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Sample records for retrograde irregular satellites

  1. Secular resonances between bodies on close orbits II: prograde and retrograde orbits for irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2017-09-01

    In extending the analysis of the four secular resonances between close orbits in Li and Christou (Celest Mech Dyn Astron 125:133-160, 2016) (Paper I), we generalise the semianalytical model so that it applies to both prograde and retrograde orbits with a one-to-one map between the resonances in the two regimes. We propose the general form of the critical angle to be a linear combination of apsidal and nodal differences between the two orbits b_1 Δ π + b_2 Δ Ω, forming a collection of secular resonances in which the ones studied in Paper I are among the strongest. Test of the model in the orbital vicinity of massive satellites with physical and orbital parameters similar to those of the irregular satellites Himalia at Jupiter and Phoebe at Saturn shows that {>}20 and {>}40% of phase space is affected by these resonances, respectively. The survivability of the resonances is confirmed using numerical integration of the full Newtonian equations of motion. We observe that the lowest order resonances with b_1+|b_2|≤ 3 persist, while even higher-order resonances, up to b_1+|b_2|≥ 7, survive. Depending on the mass, between 10 and 60% of the integrated test particles are captured in these secular resonances, in agreement with the phase space analysis in the semianalytical model.

  2. Irregular Satellites of the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    2005-01-01

    This proposal is directed towards the observational exploration of the irregular satellite systems of the planets. Primarily we use large-format CCD cameras on the world's largest telescopes, on Mauna Kea, to discover new irregular satellites and then to monitor their positions in order to ascertain their orbital characteristics. Separate observations are taken to determine the physical properties of the irregular satellites. The big picture science objective is to determine how these satellites were captures, and to use the properties of the satellites and their orbits to place constraints on early solar system (including formation) processes. Work in the first year has focussed on a major investigation of the Saturn irregular satellite system. We secured observing time on the Subaru and Gemini 8-m diameter telescopes in December 2004, January, February and March 2005 for the conduct of a deep, wide-area survey. This has resulted in the detection and orbit determination for 12 new satellites to be announced in the next week or two. Additional satellites were lost, temporarily, due to unusually poor weather conditions on Mauna Kea. These objects will be recovered and their orbits published next year. A separate survey of the Uranus irregular satellites was published (Sheppard, Jewitt and Kleyna 2005). Away from the telescope, we have discovered the amazing result that the four giant planets possess similar numbers of irregular satellites. This flies in the face of the standard gas-drag model for satellite capture, since only two of the giant planets are gas giants and the others (Uranus and Neptune) formed by a different process and in the absence of much gas. The constancy of the satellite number (each giant holds approximately 100 irregular satellites measured down to the kilometer scale) is either a coincidence, with different capture mechanisms at different planets giving by chance the same total numbers of irregular satellites, or indicates that the satellites

  3. Cartography of irregularly shaped satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    Irregularly shaped satellites, such as Phobos and Amalthea, do not lend themselves to mapping by conventional methods because mathematical projections of their surfaces fail to convey an accurate visual impression of the landforms, and because large and irregular scale changes make their features difficult to measure on maps. A digital mapping technique has therefore been developed by which maps are compiled from digital topographic and spacecraft image files. The digital file is geometrically transformed as desired for human viewing, either on video screens or on hard copy. Digital files of this kind consist of digital images superimposed on another digital file representing the three-dimensional form of a body.

  4. Orbital and Collisional Evolution of the Irregular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Alvarellos, Jose L. A.; Dones, Luke; Levison, Harold F.

    2003-07-01

    The irregular moons of the Jovian planets are a puzzling part of the solar system inventory. Unlike regular satellites, the irregular moons revolve around planets at large distances in tilted and eccentric orbits. Their origin, which is intimately linked with the origin of the planets themselves, is yet to be explained. Here we report a study of the orbital and collisional evolution of the irregular satellites from times after their formation to the present epoch. The purpose of this study is to find out the features of the observed irregular moons that can be attributed to this evolution and separate them from signatures of the formation process. We numerically integrated ~60,000 test satellite orbits to map orbital locations that are stable on long time intervals. We found that the orbits highly inclined to the ecliptic are unstable due to the effect of the Kozai resonance, which radially stretches them so that satellites either escape from the Hill sphere, collide with massive inner moons, or impact the parent planet. We also found that prograde satellite orbits with large semimajor axes are unstable due to the effect of the evection resonance, which locks the orbit's apocenter to the apparent motion of the Sun around the parent planet. In such a resonance, the effect of solar tides on a resonant moon accumulates at each apocenter passage of the moon, which causes a radially outward drift of its orbital apocenter; once close to the Hill sphere, the moon escapes. By contrast, retrograde moons with large orbital semimajor axes are long-lived. We have developed an analytic model of the distant satellite orbits and used it to explain the results of our numerical experiments. In particular, we analytically studied the effect of the Kozai resonance. We numerically integrated the orbits of the 50 irregular moons (known by 2002 August 16) for 108 yr. All orbits were stable on this time interval and did not show any macroscopic variations that would indicate

  5. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio

    2014-03-20

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10{sup –8}. This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  6. Color Survey of the Irregular Planetary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graykowski, Ariel; Jewitt, David

    2016-10-01

    Irregular satellites are characterized by their larger orbital distance from their planet, their high eccentricity and their high inclination, all indicating that they were captured. However, the mechanism of capture and the location of origin of the satellites remain unknown. We are conducting a photometric survey of the irregular satellites of the giant planets using the LRIS instrument on the 10-meter telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The measured colors will be compared to other planetary bodies in search for similarities and differences that may reflect upon the origin of the satellites. For example, if irregular satellites were captured from the Kuiper Belt then some should contain the ultrared material that is common in the trans-Neptunian and Centaur populations. If the irregular satellites of Jupiter were captured from the same source population as the Jovian Trojans, then it is natural to expect that the surface properties of satellites and Trojans should be the same. We will present initial results of this work.

  7. Rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational histories of irregularly shaped satellites are studied and are found to differ from the standard picture of tidal evolution of satellite rotations. Prior to capture into the synchronous rotation resonance, a narrow attitude-unstable chaotic zone is entered and the satellite begins to tumble chaotically. It is noted that enhanced dissipation of energy during the chaotic-tumbling phase may effect the orbital evolution. The theory suggests that, eventually, the rotation stays close to one of the accessible attitude-stable islands long enough for the weak tidal torque to remove the satellite from the chaotic zone.

  8. Capture of Irregular Satellites during Planetary Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    More than 90 irregular moons of the Jovian planets have recently been discovered. These moons are an enigmatic part of the solar system inventory. Their origin, which is intimately linked with the origin of the planets themselves, has yet to be adequately explained. Here we investigate the possibility that the irregular moons were captured from the circumsolar planetesimal disk by three-body gravitational reactions. These reactions may have been a frequent occurrence during the time when the outer planets migrated within the planetesimal disk. We propose a new model for the origin of irregular satellites in which these objects are captured from the planetesimal disk during encounters between the outer planets themselves in the model for outer planet migration advocated by Tsiganis and collaborators. Through a series of numerical simulations we show that nearby planetesimals can be deflected into planet-bound orbits during close encounters between planets, and that the overall efficiency of this capture process is large enough to produce populations of observed irregular satellites at Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The orbits of captured objects are broadly similar to those of known distant satellites. Jupiter, which typically does not have close encounters with other planets in the model of Tsiganis and coworkers, must have acquired its irregular satellites by a different mechanism. Alternatively, the migration model should be modified to accommodate Jupiter's encounters. Moreover, we find that the original size-frequency distribution of the irregular moons must have significantly evolved by collisions to produce their present populations. Our new model may also provide a plausible explanation for the origin of Neptune's large moon Triton.

  9. How Iapetus is Painted by Saturn's Irregular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hedman, M. M.

    2010-10-01

    The leading hemisphere of Iapetus, Saturn's outermost regular satellite, is ten times darker than its trailing side. To explain this unique albedo distribution, Soter (1974) proposed that collisionally generated dust from the dark outer irregular satellite Phoebe has evolved inward due to radiation forces and coated Iapetus’ leading side. The recent discovery (Verbiscer et al. 2009) of the colossal Phoebe ring between the orbits of Iapetus and Phoebe indicates that Soter's mechanism is active at some level. . To calibrate the effectiveness of this source, we follow the histories of Phoebe-ring dust under the relevant perturbations and thereby evaluate the particles’ probability of striking Iapetus, as well as the expected spatial distribution on the Iapetan surface. We find that, of the long-lived particles (those larger than 4 µm), those larger than 10 µm are virtually certain to strike Iapetus. Their calculated distribution across the surface matches well the measured albedo pattern in longitude. To explain the observed bright polar caps, our computed polar-dust-deposition rates must be overwhelmed by sublimation products from equatorial regions as proposed in the thermal runaway model of Spencer & Denk (2010); we thus constrain the latter model. We also track the dust originating from all the other known irregular moons, finding that a substantial fraction of the material from retrograde moons would eventually coat Iapetus--perhaps explaining why the spectrum of Iapetus’ dark material differs somewhat from Phoebe's (Buratti et al. 2005). We find that dust from lower-eccentricity moons with inclinations nearer 180° is more likely to strike Iapetus. . Finally, of those dust particles that do not strike Iapetus, we find that most land on Titan, with a smaller fraction hitting Hyperion. As has been previously conjectured (Burns et al. 1996), such exogenous dust, coupled with Hyperion's chaotic rotation could explain Hyperion's roughly uniform, moderate

  10. A deeper look at the colors of the saturnian irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2007-11-01

    We have performed broadband color photometry of the twelve brightest irregular satellites of Saturn with the goal of understanding their surface composition, as well as their physical relationship. We find that the satellites have a wide variety of different surface colors, from the negative spectral slopes of the two retrograde satellites S IX Phoebe ( S=-2.5±0.4) and S XXV Mundilfari ( S=-5.0±1.9) to the fairly red slope of S XXII Ijiraq ( S=19.5±0.9). We further find that there exist a correlation between dynamical families and spectral slope, with the prograde clusters, the Gallic and Inuit, showing tight clustering in colors among most of their members. The retrograde objects are dynamically and physically more dispersed, but some internal structure is apparent.

  11. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Himalia An Irregular Jovian Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.

    2002-01-01

    Spectra of the irregular Jovian satellite Himalia were obtained with the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during the Jupiter Flyby on December 18-19, 2000. These are the first spectral data of an irregular satellite beyond 2.5 microns. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. A Survey for ``Normal'' Irregular Satellites around Neptune: Limits to Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Jewitt, David; Kleyna, Jan

    2006-07-01

    We surveyed 1.75 deg2 of sky near Neptune to an R-band 50% detection efficiency of 25.8 mag (corresponding to radii of about 17 km for an assumed albedo of 0.04). We discovered one new outer satellite, Psamathe (S/2003 N1), about 20 km in radius with a distant retrograde orbit and moderate eccentricity. Until 2003 Neptune was only known to have two satellites that exhibited orbital signatures indicative of capture. Both of these, Triton and Nereid, are unusual when compared to the irregular satellites of other giant planets. With recent discoveries of four additional satellites by Holman et al. it is now apparent that Neptune has a distant ``normal'' irregular satellite system in which the satellites have radii and orbital properties similar to those of the satellites of other giant planets. We find that the satellite size distribution at Neptune is not well determined given the few objects known to date, being especially sensitive to the inclusion of Triton and Nereid in the sample. Finally, we note that Psamathe and S/2002 N4 have similar semimajor axes, inclinations, and eccentricities. They may be fragments of a once-larger satellite. Based largely on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  13. The new view of the irregular planetary satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, J.-M.; Gladman, B.; Holman, M.; Grav, T.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Nicholson, P.

    2003-04-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System each have two groups of satellites. The regular satellites move along nearly circular orbits in the planet's orbital plane, revolving about it in the same sense as the planet spins. In contrast, the so-called irregular satellites are generally smaller in size and are characterized by large orbits with significant eccentricity, inclination or both. The differences in their characteristics suggest that the regular and irregular satellites formed by different mechanisms. The regular satellites have most certainly formed in an accretion disk extending out to tens of planetary radii, like miniature Solar Systems. Irregular satellites, on the contrary, are believed to be planetesimals captured during the final stages of the planet's formation. Before 1997, the irregular satellite inventories of the gas giants where pourly known (Jupiter: 8, Saturn: 1, Uranus: 2, Neptune: 2). Since then, our team have been conducting a series of systematic and complete searches around the giant planets, discovering 12 confirmed satellites around Saturn, 6 around Uranus and 3 around Neptune plus a handfull of candidates. Sheppard et al. have identifyed 11 new irregular satellites around Jupiter while searching a small fraction of its stable region. These discoveries yield insights into the capture process of the satellites. Our team's tracking efforts have shown that the orbits of the Saturnian and Uranian irregular satellites fall into 'groups' in orbital space, ruling out independent capture and indicating that most of the moons we see today are the `children' of larger bodies that were captured long ago and then collisionally fragmented during the lifetime of the solar system.

  14. Irregular Satellites in the Context of Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, D.; Sheppard, S.

    2004-11-01

    All four giant planets in the solar system possess irregular satellites, characterized by large, highly eccentric and/or highly inclined orbits. These bodies were likely captured from heliocentric orbit, probably in association with planet formation itself. Enabled primarily by the use of large-format digital imagers on Mauna Kea telescopes, new observational work has dramatically increased the known populations of irregular satellites, with 74 discoveries in the last few years. A new perspective on the irregular satellite systems is beginning to emerge. We find that the number of irregular satellites measured to a given diameter is approximately constant from planet to planet. This is surprising, given the radically different formation scenarios envisioned for the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn compared to the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. We discuss the new results on the irregular satellites and show how these objects might be used to discriminate amongst models of giant planet formation. This work is in press in the procedings of the International Space Science Institute, Bern, from their 12-16 January meeting on "Outer Planets Before the Exploration of Saturn by Cassini".

  15. THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES: THE MOST COLLISIONALLY EVOLVED POPULATIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bottke, William F.; Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-03-15

    The known irregular satellites of the giant planets are dormant comet-like objects that reside on stable prograde and retrograde orbits in a realm where planetary perturbations are only slightly larger than solar ones. Their size distributions and total numbers are surprisingly comparable to one another, with the observed populations at Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus having remarkably shallow power-law slopes for objects larger than 8-10 km in diameter. Recent modeling work indicates that they may have been dynamically captured during a violent reshuffling event of the giant planets {approx}3.9 billion years ago that led to the clearing of an enormous, 35 M {sub +} disk of comet-like objects (i.e., the Nice model). Multiple close encounters between the giant planets at this time allowed some scattered comets near the encounters to be captured via three-body reactions. This implies the irregular satellites should be closely related to other dormant comet-like populations that presumably were produced at the same time from the same disk of objects (e.g., Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt, scattered disk). A critical problem with this idea, however, is that the size distribution of the Trojan asteroids and other related populations do not look at all like the irregular satellites. Here we use numerical codes to investigate whether collisional evolution between the irregular satellites over the last {approx}3.9 Gyr is sufficient to explain this difference. Starting with Trojan asteroid-like size distributions and testing a range of physical properties, we found that our model irregular satellite populations literally self-destruct over hundreds of Myr and lose {approx}99% of their starting mass. The survivors evolve to a low-mass size distribution similar to those observed, where they stay in steady state for billions of years. This explains why the different giant planet populations look like one another and provides more evidence that the Nice model may be viable. Our work

  16. The Irregular Satellites: The Most Collisionally Evolved Populations in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    The known irregular satellites of the giant planets are dormant comet-like objects that reside on stable prograde and retrograde orbits in a realm where planetary perturbations are only slightly larger than solar ones. Their size distributions and total numbers are surprisingly comparable to one another, with the observed populations at Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus having remarkably shallow power-law slopes for objects larger than 8-10 km in diameter. Recent modeling work indicates that they may have been dynamically captured during a violent reshuffling event of the giant planets ~3.9 billion years ago that led to the clearing of an enormous, 35 M ⊕ disk of comet-like objects (i.e., the Nice model). Multiple close encounters between the giant planets at this time allowed some scattered comets near the encounters to be captured via three-body reactions. This implies the irregular satellites should be closely related to other dormant comet-like populations that presumably were produced at the same time from the same disk of objects (e.g., Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt, scattered disk). A critical problem with this idea, however, is that the size distribution of the Trojan asteroids and other related populations do not look at all like the irregular satellites. Here we use numerical codes to investigate whether collisional evolution between the irregular satellites over the last ~3.9 Gyr is sufficient to explain this difference. Starting with Trojan asteroid-like size distributions and testing a range of physical properties, we found that our model irregular satellite populations literally self-destruct over hundreds of Myr and lose ~99% of their starting mass. The survivors evolve to a low-mass size distribution similar to those observed, where they stay in steady state for billions of years. This explains why the different giant planet populations look like one another and provides more evidence that the Nice model may be viable. Our work also indicates that

  17. NEOWISE: OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF JUPITER AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R.; Sonnett, S.; Kramer, E.; Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.

    2015-08-10

    We present thermal model fits for 11 Jovian and 3 Saturnian irregular satellites based on measurements from the WISE/NEOWISE data set. Our fits confirm spacecraft-measured diameters for the objects with in situ observations (Himalia and Phoebe) and provide diameters and albedo for 12 previously unmeasured objects, 10 Jovian and 2 Saturnian irregular satellites. The best-fit thermal model beaming parameters are comparable to what is observed for other small bodies in the outer solar system, while the visible, W1, and W2 albedos trace the taxonomic classifications previously established in the literature. Reflectance properties for the irregular satellites measured are similar to the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations, implying common origins.

  18. Predictions of Stellar Occultations by Irregular Satellites up to 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Gomes, Altair; Assafin, Marcelo; Beauvalet, Laurene; Desmars, Josselin; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Camargo, Julio I.; Morgado, Bruno Eduardo; Braga Ribas, Felipe

    2017-06-01

    Due to their orbital configurations, it is believed the irregular satellites of the Giant Planets were captured by their host planets during the Solar System evolution. It is important to know their physical parameters such as size, shape, albedo and composition in an attempt to access their origin. The best ground-based technique to do so is by stellar occultations.With the release of the GAIA catalog and the publication of a large database of positions of irregular satellites (Gomes-Júnior et al., 2015), the position of the stars and the ephemeris of the satellites are improved to better predict stellar occultation.The present work predicts such events for the 8 largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe, up to 2020. Another motivation is the passage of Jupiter in front of the Galatic Plane in 2019-2020 increasing a lot the number of stars to be occulted. The same happens with Saturn in 2018.

  19. Retrograde near-circular periodic orbits near equatorial planes of small irregular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lei; Yang, Hongwei; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2017-09-01

    Research on the stabilities of periodic orbits is useful for selection of parking orbits in asteroid and comet missions. In this paper, retrograde near-circular periodic orbits near equatorial planes (RNPOEP) of small irregular bodies are discussed, especially for their bifurcations and stabilities. RNPOEPs of six bodies are calculated based on a polyhedral method. The results reflect that two Period-Doubling Bifurcations (PDBs) cause the annular unstable regions, where RNPOEPs are all unstable, in the gravitational fields of some bodies. The unstable annular regions in the gravitational field of some bodies such as 243 Ida are wide, while those of some other bodies such as 216 Kleopatra are narrow. Based on the bodies' shapes, they are classified as two categories. Bodies of the first category have straight shapes which are approximately symmetric about the x-axis, such as 216 Kleopatra. Bodies of the second category have arched shapes which are approximately symmetric about the y-axis, such as 243 Ida. In order to provide insight of the dominating factors for the range of unstable annular regions, simplified models are proposed in the analysis. Specifically, a double-particle-linkage model is used for the first category while a triple-particle-linkage model is used for the second category. It is found that the distribution of the unstable annular regions in the gravitational field of simplified models is similar to those of the polyhedral models. Numerical results validate that the mass distribution dominates the range of the annular regions for both types of small bodies.

  20. Photometry of Irregular Satellites of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, Tommy; Holman, Matthew J.; Fraser, Wesley C.

    2004-09-01

    We present BVR photometric colors of six Uranian and two Neptunian irregular satellites, collected using the Magellan Observatory (Las Campanas, Chile) and the Keck Observatory (Manua Kea, Hawaii). The colors range from neutral to light red, and like the Jovian and the Saturnian irregular satellites (Grav et al.) there is an apparent lack of the extremely red objects found among the Centaurs and Kuiper Belt objects. The Uranian irregular satellites can be divided into three possible dynamical families, but the colors collected show that two of these dynamical families, the Caliban and Sycorax clusters, have heterogeneous colors. Of the third possible family, the 168° cluster containing two objects with similar average inclinations but quite different average semimajor axes, only one object (U XXI Trinculo) was observed. The heterogeneous colors and the large dispersion of the average orbital elements lead us to doubt that they are collisional families. We favor single captures as a more likely scenario. The two Neptunian satellites observed (N II Nereid and S/2002 N1) both have very similar neutral, Sun-like colors. Together with the high collisional probability between these two objects over the age of the solar system (Nesvorný et al.; Holman et al.), this suggests that S/2002 N1 is a fragment of Nereid, broken loose during a collision or cratering event with an undetermined impactor.

  1. The use of global ionospheric irregularity models for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Scintillation data obtained in the VHF region were used by Fremouw to develop a global scintillation model. An attempt has been made in the present study to improve this model in several respects. One of these is to modify the high latitude term in the model to better represent data obtained in the northern high latitude regions. Another improvement is the extention of the frequency region of validity to the L band and microwave regions. This attempt is based on certain theoretical considerations regarding the effects of distribution in irregularity sizes. Recent satellite in situ measurements indicate that the ionospheric irregularity description is functionally different from that assumed in the past. These satellite measurements are used in connection with the theoretical development to improve the model.

  2. The Orbits of Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozović, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2017-04-01

    We report on the improved ephemerides for the irregular Jovian satellites. We used a combination of numerically integrated equations of motion and a weighted least-squares algorithm to fit the astrometric measurements. The orbital fits for 59 satellites are summarized in terms of state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. The current data set appears to be sensitive to the mass of Himalia, which is constrained to the range of GM = 0.13-0.28 km3 s-2. Here, GM is the product of the Newtonian constant of gravitation, G and the body's mass, M. Our analysis of the orbital uncertainties indicates that 11 out of 59 satellites are lost owing to short data arcs. The lost satellites hold provisional International Astronomical Union (IAU) designations and will likely need to be rediscovered.

  3. GBT Reveals Satellite of Milky Way in Retrograde Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    New observations with National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) suggest that what was once believed to be an intergalactic cloud of unknown distance and significance, is actually a previously unrecognized satellite galaxy of the Milky Way orbiting backward around the Galactic center. Path of Complex H Artist's rendition of the path of satellite galaxy Complex H (in red) in relation to the orbit of the Sun (in yellow) about the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The outer layers of Complex H are being stripped away by its interaction with the Milky Way. The hydrogen atmosphere (in blue) is shown surrounding the visible portion (in white) of the Galaxy. CREDIT: Lockman, Smiley, Saxton; NRAO/AUI Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia, discovered that this object, known as "Complex H," is crashing through the outermost parts of the Milky Way from an inclined, retrograde orbit. Lockman's findings will be published in the July 1 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, Letters. "Many astronomers assumed that Complex H was probably a distant neighbor of the Milky Way with some unusual velocity that defied explanation," said Lockman. "Since its motion appeared completely unrelated to Galactic rotation, astronomers simply lumped it in with other high velocity clouds that had strange and unpredictable trajectories." High velocity clouds are essentially what their name implies, fast-moving clouds of predominately neutral atomic hydrogen. They are often found at great distances from the disk of the Milky Way, and may be left over material from the formation of our Galaxy and other galaxies in our Local Group. Over time, these objects can become incorporated into larger galaxies, just as small asteroids left over from the formation of the solar system sometimes collide with the Earth. Earlier studies of Complex H were hindered because the cloud currently is passing almost exactly behind the outer disk of

  4. Gas-Assisted Capture of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuk, M.; Burns, J. A.

    2001-11-01

    Recent discoveries of ``irregular'' satellites about the giant planets have dramatically increased their number such that systematic studies of their origin can begin. Since irregulars move along large, inclined and eccentric orbits, capture from circumsolar orbit is usually suspected (Franklin and Colombo 1971, Heppenheimer and Porco 1977). Because permanent capture is not possible in a strictly gravitational three-body problem, a dissipative mechanism is needed. Many assume that gas drag by protojovian nebula led to their capture (cf. Pollack et al. 1979). We numerically simulate the gas-aided capture of a planetesimal by Jupiter. The distribution and velocity of gas come from hydrocode simulations (Lubow et al. 1999). In our simple replication of their model, gas is assumed to follow gravitational trajectories, except at the shockwave fronts (taken from Lubow et al.) which the gas is forbidden to cross. The planetesimal's motion is integrated using a mixture of modern and traditional techniques. We employ a symplectic integration algorithm (Malhotra 1994) within the circumsolar and circumjovian disks. In the transitional region we used a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator expressed in rotating coordinates. The method's timesteps are independent of the presence of the gas. Subsequent orbital evolution is handled in a symplectic way, thus avoiding ``fake captures'' due to energy leakage owing to integration errors. By incorporating more sophisticated models of protoJupiter's environs, we hope to refine the nebular models and/or to elucidate the capture process. Preliminary results indicate that the parent body of the prograde cluster of Jovian irregulars (Himalia's group) may have originated from the Hilda region, at around 4 AU from the Sun. This is consistent with the taxonomical types of the cluster members (Sykes et al. 2000) being similar to those of Hildas that are close in size to Himalia (Dahlgren and Lagerkvist 1995).

  5. Regional climate network analysis from irregularly sampled satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Sykioti, Olga; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, George; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing availability of remote sensing data Earth System Analysis has taken a great step forward. This type of data, however, also harbors a variety of conceptual complications. First, depending on whether the satellite is orbiting on an ascending or descending path systematic biases are induced into the data, and both measurements cannot be evaluated simultaneously without an appropriate preprocessing. Second, remote sensing data are usually not produced with equidistant temporal sampling, but might contain huge gaps and irregular time steps. Third, the time period covered by the data is often too short to perform an appropriate seasonal detrending. Here, we propose a general framework to create homogeneous anomalized time series for a (multivariate) satellite data set by combining time series from ascending and descending satellite paths or even different missions using principal component and singular spectrum analysis. We then exemplarily apply our method to sea surface temperature data obtained from the SMOS satellite mission to study small-scale regional correlative patterns covering different parts of the Aegean Sea. To address the issue of irregular temporal sampling we utilize a kernel weighted version of the linear cross-correlation function to compute lagged correlations between all pairs of grid points in the data set. By binarizing the thus obtained matrices, we obtain a network representation of the system's similarity structure. Ultimately, we use tools from complex network theory to study regional interdependencies in the study area for different time lags of up to forty days. We find that the obtained networks represent well the observed average wind directions and speeds and display interaction structures between small regions in the Aegean Sea, which are in good agreement with earlier observations. In a second step, we extend the study area to the whole Mediterranean and Black Sea and investigate lagged interactions between these two

  6. Stripping of satellites on prograde and retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Grzegorz; Łokas, Ewa L.

    2017-03-01

    We derived a revised expression for the tidal radius, which is a theoretical boundary of a satellite orbiting a host. Our expression properly takes into account possible rotation of the satellite. We verified our predictions against simulations and obtained satisfactory agreement.

  7. Investigating GAIM-GM’s Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    INVESTIGATING GAIM-GM’S CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Brandon T. McClung, Captain, USAF...CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics...WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Brandon T. McClung, B.S. Captain, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. William F. Bailey Chair Dr. Stephen T. Fiorino

  8. K2 and Herschel/PACS photometry of irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Andras; Kiss, Csaba; Molnar, Laszlo; Mueller, Thomas G.; Sarneczky, Krisztian; Szabo, Robert; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Szabo, Gyula M.

    2016-10-01

    The combination of optical and far-infrared photometric measurements yields an unambiguous method for characterizing the basic physical and surface properties of minor bodies in the Solar System. In principle, an object with a certain visible brightness can either be an object with a small but bright or a large but dim surface. To resolve this issue, conducting thermal emission measurements can also be acquired since both larger and dimmer objects have higher infrared radiations. In addition, the precise modelling of thermal emission should certainly take into account the rotation period of these bodies - otherwise the presence of surface thermal inertia can result in inaccurate conclusions regarding to the physical size and albedo.Since early 2014, Kepler Space Telescope surveys fields close to the Ecliptic in a framework of quarterly campaigns of the K2 initiative. This program makes possible to continuously observe Solar System bodies during this period of 80-90 days and hence provide an uninterrupted photometric series of moving Solar System objects down to the magnitude range of R = 23.5. This instrument hence an ideal observatory now for Solar System studies. Due to the fact that the expected rotational periods of these objects are commensurable to the diurnal characteristics of ground-based observations, such uninterrupted light curves are rather valuable for the accurate determination of rotational characteristics - including the physical rotation period, the amplitude and the confirmation of the presence of double- or multiple peaked features.In this presentation we summarize our results of current K2 and legacy Herschel/PACS observations regarding to some of the irregular satellites of Uranus and Neptune, namely Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos and Nereid. By comparing these results with similar kind of observations for trans-Neptunian objects (see Kiss et al., this DPS meeting), one can conclude how the formation and evolution of the outer Solar

  9. Finding the trigger to Iapetus' odd global albedo pattern: Dynamics of dust from Saturn's irregular satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Burns, Joseph A.; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2011-09-01

    The leading face of Saturn's moon Iapetus, Cassini Regio, has an albedo only one tenth that on its trailing side. The origin of this enigmatic dichotomy has been debated for over 40 years, but with new data, a clearer picture is emerging. Motivated by Cassini radar and imaging observations, we investigate Soter's model of dark exogenous dust striking an originally brighter Iapetus by modeling the dynamics of the dark dust from the ring of the exterior retrograde satellite Phoebe under the relevant perturbations. In particular, we study the particles' probabilities of striking Iapetus, as well as their expected spatial distribution on the Iapetian surface. We find that, of the long-lived particles (≳5 μm), most particle sizes (≳10 μm) are virtually certain to strike Iapetus, and their calculated distribution on the surface matches up well with Cassini Regio's extent in its longitudinal span. The satellite's polar regions are observed to be bright, presumably because ice is deposited there. Thus, in the latitudinal direction we estimate polar dust deposition rates to help constrain models of thermal migration invoked to explain the bright poles (Spencer, J.R., Denk, T. [2010]. Science 327, 432-435). We also analyze dust originating from other irregular outer moons, determining that a significant fraction of that material will eventually coat Iapetus—perhaps explaining why the spectrum of Iapetus' dark material differs somewhat from that of Phoebe. Finally we track the dust particles that do not strike Iapetus, and find that most land on Titan, with a smaller fraction hitting Hyperion. As has been previously conjectured, such exogenous dust, coupled with Hyperion's chaotic rotation, could produce Hyperion's roughly isotropic, moderate-albedo surface.

  10. Properties of the Irregular Satellite System around Uranus Inferred from K2, Herschel, and Spitzer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas-Takács, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pál, A.; Molnár, L.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Hanyecz, O.; Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, R.; Marton, G.; Mommert, M.; Szakáts, R.; Müller, T.; Kiss, L. L.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present visible-range light curves of the irregular Uranian satellites Sycorax, Caliban, Prospero, Ferdinand, and Setebos taken with the Kepler Space Telescope over the course of the K2 mission. Thermal emission measurements obtained with the Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS instruments of Sycorax and Caliban were also analyzed and used to determine size, albedo, and surface characteristics of these bodies. We compare these properties with the rotational and surface characteristics of irregular satellites in other giant planet systems and also with those of main belt and Trojan asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects. Our results indicate that the Uranian irregular satellite system likely went through a more intense collisional evolution than the irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Surface characteristics of Uranian irregular satellites seem to resemble the Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects more than irregular satellites around other giant planets, suggesting the existence of a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system inside the orbit of Uranus.

  11. An Ultradeep Survey for Irregular Satellites of Uranus: Limits to Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Jewitt, David; Kleyna, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We present a deep optical survey of Uranus's Hill sphere for small satellites. The 8 m Subaru Telescope was used to survey about 3.5 square degrees with a 50% detection efficiency at limiting red magnitude mR=26.1. This magnitude corresponds to objects that are about 7 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.04). We detected (without prior knowledge of their positions) all previously known outer satellites and discovered two new irregular satellites (S/2001 U2 and S/2003 U3). The two inner satellites Titania and Oberon were also detected. One of the newly discovered bodies (S/2003 U3) is the first known irregular prograde satellite of the planet. The population, size distribution, and orbital parameters of Uranus's irregular satellites are remarkably similar to those of the irregular satellites of gas giant Jupiter. Both have shallow size distributions (power-law indices q~2 for radii larger than 7 km) with no correlation between the sizes of the satellites and their orbital parameters. However, unlike those of Jupiter, Uranus's irregular satellites do not appear to occupy tight, distinct dynamical groups in semimajor-axis versus inclination phase space. Two groupings in semimajor-axis versus eccentricity phase space appear to be statistically significant. Based largely on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership.

  12. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  13. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  14. Lost and found: orbital uncertainties of the irregular satellites of the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozovic, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2017-06-01

    The irregular satellites of the outer planets are a diverse population of relatively small objects that reside in orbits with high inclinations and eccentricities. More than 100 irregular satellites have been discovered to date, but many of these objects have poorly determined orbits due to lack of long observing arcs. We report on an orbital update of the JPL ephemerides. We used a linear covariance mapping to propagate orbital uncertainties over time. The projections of these uncertainties on the plane-of-sky (R.A. and decl.) predict which satellites are in need of the follow-up astrometry. This linear covariance mapping also identifies satellites that have the plane-of-sky uncertainties larger than 1000 arcseconds and that are effectively lost. Both Jupiter and Saturn have >15% of their irregular populations lost. Uranus and Neptune have very few known irregulars to begin with, 9 and 6 respectively, and for all but one (Neso, a satellite of Neptune), the orbits are well determined. We show that the uncertainties vary in time due to orbital geometry projection on the plane-of-sky and that it is possible to identify the times when recovery observations are more likely to succeed. However, many of these objects are faint, H>23 mag, which puts a requirement on large telescopes as the observing instruments.

  15. Observations of inner plasmasphere irregularities with a satellite-beacon radio-interferometer array

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.; Hoogeveen, G.; Carlos, R.C.; Wu, G.; Fejer, B.G.; Kelley, M.C.

    1996-09-01

    A radio-interferometer array illuminated by 136-MHz beacons of several geosynchronous satellites has been used to study small ({ge}10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}2}) transient disturbances in the total electron content along the lines of sight to the satellites. High-frequency (f{gt}3 mHz) electron content oscillations are persistently observed, particularly during night and particularly during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The oscillations move across the array plane at speeds in the range 200{endash}2000 m/s, with propagation azimuths that are strongly peaked in lobes toward the western half-plane. Detailed analysis of this azimuth behavior, involving comparison between observations on various satellite positions, indicates compellingly that the phase oscillations originate in radio refraction due to geomagnetically aligned plasma density perturbations in the inner plasmasphere. The motion of the phase perturbations across the array plane is caused by {bold EXB} drift of the plasma medium in which the irregularities are embedded. We review the statistics of 2.5 years of around-the-clock data on the local time, magnetic disturbance, seasonal, and line-of-sight variations of these observed irregularities. We compare the irregularities{close_quote} inferred electrodynamic drifts to what is known about midlatitude plasma drift from incoherent scatter. Finally, we show in detail how the observation of these irregularities provides a unique and complementary monitor of inner plasmasphere irregularity incidence and zonal drift.{copyright} 1996 American Geophysical Union

  16. Movement of Low-albedo Dust from Small Irregular Satellites to the Main Satellites of the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Hicks, M. D.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2009-09-01

    The origin and nature of the low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus represents one of the most intriguing problems in planetary science. Observations of the satellite have shown that the two hemispheres of the satellite are wholly different. The trailing hemisphere has an albedo, composition, and morphology typical of the other icy Saturnian satellites, while the surface of the leading side is composed of an extraordinarily low-albedo, reddish material that includes organic material and carbon. The study of pathological objects such as Iapetus offers clues to general alteration processes that might act throughout the outer Solar System. Bell et al. (1985, Icarus 61, 192) proposed just that by suggesting that Callisto was the Iapetus of the Jovian system in a less extreme manifestation. Unlike the other Galilean satellites, Callisto is darker on its leading side (except right at opposition), suggesting it may have swept up low-albedo dust in a process similar to that occurring on Iapetus. New medium resolution visible spectroscopy obtained from the Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain shows hemispheric diversity on the Uranian satellites. The outermost satellites (Titania and Oberon) tend to be darker and redder on the leading side. Our hypothesis is that all of the outermost major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus accrete reddish, low-albedo dust from the small, captured, outer retrograde satellites of these planets. The dust is kicked off by meteoritic impacts or by mutual collisions and spirals in by Poynting-Robertson drag to impact the leading sides of the outer larger satellites, including Iapetus, Callisto, Titania, and Oberon.

  17. THE 3 μm SPECTRUM OF JUPITER's IRREGULAR SATELLITE HIMALIA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Rhoden, A. R. E-mail: Alyssa.Rhoden@jhuapl.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present a medium resolution spectrum of Jupiter's irregular satellite Himalia covering the critical 3 μm spectral region. The spectrum shows no evidence for aqueously altered phyllosilicates, as had been suggested from the tentative detection of a 0.7 μm absorption, but instead shows a spectrum strikingly similar to the C/CF type asteroid 52 Europa. 52 Europa is the prototype of a class of asteroids generally situated in the outer asteroid belt between less distant asteroids which show evidence for aqueous alteration and more distant asteroids which show evidence for water ice. The spectral match between Himalia and this group of asteroids is surprising and difficult to reconcile with models of the origin of the irregular satellites.

  18. Collisional evolution of irregular satellite swarms: detectable dust around Solar system and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1980s it has been becoming increasingly clear that the Solar system's irregular satellites are collisionally evolved. The current populations are remnants of much more massive swarms that have been grinding away for billions of years. Here, we derive a general model for the collisional evolution of an irregular satellite swarm and apply it to the Solar system and extrasolar planets. The model uses a particle-in-a-box formalism and considers implications for the size distribution, which allows a connection between irregular satellite populations and predicted levels in the resulting dust cloud. Our model reproduces the Solar system's complement of observed irregulars well, and suggests that the competition between grain-grain collisions and Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag helps set the fate of the dust. In collision-dominated swarms most dust is lost to interplanetary space or impacts the host planet, while PR-dominated grains spiral in towards the planet through the domain of regular satellites. Because swarm collision rates decrease over time the main dust sink can change with time, and may help unravel the accretion history of synchronously rotating regular satellites that show brightness asymmetries, such as Callisto and Iapetus. Some level of dust must be present on au scales around the Solar system's giant planets if the irregular satellites are still grinding down, which we predict may be at detectable levels. We also use our model to predict whether dust produced by extrasolar circumplanetary swarms can be detected. Though designed with planets in mind, the coronagraphic instruments on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have the ability to detect the dust generated by these swarms, which are most detectable around planets that orbit at many tens of au from the youngest stars. Because the collisional decay of swarms is relatively insensitive to planet mass, swarms can be much brighter than their host planets and allow discovery of Neptune

  19. Ionospheric electron density irregularities observed by satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, low-low Doppler tracking link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A low-low, satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, Doppler tracking experiment was performed. The data are analyzed here for irregularities in electron density at the altitude of 212 km. The differential Doppler data with the relative motion term removed are integrated to obtain a representation of the electron density variation along the satellite path. Well-known large-scale features such as the equatorial geomagnetic anomaly and day/night ionization level differences are clearly observed in the integrated data. The larger crest of the morning geomagnetic anomaly is seen to occur in the southern (winter) hemisphere in agreement with previous observations. In addition, a sharp peak in the electron density at the day-to-night transition point is observed in two consecutive revolutions. This effect may be due to the previously postulated atmospheric shock wave generated by supersonic motion of the terminator.

  20. Dynamics and Fate of Dust from the Irregular Satellites at Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2011-04-01

    Spitzer has discovered a vast outer dust ring at Saturn (Verbiscer et al. 2009) apparently sourced from Saturn's largest irregular satellite Phoebe and likely coating Iapetus (Tamayo et al., 2011). This raises the question of whether similar rings might be detectable at Uranus and Neptune. We study the dynamics of dust arising off the irregular satellites in these systems, drawing comparisons to particle histories in the Saturn system. Particles are subject to radiation forces that cause the smallest particles to be lost onto heliocentric paths or strike the host planet. Most of the larger particles decay toward their central planet, and eventually strike the various inner regular-satellite surfaces. We undertake a numerical investigation to determine the final distribution of dust in these systems. We find that in the Uranian system, for a wide variety of plausible initial conditions, the majority of the dust strikes the outermost regular moon Oberon, with a small fraction reaching Titania. At Neptune, we find that Triton sweeps up nearly all the long-lived dust particles generated outside its orbit. Finally, we estimate the longitudinal reach of dust onto the satellites’ trailing sides as a result of particle-orbit eccentricities.

  1. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  2. IRREGULAR SATELLITES OF THE OUTER PLANETS: ORBITAL UNCERTAINTIES AND ASTROMETRIC RECOVERIES IN 2009-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Gladman, B.; Alexandersen, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Veillet, C.

    2012-11-01

    More than 100 small satellites have been identified orbiting the giant planets in distant, inclined, eccentric orbits. Detailed study of these objects requires that their orbits be known well enough to permit routine observations both from the Earth and from spacecraft. Unfortunately, many of the satellites have very poorly known orbits due to a scarcity of astrometric measurements. We have developed a reliable method to estimate the future on-sky position uncertainties of the satellites and have verified that those uncertainties provide a correct measure of the true on-sky positional uncertainty. Based on the uncertainties, we identified a set of satellites that are effectively 'lost' and another set that would be lost if additional observations were not obtained in the near future. We attempted recoveries of 26 of the latter group using the Hale 5 m and CFHT 3.6 m telescopes and found 23. This validated our method's predictions and led to significant improvements in our knowledge of the orbits of the recovered moons. There remains a handful of irregular moons which are recoverable and whose orbits will benefit from additional observations during the next decade, while 16 moons of Jupiter and Saturn are essentially lost and will require a re-survey to be located again.

  3. Frank Ross's Early Orbits of the First Irregular Satellites of Saturn and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2006-12-01

    Frank E. Ross, later the inventor of the wide-angle lens, photographic photometer, and correcting lens for large reflecting telescopes, developed for the 200-inch, that bear his name, was also an expert on celestial mechanics. After earning his PhD at Berkeley in 1901, he worked in Washington as chief assistant to Simon Newcomb, the leading astronomer of his time, until the latter's death in 1909. W. H. Pickering, who had discovered Phoebe, the first distant, irregular satellite of Saturn, was unable to calculate an orbit for it. He asked Newcomb to do it, but the "grim dean of American astronomy" was too busy, and turned the task over to Ross to do, mostly on his own time. The young assistant succeeded, but spent many sleepless nights on the job. He and his brother Walter were also running a cigar store in Washington at the time. Charles D. Perrine at Lick Observatory discovered J VI and J VII, the first two similar satellites of Jupiter, in 1904 and 1905, and could not obtain satisfactory orbits for them either, even with Director W. W. Campbell's help. Ross then calculated their orbits also, again at a tremendous cost of effort. He used log tables, pencil and paper, and a simple adding machine for his computing tasks, as all "computers" (persons) did at that time. These three satellites were the first to be discovered by photography.

  4. Dispersion of the Himalia family of jovian irregular satellites by planetesimal encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos

    2017-06-01

    Giant planets are believed to have migrated significant radial distances due to interaction with a primordial planetesimal disk (Tsiganis et al. 2005). This process profoundly sculpted the solar system, shaping the distribution of the different types of heliocentric objects: the giant planets, the Trojans, the Main Asteroid Belt and the KBOs. Meanwhile, the same migration may have influenced the distribution of objects in the local planetocentric system as well. Since migration is achieved mainly by planet-planetesimal encounters, we focus on irregular satellites far from the host, thus susceptible to planetesimal perturbations. Specifically, we aim to reproduce a puzzling feature of the jovian Himalia group of prograde satellites: a wide spread in $a$ and $e$, with all group members being $>200$ m/s from Himalia and apparently too high to be consistent with a purely collisional origin. Here we investigate the evolution of a pre-existing Himalia group during planetary migration.We do this in a two-step procedure. Firstly, we perform migration simulations and record the states of planetesimals approaching Jupiter. Secondly, a nascent, closely-packed Himalia group with velocity dispersion of a few 10 m/s is integrated under the gravitational disturbance of the planetesimal fly-bys. We find that these planetesimal encounters disperse the group dramatically, bumping $\\sim 60\\%$ of the members to $>200$ m/s with respect to Himalia. Particularly, $a$ and $e$ suffer the most variation while the change in $i$ is often limited, matching the actual values for the observed group fairly well.Current models posit extensive collisional processing of the irregular satellite population following the planet migration phase (Bottke et al. 2010). In evaluating the collisional probability between a group member and Himalia, we find that the closer they are, the more likely that collisions occur. This suggests that members adjacent to Himalia are more likely to be collisionally

  5. The Himalia Satellite Group: A Case Study on the Dynamical Self-spreading of Families of Irregular Satellites and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daohai; Christou, Apostolos A.

    2015-11-01

    Many of the outer planets' irregular satellites are grouped into families, thought to originate from collisional fragmentation (Nesvorný et al 2004, AJ). Interestingly, families associated with the largest irregulars are either more dispersed than expected (e.g. J6 Himalia; Nesvorný et al 2003, AJ), or do not exist at all (e.g. S9 Phoebe; Ćuk et al 2003, DDA meeting #34). Christou (2005, Icarus) found that gravitational scattering by Himalia of its own group could explain the large velocity dispersion found by Nesvorný et al (2003, AJ). At the same time, Christou identified a new type of dynamical mechanism that intermittently locks the node of the satellite J10 Lysithea to that of Himalia. The same mechanism, but due to Ceres, was recently found to operate within the Hoffmeister family, dispersing its members and allowing an estimate of its age (Novaković et al 2015, ApJ).Here we revisit the issue of family self-dispersion, aiming to better understand it by studying its effects on the Himalia group. For this we utilise (a) intensive test particle simulations on a larger scale than those by Christou (2005, Icarus) (b) a semi-analytical treatment of the new resonance based on the secular theory of coorbital motion by Namouni (1999, Icarus). This has allowed us to obtain firmer constraints on the rate of dispersion over time and on how the resonance affects the long-term evolution of the orbital elements. A principal result of this work is that particles near the resonance evolve differently than those away from it. During the meeting, we will present a new estimate of the family’s age as well as an analysis of the resonant structure and how it affects Himalia family members. We will also discuss the broader implications for the long-term evolution of orbital concentrations of small bodies in the solar system.Astronomical research at the Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  6. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J.; Fraser, Wesley C.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G.; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2004-08-01

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. `Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The `irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude mR = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  7. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Kavelaars, J J; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J; Fraser, Wesley C; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D; Burns, Joseph A; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G; Jacobson, Robert A

    2004-08-19

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. 'Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The 'irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude m(R) = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50 km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  8. Ionospheric Irregularities Predictions and Plumes Characterization for Satellite Data Validation and Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-17

    VHF radar • Irregularity prediction model (Emanoel Costa) • Irregularity prediction • 6 different GNSS receivers campaign • References São Luís...GEC-PLESSEY Card – Cornell, Stanford - U Box ) Keith Groves, Cesar Valladares, Todd Walter, Geoff Crowley, Paul Kintner† 6 different GNSS ...receivers campaign Campaing of 6 different GNSS receivers(Stanford) Different GNSS receivers behavior under scintillation condictions during March 24 2013

  9. HILAT a multi-experiment satellite addressing the dynamics of irregularity formation in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    A combined beacon, in-situ, and optical satellite mission is being prepared for definitive investigation of the formation, development, and decay of plasma-density irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere. The satellite, named HILAT (P83-1), will carry a VHF-UHF-L-Band coherent beacon for scintillation and TEC measurements, three payloads for in-situ and ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling observations, and a vacuum-ultraviolet imager for meso-scale recording of dayside and nightside auroras and emissions from the F layer. Observations are planned at northern latitudes ranging from the plasmapause to the pole, employing beacon receiving stations which also will decode telemetry from the other payloads. Launch is planned for the boreal summer of 1983.

  10. New orbits of irregular satellites designed for the predictions of stellar occultations up to 2020, based on thousands of new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Beauvalet, L.; Desmars, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Morgado, B. E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2016-10-01

    Gomes-Júnior et al. published 3613 positions for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and 1787 positions for the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe. These observations were made between 1995 and 2014 and have an estimated error of about 60-80 mas. Based on this set of positions, we derived new orbits for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter: Himalia, Elara, Pasiphae, Carme, Lysithea, Sinope, Ananke and Leda. For Phoebe we updated the ephemeris from Desmars et al. using 75 per cent more positions than the previous one. Because of their orbital characteristics, it is common belief that the irregular satellites were captured by the giant planets in the early Solar system, but there is no consensus for a single model explaining where they were formed. Size, shape, albedo and composition would help to trace back their true origin, but these physical parameters are yet poorly known for irregular satellites. The observation of stellar occultations would allow for the determination of such parameters. Indeed Jupiter will cross the galactic plane in 2019-2020 and Saturn in 2018, improving a lot the chances of observing such events in the near future. Using the derived ephemerides and the UCAC4 catalogue we managed to identify 5442 candidate stellar occultations between 2016 January and 2020 December for the nine satellites studied here. We discussed how the successful observation of a stellar occultation by these objects is possible and present some potential occultations.

  11. Investigating GAIM-GM's Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, B.

    2015-12-01

    GAIM-GM is a modularized physics based data assimilation model, that ingests data from multiple data sources. One data source is slant total electron content (TEC) from a ground station network to satellites, and along the occultation path between multiple satellites. This study examines GAIM-GM's capability to sense a scintillation feature in the ionosphere, overlaid on an IFM electron density grid, from simulated satellite constellations ingesting the slant TEC values into GAIM-GM. Satellite constellations were developed in an extension of Matlab, called STK. A real ground station network generated from IGS was ingested into STK to calculate access times to the satellite constellation and use the access data to compute the slant TEC values on the perturbed IFM grid. It was discovered that a Walker constellation would give the most frequent revisit time to the scintillation feature, which co-rotates with the Earth, capturing both the day and nightside ionosphere throughout the evaluation period (96 hrs). The size of the feature was varied along with the number of satellites in the Walker constellation. 25 different scenarios with these parameters varied were created to determine the sensitivity of GAIM-GM to sense the feature. A simple heuristic algorithm was applied comparing the truth data, in this case the perturbed IFM grid, to the GAIM-GM output in each scenario across the entire grid, and for those grid points within the feature.

  12. The STP/S3-4 Satellite Experiment: Equatorial F-region Irregularities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-14

    mean i-n mass fluctuations at 5-20 meter resolution. The S3-4 experiment has been discussed by Szuszczewicz et al. (1981). In this paper , we discuss...observations of irregularities in an isolated and decaying plasma bubble", Paper presented at International Symposium on Equatorial Aeronomy, Aguidilla, P.R...backscatter plumes", DNA report, SRI International, (Nov. 1979). 12 Tsunoda, R.T.: M.J. Baron, J. Owen and D.M. Towle , "Altair: An incoherent

  13. Periods, Poles, and Shapes of Irregular Satellites of Saturn from Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    The lightcurve-observation campaign of irregular (outer) moons of Saturn with the Cassini Imaging experiment is ongoing successfully. 21 rotation periods are now known, ranging from 5.5 h to ~3 d. The position of the Cassini spacecraft inside the orbits of the irregular moons allows observations from unusual geometries, especially at various phase angles and rapidly changing aspect angles. Many lightcurves are non-symmetric, and the large diversity of lightcurves for different objects indicates very different shapes. Lightcurves with three prominent maxima and minima are quite common, especially at phase angles higher than ~50°. For several moons, recent observations from different viewing geometries provide the potential to reveal pole directions and convex-hull "photometric shapes". As seen from the poles, Ymir is now known to have a triangular shape with two about equally long sides and one shorter side. Its pole is approximately oriented antipodally to the major planets. Siarnaq data indicate that this moon has also a triangular cross-section, but with a very different pole direction and extreme seasons. Kiviuq’s lightcurves show a very large amplitude even at low phase angles, suggesting a very elongated configuration with a ratio of the equatorial axes of about 3:1.

  14. Temporary Capture of Asteroids by a Planet: Dependence of Prograde/Retrograde Capture on Asteroids’ Semimajor Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Ida, S.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the prograde/retrograde temporary capture of asteroids by a planet on their original heliocentric semimajor axes through analytical arguments and numerical orbital integrations in order to discuss the origins of irregular satellites of giant planets. We found that capture is mostly retrograde for the asteroids near the planetary orbit and is prograde for those from farther orbits. An analytical investigation reveals the intrinsic dynamics of these dependences and gives boundary semimajor axes for the change in prograde/retrograde capture. The numerical calculations support the idea of deriving analytical formulae and confirm their dependence. Our numerical results show that the capture probability is much higher for bodies from the inner region than for outer ones. These results imply that retrograde irregular satellites of Jupiter are most likely captured bodies from the nearby orbits of Jupiter that may have the same origin as Trojan asteroids, while prograde irregular satellites originate from far inner regions such as the main-belt asteroid region.

  15. On collisional capture rates of irregular satellites around the gas-giant planets and the minimum mass of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. Elliott; Hansen, Bradley M. S.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the probability that an inelastic collision of planetesimals within the Hill sphere of the Jovian planets could explain the presence and orbits of observed irregular satellites. Capture of satellites via this mechanism is highly dependent on not only the mass of the protoplanetary disc, but also the shape of the planetesimal size distribution. We performed 2000 simulations for integrated time intervals ˜2 Myr and found that, given the currently accepted value for the minimum mass solar nebula and planetesimal number density based upon the Nesvorný et al. and Charnoz & Morbidelli size distribution dN˜D-3.5dD, the collision rates for the different Jovian planets range between ˜0.6 and ≳170 Myr-1 for objects with radii 1 km ≤r≤ 10 km. Additionally, we found that the probability that these collisions remove enough orbital energy to yield a bound orbit was ≲10-5 and had very little dependence on the relative size of the planetesimals. Of these collisions, the collision energy between two objects was ≳103 times the gravitational binding energy for objects with radii ˜100 km. We find that capturing irregular satellites via collisions between unbound objects can only account for ˜0.1 per cent of the observed population, hence this cannot be the sole method of producing irregular satellites.

  16. DISCOVERY OF TWO ADDITIONAL JOVIAN IRREGULARS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Veillet, C.; Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Rousselot, P.

    2012-07-15

    We report on the discovery of two previously undetected irregular satellites of Jupiter (S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2) during recovery observations of other known satellites. S/2010 J 1 was discovered with the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope on September 7 UT of 2011, while S/2010 J 2 was discovered on September 8 with the 3.5 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The satellites have r-band magnitudes of 23.2 {+-} 0.3 and 24.0 {+-} 0.3, for S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2, respectively, indicating diameters of {approx}2-3 km. Both S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2 are on bound retrograde orbits. Time-averaged integrated orbits suggest the association to the Carme and Ananke groups, respectively. Given that the satellites were discovered within a small field during the routine observations of the previously known irregulars, their discovery agrees with predictions that other moons of similar sizes remain undetected in the Jovian Hill sphere.

  17. Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere (SIGMA) II: Inverse modeling with high-latitude observations to deduce irregularity physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K. B.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.; Scales, W. A.; Frissell, N. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Spogli, L.; Mitchell, C.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2016-09-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is caused by irregularities in the ionospheric electron density. The characterization of ionospheric irregularities is important to further our understanding of the underlying physics. Our goal is to characterize the intermediate (0.1-10 km) to medium (10-100 km) scale high-latitude irregularities which are likely to produce these scintillations. In this paper, we characterize irregularities observed by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) during a geomagnetically active period on 9 March 2012. For this purpose, along with the measurements, we are using the recently developed model: "Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere" (SIGMA). The model is particularly applicable at high latitudes as it accounts for the complicated geometry of the magnetic field lines in these regions and is presented in an earlier paper. We use an inverse modeling technique to derive irregularity parameters by comparing the high rate (50 Hz) GNSS observations to the modeled outputs. In this investigation, we consider experimental observations from both the northern and southern high latitudes. The results include predominance of phase scintillations compared to amplitude scintillations that imply the presence of larger-scale irregularities of sizes above the Fresnel scale at GPS frequencies, and the spectral index ranges from 2.4 to 4.2 and the RMS number density ranges from 3e11 to 2.3e12 el/m3. The best fits we obtained from our inverse method that considers only weak scattering mostly agree with the observations. Finally, we suggest some improvements in order to facilitate the possibility of accomplishing a unique solution to such inverse problems.

  18. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  19. [Retrograde ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Malossini, G; Ficarra, V; Caleffi, G

    1999-06-01

    Antegrade ejaculation requires intact anatomy and innervation of the bladder neck. Retrograde ejaculation is an uncommon cause of infertility and can be defined as the escape of seminal fluid from the posterior urethra into the bladder. This pathological condition can result from disturbances at the bladder neck due to anatomical lesions, neuropathic disorders or pharmacological influences. Also congenital and idiophatic causes have been described. The diagnosis may be confirmed by findings sperm in post-coital specimens of urine. Pharmacological manipulation, electro-ejaculation and vibro-ejaculation can be utilized to recovery ejaculation. When anterograde ejaculation in this patients cannot be restored artificial insemination using sperm recovered from the antegrade post-coital urine is indicated. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the data of literature on aetiology and therapy of retrograde ejaculation.

  20. Diagnostics of magnetospheric electron density and irregularities at altitudes <5000 km using whistler and Z mode echoes from radio sounding on the IMAGE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Carpenter, D. L.; Bell, T. F.; Spasojević, M.; Inan, U. S.; Li, J.; Chen, X.; Venkatasubramanian, A.; Harikumar, J.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2004-11-01

    When the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite operates in the inner plasmasphere and at moderate to low altitudes over the polar regions, pulses emitted at the low end of its 3-kHz to 3-MHz sounding frequency range can propagate in the whistler mode and/or in the Z mode. During soundings with both 25.6-ms pulses and 3.2-ms pulses, whistler mode echoes have been observed in (1) "discrete," lightning whistler-like forms and (2) diffuse, widely time spread forms suggestive of mode coupling at the boundaries of density irregularities. Discrete echoes have been observed at altitudes less than ≈5000 km both inside the plasmasphere and over the auroral and polar regions, being most common inside the plasmasphere. Diffuse echoes have also been observed at altitudes less than 5000 km, being most common poleward of the plasmasphere. Either discrete or diffuse echoes or both have been detected during one or more soundings on at least half of all IMAGE orbits. In regions poleward of the plasmasphere, diffuse Z mode echoes of a kind reported by Carpenter et al. (2003) were found to accompany both discrete and diffuse whistler mode echoes 90% of the time and were also present during 90% of the soundings when no whistler mode echoes were detected. It is proposed that the observed discrete whistler mode echoes are a consequence of RPI signal reflections at the bottom side of the ionosphere and that diffuse whistler mode echoes are a result of scattering of RPI signals by geomagnetic field-aligned electron density irregularities located within 2000 km earthward of the satellite and in directions close to that of the field line passing through IMAGE. Diffuse Z mode echoes are believed to be due to scattering of RPI signals from electron density irregularities within 3000 km of the satellite, particularly those in the generally cross-B direction. Consistent with previous works, our results indicate that the magnetosphere at high latitudes is highly structured, with

  1. Jupiter: its captured satellites.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M

    1971-08-27

    Because of the small size and irregular orbits of the seven outer satellites of Jupiter, it is often assumed that they were derived by capture. The conditions whereby Jupiter can capture satellites have therefore been examined. Relationships derived on the basis of the three-body problem for planets in elliptical orbits enable the dimensions of the capture orbits around Jupiter to be calculated. It is found that Jupiter may capture satellites through the inner Lagrangian point when at perihelion or at aphelion. Captures at perihelion should give rise to satellites in direct orbits of 11.48 x 10(6) kilometers and capture at aphelion to retrograde orbits of 21.7 x 10(6) kilometers. The correspondence with the seven outer satellites suggests that Jupiter VI, VIl, and X in direct orbits at 11.47, 11.74, and 11.85 x 10(6) kilometers were captured at Jupiter perihelion, whereas Jupiter VIII, IX, XI, and XII in retrograde orbits of 23.5, 23.7, 22.5, and 21.2 x 10(6) kilometers were captured when Jupiter was at aphelion. Examination of the precapture orbits indicates that the seven outer satellites were derived from the asteroid belt.

  2. Distant retrograde orbits and the asteroid hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, Ettore; Ceccaroni, Marta; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Rossi, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) gained a novel wave of fame in space mission design because of their numerous advantages within the framework of the US plans for bringing a large asteroid sample in the vicinity of the Earth as the next target for human exploration. DROs are stable solutions of the three-body problem that can be used whenever an object, whether of natural or artificial nature, is required to remain in the neighborhood of a celestial body without being gravitationally captured by it. As such, they represent an alternative option to Halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Also known under other names ( e.g., quasi-satellite orbits, cis-lunar orbits, family- f orbits) these orbital configurations found interesting applications in several mission profiles, like that of a spacecraft orbiting around the small irregularly shaped satellite of Mars Phobos or the large Jovian moon Europa. In this paper a basic explanation of the DRO dynamics is presented in order to clarify some geometrical properties that characterize them. Their accessibility is then discussed from the point of view of mission analysis under different assumptions. Finally, their relevance within the framework of the present asteroid hazard protection programs is shown, stressing the significant increase in warning time they would provide in the prediction of impactors coming from the direction of the Sun.

  3. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... may develop problems as a result of a hormone imbalance. For example, disorders of the thyroid gland can cause menstrual irregularities if the levels of thyroid hormone in the blood become too low or too ...

  4. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  5. Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated Electric and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Sub-Auroral, Middle, and Low Latitudes in the Topside Ionosphere Observed with the DEMETER and DMSP Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Liebrecht, C; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Detailed observations of the plasma structure and irregularities that characterize the topside ionosphere at sub-auroral, middle, and low-latitudes are gathered with probes on the DEMETER and DMSP satellites. In particular, we present DEMETER observations near 700 km altitude that reveal: (1) the electric field irregularities and density depletions at mid-latitudes are remarkably similar to those associated with equatorial spread-F at low latitudes; (2) the mid-latitude density structures contain both depletions and enhancements with scale lengths along the spacecraft trajectory that typically vary from 10's to 100's of km; (3) in some cases, ELF magnetic field irregularities are observed in association with the electric field irregularities on the walls of the plasma density structures and appear to be related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves; (4) during severe geomagnetic storms, broad regions of nightside plasma density structures are typically present, in some instances extending from the equator to the subauroral regions; and (5) intense, broadband electric and magnetic field irregularities are observed at sub-auroral latitudes during geomagnetic storm periods that are typically associated with the trough region. Data from successive DEMETER orbits during storm periods in both the daytime and nighttime illustrate how enhancements of both the ambient plasma density, as well as sub-auroral and mid-latitude density structures, correlate and evolve with changes in the Dst. The DEMETER data are compared with near simultaneous observations gathered by the DMSP satellites near 840 km. The observations are related to theories of sub-auroral and mid-latitude plasma density structuring during geomagnetic storms and penetration electric fields and are highly germane to understanding space weather effects regarding disruption of communication and navigation signals in the near-space environment.

  6. Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception.

    PubMed

    David, S; Barkin, J S

    1992-01-01

    This is an initial report of spontaneous retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception in an adult. The patient is a 72-yr-old women with a history of ovarian cancer and hiatal hernia, who presented with symptoms of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. Retrograde intussusception was diagnosed endoscopically and confirmed radiographically with an upper gastrointestinal series. Heightened awareness of this entity may lead to its more frequent diagnosis.

  7. Functional (dissociative) retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Staniloiu, A

    2017-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia is described as condition which can occur after direct brain damage, but which occurs more frequently as a result of a psychiatric illness. In order to understand the amnesic condition, content-based divisions of memory are defined. The measurement of retrograde memory is discussed and the dichotomy between "organic" and "psychogenic" retrograde amnesia is questioned. Briefly, brain damage-related etiologies of retrograde amnesia are mentioned. The major portion of the review is devoted to dissociative amnesia (also named psychogenic or functional amnesia) and to the discussion of an overlap between psychogenic and "brain organic" forms of amnesia. The "inability of access hypothesis" is proposed to account for most of both the organic and psychogenic (dissociative) patients with primarily retrograde amnesia. Questions such as why recovery from retrograde amnesia can occur in retrograde (dissociative) amnesia, and why long-term new learning of episodic-autobiographic episodes is possible, are addressed. It is concluded that research on retrograde amnesia research is still in its infancy, as the neural correlates of memory storage are still unknown. It is argued that the recollection of episodic-autobiographic episodes most likely involves frontotemporal regions of the right hemisphere, a region which appears to be hypometabolic in patients with dissociative amnesia.

  8. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  9. Retrograde ejaculation: simpler treatment.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Rene

    2007-07-01

    To report a case of successful treatment of complete retrograde ejaculation by use of a novel, simple, and noninvasive home-based protocol. Case report. Private family medicine clinic. A couple with primary infertility due to the male's complete retrograde ejaculation due to childhood's bladder surgery. The woman was healthy with normal menstrual cycles. After intercourse, the male patient voided a urine-semen mixture from a previously alkalinized urine and proceeded to inseminate it intravaginally into his wife. Determination of best time for intercourse was done by use of the ovulation (Billings) method. This protocol has been used successfully by this couple to conceive two healthy children. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of successful management of infertility through this protocol. It might be appropriate to try this method first on select patients with retrograde ejaculation.

  10. Some background about satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Four tables of planetary and satellite data are presented which list satellite discoveries, planetary parameters, satellite orbits, and satellite physical properties respectively. A scheme for classifying the satellites is provided and it is noted that most known moons fall into three general classes: regular satellites, collisional shards, and irregular satellites. Satellite processes are outlined with attention given to origins, dynamical and thermal evolution, surface processes, and composition and cratering. Background material is provided for each family of satellites.

  11. Irregular Applications: Architectures & Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, John T.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone

    2012-02-06

    Irregular applications are characterized by irregular data structures, control and communication patterns. Novel irregular high performance applications which deal with large data sets and require have recently appeared. Unfortunately, current high performance systems and software infrastructures executes irregular algorithms poorly. Only coordinated efforts by end user, area specialists and computer scientists that consider both the architecture and the software stack may be able to provide solutions to the challenges of modern irregular applications.

  12. Irregular Saturnian Moon Lightcurves from Cassini-ISS Observations: Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.

    2013-10-01

    Cassini ISS-NAC observations of the irregular moons of Saturn revealed various physical information on these objects. 16 synodic rotational periods: Hati (S43): 5.45 h; Mundilfari (S25): 6.74 h; Suttungr (S23): ~7.4 h; Kari (S45): 7.70 h; Siarnaq (S29): 10.14 h; Tarvos (S21): 10.66 h; Ymir (S19, sidereal period): 11.92220 h ± 0.1 s; Skathi (S27): ~12 h; Hyrrokkin (S44): 12.76 h; Ijiraq (S22): 13.03 h; Albiorix (S26): 13.32 h; Bestla (S39): 14.64 h; Bebhionn (S37): ~15.8 h; Kiviuq (S24): 21.82 h; Thrymr (S30): ~27 h; Erriapus (S28): ~28 h. The average period for the prograde-orbiting moons is ~16 h, for the retrograde moons ~11½ h (includes Phoebe's 9.2735 h from Bauer et al., AJ, 2004). Phase-angle dependent behavior of lightcurves: The phase angles of the observations range from 2° to 105°. The lightcurves which were obtained at low phase (<40°) show the 2-maxima/ 2-minima pattern expected for this kind of objects. At higher phases, more complicated lightcurves emerge, giving rough indications on shapes. Ymir pole and shape: For satellite Ymir, a convex-hull shape model and the pole-axis orientation have been derived. Ymir's north pole points toward λ = 230°±180°, β = -85°±10°, or RA = 100°±20°, Dec = -70°±10°. This is anti-parallel to the rotation axes of the major planets, indicating that Ymir not just orbits, but also rotates in a retrograde sense. The shape of Ymir resembles a triangular prism with edge lengths of ~20, ~24, and ~25 km. The ratio between the longest 25 km) and shortest axis (pole axis, ~15 km) is ~1.7. Erriapus seasons: The pole direction of object Erriapus has probably a low ecliptic latitude. This gives this moon seasons similar to the Uranian regular moons with periods where the sun stands very high in the sky over many years, and with years-long periods of permanent night. Hati density: The rotational frequency of the fastest rotator (Hati) is close to the frequency where the object would lose material from the surface if

  13. Asteroid 2014 OL339: yet another Earth quasi-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-12-01

    Our planet has one permanently bound satellite - the Moon - a likely large number of mini-moons or transient irregular natural satellites, and three temporary natural retrograde satellites or quasi-satellites. These quasi-moons - (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35 and 2013 LX28 - are unbound companions to the Earth. The orbital evolution of quasi-satellites may transform them into temporarily bound satellites of our planet. Here, we study the dynamical evolution of the recently discovered Aten asteroid 2014 OL339 to show that it is currently following a quasi-satellite orbit with respect to the Earth. This episode started at least about 775 yr ago and it will end 165 yr from now. The orbit of this object is quite chaotic and together with 164207 are the most unstable of the known Earth quasi-satellites. This group of minor bodies is, dynamically speaking, very heterogeneous but three of them exhibit Kozai-like dynamics: the argument of perihelion of 164207 oscillates around -90°, the one of 277810 librates around 180° and that of 2013 LX28 remains around 0°. Asteroid 2014 OL339 is not currently engaged in any Kozai-like dynamics.

  14. Focal retrograde amnesia documented with matching anterograde and retrograde procedures.

    PubMed

    Manning, Lilianne

    2002-01-01

    Focal retrograde amnesia is an unusual and theoretically challenging form of memory disorder. The case of a 65-year-old woman presenting with focal retrograde amnesia is reported. Following a cardiac arrest and subsequent hypoxia she remained in a coma for 24 h with evidence of epileptiform activity during the early recovery period. MR scans, 4 and 7 months post-onset, showed mild bifrontal atrophic changes mainly affecting white matter areas. An [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose resting PET scan 1-year post-onset demonstrated right occipito-temporo-parietal hypometabolism. We were able to document the patient's performance on an extensive range of anterograde and retrograde tests and to monitor her recovery of function by assessing her performance at 4, 12 and 24 months post-onset. Spared anterograde memory was observed on a range of verbal and non-verbal tests, including matched tasks that compared pre-illness and post-illness onset recollections. In contrast, her performance on retrograde memory tests, using detailed autobiographical and public events verbal and photographic tasks, showed a temporally-graded retrograde amnesia, more particularly affecting memory for autobiographical episodes. Possible mechanisms underlying CH's focal retrograde amnesia are discussed in terms of Damasio's time-locked multiregional retroactivation model.

  15. Iloperidone-induced retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott A

    2013-05-01

    This case series describes the development of retrograde ejaculation with the antipsychotic iloperidone. Iloperidone is a relatively new antipsychotic and has a strong α-1 receptor antagonism, which may explain this rare adverse effect.

  16. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  17. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  18. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  19. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  20. Equatorial irregularity belt and its movement during a magnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vats, H. O.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Murthy, B. S.; Janve, A. V.; Rai, R. K.; Singh, M.; Gurm, H. S.; Jain, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence for an equatorial irregularity belt and its movement during a magnetic storm has been obtained from Faraday rotation measurements at a chain of 140-MHz radio beacons receiving from the ATS-6 satellite. The stations covered a latitude region from the magnetic equator to the 45 deg N dip on the Indian subcontinent. An irregularity belt extending from the magnetic equator to about 27 deg N latitude was observed during the main phase of the magnetic storm of 10 January, 1976.

  1. The Annual Retrograde Nutation Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, C.; Lambert, S.; Bizouard, C.

    2016-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry is the only technique that can estimate Earth nutations with an accuracy under the milliarcsecond level. With 35 years of geodetic VLBI observations, the principal nutation terms caused by luni-solar tides and geophysical response have been estimated. We focus on the variability. Two of them present very significant amplitude and phase variations: the retrograde Free Core Nutation (FCN) with a period of around 430 days and the Annual Retrograde Nutation (ARN). Despite progress made in global circulation models, the atmospheric and ocean excitation cannot account for that. In particular the ARN shows an amplitude modulation of approximately six years, reminiscent of the six-year geomagnetic oscillation in the Length-of-Day (LOD). As to the latter, we suggest that the nutation term variability may have deep Earth causes, and we estimate an order of magnitude of Earth internal structure parameters to explain this variability.

  2. Making your own retrograde carrier.

    PubMed

    Chai, W L; Ngeow, W C

    1999-02-01

    One of the problems faced by manufacturers is the difficulty in constructing a robust and reliable, angled applicator tip. This can be overcome by handmaking your own retrograde carrier. The applicator tip may be bent to about 50 degrees and, if a kink occurs while bending the tip, it can be replaced easily by a new modified needle. Because the wire used is flexible, it can adapt to the bend without a problem. Narrower carriers can also be made using a 20-G needle, perhaps more suitable for retrograde fillings of molar apices. Because the carrier is designed to be used once only, the problems of it being difficult to load and liable to blockages should not arise.

  3. Retrograde ejaculation in a stallion.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P

    2001-02-15

    Retrograde ejaculation was diagnosed in a 10-year-old Arabian stallion. Despite behavioral signs consistent with ejaculation, the collection receptacle of an artificial vagina remained devoid of semen on numerous occasions. Catheterization of the urinary bladder yielded large numbers of spermatozoa, even when an ejaculate was obtained, whereas low numbers (< 1 X 10(6)/ml) of spermatozoa are found in the bladder of clinically normal stallions after ejaculation. Endoscopic examination of the urethra, seminal colliculus, and bladder failed to reveal abnormalities. Medical treatment with imipramine hydrochloride apparently resulted in improvement initially, but was not curative. Further diagnostic and treatment measures were declined and the stallion was castrated. For stallions that seemingly fail to ejaculate or for ejaculates that contain lower seminal volumes or numbers of spermatozoa than expected, obtaining a urine sample after ejaculation via bladder catheterization is a simple diagnostic procedure that may be used to investigate the possibility of retrograde ejaculation.

  4. Forecasting morphology and dynamics of F-layer irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.

    1990-05-03

    Data and analyses are at hand to forecast the morphology and dynamics of global F-layer irregularities. For the planners of systems which are impaired by the scattering characteristics of F-layer irregularities, forecasting the morphology allows them to evaluate the utility of operating systems and to plan means for integrating back-ups. For the active users forecasting the dynamics of changes in intensity and characteristics of the irregularities as a function of geophysical conditions allows for warning operators about impending problems. For the polar region the morphological parameter used as the principal forcing function for intensification of F-layer irregularities is the solar flux. Intense irregularities appear during high sunspot number years. For the auroral region the parameter used as forcing function is magnetic activity as shown by studies of radio stars, low altitude satellites and synchronous satellites. Increased solar flux plays a role both pushing the F-layer irregularity region equatorwards in latitude and increasing the quiet day intensity. For the sub-auroral region the magnetic activity during the injection phase of the magnetic storm plays a leading role. During the recovery phase of the magnetic storm the effect of the decay of ring current ions on the sub-auroral region is such that irregularities are formed of low intensity without auroral or magnetic activity.

  5. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  6. Endoscopic retrograde sphincterotomy in swine.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Provenza, J M; Doyle, J T; Bacon, B R

    1991-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde sphincterotomy was performed on four sedated pigs, ages 3-4 months, using a standard human duodenoscope and papillotome. Sphincterotomies, 1 cm in length, were well-tolerated, and all animals recovered promptly, spontaneously regained gastrointestinal function, and gained weight. The first three animals were sacrificed after one week, and autopsy revealed no complications. The fourth animal was sacrificed immediately following the procedure, and no evidence of perforation was found. These observations demonstrate that the pig is a valid experimental model for endoscopic sphincterotomy. Its use in training is limited by technical and anatomic differences from humans. Potential uses of this technique in research are discussed.

  7. German Views of Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Vorbeck mastered the art of irregular adaptation and survival. In the Second World War, Otto Skorzeny perfected the strategic commando raid. After serving...theater of World War I, Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck mastered the art of irregular adaptation and survival. In the Second World War, Otto Skorzeny perfected ...commander, Otto Skorzeny, perfected a cornerstone operation of irregular warfare—the strategic commando raid. In September of 1943, under direct orders

  8. Bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Hanson, W. B.; Mcclure, J. P.; Cragin, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    By using the Ogo 6 satellite, McClure and Hanson (1973) have discovered sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region ion number density. In the present investigation, a description is provided of the properties of a distinct category of sinusoidal irregularities found in equatorial data from the AE-C and AE-E satellites. The observed scale sizes vary from about 300 m to 3 km in the direction perpendicular to B, overlapping with and extending the range observed by using Ogo 6. Attention is given to low and high resolution data, a comparison with Huancayo ionograms, the confinement of 'bottomside sinusoidal' (BSS) irregularities essentially to the bottomside of the F layer, spectral characteristics, and BSS, scintillation, and ionosonde observations.

  9. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  10. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  11. Anisotropy of high-latitude nighttime F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.C.; Rino, C.L.; Owen, J.; Tsunoda, R.T.

    1982-12-01

    The anisotropy of intermediate-scale, F region irregularities in the nighttime auroral zone is described. The study is based upon spaced-receiver phase scintillation measurements made with the Wideband satellite at Poker Flat, Alaska. A systematic dependence of irregularity anisotropy with local time and magnetic latitude is observed, suggesting convective control. Sheetlike irregularities are confined to the zone of east-west drift near the equatorward boundary of the auroral zone, and at the flow reversal, or Harang discontinuity, the cross-field extension of the sheets is reduced. The extension of rodlike irregularities, which are observed poleward of the zonal convection boundary, also shows apparent convection dominance. Mechanisms for convection control of the anisotropy are discussed.

  12. Rocket-borne Langmuir probe for plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, H. S. S.

    2013-11-01

    Ionospheric plasma density exhibits very large spatial and temporal variations known as ionosphere irregularities. These irregularities are generated by a number of processes related to plasma as well as neutral dynamics. The rocket- or satellite-borne Langmuir probe (LP) is very simple and yet a very powerful tool to measure spatial variation of plasma density enabling one to study ionosphere irregularities. This article describes how a rocket-borne LP can be used to study ionosphere irregularities. It begins with the basic principle of the LP, the ionospheric regions where it can be used, various sizes and shapes of the LP sensors, the effect of geomagnetic field and vehicle wake on LP measurements. Mechanical and electronic details of typical LP instrument are given next. Strengths, weaknesses and specifications of LP instrument are also given. Rocket-borne LP has been used by a large number of scientists in the world to study ionospheric irregularities produced through plasma instabilities in the equatorial electrojet region, in spread F and those produced by neutral turbulence. Highlights of such irregularity measurements are presented to give the reader a flavor of the type of studies which can be undertaken using a rocket-borne LP. The present capability of rocket-borne LP is to detect vertical scale sizes of ionospheric irregularities from a few km down to about 10 cm with percentage amplitudes as small as 0.001%. Finally, a few suggestions are given for the improvement the LP instrumentation for future use.

  13. An irregular island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-22

      This image, courtesy of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), captures the glow of distant stars within NGC 5264, a dwarf galaxy located just over 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent). Dwarf galaxies like NGC 5264 typically possess around a billion stars — just one per cent of the number of stars found within the Milky Way. They are usually found orbiting other, larger, galaxies such as our own, and are thought to form from the material left over from the messy formation of their larger cosmic relatives. NGC 5264 clearly possesses an irregular shape — unlike the more common spiral or elliptical galaxies — with knots of blue star formation. Astronomers believe that this is due to the gravitational interactions between NGC 5264 and other galaxies nearby. These past flirtations sparked the formation of new generations of stars, which now glow in bright shades of blue.

  14. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  15. Transfer and capture into distant retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Christopher J.

    This dissertation utilizes theory and techniques derived from the fields of dynamical systems theory, astrodyanamics, celestial mechanics, and fluid mechanics to analyze the phenomenon of satellite capture and interrelated spacecraft transfers in restricted three-body systems. The results extend current knowledge and understanding of capture dynamics in the context of astrodynamics and celestial mechanics. Manifold theory, fast Lyapunov indicator maps, and the classification of space structure facilitate an analysis of the transport of objects from the chaotic reaches of the solar system to the distant retrograde region in the sun-Jupiter system. Apart from past studies this dissertation considers the role of the complex lobe structure encompassing stable regions in the circular restricted three-body problem. These structures are shown to be responsible for the phenomenon of sticky orbits and the transport of objects among stable regions. Since permanent capture can only be achieved through a change in energy, fast Lyapunov indicator maps and other methods which reveal the structure of the conservative system are used to discern capture regions and identify the underpinnings of the dynamics. Fast Lyapunov indicator maps provide an accurate classification of orbits of permanent capture and escape, yet monopolize computational resources. In anticipation of a fully three-dimensional analysis in the dissipative system a new mapping parameter is introduced based on energy degradation and averaged velocity. Although the study specifically addresses the sun-Jupiter system, the qualitative results and devised techniques can be applied throughout the solar system and to capture about extrasolar planets. Extending the analysis beyond the exterior of the stable distant retrograde region fosters the construction of transfer orbits from low-Earth orbit to a stable periodic orbit at the center of the stable distant retrograde region. Key to this analysis is the predictability of

  16. Variational electric fields at low latitudes and their relation to spread-F and plasma irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtet, J. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Heppner, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In situ measurements of variational electric fields at low latitudes, taken by OGO 6 satellite instruments, are analyzed. The observations are compared with other data on F region and spread-F structures. Conformity of the electric field fluctuations with the overall picture of low-latitude irregularities is examined empirically and theoretically, and candidate processes for generation of the observed irregularities are considered. Three distinct types of irregularities are delineated and compared.

  17. Phonological Priming and Irregular Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemberger, Joseph Paul

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the processing of irregular past-tense forms is affected by phonological factors that are inherent in the relationship of the past-tense forms to other words in the lexicon (rhyming families of irregulars) or to their base forms (vowel dominance effects). This paper addresses more ephemeral phonological effects. In a…

  18. Phonological Priming and Irregular Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemberger, Joseph Paul

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the processing of irregular past-tense forms is affected by phonological factors that are inherent in the relationship of the past-tense forms to other words in the lexicon (rhyming families of irregulars) or to their base forms (vowel dominance effects). This paper addresses more ephemeral phonological effects. In a…

  19. Screening of seeds prepared from retrograded potato starch to increase retrogradation rate of maize starch.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Liu, Lizeng; Guo, Junjie; Li, Lin; Wu, Changyan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, retrograded potato starches treated by oxalic, hydrochloric and citric acids and/with amylase respectively, as seed crystals, are added into maize starch paste to increase maize starch retrogradation rate. The results show that addition of seed accelerates maize starch retrogradation greatly. Seed prepared from retrograded potato starch treated by oxalic acid increases maize starch retrogradation rate most, from 1.5% to 49%. The results of IR spectra of retrograded maize starch derived from different seeds show that double helix, not hydrogen bond, probably forms at stage of seed growth during retrogradation. The results of IR spectra, X-ray and SEM indicate that treatment of retrograded potato starch with oxalic acid leads to formation of more hydrogen bonds and an increase of seed crystal planes, which markedly promotes the growth of the seed. Retrogradation of maize starch by seeding method surely includes a stage of crystal growth through double helix in a way different from normal maize starch retrogradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful treatment of retrograde ejaculation with amezinium.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, O; Sasagawa, I; Suzuki, Y; Matsuki, S; Itoh, K; Miura, M; Tomita, Y

    2003-01-01

    The effect of amezinium, a new type of antihypotensive agent, on retrograde ejaculation was evaluated in 3 patients with retrograde ejaculation. The patients received 10 mg amezinium orally once a day. All patients achieved antegrade ejaculation. Semen analyses revealed 6-50 x 10(6)/mL (mean 28.7 x 10(6)/mL) sperm with a motility of 20-50% (mean 36.7%). The wives of 2 patients became pregnant within 6 months of the initial treatment. None of the patients had any side effects. It would appear that amezinium is a useful treatment for retrograde ejaculation.

  1. Images of Bottomside Irregularities Observed at Topside Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, William J.; Gentile, Louise C.; Shomo, Shannon R.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/ Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour period on 13-14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (approx 100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (approx 1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles; the second and third do not. The data suggest that both downward moving depletions and upward moving density enhancements and the embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvenic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward-directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  2. Images of Bottomside Irregularities Observed at Topside Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Shomo, S. R.; Roddy, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/ Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour interval on 13 - 14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (~100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (~1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles, the second and third do not. The data suggest that both they and embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvénic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  3. Images of bottomside irregularities observed at topside altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, William J.; Gentile, Louise C.; Shomo, Shannon R.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2012-03-01

    We analyzed plasma and field measurements acquired by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite during an eight-hour period on 13-14 January 2010 when strong to moderate 250 MHz scintillation activity was observed at nearby Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) ground stations. C/NOFS consistently detected relatively small-scale density and electric field irregularities embedded within large-scale (˜100 km) structures at topside altitudes. Significant spectral power measured at the Fresnel (˜1 km) scale size suggests that C/NOFS was magnetically conjugate to bottomside irregularities similar to those directly responsible for the observed scintillations. Simultaneous ion drift and plasma density measurements indicate three distinct types of large-scale irregularities: (1) upward moving depletions, (2) downward moving depletions, and (3) upward moving density enhancements. The first type has the characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles; the second and third do not. The data suggest that both downward moving depletions and upward moving density enhancements and the embedded small-scale irregularities may be regarded as Alfvénic images of bottomside irregularities. This interpretation is consistent with predictions of previously reported theoretical modeling and with satellite observations of upward-directed Poynting flux in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  4. Ionospheric irregularities over Bahir Dar, Ethiopia during selected geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, Tsegaye; Damtie, Baylie

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed the effect of geomagnetic storms on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities by considering seven case studies in the period of 2013-2014 over Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (11° N , 38° E). We inferred the irregularity indices from GPS phase fluctuation by computing the median of 1-min rate of change of total electron content (fp) along the ray paths from all satellites observed. The Fp -index was calculated as an hourly average fp -index values along the ray paths from all satellites observed during each hour. Our results revealed that the irregularity level was inhibited during post sunset hours of the main phase of the storms we considered. On average, the irregularity index has dropped from 400 (0.4 TECU/min) during quiet time to 50 (0.05 TECU/min) on disturbed time with an amount of 350 (0.35 TECU/min). However, in some of the cases, immediately after the onset of the storm, we observed the enhancement of irregularities. We found that only the observations on 01 June 2013 and 19 February 2014 exhibited a correspondence of the time of occurrence of the minimum of the Dst-index with inhibition of irregularities noted by other researchers. Our observations of the enhancement of irregularities on 17 March 2013 and 19 February 2014 can partly be explained by the orientation of the IMF BZ . Other measurements such as neutral wind, electric field are required to explain the observations on 29 June 2013, 06 July 2013, 09 November 2013 and 27 February 2014.

  5. Retrograde arterialized venous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, Harald E T; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Maechler, Heinrich; Pierer, Gerhard; Wiltgen, Marco; Koch, Horst

    2003-01-01

    An experimental model was established to study circulation in retrograde arterialized venous flaps (RAVF). Venous flaps measuring 7 x 4 cm with a matching venous system were harvested from both forearms of 10 fresh human cadavers. In each trial, both flaps were simultaneously perfused with heparinized human blood driven by a pulsatile circulation model. In each trial there was one flap with retrograde perfusion, and one flap with antegrade perfusion. Clinical assessment, measurement of outflow, and angiographic examination with digitally assisted assessment after 3 h of perfusion showed better results for retrograde perfusion in 8 of the 10 trials. This study indicates that blood circulation in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps can be enhanced by retrograde arterialization. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Does Perceptual Learning Suffer from Retrograde Interference?

    PubMed Central

    Aberg, Kristoffer C.; Herzog, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In motor learning, training a task B can disrupt improvements of performance of a previously learned task A, indicating that learning needs consolidation. An influential study suggested that this is the case also for visual perceptual learning [1]. Using the same paradigm, we failed to reproduce these results. Further experiments with bisection stimuli also showed no retrograde disruption from task B on task A. Hence, for the tasks tested here, perceptual learning does not suffer from retrograde interference. PMID:21151868

  7. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Multisatellite scintillation observations and spaced receiver drift measurements are presented for a category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal waveforms in the ion number density. The observations were made at Huancayo, Peru, and the measurements at Ancon, Peru, associated with irregularities observed by the Atmospheric-Explorer-E satellite on a few nights in December 1979. Utilizing ray paths to various geostationary satellites, it was found that the irregularities grow and decay almost simultaneously in long-lived patches extending at least 1000 km in the east-west direction.

  8. Irregular migration: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S M

    1984-01-01

    Despite the heightened awareness of irregular migrations worldwide, a certain misappreciation or underestimation of the saliency of irregular migration issues persists. Conflict in the strife-torn Indian state of Assam, for example, has been widely publicized, but its roots in immigration issues linked to communal tensions are insufficiently understood. Conflict around the globe seems increasingly to involve, both as cause and effect, migrants in irregular status whose problematical or illegitimate presence itself is at issue. The global recession prompted governments in immigration-welcoming countries to adopt more restrictive stances vis-a-vis immigration at a time when global migratory pressures were expanding enormously. As if by a process of demonstration effect, 1 country after another began to view migratory flows with alarm--flows which previously had been regarded as benign or quantitatively unimportant. Part I of this special issue examines a variety of public responses to irregular migration. Part II looks at legalization issues in a number of national contexts. Part III contains 3 comparative reflections on immigration reform in industrial democracies. Part IV provides an overview and sampling of recent empirical and survey research findings on irregular status migrants, primarily in the US. This special issue is intended to encourage further research on irregular migration, foster better understanding of this complex phenomenon, and contribute to enlightened public policy-making.

  9. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  10. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-02-10

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation.

  11. Approximate likelihood for large irregularly spaced spatial data

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Likelihood approaches for large irregularly spaced spatial datasets are often very difficult, if not infeasible, to implement due to computational limitations. Even when we can assume normality, exact calculations of the likelihood for a Gaussian spatial process observed at n locations requires O(n3) operations. We present a version of Whittle’s approximation to the Gaussian log likelihood for spatial regular lattices with missing values and for irregularly spaced datasets. This method requires O(nlog2n) operations and does not involve calculating determinants. We present simulations and theoretical results to show the benefits and the performance of the spatial likelihood approximation method presented here for spatial irregularly spaced datasets and lattices with missing values. We apply these methods to estimate the spatial structure of sea surface temperatures (SST) using satellite data with missing values. PMID:19079638

  12. Magnetic Fields in Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Muehle, S.; Robishaw, T.; Everett, J.; Wilcots, E.; Zweibel, E.; Heiles, C.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic fields are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM). They provide a source of pressure support, transfer energy from supernovae, are a possible heating mechanism for the ISM, and channel gas flows. Despite the importance of magnetic fields in the ISM, what generates and sustains galactic magnetic fields or how magnetic fields, gas, and stars interact in galaxies is not well understood. The magnetic fields may be especially important in low-mass galaxies like irregulars where the magnetic pressure may be great enough for the field to be dynamically important. Only three irregular galaxies besides the LMC and the SMC have previously observed magnetic field structures. NGC 4449 (Chyzy et al. 2000) and the LMC (Gaensler et al. 2005) both have large-scale fields, while IC 10 and NGC 6822 have mostly random fields (Chyzy et al. 2003). Our goal is to determine what mechanisms generate and sustain large-scale magnetic fields in irregular galaxies and what causes the range of magnetic field structure in irregular galaxies. We have observed the polarized radio continuum emission of four irregular galaxies with the VLA, GBT, and ATCA. Our observations double the number of irregular galaxies with observed magnetic field structure. Here we present results from two of our galaxies: NGC 4214 and NGC 1569. We find that NGC 4214 has a mostly random magnetic field structure, which is not surprising given its weak bar, small size, and high star formation rate. The magnetic field of NGC 1569 has large-scale structure which has been shaped not by a dynamo, but by an outflow generated by the massive star formation rate in this galaxy. Support for this research has been provided by a GBT Student Support Award, a Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowship, and an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  13. Lexical Semantics and Irregular Inflection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Ting; Pinker, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Whether a word has an irregular inflection does not depend on its sound alone: compare lie-lay (recline) and lie-lied (prevaricate). Theories of morphology, particularly connectionist and symbolic models, disagree on which nonphonological factors are responsible. We test four possibilities: (1) Lexical effects, in which two lemmas differ in whether they specify an irregular form; (2) Semantic effects, in which the semantic features of a word become associated with regular or irregular forms; (3) Morphological structure effects, in which a word with a headless structure (e.g., a verb derived from a noun) blocks access to a stored irregular form; (4) Compositionality effects, in which the stored combination of an irregular word’s meaning (e.g., the verb’s inherent aspect) with the meaning of the inflection (e.g., pastness) doesn’t readily transfer to new senses with different combinations of such meanings. In four experiments, speakers were presented with existing and novel verbs and asked to rate their past-tense forms, semantic similarities, grammatical structure, and aspectual similarities. We found (1) an interaction between semantic and phonological similarity, coinciding with reported strategies of analogizing to known verbs and implicating lexical effects; (2) weak and inconsistent effects of semantic similarity; (3) robust effects of morphological structure, and (4) robust effects of aspectual compositionality. Results are consistent with theories of language that invoke lexical entries and morphological structure, and which differentiate the mode of storage of regular and irregular verbs. They also suggest how psycholinguistic processes have shaped vocabulary structure over history. PMID:21151703

  14. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  15. Outer Planet Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B.

    1994-01-01

    An outer planet icy satellite is any one of the celestial bodies in orbit around Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, or Pluto. They range from large, planet-like geologically active worlds with significant atmospheres to tiny irregular objects tens of kilometers in diameter. These bodies are all believed to have some type of frozen volatile, existing alone or in combination with other volatiles.

  16. Retrograde at the Operational Level of War,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-15

    north with forces under Montgomery. There was no mention of a retrograde plan. The first enemy main thrust was along the Eifel region o4 the Ardennes...He planned a detailed retrograde prior to the Chinese attack in 2 anuar- 1to~ he wa;:;s aoin~ to ti-cns ’outr, ceI co a Of ’Seoul if the U.N. Taorces...34Lessons From Korea." Report. Ft. Benning: USAIS. 1954. Liddell Hart. B.H. The German Generals Talk. New York: William Morrow & Co .. 1948

  17. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  18. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  19. GPS and in situ Swarm observations of the equatorial plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, Irina; Astafyeva, Elvira; Cherniak, Iurii

    2016-07-01

    Here we study the global distribution of the plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere by using the concurrent GPS and Langmuir probe measurements onboard the Swarm satellites. We analyze 18 months (from August 2014 till January 2016) of data from Swarm A and B satellites that flew at 460 and 510 km altitude, respectively. To identify the occurrence of the ionospheric irregularities, we have analyzed behavior of two indices ROTI and RODI based on the change rate of total electron content and electron density, respectively. The obtained results demonstrate a high degree of similarities in the occurrence pattern of the seasonal and longitudinal distribution of the topside ionospheric irregularities derived from both types of the satellite observations. Among the seasons with good data coverage, the maximal occurrence rates for the post-sunset equatorial irregularities reached 35-50 % for the September 2014 and March 2015 equinoxes and only 10-15 % for the June 2015 solstice. For the equinox seasons the intense plasma density irregularities were more frequently observed in the Atlantic sector, for the December solstice in the South American-Atlantic sector. The highest occurrence rates for the post-midnight irregularities were observed in African longitudinal sector during the September 2014 equinox and June 2015 solstice. The observed differences in SWA and SWB results could be explained by the longitude/LT separation between satellites, as SWB crossed the same post-sunset sector increasingly later than the SWA did.

  20. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  1. Satellites of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Smith, Rodney; Frenk, Carlos; White, Simon D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-type spirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, we find fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we can treat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the halo of a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of the ensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthal distribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmberg effect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, at larger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There is a weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite and its distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidally truncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlate with apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to be rotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk. Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those on retrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satellite and its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation, or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstrates that isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to many optical radii.

  2. Is the pulse in atrial fibrillation irregularly irregular?

    PubMed Central

    Rawles, J M; Rowland, E

    1986-01-01

    The belief that there is total irregularity of the pulse in atrial fibrillation has been re-examined. In a computerised analysis of R-R intervals and pulse volumes, 100-500 (mean 237) consecutive cycles were examined in 74 patients with atrial fibrillation, of whom 36 were on digoxin and 38 were not taking any antiarrhythmic treatment. A Doppler ultrasound technique was used to assess pulse volumes, against which R-R intervals were correlated. Although the sequence of consecutive R-R intervals was random in 52 (70%), patients there was a significant correlation between consecutive intervals in 22 (30%), the correlation coefficient being negative in 11 and positive in 11. In 43 (58%) cases the sequence of consecutive pulse volumes was significantly non-random; 34 (46%) showed pulsus alternans, indicated by a negative correlation between consecutive volumes. The proportion of patients with a non-random sequence of R-R intervals or pulse volumes was the same whether or not they were taking digoxin. Thus patients with atrial fibrillation often have patterns of regularity of the pulse, with the ventricular rhythm being non-random in almost one third and the sequence of pulse volumes being non-random in over a half. Contrary to classic teaching, in many patients with atrial fibrillation the pulse is not irregularly irregular. PMID:3730206

  3. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  4. Studies of retrograde memory: A long-term view

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Elizabeth K.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia are reviewed. First, the issues of temporal gradients of retrograde amnesia are discussed. Second, the question of the anatomical substrates of this syndrome are considered. Finally, some evidence for fractionation of different classes of memoranda within the retrograde time period are presented. PMID:8942966

  5. Retrograde Jejunojejunal Intussusception After Gastrectomy: Report of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Yoshiya, Shohei; Nakanoko, Tomonori; Koga, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Shoichi; Hirose, Kohsuke; Hirayama, Yoshie; Taketani, Kenji; Yoshida, Rintaro; Minagawa, Ryosuke; Kai, Masanori; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Retrograde intussusception of the small bowel is extremely rare. We experienced four cases of retrograde jejunojejunal intussusception that needed emergency surgery. The aim of the present report was to expand awareness of retrograde jejunojejunal intussusception as an urgent complication following gastrectomy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  7. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  8. Evolutionary Models of Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    the Red Queen in Through the Looking Glass – Alice finds that however fast she runs, she always stays in the same place. If adapta- tion has become...2011 to 04 August 2012 Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Office of Scientific Research European Office of Aerospace Research and...Z39-18 1 Evolutionary Models of Irregular Warfare Dominic Johnson 4 March 2013 Report on: US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  9. Irregular Warfare: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Airman’s Assessment of FM 3-24 and the Case for Developing Truly Joint COIN Doctrine. Maxwell Air Force Base: U.S. Air University, 2007. 111pp. (UG635.33...handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA494289 Pinnell , Daniel A. The Tenets of Airpower in an Insurgent Environment. Strategy Research Project. Carlisle...Non-Kinetic Capabilities for Irregular Warfare: Four Case Studies. Alexandria: Institute for Defense Analyses, Joint Advanced Warfighting Program

  10. Roots of Russian Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    is the Russians.13 Although students of Russian (or French) military history know about Russia’s scorched earth policy—leaving no resources for the...7 6. Russians in the Caucasus Russia has a long history in the Caucasus going back centuries. During the “First” Chechen war, Russia fought an...Russian irregular warfare in previous wars. Although history is an imperfect teacher, in that events will never repeat exactly as they once occurred, it

  11. Civil Power in Irregular Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    globalized world. The need to respond effectively to irregular conflicts that threaten core U.S. national security interests has, in turn, driven a rapidly ...civil war, and the paramount concern that, if not checked, centrifugal forces could contribute to complete state disintegration , with Somalia being...were concerned about complete state disintegration . Even the word “federation” had negative connotations. The major international donors thus agreed

  12. Fire Support For Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    118 “HIMARS Rocket Artillery Systems.” 119Andreas Parsch, “Lockheed Martin (Vought) MLRS Rockets ( M26 /M30/M31). Directory of U.S. Military... Rockets ( M26 /M30/M31). Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles: MLRS. Available from http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4...PAGES 107 14. SUBJECT TERMS Irregular Warfare, Fire Support, Artillery, Mortars, Rocket Artillery, GMLRS 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  13. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  14. Regulation of postsynaptic retrograde signaling by presynaptic exosome release

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Ceren; Li, Yihang; Koles, Kate; Brewer, Cassandra; Ashley, James; Yoshihara, Motojiro; Budnik, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Retrograde signals from postsynaptic targets are critical during development and plasticity of synaptic connections. These signals serve to adjust the activity of presynaptic cells according to postsynaptic cell outputs and to maintain synaptic function within a dynamic range. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that trigger the release of retrograde signals and the role of presynaptic cells in this signaling event are unknown. Here we show that a retrograde signal mediated by Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4) is transmitted to the postsynaptic cell through anterograde delivery of Syt4 via exosomes. Thus, by transferring an essential component of retrograde signaling through exosomes, presynaptic cells enable retrograde signaling. PMID:23522040

  15. Study of electromagnetic wave scattering by periodic density irregularities in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, R.; Kuo, S.P.; Huang, J.

    1995-12-31

    A quasi-particle approach is used to formulate wave propagation and scattering in a periodically structured plasma. The theory is then applied to study the effect of bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities on the propagation of beacon satellites signals through the ionosphere. In this approach, the radio wave is treated as a distribution of quasi-particles described by a Wigner distribution function governed by a transport equation. The irregularities providing the collisional effect are modeled as a two dimensional density modulation on a uniform background plasma. The present work generalizes the previous work by including the spectral bandwidth ({Delta}k/k) effect of the spatially periodic irregularities on the transionospheric signal propagation. The collision of quasi-particles with the irregularities modifies the quasi-particle distribution and give rise to the wave scattering phenomenon. The multiple scattering process is generally considered in this deterministic analysis of radio wave scattering off the ionospheric density irregularities. The analysis shows that this two dimensional density grating effectively modulates the intensity of the beacon satellite signals. This spatial modulation of the wave intensity is converted into time modulation due to the drift of the ionospheric irregularities, which then results in the scintillation of the beacon satellite signals.

  16. Doppler-guided retrograde catheterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Leon J.; Vonesh, Michael J.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Khasho, Fouad; Lanza, George M.; Talano, James V.; McPherson, David D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a Doppler guided catheterization system as an adjunctive or alternative methodology to overcome the disadvantages of left heart catheterization and angiography. These disadvantages include the biological effects of radiation and the toxic and volume effects of iodine contrast. Doppler retrograde guidance uses a 20 MHz circular pulsed Doppler crystal incorporated into the tip of a triple lumen multipurpose catheter and is advanced retrogradely using the directional flow information provided by the Doppler waveform. The velocity detection limits are either 1 m/second or 4 m/second depending upon the instrumentation. In a physiologic flow model of the human aortic arch, multiple data points revealed a positive wave form when flow was traveling toward the catheter tip indicating proper alignment for retrograde advancement. There was a negative wave form when flow was traveling away from the catheter tip if the catheter was in a branch or bent upon itself indicating improper catheter tip position for retrograde advancement. In a series of six dogs, the catheter was able to be accurately advanced from the femoral artery to the left ventricular chamber under Doppler signal guidance without the use of x-ray. The potential applications of a Doppler guided retrograde catheterization system include decreasing time requirements and allowing safer catheter guidance in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease and suspected aortic dissection. The Doppler system may allow left ventricular pressure monitoring in the intensive care unit without the need for x-ray and it may allow left sided contrast echocardiography. With pulse velocity detection limits of 4 m/second, this system may allow catheter direction and passage into the aortic root and left ventricle in patients with aortic stenosis. A modification of the Doppler catheter may include transponder technology which would allow precise catheter tip localization once the

  17. Improvement of the scintillation-irregularity model in WBMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Fremouw, E. J.

    1983-02-01

    The descriptive model of scintillation-producing irregularities in the F layer contained in Program WBMOD has been improved, along with other aspects of the code. Improvements include use of magnetic local time for modeling high-latitude boundaries, correction of a subtle error in calculating the scan velocity of the radio line of sight, simplification of the orbit calculation, and implementation of an irregularity drift routine based on a recently published model of ionospheric convention at high latitudes. In preparation for future improvements in WBMOD, analysis and interpretation of the Wideband Satellite data base from Poke Flat, Alaska was continued. The utility of the phase-gradient ratio (i.e., the ratio of rms phase difference for interferometer baselines perpendicular and parallel to known sheetlike irregularities) was investigated for determining irregularity axial ratios and was found to be of potential use. The ratio varies strongly, however, with the phase spectral index, p. Thus, quantitative use of the phase-gradient ratio depends upon prior evaluation of the geophysical and geometrical behavior of p.

  18. Functional retrograde amnesia: a multiple case study.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Esther; Brand, Matthias; Kracht, Lutz; Kessler, Josef; Diebel, Andrea; Netz, Johannes; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2008-01-01

    Functional retrograde amnesia (RA) is a rare pathology and has been rarely studied in detail across different patients. We extensively examined five functional RA patients and compared their neuropsychological profile including anterograde and retrograde memory performance, executive functions, emotional processing, and formally assessed psychiatric symptoms. Across patients, neuropsychological deficits beyond RA were most consistently seen in executive functions and attention suggesting that these dysfunctions contribute to the remote memory deficit. In a majority of the patients, problems in social cognition and emotional behaviour were reflected in Theory of Mind deficits and accompanying psychiatric symptoms. Aberrances in a measure of social desirability were detected, pointing to repressive tendencies in three out of the five patients. Future studies of functional RA patients may investigate more specifically which frontal-lobe associated (dys-) functions contribute to the memory retrieval deficit. Moreover, studying more closely the interaction between social cognition, repressive personality style and memory inhibition in this disease seems worthwhile pursuing.

  19. Retrograde transport on the COG railway.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Daniel; Oka, Toshihiko; Krieger, Monty; Hughson, Frederick M

    2006-02-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is essential for establishing and/or maintaining the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. The Golgi apparatus, in turn, has a central role in protein sorting and glycosylation within the eukaryotic secretory pathway. As a consequence, COG mutations can give rise to human genetic diseases known as congenital disorders of glycosylation. We review recent results from studies of yeast, worm, fly and mammalian COG that provide evidence that COG might function in retrograde vesicular trafficking within the Golgi apparatus. This hypothesis explains the impact of COG mutations by postulating that they impair the retrograde flow of resident Golgi proteins needed to maintain normal Golgi structure and function.

  20. Treatment of retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation.

    PubMed

    Kamischke, A; Nieschlag, E

    1999-01-01

    Treatment of retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation The various options for the treatment of retrograde ejaculation (RE) and anejaculation (AE) are discussed systematically in this review. A total of 88 studies dealing with patients with RE emphasize medical treatment for reversal of RE and retrieval of spermatozoa from urine. In 136 studies concerning patients with AE, the main emphasis is on medical treatment, electroejaculation (EE) and electrovibration stimulation (EVS) for the reversal of AE. Sperm quality in patients with RE and AE is often impaired. However, with the help of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) available today, both ejaculation disorders can be considered as treatable diseases. The major problem when analysing the studies was the uneven methodological quality of the original articles and the difficulties presented by different drugs and dosages, equipment and techniques, along with different criteria for success. In conclusion, controlled clinical trials comparing different treatment options appear urgently warranted.

  1. Seth Nicholson's First Satellite Discovery: Jupiter IX and His Orbit for It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    2006-12-01

    Seth B. Nicholson was a graduate astronomy student at the University of California in Berkeley when he discovered his first satellite in 1914. He was later to discover three more, after he had joined the Mount Wilson Observatory staff following his PhD in 1915. Nicholson had begun his thesis on the problem of computing an improved orbit for J VIII, which had been discovered by Melotte in England in 1908, a distant irregular satellite like J VI and J VII. Nicholson was taking photographic plates to measure the position of J VIII in the summer of 1914 with the Crossley 36-inch reflector of Lick Observatory. He was a teaching assistant at Berkeley that summer, but would go up to Mount Hamilton to observe on weekends in the dark of the moon, traveling by rail, stage (an automobile on a regular schedule between San Jose and the observatory) and interurban trolley car, and sleeping in a shed near the Crossley dome. He first saw J IX as a much fainter object with the same motion as J VIII on a plate he took in late July 1914, and realized it must be another satellite of the giant planet. Nicholson obtained his first orbit of J IX, which had by then become his new thesis topic, in September, and published a paper on it in early 1915. Its orbit, like that of J VIII, was retrograde and irregular, but it was considerably fainter. Nicholson, a loyal student of Armin O. Leuschner, the head of the Berkeley Astronomy Division, used his teacher's "short method" (or analytic method) to calculate the orbit.

  2. Retrograde signaling for climbing fiber synapse elimination.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Mikuni, Takayasu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2015-02-01

    Neurons form exuberant synapses with target cells early in development. Then, necessary synapses are selectively strengthened whereas unnecessary connections are weakened and eventually eliminated during postnatal development. This process is known as synapse elimination and is a crucial step for shaping immature neural circuits into functionally mature versions. Accumulating evidence suggests that retrograde signaling from postsynaptic cells regulates synapse elimination, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that semaphorin3A (Sema3A) and semaphorin7A (Sema7A) mediate retrograde signals for elimination of redundant climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell (PC) synapses in the developing cerebellum, a representative model of synapse elimination in the central nervous system. We picked up candidate retrograde signaling molecules that are expressed in PCs during the period of CF synapse elimination and the receptors of these candidate molecules that are present in CFs. We then assessed the effects of lentivirus-mediated RNAi-knockdown of these molecules on CF synapse elimination. By this systematic screening, we found that knockdown of Sema3A in PCs or its co-receptor, plexinA4 (PlxnA4), in CFs accelerated CF synapse elimination and decreased CF-mediated synaptic inputs. Conversely, knockdown of Sema7A in PCs or either of the two receptors for Sema7A, plexinC1 (PlxnC1) and integrinB1 (ItgB1), in CFs impaired CF synapse elimination. Importantly, the effect of Sema7A involves signaling by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1), a canonical pathway in PCs for the final stage of CF synapse elimination. These results demonstrate that specific semaphorins act as retrograde signaling molecules and regulate distinct processes of CF synapse elimination during postnatal cerebellar development.

  3. Retrograde weight implantation for correction of lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Moe, Kris S

    2004-09-01

    Gold weight implantation is the most commonly used method for surgical correction of paralytic lagophthalmos. Numerous techniques for placement of the weight have been described, yet complications with these methods continue to occur (implant migration or extrusion, wound infection, failure to correct the lagophthalmos, and excessive postoperative ptosis). We developed a retrograde, postlevator aponeurosis method for implantation to improve the placement and fixation of the weight. This study describes the rationale, technique, and surgical outcome of the retrograde approach. Retrospective analysis. Data maintained and collected on 25 consecutive cases of retrograde upper lid weight implantation for paralytic lagophthalmos. Pre- and postoperative photographs were obtained, and patients were followed for at least 6 months. All procedures were performed by or under the direction of a single surgeon at tertiary academic medical centers (University of California, San Diego and University of Zurich, Switzerland). Twenty-five consecutive patients were evaluated, 16 male and 9 female, ranging in age from 27 to 86 years. There were no surgical failures or perioperative complications and no instances of implant migration or extrusion. One patient developed a delayed infection requiring removal of the implant, and one patient required replacement of the gold weight with a platinum chain implant to better fit the contour of her eyelid. Retrograde implantation allows more accurate placement of the weight while creating a permanent circumferential seal for fixation. The procedure is minimally invasive, less traumatic than previous methods, and produces an excellent cosmetic result. The efficacy has been demonstrated in the outcome of the 25 cases described in this study.

  4. Retrograde femoral interlocking nail in complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Anup, Khare; Mehra, M M

    2002-06-01

    Retrograde interlocking nail was used as the method of fixation in 35 different cases of combination of complex femoral fractures. We performed this procedure in fractures of femoral shaft associated with fracture neck femur, pathological fractures of proximal third of femur with trochanteric pathology, ipsilateral fracture of femur and tibia in polytrauma cases with multiple other injuries, in highly obese patients with fracture shaft femur. This technique was also used in cases of pregnancy with fracture shaft femur and in unstable pelvic fracture or dislocation hip associated with fracture shaft femur. Operative technique involved with retrograde insertion of un-reamed, non-cannulated custom made nail through entrance portal in intercondylar notch was applied for fixation of the shaft femur fracture. The other associated fracture around hip was stabilized separately using suitable implant according to type of fracture. In cases of ipsilateral fracture of femur and tibia, femur was stabilized by retrograde interlocking nail and tibia was stabilized by antigrade interlocking nail through same incision at the same sitting. The case was followed up for three years; the average union time was 12 to 18 weeks. Out of 35 cases, 31 cases regained full knee movement. Out of the remaining 4 cases, 2 cases could regain up to 90 degrees of movement, these were old fractures and non-cooperative patients. In one case, patellofemoral arthritis was developed because of an operative error where a nail was not put inside the articular surface. Mal-union was observed in an early case of the series and implant failure was nil. Retrograde interlocking nail was used as the method of fixation in complex fracture problems. Multiple fractures of long bones can be stabilized in one stage, preventing multiple operations at different stages in polytraumatized patients. This resulted in early recovery, lesser hospital stay, and early rehabilitation of patient with good results and is

  5. Small scale irregularities associated with a high latitude electron density gradient - Scintillation and EISCAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S. E.; Wheadon, N. S.

    1988-06-01

    A coordinated experiment involving scintillation observations using Navy Navigation Satellite System satellites and special program measurements with the European incoherent scatter inospheric radar facility is described. The results reveal the presence of sub-kilometer scale irregularities in the vicinity of a long lived steep equatorwards gradient in electron density. Evidence is presented of a southwards plasma flow which would cause the gradient to be unstable to the E-B gradient-drift mechanism. An instability growth time of about 4 min has been estimated from the observations. Cooler electron temperatures associated with enhanced densities rules out soft particle precipitation as an irregularity source in this case.

  6. High-latitude F Region irregularities observed simultaneously with ISIS 1 and the Chatanika radar

    SciTech Connect

    Muldrew, D.B.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1982-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the high-latitude ionosphere were made by the Chatanika radar and the ISIS 1 topside sounder and cylindrical electrostatic probe (CEP) when the satellite was at a height of about 700 km. The variation of enhancements and valleys of electron density with invariant latitude at the satellite on the scale of a few hundred kilometers agrees reasonably well with the radar results. These density enhancements comprise a collection of large-scale (tens of kilometers) irregularities or 'blobs.' Evidence for the formation of these blobs was obtained from the sounder. Natural, intense radio noise (Hiss) was observed on the sounder ionograms recorded on the poleward side of the auroral zone, indicating the presence of precipitating kiloelectron volt electrons. A few minutes after these ionograms were recorded the radar scanned the same invariant latitude region and a large-scale ionization enhancement, or 'blob,' not present 3 minutes earlier, had developed in the bottomside F layer. ISIS 1 telemetry dropouts resulting from medium-scale irregularities, and enhanced irregularities down to about 200 m, observed with the CEP, are observed in association with blobs. Scatter signatures observed on the ISIS ionograms may be associated with large-scale irregularities that can be identified in the radar data. The scattering detected by the sounder is caused by 30- to 60-m wavelength irregularities (small-scale) that presumably are created by instabilities operating on the edges of the large-scale irregularities. The small-scale irregularities, however, are observed on both poleward and equatorward directed gradients. If the gradient-drift instability is responsible for these irregularities, then they either convect to the point of observation, are due to zonal gradients, or are field-aligned extensions of irregularities generated at lower heights.

  7. The inner satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Synott, S.

    1981-01-01

    The Jupiter moon Amalthea and the smaller satellites J1, J2, and J3, discovered by Voyagers 1 and 2, are discussed under the collective appellation of 'inner satellites', which distinguishes them from the Galilean satellites and the outer satellites, J6-J13. Amalthea is a dark, irregular body on which two large craters are visible, with an estimated surface gravity of 5-7 cm/sec-squared. It is speculated that Amalthea's unique color/reflectance characteristics are due to prolonged charged particle and high-velocity micrometeoroid exposure. Dimensional data are presented for J1-3.

  8. Mapa MEGNO para satélites irregulares de Satuno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, M. M.; Leiva, A. M.

    By implementing the elliptic restricted three-body model we obtain high resolution dynamical maps in the phase space region corresponding to that where Saturn's irregular satellites are currently found. The nature of the trajectories is characterized by the MEGNO chaos indicator (Cincotta P. and Simó C., 2000), which allows to identify regions of chaotic and quasi- periodic trajectories much faster than with other indicators (e.g. Lyapunov exponents). The results obtained allow to identify with great detail the boundaries of the regions of regular motion, chaotic motion, and substruc- tures associated to mean motion resonances. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  9. LDRD Report: Scheduling Irregular Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Boman, Erik G.

    2014-10-01

    This LDRD project was a campus exec fellowship to fund (in part) Donald Nguyen’s PhD research at UT-Austin. His work has focused on parallel programming models, and scheduling irregular algorithms on shared-memory systems using the Galois framework. Galois provides a simple but powerful way for users and applications to automatically obtain good parallel performance using certain supported data containers. The naïve user can write serial code, while advanced users can optimize performance by advanced features, such as specifying the scheduling policy. Galois was used to parallelize two sparse matrix reordering schemes: RCM and Sloan. Such reordering is important in high-performance computing to obtain better data locality and thus reduce run times.

  10. Increased damping of irregular resonators.

    PubMed

    Russ, S; Sapoval, B

    2002-03-01

    It is shown that fractal drums and jagged geometry resonators may be more damped than ordinary Euclidean systems. Several damping mechanisms are examined and studied by numerical calculations. The results depend on the dissipation mechanisms but globally they increase with localization, frequency, and the irregularity of the resonator. The increased dissipation is due to the uneven spatial distribution of the vibrational amplitude in two different ways. First, it is related to the partial confinement of the vibrational modes. Secondly, increased dissipation may be due to singularities in the amplitude distribution. This is the case when a few points exist where the vibration is pinned to zero inducing local logarithmic singularities. This last effect can be spectacular: a single defect can dominate the surface damping by viscous forces of a square drum.

  11. Retrograde intraaxonal transport of horseradish peroxidase by neurons in octopus.

    PubMed

    Monsell, E M; Cottee, L J

    1980-01-13

    While retrograde axonal transport is the basis of a widely used neuroanatomical method, it has been rigorously demonstrated in vivo only in a few vertebrate species and not yet in an invertebrate. Evidence is presented that motor neurons of the octopus stellate ganglion are capable of retrograde intraaxonal transport of horeseradish peroxidase. This demonstration shows that retrograde transport occurs in widely divergent groups of animals, and may be a general property of neurons.

  12. Preparation of irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hualin Zhai Linfeng; Li Yanhong; Shi Tiejun

    2008-06-03

    An irregular mesoporous hydroxyapatite (meso-HA), Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, is successfully prepared from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} using surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results reveal that the positive head of CTAB is assembled on the surface precipitated HA and much NH{sub 4}{sup +} is enclosed in precipitated HA before calcination. Field scanning electron microscope (FSEM) reveals that there exist many interconnected pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment exhibits a mesoporous material type IV curve, and pore size distribution calculated from the desorption branch of the isotherms based on Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model shows that most pores throughout the HA reticular skeleton are sized at about 40 nm, but the pores are not uniform on the whole, owning to decomposition of the 'organic' CTAB templating structures and ammonium salt enclosed in the precipitated HA. The specific surface area of irregular meso-HA is calculated to be 37.6 m{sup 2}/g according to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equation. Moreover, after polylactic acid/meso-HA (PLA/meso-HA) composites degraded 12 weeks in normal saline at 37 deg. C, the interconnected pores throughout the HA skeleton were enlarged and sized in micron degree, which resemble trabecular bone structure very much.

  13. Electron density irregularities observed on DE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of electron density irregularities have been made with the Langmuir probe (LANG) on DE-2. The DE-2 LANG data were examined for irregularities with scale sizes of 30 to 170 km. Such irregularities were found at all longitudes in the polar cap and auroral oval with stronger fluctuations in the oval. Night time equatorial passes having local times near 1900 or 2400 LT and occurring in an 80 day wide band about equinox were examined for irregularity occurrence. A definite longitude pattern was found in the data from several hundred orbits which showed an eastward shift at later local times. The equatorial irregularity occurrence pattern found in the LANG data is consistent with earlier in situ and remote observations of irregularities and spread F. In fact, the combined data set was found to closely follow the season-longitude pattern determined by the condition of solar terminator alignment with magnetic field lines. Tsunoda (1985) first showed this correlation with scintillation data.

  14. Dynamical lifetimes of asteroids in retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2017-07-01

    The population of known minor bodies in retrograde orbits (i > 90°) that are classified as asteroids is still growing. The aim of our study was to estimate the dynamical lifetimes of these bodies using the latest observational data, including astrometry and physical properties. We selected 25 asteroids with the best-determined orbital elements. We studied their dynamical evolution in the past and future for ±100 Myr (±1 Gyr for three particular cases). We first used orbit determination and cloning to produce swarms of test particles. These swarms were then input into long-term numerical integrations, and the orbital elements were averaged. Next, we collected the available thermal properties of our objects and we used them in an enhanced dynamical model with Yarkovsky forces. We also used a gravitational model for comparison. Finally, we estimated the median lifetimes of 25 asteroids. We found three objects whose retrograde orbits were stable with a dynamical lifetime τ ˜ 10-100 Myr. A large portion of the objects studied displayed smaller values of τ (τ ˜ 1 Myr). In addition, we studied the possible influence of the Yarkovsky effect on our results. We found that the Yarkovsky effect can have a significant influence on the lifetimes of asteroids in retrograde orbits. Because of the presence of this effect, it is possible that the median lifetimes of these objects are extended. Additionally, the changes in orbital elements, caused by Yarkovsky forces, appear to depend on the integration direction. To explain this more precisely, the same model based on new physical parameters, determined from future observations, will be required.

  15. A Radio Propagation Technique for Geolocating Ionospheric Irregularities along Radio Occultation Ray-Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Rino, C. L.; McNeil, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Radio occultations (RO) with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signas have been widely used for remote sensing of tropospheric parameters and to provide ionospheric electron density profiles for the purpose of improving terrestrial and space weather forecasts. Radio occultations have also been used to investigate the morphology of irregularities that cause radio wave scintillation. Spaced-based monitoring of ionospheric irregularities is advantageous because it can be performed continuously and globally, including over ocean regions not easily monitored with ground-based instruments. Nevertheless, the radio propagation path of an occultation through the ionosphere can be very long (up to several thousand km), such that it can be challenging to infer the geographic location and extent of the irregularities from the scintillations they produce. Unlike RO retrievals of slant TEC which are dominated by the contribution near the tangent point, scintillations can be generated by irregularities distributed anywhere along the propagation path between transmitting and receiving satellites. In this paper, we propose a new technique for characterizing and geolocating ionospheric irregularities using radio occultation observations of amplitude scintillation. The approach taken is to solve an inverse problem for the propagation of radio waves through a phase changing screen. Referred to as Irregularity Parameter Estimation (Carrano and Rino, Radio Sci, 2016), this inverse technique estimates the irregularity turbulence strength, spectral index, and Fresnel frequency from measurements of amplitude scintillation. A new model for the effective velocity at which the radio occultation ray-path scans through the irregularity region is used to map the estimated Fresnel frequency to Fresnel spatial scale, which yields the distance from the receiver to the irregularities. Additional geophysical factors such as apex altitude and background electron density along the ray-path can

  16. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  17. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases.

  18. Stochastic theories for the irregularity of ENSO.

    PubMed

    Kleeman, Richard

    2008-07-28

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is the dominant climatic fluctuation on interannual time scales. It is an irregular oscillation with a distinctive broadband spectrum. In this article, we discuss recent theories that seek to explain this irregularity. Particular attention is paid to explanations that involve the stochastic forcing of the slow ocean modes by fast atmospheric transients. We present a theoretical framework for analysing this picture of the irregularity and also discuss the results from a number of coupled ocean-atmosphere models. Finally, we briefly review the implications of the various explanations of ENSO irregularity to attempts to predict this economically significant phenomenon.

  19. Satellite observation of effusive volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Friedman, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Infrared emission from an active effusive volcanic eruption on Surtsey, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland, was recorded by airborne and satellite infrared systems at irregular intervals between 19 August and 3 October 1966. Ground and lava temperature measurements and volumetric lava outflow data permitted a comparison to be made between total thermal-energy yield and radiant emission recorded by the satellite system. The Nimbus HRIR recorded radiant emission at a level of about 3% of the estimated total thermal yield.

  20. Variation of equatorial F-region irregularity parameters as a function of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, E.; Basu, S.

    1982-11-01

    The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory in collaboration with the Geophysical Institute of Peru and the University of Texas at Dallas performed co-ordinated measurements of nighttime F-region irregularities near the magnetic equator during 1975-1979. A variety of techniques, such as ionospheric soundings, scintillation, airglow, VHF radar backscatter and satellite in-situ density probes, were employed to study the F-region irregularities over a wide scale-length range from tens of kilometers to a few meters. The dynamics of the irregularity structures were explored by the Airborne Ionospheric Observatory on the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory as well as by the spaced receiver scintillation measurements performed on the ground. This report compiles some of these measurements with a view to studying the variation of the irregularity characteristics with changes in solar activity that occurred during the campaign periods in the years 1975-1979.

  1. The localized origin of equatorial F region irregularity patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aarons, J.; Buchau, J.; Mcclure, J. P.; Basu, S.

    1978-01-01

    An intensive study of nighttime irregularities of electron density in the equatorial ionosphere was performed in October 1976 by making 50-MHz radar backscatter measurements at Jicamarca, Peru, and scintillation measurements of 249-MHz transmissions from Les 9 at two ground stations (Ancon and Huancayo, both in Peru) as well as by aircraft flying in the vicinity of the stations. The 137-MHz scintillations from the orbiting Wideband satellite were also recorded at Huancayo. The results of such measurements made on October 16-17, 1976, are discussed in this report. We find that on this particular night a large-scale irregularity patch evolved first in the west, as was detected by the radar at Jicamarca, and drifted eastward to cause successive onsets of scintillation activity on propagation paths from Ancon and Huancayo. The observations indicate the east-west dimension of the large-scale structure to be 400 km drifting eastward at a speed of approximately 100 m/s, having a lifetime of several hours, and containing a hierarchy of irregularity scale sizes in the range of kilometers to meters causing both scintillations at 249 MHz and radar backscatter at 50 MHz.

  2. Multi-technique study of natural midlatitude irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Ganguly, S.; Klobuchar, J. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    Small-scale electron density irregularities causing scintillations on VHF trans-ionospheric communication links observed near Arecibo, Puerto Rico are associated with long-period total electron content fluctuations. Simultaneous high-resolution (height resolution = 600 m; time resolution = 85 sec) electron density profiles at Arecibo showed that a temporal variation of electron density at discrete heights in the bottomside F-region have fluctuations of the same period. Spectral analysis of these perturbations in electron density are consistent with the ionospheric response to the passage of internal gravity waves: large fluctuations of ion velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field in the meridional plane had temporal periods similar to the scintillation/TEC fluctuation events. In-situ measurements of spatial variation of ion density, irregularity amplitude and ion drift by the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite near Arecibo were also consistent with the results of the observed temporal variability. Radar and in-situ measurements indicate that the gradient drift instability is the most likely mechanism giving rise to small scale irregularities.

  3. The role of TIDs in the creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Tae-yong, Y.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle latitude F region is often interpreted in association with traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). However, the occurrence climatology of the irregularities is somewhat different from that of TIDs, and therefore, a different source of the irregularities may exist. In this study, we investigate the variability of the middle-latitude irregularities with local time, season, and solar cycle by analyzing the measurements of the ion density by the CHAMP (2001-2009) and Swarm (2014-2015) satellite observations. The occurrence climatology of the field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude is also investigated with the VHF radar observations acquired since January 2010 at Daejeon in South Korea. The role of TIDs in the creation of the middle latitude irregularities and FAIs is investigated by comparing the their occurrence climatology with the climatology of TIDs. The conventional wisdom is that the activity of TID decreases with an increase of the solar activity. However, our preliminary results show that the occurrence rate of the FAI increases with an increase of the solar activity. The distribution of the irregularities derived from the analysis of the satellite observations may provide insight into the relationship between TIDs, FAIs, and irregularities.

  4. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  5. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing

    PubMed Central

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  6. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  7. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  8. Processing of Irregular Polysemes in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocher, Andreas; Foraker, Stephani; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The degree to which meanings are related in memory affects ambiguous word processing. We examined irregular polysemes, which have related senses based on similar or shared features rather than a relational rule, like regular polysemy. We tested to what degree the related meanings of irregular polysemes ("wire") are represented with…

  9. OGO 6 ion concentration irregularity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported concerning the ionospheric F-region irregularities. The results are based on in-situ OGO-6 measurements of the total ion concentration N sub i. A proposed mechanism for the generation of equatorial F-region irregularities and the morphological results, and the occurrence of Fe(+) ions in the equatorial F-region are discussed. Related research papers are included.

  10. Processing of Irregular Polysemes in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocher, Andreas; Foraker, Stephani; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The degree to which meanings are related in memory affects ambiguous word processing. We examined irregular polysemes, which have related senses based on similar or shared features rather than a relational rule, like regular polysemy. We tested to what degree the related meanings of irregular polysemes ("wire") are represented with…

  11. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  12. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  13. Global Distribution of Density Irregularities in the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed measurements of ion number density made by the retarding potential analyzer aboard the Atmosphere Explorer-E (AE-E) satellite, which was in an approximately circular orbit at an altitude near 300 km in 1977 and later at an altitude near 400 km. Large-scale (greater than 60 km) density measurements in the high-altitude regions show large depletions of bubble-like structures which are confined to narrow local time longitude, and magnetic latitude ranges, while those in the low-altitude regions show relatively small depletions which are broadly distributed,in space. For this reason we considered the altitude regions below 300 km and above 350 km and investigated the global distribution of irregularities using the rms deviation delta N/N over a path length of 18 km as an indicator of overall irregularity intensity. Seasonal variations of irregularity occurrence probability are significant in the Pacific regions, while the occurrence probability is always high in die Atlantic-African regions and is always low in die Indian regions. We find that the high occurrence probability in the Pacific regions is associated with isolated bubble structures, while that near 0 deg longitude is produced by large depictions with bubble structures which are superimposed on a large-scale wave-like background. Considerations of longitude variations due to seeding mechanisms and due to F region winds and drifts are necessary to adequately explain the observations at low and high altitudes. Seeding effects are most obvious near 0 deg longitude, while the most easily observed effect of the F region is the suppression of irregularity growth by interhemispheric neutral winds.

  14. On the Relationship between Lightning and Equatorial Ionosphere Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Holzworth, R. H.; Willcockson, L.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The C/NOFS (Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System) satellite was launched in April 2008 and carries high time resolution vector electric field and optical transient detectors. Using calibrated optical power-time profiles from the C/NOFS lightning detector (LD), along with data from the WWLLN (World Wide Lightning Location Network) which provides timing, power, and source location for lightning events, we examine the detailed vector electric field wave data gathered by the C/NOFS probes during periods of lightning activity. Using 32 ksample/sec burst data, we demonstrate the close one-to-one coincidence of lightning sferics observed on the ground with the VLF whistler waves observed at the satellite. We then compare lightning electric field transients measured on the satellite within a plasma density cavity, such as a spread-F depletion, with those measured by the satellite probes within a stable ionosphere. We demonstrate that during lightning events, the ELF and VLF electric field amplitude within these density depletions and associated irregularities can be dominated by contributions from the electric field transients associated with lightning.

  15. Discovery of 12 satellites of Saturn exhibiting orbital clustering.

    PubMed

    Gladman, B; Kavelaars, J J; Holman, M; Nicholson, P D; Burns, J A; Hergenrother, C W; Petit, J M; Marsden, B G; Jacobson, R; Gray, W; Grav, T

    2001-07-12

    The giant planets in the Solar System each have two groups of satellites. The regular satellites move along nearly circular orbits in the planet's orbital plane, revolving about it in the same sense as the planet spins. In contrast, the so-called irregular satellites are generally smaller in size and are characterized by large orbits with significant eccentricity, inclination or both. The differences in their characteristics suggest that the regular and irregular satellites formed by different mechanisms: the regular satellites are believed to have formed in an accretion disk around the planet, like a miniature Solar System, whereas the irregulars are generally thought to be captured planetesimals. Here we report the discovery of 12 irregular satellites of Saturn, along with the determinations of their orbits. These orbits, along with the orbits of irregular satellites of Jupiter and Uranus, fall into groups on the basis of their orbital inclinations. We interpret this result as indicating that most of the irregular moons are collisional remnants of larger satellites that were fragmented after capture, rather than being captured independently.

  16. [Prevalence of retrograde ejaculation in infertility associated to hypospermia].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Bengoa, Armando; Bagnarello-González, Fiorella; Rodríguez-Perdomo, David Francisco; Rodríguez-Yee, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    Approximately 14% of couples of reproductive age have a fertility problem, defined as the inability to achieve pregnancy after a year of frequent intercourse without contraceptive protection. To determine the prevalence of retrograde ejaculation in infertile patients with hypospermia and to establish the effects of the treatment. Comparative study. A semen analysis of 207 patients with male infertility with hypospermia was performed. The patients with retrograde ejaculation were identified and its prevalence was calculated. Semen parameters were compared before and after treatment by means of a paired-t test. Hormonal levels also were compared between groups with and without retrograde ejaculation by means of a Mann-Whitney U test. Prevalence of retrograde ejaculation was 3.2% out of 2587 infertile patients. Within the group of 207 patients with hypospermia, 84 had retrograde ejaculation. After the treatment the seminal volume increased (from 1.2 to 1.5 milliliters) and the number of mobile cells increased (from 47.2 to 62.5 millions). The number of sperm in urine decreased (from 22 to 10 per high-power field). The patients with retrograde ejaculation had lower levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and testosterone than those without retrograde ejaculation. Retrograde ejaculation and hypospermia are both considered infrequent but important alterations in infertility. Prevalence of retrograde ejaculation in patients with hypospermia is 40.5%. Treatment increased seminal volume and the number of mobile cells in the ejaculated semen. It is necessary to perform future studies in order to determine the impact of severity of retrograde ejaculation on infertility.

  17. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  19. Asteroids in Retrograde Orbits: Interesting Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2014-12-01

    We present the most interesting examples of the orbital evolution of asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90°). First, we used the latest observational data to determine nominal and averaged orbital elements of these objects. Next, the equations of motion of these asteroids were integrated backward 1 My, taking into account the propagation of observational errors. We used so-called 'cloning' procedure to reproduce the reliability of initial data. We obtained some possible scenarios of the orbit inversion in the past, what is often caused by the long-term influence of outer planets. For two most interesting cases (Apollo and Amor type) we did additional calculations: 100 My in the future. Additionally, we investigated the potential influence of Yarkovski/YORP effects on the long-time orbital evolution.

  20. Selective retrograde transsynaptic transfer of a protein, tetanus toxin, subsequent to its retrograde axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, ME; Suda, K; Thoenen, H

    1979-01-01

    The fate of tetanus toxin (mol wt 150,000) subsequent to its retrograde axonal transport in peripheral sympathetic neurons of the rat was studied by both electron microscope autoradiography and cytochemistry using toxin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) coupling products, and compared to that of nerve growth factor (NGF), cholera toxin, and the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and ricin. All these macromolecules are taken up by adrenergic nerve terminals and transported retrogradely in a selective, highly efficient manner. This selective uptake and transport is a consequence of the binding of these macromolecules to specific receptive sites on the nerve terminal membrane. All these ligands are transported in the axons within smooth vesicles, cisternae, and tubules. In the cell bodies these membrane compartments fuse and most of the transported macromolecules are finally incorporated into lysosomes. The cell nuclei, the parallel golgi cisternae, and the extracellular space always remain unlabeled. In case the tetanus toxin, however, a substantial fraction of the labeled material appears in presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals which innervate the labeled ganglion cells. In these terminals tetanus toxin-HRP is localized in 500-1,000 A diam vesicles. In contrast, such a retrograde transsynaptic transfer is not at all or only very rarely detectable after retrograde transport of cholera toxin, NGF, WGA, PHA, or ricin. An atoxic fragment of the tetanus toxin, which contains the ganglioside-binding site, behaves like intact toxin. With all these macromolecules, the extracellular space and the glial cells in the ganglion remain unlabeled. We conclude that the selectivity of this transsynaptic transfer of tetanus toxin is due to a selective release of the toxin from the postsynaptic dendrites. This release is immediately followed by an uptake into the presynaptic terminals. PMID:92475

  1. Processing of irregular polysemes in sentence reading.

    PubMed

    Brocher, Andreas; Foraker, Stephani; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The degree to which meanings are related in memory affects ambiguous word processing. We examined irregular polysemes, which have related senses based on similar or shared features rather than a relational rule, like regular polysemy. We tested to what degree the related meanings of irregular polysemes (wire) are represented with shared semantic information versus unshared information represented separately, like homonyms (bank). Monitoring eye fixations, we found that later context supporting the less frequent meaning of an irregular polyseme did not slow down reading compared with control conditions, whereas for homonyms it did. This indicates that in the absence of preceding biasing context, readers access a shared component of an irregular polyseme's representation. Additionally, when the same context words preceded the ambiguous word, both irregular polysemes and homonyms initially elicited longer reading times, but the observed reading slow-down was weaker and less persistent for irregular polysemes than homonyms, indicating less competition between meaning components. We interpret these results as evidence of a shared features representation for irregular polysemes, which additionally incorporates unshared portions of meaning that can compete. When preceding, biasing context is available, readers activate shared and unshared components of the senses, producing a more fully instantiated meaning. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. On the Existence of Regular and Irregular Outer Moons Orbiting the Pluto-Charon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.; Grishin, Evgeni

    2017-02-01

    The dwarf planet Pluto is known to host an extended system of five co-planar satellites. Previous studies have explored the formation and evolution of the system in isolation, neglecting perturbative effects by the Sun. Here we show that secular evolution due to the Sun can strongly affect the evolution of outer satellites and rings in the system, if such exist. Although precession due to extended gravitational potential from the inner Pluto-Charon binary quench such secular evolution up to a crit ˜ 0.0035 au (˜0.09 R Hill the Hill radius; including all of the currently known satellites), outer orbits can be significantly altered. In particular, we find that co-planar rings and satellites should not exist beyond a crit; rather, satellites and dust particles in these regions secularly evolve on timescales ranging between 104 and 106 years, and quasi-periodically change their inclinations and eccentricities through secular evolution (Lidov-Kozai oscillations). Such oscillations can lead to high inclinations and eccentricities, constraining the range where such satellites (and dust particles) can exist without crossing the orbits of the inner satellites or crossing the outer Hill stability range. Outer satellites, if such exist are therefore likely to be irregular satellites, with orbits limited to be non-circular and/or highly inclined. Current observations, including the recent data from the New-Horizons mission explored only inner regions (<0.0012 au) and excluded the existence of additional satellites; however, the irregular satellites discussed here should reside farther, in the yet uncharted regions around Pluto.

  3. In situ irregularity identification and scintillation estimation using wavelets and CINDI on C/NOFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneback, R. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Caton, R. G.; Su, Y.-J.; Groves, K. M.

    2013-07-01

    Wavelets are a time-domain method that is able to extract both time and frequency information from a signal. The Morlet wavelet is used here to characterize the magnitude of ionospheric irregularities using measurements of the total ion density from the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation package onboard the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System spacecraft. The power in ionospheric irregularities at scale sizes less than 128 km is used to generate an irregularity amplitude index. This index is used with a phase screen analysis to form an estimate of scintillation at the satellite location. The temporal information retained in a wavelet analysis also allows for an accurate power spectrum calculation even when used on short segments of data which is useful for real-time processing of irregularity detection onboard a satellite or for analyzing the long data sets produced by a satellite. To validate the process, a comparison of the in situ scintillation estimate and Scintillation Network and Decision Aid measurements of the S4 index is presented.

  4. Ground- and Space-Based Observations of Ionospheric Irregularities over Nigeria during Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P. H.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Pedersen, T. R.; Groves, K. M.; Roddy, P. A.; Caton, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities and plasma turbulence can cause scintillation in the amplitude and phase of trans-ionospheric radio waves employed by satellite navigation and communication systems, leading to a degradation of system performance. Due to the relatively sparse distribution of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments in Africa, the climatology and morphology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa have not been adequately characterized. Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Universities of Ilorin and Lagos in Nigeria have collaborated to operate two high-rate GPS receivers capable of monitoring both Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation intensity. We use GPS measurements collected from 2007-2009 to 1) identify ionospheric irregularities and quantify their spatial extent, 2) estimate the zonal drift velocity by cross-correlating TEC measurements between pairs of GPS satellites, 3) relate ionospheric irregularities to the occurrence of weak scintillation at the GPS L1 frequency, 4) characterize the strength of amplitude and phase scintillations in terms of their power spectral densities, and 5) use phase screen theory to predict the intensity of scintillation that would be observed by ionospheric monitoring sensors operating at lower frequencies. Measurements of plasma density and zonal drift from the C/NOFS satellite during passes over Nigeria are used to corroborate and complement these ground-based GPS observations.

  5. Irregular Variability In Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecker, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The transit method is the most successful tool for exoplanet discovery to date. With more than half of all known exoplanets discovered by Kepler using this method, the mission also revealed a number of objects with dimming events that defy the common explanations, the most prominent being KIC 8462852 aka ``Tabby's star''. I embarked on a search for objects with such irregular transit signatures in the data of K2, the two-wheeled successor mission of Kepler. My method is a combination of automated pre-selection of targets showing downward flux excursions and visual light curve inspection of the selected subset comprising about SI{1.5}% of the initial sample. In addition, I developed a tool to constrain the effective temperature of a planet-hosting star from photometry alone. This software finds broad application in any science case where a photometric spectral type estimate is necessary. I used existing transit models and Bayesian inference to perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of a planetary candidate I discovered. This putative gas giant is in a SI{1.32}day circular orbit with an exceptionally tight orbital radius of a ≈ 0.012 AU. My analysis revealed a scaled planetary radius of R_{p}/R_star = 0.0927±0.0026 and an edge-on orientation with an inclination i=89.8+3.0-3.4. EPIC 217393088.01 is one of the closest-orbiting exoplanets ever detected and the first giant planet with such a small orbital radius. An additional major finding of my search is EPIC 220262993, which exhibits aperiodic, asymmetric dips in flux with rapid dimming rates and up to SI{˜25}% depth, lasting for SIrange{2}{4} day. In previous works based on optical and mid-infrared photometry, this object was inconsistently classified as a possible quasar or a white dwarf. We conducted follow-up observations both photometrically with GROND on the MPI/ESO SI{2.2} meter telescope in La Silla (Chile) and spectroscopically with FIRE on the Magellan/Baade SI{6.5} meter telescope. With

  6. Acoustic and Linguistic Interdependencies of Irregular Phonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    in a stochastic increase in episodes of irregular phonation. 13 The relationship to dialect and gender (in at least English ) can be attributed to...speech production. We know properties of irregular phonation can be clues to a speaker’s dialect and even identity. We also have evidence that irregular...Descriptions 20 2.2.3 Acoustical 21 2.2.4 . For this Thesis 22 2.3 Known Correlated Prope.ties of Speech 23 2.3.1 Speaker, Dialect , and Gender Dependence 23

  7. Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    CERC- CETA -81-17 N. IE D CETA 81-17 Z Irregular Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes by ot John P. Ahrens COASTAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AID NO. 81-17 DECEMBER...GOVT ACCESSION NO, 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER CETA 811 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Coastal Engineering IRREGULAR...Coastal Engineering Research Center, 1977); CETA 77-2 "Prediction of Irregular Wave Runup" by John P. Ahrens; and CETA 78-2 "Revised Wave Runup

  8. Bioinspired irregularly chirped broadband reflecting multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric multilayers consisting of alternating layers of two different materials with thicknesses irregularly decreasing with depth in the structure are included in the cuticle of some beetles whose shell exhibits broadband reflection in the optical wavelength range. Emulating these structures, we propose and numerically analyze irregularly chirped dielectric multilayers. Analysis was performed using a dedicated genetic algorithm (GA) that searches for the multilayer configurations maximizing the reflection for normal incidence over a large wavelength range. We found that the GA leads to the irregularly chirped reflectors that significantly outperform the regularly chirped ones proposed and analyzed in the literature.

  9. PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-20

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  10. Periods, poles, and shapes of Saturn's irregular moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We report rotational-lightcurve observations of irregular moons of Saturn based on disk-integrated observations with the Narrow-Angle Camera of the Cassini spacecraft. From 24 measured rotation periods, 20 are now known with an accuracy of ~2% or better. The numbers are as follows (in hours; an '*' marks the less reliable periods): Hati 5.42; Mundilfari 6.74; Loge 6.94*; Skoll 7.26; Kari 7.70; Suttungr 7.82*, Bergelmir 8.13; Phoebe 9.274; Siarnaq 10.188; Narvi 10.21; Tarvos 10.69; Skathi 11.30; Ymir 11.922; Hyrrokkin 12.76; Greip 12.79*; Ijiraq 13.03; Albiorix 13.32; Bestla 14.624; Bebhionn 16.40; Paaliaq 18.75; Kiviuq 21.96; Erriapus 28.15; Thrymr 35 or >45* Tarqeq 76.8.More recent data strengthen the notion that objects in orbits with an inclination supplemental angle i' > 27° have significantly slower spin rates than those at i' < 27° (i' = 180°-i for retrograde objects, and i' = i for prograde moons, with i being the orbit inclination). Actually, the fastest rotator with i' > 27°, Siarnaq, stands opposed to at least eight objects with faster spins and i' < 27°. A null hypothesis claiming that objects of the two inclination bins come from the same population is rejected at the 99% confidence level. The i' > 27° bin contains all nine known prograde moons and four retrograde objects.A total of 25 out of 38 known outer moons has been observed with Cassini, and there is no chance to observe the 13 missing objects until end-of-mission. However, all unobserved objects are part of the i' < 27° bin. This means that the periods of all known moons with i' > 27° are known, and none of them is a fast rotator, with no exception.Several objects were observed repeatedly to determine pole directions, sidereal periods, and convex shapes. A few lightcurves have been observed to show three maxima and three minima even at low phase angles, suggesting objects with a triangular equatorial cross-section. Some objects with 2 maxima/ 2 minima are probably quite elongated. One

  11. Behavior of high-latitude irregularities during geomagnetic disturbances. Environmental research papers

    SciTech Connect

    Houminer, Z.; Aarons, J.

    1980-06-24

    Scintillation observations of VHF and UHF transmissions from geostationary satellites at Goose Bay have been used to study the average characteristics of the high latitude irregularity region. The paper describes the average time development and mean diurnal pattern of irregularities during 58 magnetic storms in 1971-1976. The diurnal variation at Goose Bay shows two peaks of scintillation activity. One peak occurs during the afternoon hours, while the second occurs during the night. The average diurnal pattern is independent of type of storm. diurnal and seasonal effects appear only in the first day of storm commencement and not in the following days which show a very similar diurnal picture. (Author)

  12. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  13. Retrograde ejaculation following open ureteric reimplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Au, Eleanor; Dasgupta, Ranan; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2009-08-18

    Retrograde ejaculation is not a recognized complication of ureteric reimplantation surgery. We describe this unusual complication in a 25-year-old man, with no other cause for his ejaculatory dysfunction. A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with left hydronephrosis ascribed to a megaureter. Following open reimplantation of the ureter, the patient developed retrograde ejaculation that did not respond to medical therapy. The key result reported here is that retrograde ejaculation is a possible complication of open pelvic surgery, for which patients should receive counselling. This is relevant for both urologists and general physicians who consult relatively young men with ejaculatory difficulties.

  14. Retrograde ejaculation following open ureteric reimplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Retrograde ejaculation is not a recognized complication of ureteric reimplantation surgery. We describe this unusual complication in a 25-year-old man, with no other cause for his ejaculatory dysfunction. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with left hydronephrosis ascribed to a megaureter. Following open reimplantation of the ureter, the patient developed retrograde ejaculation that did not respond to medical therapy. Conclusion The key result reported here is that retrograde ejaculation is a possible complication of open pelvic surgery, for which patients should receive counselling. This is relevant for both urologists and general physicians who consult relatively young men with ejaculatory difficulties. PMID:19918274

  15. Irregular sesquiterpenoids from Ligusticum grayi roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Root oil of Ligusticum grayi (Apiaceae) contains numerous irregular sesquiterpenoids. In addition to the known acyclic sesquilavandulol and a new sesquilavandulyl aldehyde, two thapsanes, one epithapsane, and fourteen sesquiterpenoids representing eight novel carbon skeletons were found. The new sk...

  16. A new irregular diterpenoid from Opopanax chironium.

    PubMed

    Muckensturm, Bernard; Boulanger, Anna; Ouahabi, Souad; Reduron, Jean-Pierre

    2005-12-01

    The ethereal extract of the roots of Opopanax chironium yielded peucelinenoxide acetate (1), a new natural product with an irregular diterpene skeleton, besides the known coumarins gaudichaudin, columbianadin, peucedanin and officinalin isobutyrate.

  17. Orbital simulations of satellite escape/capture and the origin of satellites such as Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Lance A. M.; Mckinnon, William B.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate satellite escape/capture in the context of the restricted, circular three body problem as applied to the Sun, Neptune, and Triton. We have computed a large number of coplanar prograde and retrograde orbital simulations over a range of initial distances and velocities. The satellite starts at superior conjunction within approximately 2 Hill radii of Neptune and has a velocity orthogonal to the Sun-planet line. Orbits with these initial conditions can be reflected with respect to time, so an escape is simply the reverse of a capture. We numerically integrate the equations of motion to compute the satellite's position until it escapes, collides with Neptune, or after 100 planetary years fails to escape, when computations cease. The initial distance x and velocity v in the restricted problem uniquely define the Jacobi constant C, a conserved energy-like quantity. Plots of the simulation outcomes in the prograde and retrograde C, x phase spaces reveal distinct zones in which temporary satellites approach the planet closely enough that permanent capture can be effected by gas drag with a protoplanetary nebula or by collision with a pre-existing satellite. Single and double close-flybys constitute the most common possible capture orbits. Long term multiple flyby orbits occur near the stability limits between bound and unbound orbits, and are more common among retrograde captures.

  18. Propagating waves can explain irregular neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keane, Adam; Gong, Pulin

    2015-01-28

    Cortical neurons in vivo fire quite irregularly. Previous studies about the origin of such irregular neural dynamics have given rise to two major models: a balanced excitation and inhibition model, and a model of highly synchronized synaptic inputs. To elucidate the network mechanisms underlying synchronized synaptic inputs and account for irregular neural dynamics, we investigate a spatially extended, conductance-based spiking neural network model. We show that propagating wave patterns with complex dynamics emerge from the network model. These waves sweep past neurons, to which they provide highly synchronized synaptic inputs. On the other hand, these patterns only emerge from the network with balanced excitation and inhibition; our model therefore reconciles the two major models of irregular neural dynamics. We further demonstrate that the collective dynamics of propagating wave patterns provides a mechanistic explanation for a range of irregular neural dynamics, including the variability of spike timing, slow firing rate fluctuations, and correlated membrane potential fluctuations. In addition, in our model, the distributions of synaptic conductance and membrane potential are non-Gaussian, consistent with recent experimental data obtained using whole-cell recordings. Our work therefore relates the propagating waves that have been widely observed in the brain to irregular neural dynamics. These results demonstrate that neural firing activity, although appearing highly disordered at the single-neuron level, can form dynamical coherent structures, such as propagating waves at the population level. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351591-15$15.00/0.

  19. Climatological study of ionospheric irregularities over the European mid-latitude sector with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, René

    2014-03-01

    High-frequency variability of the ionosphere, or irregularities, constitutes the main threat for real-time precise positioning techniques based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements. Indeed, during periods of enhanced ionospheric variability, GNSS users in the field—who cannot verify the integrity of their measurements—will experience positioning errors that can reach several decimeters, while the nominal accuracy of the technique is cm-level. In the frame of this paper, a climatological analysis of irregularities over the European mid-latitude region is presented. Based on a 10 years GPS dataset over Belgium, the work analyzes the occurrence rate (as a function of the solar cycle, season and local time) as well as the amplitude of ionospheric irregularities observed at a single GPS station. The study covers irregularities either due to space weather events (solar origin) or of terrestrial origin. If space weather irregularities are responsible for the largest effects in terms of ionospheric error, their occurrence rate highly depends on solar activity. Indeed, the occurrence rate of ionospheric irregularities is about 9 % during solar maximum, whereas it drops to about 0 % during medium or low solar activity periods. Medium-scale ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) occurring during daytime in autumn/winter are the most recurrent pattern of the time series, with yearly proportions slightly varying with the solar cycle and an amplitude of about 10 % of the TEC background. Another recurrent irregularity type, though less frequent than MSTIDs, is the noise-like variability in TEC observed during summer nighttime, under quiet geomagnetic conditions. These summer nighttime irregularities exhibit amplitudes ranging between 8 and 15 % of the TEC background.

  20. Kilometer-Spaced GNSS Array for Ionospheric Irregularity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang

    This dissertation presents automated, systematic data collection, processing, and analysis methods for studying the spatial-temporal properties of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) scintillations produced by ionospheric irregularities at high latitudes using a closely spaced multi-receiver array deployed in the northern auroral zone. The main contributions include 1) automated scintillation monitoring, 2) estimation of drift and anisotropy of the irregularities, 3) error analysis of the drift estimates, and 4) multi-instrument study of the ionosphere. A radio wave propagating through the ionosphere, consisting of ionized plasma, may suffer from rapid signal amplitude and/or phase fluctuations known as scintillation. Caused by non-uniform structures in the ionosphere, intense scintillation can lead to GNSS navigation and high-frequency (HF) communication failures. With specialized GNSS receivers, scintillation can be studied to better understand the structure and dynamics of the ionospheric irregularities, which can be parameterized by altitude, drift motion, anisotropy of the shape, horizontal spatial extent and their time evolution. To study the structuring and motion of ionospheric irregularities at the sub-kilometer scale sizes that produce L-band scintillations, a closely-spaced GNSS array has been established in the auroral zone at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska to investigate high latitude scintillation and irregularities. Routinely collecting low-rate scintillation statistics, the array database also provides 100 Hz power and phase data for each channel at L1/L2C frequency. In this work, a survey of seasonal and hourly dependence of L1 scintillation events over the course of a year is discussed. To efficiently and systematically study scintillation events, an automated low-rate scintillation detection routine is established and performed for each day by screening the phase scintillation index. The spaced-receiver technique is applied to cross

  1. Inhibition of retrograde transport protects mice from lethal ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Bahne; Bai, Siau-Kun; Gobbo, Emilie; Lopez, Roman; Merer, Goulven; Pinchard, Suzy; Panigai, Laetitia; Tenza, Danièle; Raposo, Graça; Beaumelle, Bruno; Sauvaire, Didier; Gillet, Daniel; Johannes, Ludger; Barbier, Julien

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial Shiga-like toxins are virulence factors that constitute a significant public health threat worldwide, and the plant toxin ricin is a potential bioterror weapon. To gain access to their cytosolic target, ribosomal RNA, these toxins follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, via endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify small molecule inhibitors that protect cells from ricin and Shiga-like toxins. We identified two compounds that selectively block retrograde toxin trafficking at the early endosome-TGN interface, without affecting compartment morphology, endogenous retrograde cargos, or other trafficking steps, demonstrating an unexpected degree of selectivity and lack of toxicity. In mice, one compound clearly protects from lethal nasal exposure to ricin. Our work discovers the first small molecule that shows efficacy against ricin in animal experiments and identifies the retrograde route as a potential therapeutic target.

  2. Plant Intracellular Transport: Tracing Functions of the Retrograde Kinesin.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2015-09-21

    Adding to its varied repertoire of functions in cell morphogenesis and cell division, a molecular motor protein of the kinesin-14 class has recently been implicated in rapid retrograde transport along cellular tracks in moss.

  3. Difficult retrograde endotracheal intubation: the utility of a pharyngeal loop.

    PubMed

    Arya, Virendra K; Dutta, Amitabh; Chari, Pramila; Sharma, Ramesh K

    2002-02-01

    Direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation remains the technique of choice to achieve control of the airway. Alternative or additional techniques of airway control are required whenever an airway is deemed difficult because of anatomical and/or technical reasons. The retrograde intubation technique is an important option for gaining airway access from below the vocal cords in such situations (1). We report successful management and the problems encountered while gaining the upper airway by the retrograde catheter method in a patient having bilateral fibrous ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A 30-yr-old woman presented for redo-release of bilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis under general anesthesia. During the previous anesthetic for primary release of ankylosis, tracheostomy was done, as conventional blind nasotracheal and retrograde intubation attempts failed several times. This case report describes the method for overcoming the difficulties of a retrograde intubation procedure in removing the guiding catheter nasally by using a pharyngeal loop assembly.

  4. Prostatic urethra malformation associated with retrograde ejaculation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Aiming; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-12-21

    Retrograde ejaculation can have anatomical, neurogenic, or pharmacological causes. Among these factors, malformation of the prostatic urethra is an uncommon cause. We describe a 29-year-old Han Chinese man with absence of his verumontanum combined with ejaculatory duct cysts, and no other cause for ejaculatory dysfunction. His verumontanum was replaced by a deep groove adjacent to his bladder neck, which could significantly influence bladder neck contraction. In addition, the large cysts in the ejaculatory duct could obstruct the anterior outlet of his prostatic urethra and prevent seminal fluid flow in an anterograde direction. There are few reports of retrograde ejaculation associated with congenital malformations of the posterior urethra. Malformations associated with bladder neck laxity and increased tone of the prostatic urethral outlet can contribute to retrograde ejaculation. Malformation of the prostatic urethra is an uncommon cause of retrograde ejaculation, and can be difficult to treat.

  5. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  6. The 'SAFARI' Technique Using Retrograde Access Via Peroneal Artery Access

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Kun Da; Tan, Seck Guan; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2012-08-15

    The 'SAFARI' technique or subintimal arterial flossing with antegrade-retrograde intervention is a method for recanalisation of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) when subintimal angioplasty fails. Retrograde access is usually obtained via the popliteal, distal anterior tibial artery (ATA)/dorsalis pedis (DP), or distal posterior tibial artery (PTA). Distal access via the peroneal artery has not been described and has a risk of continued bleeding, leading to compartment syndrome due to its deep location. We describe our experience in two patients with retrograde access via the peroneal artery and the use of balloon-assisted hemostasis for these retrograde punctures. This approach may potentially give more options for endovascular interventions in lower limb CTOs.

  7. Geomagnetic storm effect on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities over African equatorial sector using GPS-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Paul; Oyeyemi, Elijah; Akala, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Total electron content (TEC) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) measurements provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) network have been used to study the occurrence of large scale ionospheric irregularities over the African equatorial sector. The rate of change of TEC (ROT) as well as its standard deviation over five minutes (ROTI) were used to monitor the level of irregularities over 3 stations distributed across the three longitudinal sectors of Africa (eastern, central and western longitudinal sectors). The storm effect on irregularities occurrence has been studied in conjunction with the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the z component of the Interplanetary magnetic field (IMFBz) indices during four intense storms which were classified according to their season of occurrence during the year 2015. Irregularities were associated with GPS-TEC fluctuations as seen in the increased ROT and ROTI values especially in the post sunset period. Irregularities were inhibited over all the stations during the storm of March plausibly as a result of electric field conditioned by the southward turning of IMFBz during the pre and post midnight periods. The triggering of irregularities over the western and central stations and their inhibition over the eastern station during the storm of June was controlled by the ring current. The storm effect on irregularities was not evident over the western and central stations but inhibition of irregularities was observed over the eastern station during the storm of September.

  8. Bottomside sinusoidal waves, a new class of equatorial plasma irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Valladares, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities having properties easily distinguished from those of plasma bubbles, depletions or broadened turbulence is described. This new class of irregularities has been identified in the data from the Retarding Potential Analizer (RPA) and the Ion Drift Meter (IDM) on the Atmosphere Explorer satellites AE-C and -E. They are observed in the bottomside at night in a narrow belt extending approximately +/-12/sup 0/ from the dip equator, and up to 7500 km or more in the east-west direction. High resolution data from the RPA reveal nearly sinusoidal waves in the ion number density N/sub i/ with peak-to-peak (..delta..N/sub i)/(N/sub i/) amplitudes that span more than 3 orders of magnitude, from values less than 0.1% to more than 100%. These distinctive ''Bottom Side Sinusoidal'' (BSS) irregularities typically have a central wavelength lying in the range from 300 m to 3 km, and relatively narrow spectra. The power spectral index is often large (5 or 6) at the shorter wavelengths but the spectrum usually decays much less rapidly on the longer wavelength side. The vertical drift velocity also has a wavelike structure that appears to be anticorrelated with the N/sub i/ variations, such that regions of lower density plasma move upward and higher density regions move downward with respect to the mean ionospheric drift. Anticorrelated wavelikle drift and density fluctuations are consistent with plasma that is Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) unstable. Considerations of altitude and latitude localization and cross-field ambipolar diffusion effects introduce a peak in the R-T growth rate near 1 km and also restrict the range of wavelengths that becomes unstable.

  9. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Bilioenteric Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Taek

    2016-01-01

    For diagnosis and treatment of pancreatobiliary diseases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is useful method nowadays and its technically success rate is usually in about 90%-95% of patients with normal gastric and pancreaticobiliary anatomy. Recently ERCP is significantly challenging after intestinal reconstruction, particularly in patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, classic Whipple’s operation) or pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) with reconstruction. PD and PPPD relate to numerous techniques have been presented for reconstruction of the digestive tract and pancreaticobiliary tree during the resection bilioenteric stricture commonly occurs later in the postoperative course and developed in 5-year cumulative probability of biliary stricture rate of 8.2% and pancreaticoenteric stricture of 4.6%. This complication was no difference in incidence between patients with benign or malignant disease. In PD or PPPD with reconstruction, short pancreatobiliary limb with biliojejunal anastomosis site is made usually, modestly success rate of intubation to blind loop and cannulation with conventional endoscope. However, in combined Reux-en-Y anastomosis, longer pancreatobiliary limb and additional Reux limb are obstacle to success intubation and cannulation by using conventional endoscope. In this situation, new designed enetroscope with dedicated accessories is efficient. PMID:27838918

  10. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  11. San Andreas Fault tremor and retrograde metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Diener, Johann F. A.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic tremor is an enigmatic low-frequency seismic phenomenon mainly observed in subduction zones, but also documented along the deep extension of the central San Andreas Fault. The physical mechanisms behind this unusual seismic event are not yet determined for any tectonic setting; however, low effective stress conditions arising from metamorphic fluid production are commonly inferred for subduction-related tremor. We investigate the petrologic conditions at which the San Andreas tectonic tremor is inferred to occur through calculations of the pressure - temperature - time evolution of stable mineral assemblages and their water content in the dominant lithologies of the Franciscan Complex. We find that tremor locations around Parkfield and Cholame are currently experiencing retrograde metamorphic conditions. Within the temperature-depth conditions of observed tremor activity, at approximately 500°C and 20 km depth, several mineralogical transitions may occur in cooling greywacke and mafic rocks, leading to localised, significant removal of free water and an associated volume decrease. This indicates that, contrary to subduction-related tremor, tremor on the San Andreas Fault is not linked to prograde, crustal metamorphic fluid production within the fault zone; rather it might be related to mantle-derived fluids from below the tremor zone, and/or fault zone weakening that occurs as phyllosilicates replace more competent and granular mineral phases.

  12. Complications of internal jugular vein retrograde catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gemma, M; Beretta, L; De Vitis, A; Mattioli, C; Calvi, M R; Antonino, A; Rizzi, B; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, A

    1998-01-01

    We report on the incidence of complications of 172 internal jugular vein retrograde catheterizations (IJVRCs) performed on 126 patients. Standard cannulation and X-ray control of the catheter tip placement were performed. Difficulties encountered during the manouvre were registered. Patients with a jugular catheter in place for more than one day had neck echography on catheter removal and one week later. Carotid artery puncture occurred in 20 (12%) cases and lymphatic vessel puncture in one. In 13 (8%) cases IJVRC failed due to difficulties in advancing the guide. X-ray films documented catheter misplacement in 39 (23%) cases: loop into the internal jugular vein in 11 (6%); paravertebral venous plexus cannulated in one; other extracranial jugular afferent cannulated in 4 (2%); catheter tip into the jugular lumen in 10 (6%); catheter tip beyond the jugular bulb in 13 (8%). First neck echography documented: one perivascular hematoma (absent one week later); 3 (4%) jugular vein thrombosis (2 asymptomatic and absent one week later; one symptomatic and still evident one week later). Positive neck echography was not associated with difficulties, length of catheterization, diameter of the catheter. IJVRC is a simple and safe procedure with a low incidence of serious complications.

  13. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  14. Pleuropancreatic fistula: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, S.; Pellegrini, C.A.; Moss, A.A.; Way, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    The complementary use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of pleuropancreatic fistulas is described in relation to four cases in which computed tomography revealedthe thoracic extension of a pancreatic fistula not demonstrable by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, although the latter indicated an abnormal pancreatic duct. The complementary use of both techniques may be necessary to define the pathologic anatomy so that the appropriate therapy, particularly the surgical approach, can be decided.

  15. An unusual cause of retrograde ejaculation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, A; Truss, M C; Rademaker, J; Stief, C B; von zur Mühlen, A

    2000-06-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with a 1-year history of retrograde ejaculation and a 10-year history of drug-resistant hypertension. Diagnostic abdominal ultrasound revealed an open bladder neck during the filling phase and a retroperitoneal tumor. After surgical excision histology revealed an extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma, which should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with retrograde ejaculation and hypertension.

  16. The inherent catastrophic traps in retrograde CTO PCI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eugene B; Tsuchikane, Etsuo

    2017-05-04

    When we learn to drive, our driving instructor tells us how to check the side mirror and turn your head to check the blind spot before changing lanes. He tells us how to stop at stop signs, how to drive in slippery conditions, the safe stopping distances, and these all make our driving safe. Similarly, when we learn PCI, our mentors teach us to seat the guiding catheter co-axially, to wire the vessel safely, to deliver balloon and stents over the wire, to watch the pressure of the guiding, in order that we perform PCI safely and evade complications. In retrograde CTO PCI, there is no such published teaching. Also many individual mentors have not had the wide experience to see all the possible complications of retrograde CTO PCI and, therefore, may not be able to warn their apprentice. As the number of retrograde procedures increase worldwide, there is a corresponding increase in catastrophic complications, many of which, we as experts, can see are easily avoidable. To breach this gap in knowledge, this article describes 12 commonly met inherent traps in retrograde CTO PCI. They are inherent because by arranging our equipment in the manner to perform retrograde CTO PCI, these complications are either induced directly or happen easily. We hope this work will enhance safety of retrograde CTO PCI and avoid many catastrophic complications for our readers and operators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Increased sinusoidal volume and solute extraction during retrograde liver perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, N.M.; Manning, J.A.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    Retrograde isolated liver perfusion has been used to probe acinar functional heterogeneity, but the hemodynamic effects of backward flow have not been characterized. In this study, extraction of a long-chain fatty acid derivative, 12-N-methyl-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-amino stearate (12-NBDS), was greater during retrograde than during anterograde perfusion of isolated rat liver. To determine whether hemodynamic differences between anterograde and retrograde perfused livers could account for this finding, the hepatic extracellular space was measured for both directions of flow by means of (/sup 14/C)sucrose washout during perfusion as well as by direct measurement of (/sup 14/C)sucrose entrapped during perfusion. A three- to fourfold enlargement of the total hepatic extracellular space was found during retrograde perfusion by both approaches. Examination of perfusion-fixed livers by light microscopy and morphometry revealed that marked distension of the sinusoids occurred during retrograde perfusion and that this accounts for the observed increase in the (/sup 14/C)sucrose space. These findings support the hypothesis that maximum resistance to perfusate flow in the isolated perfused rat liver is located at the presinusoidal level. In addition, increased transit time of perfusate through the liver and greater sinusoidal surface area resulting from sinusoidal distension may account for the higher extraction of 12-NBDS and possibly other compounds by retrograde perfused liver.

  18. Plasma irregularities caused by cycloid bunching of the CRRES G-2 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Pongratz, M. B.; Simons, D. J.; Wolcott, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft carried a number of barium thermite canisters for release into the upper atmosphere. The barium release labeled G-2 showed evidence of curved irregularities not aligned with the ambient magnetic field B. The newly discovered curved structures can be explained by a process called cycloid bunching. Cycloid bunching occurs when plasma is created by photoionization of a neutral cloud injected at high velocity perpendicular to B. If the injection velocity is much larger than the expansion speed of the cloud, the ion trail will form a cycloid that has irregularities spaced by the product of the perpendicular injection speed and the ion gyroperiod, Images of the solar-illuminated barium ions are compared with the results of a three-dimensional kinetic simulation. Cycloid bunching is shown to be responsible for the rapid generation of both curved and field-aligned irregularities in the CRRES G-2 experiment.

  19. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  20. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  1. Detecting chaos in irregularly sampled time series.

    PubMed

    Kulp, C W

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Wiebe and Virgin [Chaos 22, 013136 (2012)] developed an algorithm which detects chaos by analyzing a time series' power spectrum which is computed using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). Their algorithm, like other time series characterization algorithms, requires that the time series be regularly sampled. Real-world data, however, are often irregularly sampled, thus, making the detection of chaotic behavior difficult or impossible with those methods. In this paper, a characterization algorithm is presented, which effectively detects chaos in irregularly sampled time series. The work presented here is a modification of Wiebe and Virgin's algorithm and uses the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) to compute a series' power spectrum instead of the DFT. The DFT is not appropriate for irregularly sampled time series. However, the LSP is capable of computing the frequency content of irregularly sampled data. Furthermore, a new method of analyzing the power spectrum is developed, which can be useful for differentiating between chaotic and non-chaotic behavior. The new characterization algorithm is successfully applied to irregularly sampled data generated by a model as well as data consisting of observations of variable stars.

  2. Efficacy of treatment with pseudoephedrine in men with retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Shoshany, O; Abhyankar, N; Elyaguov, J; Niederberger, C

    2017-07-01

    The use of pseudoephedrine, an alpha agonist, for the treatment of retrograde ejaculation is well-known, however, there is no clear consensus from the literature regarding its efficacy and treatment protocol. We evaluated the efficacy of pseudoephedrine treatment in patients with retrograde ejaculation, utilizing a yet undescribed short-period treatment protocol. Twenty men were medically treated with pseudoephedrine for retrograde ejaculation between January 2010 and May 2016 (12 with complete retrograde ejaculation and 8 with partial retrograde ejaculation). All patients had a semen analysis and post-ejaculatory urinalysis before and after treatment. The treatment protocol consisted of 60 mg of pseudoephedrine every 6 h on the day before semen analysis and two more 60 mg doses on the day of the semen analysis. Diabetes was the most common etiology for complete retrograde ejaculation (60%), whereas an idiopathic cause was the most common etiology for partial retrograde ejaculation (82%). Of the 12 complete retrograde ejaculation patients treated with pseudoephedrine prior to semen analysis, 7 (58.3%) recovered spermatozoa in the antegrade ejaculate, with a mean total sperm count of 273.5 ± 172.5 million. Of the eight patients with partial retrograde ejaculation, five (62.5%) had a ≥50% increase in the antegrade total sperm count. In this group, the mean total sperm count increased from 26.9 ± 8.5 million before treatment to 84.2 ± 24.6 million after treatment, whereas the percentage of spermatozoa in the urine declined from 43.2 ± 9% to 17 ± 10%, respectively (both p < 0.05). Overall, in men with retrograde ejaculation treated with a pseudoephedrine regimen prior to ejaculation, some improvement in seminal parameters occurred in 14 (70%) patients, with 10 patients (38.5% of all patients) achieving antegrade total sperm counts over 39 million. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  3. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Emily M; McBeth, Zachary L; Henry, Sarah E; Cooley, Robert; Burger, Evalina L; Cain, Christopher M J; Patel, Vikas V

    2012-09-15

    A retrospective cohort study. To compare the incidence of retrograde ejaculation (RE) after anterior lumbar spine surgery with disc replacement versus fusion with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP). Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has become a popular choice for treating a number of pathologies, largely because it preserves the posterior paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Despite these advantages, the anterior approach is also associated with various complications, one of which is RE. A recent study has questioned whether the risk of RE is increased by the use of BMP in ALIF procedures rather than by the approach alone. We conducted a retrospective review of all male patients who received ALIF using BMP or artificial disc replacement (ADR) on at least the L5-S1 level between 2004 and 2011. Medical records were evaluated for the occurrence of RE, and patients were contacted via the phone to obtain current information. The incidence of RE was then compared between the 2 anterior lumbar surgery procedures. Of the 95 cases of anterior surgery including L5-S1, 54 patients underwent ALIF with BMP (56.8%) and 41 patients were treated with ADR (43.2%). Postoperative RE occurred in 4 of the 54 ALIF patients (7.4%) and in 4 of the 41 ADR patients (9.8%). The incidence of RE was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.7226). At latest follow-up, 1 ALIF and 1 ADR patient reported resolution of the RE. This study found that RE occurred at a similar rate in patients treated with ADR and ALIF with BMP. The overall rate of RE after retroperitoneal anterior lumbar surgery was higher than expected, which underscores the importance of counseling patients about this risk and specifically questioning patients about the symptoms of RE at postoperative visits.

  4. Signature of ionospheric irregularities under different geophysical conditions on SBAS performance in the western African low-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Oladipo Emmanuel; Villamide, Xurxo Otero; Paparini, Claudia; Ngaya, Rodrigue Herbert; Radicella, Sandro M.; Nava, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Rate of change of TEC (ROT) and its index (ROTI) are considered a good proxy to characterize the occurrence of ionospheric plasma irregularities like those observed after sunset at low latitudes. SBASs (satellite-based augmentation systems) are civil aviation systems that provide wide-area or regional improvement to single-frequency satellite navigation using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) constellations. Plasma irregularities in the path of the GNSS signal after sunset cause severe phase fluctuations and loss of locks of the signals in GNSS receiver at low-latitude regions. ROTI is used in this paper to characterize plasma density ionospheric irregularities in central-western Africa under nominal and disturbed conditions and identified some days of irregularity inhibition. A specific low-latitude algorithm is used to emulate potential possible SBAS message using real GNSS data in the western African low-latitude region. The performance of a possible SBAS operation in the region under different ionospheric conditions is analysed. These conditions include effects of geomagnetic disturbed periods when SBAS performance appears to be enhanced due to ionospheric irregularity inhibition. The results of this paper could contribute to a feasibility assessment of a European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System-based SBAS in the sub-Saharan African region.

  5. Effect of irregularities of nanosatellites position and size on collective electric and magnetic plasmonic resonances in spherical nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Vallecchi, Andrea; Albani, Matteo; Capolino, Filippo

    2013-03-25

    Spherical nanoclusters (NCs) with a central dielectric core surrounded by several satellite plasmonic nanospheres have been recently investigated as aggregates supporting electric and magnetic collective resonances. Notably, the collective magnetic resonance has been exploited to provide magnetic properties in optics, i.e., materials with macroscopic relative permeability different from unity. The NCs discussed in this paper can be realized using state-of-the-art nanochemistry self-assembly techniques. Accordingly, perfectly regular disposition of the nanoplasmonic satellites is not possible and this paper constitutes the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of such irregularities onto the electric and magnetic collective resonances. In particular we will show that the peak of the scattering cross section associated to the magnetic resonance is very sensitive to certain irregularities and significantly less to others. It is shown here that "artificial magnetic" properties of NCs are preserved for certain degrees of irregularities of the nanosatellites positions, however they are strongly affected by irregularities in the plasmonic nanosatellites sizes and by the presence of "defects" caused by the absence of satellites in the process of self-assembly around the dielectric core. The "artificial electric" resonance is instead less affected by irregularities mainly because of its wider frequency bandwidth.

  6. Irregular menstruation according to occupational status.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeunhee; Kim, Yoonjung

    2017-07-06

    This cross-sectional study explored associations of irregular menstruation with occupational characteristics, using secondary analyses of data from 4,731 women aged 19-54 years, collected from a nationally representative sample, the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-V during 2010-2012. The associations between irregular menstruation and occupation were explored using multiple logistic regression. Compared to non-manual workers, service/sales workers had a greater odds of irregular menstruation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.44; 95percent confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-1.99) as did manual workers and unemployed women (aOR: 1.56; 95percent CI: 1.10-2.22, aOR: 1.46; 95percent CI: 1.14-1.89, respectively). Compared to regular workers, temporary workers and unemployed women had aORs of 1.52 (95percent CI: 1.08-2.13) and 1.33 (95percent CI: 1.05-1.69), respectively. Also, when compared to full-time workers, part-time workers and unemployed women had greater odds of irregular menstruation (aOR: 1.41; 95percent CI: 1.00-2.00 and aOR: 1.29; 95percent CI: 1.03-1.63, respectively). Furthermore, compared to daytime workers, shift workers and unemployed women had greater odds irregular menstruation (aOR: 1.39; 95percent CI: 1.03-1.88 and aOR: 1.28; 95percent CI: 1.04-1.59, respectively). Women with these occupational characteristics should be screened for early diagnosis and intervention for irregular menstruation.

  7. 3D Spectrum of Equatorial Density Irregularities Generated from Observed 1D Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Psiake, M.; Kelley, M. C.; Roddy, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    ASTRA and Cornell University have a joint project underway to develop an inverse diffraction tomography algorithm suitable for a two-dimensional array of GPS receivers located in the equatorial region. A significant component of the research involves development of an accurate, realistic electro-magnetic propagation forward model that goes from the GPS satellites to the array of ground receivers. The forward model will be used to test the accuracy of the inverse diffraction tomography algorithm, help select the optimal method of doing the inversion, allow for comprehensive, sophisticated non-linear inversions, and help provide insight to the science that will result from the inversion analysis. The method of approach to the forward model includes a realistic 3D model of the electron density irregularities, arbitrary time-varying geometry between satellite and ground receiver array and multiple phase screens to allow for strong scattering. The focus of this talk is on the development of the 3D spectrum of the irregularities, and how the 3D spectrum can be generated from observed in-situ 1D spectra from rockets or satellites such C/NOFS. The C/NOFS satellite has an in-situ Plasma Langmuir Probe (PLP) sensor that is capable of measuring electron density fluctuations at sample rates of 512 Hz. Preliminary analysis has been performed on these fluctuations. Spectra have been calculated for a number of different altitudes and local times. Preliminary results are presented from this research and, assuming a power law form for the spectra, spectral indices are calculated. Given observed 1D spectra of the irregularities, a theoretical analysis will be presented that allows recovery of the 3D spectrum of irregularities from the observed 1D spectra. Preliminary calculations of such 3D spectra derived from the observed C/NOFS 1D spectra will be presented.

  8. Rocket measurements of mesospheric ionization irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, R. B.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir probe technique for measurement of electron concentration in the mesosphere is capable of excellent altitude resolution, of order 1 m. Measurements from nine daytime rocket flights carrying an electron density fine structure experiment frequently show small scale ionization structures in the altitude region 70 to 90 km. The irregularities are believed to be the result of turbulent advection of ions and electrons. The fine structure experiment flown by the University of Illinois is described and methods of analyzing the collected data is presented. Theories of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are reviewed. Power spectra of the measured irregularities are calculated and compared to spectra predicted by turbulence theories.

  9. Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by multiple bouts of sleep within a 24-hour period. Patients present with symptoms of insomnia, including difficulty either falling or staying asleep, and daytime excessive sleepiness. The disorder is seen in a variety of individuals, ranging from children with neurodevelopmental disorders, to patients with psychiatric disorders, and most commonly in older adults with neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment of irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder requires a multimodal approach aimed at strengthening circadian synchronizing agents, such as daytime exposure to bright light, and structured social and physical activities. In addition, melatonin may be useful in some patients.

  10. Scintillation and irregularities from the nightside part of a Sun-aligned polar cap arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meeren, Christer; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Paxton, Larry J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study the presence of irregularities and scintillation in relation to the nightside part of a long-lived, Sun-aligned transpolar arc on 15 January 2015. The arc was observed in DMSP UV and particle data and lasted at least 3 h between 1700 and 2000 UT. The arc was more intense than the main oval during this time. From all-sky imagers on Svalbard we were able to study the evolution of the arc, which drifted slowly westward toward the dusk cell. The intensity of the arc as observed from ground was 10-17 kR in 557.7 nm and 2-3.5 kR in 630.0 nm, i.e., significant emissions in both green and red emission lines. We have used high-resolution raw data from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers and backscatter from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars to study irregularities and scintillation in relation to the polar cap arc. Even though the literature has suggested that polar cap arcs are potential sources for irregularities, our results indicate only very weak irregularities. This may be due to the background density in the northward IMF polar cap being too low for significant irregularities to be created.

  11. Equatorial F region irregularities during MiniMax and the onset conditions in the Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, P. C.; Patra, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The strange behavior of the ongoing solar cycle has attracted worldwide attention of the ionospheric community in an effort to understand the impact of the solar activity on the ionosphere in general and ionospheric plasma irregularities in particular. Unexpected results obtained during the prolonged deep solar minimum during 2008-2009 have already been witnessed. Although it is known that characteristics and occurrence of equatorial F region irregularities vary with solar activity, the effect of relatively low level of solar flux during the present maxima on the occurrence and characteristics of F region irregularities has yet to be known. In this paper, we present results on F region plasma irregularities based on extensive radar observations made during the MiniMax of the solar cycle 23/24. These observations were made using the newly established Gadanki Ionospheric Radar Interferometer (GIRI) in the scanning mode providing zonal distribution and drifts of the plasma irregularities. The onset location and ionospheric background conditions have been studied using the scanning capability of GIRI, collocated digisonde and C/NOFS satellite observations. The study also includes the role of the solar terminator and sporadic E conditions. Results obtained during the MiniMax are finally compared with those observed during the similar solar activity condition of the previous solar cycle.

  12. Preliminary comparisons of VHF radar maps of F-region irregularities with scintillations in the equatorial region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S.; Aarons, J.; Mcclure, J. P.; Lahoz, C.; Bushby, A.; Woodman, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Multiantenna 50 MHz radar backscatter maps of echo power from night-time F-region equatiorial irregularities obtained at Jicamarca, Peru were compared with simultaneous VHF scintillation observations from Huancayo at 137 and 254 MHz during the period 20 November to 12 December 1975. Saturation of VHF scintillations in excess of 20 dB was observed at both these frequencies during times when radar maps showed large intense plume structures rising into the topside ionosphere. On nights when only thin layers of bottomside irregularities were observed, moderate to weak scintillations were recorded at VHF. Preliminary values of east-west horizontal irregularity drift velocities were obtained and compared with scintillation rate observations. Using the 1.5-deg and 4.5-deg longitudinal separation between the Jicamarca radar and ionospheric observation points of the two satellites from Huancayo, information was derived regarding large-scale east-west structure during the development phase of the irregularities.

  13. Holding Irregularly Shaped Parts For Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Burt W.; Wilson, Rick R.

    1988-01-01

    Part with complicated, irregular outside contours clamped for precise machining of internal passages with aid of simple method. Exterior of part cast in Rigidex, or equivalent epoxy. Forms wall to be clamped. Interior of part machined to finish of 125 microinches or finer. When machining finished, epoxy melted away by heating part to 200 degree F.

  14. Irregularity Decay in an Isolated Plasma Bubble.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    irregularities that they produce as they develop, are clearly associated with radar back- scatter, ionogram spread F, airglow depletions and radio-wave scintil...can structure as a result of the gra- dient drift instability. At these local times, the zonal neutral wind is large (; 2150 m/s) and eastward, so

  15. Irregularly Shaped Space-Filling Truncated Octahedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, John Robert

    2008-01-01

    For any parent tetrahedron ABCD, centroids of selected sub-tetrahedra form the vertices of an irregularly shaped space-filling truncated octahedron. To reflect these properties, such a figure will be called an ISTO. Each edge of the ISTO is parallel to and one-eighth the length of one of the edges of tetrahedron ABCD and the volume of the ISTO is…

  16. Analysis of variance calculations for irregular experiments

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Wright

    1977-01-01

    Irregular experiments may be more useful than much smaller regular experiments and can be analyzed statistically without undue expenditure of time. For a few missing plots, standard methods of calculating missing-plot values can be used. For more missing plots (up to 10 percent), seedlot means or randomly chosen plot means of the same seedlot can be substituted for...

  17. Extracting Periodic Signals From Irregularly Sampled Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.

    1995-01-01

    Successive approximations formed in Fourier space. Algorithm extracts periodic signals from sparse, irregularly sampled sets of measurement data. Pertains to data processed via fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). Data represents signal components with initially unknown frequencies spanning large spectral range and includes frequencies not integer multiples of minimum FFT frequency.

  18. Spelling Pronunciations: Transforming Irregularity into Regularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Thaler, Verena; Reitsma, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    In a 10-day training, the efficacy of spelling pronunciations on German speaking 5th-graders' spelling skills for irregular words was examined. Poor spellers were less efficient in learning the spelling pronunciations than age-adequate spellers. On post-tests, 1 week after the last training day and between 5 and 12 weeks after post-test 1, poor…

  19. Density Irregularities Inside the Plasmasphere: Cluster Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrouzet, F.; Lemaire, J. F.; Decreau, P. M. E.; DeKeyser, J.; Masson, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Santolik, O.; Trotignon, J. G.; Rauch, J. L.; LeGuirriec, E.

    2003-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments onboard the four Cluster spacecraft reveal small-scale density irregularities inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We review statistics of the plasmapause position and thickness, as well as statistics of these density structures. We focus on a particular plasmasphere crossing on 11 April 2002, with several density irregularities, as well as two plasma tails, observed by Cluster on the legs of the inbound and outbound passes. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We determine also the normal velocity of the surface of these irregularities, assuming they are planar boundaries, from the time delays between density structures in the four individual density profiles. These new observations yield novel insights about (1) the dimensions of plasma irregularities across and parallel to magnetic field lines, (2) the dynamics of these small-scale structures, (3) their bulk velocities, and (4) their position and distribution as a function of the magnetic local time (MLT) and the geomagnetic conditions (as determined by Kp).

  20. Generalisation of Regular and Irregular Morphological Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasada, Sandeep; and Pinker, Steven

    1993-01-01

    When it comes to explaining English verbs' patterns of regular and irregular generalization, single-network theories have difficulty with the former, rule-only theories with the latter process. Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence, based on observation during experiments and simulations in morphological pattern generation, independently call…

  1. Spelling Pronunciations: Transforming Irregularity into Regularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Thaler, Verena; Reitsma, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    In a 10-day training, the efficacy of spelling pronunciations on German speaking 5th-graders' spelling skills for irregular words was examined. Poor spellers were less efficient in learning the spelling pronunciations than age-adequate spellers. On post-tests, 1 week after the last training day and between 5 and 12 weeks after post-test 1, poor…

  2. Enhanced wave absorption through irregular interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, S.; Sapoval, B.; Filoche, M.; Asch, M.

    2009-01-01

    The diffraction and absorption of waves by a system with both absorbing properties and irregular geometry is an open physical problem. A more reachable and closely related question is the understanding of wave oscillations in confined systems containing an absorbing material with an irregular shape. This has to be solved to understand why anechoic chambers (electromagnetic or acoustic) do work better with irregular absorbing walls. The answer to this question could also be used in other fields such as light or microwave absorption, or also to improve the performances of break-waters in order to damp sea-waves. It is found here that, in resonators containing an irregular shaped absorbent material, there appears a new type of mode localization. This phenomemon, that we call "astride" localization, describes the fact that these modes exist in both the lossless and the lossy regions. It is these modes that are particularly efficient in dissipating the energy of waves excited in the non-absorbing region.

  3. Synchronizing data from irregularly sampled sensors

    DOEpatents

    Uluyol, Onder

    2017-07-11

    A system and method include receiving a set of sampled measurements for each of multiple sensors, wherein the sampled measurements are at irregular intervals or different rates, re-sampling the sampled measurements of each of the multiple sensors at a higher rate than one of the sensor's set of sampled measurements, and synchronizing the sampled measurements of each of the multiple sensors.

  4. Investigation of the role of plasma wave cascading processes in the formation of midlatitude irregularities utilizing GPS and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltrass, A.; Scales, W. A.; Erickson, P. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that midlatitude ionospheric irregularities are less understood due to lack of models and observations that can explain the characteristics of the observed wave structures. In this paper, the cascading processes of both the temperature gradient instability (TGI) and the gradient drift instability (GDI) are investigated as the cause of these irregularities. Based on observations obtained during a coordinated experiment between the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and the Blackstone Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar, a time series for the growth rate of both TGI and GDI is calculated for observations in the subauroral ionosphere under both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Recorded GPS scintillation data are analyzed to monitor the amplitude scintillations and to obtain the spectral characteristics of irregularities producing ionospheric scintillations. Spatial power spectra of the density fluctuations associated with the TGI from nonlinear plasma simulations are compared with both the GPS scintillation spectral characteristics and previous in situ satellite spectral measurements. The spectral comparisons suggest that initially, TGI or/and GDI irregularities are generated at large-scale size (kilometer scale), and the dissipation of the energy associated with these irregularities occurs by generating smaller and smaller (decameter scale) irregularities. The alignment between experimental, theoretical, and computational results of this study suggests that in spite of expectations from linear growth rate calculations, cascading processes involving TGI and GDI are likely responsible for the midlatitude ionospheric irregularities associated with GPS scintillations during disturbed times.

  5. Axoplasmic importins enable retrograde injury signaling in lesioned nerve.

    PubMed

    Hanz, Shlomit; Perlson, Eran; Willis, Dianna; Zheng, Jun-Qi; Massarwa, R'ada; Huerta, Juan J; Koltzenburg, Martin; Kohler, Matthias; van-Minnen, Jan; Twiss, Jeffery L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2003-12-18

    Axoplasmic proteins containing nuclear localization signals (NLS) signal retrogradely by an unknown mechanism in injured nerve. Here we demonstrate that the importin/karyopherin alpha and beta families underlie this process. We show that importins are found in axons at significant distances from the cell body and that importin beta protein is increased after nerve lesion by local translation of axonal mRNA. This leads to formation of a high-affinity NLS binding complex that traffics retrogradely with the motor protein dynein. Trituration of synthetic NLS peptide at the injury site of axotomized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons delays their regenerative outgrowth, and NLS introduction to sciatic nerve concomitantly with a crush injury suppresses the conditioning lesion induced transition from arborizing to elongating growth in L4/L5 DRG neurons. These data suggest a model whereby lesion-induced upregulation of axonal importin beta may enable retrograde transport of signals that modulate the regeneration of injured neurons.

  6. Yarkovsky effect in the motion of asteroids in retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    Since the last few years, many small bodies in retrograde orbits was discovered, classified as asteroids. %Most of these orbits are located in peripherals of the Solar System. Main aim of our work is the analysis of their dynamical past and future. For 56 asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90) we studied the orbital evolution and calculated median dynamical lifetimes. Due to important role of the Yarkovsky effect in the motion of small bodies, we decided to apply the model with the Yarkovsky forces. Because the physical properties of these objects are still not well determined, we collected thermal parameters from literature or calculated from available formulas. The complete set of 'thermal' properties of each body is still not available from observational data, so our approach is a kind of approximation. Results obtained with these parameters allowed us to estimate the influence of the Yarkovsky effect on the stability of retrograde orbits.

  7. Retrograde resonance in the planar three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2013-12-01

    We continue the investigation of the dynamics of retrograde resonances initiated in Morais and Giuppone (Mon Notices R Astron Soc 424:52-64, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21151.x, 2012). After deriving a procedure to deduce the retrograde resonance terms from the standard expansion of the three-dimensional disturbing function, we concentrate on the planar problem and construct surfaces of section that explore phase-space in the vicinity of the main retrograde resonances (2/1, 1/1 and 1/2). In the case of the 1/1 resonance for which the standard expansion is not adequate to describe the dynamics, we develop a semi-analytic model based on numerical averaging of the unexpanded disturbing function, and show that the predicted libration modes are in agreement with the behavior seen in the surfaces of section.

  8. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  9. Dynein is the motor for retrograde axonal transport of organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapp, B.J.; Reese, T.S.

    1989-03-01

    Vesicular organelles in axons of nerve cells are transported along microtubules either toward their plus ends (fast anterograde transport) or toward their minus ends (retrograde transport). Two microtubule-based motors were previously identified by examining plastic beads induced to move along microtubules by cytosol fractions from the squid giant axon: (i) an anterograde motor, kinesin, and (ii) a retrograde motor, which is characterized here. The retrograde motor, a cytosolic protein previously termed HMW1, was purified from optic lobes and extruded axoplasm by nucleotide-dependent microtubule affinity and release; microtubule gliding was used as the assay of motor activity. The following properties of the retrograde motor suggest that it is cytoplasmic dynein: (i) sedimentation at 20-22 S with a heavy chain of Mr greater than 200,000 that coelectrophoreses with the alpha and beta subunits of axonemal dynein, (ii) cleavage by UV irradiation in the presence of ATP and vanadate, and (iii) a molecular structure resembling two-headed dynein from axonemes. Furthermore, bead movement toward the minus end of microtubules was blocked when axoplasmic supernatants were treated with UV/vanadate. Treatment of axoplasmic supernatant with UV/vanadate also blocks the retrograde movement of purified organelles in vitro without changing the number of anterograde moving organelles, indicating that dynein interacts specifically with a subgroup of organelles programmed to move toward the cell body. However, purified optic lobe dynein, like purified kinesin, does not by itself promote the movement of purified organelles along microtubules, suggesting that additional axoplasmic factors are necessary for retrograde as well as anterograde transport.

  10. Retrograde tibial nail: anatomical implantation and surgical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, S; Appelmann, P; Pairon, P; Gruszka, D; Rommens, P M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The treatment of distal tibial fractures requires a stable fixation while minimizing the secondary trauma to the soft tissues by the surgical approach and implant. The experimental Retrograde Tibial Nail is currently investigated as a minimally invasive alternative to plating and antegrade nailing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical feasibility in a cadaver model for all distal tibial fracture types generally considered treatable by nailing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Five different fracture types (AO/OTA 43-A1/A2/A3 and 43-C1/C2) were created on separate cadaveric limbs. In simple fractures (AO/OTA 43-A1/A2/A3) primary nailing was performed. In intraarticular fractures (AO/OTA 43-C1/2) reduction of the articular block and lag screw fixation was performed before nailing. Intraoperative complications, quality of reduction, fluoroscopy duration and operative time were evaluated. RESULTS Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps. Retrograde nailing is possible in fractures with simple intraarticular involvement after primary lag screw fixation. The duration of surgery averaged 51.8 minutes (range 40-62 min). No major complications occurred during nailing. CONCLUSIONS The minimally invasive retrograde nail combines a minimally invasive local osteosynthesis with the ability to adequately fix extraarticular and simple intraarticular distal tibial fractures. The results suggests that retrograde tibia nailing is a promising new concept for the treatment of distal tibia fractures. Key words: minimally invasive surgery, tibia, metaphyseal fractures, intramedullary nailing, retrograde nailing.

  11. Orbital Evolution and Impact Hazard of Asteroids on Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2014-07-01

    We present the past evolutional scenarios of known group of asteroids in retrograde orbits. Applying the latest observational data, we determined their nominal and averaged orbital elements. Next, we studied the behaviour of their orbital motion 1~My in the past (100~My in the future for two NEAs) taking into account the limitations of observational errors. It has been shown that the influence of outer planets perturbations in many cases can import small bodies on high inclination or retrograde orbits into the inner Solar System.

  12. Physiology and pathology of endosome-to-Golgi retrograde sorting.

    PubMed

    Burd, Christopher G

    2011-08-01

    Bidirectional traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the endosomal system sustains the functions of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in secretion and organelle biogenesis. Export of cargo from the TGN via anterograde trafficking pathways depletes the organelle of sorting receptors, processing proteases, SNARE molecules, and other factors, and these are subsequently retrieved from endosomes via the retrograde pathway. Recent studies indicate that retrograde trafficking is vital to early metazoan development, nutrient homeostasis, and for processes that protect against Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases.

  13. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    SciTech Connect

    Valladares, C.E.; DasGupta, A.; Whitney, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal wave forms in the ion number density N/sub i/ was observed by the Atmosphere Explorer satellites. Multisatellite scintillation observations made at Huancayo, Peru and spaced-receiver drive measurements made at Ancon, Peru are associated with such irregularities observed by AE-E on a few nights in December 1979. The scintillations continue for a period of almost 6 hours, at a level that varies from moderate to fairly intense (S4 = 0.1-0.8 at 250 MHz), and these S4 fluctuations are quite well correlated, even over a distance of 1000 km. The irregularities constituting the large patch are found to drift eastward at a velocity of approximately 140 m/s. This and other such events are accompanied by the frequency spread signatures on Huancayo ionograms, as previously reported. The unique feature of the Fourier spectra associated with such bottomside sinusiodal (BSS) irregularities is the presence of Fresnel oscillations, which allow a determination of the velocity of the diffraction pattern perpendicular to the direction of the ray from the satellite to the ground station. The velocity so determined agrees well with the results of simultaneously performed spaced-receiver drift measurements. The presence of Fresnel oscillations indicates that the BSS irregularities occur in a relatively thin layer. However, while the scintillation data indicate a high frequency, roll off with a spectral index of the order of -3 to -4, the in-situ data tend to indicate that the index is of the order -5 to -6. Modeling studies are necessary to resolve this difference.

  14. Low and Midlatitude Ionospheric Plasma Density Irregularities and Their Effects on Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Stolle, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    Earth's magnetic field results from various internal and external sources. The electric currents in the ionosphere are major external sources of the magnetic field in the daytime. High-resolution magnetometers onboard low-Earth-orbit satellites such as CHAMP and Swarm can detect small-scale currents in the nighttime ionosphere, where plasma density gradients often become unstable and form irregular density structures. The magnetic field variations caused by the ionospheric irregularities are comparable to that of the lithospheric contribution. Two phenomena in the nighttime ionosphere that contribute to the magnetic field variation are presented: equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). EPB is formed by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability over the dip equator and grows nonlinearly to as high as 2000 km apex altitude. It is characterized by deep plasma density depletions along magnetic flux tubes, where the diamagnetic effect produced by a pressure-gradient-driven current enhances the main field intensity. MSTID is a few hundred kilometer-scale disturbance in the midlatitude ionosphere generated by the coupled electrodynamics between the ionospheric E and F regions. The field-aligned currents associated with EPBs and MSTIDs also have significant signatures in the magnetic field perpendicular to the main field direction. The empirical discovery of the variations in the magnetic field due to plasma irregularities has motivated the inclusion of electrodynamics in the physical modeling of these irregularities. Through an effective comparison between the model results and observations, the physical process involved has been largely understood. The prediction of magnetic signatures due to plasma irregularities has been advanced by modeling studies, and will be helpful in interpreting magnetic field observations from satellites.

  15. Low and Midlatitude Ionospheric Plasma Density Irregularities and Their Effects on Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Earth's magnetic field results from various internal and external sources. The electric currents in the ionosphere are major external sources of the magnetic field in the daytime. High-resolution magnetometers onboard low-Earth-orbit satellites such as CHAMP and Swarm can detect small-scale currents in the nighttime ionosphere, where plasma density gradients often become unstable and form irregular density structures. The magnetic field variations caused by the ionospheric irregularities are comparable to that of the lithospheric contribution. Two phenomena in the nighttime ionosphere that contribute to the magnetic field variation are presented: equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). EPB is formed by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability over the dip equator and grows nonlinearly to as high as 2000 km apex altitude. It is characterized by deep plasma density depletions along magnetic flux tubes, where the diamagnetic effect produced by a pressure-gradient-driven current enhances the main field intensity. MSTID is a few hundred kilometer-scale disturbance in the midlatitude ionosphere generated by the coupled electrodynamics between the ionospheric E and F regions. The field-aligned currents associated with EPBs and MSTIDs also have significant signatures in the magnetic field perpendicular to the main field direction. The empirical discovery of the variations in the magnetic field due to plasma irregularities has motivated the inclusion of electrodynamics in the physical modeling of these irregularities. Through an effective comparison between the model results and observations, the physical process involved has been largely understood. The prediction of magnetic signatures due to plasma irregularities has been advanced by modeling studies, and will be helpful in interpreting magnetic field observations from satellites.

  16. ESA' s novel gravitational modeling of irregular planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    A detailed understanding and modeling of the gravitational modeling is required for realistic investigation of the dynamics of orbits close to irregularly shaped bodies. Gravity field modelling up to a certain maximum spherical harmonic degree N involves N2 unkown spherical harmonic coefficients or complex harmonics. The corresponding number of matrix entries reaches till N4 . For missions like CHAMP, GRACE or GOCE, the maximum degree of resolution is 75, 150 and 300 respectively. Therefore, the number of unknowns for a satellite like GOCE will be around 100.000. Since these missions usually fly for a period of time of several years, the number of observations is huge. Hence, gravity field recovery from these missions is a high demanding task. The classical approaches like spherical expansion of the potential lead generally to a high number of coefficients, which reduce the software computational efficiency of the orbit propagation and which have mostly a limited physical meaning. One of the main targets of the activity is the modelling of asteroids, small moons, and cometary bodies. All celestial bodies are irregular by definition. However, the scope of the activity is broad enough as to be able to use the models and the software in quasy-regular bodies as well. Therefore the models and tools could be used for bodies such as the Moon, Mars, Venus, Deimos, Europa, Eros, Mathilda, and Churyumov-Gerasimenko, etc., being these applications relevant for scientific (Rosetta, Bepi Colombo), exploration (Exo-Mars), NEO mitigation (Don Quijote) and Earth observation (GOCE) missions of ESA.

  17. Parallel Programming Strategies for Irregular Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Achieving scalable performance for dynamic irregular applications is eminently challenging. Traditional message-passing approaches have been making steady progress towards this goal; however, they suffer from complex implementation requirements. The use of a global address space greatly simplifies the programming task, but can degrade the performance for such computations. In this work, we examine two typical irregular adaptive applications, Dynamic Remeshing and N-Body, under competing programming methodologies and across various parallel architectures. The Dynamic Remeshing application simulates flow over an airfoil, and refines localized regions of the underlying unstructured mesh. The N-Body experiment models two neighboring Plummer galaxies that are about to undergo a merger. Both problems demonstrate dramatic changes in processor workloads and interprocessor communication with time; thus, dynamic load balancing is a required component.

  18. Trefftz difference schemes on irregular stencils

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2010-04-20

    The recently developed Flexible Local Approximation MEthod (FLAME) produces accurate difference schemes by replacing the usual Taylor expansion with Trefftz functions - local solutions of the underlying differential equation. This paper advances and casts in a general form a significant modification of FLAME proposed recently by Pinheiro and Webb: a least-squares fit instead of the exact match of the approximate solution at the stencil nodes. As a consequence of that, FLAME schemes can now be generated on irregular stencils with the number of nodes substantially greater than the number of approximating functions. The accuracy of the method is preserved but its robustness is improved. For demonstration, the paper presents a number of numerical examples in 2D and 3D: electrostatic (magnetostatic) particle interactions, scattering of electromagnetic (acoustic) waves, and wave propagation in a photonic crystal. The examples explore the role of the grid and stencil size, of the number of approximating functions, and of the irregularity of the stencils.

  19. Quantifying Irregularity in Pulsating Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Esteves, S.; Lin, A.; Menezes, C.; Wu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Hundreds of red giant variable stars are classified as “type L,” which the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) defines as “slow irregular variables of late spectral type...which show no evidence of periodicity, or any periodicity present is very poorly defined....” Self-correlation (Percy and Muhammed 2004) is a simple form of time-series analysis which determines the cycle-to-cycle behavior of a star, averaged over all the available data. It is well suited for analyzing stars which are not strictly periodic. Even for non-periodic stars, it provides a “profile” of the variability, including the average “characteristic time” of variability. We have applied this method to twenty-three L-type variables which have been measured extensively by AAVSO visual observers. We find a continuous spectrum of behavior, from irregular to semiregular.

  20. Kinematics in irregular galaxies: NGC 4449.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, M.; Rosado, M.

    1998-11-01

    A kinematical analysis of the irregular galaxy NGC 4449 is presented based on the Fabry-Perot interferometer PUMA observations. In NGC 4449 we analyse its global velocity field, HII regions population as well as the SNR population identified on radioastronomy studies. Our first results for NGC 4449 show that the optical velocity field, presents a decreasing gradient in velocity along the optical bar and an anticorrelation with respect to the velocity field of the HI halo.

  1. Conditions for Adopting an Irregular Defense Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    and neutrality—are not always viable choices, and are often unaffordable. So these countries must seek more effective and less expensive solutions...2) Is it wise to consider a professional irregular warfighting capability in defense strategy? Recent research proved the effectiveness of...more effective and less expensive solutions. From more powerful countries’ perspectives, there is something to be changed, too, since the conflicts

  2. Transforming USMC Intelligence to Address Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    nation’s 衟 force" demands that it be prepared to face these irregular warfare challenges with little or no preparation time. This presents a...rarely attribute these skills to a result of thorough preparation by the intelligence or military supporting establishment prior to the individual’s...identify areas where the Mmine Corps can improve its intelligence capabilities in order to be prepared to face the current and future IW threats. Although

  3. Magnetic Fields in Irregular Galaxies: NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Wilcots, E. M.; Robishaw, T.; Heiles, C.; Zweibel, E.

    2006-12-01

    Magnetic fields are an important component of the interstellar medium of galaxies. They provide support, transfer energy from supernovae, provide a possible heating mechanism, and channel gas flows (Beck 2004). Despite the importance of magnetic fields in the ISM, it is not well known what generates and sustains galactic magnetic fields or how magnetic fields, gas, and stars interact in galaxies. The magnetic fields may be especially important in low-mass galaxies like irregulars where the magnetic pressure may be great enough for the field to be dynamically important. However, only four irregular galaxies besides the LMC and the SMC have observed magnetic field structures. The goal of our project is to significantly increase the number of irregular galaxies with observed magnetic field structure. Here we present preliminary results for one of the galaxies in our sample: NGC 4214. Using the VLA and the GBT, we have obtained 3cm, 6cm, and 20cm radio continuum polarization observations of this well-studied galaxy. Our observations allow us to investigate the effects of NGC 4214's high star formation rate, slow rotation rate, and weak bar on the structure of its magnetic field. We find that NGC 4214's magnetic field has an S-shaped structure, with the central field following the bar and the outer edges curving to follow the shape of the arms. The mechanism for generating these fields is still uncertain. A. Kepley is funded by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  4. Parallel Computing Strategies for Irregular Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Shan, Hongzhang; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Parallel computing promises several orders of magnitude increase in our ability to solve realistic computationally-intensive problems, but relies on their efficient mapping and execution on large-scale multiprocessor architectures. Unfortunately, many important applications are irregular and dynamic in nature, making their effective parallel implementation a daunting task. Moreover, with the proliferation of parallel architectures and programming paradigms, the typical scientist is faced with a plethora of questions that must be answered in order to obtain an acceptable parallel implementation of the solution algorithm. In this paper, we consider three representative irregular applications: unstructured remeshing, sparse matrix computations, and N-body problems, and parallelize them using various popular programming paradigms on a wide spectrum of computer platforms ranging from state-of-the-art supercomputers to PC clusters. We present the underlying problems, the solution algorithms, and the parallel implementation strategies. Smart load-balancing, partitioning, and ordering techniques are used to enhance parallel performance. Overall results demonstrate the complexity of efficiently parallelizing irregular algorithms.

  5. Irregular Wavelike Structure in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.

    2005-01-01

    We have searched Saturn's A, B, and C rings for irregular wavelike structure using Voyager Photopolarimeter (PPS), Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS), and Radio Science (RSS) occultation datasets, as well as ring reflectivity profiles derived from Voyager images. A maximum entropy technique for conducting spectral analysis was used to estimate wave frequency power in relation to radial location for each dataset. Using this method we have found irregular structure in the PPS and UVS inner B Ring occultation datasets previously identified in Voyager imaging data. Both finer structure, with a wavelength of around 20 km, and large structure with wavelengths of 200 to 1000 km, are visible in the occultation data and appear similar to that seen in the imaging data. After removing ringlets from the C-Ring data, we have identified what appears to be a 1000-km wave sustained throughout the ring. The large dominant wavelength appears in all datasets; however, tests are currently being conducted in an attempt to verify its existence. Irregular structure with a wavelength of approximately 20 km has been observed in the C Ring reflectivity profiles, but not within the occultation datasets. This leads us to doubt it is caused by ring surface mass density fluctuations detectable by the occultation experiments.

  6. Irregular Wavelike Structure in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.

    2005-01-01

    We have searched Saturn's A, B, and C rings for irregular wavelike structure using Voyager Photopolarimeter (PPS), Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS), and Radio Science (RSS) occultation datasets, as well as ring reflectivity profiles derived from Voyager images. A maximum entropy technique for conducting spectral analysis was used to estimate wave frequency power in relation to radial location for each dataset. Using this method we have found irregular structure in the PPS and UVS inner B Ring occultation datasets previously identified in Voyager imaging data. Both finer structure, with a wavelength of around 20 km, and large structure with wavelengths of 200 to 1000 km, are visible in the occultation data and appear similar to that seen in the imaging data. After removing ringlets from the C-Ring data, we have identified what appears to be a 1000-km wave sustained throughout the ring. The large dominant wavelength appears in all datasets; however, tests are currently being conducted in an attempt to verify its existence. Irregular structure with a wavelength of approximately 20 km has been observed in the C Ring reflectivity profiles, but not within the occultation datasets. This leads us to doubt it is caused by ring surface mass density fluctuations detectable by the occultation experiments.

  7. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma: an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Baudet, Juan-Salvador; Arguiñarena, Xabier; Redondo, Ignacio; Tadeo, Eva; Navazo, Lucía; Mendiz, Javier; Montiel, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the case of a patient who developed a subcapsular hepatic hematoma 48 hours after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. She was treated by embolizing the sites of bleeding and by surgically resecting the area. We review the literature and discuss the potential mechanisms that cause this complication.

  8. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Selected properties of acetylated adipate of retrograded starch.

    PubMed

    Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Kapelko, M

    2014-01-01

    Native potato starch (NS) and retrograded starch (R - obtained via freezing and defrosting of a starch paste) were used to prepare starch acetates: NS-A and R-A, and then acetylated distarch adipates: NS-ADA and R-ADA. The chemically-modified preparations produced from retrograded starch (R-A; R-ADA) were characterized by a higher degree of esterification compared to the modified preparations produced under the same conditions from native potato starch (NS-A; NS-ADA). Starch resistance to amylolysis was observed to increase (to 30-40 g/100 g) as a result of starch retrogradation and acetylation. Starch cross-linking had a significant impact on the increased viscosity of the paste in the entire course of pasting characteristics and on the increased values of rheological coefficients determined from the equations describing flow curves. The produced preparation of acetylated retrograded starch cross-linked with adipic acid (R-ADA) may be deemed an RS3/4 preparation to be used as a food thickening agent.

  10. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-06

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage.

  11. The management of retrograde ejaculation: a systematic review and update.

    PubMed

    Jefferys, Amanda; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Wardle, Peter

    2012-02-01

    To determine the best management of retrograde ejaculation to optimize the chance of conception. Systematic review. Tertiary reproductive medicine center. Subfertile men with retrograde ejaculation. Systematic search of studies using search terms "management" or "therapy" or "treatment" and "retrograde ejaculation." We excluded case reports and papers not in English. Pregnancy and live birth rates and rates of achievement of antegrade ejaculation. Thirty-four studies met our criteria. Studies were mostly observational. Descriptions of predictive and confounding variables were often insufficient. The treatment options included urinary sperm retrieval and medical management with anticholinergics and sympathomimetics. Successful pregnancies and live births were also achieved using surgical techniques and electroejaculation; however, numbers were small. Many treatment options exist in the management of retrograde ejaculation; however, current literature is insufficient to allow firm comparisons between interventions. Treatment should be tailored, therefore, to the individual. Our findings support the need for further research in this area-including large randomized controlled trials. However, these would be difficult logistically and may not be possible. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  13. Retrograde Oxygen Persufflation of Kidney - Experiment on an Animal.

    PubMed

    Moláček, Jiri; Opatrný, Václav; Matějka, Roman; Baxa, Jan; Třeška, Vladislav

    There is still a lack of organs for transplantation purposes. In the field of kidney and liver transplantation, one available solution is the use of organs from so-called marginal donors. These donors can be e.g. non-heart-beating donors. In these cases, perfusion and preservation of organs intended for transplantation is generally more difficult. Retrograde oxygen persufflation (ROP) may be a possible solution to this issue. This method is based on retrograde perfusion by oxygen through the renal vein thus reconditioning the organ. We operated on 10 animals (porcine models). Ischemic injury of the right kidney was simulated in all animals. In group A (N=5), kidneys were perfused with retrograde oxygen persufflation after explantation. In group B (N=5), kidneys were perfused intrarterially as in usual clinical practice. After perfusion all kidneys were transplanted to the original donor animal. Quality of graft restitution was evaluated by the urea level obtained from the renal vein and by histopathological analysis after explantation. We found no statistically significant differences between groups A and B in urea levels after transplantation, nor did we find any significant differences in quality of kidney parenchyma restoration between these groups. Retrograde oxygen persufflation is able to protect and restore kidney parenchyma. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Total irregular labeling of butterfly network on level two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin

    2017-08-01

    Previous results related to the concepts of the total irregular labeling of a graph indicate that the butterfly network was one of some graphs which have not been specified in term of the total irregularity strengths. This paper aimed to determine the total vertex irregularity strength, the total edge irregularity strength, and the total irregularity strength of butterfly network on level 2. The assessment of three parameters of butterfly network was conducted by determining the lower bound and the upper bound. The lower bound was analyzed based on the characteristics of the graph and other proponent theorems, while upper bound was analyzed by constructing a function. In this paper we determine that the total vertex irregularity strength, the total edge irregularity strength, and the total irregularity strength of butterfly network are 4, 6, and 6, respectively.

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  16. Drift velocity of the ionospheric irregularities measured by closely-spaced GNSS receivers in Tromsoe, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Hosokawa, K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A radio signal passing through small-scale irregularities in the ionospheric electron density fluctuates in amplitude and phase because the irregularities act as diffraction gratings. This phenomenon is known as scintillation. The GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) scintillation is caused by irregularities with a scale-size of several hundred meters. In this study, we use three GNSS receivers at the EISCAT radar site in Tromsoe, Norway, where optical and radio measurements are carried out. On January, 2012, we have installed a GNSS receiver at EISCAT radar site in Tromsoe, Norway. The receiver measures phase and signal-to-noise ratio of the radio wave from the GNSS satellites at dual frequency (L1 and L2) at 50 Hz, so that total electron content (TEC) and phase and amplitude scintillations of the ionosphere can be obtained. On September, 2012, we have installed two more receivers at Tromsoe. The distances between the three GNSS receivers are 172m, 242m and 218m, respectively. Drift velocities of irregularities can be measured using cross-correlation analysis for the time series of the GNSS signal intensity and phase obtained from the three receivers. Weak scintillation with an S4 index of 0.15 was observed at 1545 - 1605 UT on November 20, 2012. Period of the signal intensity variation was approximately 0.5 seconds. Since the scale-size of the irregularity causing the GPS scintillation, which corresponds to the Fresnel scale, is approximately 200 m, drift velocity of the irregularity causing the scintillation is estimated 400 m/s. On the other hand, the drift velocity was also estimated to be 350-400 m/s west-northwestward using cross-correlation analysis with the time series of the GPS signal intensity obtained from the three receivers. This velocity is similar to that estimated from the period of the signal intensity variation. The direction of aurora movement observed simultaneously using a digital camera at Tromsoe is also similar to that of the velocity

  17. On the Longitudinal Morphology of Zonal Irregularity Drift Measured using Networks of GPS Scintillation Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Valladares, C. E.; Delay, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    A complete characterization of field-aligned ionospheric irregularities responsible for the scintillation of satellite signals includes not only their spectral properties (power spectral strength, spectral index, anisotropy ratio, and outer-scale) but also their horizontal drift velocity. From a system impacts perspective, the horizontal drift velocity is important in that it dictates the rate of signal fading and also, to an extent, the level of phase fluctuations encountered by the receiver. From a physics perspective, studying the longitudinal morphology of zonal irregularity may lead to an improved understanding of the F region dynamo and regional electrodynamics at low latitudes. The irregularity drift at low latitudes is predominantly zonal and is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of satellite signals made by a pair of closely-spaced antennas. The AFRL-SCINDA network operates a small number of VHF spaced-antenna systems at low latitude stations for this purpose. A far greater number of GPS scintillation monitors are operated by AFRL-SCINDA (25-30) and the Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are situated too far apart to monitor the drift using cross-correlation techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory (Rino, Radio Sci., 1979) to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GPS measurements of S4, sigma-phi, and the propagation geometry alone. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this technique requires assumptions for the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment show that the ratio of sigma-phi to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift, and hence the zonal drift can be estimated with reasonable accuracy. In

  18. Analysis of retrograde ejaculation using color Doppler ultrasonography before and after transurethral collagen injection.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Nasu, Y; Watanabe, M; Tsugawa, M; Iguchi, H; Kumon, H

    2004-10-01

    Transurethral bladder neck collagen injection therapy was performed in a patient with retrograde ejaculation. The phenomenon of retrograde ejaculation and its correction after the therapy were clearly demonstrated by color Doppler ultrasonography. To our knowledge this is the first report showing successful observation of retrograde ejaculation using color Doppler ultrasonography.

  19. Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities: Origins and Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    data at Hawaii. See http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EAE03/05826/EAE03-J-05826.pdf. REFERENCES Cerruti, A. P., B. M. Ledvina , and P. M. Kintner...Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite signal, Radio Sci., in press, 2006. Ledvina , B. M., P. M. Kintner, and J. J. Makela...2000. [published, refereed] Cerruti, A.P., B.M. Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite

  20. Effects of magnetic-storm phases on F-layer irregularities from auroral to equatorial latitudes. Quarterly report, 1 Oct-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.; Mendillo, M.

    1990-12-31

    Partial Contents: The effects of electric field and ring current energy increases on F-layer irregularities at auroral and sub-auroral latitudes; The role of the ring current in generating or inhibiting equatorial F-layer irregularities during magnetic storms; Auroral and sub-auroral F-layer irregularities and high plasma convection during the magnetically active periods of September 17-24, 1984; and Simultaneous All-Sky Optical Airglow Imaging Observations and San Marco Satellite Measurements in the Pacific Sector.

  1. Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J. ); Valley, J.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

  2. Retrograde traffic in the biosynthetic-secretory route

    PubMed Central

    Neumüller, Josef; Ellinger, Adolf

    2008-01-01

    In the biosynthetic-secretory route from the rough endoplasmic reticulum, across the pre-Golgi intermediate compartments, the Golgi apparatus stacks, trans Golgi network, and post-Golgi organelles, anterograde transport is accompanied and counterbalanced by retrograde traffic of both membranes and contents. In the physiologic dynamics of cells, retrograde flow is necessary for retrieval of molecules that escaped from their compartments of function, for keeping the compartments’ balances, and maintenance of the functional integrities of organelles and compartments along the secretory route, for repeated use of molecules, and molecule repair. Internalized molecules may be transported in retrograde direction along certain sections of the secretory route, and compartments and machineries of the secretory pathway may be misused by toxins. An important example is the toxin of Shigella dysenteriae, which has been shown to travel from the cell surface across endosomes, and the Golgi apparatus en route to the endoplasmic reticulum, and the cytosol, where it exerts its deleterious effects. Most importantly in medical research, knowledge about the retrograde cellular pathways is increasingly being utilized for the development of strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the interior of cells. Multiple details about the molecular transport machineries involved in retrograde traffic are known; a high number of the molecular constituents have been characterized, and the complicated fine structural architectures of the compartments involved become more and more visible. However, multiple contradictions exist, and already established traffic models again are in question by contradictory results obtained with diverse cell systems, and/or different techniques. Additional problems arise by the fact that the conditions used in the experimental protocols frequently do not reflect the physiologic situations of the cells. Regular and pathologic situations often are intermingled, and

  3. Short-term magnetic field alignment variations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.

    1988-06-01

    The ionospheric irregularities that cause equatorial scintillation are elongated along the north-south magnetic field lines. During a 1981 field campaign at Ascension Island, 250-MHz receivers were spaced from 300 m to 1.6 km along the field lines, and the signals received from the Marisat satellite were cross correlated. Data collected during eight nights of fading showed a linear relationship between fading rate and cross correlation. The alignment of the antennas was adjusted to give a zero time lag between the widely spaced receivers with a measurement accuracy of 0.03 s. Since the average irregularity velocity was 125 m/s, this time accuracy translated to an angular measurement accuracy of 0.1 deg. During a 4-hour period of nightly fading, occasional differences in time of arrival were noted that corresponded to a tilt in the north-south alignment of + or - 1 deg. Data from several nights of fading were analyzed, and each night exhibited the same variance in the north-south irregularity alignment. It is postulated that the shift in the measured peak correlation may have been caused by patches of irregularities at different altitudes where the magnetic field lines have a slightly different direction. 13 references.

  4. Stormtime Ionospheric Irregularities in SAPS-Related Troughs: Causes of GPS Scintillations at Mid Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Burke, W. J.; Basu, S.; Kintner, P. M.; Ledvina, B.

    2003-12-01

    Radio-wave scintillations are space weather effects caused by ionospheric plasma density irregularities. The subauroral ionosphere, at magnetic latitudes corresponding to the northeastern US, is generally free of such irregularities and consequently scintillations. Recently, Basu et al. [JGR, 106, 30389, 2001] and Ledvina et al. [GRL, 29, 10.1029/2002GL014770] reported observations of strong GPS phase and amplitude scintillations at 1.5 GHz at Hanscom AFB, MA and Ithaca, NY during the magnetic storms of 23 September, 1999 and 25 - 26 September, 2001, respectively. We report results of a survey of small-scale plasma density and electromagnetic oscillations detected by DMSP F13, 14, and 15 satellites while flying over the affected regions at altitude of 840 km. Langmuir probe data, sampled at a rate of 24 Hz, show that during the scintillation intervals the amplitudes of density oscillations in the frequency range of 3-10 Hz increased by a factor of 100. The enhanced fluctuations appeared at the poleward edges of large-scale density troughs, embedded within subauroral polarization streams. When Doppler-shifted from spacecraft frames of reference the oscillations correspond to irregularities with spatial scales of 2-0.7 km. Most likely these irregularities are responsible for radio-signal scintillations at frequencies near 1 GHz.

  5. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities occurring...

  6. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities occurring...

  7. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities occurring...

  8. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  9. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  10. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  11. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  12. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  13. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities occurring...

  14. 14 CFR 121.563 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 121.563 Section 121.563 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical irregularities occurring...

  15. Region of permanent generation of large-scale irregularities in the daytime winter ionosphere of the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Zhbankov, G. A.; Telegin, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    With the use of data from topside sounding on board the Interkosmos-19 (IK-19) satellite, the region of permanent generation of large-scale irregularities in the daytime winter ionosphere of the Southern Hemisphere is differentiated. This region is characterized by low values of foF2 and hmF2 and occupies a rather large latitudinal band, from the equatorial anomaly ridge to ~70° S within the longitudinal range from 180° to 360°. Irregularities with a dimension of hundreds kilometers are regularly observed in the period from 0700-0800 to 1800-1900 LT, i.e., mainly in the daytime. In the IK-19 ionograms, they normally appear in the form of an extra trace with a critical frequency higher than that of the main trace reflected from the ionosphere with lower density. The electron density in the irregularity maximum sometimes exceeds the density of the background ionosphere by nearly a factor of 3. A model of the ionosphere with allowance for its irregular structure was created, and it was shown on the basis of trajectory calculations how the IK-19 ionograms related to these irregularities are formed. A possible mechanism of the generation of large-scale irregularities of the ionospheric plasma is discussed.

  16. A CCD comparison of outer Jovian satellites and Trojan asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1991-01-01

    The eight small outer Jovian satellites are not as well known as the brighter, more illustrious Galilean satellites. They are divided into two groups, each containing four satellites; the inner group travels in prograde orbits while the outer group travels in retrograde orbits. From the distinct orbital characteristics of the two groups, most of the theories of their origin involve the capture and breakup of two planetesimals upon entry into the atmosphere of proto-Jupiter. Their proximity to the Trojans asteroids has led to conjectures of a link between them and the Trojans. However, Tholen and Zellner (1984) found no red spectrum among six of the satellites and postulated that they were all C-type objects; therefore, they were unlikely to be derivatives of the Trojan population. Charge-coupled device (CCD) photometry and spectroscopy of the eight outer Jovian satellites obtained from 1987 to 1989 and a comparison between these eight satellites and the Trojan asteroids are presented.

  17. Galilean satellites - 1976 radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Ostro, S. J.; Pettengill, G. H.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to a report of radar observations concerning the Galilean satellites made in the fall of 1976, Doppler results are presented from 1975 and January 1976. The primary objectives of the investigation conducted in 1976 are related to a study of each satellite at widely separated orbital phases and a close examination of the polarization of its scattered energy. The investigation included an observation of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto with the upgraded Arecibo S-band radar system on 11 nights irregularly distributed from 26 October 1976 to 7 December 1976. Several peculiarities revealed by the radar observations of the three outer Galilean satellites are related to large and possibly time-varying albedos, and the unexpected result that the circular polarization transmitted exceeds unity by a substantial amount.

  18. THE ORBITS OF NEPTUNE'S OUTER SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brozovic, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.; Sheppard, Scott S. E-mail: raj@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-04-15

    In 2009, we used the Subaru telescope to observe all the faint irregular satellites of Neptune for the first time since 2004. These observations extend the data arcs for Halimede, Psamathe, Sao, Laomedeia, and Neso from a few years to nearly a decade. We also report on a search for unknown Neptune satellites in a half-square degree of sky and a limiting magnitude of 26.2 in the R band. No new satellites of Neptune were found. We numerically integrate the orbits for the five irregulars and summarize the results of the orbital fits in terms of the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. Sao and Neso are confirmed to be Kozai librators, while Psamathe is a 'reverse circulator'. Halimede and Laomedeia do not seem to experience any strong resonant effects.

  19. The detection of the ionospheric irregularities by GNSS signal and the incoherent scatter radio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Sieradsky, Rafal; Zakharenkova, Irina; Rietveld, Michael; Kapcia, Jacek

    2013-04-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere has a very complicated structure and high dynamics. The ionospheric irregularities can produce scintillations of radio waves that occur predominantly in the ionosphere F-layer. The strong fluctuations can influence on the performance of the different space communication and navigation radio systems. The fluctuations of GPS/GLONASS signals are caused by the ionospheric irregularities with spatial dimensions more than 10 km. These structures can be detected by high potential incoherent scatter radars. It was proposed and carried out at the beginning of June 2012 experiment for a detailed study of the nature of the ionospheric irregularities, influencing on GPS/GLONASS signals parameters, by incoherent scatter and trans-ionospheric radio measurements simultaneously. The EISCAT facilities position provides the unique opportunity to study the ionospheric irregularities' parameters associated with TEC fluctuations and GPS/GLONASS signals scintillations. The EISCAT heating facility provides unique possibility to generate the artificial ionospheric irregularities and to estimate the impact factor of these irregularities on GPS/GLONASS signals transionospheric propagation. In order to detect the ionosphere irregularities it is used the IS radar measurements (electron density and plasma temperatures profiles) and simultaneously registered on EISCAT site amplitude and phase fluctuations in GPS/GLONASS signals by use of the Javad multi-constellation GPS/GLONASS receiver with high samples rate (100 Hz) and special scintillation GPS receiver PolaRxS PRO that dedicated to ionospheric monitoring and space weather applications and provides TEC and S4 scintillation index measurements. The low frequency fluctuations can be directly measured due to the electron density changes along the radio ray path between a GPS/GLONASS satellite and a ground-based receiver on EISCAT site. The raw data (under scintillating conditions) obtained by use of the high samples

  20. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  1. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  2. Analysis of ionospheric irregularities during total solar eclipse 2016 based on GNSS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husin, A.; Jiyo; Anggarani, S.; Ekawati, S.; Dear, V.

    2016-11-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred over Indonesia in the morning hours on 9 March 2016. Ionisations in the ionosphere which is associated with the solar radiation during the total eclipse provided a good opportunity to study the ionospheric irregularities. Using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data taken from dual-frequency receivers in Manado, we investigated and analysed the total electron content (TEC) perturbations with a time resolution of 60 s to reveal ionospheric irregularities during total eclipse. Result showed that TEC conditions based on IPP were decreased during solar eclipse on March 9, comparing with the neighbour day. The maximum percentage deviation (DTEC) from the average value during eclipse period, 00:00 - 02:40 UT reach -41.5%. The duration of maximum decrement in TEC occurs were around 2-30 minutes after the maximum obscuration.

  3. Weighted statistical parameters for irregularly sampled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Unevenly spaced time series are common in astronomy because of the day-night cycle, weather conditions, dependence on the source position in the sky, allocated telescope time and corrupt measurements, for example, or inherent to the scanning law of satellites like Hipparcos and the forthcoming Gaia. Irregular sampling often causes clumps of measurements and gaps with no data which can severely disrupt the values of estimators. This paper aims at improving the accuracy of common statistical parameters when linear interpolation (in time or phase) can be considered an acceptable approximation of a deterministic signal. A pragmatic solution is formulated in terms of a simple weighting scheme, adapting to the sampling density and noise level, applicable to large data volumes at minimal computational cost. Tests on time series from the Hipparcos periodic catalogue led to significant improvements in the overall accuracy and precision of the estimators with respect to the unweighted counterparts and those weighted by inverse-squared uncertainties. Automated classification procedures employing statistical parameters weighted by the suggested scheme confirmed the benefits of the improved input attributes. The classification of eclipsing binaries, Mira, RR Lyrae, Delta Cephei and Alpha2 Canum Venaticorum stars employing exclusively weighted descriptive statistics achieved an overall accuracy of 92 per cent, about 6 per cent higher than with unweighted estimators.

  4. Predisposing conditions for retrograde peri-implantitis, and treatment suggestions.

    PubMed

    Quirynen, Marc; Vogels, Roel; Alsaadi, Ghada; Naert, Ignace; Jacobs, Reinhilde; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    Recent case reports introduced the term retrograde peri-implantitis as a lesion (radiolucency) around the most apical part of an osseointegrated implant. It develops within the first months after insertion. This retrospective study aimed to find predisposing conditions for such peri-apical lesions and to evaluate treatment strategies. All single implants (426 in the upper, 113 in the lower jaw, all Brånemark system type) placed at the department of Periodontology of the University Hospital (Catholic University Leuven) were included in this retrospective evaluation to check the incidence of retrograde peri-implantitis. Eventual predisposing factors such as patient characteristics (age, medical history), recipient site (local bone quality and quantity, cause of tooth loss), periodontal and endodontic conditions of neighboring teeth, implant characteristics (length, surface characteristics), and surgical aspects (guided bone regeneration, osseous fenestration, or dehiscency) were considered. Moreover, implants with retrograde peri-implantitis were followed longitudinally to verify their treatment outcome by means of different parameters (Periotest values (PTV), marginal bone level, radiological size of peri-apical defect). Seven implants in the upper (1.6%) and 3 in the lower jaw (2.7%) showed retrograde peri-implantitis, before or at abutment connection. In comparison with successful implants, such peri-apical lesions occurred preferably at sites with a history of an obvious endodontic pathology of the extracted tooth to be replaced. The incidence of retrograde peri-implantitis was significantly higher (P<0.0001) for TiUnite implants when compared with the machined implants (8/80 vs. 2/459). The machined implant surface, however, showed a higher failure rate (6.8%) than the TiUnite implants (2.5%). Failures with machined surfaces preferably occurred at extraction sites of teeth with a history of endodontic pathology or sites adjacent to teeth with an obvious

  5. Effects of inulin with different degree of polymerization on gelatinization and retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Luo, Denglin; Li, Yun; Xu, Baocheng; Ren, Guangyue; Li, Peiyan; Li, Xuan; Han, Sihai; Liu, Jianxue

    2017-08-15

    The effects of three types of inulin, including FS (DP≤10), FI (DP of 2-60) and FXL (DP≥23), on the gelatinization and retrogradation characteristics of wheat starch were investigated. As the concentration of inulin added into starch increased, the gelatinization temperature increased whereas the breakdown value decreased, and the value of setback first decreased and then increased slightly. The three types of inulin with lower concentrations (<15%) all showed obvious suppression effects on the short-term retrogradation of wheat starch. After 7days of storage, the three types of inulin showed a significant suppression of starch retrogradation in the addition range of 5-7.5%. They can all inhibit amylose retrogradation, but accelerate amylopectin retrogradation. Inulin with lower DP has stronger effects on the starch retrogradation. Generally, the three types of inulin can all retard the retrogradation performance of wheat starch to some extent in the long-term storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of chitin nano-whiskers on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and potato starches.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Liu, Chengzhen; Zhang, Shuangling; Yu, Jing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Starch is very prone to retrogradation after gelatinization. Inhibition of starch retrogradation has been an important factor in improving the quality of food. For the first time, we investigated the effect of nano-materials, represented by chitin nano-whiskers (CNWs), on the short- and long-term retrogradation of maize and potato starches. Rapid Visco-Analyser results showed that the addition of CNWs significantly decreased the setback values of maize and potato starches, which suggested that CNWs could retard the short-term retrogradation of starch. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results showed that the percentage of retrogradation of maize and potato starches significantly decreased (P<0.05), suggesting the inhibition of long-term retrogradation. The CNWs could be used as a new inhibitor of starch retrogradation to develop starch-based food with longer shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of irregularity anisotropy on Faraday polarization fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Nghiem, S. V.; Yoo, C.

    1989-01-01

    The previous model (Lee et al., 1982) of the Faraday polarization fluctuations (FPF) is extended after taking into account the anisotropic nature of the commonly observed, rodlike and sheetlike ionospheric irregularities. Striking effects of irregularity anisotropy are found in the longitudinal radio propagation. However, if the wave propagation angle is not small (say, greater than 5 deg), the effects of irregularity anisotropy on FPF introduced by rodlike irregularities weaken significantly, while those caused by sheetlike irregularities remain prominent. Therefore, under the same ionospheric propagation conditions, sheetlike ionospheric irregularities are more effective than rodlike ionospheric irregularities in causing the FPF of radio waves. It is expected that intense FPF of VHF radio signals can be observed not only near the equatorial anomaly but also in the auroral region.

  8. Analysis of Slope Limiters on Irregular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of flux and slope limiters on non-uniform grids in multiple dimensions. Many slope limiters in standard use do not preserve linear solutions on irregular grids impacting both accuracy and convergence. We rewrite some well-known limiters to highlight their underlying symmetry, and use this form to examine the proper - ties of both traditional and novel limiter formulations on non-uniform meshes. A consistent method of handling stretched meshes is developed which is both linearity preserving for arbitrary mesh stretchings and reduces to common limiters on uniform meshes. In multiple dimensions we analyze the monotonicity region of the gradient vector and show that the multidimensional limiting problem may be cast as the solution of a linear programming problem. For some special cases we present a new directional limiting formulation that preserves linear solutions in multiple dimensions on irregular grids. Computational results using model problems and complex three-dimensional examples are presented, demonstrating accuracy, monotonicity and robustness.

  9. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-10-09

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen's vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons.

  10. Clusters in irregular areas and lattices.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M; Rogerson, Peter A; Wong, David W S

    2012-01-01

    Geographic areas of different sizes and shapes of polygons that represent counts or rate data are often encountered in social, economic, health, and other information. Often political or census boundaries are used to define these areas because the information is available only for those geographies. Therefore, these types of boundaries are frequently used to define neighborhoods in spatial analyses using geographic information systems and related approaches such as multilevel models. When point data can be geocoded, it is possible to examine the impact of polygon shape on spatial statistical properties, such as clustering. We utilized point data (alcohol outlets) to examine the issue of polygon shape and size on visualization and statistical properties. The point data were allocated to regular lattices (hexagons and squares) and census areas for zip-code tabulation areas and tracts. The number of units in the lattices was set to be similar to the number of tract and zip-code areas. A spatial clustering statistic and visualization were used to assess the impact of polygon shape for zip- and tract-sized units. Results showed substantial similarities and notable differences across shape and size. The specific circumstances of a spatial analysis that aggregates points to polygons will determine the size and shape of the areal units to be used. The irregular polygons of census units may reflect underlying characteristics that could be missed by large regular lattices. Future research to examine the potential for using a combination of irregular polygons and regular lattices would be useful.

  11. Venus - Multiple-Floored, Irregular Impact Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-26

    NASA' sMagellan imaged this multiple-floored, irregular impact crater at latitude 16.4 degrees north, longitude 352.1 degrees east, during orbits 481 and 482 on 27 September 1990. This crater, about 9.2 kilometers in maximum diameter, was formed on what appears to be a slightly fractured, radar-dark (smooth) plain. The abundant, low viscosity flows associated with this cratering event have, however, filled local, fault-controlled troughs (called graben). These shallow graben are well portrayed on this Magellan image but would be unrecognizable but for their coincidental infilling by the radar-bright crater flows. This fortuitous enhancement by the crater flows of fault structures that are below the resolution of the Magellan synthetic aperture radar is providing the Magellan Science Team with valuable geologic information. The flow deposits from the craters are thought to consist primarily of shock melted rock and fragmented debris resulting from the nearly simultaneous impacts of two projectile fragments into the hot (800 degrees Fahrenheit) surface rocks of Venus. The presence of the various floors of this irregular crater is interpreted to be the result of crushing, fragmentation, and eventual aerodynamic dispersion of a single entry projectile during passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00462

  12. Statistical detection of systematic election irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Yegorov, Yuri; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Democratic societies are built around the principle of free and fair elections, and that each citizen’s vote should count equally. National elections can be regarded as large-scale social experiments, where people are grouped into usually large numbers of electoral districts and vote according to their preferences. The large number of samples implies statistical consequences for the polling results, which can be used to identify election irregularities. Using a suitable data representation, we find that vote distributions of elections with alleged fraud show a kurtosis substantially exceeding the kurtosis of normal elections, depending on the level of data aggregation. As an example, we show that reported irregularities in recent Russian elections are, indeed, well-explained by systematic ballot stuffing. We develop a parametric model quantifying the extent to which fraudulent mechanisms are present. We formulate a parametric test detecting these statistical properties in election results. Remarkably, this technique produces robust outcomes with respect to the resolution of the data and therefore, allows for cross-country comparisons. PMID:23010929

  13. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  14. Retrograde amnesia following carbon monoxide poisoning: a case report.

    PubMed

    Acland, Peter R; Heaver, Catriona

    2008-07-01

    Retrograde amnesia is a recognised neurological complication of carbon monoxide poisoning. This article describes the case of a female found dead in her bath where initial post-mortem findings and the surrounding circumstances raised strong suspicions of homicide, especially when there was contradictory evidence from her husband who was the only other person present. He was later diagnosed as having retrograde amnesia between his two visits to the bathroom to attend to his wife which caused him to merge them into one event, thus arousing suspicions of foul play. The discussion explores the current clinical views on non-fatal carbon monoxide poisoning as well as problems of interpretation of information derived from case work.

  15. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  16. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  17. Retrograde Lacrimal Duct Airflow During Nasal Positive Pressure Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Zandieh, Stephanie; Katz, Eliot S.

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation is widely used for chronic respiratory failure in children with neuromuscular disorders, thus avoiding the need for tracheostomy. However, the pressures required to support ventilation in these children may be considerably higher than those necessary to treat obstructive sleep apnea. The complications of nasal positive airway pressure are numerous, including skin breakdown, conjunctivitis, nasal congestion, airway dryness, pneumothorax, and bowel obstruction. Ophthalmologic complaints are particularly common, largely attributed to an air leak in the mask. In the present case, we demonstrate, through two modalities—video and CT scan—retrograde airflow through the nasolacrimal duct causing sleep disruption and eye irritation in a profoundly hypotonic 14-month-old boy with chronic respiratory failure on bilevel ventilation during sleep. Citation: Zandieh S; Katz ES. Retrograde lacrimal duct airflow during nasal positive pressure ventilation. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(6):603-604. PMID:21206550

  18. Retrograde amnesia induced by drugs acting on different molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bonini, Juliana S; Coitinho, Adriana S; Vianna, Monica R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2004-06-01

    The gamma aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-sub(A)) agonist, muscimol, the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), and the inhibitor of the extracellularly regulated kinases (ERKs), UO 126, cause retrograde amnesia when administered to the hippocampus. In the present study, the authors found that they all cause retrograde amnesia for 1-trial inhibitory avoidance, not only when infused into the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus, but also when infused into the basolateral amygdala or the entorhinal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices. The posttraining time course of the effect of each drug was, however, quite different across brain structures. Thus, in all of them, NMDA receptors and the ERK pathway are indispensable for memory consolidation, and GABA-sub(A) receptor activation inhibits memory consolidation: but in each case, their influence is interwoven differently.

  19. The Management of Retrograde Peri-Implantitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Alam, Md Nazish; Singh, Gurudeep; Chandrasekaran, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Peri-Implantitis is defined as an inflammatory reaction with the loss of the supporting bone in the tissues which surround a functioning implant. The peri-implantitis lesions are often asymptomatic and they are usually detected during the routine recall appointments. Careful probing around the teeth and the implants should be done routinely along with the radiologic evaluation during these check-up appointments. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove even more difficult to identify, resulting in the loss of the implant. This paper presents a report of the extensive and the meticulous management of retrograde peri-implantitis and the implant being finally restored to health and the full functional status. PMID:23285472

  20. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL.

  1. Ureteroscopy assisted retrograde nephrostomy for complete staghorn renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus.

  2. Ureteroscopy Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy for Complete Staghorn Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus. PMID:24917723

  3. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL. PMID:22924043

  4. Retrograde trafficking of AB₅ toxins: mechanisms to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Linstedt, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial AB5 toxins are a clinically relevant class of exotoxins that include several well-known members such as Shiga, cholera, and pertussis toxins. Infections with toxin-producing bacteria cause devastating human diseases that affect millions of individuals each year and have no definitive medical treatment. The molecular targets of AB5 toxins reside in the cytosol of infected cells, and the toxins reach the cytosol by trafficking through the retrograde membrane transport pathway that avoids degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Focusing on Shiga toxin as the archetype member, we review recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the retrograde trafficking of AB5 toxins and highlight how these basic science advances are leading to the development of a promising new therapeutic approach based on inhibiting toxin transport.

  5. Clinical application of the retrograde arterialized venous flap.

    PubMed

    Koch, Horst; Scharnagl, Erwin; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Hubmer, Martin; Moshammer, Harald E T

    2004-01-01

    Retrograde arterialized venous flaps were applied to skin and soft-tissue defects in 13 patients with an average age of 34.4 years. Ten defects were located on the hand, and three on the lower leg. All flaps were harvested from the flexor aspect of the forearm; they ranged in size from 2 x 1 to 11 x 7 cm. There was venous congestion with superficial epidermolysis in six flaps, but not in the other seven. Partial skin necrosis in two of the lower-extremity flaps necessitated secondary skin grafts. Our results suggest that retrograde perfusion enhances blood flow in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps and gives good results in terms of flap survival, especially on the upper extremity. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Chaos at Uranus Spreads Dust Across the Regular Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Dan; Burns, J. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-05-01

    The short collision timescales between the Uranian irregular satellites argue for the past generation of vast quantities of dust at the outer reaches of Uranus’ Hill sphere (Bottke et al. 2010). Uranus’ extreme obliquity (98 degrees) renders the orbits of large objects unstable to eccentricity perturbations in the radial range a ≈ 60 - 75 Rp. (Tremaine et al. 2009). We study the effect on dust by investigating how the instability is modified by radiation pressure. We find that dust particles generated at the orbits of the irregular satellites move inward as radiation forces cause their orbits to decay (Burns et al. 1979). When they reach the unstable region, grain orbits undergo chaotic large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations that bring their pericenters inside the orbits of the regular satellites. We argue that the impact probabilities and expected spatial distribution across the satellite surfaces might explain the observed hemispherical color asymmetries common to the outer four regular satellites.

  7. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR INCLINED AND RETROGRADE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-03-20

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0 deg. < i < 170 deg., only reducing in amplitude for i>170 deg. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45 deg., becoming approximately constant for 45 deg. < i < 135 deg., and then declining for i>135 deg. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0 deg. to 180 deg., whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135 deg. < i {<=} 180 deg.), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  8. Propofol use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny G; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are often lengthier and more complex, thus requiring higher doses of sedatives for patient comfort and compliance. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with information regarding the use, safety profile, and merits of propofol for sedation in advanced endoscopic procedures like ERCP and EUS, based on the current literature. PMID:24833847

  9. Formation Flying in Earth, Libration, and Distant Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation examines the current and future state of formation flying, LEO formations, control strategies for flight in the vicinity of the libration points, and distant retrograde orbit formations. This discussion of LEO formations includes background on perturbation theory/accelerations and LEO formation flying. The discussion of strategies for formation flight in the vicinity of the libration points includes libration missions and natural and controlled libration orbit formations. A reference list is included.

  10. Life threatening hemobilia after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Ihab I; Sherman, Stuart; Pyko, Maximilian; Lehman, Glen A

    2017-09-11

    Arterial vascular complication from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is exceedingly rare. This report describes a life threatening hemobilia, from a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery (RHA), which occurred post ERCP. The pseudoaneurysm and the active bleed were diagnosed by selective angiography of the RHA, and successfully treated with stenting. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Side Effects of alpha-Blocker Use: Retrograde Ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    There are currently 5 alpha-blockers that are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The American Urological Association guidelines committee believes that all alpha-blockers are equally effective. However, alpha-blockers differ in their likelihood of causing abnormal ejaculation. This article discusses the effects on ejaculatory function, and specifically retrograde ejaculation, of the currently available alpha-blockers being used to treat men with LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  12. Laparoscopic transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after biliopancreatic diversion.

    PubMed

    Molina Romero, Francesc Xavier; Morón Canis, José Miguel; Llompart Rigo, Alfredo; Rodríguez Pino, José Carlos; Morales Soriano, Rafael; González Argente, Francesc Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be difficult in patients that have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Due to the fact that prevalence of morbid obesity is increasing, and laparoscopic procedures for its treatment have increased, the incidence of biliary tract problems in patients of altered anatomy is also growing. We describe a laparoscopic technique to access the biliary tree by endoscope, through the excluded stomach.

  13. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-29

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  14. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  15. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  16. Osteochondritis Dissecans Involving the Trochlear Groove Treated With Retrograde Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Yoshio; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Konosuke; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) occurs frequently in the humeral capitellum of the upper extremity, whereas OCD involving the trochlear groove (trochlear groove OCD) is rarely reported. A standard treatment for trochlear groove OCD has therefore not been determined, although several methods have been tried. The case of a 14-year-old male gymnast with bilateral trochlear groove OCD is presented. Retrograde drilling from the lateral condyle of the humerus was applied for the OCD lesion of the left elbow, since it was larger in size than that in the right elbow and was symptomatic. Conversely, since the right lesion was small and asymptomatic, it was managed conservatively. After treatment, consolidation of the OCD lesions was observed in both elbows. However, the time to healing was shorter in the left elbow treated surgically than in the right elbow managed conservatively. In conclusion, retrograde drilling is a very simple and minimally invasive treatment. This case suggests that retrograde drilling for trochlear groove OCD may be a useful procedure that may accelerate the healing process for OCD lesions. PMID:26356703

  17. Novel Class of Potential Therapeutics that Target Ricin Retrograde Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Lau, Zerlina; Morohashi, Keita; Felsenfeld, Dan; Tortorella, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Ricin toxin, an A-B toxin from Ricinus communis, induces cell death through the inhibition of protein synthesis. The toxin binds to the cell surface via its B chain (RTB) followed by its retrograde trafficking through intracellular compartments to the ER where the A chain (RTA) is transported across the membrane and into the cytosol. Ricin A chain is transported across the ER membrane utilizing cellular proteins involved in the disposal of aberrant ER proteins by a process referred to as retrograde translocation. Given the current lack of therapeutics against ricin intoxication, we developed a high-content screen using an enzymatically attenuated RTA chimera engineered with a carboxy-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (RTAE177Qegfp) to identify compounds that target RTA retrograde translocation. Stabilizing RTAE177Qegfp through the inclusion of proteasome inhibitor produced fluorescent peri-nuclear granules. Quantitative analysis of the fluorescent granules provided the basis to discover compounds from a small chemical library (2080 compounds) with known bioactive properties. Strikingly, the screen found compounds that stabilized RTA molecules within the cell and several compounds limited the ability of wild type RTA to suppress protein synthesis. Collectively, a robust high-content screen was developed to discover novel compounds that stabilize intracellular ricin and limit ricin intoxication. PMID:24366208

  18. Novel class of potential therapeutics that target ricin retrograde translocation.

    PubMed

    Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Lau, Zerlina; Morohashi, Keita; Felsenfeld, Dan; Tortorella, Domenico

    2013-12-23

    Ricin toxin, an A-B toxin from Ricinus communis, induces cell death through the inhibition of protein synthesis. The toxin binds to the cell surface via its B chain (RTB) followed by its retrograde trafficking through intracellular compartments to the ER where the A chain (RTA) is transported across the membrane and into the cytosol. Ricin A chain is transported across the ER membrane utilizing cellular proteins involved in the disposal of aberrant ER proteins by a process referred to as retrograde translocation. Given the current lack of therapeutics against ricin intoxication, we developed a high-content screen using an enzymatically attenuated RTA chimera engineered with a carboxy-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (RTA(E177Q)egfp) to identify compounds that target RTA retrograde translocation. Stabilizing RTA(E177Q)egfp through the inclusion of proteasome inhibitor produced fluorescent peri-nuclear granules. Quantitative analysis of the fluorescent granules provided the basis to discover compounds from a small chemical library (2080 compounds) with known bioactive properties. Strikingly, the screen found compounds that stabilized RTA molecules within the cell and several compounds limited the ability of wild type RTA to suppress protein synthesis. Collectively, a robust high-content screen was developed to discover novel compounds that stabilize intracellular ricin and limit ricin intoxication.

  19. Satellite theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  20. Computing Proton Dose to Irregularly Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, and 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  1. Computing proton dose to irregularly moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods: The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results: A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  2. Treatment of iatrogenic abdominal contour irregularities.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luiz Haroldo; Sterodimas, Aris

    2010-04-01

    In many countries, liposuction is the most frequently performed aesthetic procedure. The procedure is promoted as a safe, easy-to-learn, outpatient procedure. The increasing number of liposuction procedures, often performed by inadequately trained physicians, has led to a growing number of iatrogenic postliposuction contour deformities and skin irregularities. This report describes a treatment protocol for iatrogenic abdominal contouring deformities. For patients who present with contour deformities but no skin flaccidity, the type 1 treatment plan (syringe-assisted lipectomy and lipografting) is the suggested approach. In cases of contour deformities and infraumbilical skin flaccidity, the type 2 treatment plan (mini-lipoabdominoplasty and lipografting procedures) is used. Finally, in the case of contour deformities as well as supra- and infraumbilical flaccidity, the type 3 treatment plan (lipoabdominoplasty and lipografting procedures) is indicated.

  3. Linearity-Preserving Limiters on Irregular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael; Murman, Scott

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of flux and slope limiters on non-uniform grids in multiple dimensions. We note that on non-uniform grids the scalar formulation in standard use today sacrifices k-exactness, even for linear solutions, impacting both accuracy and convergence. We rewrite some well-known limiters in a n way to highlight their underlying symmetry, and use this to examine both traditional and novel limiter formulations. A consistent method of handling stretched meshes is developed, as is a new directional formulation in multiple dimensions for irregular grids. Results are presented demonstrating improved accuracy and convergence using a combination of model problems and complex three-dimensional examples.

  4. Parametric phase diffusion analysis of irregular oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabedal, Justus T. C.

    2014-09-01

    Parametric phase diffusion analysis (ΦDA), a method to determine variability of irregular oscillations, is presented. ΦDA is formulated as an analysis technique for sequences of Poincaré return times found in numerous applications. The method is unbiased by the arbitrary choice of Poincaré section, i.e. isophase, which causes a spurious component in the Poincaré return times. Other return-time variability measures can be biased drastically by these spurious return times, as shown for the Fano factor of chaotic oscillations in the Rössler system. The empirical use of ΦDA is demonstrated in an application to heart rate data from the Fantasia Database, for which ΦDA parameters successfully classify heart rate variability into groups of age and gender.

  5. Phased Array Inspection of Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to research and develop new conformable phased arrays that allow reliable ultrasonic inspection of components with an irregular surface. Two alternative approaches have been considered: flexible contact arrays in which the array itself conforms to the surface and a membrane device in which a standard array is coupled to the surface via a fluid-filled membrane. A linear flexible contact phased array was purchased from CEA France and a conformable membrane device was designed and manufactured at Imperial College. Initial investigations were conducted to evaluate both approaches when coupling to test pieces with machined surfaces representative of typical welded pipes without removal of the weld caps. The research incorporated beam modelling using the CEA CIVA software and comparisons with experimental measurements. It is shown that the conformable membrane approach using a standard array transducer is competitive with the bespoke flexible array.

  6. Artificial periodic irregularities in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietveld, M. T.; Turunen, E.; Matveinen, H.; Goncharov, N. P.; Pollari, P.

    1996-12-01

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) are produced in the ionospheric plasma by a powerful standing electromagnetic wave reflected off the F region. The resulting electron-density irregularities can scatter other high-frequency waves if the Bragg scattering condition is met. Such measurements have been performed at mid-latitudes for two decades and have been developed into a useful ionospheric diagnostic technique. We report here the first measurements from a high-latitude station, using the EISCAT heating facility near Tromsø, Norway. Both F-region and lower-altitude ionospheric echoes have been obtained, but the bulk of the data has been in the E and D regions with echoes extending down to 52-km altitude. Examples of API are shown, mainly from the D region, together with simultaneous VHF incoherent-scatter-radar (ISR) data. Vertical velocities derived from the rate of phase change during the irregularity decay are shown and compared with velocities derived from the ISR. Some of the API-derived velocities in the 75-115-km height range appear consistent with vertical neutral winds as shown by their magnitudes and by evidence of gravity waves, while other data in the 50-70-km range show an unrealistically large bias. For a comparison with ISR data it has proved difficult to get good quality data sets overlapping in height and time. The initial comparisons show some agreement, but discrepancies of several metres per second do not yet allow us to conclude that the two techniques are measuring the same quantity. The irregularity decay time-constants between about 53 and 70 km are compared with the results of an advanced ion-chemistry model, and height profiles of recorded signal power are compared with model estimates in the same altitude range. The calculated amplitude shows good agreement with the data in that the maximum occurs at about the same height as that of the measured amplitude. The calculated time-constant agrees very well with the data below 60 km but

  7. Measurement of Nonlinear Receptivity to Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila-Acaron, Jose B.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity is the process by which acoustic disturbances are internalized into the shear layer to generate instability waves. Experiments have shown that, when tuned to the eigenvalue modes, the amplitude of the resulting T-S waves scales with the acoustic field intensity. When a surface irregularity is present, the characteristic wall wavenumber forces a spatial mode onto the near-wall mean velocity field, thus providing modal length scales comparable to those of T-S waves. In this experiment an attempt was made to increase the acoustic receptivity by exciting a difference mode via a quadratic interaction between two larger-wavenumber, forced modes. The difference mode is tuned to the dominant T-S eigenmode wavenumber. As expected, an increased receptivity corresponding to the difference mode was measured downstream of branch I, suggesting the presence of the nonlinearity.

  8. Irregular trajectories in vakonomic mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakov, E. R.; Oleinikov, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    In his works, V.V. Kozlov proposed a mathematical model for the dynamics of a mechanical system with nonintegrable constraints, which was called vakonomic. In contrast to the then conventional nonholonomic model, trajectories in the vakonomic model satisfy necessary conditions for a minimum in a variational problem with equality constraints. We consider the so-called irregular case of this variational problem, which was not covered by Kozlov, when the trajectory is a singular point of the constraints and the necessary minimum conditions based on the Lagrange principle make no sense. This situation is studied using the theory of abnormal problems developed by the first author. As a result, the classical necessary minimum conditions are strengthened and developed to this class of problems.

  9. Irregular employment amongst migrants in Spanish cities.

    PubMed

    Sole, C; Ribas, N; Bergalli, V; Parella, S

    1998-04-01

    This article presents the irregular employment situation of non-European union immigrants in Spanish cities. Foreign labor is remarkable for its heterogeneity in terms of country of origin, demographic characteristics, and the different ways in which immigrants have entered the job market. Legal immigrants tend to concentrate in five different branches of activity, such as domestic service (mostly women), hotel and restaurant industry, agriculture, building and retail trade. Migrants who work in agriculture suffer the worst labor conditions than all other migrants. However, all migrants experience difficulty in obtaining residency and labor permits. Four integration strategies among Moroccan immigrants in Catalonia are discussed and can be viewed as support networks of the immigrants.

  10. A parametric approach to irregular fatigue prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erismann, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    A parametric approach to irregular fatigue protection is presented. The method proposed consists of two parts: empirical determination of certain characteristics of a material by means of a relatively small number of well-defined standard tests, and arithmetical application of the results obtained to arbitrary loading histories. The following groups of parameters are thus taken into account: (1) the variations of the mean stress, (2) the interaction of these variations and the superposed oscillating stresses, (3) the spectrum of the oscillating-stress amplitudes, and (4) the sequence of the oscillating-stress amplitudes. It is pointed out that only experimental verification can throw sufficient light upon possibilities and limitations of this (or any other) prediction method.

  11. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  12. Satellite Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chayes, Abram; And Others

    This report of the 1970 International Broadcast Institute (IBI) surveyed legal and communicational experts in France, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States on the general topic of satellite broadcasting. The responses covered technical data (satellite and ground systems), legal information (international law and the International…

  13. Satellite Vulnerabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-18

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...allies. 8  Satellites and Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance We have become dependent also on our satellite surveillance assets...uninterrupted ISR”, with “space intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems…fundamental to air power—especially to the execution

  14. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  15. Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities: Origins and Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    and Ionospheric Scintillations that can be found at: GPS and ionospheric scintillations, P.M. Kintner, B.M. Ledvina , and E.R. de Paula, Space... Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Measurements of equatorial scintillations on the WAAS satellite signal, Radio Sci., submitted, 2005. [refereed] 7...Adv. Space Res., 31(3), 741-747, 2003. [refereed] Humphreys, T.E., B.M. Ledvina , M.L. Psiaki, A.P. Cerruti, and P.M. Kintner, Analysis of

  16. Evidence for a continuous, power law, electron density irregularity spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral form of the irregularities in electron density that cause interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of small angular diameter radio sources is discussed. The intensity scintillation technique always yields an irregularity scale size, which is of the order of the first Fresnel zone for the wavelength at which the observations are taken. This includes not only the radio wavelength measurements of the structure of the interplanetary medium, but also radio wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the ionosphere and interstellar medium, and optical wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the atmosphere.

  17. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  18. Avoiding irregularities on the nasal dorsum in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Fernando Javier; Cardemil, Felipe

    2016-03-30

    Palpable irregularities along the nasal dorsum are a frequent complication of dorsal handling in rhinoplasty because resection techniques are used. This is often a result of improper management of the dorsum after resection. The surgical technique for handling of dorsal irregularities following dorsal resection is described. The key steps to avoid irregularities are diamond rasps, autospreader and morselized cartilage as camouflage. Following resection of the hump, the anatomy of the nasal dorsum should be adequately restructured; thereby we achieve an adequate aesthetic result and ideally preventing irregularities on palpation.

  19. C/NOFS observations of intermediate and transitional scale-size equatorial spread F irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; Kelley, M. C.; Roddy, P. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; de La Beaujardière, O.; Bust, G. S.

    We present initial results of the analysis of high sampling rate (512 Hz) measurements made by the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) instrument and the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) onboard the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. This letter focuses on the analysis of irregularities with scale-sizes in the intermediate (0.1-10 km) and transitional (10-100 m) domains observed when the satellite was flying through a large equatorial spread F (ESF) depletion on the night of October 9-10, 2008 over South America. The results presented in this letter suggest the operation of a diffusive subrange in the density power spectra and the possibility of an inertial plasma regime being observed at relatively low altitudes as a result of the long-lasting solar minimum conditions.

  20. Grain-scale Sr isotope heterogeneity in amphibolite (retrograded UHP eclogite, Dabie terrane): Implications for the origin and flow behavior of retrograde fluids during slab exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Yang, Yueheng; Chen, Yi; Su, Bin; Gao, Yijie; Zhang, Lingmin; Liu, Jingbo; Mao, Qian

    2016-12-01

    To constrain the origin and flow behavior of amphibolite-facies retrograde fluids during slab exhumation, we investigate the textures, trace element contents, and in situ strontium (Sr) isotopic compositions (using LA-MC-ICP-MS) of multiple types of epidote and apatite in the UHP eclogite and amphibolites from the Hualiangting area (Dabie terrane, China). The UHP epidote porphyroblasts in the eclogite (Ep-E), which formed at 28-30 kbar and 660-720 °C, contain high amounts of Sr, Pb, Th, Ba, and light rare earth elements (LREEs) and have a narrow range of initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70431 ± 0.00012 to 0.70454 ± 0.00010). Two types of amphibolite-facies epidote were recognized in the amphibolites. The first type of epidote (Ep-AI) developed in all the amphibolites and has slightly lower trace element contents than Ep-E. The Ep-AI has a same initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio range as the Ep-E and represents the primary amphibolite-facies retrograde product that is associated with an internally buffered fluid at 8.0-10.3 kbar and 646-674 °C. The other type of epidote (Ep-AII) occurs as irregular fragments, veins/veinlets, or reaction rims on the Ep-AI in certain amphibolites. Elemental X-ray maps reveal the presence of Ep-AI relics in the Ep-AII domains (appearing as a patchy texture), which indicates that Ep-AII most likely formed by the partial replacement of the Ep-AI in the presence of an infiltrating fluid. The distinctly lower trace element contents of Ep-AII are ascribed to element scavenging by a mechanism of dissolution-transport-precipitation during replacement. The Ep-AII in an individual amphibolite exhibits large intra- and inter-grain variations in the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70493 ± 0.00030 to 0.70907 ± 0.00022), which are between those of the Ep-AI and granitic gneisses (wall rock of the amphibolites, 0.7097-0.7108). These results verify that the infiltrating fluid was externally derived from granitic gneisses. The matrix apatite in the amphibolites has

  1. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Thomas, Peter C.; Carcich, Brian T.; Veverka, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  2. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Thomas, Peter C.; Carcich, Brian T.; Veverka, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  3. Modeling of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetically disturbed conditions over African low-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick; Habarulema, John Bosco; Jurua, Edward

    2016-10-01

    In this study, station-specific models of ionospheric irregularities over low-latitude African region during geomagnetically disturbed days (Dst≤-50 nT) have been developed. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-derived ionospheric total electron content (TEC) data during 1998-2014 were used. Ionospheric irregularities were represented with the rate of change of TEC index (ROTI). The inputs for the models are the local time, solar flux index, day number of the year, auroral electrojet, and the disturbance storm time indices, while the output is the hourly median ROTI during these given conditions. To develop the models, the ROTI index values were binned based on the input parameters and cubic B splines were then fitted to the binned data. Developed models were validated with independent data over stations within 680 km radius. The models reproduced fairly well the inhibitions and the occurrences of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetically disturbed days. The models even emulated these patterns in the various seasons, during medium and high solar activity conditions. During validations of the models, the percentages of the number of errors (difference between the observed and the modeled ROTI) <0.05 total electron content unit, 1TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU)/Min at all the stations were all >70% and the root-mean-square error were mostly < 0.1 TECU/Min. Furthermore, the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.47 to 0.76.

  4. Equatorial Density Irregularity Structures at Intermediate Scales and Their Temporal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We examine high resolution measurements of ion density in the equatorial ionosphere from the AE-E satellite during the years 1977-1981. Structure over spatial scales from 18 km to 200 m is characterized by the spectrum of irregularities at larger and smaller scales and at altitudes above 350 km and below 300 km. In the low-altitude region, only small amplitude large-scale (lambda greater than 5 km) density modulations are often observed, and thus the power spectrum of these density structures exhibits a steep spectral slope at kilometer scales. In the high-altitude region, sinusoidal density fluctuations, characterized by enhanced power near 1-km scale, are frequently observed during 2000-0200 LT. However, such fluctuations are confined to regions at the edges of larger bubble structures where the average background density is high. Small amplitude irregularity structures, observed at early local time hours, grow rapidly to high-intensity structures in about 90 min. Fully developed structures, which are observed at late local time hours, decay very slowly producing only-small differences in spectral characteristics even 4 hours later. The local time evolution of irregularity structure is investigated by using average statistics for low-(1% less than sigma less than 5%) and high-intensity (sigma greater than 10%) structures. At lower altitudes, little chance in the spectral slope is seen as a function of local time, while at higher attitudes the growth and maintenance of structures near 1 km scales dramatically affects the spectral slope.

  5. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  6. Intermittent rate-dependent retrograde conduction over a concealed atrioventricular accessory pathway: what is the mechanism?

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Roberto; Vicentini, Alessandro; Petracci, Barbara; Landolina, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Intermittent retrograde conduction over an accessory pathway (AP) is quite an uncommon phenomenon. We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of palpitations. Atrioventricular re-entry tachycardia was diagnosed at electrophysiological study. Interestingly, retrograde conduction over the AP was detectable only when ventricular pacing was performed at fast rate. Supernormal retrograde conduction over the AP was considered the most likely explanation of this unusual finding.

  7. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  8. Successful rescue of a perforated chronic total occlusion using retrograde technique.

    PubMed

    Nah, Jong Chun; Cho, Wook Hyun; Choi, Suk Koo

    2009-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention of chronic total occlusion (CTO) is one of the greatest challenges in coronary interventions. Retrograde wiring is suggested as a solution to improve the success rate of intervention for CTO. We experienced the coronary perforation during antegrade wiring at the CTO lesion and sealed it using retrograde wiring and antegrade stenting in a patient who underwent coronary arterial bypass grafting. We found that, in selected cases, the retrograde wire technique may provide a valuable rescue option for perforated CTO in a patient having a retrogradely accessible conduit vessel.

  9. Changing Strategies of the Retrograde Approach for Chronic Total Occlusion During the Past 7 Years

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Toshiya; Tsukahara, Reiko; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ishimori, Hiroshi; Park, Seung-Jung; Winter, Robert; Shokry, Khaled; Wang, Lefeng; Chen, Jiyan; Wang, Haichang

    2013-01-01

    Objective We reviewed the technical changes and results achieved with the retrograde approach since we introduced it 7 years ago. Subjects and Methods The subjects were 1,268 patients who were treated for CTO between January 2004 and December 2010. They were investigated with respect to the success rate, the frequency of employing the retrograde approach and its outcome, and other factors. Results The retrograde approach was employed in ∼30% of chronic total occlusion (CTO) patients (n = 281) and the retrograde guidewire success rate was 81.1%. The kissing wire technique was substituted for the retrograde approach in 126 of the 281 patients, with antegrade crossing of a guidewire being successful in 88 of them (70%). The retrograde approach was combined with the CART and reverse controlled antegrade retrograde tracking (CART) techniques in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Among 83 patients treated with Corsair catheters, crossing of the CTO was achieved in 63. The overall procedural success rate was 79.7% (224 patients). Complications of the retrograde approach included collateral channel dissection (2.1%), channel perforation (1.7%), CTO perforation (1.7%), and donor artery occlusion (1.1%). Conclusion The success rate and safety of the retrograde approach are both satisfactory if the appropriate devices and techniques are selected. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22517670

  10. Physicochemical and release kinetics of natural and retrograded starch of Indian palmyrah shoots.

    PubMed

    Kumar Varma, Ch Ashok; Panpalia, S G; Kumar, K Jayaram

    2014-05-01

    Starch was isolated from the shoots of Indian palmyrah (Borassus flabellifer L.) and it was subjected to the process of retrogradation. The influence of retrogradation on morphological, physicochemical and drug release properties was studied. Retrogradation of native starch changed its morphology from oval, elliptical to crystalline rods. Due to retrogradation there is an increase in amylose content and better hydration capacity, swelling and solubility power. The micromeritic properties of native and retrograded starch uncover its usage as excipients in tablet manufacturing. The retrograded starch showed better powder characteristics to that of native starch. The characteristic peaks for d-glucopyranosyl ring confirms the carbohydrate nature of starch. The TGA data reveals that the retrograded starch shows less bound water to that of native starch during the first decomposition step. In-vitro release study reveals that the retrograded starch attained a better release retardant property and was best explained by Hixson-Crowell model. The result showed that retrograded starches can be used for the preparation of sustained release tablets.

  11. Prevention of retrograde calculus migration with the Stone Cone.

    PubMed

    Pardalidis, N P; Papatsoris, A G; Kosmaoglou, E V

    2005-02-01

    Retrograde calculus migration during ureteroscopic lithotripsy remains a problem in 5-40% of cases. We assessed the safety and efficacy of the Stone Cone device, in comparison with the standard flat wire basket. A total of 56 consecutive patients with ureteral calculi, suitable for ureteroscopic extraction and/or lithotripsy, where included in this prospective study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In group A (30 patients), we used the Stone Cone, while in group B (26 patients) we used the standard flat wire basket. The Stone Cone was placed through a cystoscope under fluoroscopic guidance, or when necessary under direct ureteroscopic control. Whenever necessary, intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy took place in both groups. Statistical significance was assessed by the paired t-test. The mean operative time was 48.5 min in group A, and 42.4 min in group B. Intact calculus extraction was possible in 16.6% in group A, and in 7.6% in group B (P < 0.01). Retrograde stone migration was revealed in 23% in group B only (P < 0.001). Also, residual fragments > 3 mm were recorded in 30.7% in group B only (P < 0.001). None of the patients in group A required auxiliary procedures, in contrary to 23% in group B (P < 0.001). No major complications were recorded in group A, while in group B a case of major ureteral mucosal abrasion was recorded. The Stone Cone is safe and efficient in preventing retrograde stone migration and in minimizing residual fragments during ureteroscopic lithotripsy in comparison with the flat wire basket.

  12. Hemodynamic changes and retrograde flow in LVAD failure.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    In the event of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) failure, we hypothesized that rotary blood pumps will experience significant retrograde flow and induce adverse physiologic responses. Catastrophic LVAD failure was investigated in computer simulation with pulsatile, axial, and centrifugal LVAD, mock flow loop with pulsatile (PVAD) and centrifugal (ROTAFLOW), and healthy and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models with pulsatile (PVAD), axial (HeartMate II), and centrifugal (HVAD) pumps. Simulated conditions were LVAD "off" with outflow graft clamped (baseline), LVAD "off" with outflow graft unclamped (LVAD failure), and LVAD "on" (5 L/min). Hemodynamics (aortic and ventricular blood pressures, LVAD flow, and left ventricular volume), echocardiography (cardiac volumes), and end-organ perfusion (regional blood flow microspheres) were measured and analyzed. Retrograde flow was observed with axial and centrifugal rotary pumps during LVAD failure in computer simulation (axial = -3.4 L/min, centrifugal = -2.8 L/min), mock circulation (pulsatile = -0.1 L/min, centrifugal = -2.7 L/min), healthy (pulsatile = -1.2 ± 0.3 L/min, axial = -2.2 ± 0.2 L/min, centrifugal = -1.9 ± 0.3 L/min), and ischemic heart failure (centrifugal = 2.2 ± 0.7 L/min) bovine models for all test conditions (p < 0.05). Differences between axial and centrifugal LVAD were statistically indiscernible. Retrograde flow increased ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes and workload, and decreased myocardial and end-organ perfusion during LVAD failure compared with baseline, LVAD support, and pulsatile LVAD failure.

  13. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  14. From Hard to Harder: Iraq Retrograde Lessons for Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    major commands of Multi-National Force-Iraq ( MNF -I), Multi-National Corps-Iraq (MNC-I), and Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq (MNSTC-I...into a single 2 headquarters—US Forces-Iraq (USF-I)—to facilitate the mission change.3 The transition from MNF -I to USF-I was made easier by the...of the MNF -I, MNC-I, and MNSTC-I into USF-I into a single operational chain of command. In support of this retrograde operation, CENTCOM assigned

  15. Utility of retrograde ureterocelogram in management of complex ureterocele.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, M K; Prieto, J C; Cost, N; Nuss, G; Brown, B J; Baker, L A

    2017-02-01

    Symptomatic pediatric ureterocele has diverse manifestations, making evidence-based management impractical. Thus, detailed visualization of ureterocele anatomy prior to first surgical incision is invaluable. Retrograde ureterocelogram (RUC) is a simple, underutilized radiologic technique that can be performed during cystoscopy. This study sought to determine whether RUC changes surgical management by more accurately depicting the complex ureteral and ureterocele anatomy, compared with renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). Patients who underwent surgical management of ureterocele from 2003 to 2015 were identified; those who received concomitant fluoroscopic RUC were selected for the case series. Data collected included: demographics, pre-operative evaluation, surgical interventions, and outcomes. The RUC images were individually examined, and the anatomic impression compared with previous renal US and VCUG. Novel RUC findings not previously appreciated by the pre-operative evaluation were noted. The RUC was performed by cystoscopically inserting a needle into the ureterocele and injecting contrast retrograde. If indicated, simultaneous PIC (Positioning the Instillation of Contrast) cystography was performed. Of the 43 patients that underwent surgery for suspected ureterocele, 28 underwent cystoscopy + RUC (10 M: 18 F) at a median age of 4.6 months and median follow-up of 37.0 months. All patients had prior US, 25 had prior VCUG, and 20 had prior radionuclide studies. Ureteroceles were either duplex system (n = 21) or single system (n = 7); 17 were ectopic into the bladder neck or urethra; seven were intravesical; and four were pseudoureteroceles. Fourteen patients underwent concomitant transurethral incision of the ureterocele (TUIU); two were deferred for surgery; and 11 received concomitant definitive surgery (e.g., nephrectomy). The RUC illuminated novel aspects of the anatomy in 20 of the 28 patients. No adverse events occurred

  16. Postcholecystectomy syndrome: evaluation using biliary scintigraphy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Burrell, M.I.; Dobbins, J.; Jaffe, M.K.; Choyke, P.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors prospectively studied 30 patients with postcholecystectomy syndrome to determine the efficacy of biliary scintigraphy in the detection of stenosis of the sphincter of Oddi. All patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Biliary scintigraphy disclosed stenosis of the sphincter by agreement with the ERCP or surgical findings in nine (90%) of ten patients and in eight (100%) of eight patients with biliary obstruction from other causes. Retention of activity at 2 hours in visually prominent ducts was the best predictor of abnormal biliary drainage. Biliary scintigraphy is a useful, noninvasive screening test for the detection of postcholecystectomy biliary obstruction.

  17. Side Effects of α-Blocker Use: Retrograde Ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    There are currently 5 α-blockers that are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The American Urological Association guidelines committee believes that all α-blockers are equally effective. However, α-blockers differ in their likelihood of causing abnormal ejaculation. This article discusses the effects on ejaculatory function, and specifically retrograde ejaculation, of the currently available α-blockers being used to treat men with LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:20126607

  18. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  19. Multi-station observation of ionospheric irregularities over South Africa during strong geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant Bertillas; Cilliers Pierre, J.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents results pertaining to the response of the mid-latitude ionosphere to strong geomagnetic storms that occurred from 31 March to 02 April 2001 and 07-09 September 2002. The results are based on (i) Global Positioning Systems (GPSs) derived total electron content (TEC) variations accompanying the storm, (ii) ionosonde measurements of the ionospheric electrodynamic response towards the storms and (iii) effect of storm induced travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) on GPS derived TEC. Ionospheric data comprising of ionospheric TEC obtained from GPS measurements, ionograms, solar wind data obtained from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and magnetic data from ground based magnetometers were used in this study. Storm induced features in vertical TEC (VTEC) have been obtained and compared with the mean VTEC of quiet days. The response of the mid-latitude ionosphere during the two storm periods examined may be characterised in terms of increased or decreased level of VTEC, wave-like structures in VTEC perturbation and sudden enhancement in hmF2 and h‧F. The study reveals both positive and negative ionospheric storm effects on the ionosphere over South Africa during the two strong storm conditions. These ionospheric features have been mainly attributed to the travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) as the driving mechanism for the irregularities causing the perturbations observed. TEC perturbations due to the irregularities encountered by the satellites were observed on satellites with pseudo random numbers (PRNs) 15, 17, 18 and 23 between 17:00 and 23:00 UT on 07 September 2002.

  20. Design strategies for irregularly adapting parallel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Shan, Hongzhang; Sing, Jaswinder Pal

    2000-11-01

    Achieving scalable performance for dynamic irregular applications is eminently challenging. Traditional message-passing approaches have been making steady progress towards this goal; however, they suffer from complex implementation requirements. The use of a global address space greatly simplifies the programming task, but can degrade the performance of dynamically adapting computations. In this work, we examine two major classes of adaptive applications, under five competing programming methodologies and four leading parallel architectures. Results indicate that it is possible to achieve message-passing performance using shared-memory programming techniques by carefully following the same high level strategies. Adaptive applications have computational work loads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications are therefore a challenging task. This work examines the implementation of two typical adaptive applications, Dynamic Remeshing and N-Body, across various programming paradigms and architectural platforms. We compare several critical factors of the parallel code development, including performance, programmability, scalability, algorithmic development, and portability.

  1. Evaluating transport in irregular pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Dimitri A.; Hooman, Kamel; Klimenko, Alexander Y.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for investigating transport phenomena in porous media is presented. This approach has the capacity to represent various kinds of irregularity in porous media without the need for excessive detail or computational effort. The overall method combines a generalized effective medium approximation (EMA) with a macroscopic continuum model in order to derive a transport equation with explicit analytical expressions for the transport coefficients. The proposed form of the EMA is an anisotropic and heterogeneous extension of Kirkpatrick's EMA [Rev. Mod. Phys.RMPHAT0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.45.574 45, 574 (1973)] which allows the overall model to account for microscopic alterations in connectivity (with the locations of the pores and the orientation and length of the throat) as well as macroscopic variations in transport properties. A comparison to numerical results for randomly generated networks with different properties is given, indicating the potential for this methodology to handle cases that would pose significant difficulties to many other analytical models.

  2. Sampling characteristics of satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1989-01-01

    The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended to account for both irregular data distributions and observational noise - the sampling irregularity making the system much more susceptible to noise than in regularly sampled cases. The problem is formulated here in terms of least-squares and applied to spacecraft in 10-day and 17-day repeating orbits. The 'diamond-pattern' laid down spatially in such repeating orbits means that either repeat period adequately samples the spatial variables, but the slow overall temporal coverage in the 17-day pattern leads to much greater uncertainty than in the shorter repeat cycle. The result is not definitive and it is not concluded that a 10-day orbit repeat is the most appropriate one. A major conclusion, however, is that different orbital choices have potentially quite different sampling characteristics which need to be analyzed in terms of the spectral characteristics of the moving sea surface.

  3. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  4. BATHYMETRIC IRREGULARITIES, JET FORMATION, AND SUBSEQUENT MIXING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that bathymetric contours influence and steer currents and that irregularities in bathymetry contribute to the formation of aquatic non-buoyant jets and buoyant plumes. For example, bathymetric irregularities can channel flow through canyons or accelerate flow ov...

  5. BATHYMETRIC IRREGULARITIES, JET FORMATION, AND SUBSEQUENT MIXING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that bathymetric contours influence and steer currents and that irregularities in bathymetry contribute to the formation of aquatic non-buoyant jets and buoyant plumes. For example, bathymetric irregularities can channel flow through canyons or accelerate flow ov...

  6. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  7. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  8. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  9. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  10. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  11. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  12. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations... irregularities occurring during flight are entered in the maintenance log of the airplane at the next place of landing. Before each flight, the pilot in command shall ascertain the status of each irregularity...

  13. 14 CFR 375.33 - Transit flights, irregular operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Authorized Operations § 375.33 Transit flights, irregular operations. Foreign civil aircraft carrying... mail are transferred to another aircraft. Flights involving stops under such circumstances may, however... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transit flights, irregular operations....

  14. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  15. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical...

  16. 14 CFR 125.323 - Reporting mechanical irregularities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting mechanical irregularities. 125.323 Section 125.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 125.323 Reporting mechanical irregularities. The pilot in command shall ensure that all mechanical...

  17. Irregular variations of Sea Level Anomaly data and their impact on prediction errors of these data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbylut-Górska, Maria; Kosek, Wieslaw; Niedzielski, Tomasz; Popiński, Waldemar; Wnęk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    The movement of water around the oceans caused by density and a wind driven circulation plays a significant role in variation of sea surface heights which is now observed by satellite altimetry. Weekly SLA data thanks to courtesy of AVISO (Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic) service were analyzed to detect their irregular variations using the two time-frequency methods: Fourier Transform Band Pass Filter with Hilbert Transform (FTBPF+HT) and Complex demodulation with the Fourier Transform Low Pass Filter (CD+FTLPF). Using these two methods it is possible to compute time variable amplitudes and phases of oscillations as a function of geographic location. The global ocean maps of the standard deviations of amplitude differences and products of amplitude and phase differences for the annual oscillation and other shorter period oscillations with frequencies being an integer multiplicity of the annual frequency were computed to show the ocean areas with the greatest irregular variations. Such irregular amplitude and phase variations of the oscillations are the main causes of the SLA prediction errors. The predictions of the SLA time series were computed by a combination of the polynomial-harmonic model with the autoregressive prediction in the frame of PROGNOCEAN prediction service at the University of Wroclaw. The maps of these standard deviations are very similar to the maps of the mean prediction errors for a two weeks in the future of the SLA data. Thus, it's possible that the broadband annual oscillation is the main cause of the increase of the SLA data prediction errors.

  18. Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts as a Source of Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) [1, 2]. SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. A numerical code in C language to solve the derived nonlinear equations for analysis of interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere was developed. This code was used to analyze competition between interchange and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities in the equatorial region [3]. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defence Military Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data [2] during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. [1] Mishin, E. (2013), Interaction of substorm injections with the subauroral geospace: 1. Multispacecraft observations of SAID, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 5782-5796, doi:10.1002/jgra.50548. [2] Mishin, E., and N. Blaunstein (2008), Irregularities within subauroral polarization stream-related troughs and GPS radio interference at midlatitudes. In: T. Fuller-Rowell et al. (eds), AGU Geophysical Monograph 181, MidLatitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances, pp. 291-295, doi:10.1029/181GM26, Washington, DC, USA. [3] V. Sotnikov, T. Kim, E. Mishin, T. Genoni, D. Rose, I. Paraschiv, Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 15 - 19 December, 2014.

  19. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  20. Irregular conformal block, spectral curve and flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Kwan; Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Irregular conformal block is motivated by the Argyres-Douglas type of N=2 super conformal gauge theory. We investigate the classical/NS limit of irregular conformal block using the spectral curve on a Riemann surface with irregular punctures, which is equivalent to the loop equation of irregular matrix model. The spectral curve is reduced to the second order (Virasoro symmetry, SU(2) for the gauge theory) and third order (W 3 symmetry, SU(3)) differential equations of a polynomial with finite degree. The conformal and W symmetry generate the flow equations in the spectral curve and determine the irregular conformal block, hence the partition function of the Argyres-Douglas theory ala AGT conjecture.

  1. The Interplay Between Gas and Stars in Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, M.; Valdez-Gutiérrez, M.; Bullejos, A.; Arias, L.; Georgiev, L.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.

    2002-01-01

    Irregular galaxies are unique objects where the interrelationship between massive stars and gas can be studied without the contamination of other phenomena such as the density waves present in spiral galaxies. 3D spectrometers, in particular, scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers, are the best suited instruments to detect and study the kinematical behavior of bubbles and superbubbles in irregular galaxies. When we complement these results with the information on the stellar content of the bubbles and the distribution of massive stars in the irregular galaxies, we get a deeper insight on how the star formation process occur in irregular galaxies and how the massive stars shape the interestellar medium. We will present examples of the interplay between massive stars and superbubbles in irregular galaxies from the observations of these objects by means of the PUMA scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer.

  2. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period.

  3. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M.; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  4. Laser fluorescence angiography reveals perfusion defects in retrograde cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Gorki, H; Patel, N C; Balacumaraswami, L; Pillai, J B; Subramanian, V A

    2011-11-01

    Adequate perfusion of the right ventricle with retrograde cardioplegia has always been questioned. However, clinical studies suggested sufficient protection and, up to now, intraoperative assessment of cardioplegia distribution has been difficult. As a pilot study in 14 patients, we used indocyanine green laser fluorescence angiography (ICGLA) to assess vascular and myocardial perfusion of different areas of the right anterior ventricular wall. Regions of interest were analyzed quantitatively using a new software package. ICGLA allowed rapid and reliable visualization of cardioplegic flow and distribution. Retrograde cardioplegia revealed perfusion defects in the territory of the right anterior cardiac veins when compared to antegrade delivery and to areas close to the left anterior descending vein(s), confirmed by quantitative analyses of maximal fluorescence intensity. Five patients were excluded from quantitative analyses. The learning curve, pitfalls, limitations and special image details are described. A larger study is necessary to examine the relevance of perfusion defects to metabolic changes in affected myocytes and to global right ventricular function.

  5. Searching for the anatomical basis of retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Calabrese, P; Haupts, M; Durwen, H F; Liess, J; Gehlen, W

    1993-11-01

    The case of a patient with profound retrograde and minor anterograde amnesia is described and used to discuss the kind of brain damage which will most likely result in persistent retrograde amnesia as the principal symptom. The patient was an industrial manager who had fallen off a horse four years prior to the present neuropsychological and neuroradiological investigation. MRI examination revealed an injury to both temporal poles and to the latero-ventral portion of the right prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal and temporal cortical damage on the right side deeply invaded the white matter while the temporal cortical damage on the left side was much smaller; here, however, portions of the temporo-parietal transition zone were affected as well. The patient was of average intelligence. His attention, short-term memory, and learning ability were average or somewhat below average. His old memories were severely affected in the personal-episodic domain, and much less so in that of semantic remote memory. We conclude from this case that the necessary anatomical substrate for the retrieval of old episodic memories lies within the anterior temporal regions (including deeper situated fiber projections) and possibly involves an interaction with the prefrontal cortex, and that this damage is dissociable from the medial temporal-lobe damage leading to anterograde amnesia.

  6. Role of phospholipase A(2) in retrograde transport of ricin.

    PubMed

    Klokk, Tove Irene; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2011-09-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin classified as a bioterror agent, for which there are no known treatment options available after intoxication. It is composed of an enzymatically active A-chain connected by a disulfide bond to a cell binding B-chain. After internalization by endocytosis, ricin is transported retrogradely to the Golgi and ER, from where the ricin A-chain is translocated to the cytosol where it inhibits protein synthesis and thus induces cell death. We have identified cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) as an important factor in ricin retrograde transport. Inhibition of PLA(2) protects against ricin challenge, however the toxin can still be endocytosed and transported to the Golgi. Interestingly, ricin transport from the Golgi to the ER is strongly impaired in response to PLA(2) inhibition. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that ricin is still colocalized with the trans-Golgi marker TGN46 in the presence of PLA(2) inhibitor, but less is colocalized with the cis-Golgi marker GM130. We propose that PLA(2) inhibition results in impaired ricin transport through the Golgi stack, thus preventing it from reaching the ER. Consequently, ricin cannot be translocated to the cytosol to exert its toxic action.

  7. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of <4.2 ± 1.8 μG, three times lower than in the normal spirals. The strongest field among all LG dwarfs of 10 μG (at 2.64 GHz) is observed in the starburst dwarf IC 10. The production of total magnetic fields in dwarf systems appears to be regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization

  8. Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Intermediate -scale Irregularities in the Post-sunset Low-latitude Ionosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.

    2013-12-01

    Efforts to forecast the strength and latitudinal extent of scintillations on VHF and higher frequency trans-ionospheric radio signals recorded in low-latitude regions require a knowledge of the evolution of the spectrum of ionospheric irregularities in the intermediate scale range (~ 100m - few km), and dynamics of the irregularities. At present, the 3-D models that have been developed to simulate the evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs), capture the dynamics of EPBs but do not have adequate spatial resolution to yield the intermediate scale irregularity spectrum. Power spectra of weak scintillations recorded on a VHF, UHF, or L-band signal provide direct information about the intermediate scale irregularity spectrum. However, for strong scintillations, it is not possible to derive the irregularity spectral slopes from scintillation spectra, and information about the irregularity spectrum is deduced from other characteristics, such as the coherence scale of the ground scintillation pattern of intensity, which depends on the irregularity spectrum as seen from model calculation results presented here. Information about the spatio-temporal evolution of intermediate scale irregularities is derived from scintillation data on the basis of these theoretical results. For this study, spaced receiver measurements of intensity scintillations on a VHF signal transmitted from a geo-stationary satellite and recorded at an equatorial station are used. Generally, in the initial phase of EPB development after sunset, there is a large de-correlation between the spaced receiver signals, that may be attributed to fluctuations in the velocity of the irregularities due to the perturbation electric fields associated with the interchange instability, which gives rise to the irregularities. The 'random velocity' parameter, computed from spaced receiver intensity scintillation measurements, is a measure of the de-correlation. The coherence scale and the random velocity, together

  9. Retrograde replacement, reaction-driven cracking and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Retrograde reactions involve hydration, carbonation and/or oxidation of volatile-poor, high grade metamorphic and igneous rocks. They can increase solid volume, via increasing solid mass and decreasing solid density, provided fluid is supplied in an open system, and dissolution does not remove significant solid mass. Increasing solid volume can create deviatoric stress, causing fractures to form. This can be a positive feedback, maintaining or increasing permeability and reactive surface area. Alternatively, high viscosity host rock can act as a rigid container. Transient stress rise due to initial volume change causes nearly equal volumetric rates of precipitation and pressure solution. Retrograde reactions can be self-limiting, consuming fluid that is required both as a reactant and as a catalyst, filling pore space with newly crystallized material, and armoring reactive surface areas. However, retrograde products, such as serpentine, talc and clays are common, and have important controls on crustal rheology and physical properties, e.g., in the "cold nose" above subduction zones, in subducting plates, and in fault zones. The best-known retrograde processes are hydration and carbonation of olivine, in igneous rocks and residual mantle peridotite, e.g. near the seafloor. Fully hydrated (serpentinites) or carbonated (listwanites) peridotites show that retrograde reactions can proceed to completion. It is common to find that replacement is nearly isochemical, with the exception of H2O and CO2, suggesting that large-scale dissolution did not take place and solid volume expansion was significant. The free energy changes driving hydration and carbonation of olivine could generate overpressures of 100's to 1000's of MPa. These thermodynamic upper bounds can be compared to estimates based on microstructure. Evans (Int Geol Rev 2004) and Jamtveit et al. (EPSL 2008) provide microphotographs of igneous troctolites, with interstitial plagioclase surrounding rounded olivine

  10. Satellites of Mars - Geologic history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Bell, J.; Lunine, J.; Cruikshank, D.

    1992-01-01

    The small, irregularly shaped satellites of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, provide the most detailed view of the geomorphic forms and processes important on small solar system bodies. The satellites appear to be very similar in composition, strongly resembling carbonaceous asteroids; however, recent groundbased spectra suggest that their surfaces have little bound or interlayer water. Despite their similar compositions, sizes and environments, Phobos and Deimos have radically different surface features. Phobos is densely covered by craters that are nearly lunar in appearance; Deimos' craters are subdued and largely filled in by debris. Phobos shows only local downslope movement of regolith; Deimos has it on a global scale. Phobos is criss-crossed by linear depressions; Deimos has none. Crater ejecta appear to be retained near their sources on Phobos while the ejecta are widespread on Deimos. The reasons for the differences between the satellites are not known; imaging of asteroids should tell us which, if either, satellite is typical of the many small bodies that populate the asteroid belt.

  11. Ionosphere Explorer I Satellite: First Observations from the Fixed-Frequency Topside Sounder.

    PubMed

    Calvert, W; Knecht, R W; Vanzandt, T E

    1964-10-16

    The satellite has yielded new information on the arrangement of irregularities in sheets and the structure of plasma resonances in the ionosphere. Studies of the geographical distributions of the different kinds of spread F, sporadic E, and other phenomena will be facilitated by the satellite. More phenomena will undoubtedly be recognized as the records are studied.

  12. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  13. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  14. Giant hydronephrosis of a duplex system associated with ureteral ectopia: a cause of retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Lee, S S; Sun, G H; Yu, D S; Chen, H I; Chang, S Y

    2000-01-01

    Retrograde ejaculation is an extremely rare complication of the ectopic ureter or ectopic ureterocele. In the literature, only two cases have been reported worldwide. In this article the authors describe a patient who has a completely duplicated collecting system with massive dilatation of the upper pole system, which has manifested as a huge abdominal and retroperitoneal mass, complicated by retrograde ejaculation.

  15. Origins, Evolutions and Processes of the Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; D'Angelo, G.; Hubickyj, O.

    2012-12-01

    Recent simulations of the late stages growth of Jupiter presented by Lissauer et al. (2009, Icarus 199, 338) are used to test the model of capture of Jupiter's irregular satellites within proto-Jupiter's distended and thermally-supported envelope. We find such capture highly unlikely, since the envelope shrinks too slowly for a large number of moons to be retained, and many of those that would be retained would orbit closer to the planet than do the observed jovian irregulars. Our calculations do not address (and therefore do not exclude) the possibility that the irregular satellites were captured as a result of gas drag within a circumjovian disk. Support for this research from NASA Outer Planets Research Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Climatology of low latitude F-region irregularities using GPS radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepkar, Ankur; Arras, Christina; Wickert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Since the presence of electrons in the upper atmosphere affects radio waves, GNSS signals which operate at radio frequencies result in weak signal strength at reception. Such affected signals can be associated with the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) to study disturbances which are caused by irregularities in the Earth's ionosphere. For this study we use data obtained by the GPS radio occultation method, a satellite-satellite remote sensing technique. The general idea of this method is to track the GPS radio signal, as it passes through the Earth's atmosphere crossing Earth's limb. This weather independent method provides global coverage, high accuracy and a high vertical resolution. Due to the refraction of the GPS electromagnetic waves induced by electron density gradients in ionospheric altitudes, the GPS signals contain information on current ionospheric conditions. The study mainly focuses on providing a climatology of disturbances at low latitude region of the ionosphere taking into account the measurements obtained from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (2006-2013). We use GPS L1 profiles tracked in 1Hz mode which scans the Earth's atmosphere with an altitude resolution of 2km. Strong SNR fluctuations are referred to vertical changes in the electron density. The six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites provide in total about 2,000 radio occultation profiles per day on an average. About 5 millions of profiles were processed for this study, of which 0.16% contain strong disturbances in the ionospheric F-region. We observed that the F-region irregularity phenomenon occurs mainly at night time close to the Earth's magnetic equator during years with high solar activity. Distinctive seasonal variations can be seen from such investigations when analyzed for different years of data. This phenomenon is traditionally explained as a consequence of plasma instability.

  17. Analysis of Plasma Irregularities and Electromagnetic Signals Based on Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometer Burst Mode Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Coisson, P.; Brocco, L.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Vigneron, P.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.

    2015-12-01

    The commissioning phase of Swarm satellites provided opportunities to acquire measurement during special acquisitions sessions. The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) instrument of each satellite were operated in "burst mode": the recording frequency of the instruments were risen from the nominal 1 Hz to 250 Hz. A total of seven burst mode sessions, covering between 3 and 48 hours of continuous recording, were realized between December 2013 and February 2014. During that time, the local time of Swarm satellites orbits shifted from midnight-noon to post sunrise-post sunset. The last burst-mode session occurred during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. Therefore ASM burst mode data allow to investigate both quiet and geomagnetic active periods. The analysis of burst mode data was focused on the phenomena that can be investigated only using this higher sampling rate, providing insight in the frequency band between few Hz to 125 Hz. From the analysis of the magnetic field data we could observe typical signals related to different geomagnetic phenomena, showing distinct features at low, mid and high latitude. We were able to detect fast magnetic field fluctuations with a typical pattern, associated with low-latitudes irregularities in the ionospheric plasma during the development of post-sunset plasma bubbles. We also present results of the analysis of short electromagnetic signals that were detected mostly in the mid-to-low latitudes evening sector, investigating their correlation with the occurrence of lightning on the ground. Over the high latitudes, we detected fast variations in the intensity of the magnetic field during the active periods and analyse their correlations with plasma irregularities.

  18. Splenic Subcapsular Hematoma After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Montenovo, Martin; Javed, Emran; Bakthavatsalam, Ramasamy; Reyes, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Splenic injuries after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are a rare but lethal complication. We describe a subcapsular splenic hematoma requiring emergent splenectomy after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a liver transplant recipient.

  19. The effect of branched limit dextrin on corn and waxy corn gelatinization and retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Xu, Jin; Fan, Xuerong; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Jiugang; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Li

    2017-08-02

    The effect of branched limit dextrins (BLDs) on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of corn and waxy corn starch was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide X-ray diffraction (WXRD). The DSC data showed that the presence of BLDs increased the gelatinization and decreased the gelatinization enthalpy (ΔHgel). The retrogradation of corn and waxy corn starch were retarded by BLDs. The BLD with the lowest molecular weight had the best influence on corn and waxy corn starch retrogradation. The result of WXRD confirmed it. Avrami equation was used to analyze the enthalpies of retrograded corn and waxy corn starch. Starch recrystallization rate (k) reduced with the addition of BLDs, indicating that BLDs reduced the kinetics of starch retrogradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Retrograded starches as potential anodes in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wen, Yan; Zhu, Wei; Li, Lin; Zhang, Kunsheng; Wang, Wanyu

    2012-11-01

    Retrograded starch is a crystal formed by starch molecules with hydrogen bonds. Many literatures have reported its physicochemical character, but its crystal structure is so far unclear. As we isolate amylose and amylopectin from retrograded maize, sweet potato and potato starches in 4.0 M KOH solutions and make them retrograde alone in neutral solution (adjusted by HCl) to form crystal, a new phenomenon appears, crystals of KCl do not appear in retrograded potato amylose, potato amylopectin, and maize amylose, indicating that those crystals may absorb K⁺ and (or) Cl⁻, and those ions probably act with aldehyde of starch or hydroxy of fatty acid attached in starch, such characteristic may make retrograded starches replace graphite as anode with high-capacity in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Case report: A healthy live birth following icsi with retrograde ejaculated sperm.

    PubMed

    Yakass, Michael B; Woodward, Bryan; Otoo, Mary A; Hiadzi, Edem K

    2014-12-01

    Retrograde ejaculation, sometimes called dry orgasm, refers to the medical condition when semen enters the urinary bladder (retrograde) instead of emerging through the penis after orgasm (antegrade). In some instances, a very minute quantity of antegrade semen appears in the ejaculate and may or may not be devoid of spermatozoa. Complete retrograde ejaculation causes male infertility. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been employed to achieve fertilization in some cases of male subfertility, e.g., severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia. Assisted reproductive techniques to aid conception in cases of retrograde ejaculation have been described extensively elsewhere but there is paucity of knowledge on the occurrence and treatment in Africa. This case report describes the identification and successful treatment of a couple where the male partner suffered from retrograde ejaculation.

  2. Star Formation in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm-Palmer, Robbie Christopher

    I have explored the star formation histories of the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A and GR 8. I measured photometry of individual stars from images taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. With the photometry I constructed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in the B, V, and I. I investigated the errors in the photometry extraction, and conducted artificial star tests to measure the photometric limits. The high resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope allowed photometric measurements that were far more accurate than ground-based observations. For galaxies at these distances (1-2 Mpc), the accuracy of stellar photometry from ground-based observations is limited by crowding of stellar images. The high accuracy photometry showed a clear separation of the main sequence from the massive, blue, core He-burning stars (HeB). These are stars in the bluest extent of the so-called 'blue-loop' phase of stellar evolution. This is the first time this phase of evolution has been clearly identified in a low metallicity system. The distributions of stars in the CMDs agreed very well with stellar evolution model predictions. I have used the CMDs to calculate the recent star formation histories of both galaxies. The main sequence luminosity function provided the star formation rate (SFR) over the past ~50 Myr. I developed a new technique for calculating the SFR from the blue HeB luminosity function. Furthermore, the blue HeB evolutionary phase has a one-to-one relation between age and magnitude. This allowed me to calculate the position, as well as the strength of star formation over the past ~500 Myr. The star formation was found in concentrated regions. These regions are of order 100 pc across and last of order 100 Myr. The regions were found near the highest density HI gas. I estimated the gas-to-star conversion efficiency to be 5-10%. The results from GR 8 suggest that the star forming gas clouds may be self-gravitating, and that each cloud

  3. Determining Ionospheric Irregularity Spectral Density Function from Japan GEONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, E. H.; Light, M. E.; Parker, P. A.; Carrano, C. S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Japan's GEONET GPS network is the densest GPS monitoring network in the world, with 1200+ receivers over the area of Japan. Measuring and calibrating the integrated total electron content (TEC) from each station has been done in many cases to provide detailed maps of ionospheric disturbances over Japan. We use TEC measurements from Japan's GEONET array to determine an empirically derived description of the 2-dimensional scale sizes of spatial irregularities above Japan. The contributions from various scale sizes will be included in a statistical description for the irregularity spectral density (ISD) function. We will compare the statistics of the spatial irregularities between calm and moderately scintillated conditions.

  4. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  5. A Switch in Retrograde Signaling from Survival to Stress in Rapid Onset Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Perlson, Eran; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Ross, Jenny L.; Dixit, Ram; Wallace, Karen E.; Kalb, Robert G.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Retrograde axonal transport of cellular signals driven by dynein is vital for neuronal survival. Mouse models with defects in the retrograde transport machinery including the Loa mouse (point mutation in dynein) and the Tgdynamitin mouse (overexpression of dynamitin) exhibit mild neurodegenerative disease. Transport defects have also been observed in more rapidly progressive neurodegeneration, such as that observed in the SOD1G93A transgenic mouse model for familial ALS. Here we test the hypothesis that alterations in retrograde signaling lead to neurodegeneration. In-vivo, in-vitro and live cell imaging motility assays show mis-regulation of transport and inhibition of retrograde signaling in the SOD1G93A model. However, similar inhibition is also seen in the Loa and Tgdynamitin mouse models. Thus, slowing of retrograde signaling leads only to mild degeneration and cannot explain ALS etiology. To further pursue this question, we used a proteomics approach to investigate dynein-associated retrograde signaling. These data indicate a significant decrease in retrograde survival factors including P-Trk and P-Erk1/2, and an increase in retrograde stress factor signaling, including P-JNK, Caspase-8 and p75NTR cleavage fragment in the SOD1G93A model; similar changes are not seen in the Loa mouse. Co-cultures of motor neurons and glia expressing mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) in compartmentalized chambers indicate that inhibition of retrograde stress signaling is sufficient to block activation of cellular stress pathways and to rescue motor neurons from mSOD1-induced toxicity. Hence, a shift from survival-promoting to death-promoting retrograde signaling may be key to the rapid onset of neurodegeneration seen in ALS. PMID:19657041

  6. First evidence of anisotropy of GPS phase slips caused by the mid-latitude field-aligned ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Ishin, A. B.; Tinin, M. V.; Yasyukevich, Yu. V.; Jin, S. G.

    2011-05-01

    The mid-latitude field-aligned irregularity (FAI) along the magnetic field line is a common phenomenon in the ionosphere. However, few data reveal the field-aligned ionospheric irregularities. They are insufficient to identify FAIs effects so far, particularly effect on global positioning system (GPS) signals. In this paper, the mid-latitude FAIs by line-of-sight angular scanning relative to the local magnetic field vector are investigated using the denser GPS network observations in Japan. It has been the first found that total GPS L2 phase slips over Japan, during the recovery phase of the 12 Feb 2000 geomagnetic storm were caused by GPS signal scattering on FAIs both for the lines-of-sight aligned to the magnetic field line (the field of aligned scattering, FALS) and across the magnetic field line (the field of across scattering, FACS). The FALS results are also in a good agreement with the data of the magnetic field orientation control of GPS occultation observations of equatorial scintillation during thorough low earth orbit (LEO) satellites measurements, e.g. Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C). The role of large-angle scattering almost along the normal to the magnetic field line in GPS scintillation is determined by attenuation of the irregularity anisotropy factor as compared with the other factors.

  7. Asteroid 243 IDA and its satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Klaasen, K.; Belton, M. J. S.; Veverka, J.

    1994-07-01

    A high-resolution mosaic of Ida shows a highly irregular body (roughly 56 km long), heavily covered with craters, with many interesting geological features, including grooves, blocks, chutes, dark-floored craters, and crater chains. A satellite of Ida, with a preliminary designation of 1993 (243) 1, was discovered in orbit around Ida. It is approximately 1.5 km in diameter, has an albedo and spectral reflectance not grossly different from Ida, and orbits Ida in a prograde direction with a period of roughly 20 hr. No other comparable-sized satellites have been found near Ida. New pictures of the opposite side of Ida reveal an irregular, dog-bone shape, with a prominent gouge that seems to separate Ida into two chief components. A V-shaped valley, well shown in the highest-resolution view of Ida returned in April, may mark a modest expression on the September face of the more dramatic feature on the back side. Ida's dense population of craters shows a wide diversity of morphologies, consistent with the surface having been subjected to saturated bombardment by smaller projectiles. Assuming the same projectile flux applies to Ida was used in deriving Gaspra's cratering age of about 200 m.y., and assuming that Gaspra and Ida both have the same impact strength, then the age of Ida's surface is calculated to be 1-2 b.y. This is considerably older than expected from other evidence concerning the Koronis family. Our favored explanation of Ida's satellite is that it (or a precursor satellite from which the present satellite was derived) formed during the catastrophic disruption event that formed Ida itself and formed the Koronis family of asteroids. Perhaps, instead, the satellite is a block ejected from a cratering impact. In any case, smaller blocks visible on some parts of Ida are more certain to be crater ejecta, whether or not they were ever temporary satellites.

  8. STABILITY OF SATELLITES IN CLOSELY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Deck, Katherine M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to ∼0.4 R{sub H} (where R{sub H} is the Hill radius) as opposed to 0.5 R{sub H} in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5-4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if a ∼ 0.65 R{sub H} . In very close planetary pairs (e.g., the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of circumplanetary semi-major axes. The majority of systems investigated stably harbored satellites over a wide parameter-space, suggesting that STIPs can generally offer a dynamically stable home for satellites, albeit with a slightly smaller stable parameter-space than the single-planet case. As we demonstrate that multi-planet systems are not a priori poor candidates for hosting satellites, future measurements of satellite occurrence rates in multi-planet systems versus single-planet systems could be used to constrain either satellite formation or past periods of strong dynamical interaction between planets.

  9. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  10. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives.

  11. Retrograde jejunogastric intussusception with jejunojejunal intussusception (double telescoping)

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manash Ranjan; Bhaskar, Ved; Mohapatra, Vedavyas

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with features of gastric outlet obstruction not responding to conservative treatment at a peripheral hospital. She had gastric surgery 15 years before. On examination, there was a globular mass palpable in the epigastrium. Ultrasound and endoscopy findings were suggestive of retrograde jejunogastric intussusception. After initial resuscitation, emergency laparotomy was undertaken which revealed a jejunogastric intussusception at the previous retrocolic gastrojejunostomy site. After manual reduction of the intussuscepted loop by gentle traction, another segment of the jejunum was seen to be telescoping within this loop. On reduction, this jejunal loop was seen to measure around 20 cm and the apex of the intussusceptum was found to be gangrenous and perforated. Resection of the involved segment was done followed by a Roux-en-y anastomosis to restore the continuity. PMID:23682086

  12. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  13. [Hindfoot fusion for Charcot osteoarthropathy with a curved retrograde nail].

    PubMed

    Pyrc, J; Fuchs, A; Zwipp, H; Rammelt, S

    2015-01-01

    Charcot osteoarthropathy of the hindfoot with considerable dislocation and instability represents a therapeutic dilemma. The treatment goal is a plantigrade, stable foot that is free of infection and ulceration with the ability to ambulate in special footwear. Over a period of 6 years, we performed 23 hindfoot fusions in 21 patients with manifest Charcot arthropathy with the help of a curved retrograde nail (HAN). All patients suffered from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with polyneuropathy; 12 patients had additional peripheral vasculopathy. An average of 3.5 previous surgeries had been performed prior to hindfoot fusion. Complete tibiotalocalcaneal fusion was obtained in 16 of 21 patients (76 %). Of these 21 patients, 18 (86 %) were followed clinically and radiologically for an average of 2 years. Overall, 16 patients (89 %) reported a substantial subjective improvement compared to the preoperative state. Hardware failure occurred in 7 cases (30 %) that could be brought to consolidation with exchange of the locking bolts or the complete nail. In 5 cases (22 %), a postoperative hematoma had to be removed and in 8 cases (35 %) wound edge necrosis was treated with local wound care. In 2 cases (9 %), a secondary or reactivated osteitis occurred that finally required below knee amputation. Tibiotalocalcaneal fusion with a curved retrograde intramedullary nail (HAN) is an effective treatment option in highly unstable and deforming Charcot osteoarthropathy of the hindfoot. It is an alternative to external or other internal fixation methods and helps to avoid below knee amputation in more than 90 % of cases.

  14. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography associated pancreatitis: A 15-year review

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Kevin E; Willingham, Field F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the literature regarding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis. We searched for and evaluated all articles describing the diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, morbidity, mortality and prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) in adult patients using the PubMed database. Search terms included endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, pancreatitis, ampulla of vater, endoscopic sphincterotomy, balloon dilatation, cholangiography, adverse events, standards and utilization. We limited our review of articles to those published between January 1, 1994 and August 15, 2009 regarding human adults and written in the English language. Publications from the reference sections were reviewed and included if they were salient and fell into the time period of interest. Between the dates queried, seventeen large (> 500 patients) prospective and four large retrospective trials were conducted. PEP occurred in 1%-15% in the prospective trials and in 1%-4% in the retrospective trials. PEP was also reduced with pancreatic duct stent placement and outcomes were improved with endoscopic sphincterotomy compared to balloon sphincter dilation in the setting of choledocholithiasis. Approximately 34 pharmacologic agents have been evaluated for the prevention of PEP over the last fifteen years in 63 trials. Although 22 of 63 trials published during our period of review suggested a reduction in PEP, no pharmacologic therapy has been widely accepted in clinical use in decreasing the development of PEP. In conclusion, PEP is a well-recognized complication of ERCP. Medical treatment for prevention has been disappointing. Proper patient selection and pancreatic duct stenting have been shown to reduce the complication rate in randomized clinical trials. PMID:21160744

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis in retrograde ureteroscopy: what strategy should we adopt?

    PubMed Central

    Pricop, Cătălin; Dorobăt¸, Carmen; Puia, Dragoş; Orsolya, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Background Retrograde ureteroscopy as a minimally invasive treatment of ureteral calculi can be complicated by the occurrence of urinary tract infections. Fever is considered the main indicator of such postoperative complications and we aimed to study its incidence in patients with and without preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Methods We included all patients who underwent retrograde ureteroscopy for ureteric stones in the Iaşi and Tg Mureş Urology Clinics from 2009 to 2012. Data were statistically analyzed using the EpiInfo 7 software. Indicative of a statistically significant difference was a p value <0.05. Results We recorded fever in a total of 108 cases, accounting for 22.83% of all subjects in the study. Group 1 included patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis; 48 of 147 (32.65%) were febrile, compared with Group 2 (no antibiotic prophylaxis), where we recorded febrile syndrome in 60 (18.40%) cases, p=0.0009. Comparing the two groups based on calculus size, for stones with diameters of 0.6-0.8 cm 38.71% of patients were febrile in Group 1, compared with 10.88% in Group 2 (p=0.0008). Secondary ureterohydronephrosis did not statistically influence the frequency of fever in any of the studied groups. Conclusion Less than half of all febrile patients had positive urine cultures, which may point to other causes, such as noninfectious factors (aseptic kidney inflammation). This study did not prove the efficiency of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis; however, based on the clinical experience of the past 120 years, infectious complications are known to be associated with urological maneuvers and prophylaxis could be indicated. PMID:24432295

  16. Conscious Sedation for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Dexmedetomidine Versus Midazolam

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Neslihan; Sahin, Sukran; Aksu, Hale; Yavascaoglu, Belgin; Gurbet, Alp; Turker, Gurkan; Kadioglu, Asli Guler

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Midazolam and dexmedetomidine, which are used for sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, were compared to evaluate the differences in efficacy, hemodynamics, and side effects. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients aged between 18 and 80 were randomly assigned to two groups according to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification: Group M received midazolam with an initial bolus infusion of 0.04 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), followed by additional doses of 0.5 mg i.v. midazolam, titrated to achieve a Ramsay sedation scale score of 3–4. Group D received dexmedetomidine with an initial bolus infusion of 1 mcg/kg/hr i.v. over 10 minutes, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2–0.7 mcg/kg/hr, titrated to achieve an RSS of 3–4. A Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was performed prior to sedation and in the recovery room once the Modified Aldrete Score (MAS) reached 9–10. Patient heart rates, arterial pressure and pain were evaluated. Results: Patients in Group D had lower heart rates at 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 minutes following the initiation of sedation (p<0.05). There was no statistical difference in arterial pressure, RSS, MMSE or respiratory rate between the two groups. Coughing, nausea and vomiting occurred in 3 patients in Group M (12%), whereas no patient in Group D experienced these symptoms. The procedure elicited a gag response in 7 patients in Group M (28%) and in 4 patients in Group D (16%), with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). When patient and surgeon satisfaction was compared between the two groups, Group D showed higher surgeon satisfaction scores (p<0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine for conscious sedation during short, invasive procedures, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, could be a superior alternative to the use of midazolam. PMID:25610153

  17. Context effects on orthographic learning of regular and irregular words.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Chen; Castles, Anne; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nation, Kate

    2011-05-01

    The self-teaching hypothesis proposes that orthographic learning takes place via phonological decoding in meaningful texts, that is, in context. Context is proposed to be important in learning to read, especially when decoding is only partial. However, little research has directly explored this hypothesis. The current study looked at the effect of context on orthographic learning and examined whether there were different effects for novel words given regular and irregular pronunciations. Two experiments were conducted using regular and irregular novel words, respectively. Second-grade children were asked to learn eight novel words either in stories or in a list of words. The results revealed no significant effect of context for the regular items. However, in an orthographic decision task, there was a facilitatory effect of context on irregular novel word learning. The findings support the view that contextual information is important to orthographic learning, but only when the words to be learned contain irregular spelling-sound correspondences.

  18. On the long range propagation of sound over irregular terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation over randomly irregular, nominally plane terrain of finite impedance is discussed. The analysis is an extension of the theory of coherent scatter originally proposed by Biot for an irregular rigid surface. It combines Biot's approach, wherein the surface irregularities are modeled by a homogeneous distribution of hemispherical bosses, with more conventional analyses in which the ground is modeled as a smooth plane of finite impedance. At sufficiently low frequencies the interaction of the surface irregularities with the nearfield of a ground-based source leads to the production of surface waves, which are effective in penetrating the ground shadow zone predicted for a smooth surface of the same impedance.

  19. Working Too Much Might Tip Heart into Irregular Rhythm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Search Search ... Working Too Much Might Tip Heart Into Irregular Rhythm Study shows a link between on-the-job hours and atrial fibrillation, but couldn't prove ...

  20. On the long range propagation of sound over irregular terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation over randomly irregular, nominally plane terrain of finite impedance is discussed. The analysis is an extension of the theory of coherent scatter originally proposed by Biot for an irregular rigid surface. It combines Biot's approach, wherein the surface irregularities are modeled by a homogeneous distribution of hemispherical bosses, with more conventional analyses in which the ground is modeled as a smooth plane of finite impedance. At sufficiently low frequencies the interaction of the surface irregularities with the nearfield of a ground-based source leads to the production of surface waves, which are effective in penetrating the ground shadow zone predicted for a smooth surface of the same impedance.

  1. Traffic dispersion through a series of signals with irregular split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study the traffic behavior of a group of vehicles moving through a sequence of signals with irregular splits on a roadway. We present the stochastic model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals. The dynamic behavior of vehicular traffic is clarified by analyzing traffic pattern and travel time numerically. The group of vehicles breaks up more and more by the irregularity of signal's split. The traffic dispersion is induced by the irregular split. We show that the traffic dispersion depends highly on the cycle time and the strength of split's irregularity. Also, we study the traffic behavior through the series of signals at the green-wave strategy. The dependence of the travel time on offset time is derived for various values of cycle time. The region map of the traffic dispersion is shown in (cycle time, offset time)-space.

  2. 13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT THE BASE OF THE LEFT (EAST) BUTTRESS. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. Uranus Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-26

    On Jan. 18, 1986, NASA Voyager 2 discoverd three Uranus satellites. All three lie outside the orbits of Uranus nine known rings, the outermost of which, the epsilon ring, is seen at upper right. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00368

  4. Galilean Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    These photos of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter were taken by NASA Voyager 1 during its approach to the planet in early March 1979. Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are shown in their correct relative sizes. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00012

  5. The dynamics of rings around small, irregular bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Stellar occultations revealed the presence of two dense rings around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo (Braga-Ribas et al., Nature 508, 72, 2014). This is the first ring system discovered around an object that is not a giant planet, suggesting that rings may exist around numerous bodies in the solar system. Chariklo's rings roughly reside at the outer limit of the Roche zone of the body. Moreover, the main ring has sharp edges, which call for the presence of putative shepherd satellites. Those characteristics give an image of Chariklo's rings that are rather similar, in terms of dynamics, to those surrounding the gaseous planets.An important difference exists, however, between giant planets and small bodies: the formers are highly axisymmetric, while the latters can support mass anomalies (eg surface topographic features) or non-spherical shapes (eg an ellipsoidal figure of equilibrium) that involve masses, relative to the body itself, as large as 10-4-10-3.We investigate the effect of non-axisymmetric terms in the potential of the body upon a collisional debris disk that initially surrounds a small irregular body. We show that the corotation points being maxima of energy, dissipative collisions remove the particles from the corotation zone over short time scales (< 106 years). Moreover, the Lindblad resonances inside the corotation radius create torques that drive the particles onto the surface of the central body. Conversely, the outer Lindblad resonances push the disk material beyond the outer 3/2 and 2/1 Lindblad resonances.Taking as an example Chariklo's ring system, for which recent data have been obtained from stellar occultations, we show that the Lindblad resonant torques actuate over short time scales (< 106 years). This general picture offers a natural explanation of the presence of dense rings at the outer limit of Chariklo's Roche zone, and their absence closer to the body.The work leading to this results has received funding from the European

  6. Friction in the U.S. Army During Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    and great friction during irregular warfare. Historic analysis confirms this trend, and reveals a dominant grammar of traditional warfare supported by...dominant grammar of traditional warfare, the alternate grammar of irregular warfare is visible only when politicians force the Army to conduct...operations in that manner. Doctrine and theory from other nations, although available, did not facilitate maturation of this second grammar in the U.S. Army

  7. Suppression of resonance of offshore platform in irregular waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Komura, T.

    1994-12-31

    A theoretical solution of the vibration of offshore platforms due to irregular waves has been presented by using the equivalent linearized method. This solution has been verified by comparison with the experimental data from the viewpoint of time variation and the spectrum analysis. In the case of irregular waves as well as periodic waves, the resonance can be suppressed by bringing the resonance point close to the cancellation point.

  8. Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of irregularity in chronic sleep routines.

    PubMed

    Taub, J M

    1978-09-01

    Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of irregularity in chronic sleep routines were studied. Two groups each of 18 healthy male university students were classified as either irregular sleepers or control subjects according to retrospective questionnaires, and sleep chart criteria. The control group was composed of persons who slept naturally from 12-8:00 a.m. for 7-8 hr. Irregular sleepers were defined as those whose retiring and awakening times varied by about 2-4 hr. Measurements were obtained from an auditory reaction time task, a mood adjective check list, of sublingual temperature and pulse rate 30 min. after awakening in the (a) morning, at (b) noon, in the (c) afternoon and (d) early evening following an electroencephalographically recorded 12-8:00 a.m. sleep night. At various points in the diurnal cycle irregular sleepers compared with the control group had significantly lower levels of pulse rate and body temperature, but significantly longer reaction times. During the four time periods negative affects (deactivation-sleep, depression, general deactivation, inert-fatigued) were significantly greater and positive mood states (cheerful, energetic, general activation--significantly less in the irregular sleepers. The irregular sleepers averaged significantly less stage 4, and REM, but more stage 2 and transitions between sleep stages. The present results indicate that relatively lowered levels of physiological arousal indexes, psychomotor performance and subjective mood are associated with irregularity in chronic sleep routines of young adult males. These psychobehavioral correlates of chronically maintained sleep pattern variations complement and extend previous findings on degradations in waking functions following acute 2-4 hr temporal shifts of habitual sleep periods. It is postulated that there were psychobehavioral deficits in the irregular sleepers attributable either to selective sleep stage (REM and/or stage 4) deprivation or to the more

  9. Losses of GPS signals onboard the Swarm satellites and its relation to strong plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, C.; Xiong, C.; Juan, R. Z.; Siemes, C.

    2016-12-01

    Low latitude plasma irregularities are significant structures in the post-sunset low-latitude ionosphere. The Swarm satellite mission, which has been launched in November 2013, is equipped with multiple instruments and provides good opportunity to investigate these irregularities in their different components, such as plasma densities and drifts, the magnetic field, and its effect on the reception of GPS signals. This study focuses on the relation of the depletion depth of plasma irregularities and the loss of GPS signal. Our result shows that these GPS events mainly occur in low latitudes and between 19LT - 22LT. All of these losses are related to post-sunset equatorial plasma irregularities. If a depletion with a depth of 10×1011 m-3 is met, signals of less than 4 GPS satellites have been received for almost 50% of the cases which makes the precise point position impossible and at around 10% of the events all GPS signals have been lost. The probability of loss is drastically reduced when the Swarm satellite does not fly through an irregularity or through an irregularity with lower depletion value. We further experienced that the loss of signals reduced after different GPS receiver settings had been changed onboard the Swarm satellites, however these more recent periods of the mission also coincide with lower electron density background due to the declining solar cycle, both making GPS loss events less likely.

  10. Localized dissolution electrochemistry at surface irregularities of pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Cheng, Y. F.

    2008-06-01

    The localized electrochemical dissolution behavior at surface irregularities, including scratch, mechanically induced hole and corrosion pit, on pipeline steel was investigated in both near-neutral pH and high pH solutions by scanning vibrating micro-electrode and localized electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. In near-neutral pH solution, the localized dissolution behavior at surface irregularities is dependent of their geometrical depth, which is critical to development of a local electrochemical condition to support the further localized dissolution. Therefore, surface irregularities exceeding a certain depth provide potential sites to initiate stress corrosion cracks in near-neutral pH solution. The strong passivating capability of high pH solution would result in the formation of oxide film over the whole electrode surface to "equalize" the electrochemical activity at irregularities to the intact area. Therefore, the irregularities would not result in localized dissolution electrochemistry. Consequently, localized corrosion and crack initiation are not anticipated to initiate from the geometrical irregularities in high pH solution. However, corrosion pits generating due to passive film breakdown could support the high local dissolution kinetics in high pH solution, providing potential sites for crack initiation. The effects of hydrogen-charging on anodic dissolution at regularities depend on the defect geometry and the solution pH.

  11. Design Optimization of Irregular Cellular Structure for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Hua; Jing, Shi-Kai; Zhao, Fang-Lei; Wang, Ye-Dong; Xing, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Tao

    2017-09-01

    Irregularcellular structurehas great potential to be considered in light-weight design field. However, the research on optimizing irregular cellular structures has not yet been reporteddue to the difficulties in their modeling technology. Based on the variable density topology optimization theory, an efficient method for optimizing the topology of irregular cellular structures fabricated through additive manufacturing processes is proposed. The proposed method utilizes tangent circles to automatically generate the main outline of irregular cellular structure. The topological layoutof each cellstructure is optimized using the relative density informationobtained from the proposed modified SIMP method. A mapping relationship between cell structure and relative densityelement is builtto determine the diameter of each cell structure. The results show that the irregular cellular structure can be optimized with the proposed method. The results of simulation and experimental test are similar for irregular cellular structure, which indicate that the maximum deformation value obtained using the modified Solid Isotropic Microstructures with Penalization (SIMP) approach is lower 5.4×10-5 mm than that using the SIMP approach under the same under the same external load. The proposed research provides the instruction to design the other irregular cellular structure.

  12. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance.

  13. The Peculiar Velocities of Satellites of External Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzaro, Marco; Zentner, Andrew R.; Prada, Francisco; Klypin, Anatoly A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the angular distribution and the orbital rotation directions of a sample of carefully selected satellite galaxies about disk galaxy primaries extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We complement this analysis with a theoretical study of these statistics in an N-body simulation of cosmological structure formation set within the ΛCDM paradigm under various assumptions for the orientations of disk angular momenta. Under the assumption that the angular momenta of the disks are aligned with the angular momenta of the inner regions of their host dark matter halos, we find that the fraction of simulated satellite halos that exhibit prograde motion is fprog~0.55-0.60, with larger satellites more likely to be prograde. In our observational sample, approximately 60% of the satellites exhibit prograde motion, a result that is broadly consistent with the simulated sample. Our observational sample of satellite galaxies shows no evidence for an anisotropic satellite distribution relative to disk primaries; however, the small sample size does not yet support a statistically significant comparison to previous studies of satellite anisotropy. Again, this result is broadly consistent with our simulated sample of satellites under the assumption that disk and halo angular momenta are aligned. However, the small size of our observational sample does not yet allow us to distinguish between various assumptions regarding the orientations of disks in their halos. Finally, we present an assessment of the importance of contamination by interlopers on the measured prograde and retrograde statistics.

  14. Variable anisotropy of small-scale stratospheric irregularities retrieved from stellar scintillation measurements by GOMOS/Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Valery; Dalaudier, Francis; Sofieva, Viktoria

    In this work, we consider possibilities for studying the anisotropy of small-scale air density irregularities using satellite observations of bi-chromatic stellar scintillations during tangential occultations. Estimation of the anisotropy coefficient (the ratio of the characteristic horizontal to vertical scales) and other atmospheric parameters is based on the comparison of simulated/theoretical and experimental auto-spectra and coherency spectra of scintillation. Our analyses exploit a 3D model of the spectrum of atmospheric inhomogeneities, which consists of anisotropic and isotropic components. For the anisotropic component, a spectral model with variable anisotropy is used. Using stellar scintillations measurements by GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars) fast photometers, estimates of the anisotropy coefficient are obtained for atmospheric irregularities with vertical scales of 8-55 m at altitudes of 43-30 km. It is shown that the anisotropy increases from about 10 to 50 with increasing vertical scales.

  15. Is retrograde drilling really useful for osteochondral lesion of talus with subchondral cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong-Yup; Kim, Jong-Kil; Lee, Kwang-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Retrograde drilling is a well accepted procedure for osteochondral lesion of the talus and subchondral cyst with intact overlying cartilage. It has good results in most reports. Compared to anterograde drilling, retrograde drilling can protect the integrity of the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of using retrograde drilling for osteochondral lesion with subchondral cyst and discuss the mechanism involved in the development of subchondral cyst. Patient concerns: We report a 53-year-old man who had complained left ankle pain that lasted over 6 months which was exacerbated by walking. Diagnoses: We diagnosed it as osteochondral lesion of the talus with subchondral cyst. Interventions: Plain X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. Outcomes: He undertook retrograde drilling without debridement of cartilage. After the surgery, the pain had been subsided for 1 year, although arthritic change had progressed. However, after 5 years of retrograde drilling, he revisited our hospital due to severe ankle pain. Plain X-ray and MRI showed arthritic change of the ankle and multiple cystic formation of talus. Lessons: Retrograde drilling has some problem because this procedure is not theoretically correct when the development of a subchondral cyst in osteochondral lesion of the talus is considered. In addition, retrograde drilling may impair uninjured bone marrow of the talus, resulting in the development of multiple cystic formations. PMID:27930520

  16. Effects of protein in wheat flour on retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Xijun, Lian; Junjie, Guo; Danli, Wang; Lin, Li; Jiaran, Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Albumins, globulins, gliadins, and glutenins were isolated from wheat flour and the effects of those proteins on retrogradation of wheat starch were investigated. The results showed that only glutenins retarded retrogradation of wheat starch and other 3 proteins promoted it. The results of IR spectra proved that no S-S linkage formed during retrogradation of wheat starch blended with wheat proteins. Combination of wheat starch and globulins or gliadins through glucosidic bonds hindered the hydrolysis of wheat starch by α-amylase. The melting peak temperatures of retrograded wheat starch attached to different proteins were 128.46, 126.14, 132.03, 121.65, and 134.84 °C for the control with no protein, albumins, glutenins, globulins, gliadins groups, respectively, and there was no second melting temperature for albumins group. Interaction of wheat proteins and starch in retrograded wheat starch greatly decreased the endothermic enthalpy (△H) of retrograded wheat starch. Retrograded wheat starch bound to gliadins might be a new kind of resistant starch based on glycosidic bond between starch and protein.

  17. The retromer complex and clathrin define an early endosomal retrograde exit site.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Vincent; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Tenza, Danièle; Rojas, Raúl; Lamaze, Christophe; Bonifacino, Juan S; Raposo, Graça; Johannes, Ludger

    2007-06-15

    Previous studies have indicated a role for clathrin, the clathrin adaptors AP1 and epsinR, and the retromer complex in retrograde sorting from early/recycling endosomes to the trans Golgi network (TGN). However, it has remained unclear whether these protein machineries function on the same or parallel pathways. We show here that clathrin and the retromer subunit Vps26 colocalize at the ultrastructural level on early/recycling endosomes containing Shiga toxin B-subunit, a well-studied retrograde transport cargo. As previously described for clathrin, we find that interfering with Vps26 expression inhibits retrograde transport of the Shiga toxin B-subunit to the TGN. Under these conditions, endosomal tubules that take the Shiga toxin B-subunit out of transferrin-containing early/recycling endosomes appear to be stabilized. This situation differs from that previously described for low-temperature incubation and clathrin-depletion conditions under which Shiga toxin B-subunit labeling was found to overlap with that of the transferrin receptor. In addition, we find that the Shiga toxin B-subunit and the transferrin receptor accumulate close to multivesicular endosomes in clathrin-depleted cells, suggesting that clathrin initiates retrograde sorting on vacuolar early endosomes, and that retromer is then required to process retrograde tubules. Our findings thus establish a role for the retromer complex in retrograde transport of the B-subunit of Shiga toxin, and strongly suggest that clathrin and retromer function in consecutive retrograde sorting steps on early endosomes.

  18. Is retrograde drilling really useful for osteochondral lesion of talus with subchondral cyst?: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Yup; Kim, Jong-Kil; Lee, Kwang-Bok

    2016-12-01

    Retrograde drilling is a well accepted procedure for osteochondral lesion of the talus and subchondral cyst with intact overlying cartilage. It has good results in most reports. Compared to anterograde drilling, retrograde drilling can protect the integrity of the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of using retrograde drilling for osteochondral lesion with subchondral cyst and discuss the mechanism involved in the development of subchondral cyst. We report a 53-year-old man who had complained left ankle pain that lasted over 6 months which was exacerbated by walking. We diagnosed it as osteochondral lesion of the talus with subchondral cyst. Plain X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. He undertook retrograde drilling without debridement of cartilage. After the surgery, the pain had been subsided for 1 year, although arthritic change had progressed. However, after 5 years of retrograde drilling, he revisited our hospital due to severe ankle pain. Plain X-ray and MRI showed arthritic change of the ankle and multiple cystic formation of talus. Retrograde drilling has some problem because this procedure is not theoretically correct when the development of a subchondral cyst in osteochondral lesion of the talus is considered. In addition, retrograde drilling may impair uninjured bone marrow of the talus, resulting in the development of multiple cystic formations.

  19. The Yeast Retrograde Response as a Model of Intracellular Signaling of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jazwinski, S. Michal; Kriete, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates intracellular signaling pathways that impact yeast longevity, and the best known of these pathways is the retrograde response. More recently, similar responses have been discerned in other systems, from invertebrates to human cells. However, the identity of the signal transducers is either unknown or apparently diverse, contrasting with the well-established signaling module of the yeast retrograde response. On the other hand, it has become equally clear that several other pathways and processes interact with the retrograde response, embedding it in a network responsive to a variety of cellular states. An examination of this network supports the notion that the master regulator NFκB aggregated a variety of mitochondria-related cellular responses at some point in evolution and has become the retrograde transcription factor. This has significant consequences for how we view some of the deficits associated with aging, such as inflammation. The support for NFκB as the retrograde response transcription factor is not only based on functional analyses. It is bolstered by the fact that NFκB can regulate Myc–Max, which is activated in human cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and impacts cellular metabolism. Myc–Max is homologous to the yeast retrograde response transcription factor Rtg1–Rtg3. Further research will be needed to disentangle the pro-aging from the anti-aging effects of NFκB. Interestingly, this is also a challenge for the complete understanding of the yeast retrograde response. PMID:22629248

  20. Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis by Endoscopic Retrograde Appendicitis Therapy (ERAT): Combination of Colonoscopy and Endoscopic Retrograde Appendicography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingchao; Mi, Chen; Li, Weizhi; She, Junjun

    2016-11-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency, but the diagnosis of appendicitis remains a challenge. Endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy (ERAT) is a new and minimally invasive procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis. To investigate the diagnostic value of ERAT for acute appendicitis by the combination of colonoscopy and endoscopic retrograde appendicography (ERA). Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of suspected uncomplicated acute appendicitis who underwent ERAT between November 2014 and January 2015 were included in this study. The main outcomes, imaging findings of acute appendicitis including colonoscopic direct-vision imaging and fluoroscopic ERA imaging, were retrospectively reviewed. Secondary outcomes included mean operative time, mean hospital stay, rate of complication, rate of appendectomy during follow-up period, and other clinical data. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was established in 20 patients by positive ERA (5 patients) or colonoscopy (1 patient) alone or both (14 patients). The main colonoscopic imaging findings included mucosal inflammation (15/20, 75 %), appendicoliths (14/20, 70 %), and maturation (5/20, 25 %). The key points of ERA for diagnosing acute appendicitis included radiographic changes of appendix (17/20, 85 %), intraluminal appendicoliths (14/20, 70 %), and perforation (1/20, 5 %). Mean operative time of ERAT was 49.7 min, and mean hospital stay was 3.3 days. No patient converted to emergency appendectomy. Perforation occurred in one patient after appendicoliths removal was not severe and did not require invasive procedures. During at least 1-year follow-up period, only one patient underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. ERAT is a valuable procedure of choice providing a precise yield of diagnostic information for patients with suspected acute appendicitis by combination of colonoscopy and ERA.

  1. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions. PMID:26891225

  2. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions.

  3. Light Pollution in Leo-Satellite Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, L. S.; Marsakova, V. I.; Golubovskaya, T. A.; Terpan, S. S.; Melikyants, S. M.; Korobeynikova, E. A.

    Because of the high level of the light pollution in Odessa city, only the observations of LEO (low Earth orbit)-satellites are performed in the main office of the Astronomical observatory of Odessa National University named after I.I. Mechnikov. As the one of the observation results we obtain the sky background measurements along the satellite's way through the sky (at different azimuths and altitudes that change during the satellite tracking). We propose the method of irregular extinction changes diagnostics that realized by using the different data filtration methods. Also as the result of our analysis of these observations we present azimuth-altitude diagram of sky background that shows the most significant light pollution at the north-western and northern directions caused by the Port of Odessa and the stadium "Chernomorets".

  4. Coronary perforation with tamponade successfully managed by retrograde and antegrade coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Boukhris, Marouane; Tomasello, Salvatore Davide; Azzarelli, Salvatore; Elhadj, Zied Ibn; Marzà, Francesco; Galassi, Alfredo Ruggero

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, retrograde approach for chronic total occlusions has rapidly evolved, enabling a higher rate of revascularization success. Compared to septal channels, epicardial collaterals tend to be more tortuous, more difficult to negotiate, and more prone to rupture. Coronary perforation is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of coronary angioplasty, often leading to emergency cardiac surgery. We report a case of a retrograde chronic total occlusion revascularization through epicardial collaterals, complicated by both retrograde and antegrade coronary perforation with tamponade, and successfully managed by coil embolization.

  5. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  6. Independent predictors of retrograde failure in CTO-PCI after successful collateral channel crossing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Muto, Makoto; Yamane, Masahisa; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Okamura, Atsunori; Igarashi, Yasumi; Fujita, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Shigeru; Oida, Akitsugu; Tsuchikane, Etsuo

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate factors for predicting retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing. Successful guidewire/catheter collateral channel crossing is important for the retrograde approach in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO). A total of 5984 CTO-PCI procedures performed in 45 centers in Japan from 2009 to 2012 were studied. The retrograde approach was used in 1656 CTO-PCIs (27.7%). We investigated these retrograde procedures to evaluate factors for predicting retrograde CTO-PCI failure even after successful collateral channel crossing. Successful guidewire/catheter collateral crossing was achieved in 77.1% (n = 1,276) of 1656 retrograde CTO-PCI procedures. Retrograde procedural success after successful collateral crossing was achieved in 89.4% (n = 1,141). Univariate analysis showed that the predictors for retrograde CTO-PCI failure were in-stent occlusion (OR = 1.9829, 95%CI = 1.1783 - 3.3370 P = 0.0088), calcified lesions (OR = 1.9233, 95%CI = 1.2463 - 2.9679, P = 0.0027), and lesion tortuosity (OR = 1.5244, 95%CI = 1.0618 - 2.1883, P = 0.0216). On multivariate analysis, lesion calcification was an independent predictor of retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing (OR = 1.3472, 95%CI = 1.0614 - 1.7169, P = 0.0141). The success rate of retrograde CTO-PCI following successful guidewire/catheter collateral channel crossing was high in this registry. Lesion calcification was an independent predictor of retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing. Devices and techniques to overcome complex CTO lesion morphology, such as lesion calcification, are required to further improve the retrograde CTO-PCI success rate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Managing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Integral Systems, Inc.'s EPOCH 2000 forms the core of NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission's command and control center. EPOCH 2000, which allows ground operators to monitor and control satellites over a wide area network, owes part of its heritage from work completed to support Goddard Space Flight Center. The software automates telemetry processing, commanding, anomaly detection, and archiving collected data. The NEAR spacecraft, launched in February 1996, will rendezvous in early 1999 and orbit the Asteroid Eros for a year. Integral Systems also provided Low Earth Orbit Autonomous Ground Terminals (LEO-Ts) to NASA. The LEO-T is designed to make it easier and less expensive for principal investigators to obtain telemetry, tracking and control services for their science missions. The company products have supported well over 70 satellite missions aimed at scientific research, meteorology, or communications applications.

  8. Materials for retrograde filling in root canal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Chunjie; Jia, Liuhe; Wang, Yan; Liu, Wenwen; Zhou, Xuedong; Johnson, Trevor M; Huang, Dingming

    2016-12-17

    Root canal therapy is a sequence of treatments involving root canal cleaning, shaping, decontamination and obturation. It is conventionally performed through a hole drilled into the crown of the affected tooth, namely orthograde root canal therapy. For teeth that cannot be treated with orthograde root canal therapy, or for which it has failed, retrograde root filling, which seals the root canal from the root apex, is a good alternative. Many materials, such as amalgam, zinc oxide eugenol and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), are generally used. Since none meets all the criteria an ideal material should possess, selecting the most efficacious material is of utmost importance. To determine the effects of different materials used for retrograde filling in children and adults for whom retrograde filling is necessary in order to save the tooth. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 13 September 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 13 September 2016); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 13 September 2016); Embase Ovid (1980 to 13 September 2016); LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 13 September 2016); and OpenSIGLE (1980 to 2005). ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We also searched Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (in Chinese, 1978 to 20 September 2016); VIP (in Chinese, 1989 to 20 September 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (in Chinese, 1994 to 20 September 2016); and Sciencepaper Online (in Chinese, to 20 September 2016). No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) only that compared different retrograde filling materials, with reported success rate that was assessed by clinical or

  9. Tactical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, F. H.

    1993-02-01

    The concept of a Tactical Space System (TACSAT) is a means to provide a rapid, on demand, augmentation of the backbone U.S. military space systems. Such augmentation would be valuable to temporarily replace lost capability or in times of crisis, to accommodate surge demands. Because augmentation needs are not always known a-priori, it would be desirable to be able to rapidly constitute the appropriate payload-satellite bus combination to accommodate the need for a specific space capability. To do this, one can envision a standard bus capable of accepting a variety of payloads, or better yet, a single spacecraft designed to perform several different missions. Both options are considered. A number of potential missions exist in the areas of surveillance, navigation, environmental sensing, and communications. Of these, two are presented as strawman concepts: surveillance and communication. For surveillance, an electro-optical payload is described that could be used for missile surveillance, theater targeting, or weather data using the same optics, focal plane, and processor. The satellite orbit selected dictates which mission is performed. For communication, both SHF and EHF payloads are defined to provide theater coverage for the tactical user. The advantages and penalties that accrue to the use of a common bus are also explored. In addition, launch options are identified and a comparison made between 'launch-on-demand' and 'launch-on-schedule' strategies. Potential timelines for rapid launch are shown based on parallel processing and checkout of spacecraft and launcher. This technique is compared with launching satellites on a routine basis and storing them in orbit. Energy requirements for repositioning these stored satellites after they are activated in time of need are defined.

  10. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  11. Satellite and Rocket Observations of Equatorial Spread-F Irregularities: A Two Dimensional Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-17

    DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C. 20305 COMM, DMD , CONT & INTELL 01CY ATTN STVL WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301 04CY ATTN...92409 OICY ATTN NSSP-2722 FRED WIMBERLY (MINUTEMAN) 01CY ATTN MNNL LTC KENNEDY NAVAL SPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY P.O. BOX 92960 COMMANDER WORLDWAY POSTAL

  12. Seasonal variation in ionospheric electron content and irregularities over waltair - a comparison with slim model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. V. S. Rama; Ram, P. Sri; Jayachandran, P. T.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    1996-01-01

    Beacon satellite measurements made during 1984-85 and 1989-90 at a low latitude station Waltair (17.7 degN, 83.3 degE) are used to study the diurnal and seasonal variations in ionospheric electron content (IEC) and amplitude scintillations. In 1989-90, under high solar activity, the daytime IEC shows winter anomaly in the peak values and local time differences in their occurrence. By night, enhancements in IEC and the occurrence of scintillations and spread-F were frequent, particularly at equinoxes. The seasonal variations of the meridional wind direction and phase computed from the SLIM model/1/ compare well with the daytime peak density anomaly and with nighttime IEC over Waltair. A probable effect of neutral winds on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities is discussed.

  13. Phase scintillations due to equatorial F region irregularities with two-component power law spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R. G.

    1986-10-01

    Power spectra of weak phase scintillations on a 140-MHz signal, transmitted from the geostationary satellite ATS 6 and observed during premidnight and postmidnight periods at an equatorial station Ootacamund (magnetic dip 6 N), show that the nighttime equatorial F region irregularities in the wavelength range of about hundred meters to a few kilometers exhibit a two-component power law spectrum. The long- and short-wavelength spectral indices and the break scale at which the transition from a shallow to a steep slope occurs are determined self-consistently using both the phase and amplitude scintillation data. As the power spectra of phase scintillations do not exhibit the effect of Fresnel filtering, they provide fairly accurate estimates of the spectral indices and the break scale. These estimated parameters are utilized in a model calculation of the dependence of the S4 index on signal frequency based on weak scattering theory.

  14. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated. 15 references.

  15. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  16. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  17. Dynamics of small- and large-scale irregularities at sub-auroral latitudes. Final report, 1 May 1985-31 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, J.; Mendillo, M.

    1987-10-10

    In order to study the dynamics of ionospheric F-layer irregularities at latitudes below the auroral oval, radio, optical, and incoherent-scatter observations were initiated primarily in the region of 75/sup 0/W longitude. In addition, earlier observations including in-situ satellite measurements were used. The principal conclusions were: (1) the sub-auroral ionospheric observations could be understood by correlating F-layer irregularities with ring-current intensities as measured by Dst, the magnetic field measurement made near the magnetic equator; and sub-auroral irregularities that affect HF communications and over-the-horizon observations last over several nights while the ring current recovers from an injection of ions during a magnetic storm; and (2) local observations of Stable Auroral Red (SAR) Arcs and by Millstone Hill incoherent scatter data reveal that the weaker SAR Arcs detected are important in determining the physics of the generation of these emissions.

  18. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  19. Irregularity excitation associated with charged dust cloud boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2012-02-01

    Irregularity generation associated with dust cloud expansion through a background plasma along a magnetic field is investigated. Because of the dust charging process, a boundary layer is produced, separating the dusty plasma generated and the background plasma. It is observed that under appropriate conditions, localized plasma irregularities may be generated in this boundary layer. Theoretical and computational models are used to study the evolution of relevant plasma instabilities thought to play a dominant role in irregularity production. An electron flow develops along the boundary layer of the dust cloud, and plasma irregularities are generated in response to this flow. Several aspects of the cloud's structure (thickness of the boundary layer, average particle size and density, collisional processes, and cloud expansion speed) and the ambient plasma are varied to determine the effect of these quantities on the resulting irregularities. The relevance of these results to past experimental observations in space and the laboratory for applications to the expansion of naturally or artificially created dust clouds is discussed.

  20. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  1. Novel Method for Border Irregularity Assessment in Dermoscopic Color Images

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most important lesion features predicting malignancy is border irregularity. Accurate assessment of irregular borders is clinically important due to significantly different occurrence in benign and malignant skin lesions. Method. In this research, we present a new approach for the detection of border irregularities, as one of the major parameters in a widely used diagnostic algorithm the ABCD rule of dermoscopy. The proposed work is focused on designing an efficient automatic algorithm containing the following steps: image enhancement, lesion segmentation, borderline calculation, and irregularities detection. The challenge lies in determining the exact borderline. For solving this problem we have implemented a new method based on lesion rotation and borderline division. Results. The algorithm has been tested on 350 dermoscopic images and achieved accuracy of 92% indicating that the proposed computational approach captured most of the irregularities and provides reliable information for effective skin mole examination. Compared to the state of the art, we obtained improved classification results. Conclusions. The current study suggests that computer-aided system is a practical tool for dermoscopic image assessment and could be recommended for both research and clinical applications. The proposed algorithm can be applied in different fields of medical image analysis including, for example, CT and MRI images. PMID:26604980

  2. Structure of ionospheric irregularities from amplitude and phase scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R.G. )

    1991-04-01

    The mutual coherence function Gamma 2, or the second moment of the complex amplitude of a radio wave which traverses through equatorial F region irregularities, is computed from amplitude and phase scintillation data. Theoretically, the equation satisfied by the coherence function has an analytic solution over the whole range of scintillation strength. This solution is directly related to the structure function for the phase fluctuations produced by the irregularities. Hence, the shape of the correlation function for variations in the total electron content along the signal path can be derived from the computed values of Gamma 2. With a suitable power-law model for the irregularities, an 'intermediate break scale', this scale, as well as the rms density fluctuation are deduced from a comparison of computed values for short-time lags with those expected from theory. During a postsunset scintillation event, this scale is found to increase with local time. In the context of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the likely source of the irregularities, this increase may be attributed to a decline in the effective electric field prevailing in the region of the irregularities. 26 refs.

  3. Stability Of Magnetic Remanence In Grains With Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W.; Evans, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic minerals, such as magnetite, often have morphologies that depart from their ideal crystalline shapes. A spectrum of irregular grain geometries is possible, from simple distorted surfaces of an octahedron to that of the extreme case of the "Christmas tree" patterns formed by constitutional supercooling of mixed metal oxides that can occur in submarine basalts. In this presentation we will examine the domain structures and stability of magnetic remanences that such irregular grain structures may have. We use a three-dimensional finite-element/boundary-element micromagnetic model, which provides the flexibility to generate the exact geometry required, unrestricted by the regular cell structure of finite difference models. Two sets of results will be presented. The first examines the effect of irregular surfaces on spherical grains of magnetite. The spherical grains are free from any form of shape or configurational anisotropy, so that the effects of the irregular surfaces are easily quantified. The surface irregularities are examined in terms of the amplitude inside or outside the mean surface radius, and their frequency distribution over the sphere. The second set attempts to reconstruct the dendritic geometries of iron oxides often observed in oceanic basalts that have been rapidly quenched.

  4. Satellite Navigation Using High Definition Television Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handzo, Ryan E.

    Spacecraft operators can use a variety of observables to perform orbit determination throughout a mission. Currently the mission design community has an interest in both autonomous spacecraft operations and in crewed, cis-lunar space missions. Navigators are focusing on ensuring resiliency and redundancy for satellites in the event that a navigation system fails. A spacecraft navigation system that utilizes high definition television (HDTV) signals is explored in this thesis. Using HDTV signals as the source for navigation observables, a satellite navigator can perform orbit determination (OD), either as the primary navigation source or as a backup navigation system. HDTV signals provide strong orbital coverage due to their prevalence around the world. It is shown that due to the high transmission powers HDTV signals are broadcast the signals can be received by satellites out to cis-lunar environments. The ability to extract accurate timing information from the signals in real time is demonstrated at a low CPU resource draw through the implementation of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). With the timing extracted from the signals, simulations show that accurate OD for satellites in lunar distant retrograde and halo orbits can be performed using only HDTV signals. These simulations are performed using the DE431 planetary ephemeris, planetary gravity, and solar radiation pressure in both an extended Kalman filter and square rootinformation filter. The full satellite state, range and range-rate biases, and spacecraft reflectance are all successfully estimated by the filters with the presence of errors in the models of the systems dynamics. Since these signals are broadcast around the world at all times, they provide a free signal source for a satellite to utilize at any time more navigation information is needed or a back-up navigation source is required.

  5. A Narrow QRS Complex Tachycardia With An Apparently Concentric Retrograde Atrial Activation Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Miguel A; Castellanos, Eduardo; Puchol, Alberto; Pachon, Marta

    2009-01-01

    The retrograde atrial activation sequence constitutes an initial important clue to elucidate the tachycardia mechanism during diagnostic electrophysiological testing in patients with supraventricular tachycardia. However, in some cases its correct analysis is challenging. PMID:19308284

  6. A photographic approach to the possible mechanism of retrogradation of sweet potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Zhao, Shuyi; Liu, Qinsheng; Zhang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Although the subject of starch retrogradation has been studied for about 20 years, the mechanism of starch retrogradation seems not yet to be completely established. In this paper, the possible retrogradation mechanism of sweet potato starch was postulated from four optical micrographs at the stages of melting of the starch granules, autoclaving treatment and aging. The possible process of retrogradation consists of three stages. Firstly, starch granules was swelled and melted with loss of X-ray crystallinity and formation of both crystalline and amorphous lamellae; secondly, in crystalline lamellae, amylopectin began to form nucleation when they were autoclaved; finally, the nucleus grew up to great rod-like crystals as the result of congregating of amylose on plates which were composed of and prolongated by amylopectin.

  7. Fiberoptic Guided Retrograde Intubation in an Anticipated Difficult Airway: Revival of an Antiquated Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ninu, Marie; Yunus, Md.; Syiemiong, Newstar

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde intubation is an invaluable technique which can be helpful in anticipated difficult airway situation. In this advanced era where fiberoptic intubation and video laryngoscopes are in abundant use, retrograde intubation is a forgotten technique. However, it may be useful in various difficult airway situations in this advanced era. In our case the patient had a bitter experience with previous fiberoptic intubation. Owing to that we had planned and performed a fiber optic guided retrograde intubation, where we had kept the fiberoptic bronchoscope in the pharynx keeping larynx and vocal cords in the focus to facilitate the emergence of guide wire through one of the nostrils as well as direct visual confirmation of intubation. This fiber optic guided retrograde intubation is a first reported case of its kind in a predicted difficult airway which can be beneficial in different difficult airway situations. PMID:27891428

  8. Retrograde left ventricular catheterization in patients with an aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Karsh, D L; Michaelson, S P; Langou, R A; Cohen, L S; Wolfson, S

    1978-05-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive patients with an aortic valve prosthesis were evaluated with retrograde left ventricular catheterization. The prosthesis was successfully crossed, permitting hemodynamic and angiographic evaluation of function of the prosthetic valve, left ventricle and mitral valve in all 27 cases. No complications were encountered. In patients with active endocarditis or recent embolization, the retrograde technique was avoided when possible, and attempts were made to utilize other techniques for study. However, three such patients were evaluated with the retrograde technique without complication. Examination of pressure tracings and cineangiographic films suggested only minor interference with valve poppet movement induced by the catheter transversing the valve. In three cases, hemodynamic data were recorded with the catheter crossing the prosthesis at one time and a paraprosthetic valve defect at another time. Identical gradients were recorded. This series documents the safety and efficacy of the retrograde approach, which is proposed as an alternative to the transseptal technique and left ventricular puncture.

  9. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour.

  10. Yeast as a tool to study mitochondrial retrograde pathway en route to cell stress response.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling is a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, by which dysfunctional mitochondria relay signals that lead to cell stress adaptation in physiopathological conditions by changes in nuclear gene expression. The best comprehension of components and regulation of retrograde signaling have been obtained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where retrograde target gene expression is regulated by RTG genes. In this chapter, we describe the methods to measure mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation in yeast cells by monitoring the mRNA levels of RTG target genes, such as those encoding for peroxisomal citrate synthase, aconitase, and NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit 1, as well as the phosphorylation status of Rtg1/3p transcriptional factor which controls RTG target gene transcription.

  11. Analysis of human ejaculation using color Doppler ultrasonography: a comparison between antegrade and retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Atsushi; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Iguchi, Hiroki; Kusumi, Norihiro; Kumon, Hiromi

    2005-02-01

    To observe the phenomenon of human ejaculation dynamically using color Doppler ultrasonography. Human ejaculation was observed using transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography in a healthy man and a patient with retrograde ejaculation. Ejaculation was induced manually with audiovisual sexual stimulation. The ejaculatory phenomenon was analyzed and compared with that of retrograde ejaculation. In the healthy man, the prostatic urethra flattened slightly and the bladder neck contracted just before expulsion. The ejaculatory stream spurted from the seminal vesicles to the bulbous urethra through the ejaculatory duct. In the patient with retrograde ejaculation, the ejaculatory stream from the seminal vesicles and inframontanal and distal prostatic urethras distended into a globular-shaped sac filled with semen. No seminal flow toward the bulbous urethra occurred. The semen remaining in the prostatic urethra began flowing slowly into the bladder. Differences between antegrade and retrograde ejaculation can be clearly detected by color Doppler ultrasonography, providing a noninvasive method to diagnose ejaculatory disorders.

  12. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Topical report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-12-31

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  13. Pancreatitis with an unusual fatal complication following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kanen, Boris; Loffeld, Ruud JLF

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography has been the treatment of choice for stones in the common bile duct. Although the procedure is usually safe, procedure-related complications do occur. Case presentation A case of pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is described in a 55-year-old woman. After an uneventful recovery the patient's condition deteriorated rapidly 16 days after the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and the patient died within 1 hour. Post-mortem examination revealed massive intrapulmonary fat embolism. The complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and pancreatitis are described. Conclusion Fat embolism can occur after the remission of pancreatitis and pancreatic necrosis may be overlooked on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning. PMID:18577211

  14. Veiled right kidney sign in retroperitoneal duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Banerji, John Samuel

    2011-08-01

    Retropneumoperitoneum due to duodenal perforation after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is rare. Recognizing the presence of free air, which outlines the right kidney, is essential for its early diagnosis and appropriate management.

  15. Monitoring of ionospheric irregularities with multi-GNSS observations: a new ionosphere activity index and product services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zishen; Yuan, Yunbin; Yuan, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Key words: Ionospheric irregularity, Rate of TEC (ROT), Rate of ROT index (RROT), GPS and GLONASS The ionospheric irregularities have a strong impact on many applications of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other space-based radio systems. The rate of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) change index (ROTI, TECu/min), defined as the standard deviation of rate of TEC change (ROT) within a short time (e.g. 5 minutes), has been developed to describe the ionospheric irregularities and associated scintillations. However, ROT parameter may still contain the trend term of ionospheric TEC in spite of small-scale fluctuations. On the basis of single-differenced ROT (dROT) values, we develop a new ionosphere activity index, rate of ROT change index (RROT, TECu/min), to characterize the irregularity degree of the ionosphere. To illustrate the use of the index, we investigated the consistency between ROTI and RROT indexes, through the analysis of GPS data and S4 observations collected at two high-latitude stations of the northern hemisphere. It is confirmed that the correlation coefficients between RROT and S4 are higher than those between ROTI and S4 for the test period, meaning that the proposed RROT index is applicable to monitor the ionospheric irregularities and associated scintillations. RROT index can be easily calculated from dual-frequency GNSS signals (like GPS L1 and L2 carrier phase measurements). On the basis of GPS and GLONASS data provided by the IGS, ARGN, EPN and USCORS tracking networks (more than 1500 stations per day), absolute ROT (AROT), gradient of TEC index (GOTI), ROTI and RROT maps are generated to reflect the ionospheric irregularity activities. These maps are provided in an IONEX-like format on a global scale with a temporal resolution of 15 minutes and a spatial resolution of 5 and 2.5 degrees in longitude and latitude, respectively, and the maps with high spatial resolution (2x2 degrees) are also generated for European, Australia

  16. Retrograde transport of toxins across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Lord, J M; Deeks, E; Marsden, C J; Moore, K; Pateman, C; Smith, D C; Spooner, R A; Watson, P; Roberts, L M

    2003-12-01

    Several protein toxins, including the A chain of the plant protein ricin (RTA), enter mammalian cells by endocytosis and catalytically modify cellular components to disrupt essential cellular processes. In the case of ricin, the process inhibited is protein synthesis. In order to reach their cytosolic substrates, several toxins undergo retrograde transport to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) before translocating across the ER membrane. To achieve this export, these toxins exploit the ERAD (ER-associated protein degradation) pathway but must escape, at least in part, the normal degradative fate of ERAD substrates in order to intoxicate the cell. Toxins that translocate from the ER have an unusually low lysine content that reduces the likelihood of ubiquitination and ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. We have changed the two lysyl residues normally present in RTA to arginyl residues. Their replacement in RTA did not have a significant stabilizing effect on the protein, suggesting that the endogenous lysyl residues are not sites for ubiquitin attachment. However, when four additional lysyl residues were introduced into RTA in a way that did not compromise the activity, structure or stability of the toxin, degradation was significantly enhanced. Enhanced degradation resulted from ubiquitination that predisposed the toxin to proteasomal degradation. Treatment with the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin increased the cytotoxicity of the lysine-enriched RTA to a level approaching that of wild-type RTA.

  17. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Vickers, C R; Buckels, J A; McMaster, P; Neuberger, J M; West, R J; Elias, E

    1991-01-01

    Twelve of 178 (7%) liver transplant patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) after transplantation. The indications for ERCP were persistent or late onset cholestasis, recurrent cholangitis, and suspected biliary leaks or strictures. The time between transplantation and ERCP ranged from 44 to 330 days (median 153 days). Biliary complications diagnosed by ERCP included biliary sludge in the form of casts, calculi, or debris (n = 7); bile leaks (n = 2); a biliary stricture (n = 1), and complete biliary obstruction (n = 1). One patient had a normal cholangiogram after transplantation. Biliary sludge was detected by ultrasound before ERCP in only one of six patients. Eight patients underwent endoscopic papillotomy, followed by clearance of biliary sludge in four and dilatation of a biliary stricture in one. Two patients bled after papillotomy but neither required surgical intervention. At a median follow up of 1.2 years (range 0.5-2.8 years), nine patients are well and three have died. ERCP provides both accurate diagnosis of biliary complications after liver transplantation and treatment that obviates the need for additional surgery in selected patients. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2026341

  18. Radiation exposure to personnel performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, L; Singhal, S; Preece, D; Vohrah, A; Loft, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) relies on the use of ionising radiation but risks to operator and patient associated with radiation exposure are unclear. The aim of this prospective study was to estimate the radiation dose received by personnel performing fluoroscopic endoscopic procedures, mainly ERCP. Methods: Consecutive procedures over a two month period were included. The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure radiation exposure to the abdomen, thyroid gland, and hands of the operator permitted an estimation of the annual whole body effective dose equivalent. Results: During the study period 66 procedures (61 ERCP) were performed and the estimated annual whole body effective dose equivalent received by consultant operators ranged between 3.35 and 5.87 mSv. These values are similar to those received by patients undergoing barium studies and equate to an estimated additional lifetime fatal cancer risk between 1 in 7000 and 1 in 3500. While within legal safety limits for radiation exposure to personnel, these doses are higher than values deemed acceptable for the general public. Conclusions: It is suggested that personnel as well as patients may be exposed to significant values of radiation during ERCP. The study emphasises the need to carefully assess the indication for, and to use measures that minimise radiation exposure during any fluoroscopic procedure. PMID:16210465

  19. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bao-Ying; Li, Cai-Hong

    2013-03-07

    Subcapsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and there are few reports about this unusual complication worldwide. The primary symptom of most cases reported in the literature is abdominal pain. We report an unusual case with the primary symptom of fever. A 56-year-old man who had a six-month history of recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed, and stones from the common bile duct were successfully extracted with a basket. The patient had a persistent fever after ERCP, and treatment with intravenous antibiotics was unsuccessful. Computed tomography showed a 13 cm × 6 cm subcapsular hepatic haematoma filled with air and liquid on the surface of the right hepatic lobe. The patient was successfully treated with peritoneal drainage under B-ultra guidance. Subcapsular liver haematoma should be considered when hard-to- explain symptoms persist in the early period after ERCP. Percutaneous drainage is an effective treatment.

  20. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.