the SB0 galaxy NGC 4546

    SciTech Connect

    Galletta, G.

    1987-07-01

    Spectroscopic observations are reported of the almost edge-on SB0 galaxy NGC 4546 which reveal a striking discordance between the derived emission and absorption-line velocities. The gas clouds show velocities that are similar in amplitude but opposite in direction from the stars. This discordance is seen in observations obtained through slits oriented in a wide range of position angles. NGC 4546 is thus, at present, unique as a disk system exhibiting large-scale retrograde motions relative to the stellar component. Orbits elongated both along the bar major axis (prograde, stars) and along the bar intermediate axis (retrograde, gas) are found. The possibility that this material originated from an infall is discussed. 27 references.

  8. LRRK2 regulates retrograde synaptic compensation at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Jay; Tsurudome, Kazuya; Liao, Edward H.; Kauwe, Grant; Gray, Lindsay; Yanagiya, Akiko; R. Calderon, Mario; Sonenberg, Nahum; Haghighi, A. Pejmun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease gene leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in a number of processes including the regulation of mitochondrial function, autophagy and endocytic dynamics; nevertheless, we know little about its potential role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Here we demonstrate that postsynaptic knockdown of the fly homologue of LRRK2 thwarts retrograde, homeostatic synaptic compensation at the larval neuromuscular junction. Conversely, postsynaptic overexpression of either the fly or human LRRK2 transgene induces a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release by increasing the size of the release ready pool of vesicles. We show that LRRK2 promotes cap-dependent translation and identify Furin 1 as its translational target, which is required for the synaptic function of LRRK2. As the regulation of synaptic homeostasis plays a fundamental role in ensuring normal and stable synaptic function, our findings suggest that aberrant function of LRRK2 may lead to destabilization of neural circuits. PMID:27432119

  9. Effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of maize starch and waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Siming; Liu, Youming; Liu, Ru

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch. Experimental results showed that the salting-out or structure-making ions, such as F(-) and SO4(2-), decreased the swelling power, solubility and transparency of both starches, but increased the gelatinization temperature, enthalpy, and syneresis, due to the tendency of these ions to protect the hydrogen bond links among starch molecules. On the other hand, the salting-in or structure-breaking ions, such as I(-) and SCN(-), exhibited the opposite effects. Microscopic observations confirmed such effects of salts on both starches. Furthermore, the effects of salts were more significant on waxy maize and on normal maize starch. Generally, salts could significantly influence on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch, following the order of the Hofmeister series. PMID:27507481

  10. Deubiquitination, a new player in Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mickaël; Stutz, Françoise; Dargemont, Catherine

    2003-12-26

    Modification by ubiquitin plays a major role in a broad array of cellular functions. Although reversal of this process, deubiquitination, likely represents an important regulatory step contributing to cellular homeostasis, functions of deubiquitination enzymes still remain poorly characterized. We have previously shown that the ubiquitin protease Ubp3p requires a co-factor, Bre5p, to specifically deubiquitinate the coat protein complex II (COPII) subunit Sec23p, which is involved in anterograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments. In the present report, we show that disruption of BRE5 gene also led to a defect in the retrograde transport from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum. Further analysis indicate that the COPI subunit beta'-COP represents another substrate of the Ubp3p.Bre5p complex. All together, our results indicate that the Ubp3p.Bre5p deubiquitination complex co-regulates anterograde and retrograde transports between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments.

  11. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  12. Effect of retrogradation time on preparation and characterization of proso millet starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjie; Gong, Min; Li, Ying; Xiong, Liu

    2014-10-13

    Starch nanoparticles were prepared from proso millet starch using a green and facile method combined with enzymolysis and recrystallization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the starch nanoparticles prepared with different retrogradation time (0.5, 4, 12, and 24h). The results showed that the sizes of the starch nanoparticles were between 20 nm and 100 nm. The crystal pattern changed from A-type (native starch) to B-type (nanoparticles), and the relative crystallinity of the nanoparticles increased obviously, as compared with the native starch. The nanoparticles prepared with the 12h retrogradation time had the highest degree of crystallinity (47.04%). Compared to conventional acid hydrolysis to make starch nanoparticles, the present approach has the advantage of being quite rapid and presenting a higher yield (about 55%).

  13. Relative importance of moisture migration and amylopectin retrogradation for pound cake crumb firming.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Delcour, J A

    2013-12-15

    Moisture migration largely impacts cake crumb firmness during storage at ambient temperature. To study the importance of phenomena other than crumb to crust moisture migration and to exclude moisture and temperature gradients during baking, crustless cakes were baked using an electrical resistance oven (ERO). Cake crumb firming was evaluated by texture analysis. First, ERO cakes with properties similar to those baked conventionally were produced. Cake batter moisture content (MC) was adjusted to ensure complete starch gelatinisation in the baking process. In cakes baked conventionally, most of the increase in crumb firmness during storage was caused by moisture migration. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) showed that the population containing protons of crystalline starch grew during cake storage. These and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data pointed to only limited amylopectin retrogradation. The limited increase in amylopectin retrogradation during cake storage cannot solely account for the significant firming of ERO cakes and, hence, other phenomena are involved in cake firming.

  14. Retrograde amnesia after hippocampal damage: recent vs. remote memories in two tasks.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, R J; Weisend, M P; Mumby, D; Astur, R S; Hanlon, F M; Koerner, A; Thomas, M J; Wu, Y; Moses, S N; Cole, C; Hamilton, D A; Hoesing, J M

    2001-01-01

    We review evidence from experiments conducted in our laboratory on retrograde amnesia in rats with damage to the hippocampal formation. In a new experiment reported here, we show that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced hippocampal damage produced retrograde amnesia for both hidden platform and two-choice visible platform discriminations in the Morris water task. For both problems there was a significant trend for longer training-surgery intervals to be associated with worse retention performance. Little support is offered by our work for the concept that there is a process involving hippocampal-dependent consolidation of memories in extrahippocampal permanent storage sites. Long-term memory consolidation may take place within the hippocampus. The hippocampus may be involved permanently in storage and/or retrieval of a variety of relational and nonrelational memories if it was intact at the time of learning, even involving information which is definitely not affected in anterograde amnesia after hippocampal damage.

  15. A catalog of ionospheric F region irregularity behavior based on Ogo 6 retarding potential analyzer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, J. P.; Hanson, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Review of in situ data obtained with the aid of the retarding potential analyzer on board Ogo 6 which reveal the nature of ionospheric irregularities in the total ion concentration above 400 km. Except for the high-latitude regions, the ionosphere is usually observed to be very smooth in the daytime, but considerable structure is observed at night, particularly near the equator and at Atlantic longitudes. Although most of the irregularities observed appear to be stochastic in nature, many nearly monochromatic waveforms are observed near the equator. The topics discussed include the midlatitude scintillation boundary, large-amplitude equatorial irregularities, the fluctuation spectrum of typical F-region irregularities, the lower edge of the equatorial F region, sinusoidal waveforms, ground glass irregularities, breaking wave irregularities, and regions of smooth and irregular ionization inside the polar cap.

  16. Designing Next Generation Massively Multithreaded Architectures for Irregular Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone; Villa, Oreste

    2012-08-31

    Irregular applications, such as data mining or graph-based computations, show unpredictable memory/network access patterns and control structures. Massively multi-threaded architectures with large node count, like the Cray XMT, have been shown to address their requirements better than commodity clusters. In this paper we present the approaches that we are currently pursuing to design future generations of these architectures. First, we introduce the Cray XMT and compare it to other multithreaded architectures. We then propose an evolution of the architecture, integrating multiple cores per node and next generation network interconnect. We advocate the use of hardware support for remote memory reference aggregation to optimize network utilization. For this evaluation we developed a highly parallel, custom simulation infrastructure for multi-threaded systems. Our simulator executes unmodified XMT binaries with very large datasets, capturing effects due to contention and hot-spotting, while predicting execution times with greater than 90% accuracy. We also discuss the FPGA prototyping approach that we are employing to study efficient support for irregular applications in next generation manycore processors.

  17. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic blood flow through irregular multi-stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Norzieha; Amin, Norsarahaida; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar

    2009-10-01

    Flow of an electrically conducting fluid characterizing blood through the arteries having irregular shaped multi-stenoses in the environment of a uniform transverse magnetic-field is analysed. The flow is considered to be axisymmetric with an outline of the irregular stenoses obtained from a three-dimensional casting of a mild stenosed artery, so that the physical problem becomes more realistic from the physiological point of view. The marker and cell (MAC) and successive-over-relaxation (SOR) methods are respectively used to solve the governing unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and pressure-Poisson equation quantitatively and to observe the flow separation. The results obtained show that the flow separates mostly towards the downstream of the multi-stenoses. However, the flow separation region keeps on shrinking with the increasing intensity of the magnetic-field which completely disappears with sufficiently large value of the Hartmann number. The present observations certainly have some clinical implications relating to magnetotherapy which help reducing the complex flow separation zones causing flow disorder leading to the formation and progression of the arterial diseases.

  18. Inventory Management for Irregular Shipment of Goods in Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hitoshi; Kitaoka, Masatoshi; Usuki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The shipping amount of commodity goods (Foods, confectionery, dairy products, such as public cosmetic pharmaceutical products) changes irregularly at the distribution center dealing with the general consumer goods. Because the shipment time and the amount of the shipment are irregular, the demand forecast becomes very difficult. For this, the inventory control becomes difficult, too. It cannot be applied to the shipment of the commodity by the conventional inventory control methods. This paper proposes the method for inventory control by cumulative flow curve method. It proposed the method of deciding the order quantity of the inventory control by the cumulative flow curve. Here, it proposes three methods. 1) Power method,2) Polynomial method and 3)Revised Holt's linear method that forecasts data with trends that is a kind of exponential smoothing method. This paper compares the economics of the conventional method, which is managed by the experienced and three new proposed methods. And, the effectiveness of the proposal method is verified from the numerical calculations.

  19. Learning Adaptive Forecasting Models from Irregularly Sampled Multivariate Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Building accurate predictive models of clinical multivariate time series is crucial for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, and clinical decision making. A challenging aspect of this process is that the model should be flexible and adaptive to reflect well patient-specific temporal behaviors and this also in the case when the available patient-specific data are sparse and short span. To address this problem we propose and develop an adaptive two-stage forecasting approach for modeling multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series of varying lengths. The proposed model (1) learns the population trend from a collection of time series for past patients; (2) captures individual-specific short-term multivariate variability; and (3) adapts by automatically adjusting its predictions based on new observations. The proposed forecasting model is evaluated on a real-world clinical time series dataset. The results demonstrate the benefits of our approach on the prediction tasks for multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series, and show that it can outperform both the population based and patient-specific time series prediction models in terms of prediction accuracy. PMID:27525189

  20. Using Radio-Induced Aurora to Observe Ionospheric Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Gondarenko, N.; Guzdar, P.; Huba, J.; Ossakow, S.; Djuth, F.; Tepley, C.; Sulzer, M.; Kagan, L.; Kelley, M.

    Two-dimensional images of F- and E- layers have been obtained using the technique called radio-induced aurora (RIA). This technique makes the plasma layers glow in the ionosphere glow when being stimulated by high power radio waves. Normally the irregularities in the ionosphere do not radiate strong enough visible emissions to be observed from the ground. Experiments at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and the SURA facility in Russia have shown that the plasma structures can be made to glow at 630.0 nm, 557.7 nm and other wavelengths by illuminating them by HF radio waves with effective radiated powers of 80 megawatts. The regions of the sporadic-E layers that have electron densities greater than the critical density for reflection of the radio waves emit electrons that collide with and excite atmospheric atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen. A charge-coupled-device (CCD) imager located on the ground is used to capture images of the glowing E and F-region structures. The camera exposure- times were in the range of 15 to 45 seconds. The images obtained using this technique show a wide variety of both field-aligned and wind-aligned irregularities. Some layers cover the antenna pattern cone illuminated by the radio wave beam. Other layers show strong modulations by both plasma and neutral instabilities. Two-dimensional computer simulations of the coupling between neutral winds, electric fields and the ion layers simulate the structure in the images.

  1. New techniques for auroral irregularity studies with COSCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglitis, P.; McCrea, I. W.; Robinson, T. R.; Nygrén, T.; Schlegel, K.; Turunen, T.; Jones, T. B.

    1998-10-01

    The COSCAT system enables the detection of E-region auroral backscatter with the EISCAT remote receivers at magnetic aspect angles close to 90 °. This is achieved by utilising a low-power transmitter stationed in Oulu, Finland. Many important observations of E-region irregularities have been achieved with this simple experiment. Recent studies have attempted to push the COSCAT system to its experimental limits. Firstly, the CW signal has been phase-modulated with 13-bit Barker codes with baud lengths of 40, 70 and 100 µs. Interpretation of the received power allows the spatial distribution of the auroral scatterers to be determined. The second advance is in the use of a sophisticated correlator program which allows data to be buffered within the correlator at very high time resolution. This enables the coherent backscatter power to be sampled every 12.5 ms and the full auto-correlation function to be measured every 100 ms. These measurements allow the COSCAT system to be employed for the first time in an investigation of the growth and decay of the auroral irregularities.

  2. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic blood flow through irregular multi-stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Norzieha; Amin, Norsarahaida; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar

    2009-10-01

    Flow of an electrically conducting fluid characterizing blood through the arteries having irregular shaped multi-stenoses in the environment of a uniform transverse magnetic-field is analysed. The flow is considered to be axisymmetric with an outline of the irregular stenoses obtained from a three-dimensional casting of a mild stenosed artery, so that the physical problem becomes more realistic from the physiological point of view. The marker and cell (MAC) and successive-over-relaxation (SOR) methods are respectively used to solve the governing unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and pressure-Poisson equation quantitatively and to observe the flow separation. The results obtained show that the flow separates mostly towards the downstream of the multi-stenoses. However, the flow separation region keeps on shrinking with the increasing intensity of the magnetic-field which completely disappears with sufficiently large value of the Hartmann number. The present observations certainly have some clinical implications relating to magnetotherapy which help reducing the complex flow separation zones causing flow disorder leading to the formation and progression of the arterial diseases. PMID:19665698

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of settling behaviors of irregularly shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Galindo-Torres, S. A.; Tang, Hongwu; Jin, Guangqiu; Scheuermann, A.; Li, Ling

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the settling dynamics of irregularly shaped particles in a still fluid under a wide range of conditions with Reynolds numbers Re varying between 1 and 2000, sphericity ϕ and circularity c both greater than 0.5, and Corey shape factor (CSF) less than 1. To simulate the particle settling process, a modified lattice Boltzmann model combined with a turbulence module was adopted. This model was first validated using experimental data for particles of spherical and cubic shapes. For irregularly shaped particles, two different types of settling behaviors were observed prior to particles reaching a steady state: accelerating and accelerating-decelerating, which could be distinguished by a critical CSF value of approximately 0.7. The settling dynamics were analyzed with a focus on the projected areas and angular velocities of particles. It was found that a minor change in the starting projected area, an indicator of the initial particle orientation, would not strongly affect the settling velocity for low Re. Periodic oscillations developed for all simulated particles when Re>100 . The amplitude of these oscillations increased with Re. However, the periods were not sensitive to Re. The critical Re that defined the transition between the steady and periodically oscillating behaviors depended on the inertia tensor. In particular, the maximum eigenvalue of the inertia tensor played a major role in signaling this transition in comparison to the intermediate and minimum eigenvalues.

  4. Learning in neural networks by reinforcement of irregular spiking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2004-04-01

    Artificial neural networks are often trained by using the back propagation algorithm to compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to the synaptic strengths. For a biological neural network, such a gradient computation would be difficult to implement, because of the complex dynamics of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in neurons. Here we show that irregular spiking similar to that observed in biological neurons could be used as the basis for a learning rule that calculates a stochastic approximation to the gradient. The learning rule is derived based on a special class of model networks in which neurons fire spike trains with Poisson statistics. The learning is compatible with forms of synaptic dynamics such as short-term facilitation and depression. By correlating the fluctuations in irregular spiking with a reward signal, the learning rule performs stochastic gradient ascent on the expected reward. It is applied to two examples, learning the XOR computation and learning direction selectivity using depressing synapses. We also show in simulation that the learning rule is applicable to a network of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons.

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously.

  6. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously. PMID:23986827

  7. Retrograde Transpubic Approach for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Cementoplasty of Acetabular Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bauones, Salem; Freire, Veronique; Moser, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of painful and disabling anterior acetabular bone metastasis treated with bipolar radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty. Due to the high risk of complications related to the proximity of the femoral neurovascular structures with a direct approach, we successfully performed a retrograde transpubic approach under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance. In the present report, we describe this approach detailing its indications, advantages, and the technical tips to achieve a safe and satisfactory procedure. PMID:26491595

  8. Functional relationship between mTERF4 and GUN1 in retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Duorong; Liu, Zhixin; Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling plays an important role in regulating the expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) in accordance with physiological demands on chloroplast biogenesis and function. Despite its fundamental importance, little is known about the molecular nature of the plastid gene expression (PGE)-dependent type of retrograde signaling. PGE is a multifaceted process, and several factors, including pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, are involved in its regulation. The PPR protein GUN1 plays a central role in PGE-dependent retrograde signaling. In this study, we isolated a mutant exhibiting up-regulation of CHLOROPHYLL A/B-BINDING PROTEIN (CAB) under normal growth conditions (named coe1 for CAB overexpression 1). The coe1 mutant has a single-base mutation in the gene for mitochondrial transcription termination factor 4 (mTERF4)/BSM/RUG2, which plays a role in regulating the processing of certain plastid transcripts. Defects in GUN1 or mTERF4 de-repressed the expression of specific plastid mRNAs in the presence of lincomycin (LIN). In wild-type plants, treatment with LIN or spectinomycin (SPE) inhibited processing of plastid transcripts. Comparative analysis revealed that in gun1 and coe1/mterf4, but not in wild-type, gun4, or gun5 plants, the processing of plastid transcripts and expression levels of Lhcb1 mRNA were affected in opposite ways when plants were grown in the presence of LIN or SPE. In addition, the coe1 mutation affected the intracellular accumulation and distribution of GUN1, as well as its plastid signaling activity. Taken together, these results suggest that GUN1 and COE1 cooperate in PGE and retrograde signaling. PMID:26685190

  9. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  10. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  11. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  12. Comparison of commonly used retrograde tracers in rat spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, You-Lai; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four fluorescent dyes, True Blue (TB), Fluoro-Gold (FG), Fluoro-Ruby (FR), and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), in retrograde tracing of rat spinal motor neurons. We transected the muscle branch of the rat femoral nerve and applied each tracer to the proximal stump in single labeling experiments, or combinations of tracers (FG-DiI and TB-DiI) in double labeling experiments. In the single labeling experiments, significantly fewer labeled motor neurons were observed after FR labeling than after TB, FG, or DiI, 3 days after tracer application. By 1 week, there were no significant differences in the number of labeled neurons between the four groups. In the double-labeling experiment, the number of double-labeled neurons in the FG-DiI group was not significantly different from that in the TB-DiI group 1 week after tracer application. Our findings indicate that TB, FG, and DiI have similar labeling efficacies in the retrograde labeling of spinal motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve when used alone. Furthermore, combinations of DiI and TB or FG are similarly effective. Therefore, of the dyes studied, TB, FG and DiI, and combinations of DiI with TB or FG, are the most suitable for retrograde labeling studies of motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve. PMID:26692873

  13. Retrograde NGF Axonal Transport—Motor Coordination in the Unidirectional Motility Regime

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Praveen D.; Che, Daphne L.; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed motion analysis of retrograde nerve growth factor (NGF) endosomes in axons to show that mechanical tugs-of-war and intracellular motor regulation are complimentary features of the near-unidirectional endosome directionality. We used quantum dots to fluorescently label NGF and acquired trajectories of retrograde quantum-dot-NGF-endosomes with <20-nm accuracy at 32 Hz in microfluidic neuron cultures. Using a combination of transient motion analysis and Bayesian parsing, we partitioned the trajectories into sustained periods of retrograde (dynein-driven) motion, constrained pauses, and brief anterograde (kinesin-driven) reversals. The data shows many aspects of mechanical tugs-of-war and multiple-motor mechanics in NGF-endosome transport. However, we found that stochastic mechanical models based on in vitro parameters cannot simulate the experimental data, unless the microtubule-binding affinity of kinesins on the endosome is tuned down by 10 times. Specifically, the simulations suggest that the NGF-endosomes are driven on average by 5–6 active dyneins and 1–2 downregulated kinesins. This is also supported by the dynamics of endosomes detaching under load in axons, showcasing the cooperativity of multiple dyneins and the subdued activity of kinesins. We discuss the possible motor coordination mechanism consistent with motor regulation and tugs-of-war for future investigations. PMID:26039170

  14. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  15. Clustering of a kinesin-14 motor enables processive retrograde microtubule-based transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Erik; Yamada, Moé; Vale, Ronald D.; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The molecular motors kinesin and dynein drive bidirectional motility along microtubules (MTs) in most eukaryotic cells. Land plants, however, are a notable exception, because they contain a large number of kinesins but lack cytoplasmic dynein, the foremost processive retrograde transporter. It remains unclear how plants achieve retrograde cargo transport without dynein. Here, we have analysed the motility of the six members of minus-end-directed kinesin-14 motors in the moss Physcomitrella patens and found that none are processive as native dimers. However, when artificially clustered into as little as dimer of dimers, the type-VI kinesin-14 (a homologue of Arabidopsis KCBP (kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein)) exhibited highly processive and fast motility (up to 0.6 μm s−1). Multiple kin14-VI dimers attached to liposomes also induced transport of this membrane cargo over several microns. Consistent with these results, in vivo observations of green fluorescent protein-tagged kin14-VI in moss cells revealed fluorescent punctae that moved processively towards the minus-ends of the cytoplasmic MTs. These data suggest that clustering of a kinesin-14 motor serves as a dynein-independent mechanism for retrograde transport in plants. PMID:26322239

  16. Preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: What can be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Stimac, Davor; Zerem, Enver; Jovanović, Predrag; Blazevic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The incidence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis varies substantially and is reported around 1%-10%, although there are some reports with an incidence of around 30%. Usually, PEP is a mild or moderate pancreatitis, but in some instances it can be severe and fatal. Generally, it is defined as the onset of new pancreatic-type abdominal pain severe enough to require hospital admission or prolonged hospital stay with levels of serum amylase two to three times greater than normal, occurring 24 h after ERCP. Several methods have been adopted for preventing pancreatitis, such as pharmacological or endoscopic approaches. Regarding medical prevention, only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, namely diclofenac sodium and indomethacin, are recommended, but there are some other drugs which have some potential benefits in reducing the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Endoscopic preventive measures include cannulation (wire guided) and pancreatic stenting, while the adoption of the early pre-cut technique is still arguable. This review will attempt to present and discuss different ways of preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:25632179

  17. Posttraumatic Retrograde and Anterograde Amnesia: Pathophysiology and Implications in Grading and Safe Return to Play

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The presence of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) and loss of consciousness have been main factors used in a number of concussion guidelines. In this article, the focus is on using PTA (both retrograde and anterograde) as salient indicators of traumatic brain injury severity and the most reliable index of outcome prediction, even in mild cases. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search for the years 1990–2000 using the key words posttraumatic retrograde and anterograde amnesia, concussion and mild traumatic brain injury was done. Data Synthesis: On-the-field testing of PTA is a salient and integral component of the initial and follow-up neurologic assessments of the head-injured athlete. Conclusions/Recommendations: Initial and follow-up assessments of PTA, anterograde and retrograde, are an essential part of the neurologic evaluation of the head-injured athlete. Increasingly, neuropsychological testing, including computer models, is being employed in this assessment. The importance of not just PTA but all postconcussion signs and symptoms being absent at rest and exertion before allowing the athlete to return to play is emphasized. PMID:12937491

  18. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  19. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF NATURALLY TILTED, RETROGRADELY PRECESSING, NODAL SUPERHUMPING ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2012-02-15

    Accretion disks around black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf systems are thought to sometimes tilt, retrogradely precess, and produce hump-shaped modulations in light curves that have a period shorter than the orbital period. Although artificially rotating numerically simulated accretion disks out of the orbital plane and around the line of nodes generate these short-period superhumps and retrograde precession of the disk, no numerical code to date has been shown to produce a disk tilt naturally. In this work, we report the first naturally tilted disk in non-magnetic cataclysmic variables using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Our simulations show that after many hundreds of orbital periods, the disk has tilted on its own and this disk tilt is without the aid of radiation sources or magnetic fields. As the system orbits, the accretion stream strikes the bright spot (which is on the rim of the tilted disk) and flows over and under the disk on different flow paths. These different flow paths suggest the lift force as a source to disk tilt. Our results confirm the disk shape, disk structure, and negative superhump period and support the source to disk tilt, source to retrograde precession, and location associated with X-ray and He II emission from the disk as suggested in previous works. Our results identify the fundamental negative superhump frequency as the indicator of disk tilt around the line of nodes.

  1. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  2. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement.

  3. Geldanamycin Enhances Retrograde Transport of Shiga Toxin in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Roger; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) has been shown to alter endosomal sorting, diverting cargo destined for the recycling pathway into the lysosomal pathway. Here we investigated whether GA also affects the sorting of cargo into the retrograde pathway from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. As a model cargo we used the bacterial toxin Shiga toxin, which exploits the retrograde pathway as an entry route to the cytosol. Indeed, GA treatment of HEp-2 cells strongly increased the Shiga toxin transport to the Golgi apparatus. The enhanced Golgi transport was not due to increased endocytic uptake of the toxin or perturbed recycling, suggesting that GA selectively enhances endosomal sorting into the retrograde pathway. Moreover, GA activated p38 and both inhibitors of p38 or its substrate MK2 partially counteracted the GA-induced increase in Shiga toxin transport. Thus, our data suggest that GA-induced p38 and MK2 activation participate in the increased Shiga toxin transport to the Golgi apparatus. PMID:26017782

  4. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats’ performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects’ performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans. PMID:26795072

  5. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-21

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats' performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects' performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans.

  6. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation.

  7. Factors Predicting Coronary Sinus Rupture Following Cannula Insertion for Retrograde Cardioplegia

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Zokaei, Abdolhamid

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary sinus rupture (CSR) is a rare preventable complication of cannula insertion for retrograde cardioplegia. In the hands of an inexperienced surgeon, this complication has the risk of potential mortality and morbidity, and its repair is technically challenging. Techniques for repairing CSR have been reported previously. In this study, we determined predictors of CSR following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods Over a four-year period, we retrospectively analyzed 1500 patients in whom a retrograde coronary sinus catheter was used to administer cardioplegic solution. CSR occurred in 15 patients. (12 women and 3 men). Variables such as age, weight, body mass index, gender, aortic clamp time, pump time, cardiomegaly, ejection fraction, and number of grafts were determined for each patient. Factors correlated with CSR were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, and odd ratios of significant variables were determined. Results In multiple regression analysis, factors such as female gender, age, weight, and body mass index showed a significant correlation with CSR, and their odd ratios were 4.2, 1.0, 0.96, and 2.2, respectively. Conclusion In all 15 cases, a retrograde cannula with a self-inflatable balloon was used and 12 patients were woman with low body mass index. Forceful insertion due to coronary sinus web, fragility of arteries in thin patients, or a small coronary sinus caused CSR in the hands of an inexperienced surgeon. PMID:22259260

  8. Transneuronal retrograde dual viral labelling of central autonomic circuitry: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, G J

    2000-10-01

    Viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has become an important neuroanatomical tract-tracing tool for characterization of limbic neuronal networks. Recently, dual viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has been introduced; a method employing differential transgene expression of two genetically engineered virus strains to identify double infected cells with selective antibodies. In this way, interactions of parallel networks can be revealed. The use of this method will increase the understanding of the function of the limbic system, for example in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis, but is associated with limitations related to the use of genetically engineered virus strains. Virulence, speed of replication and retrograde transport may be affected by the insertion or deletion of genes in the viral genome. Moreover, the rate of replication and transport can be affected by the immune system of the host and competition between the two viruses. There may be selective affinity of the virus strain for the sympathetic or parasympathetic systems. False negative results are the most important risk in dual viral labelling addressed in this review. Several control experiments are presented that can help to reduce the risk of obtaining false negative results. PMID:11593764

  9. Axonal autophagosomes recruit dynein for retrograde transport through fusion with late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiu-Tang; Zhou, Bing; Lin, Mei-Yao; Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-05-11

    Efficient degradation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) via lysosomes is an important cellular homeostatic process. This is particularly challenging for neurons because mature acidic lysosomes are relatively enriched in the soma. Although dynein-driven retrograde transport of AVs was suggested, a fundamental question remains how autophagosomes generated at distal axons acquire dynein motors for retrograde transport toward the soma. In this paper, we demonstrate that late endosome (LE)-loaded dynein-snapin complexes drive AV retrograde transport in axons upon fusion of autophagosomes with LEs into amphisomes. Blocking the fusion with syntaxin17 knockdown reduced recruitment of dynein motors to AVs, thus immobilizing them in axons. Deficiency in dynein-snapin coupling impaired AV transport ,: resulting in AV accumulation in neurites and synaptic terminals. Altogether, our study provides the first evidence that autophagosomes recruit dynein through fusion with LEs and reveals a new motor-adaptor sharing mechanism by which neurons may remove distal AVs engulfing aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles for efficient degradation in the soma.

  10. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material.

    PubMed

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion . Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  11. None detectable retrograde transport of Chinese botulinum toxin type A in mice by single intramuscular injection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bin; Yao, Lin-Lin; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) can specifically cleave synaptosomal associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) into cleaved SNAP-25 (cl.SNAP-25), thus blocking the synaptic transmission in motor end plate and resulting in paralysis. It has been widely applied in clinical for treatment of various conditions characterized by muscle hyperactivity, such as dystonia and spasticity. BoNT/A is used locally, with little diffusion. Its paralyzing role is considered to be restricted to the nerve muscle junction, or close to the injection site. Recently, more and more studies, however, have suggested that BoNT/A also has central effects. In addition, some investigators have demonstrated that BoNT/A enters into central nervous system via retrograde transport after local intramuscular administration. The retrograde axonal transport of Chinese BoNT/A (CBoNT/A) was studied in this paper, which was rare in report. And the results showed that cl.SNAP-25 appeared not only at the injection site but also in contralateral muscle. Retrograde transport, however, was non-existent or too little to be detected in our study. PMID:26629081

  12. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation. PMID:26041205

  13. Silver glass ionomer cement as a retrograde filling material: a study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pissiotis, E; Sapounas, G; Spångberg, L S

    1991-05-01

    Comparison was made of the apical microleakage of retrograde fillings with amalgam and with silver glass ionomer cements using a modified dye penetration method. Forty instrumented human teeth were divided into four groups. Each group was characterized by a different retrograde filling material or technique: Group 1--silver glass ionomer (SGI); group 2--SGI with previous acid wash of the cavity; group 3--SGI in a previously acid washed cavity, protected with varnish; and group 4--zinc-free amalgam. A paper cone for dye adsorption analysis was placed in contact with retrofill and the main canal was obturated with thermoplasticized gutta-percha. All teeth were coated, immersed in methylene blue dye, and evacuated to assure complete penetration of the dye in any possible void. Later the teeth were cleared and evaluated under stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis showed that group 1 had the least microleakage of all. In addition, the biocompatibility of the SGI and varnish was compared with that of amalgam using the 51Cr release evaluation method. The results showed that SGI and varnish were less cytotoxic than amalgam. It was concluded that SGI cement can be considered an alternative retrograde filling material.

  14. Relay of retrograde synaptogenic signals through axonal transport of BMP receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca B.; Machamer, James B.; Kim, Nam Chul; Hays, Thomas S.; Marqués, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neuronal function depends on the retrograde relay of growth and survival signals from the synaptic terminal, where the neuron interacts with its targets, to the nucleus, where gene transcription is regulated. Activation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction results in nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated form of the transcription factor Mad in the motoneuron nucleus. This in turn regulates transcription of genes that control synaptic growth. How BMP signaling at the synaptic terminal is relayed to the cell body and nucleus of the motoneuron to regulate transcription is unknown. We show that the BMP receptors are endocytosed at the synaptic terminal and transported retrogradely along the axon. Furthermore, this transport is dependent on BMP pathway activity, as it decreases in the absence of ligand or receptors. We further demonstrate that receptor traffic is severely impaired when Dynein motors are inhibited, a condition that has previously been shown to block BMP pathway activation. In contrast to these results, we find no evidence for transport of phosphorylated Mad along the axons, and axonal traffic of Mad is not affected in mutants defective in BMP signaling or retrograde transport. These data support a model in which complexes of activated BMP receptors are actively transported along the axon towards the cell body to relay the synaptogenic signal, and that phosphorylated Mad at the synaptic terminal and cell body represent two distinct molecular populations. PMID:22573823

  15. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation.

  16. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  17. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  18. High-latitude ionospheric irregularities: differences between ground- and space-based GPS measurements during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of ionospheric irregularities at high latitudes during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm. Our study used measurements from ~2700 ground-based GPS stations and GPS receivers onboard five low earth orbit (LEO) satellites—Swarm A, B and C, GRACE and TerraSAR-X—that had close orbit altitudes of ~500 km, and the Swarm in situ plasma densities. An analysis of the rate of TEC index (ROTI) derived from LEO-GPS data, together with Swarm in situ plasma probe data, allowed us to examine the topside ionospheric irregularities and to compare them to the main ionospheric storm effects observed in ground-based GPS data. We observed strong ionospheric irregularities in the topside ionosphere during the storm's main phase that were associated with storm-enhanced density (SED) formation at mid-latitudes and further evolution of the SED plume to the polar tongue of ionization (TOI). Daily ROTI maps derived from ground-based and LEO-GPS measurements show the pattern of irregularities oriented in the local noon-midnight direction, which is a signature of SED/TOI development across the polar cap region. Analysis of the Swarm in situ plasma measurements revealed that, during the storm's main phase, all events with extremely enhanced plasma densities (>106 el/cm3) in the polar cap were observed in the Southern Hemisphere. When Swarm satellites crossed these enhancements, degradation of GPS performance was observed, with a sudden decrease in the number of GPS satellites tracked. Our findings indicate that polar patches and TOI structures in the topside ionosphere were predominantly observed in the Southern Hemisphere, which had much higher plasma densities than the Northern Hemisphere, where SED/TOI structures have already been reported earlier. LEO-GPS data (ROTI and topside TEC) were consistent with these results.

  19. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  20. Reduced liver uptake of arterially infused melphalan during retrograde rat liver perfusion with unaffected liver tumor uptake.

    PubMed

    Rothbarth, Joost; Sparidans, Rolf W; Beijnen, Jos H; Schultze-Kool, Leo J; Putter, Hein; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Mulder, Gerard J

    2002-11-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP) with melphalan is used for patients with nonresectable metastases confined to the liver. To improve the efficacy of IHP and to reduce the toxicity to the liver, reversion (retrograde perfusion) of the bloodstream through the liver in a rat model was studied. For liver tumor induction male WAG/Rij rats were inoculated with CC531 cells, a colorectal tumor cell line. After 11 to 12 days the tumor-bearing rat livers were perfused by single-pass perfusion through either the portal (orthograde) or caval vein (retrograde) for different time periods. During perfusion melphalan (160 Schultze) was infused in the hepatic artery. Melphalan concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rapid extraction of melphalan by the liver occurred in the first 5 min, reaching steady state after 10 to 20 min for both perfusion directions. The melphalan concentration of the outflow perfusate was significantly higher in the retrograde perfusion compared with the orthograde perfusion. The melphalan content of the tumor tissue was unaffected by perfusion direction at any time point. To the contrary, the melphalan uptake in liver tissue was strongly influenced: the melphalan content after 40-min retrograde perfusion was 12% of that after orthograde perfusion. The average tumor/liver concentration ratio was 6 for orthograde perfusion and 30 for retrograde perfusion. In conclusion, retrograde IHP with continuous melphalan infusion in the hepatic artery provides a high tumor uptake of melphalan with potentially reduced liver toxicity compared with orthograde IHP. PMID:12388659